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FOR THE RECORD 2 Weekend July 21-22, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL

The San Mateo Daily Journal


800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
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Comedian-actor
Robin Williams is
61.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1925
The so-called Monkey Trial ended in
Dayton, Tenn., with John T. Scopes
convicted of violating state law for
teaching Darwins Theory of Evolution.
(The conviction was later overturned on
a technicality.)
Suspense is worse
than disappointment.
Robert Burns (1759-1796)
Former Attorney
General Janet
Reno is 74.
Actor Josh
Hartnett is 34.
Birthdays
ROSIE LINARES/DAILY JOURNAL
From left, Fumiko Matsumoto, wife of mayor Matsumoto of Omura City; Hiroshi Inomata, council general of Japan; Matt
Grocott,mayor of San Carlos; and Takanobu Nagao,vice chairman of the Omura City Council plant a cherry tree near the San
Carlos City Council Chambers on Friday representing the growing relationship between the U.S. and Japan.
Saturday: Cloudy in the morning then
becoming sunny. Patchy fog in the morning.
Highs in the 60s to lower 70s. West winds 5
to 15 mph.
Saturday night: Clear in the evening then
becoming cloudy. Patchy fog after mid-
night. Lows in the lower 50s. Northwest
winds 5 to 15 mph.
Sunday: Cloudy in the morning then becoming sunny. Patchy
fog in the morning. Highs in the upper 50s to lower 70s. West
winds 5 to 15 mph.
Sunday night: Clear in the evening then becoming cloudy.
Patchy fog after midnight. Lows around 50. West winds 5 to 15
mph.
Monday: Cloudy in the morning then becoming sunny. Patchy
fog. Highs in the 60s to lower 70s.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Money Bags,
No. 11, in rst place; Gold Rush, No. 1, in second
place; and Lucky Star, No. 2, in third place. The
race time was clocked at 1:43.72.
(Answers Monday)
INEPT STAFF TAVERN GOALIE
Yesterdays
Jumbles:
Answer: When she complained about him taking too
many naps, he said this GIVE IT A REST
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
DOLYD
CLOKB
STOLCY
SIGOPS
2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
F
in
d

u
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o
n

F
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Print your
answer here:
8 6 6
2 44 48 50 52 3
Mega number
July 20 Mega Millions
5 9 21 22 25
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
3 8 3 5
Daily Four
8 7 7
Daily three evening
In 1773, Pope Clement XIV issued an order suppressing the
Society of Jesus, or Jesuits. (The Society was restored by Pope
Pius VII in 1814.)
In 1796, Scottish poet Robert Burns died in Dumfries at age
37.
In 1861, during the Civil War, the rst Battle of Bull Run was
fought at Manassas, Va., resulting in a Confederate victory.
In 1930, President Herbert Hoover signed an executive order
establishing the Veterans Administration (later the U.S.
Department of Veterans Affairs).
In 1944, American forces landed on Guam during World War
II.
In 1949, the U.S. Senate ratied the North Atlantic Treaty.
In 1952, the Democratic National Convention, which would
nominate Adlai Stevenson for president, opened in Chicago.
In 1959, the NS Savannah, the rst nuclear-powered merchant
ship, was christened by rst lady Mamie Eisenhower at
Camden, N.J.
In 1961, Capt. Virgil Gus Grissom became the second
American to rocket into a sub-orbital pattern around the Earth,
ying aboard the Liberty Bell 7.
In 1969, Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin
Buzz Aldrin blasted off from the moon aboard the ascent
stage of the lunar module for docking with the command mod-
ule.
In 1972, the Irish Republican Army carried out 22 bombings in
Belfast, Northern Ireland, killing nine people and injuring 130
in what became known as Bloody Friday.
In 1980, draft registration began in the United States for 19-
and 20-year-old men.
Singer Kay Starr is 90. Movie director Norman Jewison is 86.
Actress Patricia Elliott is 70. Actor David Downing is 69. Actor
Edward Herrmann is 69. Actor Leigh Lawson is 67. Actor
Wendell Burton is 65. Actor Art Hindle is 64. Singer Yusuf Islam
(formerly Cat Stevens) is 64. Cartoonist Garry Trudeau is 64.
Actor Jamey Sheridan is 61. Rock singer-musician Eric Bazilian
(The Hooters) is 59. Comedian Jon Lovitz is 55. Actor Lance
Guest is 52. Actor Matt Mulhern is 52. Comedian Greg Behrendt
is 49. Rock musician Koen Lieckens (Ks Choice) is 46. Rock
singer Emerson Hart is 43. Country singer Paul Brandt is 40.
Actress Ali Landry is 39. Actor Justin Bartha is 34.
The 100 billionth Crayola crayon rolled
off the production line in Easton, Penn. in
1996.
***
The rst president of the United States
born in a hospital was Jimmy Carter (born
1924), the 39th president.
***
One of Hollywoods most famous kisses
was between Burt Lancaster (1913-1994)
and Deborah Kerr (1921-2007) in the
movie From Here to Eternity (1953).
The scene of the passionate kiss on a
beach in the surf is only three seconds
long.
***
The only words with three dotted letters in
a row are hijinks, Beijing and Fiji.
***
The Uniform Time Act of 1966 standard-
ized the beginning and end of Daylight
Savings Time nationwide.
***
Rabbits were brought to Australia in 1859
for hunting. Soon rabbits, not native to
Australia, were reproducing at such a
rapid rate they were becoming a plague.
In 1950, the government introduced a dis-
ease called myxomatosis that successfully
controlled the rabbit population with a
mortality rate of 99 percent.
***
The Trumpeter swan is the largest water-
fowl in North America. A pair of trum-
peter swans mates for life. They live 20 to
30 years.
***
The worlds smallest bird is the bee hum-
mingbird. Found in Cuba, the tiny birds
are about the size of a bee and weigh 0.07
ounces.
***
The longest outdoor covered escalator in
the world is in Hong Kong. It takes 20
minutes to ride the 2,625-foot long
Central-Mid-levels escalators, opened in
1994. The escalator runs down from 6
a.m. to 10 a.m. and up from 10:30 p.m. to
midnight.
***
On July 16, 1945 a test took place that
was code named Trinity. Do you know
what the test was? See answer at end.
***
Elephants walk at a speed of about four
mph.
***
French physicist Augustin Jean Fresnel
(17881827) invented the Fresnel lens
used in lighthouses. The multiprismed
lens intensied the light and focused the
beam in lighthouse lamps.
***
In 1996, the Food and Drug
Administration approved olestra, a calo-
rie-free fat substitute, for use in salty
snacks such as chips and crackers.
However, all snacks containing olestra
had to carry a warning label that olestra
may cause abdominal cramping and loose
stools. As of 2003, the label was no longer
required because it confused consumers.
***
Introduced in 1930, the Motorola was one
of the rst commercially successful car
radios. The brand name came from com-
bining the word motor, for motorcar, and
ola, which implied sound; thus
Motorola meant sound in motion.
***
Ad campaigns for Lifebuoy Soap popu-
larized the term B.O. for body odor.
***
Harvard College, established in 1636, was
named for its rst benefactor. John
Harvard (1607-1638) of Charlestown,
Mass. was a minister who left his library
and half his estate to the new institution.
***
Actor Telly Savalas (1924-1994) was
actress Jennifer Anistons (born 1969)
godfather. Telly is short for Aristotle.
***
Answer: It was the testing of the rst
atomic bomb, conducted by the United
States. The plutonium bomb was detonat-
ed on July 16, 1945 at Alamogordo, N.M.
The explosion was equivalent to 20 kilo-
tons of TNT and the mushroom cloud
reached 7.5 miles in height. Trinity is con-
sidered the beginning of the Atomic Age.
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in the
weekend and Wednesday editions of the Daily
Journal. Questions? Comments? Email know-
itall@smdailyjournal.com or call 344-5200
ext. 114.
16 18 19 29 38 9
Mega number
July 18 Super Lotto Plus
3
Weekend July 21-22, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
BURLINGAME
Vandalism. Someone reported that human
feces were left on her porch on the 400 block
of Marin Drive before 9:21 p.m. Tuesday, July
17.
Fraud. A man reported that he had not
received his Social Security checks for ve
months on the 1200 block of Oak Grove
Avenue before 5:07 p.m. Tuesday, July 17.
Burglary. Someone reported that his vehicle
had been rummaged through on the 1000
block of Cabrillo Avenue before 7:50 a.m.
Tuesday, July 17. The owner said he may have
left the car unlocked and nothing appeared to
be missing.
BELMONT
Robbery. A strong armed robbery occurred on
Ralston Avenue before 4:21 p.m. on
Wednesday, July 18.
Theft. Reporting person stated $8,000 was
missing from his wall safe on Emmett Avenue
before 1:18 p.m. on Wednesday, July 18.
Theft. Someone reported her 2004 Blue
Toyota Solaro was broken into and paperwork
was stolen on Irene Court before 7:02 a.m. on
Wednesday, July 18.
Reckless driver. A driver making obscene
gestures to other drivers was reported at
Highway 101 and Ralston Avenue before 5:24
p.m. Tuesday, July 17.
Police reports
No surprises here
Two people brought a package to resi-
dence that was not expecting a package
on Cipriani Boulevard in Belmont before
10:31 p.m. Tuesday, July 10.
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Gregory Leon Elarms, the previously com-
mitted man accused of fatally shooting his
childhood friend at a San Mateo shopping
center because he thought the community
activist was out to get him, cannot have a new
attorney to contest his competency to stand
trial.
A judge Friday denied Elarms request to
re his court-appointed attorney, Jonathan
McDougall, who was named to the case after
the 59-year-old man returned from Napa State
Hospital.
McDougall previously contested the doc-
tors conclusions Elarms is now able to aid in
his own defense and that
hearing remains set for
Aug. 20.
Elarms faces life in
prison without parole on
charges of first-degree
murder and gun use plus
the special allegation of
lying in wait for the June
9, 2010 death of East Palo
Alto activist David Lewis.
Elarms, of the East Bay city of Pittsburg, is
accused of following Lewis, 54, from the San
Mateo Medical Center where he was an out-
reach worker to the parking lot of Hillsdale
Shopping Center on June 9, 2010. Just before
6 p.m., Elarms allegedly pulled a .44-caliber
gun and shot Lewis in the torso.
During a preliminary hearing on the murder
and gun charges, a San Mateo police detective
testied that Elarms believed gangmembers
were after him and that Lewis, once his friend,
was now his opponent. Lewis uttered the
name Greg before dying but police made no
arrests until contacted by Elarms six months
after the shooting.
Lewis was known as a community activist
and rehabilitation counselor who overcame
addiction and incarceration.
Elarms remains in custody without bail.
Accused killer of activist denied new attorney
CITY GOVERNMENT
The San Carlos
Economic Development
Advisory Commission will
discuss the next steps for
marketing strategy, including priorities and
next steps in bringing desired retail outlets to
to the city.
EDAC meets 4 p.m. Tuesday, July 24 at
City Hall, Second orr, Room 207, 600 Elm
St., San Carlos.
Gregory Elarms
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
One of four alleged gangmembers charged
in the repeated stabbing of a man in Redwood
City is mentally t to aid in his defense
against charges of attempted murder.
Bryan Alexander Morales, 19, is also
charged with being an accessory to a felony
and acting to further a street gang. Co-defen-
dants Jose Antonio Jiminez-Hernandez, 20,
Billi Ruben Antonio, 19, and Jose Luis
Segurasuarez, 20, are similarly charged.
But while the other three have been moving
toward a July 30 trial, Morales defense attor-
ney had questioned his clients competency
and had the case severed. Both court-appoint-
ed doctors who evaluated Morales concluded
he is competent and criminal proceedings
were reinstated. Morales returns to court July
23 to set a new trial date.
According to prosecutors, the four teens and
a 16-year-old boy stabbed the victim several
times in the abdomen at approximately 4:30
p.m. Dec. 13 on the 800 block of Brewster
Avenue. Witnesses reported seeing two males
jump out of a gold car, stab the man and ee
the area. Police located a car matching the
vehicle description at a home in the 2600
block of Marlborough Avenue and ultimately
arrested the three teens inside based on their
statements.
The victim was hospitalized with critical
injuries.
All four remain in custody without bail.
State unemployment
rate falls to 10.7 percent
SACRAMENTO Californias unemploy-
ment rate fell slightly in June to 10.7 percent,
as the state added 38,300 jobs.
The Employment Development Department
released the latest jobs gure on Friday. It
marked a slight drop from May, when unem-
ployment was at 10.8 percent.
State ofcials say trade, transportation and
utilities posted the largest job increases since
May.
The U.S. unemployment rate remained at
8.2 percent in June. Californias decline is a
dramatic drop from a year ago, when unem-
ployment in the state was 11.9 percent.
Nearly 1.8 million Californians remain
unemployed.
Alleged gangmember competent for attempted murder trial
Around the state
4
Weekend July 21-22, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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By Judy Lin
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO The director
of Californias state parks resigned
and a deputy was red Friday after
ofcials learned the department sat
on nearly $54 million in surplus
money for years while parks were
threatened with closure over budget
cuts.
Ruth Coleman, director of the
state Department of Parks and
Recreation, stepped down, and
chief deputy Michael Harris was let
go amid questions about the under-
reported funds that date back 12
years, according to Clark
Blanchard, a
spokesman for
the secretary of
the Natural
R e s o u r c e s
Agency, which
oversees the
parks depart-
ment.
This is in
light of the fund
balances that just in the last 48
hours have come to light,
Blanchard said Friday. This money
is obviously one-time money and
we will be working with the
Legislature to see how to best use
it.
The attorney generals ofce is
investigating and state nance of-
cials will conduct an audit,
Blanchard said.
Coleman said she was unaware of
the surplus but accepted responsi-
bility for the accounting problem.
I am personally appalled to learn
that our documents were not accu-
rate, she wrote in her resignation
letter released by the governors
ofce.
The shake-up comes at a time
when state lawmakers and park
advocates have been trying to nd
ways to keep most parks open
despite ongoing budget cuts. Last
month, park officials announced
most of the 70 state parks once slat-
ed to close would remain open.
State parks director resigns amid scandal
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A San Mateo woman who has
received welfare and food stamps
for nearly a dozen years was earning
$2,000 a month and living with her
childs father but lied on her annual
benet renewal statements, accord-
ing to prosecutors who charged her
with felony welfare fraud.
Sarah Ramirez, 43, pleaded no
contest to the charge in return for no
more than seven months jail when
she is sentenced Sept. 13.
Between March 27, 2007 and
Sept., 30, 2010, prosecutors alleged
Ramirez perjured herself by ling
statements claiming that the father
of her child was gone and she had
nobody living with her. Instead, she
reportedly lived
with that man
since 2006 and
also rented a
room to another
for $200 month-
ly. She also
r e p o r t e d l y
earned $2,000
per month.
Ramirez had
been on CalWorks and food stamps
since December 1990, according to
the District Attorneys Ofce.
Prosecutors also say investigators
interviewed Ramirez and concluded
she knew what she was doing to
maintain her benets.
Ramirez remains free from cus-
tody on $25,000 bail.
Woman facing jail for welfare fraud
Sarah Ramirez
Ruth Coleman
5
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By Michael R. Blood
and Dan Elliott
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DENVER James Eagen
Holmes came from a well-tended
San Diego enclave of two-story
homes with red-tiled roofs, where
neighbors recall him as a clean-cut,
studious young man of sparing
words.
Tall and dark-haired, he stared
clear-eyed at the camera in a 2004
high school yearbook snapshot,
wearing a white junior varsity soc-
cer uniform No. 16. The son of
a nurse, Arlene, and a software
company manager, Robert, James
Holmes was a brilliant science
scholar in college.
The biggest mystery surrounding
the 24-year-old doctoral student
was why he would have pulled on a
gas mask and shot dozens of peo-
ple early Friday in a suburban
Denver movie theater, as police
allege.
In the age of widespread social
media, no trace of Holmes could be
found on Facebook, LinkedIn,
MySpace, Twitter or anywhere on
the Web. Either he never engaged
or he scrubbed his trail.
A longtime neighbor in San
Diego, where Holmes grew up,
remembers only a shy guy ... a
loner from a churchgoing family.
In addition to playing soccer at
Westview High School, he ran
cross country.
The bookish
demeanor con-
cealed an
unspooling life.
Holmes strug-
gled to find
work after grad-
uating with
highest honors
in spring 2010
with a neuro-
science degree from the University
of California, Riverside, said the
neighbor, retired electrical engi-
neer Tom Mai.
Holmes enrolled last year in a
neuroscience Ph.D. program at the
University of Colorado-Denver but
left the program in June, said
school officials, who didnt pro-
vide a reason.
As part of the advanced program
in Denver, a James Holmes had
been listed as making a presenta-
tion in May about Micro DNA
Biomarkers in a class named
Biological Basis of Psychiatric
and Neurological Disorders.
In academic achievement, he
was at the top of the top, recalled
Riverside Chancellor Timothy P.
White.
Holmes concentrated his study
on how we all behave, White
added. Its ironic and sad.
From a distance, Holmes life
appears unblemished, a young man
with unlimited potential. There are
no indications he had problems
with police.
Colorado suspect was brilliant student
REUTERS
People pray during a vigil for victims behind the theater where a gunman
opened re on moviegoers in Aurora, Colo.
James Holmes
Q: WHATHAPPENED?
A: Shortly after midnight Friday, a gunman
wearing a gas mask and black SWAT gear set off
a gas canister and then opened re inside a
crowded theater in the Denver suburb of Aurora,
Colo., killing 12 people and wounding nearly 60
others, authorities said.The suspect was arrested
near a car behind the theater and identied as
24-year-old James Holmes. Authorities did not
release a motive. The FBI said there was no
indication of ties to any terrorist groups.
Q: AREMOVIETHEATERSSTILLSHOWINGTHE
FILM?
A: Yes, though theaters and police increased
security and AMC Theaters, the nations second-
largest chain, barred customers from wearing
masks or costumes. Some fans were nervous
about going to see the lm, but many were
undeterred.
Two police ofcers were stationed outside the
AMC theater in New Yorks Times Square, which
hadshowingsbeginningevery20minutesFriday.
Later in the day, the ofcers gave way to a police
cruiser that was parked out front with an ofcer
in it. At the Regal Gallery Place multiplex in
downtown Washington, theater employees
searched patrons bags and purses while taking
their tickets.
Q: WHOWASHURTINTHETHEATER?
A: Many victims treated at hospitals were under
40,including a 4-month-old baby and 6-year-old.
The oldest reported patient was 45.
Victims were treated for chemical exposure,
apparently related to canisters thrown by the
gunman, and gunshot and shrapnel wounds.
Eleven remain in critical condition.
The Defense Department said two sailors and an
airman were wounded and one sailor was
unaccounted for in the shooting.
Q: WAS THERE ANY LINK BETWEEN THE
SHOOTINGANDTHEMOVIE?
A:Itsunclear.NewYorkCityspolicecommissioner
said he was told the gunman had painted his hair
red and called himself the Joker Batmans
nemesis but Aurora police would not conrm
that.
In The Dark Knight Rises,a masked villain leads
a murderous crew into a packed football stadium
and wages an attack involving guns and
explosives. But violent attacks on the public by
villains are key components of most superhero
movies.
There are general parallels to the shooting,The
Dark Knightand the comic book character.Bruce
Waynes drive to become Batman arose from
witnessing the deaths of his parents at the hands
of small-time criminal who shot and killed them
after they had left a movie theater. The Batman
video game called Arkham City takes place in
an abandoned movie theatre.
Shooting Q&A
The San Mateo Police
Department met with local cinema
management Friday to review safe-
ty procedures and increase security
awareness for this weekend.
We have no reason to believe
that this is [anything] other than
an isolated incident, the San
Mateo Police wrote in a press
release about the Colorado shoot-
ing. However, in an abundance
of caution, we will be increasing
our community police officers in
the downtown cinema area over
the weekend to provide a reassur-
ing presence in order to quell con-
cerns, and ensure there are no
incidents in reaction to this
event.
People are encouraged to call
the San Mateo Police if they see a
crime or suspicious activities at
911 or the non-emergency line
522-7700.
What to expect in San Mateo
6
Weekend July 21-22, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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Man arrested after attempting to steal car
Twenty-six-year-old Alejandro Valencia was arrested
Thursday evening after trying to steal a car that was left run-
ning while the owner ran into a convenience store in Belmont,
according to police.
Around 6:30 p.m. Thursday, a San Mateo man stopped at the
7-Eleven store on the 400 block of El Camino Real in
Belmont. He parked the car but left it running while he went
inside. When leaving, the owner of the car saw another man
backing up the vehicle, according to a press release by
Belmont Police.
The two men got into an argument, during which Valencia
was removed from the car. He ran from the scene and was
chased by the victim and a witness, according to police.
Valencia, 26, of Newark was arrested by Belmont Police
without incident, according to the press release. He was found
to be under the inuence of an illegal drug and in possession
methamphetamine. Both the victim and Valencia were treated
on the scene for non life-threatening injuries. Valencia received
further treatment at the hospital before being booked into the
San Mateo County Jail on charges of auto theft, possession of
methamphetamine and for being under the inuence of a con-
trolled substance, according to police.
Trial date set for Giants fan beating lawsuit
LOS ANGELES A San Francisco Giants fan whos suing
former Dodgers owner Frank McCourt over a vicious beating
at Dodger Stadium will have his day in court next year.
City News Service says a Los Angeles judge on Friday set a
Feb. 5 trial date for Bryan Stows $50-million lawsuit.
The Santa Cruz man was attacked in the parking lot during
last years opening game. Court papers say he suffered severe
brain damage that left him unable to walk, hold a conversation
or control his bodily functions. His lawyers say hell need life-
long care.
Stow sued McCourt and the Dodgers organization for bat-
tery and negligence, claiming security cutbacks were partly to
blame. Hes seeking damages and coverage of future medical
costs.
Two men have pleaded not guilty to criminal charges.
Local briefs
T
he Peninsula College Fund, an
organization dedicated to help-
ing local rst-generation minor-
ity students succeed in college, recently
announced that it awarded college schol-
arships to 14 high school senior students
from East Palo Alto, eastern Menlo Park
and Redwood City. In addition to the
$12,000 scholarship, each PCF scholar
will be provided with one-on-one men-
toring, college and job skills training and
assistance in securing summer intern-
ships.
Winners include: From East Palo Alto
Academy, Suleyma Garcia who plans
to attend San Jose State University;
from Eastside College Preparatory,
Katherine Garcia who plans to attend
Loyola Marymount, Lauren
Longmire who plans to attend the
University of California at Riverside
and Karina Macias who plans to St.
Marys; from Menlo-Atherton High
School, Cristian Diaz who plans to
attend the University of California at
Merced, Diana Lopez Solorzano who
plans to attend the University of
California at Davis; from Sequoia
High School, Alexandra Cota who
plans to attend Notre Dame de Namur
University, Adrian Esqueda who plans
to attend the University of California at
Santa Cruz, Javier Guzman who plans
to attend San Jose State University and
Yarita Lara Alvarez who plans to
attend Notre Dame de Namur
University; from Summit Preparatory,
Francisco Trejo who plans to attend
San Francisco State University; and
from Woodside High School, Pierre
Abdel-Malek who plans to attend Cal
Poly, Yxenia Contreras who plans to
attend the University of California at
Santa Barbara and Martin Esquivias
who plans to attend the University of
California at Santa Cruz.
The 14 new PCF scholars join a group
of 67 students who have received sup-
port since the organization was founded
seven years ago. Of this number, all but
one are in school full time or have grad-
uated a testimony to the effectiveness
of PCFs unique combination of scholar-
ship funds, dedicated mentors and sum-
mer job opportunities and training.
Class notes is a column dedicated to school
news. It is compiled by education reporter
Heather Murtagh. You can contact her at
(650) 344-5200, ext. 105 or at
heather@smdailyjournal.com.
On May 4,Serendipity School in Belmont had its third annual Jump Rope for Heart,
fundraiser. The event was put on by the schools teachers: Laurie Cerece, Kim
George and Brian Srabian. The small school was able to raise $13,300 to give to
the American Heart Association.The children were very involved in learning about
heart disease and how the money raised will help others in need. Four of the
schools families raised more than $1,000 each.One child even went door-to-door
in his neighborhood collecting for the cause.
7
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1. The color of clean teeth
5. Pour this into the
washing machine to get
dirty socks bright 1A
7. It's like food for the
washing machine
10. A foor cleaner on a
stick
11. These take a drive-
through bath and come
out shiny and clean
14. What you can do to get
the wrinkles out of a
shirt
15. After you fry food in a
_____, it
might need a good
scrubbing
17. Sour power: _____
juice can be used to
make a penny look like
new
18. Brushing your teeth
makes your smile bright
and keeps your _____
fresh
19. It holds the sudsy water
while you 10A the foor
21. The body part an
elephant uses to give
himself a shower
23. To clean yourself in the
tub
24. Nature's perfect bird
bath that appears after
a rainstorm
Parents Down
1. What many 10A handles
are made of
2. Medium that ad execs
have long used to sell
soap, for short
3. Lather for locks
4. Mop time: What water
does from a shaggy dog
after a bath
5. Reusable sack at the
laundromat: Laundry
____
6. Zit-zapping, alcohol-
based skin cleanser
8. Get away clean
9. A cotton swab should
be used to clean only
the outside of it
12. Easy-to-squeeze
housework helper
13. As a family member's
cold subsides, it pays to
disinfect this door part
16. Slip into something a
little cleaner,
clotheswise
19. Infant's essential
neckwear at
mealtime
20. Bath-dodging pet
22. Clean oneself: Wash __
This Weeks Solution
2012 Jan Buckner Walker. Distributed by Creators
Syndicate, Inc.
7/22/12 kris@kapd.com Visit www.kapd.com to join the KAPD family!

The Original Crossword Puzzle for Kids and Their Favorite Adults

The across clues are for kids and the down clues are for grown-ups!
Lather and Laughter
By Jan Buckner Walker
NATION 8
Weekend July 21-22, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
s Contemporary Fine Art & Crafts
s Fabulous Food &Wine
s Home & Garden Exhibits
s Green Products Showcase
s Artisan Specialty Food Purveyors
s Health &Wellness Displays
s Microbrew &Wine Tasting Tent
s Chefs Demos Under A Shady Tent
Celebrity Chef/Author Joanne Weir,
12:45 p.m. Saturday
s AutoVino Collector Car Show
s Action-Packed Kids Fun Zone
s Stellar Lineup of Rockn Roll,
Blues, Jazz & Party Music
s Saturday Twilight Concert
Featuring THE BIG DIG, Sensational
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5:30 - 8 p.m. in Fremont Park
s Radio Disney Road Crew
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s Bicycle Parking in the
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Air Force instructor
convicted of rape, assault
SAN ANTONIO An Air Force instructor
was convicted Friday of rape and sexual
assault in a massive sex
scandal that has rocked a
Texas base, one of the
nations busiest military
training centers.
A seven-person jury of
military personnel at
Lackland Air Force Base
in San Antonio found Staff
Sgt. Luis Walker guilty on
all seven counts he faced,
including rape, aggravated sexual contact and
multiple counts of aggravated sexual assault.
The jury deleted a clause from two counts
that accused Walker of making irtatious and
lewd comments to trainees. However, it upheld
the overall counts containing the deleted claus-
es, which accused him of trying to cultivate a
sexual relationship with two trainees.
Govt acknowledges
one-time surveillance problem
WASHINGTON In a rare move, the
Obama administration acknowledged Friday
that the governments surveillance efforts have
exceeded legal limits on at least one occasion.
The Ofce of the Director of National
Intelligence made the comment in a letter to
Democratic Sen. Ron Wyden.
Wyden is a member of the Senate
Intelligence Committee. The Oregon
Democrat has suggested that the government
may be reviewing the emails and phone calls
of law-abiding Americans in the U.S. who are
at the other end of communications being
monitored abroad by the U.S. government.
By Christopher S. Rugaber
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON Three years since the
recession ended, 43 states have yet to regain
the jobs they lost in the downturn. The gure
is a reminder of how weak the nations job
market remains.
The states that are the furthest behind in job
growth are those that were hit hardest by the
housing bust: Arizona, Florida and Nevada.
Overall, the U.S. economy has 3.5 percent
fewer jobs than it did before the Great
Recession, which began in December 2007.
The national unemployment rate has been
stuck at 8.2 percent.
As slow as the recovery in jobs has been, a
few states are doing quite well. Seven have
more jobs now than before the recession.
Some North Dakota, Texas and Alaska
are beneting from an oil boom.
But most states have lagged behind.
Except for these energy-producing states,
everywhere theres still this caution in terms
of hiring, Steve Cochrane, a regional econo-
mist at Moodys Analytics, said.
Last month, unemployment rates rose in 27
U.S. states, the most in almost a year.
Unemployment rates fell in 11 states the
fewest since August and were unchanged
in 12, the Labor Department said Friday.
Nevada had the nations highest unemploy-
ment rate in June at 11.6 percent. The state
also had 12.4 percent fewer jobs than before
the recession, the biggest percentage of jobs
lost of any state.
The state is still reeling more than four
years after the housing market went bust.
Nevada had the highest rate of foreclosures
in the nation in the rst half of 2012, accord-
ing to RealtyTrac. In the rst three months of
the year, 61 percent of homeowners were
underwater, or owed more on their mort-
gages then their homes are worth, according
CoreLogic, a real estate data rm. Thats also
the highest share in the nation.
Arizona has also struggled to regain the jobs
it lost, with 8.2 percent fewer in June than
before the recession. Thats the second-
biggest loss. It had the nations second-highest
foreclosure rate in the rst half of the year.
Florida had 7.8 percent fewer jobs in June
than before the recession, the third-biggest
decline.
Most U.S. states trail pre-recession job levels
By Daniel Wagner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON Risky lending caused
private student loan debt to balloon in the past
decade, leaving many Americans struggling to
pay off loans that they cant afford, a govern-
ment study says.
Private lenders gave out money without
considering whether borrowers would repay,
then bundled and resold the loans to investors
to avoid losing money when students default-
ed, according to the study released Friday.
Those practices are closely associated with
subprime mortgage lending, which inated
the housing bubble and helped bring about the
2008 nancial crisis.
Subprime-style lending went to college,
and now students are paying the price, said
Education Secretary Arne Duncan, whose
department produced the report with the
Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.
Duncan said the government must do more
to ensure that people who received private
loans enjoy the same protections as those who
borrow from the federal government.
Student loans fall into two main categories:
Loans directly from the government and those
offered by banks and other private nancial
companies. The report focused on private stu-
dent loans, which spiked from $5 billion in
loans originated in 2001 to more than $20 bil-
lion in 2008. After the nancial crisis, as lend-
ing standards tightened, the market shrank to
$6 billion in 2011.
American consumers still owe more than
$150 billion in private student loan debt, the
study said. Including federal loans, Americans
now owe more than $1 trillion in student loan
debt, according to the CFPB. It has surpassed
credit card debt as the biggest source of unse-
cured debt for U.S. consumers.
Private student loans are riskier than federal
loans, the study said. They often carry vari-
able interest rates, which can cause monthly
payments to rise unexpectedly. Federal loans
offer xed interest rates.
In many cases, if a borrower is unable to
repay, federal loans can be postponed or
reduced. Those options are rare for private
loans, the study said.
Students often did not understand the differ-
ence between federal and private loans, the
study said. That caused many to take out cost-
ly student loans when they were eligible for
cheaper, safer government loans.
The study highlights a unique feature of stu-
dent debt: Unlike other credit card balances
and most other debt, it is nearly impossible to
cancel student debt by ling for bankruptcy.
That leaves many borrowers trapped, behind
on loans that lenders are unwilling to modify,
the study said.
Study: Private student loans parallel subprime
Around the nation
Luis Walker
OPINION 9
Weekend July 21-22, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Bigger mess
Editor,
In his column about manufactured
goods sold within the United States,
Paul Krugman never took this calami-
tous practice to the next step. Krugman
wrote that 86 percent of goods manu-
factured in the United States are sold in
the United States, while 14 percent is
exported. That gure is damning
enough but take it one step further. The
jobs big business have outsourced for
the good of their stockholders have
another devastating effect on our econ-
omy. The tens of billions of dollars that
big business pays to other countries in
the form of wages stay in those coun-
tries and are used to purchase products
manufactured in those countries, 14
percent less that may trickle back to the
United States. So not only are we los-
ing jobs to greed, but we are also los-
ing gross national product to big busi-
nesses greed. Then they have the nerve
to keep their money in off-shore
accounts, waiting for a sweetheart tax
deal from the government, just like the
29 percent tax break they got from the
Bush Administration. Big business con-
tinues to use all our infrastructure for
their personal greed but do everything
they can to avoid paying their fare
share to maintain it. Thats what we 99
percenters are for.
Mike Turturici
San Carlos
Religion of peace at war
Editor,
President Barack Obama may not be
entirely to blame for the meltdown of
the Arab world following his nave
2009 Cairo University speech, but the
timing of subsequent events seem more
than coincidental. After he extolled the
alleged virtues of the Muslim world
and its purported contributions to mod-
ern civilization, the Muslim world pro-
vided a graphic demonstration of the
opposite. Syria is currently on center
stage. Before Syrias upheaval, Egypt
and Libya went through their own
paroxysms. But Western-educated Dr.
Bashar al-Assad set new standards for
barbarism against his own people,
which proves that education wont nec-
essarily civilize a person.
Assad, an Alawite Muslim, has
apparently not yet used poison gas or
nerve agents in his bid to crush the
Syrian uprising. But hes used just
about every other weapon he has. Now,
his archenemy, Israel, is concerned
that, if Assad feels he is going down,
he will re every missile in his arsenal
at its population centers just because he
can. The tiptoeing around the truth in
deference to Muslim sensibilities has
been counterproductive. People without
self-respect will do heinous things to
each other. They will certainly not be
nicer to those whose religion tells them
are inferior dhimmis. Maybe now
thoughtful people will acknowledge
that Islam can no longer be sold as a
religion of peace. Given the chance it
will erase and rewrite the history of the
world. We may not yet be at war with
it, but it is at war with us.
Desmond Tuck
San Mateo
Letters to the editor
By Steve Okamoto
A
s a parent, my goal was to
keep my children safe. Many
of you are parents as well and
also share my desire for child safety.
Whenever possible, we keep an eye
on our kids to be sure they are involved
in safe activities. However, there are
times when you have to entrust the
safety of your kids to others.
One of those times is when they are
in school and, specically, when they
are walking too and from school.
During those times, we count on our
school crossing guards to see that our
kids cross safely on those busy streets,
especially during the morning com-
mute.
Those school crossing guards are
hired, supervised and paid by the
school district. Because of the nancial
constraints of the state budget and the
amounts allocated to the schools, the
Foster City-San Mateo School District
has asked the city to lend assistance by
funding the cost of the crossing guard
expense.
At a recent City Council meeting, the
Council, aware of the need for the safe-
ty of our kids through the crossing
guard program, appropriated the neces-
sary funds so that the school district
could hire those crossing guards for the
upcoming school year.
Discussions for the
nancing of the
guards have been a
subject of delibera-
tion with the two
sub-committees of
the school district
and the city for the
past several months.
It was decided that
the sub-committee would embark on a
fundraising campaign and try to raise
funds to reimburse the city for their
recent budget allocation. The funds
would be raised through the Foster City
Foundation, a 501(c)3 organization.
The fundraising campaign would tar-
get the Foster City community. If you
feel that child safety is a priority and
you would like to contribute to the
campaign, please send a donation to the
Foster City Foundation, 610 Foster City
Blvd., Foster City, CA 94404. Some
businesses have already expressed a
desire to support the program and I
hope they will step forward with a
check.
Finally, in an earlier article, I dis-
cussed how the success of the test
scores of our four schools has resulted
in a large inux of school age kids
moving into town. This has resulted in
an overcrowding of our already maxed
out schools and the demographers have
predicted even more classrooms with be
needed in the next couple of years.
The Superintendent, with the aid of
the city, has convened a committee of
concerned citizens (SCORE) to study
the overcrowding issue. Several meet-
ings have been held at the district ofce
with many ideas submitted and dis-
cussed.
I have been attending each of these
meeting and am truly impressed with
the sincerity and concern that these
committee members have shown to try
and come up with a solution to this
overcrowding problem.
The nal meetings will be held in
July, with a recommendation to the dis-
trict due in early August. Stay tuned for
more details.
If you have any questions or concerns
about the school crossing guards or the
SCORE committee, please let me
know. I can be reached by phone at
286-3501 or by email at
sokamoto@fostercity.org.
Steve Okamoto is a Foster City council-
man.
Keeping our kids safe
Parks officials evaded
rules, insulted public
The Sacramento Bee
T
he California state parks system as state gov-
ernment itself is in deep budget trouble. Yet
that did not stop the head of one division within
the state parks system administrative services, which
handles accounting and personnel functions from
hatching a scheme to give himself and 55 managers
immediate cash payouts for their unused vacation time.
This gaming of the system, by the very people who
handle money transactions, came at a time when the
state parks system was announcing the closure of 70
state parks and nonprofit organizations were striving to
raise private funds to keep parks open. That $271,000
could have helped keep parks running.
This betrayal, detailed in a November 2011 internal
audit and an April state attorney generals investigation
and reported by The Sacramento Bees Matt Weiser
is despicable. While names have been redacted,
details make it clear that the ringleader was Manuel
Thomas Lopez, who was deputy director of administra-
tive services. But he was not alone. Others were com-
plicit in the outrage.
These people deserve public censure not redacted
names in a report. They should be terminated, with let-
ters in their files so they cant return as retired annui-
tants to state service. Those who falsified documents
should be prosecuted.
Let us be clear. This scandal reveals not just corrup-
tion by individuals but problems with the states vaca-
tion leave system.
California state government does not have a use it or
lose it system, as in the private sector. State employees
are allowed to bank unlimited vacation hours and to
cash them out when they retire. When employees come
close to 80 days worth of unused vacation, or 640
hours, managers are supposed to create a plan for the
employee to burn the balance before the next year,
according to the state employee handbook.
But many employees are well over the 80-day, 640-
hour guideline, which creates a big liability for the state
when people retire.
So on rare occasions, in flush budget times, the state
will authorize a limited statewide leave buyback for all
departments to reduce the states future liability. The
last one was in March 2007, before the economic col-
lapse. Such buybacks do not happen during economic
hard times.
That makes the crafty stratagem dreamed up in the
administrative services division all the more offensive.
According to the audit and investigation, the ringleaders
justified a buyback because of an expected budget sur-
plus. What planet were they on?
This came at a time when executive staff in the state
parks system, according to the investigation, agreed that
although extensive leave balances were worrisome as a
future liability to the department, it was not politically
feasible to do any kind of buyback because of the dire
situation which the department faced, including park
closures.
To get around this, the schemers coded vacation hours
as overtime to get checks from the state controllers
office and cover their tracks.
The plan was hatched in June 2011. By fall, rumors of
the buyback were flying. By Oct. 19, Lopez had been
relieved of his position and an internal audit was
launched. Others have been demoted or are retiring.
The state is putting better controls in place to police
unused vacation buybacks, but state officials would do
better to thoroughly re-examine vacation policies
with the aim of establishing a use it or lose it policy,
providing less opportunity for unscrupulous characters
to exploit a complicated system.
No doubt, those who have resisted changes in the
state parks department public-private partnerships
and routes other than law-enforcement rangers to
become superintendents, for example will use the
scandal to unfairly undermine state parks director Ruth
Coleman, who has served since 2002. In fact, employ-
ees blew the whistle, and leaders took quick personnel
action.
The individuals involved in the scam did more than
deprive the state parks system of $271,000 when it des-
perately needed every dime to keep parks open. They
besmirched public service at a time when public trust is
needed.
Other voices
Guest
perspective
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BUSINESS 10
Weekend July 21-22, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 12,822.57 -0.93% 10-Yr Bond 1.46 -3.63%
Nasdaq2,925.30 -1.37% Oil (per barrel) 91.580002
S&P 500 1,362.66 -1.01% Gold 1,584.60
By Chistina Rexrode
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK For the past few
days, the U.S. stock market was able to
forget about problems in Europe.
Friday put Europe squarely back in the
spotlight.
U.S. stocks fell sharply as escalating
problems in Spain jolted investors.
Spains stock market plunged 6 percent
and its borrowing costs spiked after a
regional government asked for a nan-
cial lifeline.
The drop on Wall Street, which sent
the Dow Jones industrial average down
as much as 133 points, marked a U-turn
for the market. Stocks had risen over the
past three days as investors focused on
healthy earnings from U.S. companies
like Mattel, Honeywell and Coca-Cola.
On Friday, talk of sluggishness in
Europe was prevalent as more compa-
nies turned in their quarterly results.
Stafng agency Manpower fell 6 per-
cent, to $33.46, and chip maker
Advanced Micro Devices fell 13 per-
cent, to $4.22, after reporting that weak
demand in Europe had dragged down
second-quarter revenue.
Xerox trimmed its earnings forecasts
as Europeans bought less equipment.
Ingersoll-Rand, whose products include
Trane air conditioners, cut its revenue
prediction for the same reason. Xerox
fell 49 cents to $6.70, and Ingersoll-
Rand lost $1.22 to $40.25.
Late Thursday, guitar maker Fender
abruptly canceled its plans to go public,
blaming current market conditions and
concerns about economic conditions in
Europe. And General Electric, though
its stock edged up 7 cents to $19.87,
noted Friday that its orders also fell in
Europe.
We prepared ourselves for a pretty
tough year this year, or certainly a
volatile year, CEO Jeff Immelt said in a
call with analysts. We havent been dis-
appointed. GEs nance ofcer, Keith
Sherin, said the company is making a
full-court press to reduce exposure to
Europe.
Even the Internet powerhouse Google
noted that growth in Southern Europe
had slowed, particularly in Spain. But
Google also reported higher revenue and
prot, and its stock rose $17.76, to
$610.82.
All the major U.S. stock indexes fell.
The Dow Jones industrial average
dropped 120.79 points to 12,822.57. The
Standard & Poors 500 fell 13.85 to
1,362.66. The Nasdaq composite index
lost 40.60 to 2,925.30. All three indica-
tors were down about 1 percent. They
eked out tiny gains for the week and are
about at for the month to date.
Market cant get ahead
Wall Street
Stocks that moved substantially or traded
heavily Friday on the New York Stock Exchange
and Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Chipotle Mexican Grill Inc., down $86.88 at
$316.98
The restaurant chain said that its net income
rose more than 61 percent in the second
quarter, but its revenue growth missed
expectations.
Dole Food Co. Inc., up $1.32 at $10.15
The fruit and vegetable company said that it is
considering a possible sale or a spin-off of its
packaged foods business.
ManpowerGroup, down $2.24 at $33.46
Market volatility, particularly in Europe, and a
stronger dollar weighed on the stafng
companys results in the second quarter.
Advanced Micro Devices Inc.,down 64 cents at
$4.22
The chipmaker said that a weak global
economy dragged down its second-quarter
results and hurt its performance through the
summer.
Xerox Corp., down 49 cents at $6.70
Due to weak economic conditions, especially
in Europe, the technology company said that
its second-quarter prot fell 3.1 percent.
Nasdaq
E-Trade Financial Corp.,down 43 cents at $7.39
The online broker reported a 16 percent decline
in second-quarter earnings as investors made
far fewer trades than a year ago.
SanDisk Corp., up $3.62 at $38.70
The chipmaker said that its net income fell in
the second quarter as the company sold fewer
memory chips to mobile device makers.
Rambus Inc., down 92 cents at $4.30
The memory-chip designer said that its net loss
in the second quarter widened to $32.2 million
on weaker revenue from contracts.
Big movers
By Barbara Ortutay
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK Investors showed
their appetite for freshly public technol-
ogy stocks on Friday, but a decidedly
old-school company Fender
Instruments bowed out of its planned
initial public offering citing market con-
ditions.
Analysts were quick to isolate the gui-
tar maker as a solo act, out of tune with
the broader IPO market. The rest of the
bunch did well, after all. The stock of
security software company Palo Alto
Networks popped 27 percent in its mar-
ket debut. The stock of Kayak, the trav-
el-booking website jumped 28 percent.
So much for the Facebook freeze.
There are eight IPOs scheduled for next
week. Theres a security software maker
from the Netherlands, a high-end steak-
house from Texas and a natural-food
grocery store chain from Lakewood,
Colo., among others. The diversity of
companies taking the plunge, along with
their sheer number during the usually
slow summer season, shows that the
market for initial public offerings is in
the midst of a rebound after a lull that
followed Facebooks mid-May debut.
Yes, the IPO market is back, for the
time being, said Francis Gaskins, presi-
dent of researcher IPOdesktop. Though
the companies going public are small,
they also hail from various industries,
which is a good sign for the IPO market
as well as the broader economy. It means
the market is not dependent on just one
sector doing well. That was an issue last
year, when a slew of high-profile
Internet companies focused on social
networking went public. Several
including Groupon and Zynga
opped despite the hype.
Now, investors are looking for compa-
nies that have proven they can grow.
At best, this economy is at, and its
hard to find growth opportunities,
Gaskins said. He added that both Kayak
Software Corp. and Palo Alto Networks
Inc. are growing their revenue and doing
well in spite of the economy.
There are a few companies that t that
criteria. And the ones that do get demand,
he said. Tech stocks are the ones that are
showing consecutive quarterly growth and
good gross (prot) margins.
Facebook, of course began trading
May 18, the Friday that capped the worst
week for the U.S. stock market this year.
After months of hoopla, the social net-
work saw its stock land with a thud. It is
now trading 24 percent below its $38
IPO price. After Facebook, the IPO mar-
ket was frozen for ve weeks. It began to
thaw in the last week of June when nat-
ural gas company EQT Midstream
Partners went public on the 26th.
IPO market heats up after Facebook freeze
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK Apple Inc. is expected
to report a healthy increase in earnings
and revenue for its scal third quarter on
Tuesday, but investors are already look-
ing ahead to the big event of the year: the
launch of a new iPhone model.
The latest iPhone model, the 4S, was
launched last year and is getting long in
the tooth. Analysts expect that Apple
shipments to have dipped substantially in
the just-ended quarter.
Brian White at Topeka Capital Markets
expects Apple to report selling 30.9 mil-
lion units, while Andy Hargreaves at
Pacic Crest expects it to report selling
25.4 million. In the second quarter,
Apple shipped 35 million.
The trend in iPads is expected to be
stronger, since Apple launched the latest
model just two weeks before the start of
the quarter. White expects it to have
shipped 15.9 million units, which would
be a record, while Hargreaves expects it
to have shipped 14.3 million. That would
beat the second quarter but not the holi-
day-fueled rst quarter.
The company doesnt announce new
products on its nancial conference calls,
but analysts are sure to probe executives
for clues as to how fast the company can
ramp production of the iPhone 5.
We expect the product to be supply
constrained for several months, which sug-
gests that component supply and produc-
tion capacity are likely to dictate Apples
(October to March) earnings power and
the direction of its stock, Hargreaves
wrote. The iPhone 5 is expected to be able
to use the fastest new wireless data net-
works operated by Verizon, AT&T and
Sprint. Theres also speculation that it
could have a slightly larger screen.
Apple launched new MacBooks in the
quarter, including a high-end model with
a super-high-resolution screen. In the
second quarter, Macs accounted for 13
percent of Apples revenue, compared to
17 percent for iPads and 58 percent for
iPhones.
Apple to report third quarter results
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK Shares of security
software company Palo Alto Networks
Inc. are shooting higher in their rst day
of trading on the New York Stock
Exchange Friday.
The Santa Clara company is going
public as the market for IPOs comes
back to life following a ve-week freeze.
Demand for shares of newly public com-
panies had collapsed as worries about
slowing global growth and sliding stock
markets exacerbated disappointment fol-
lowing Facebooks IPO in May.
But not every company is making it to
market. Fender, maker of guitars played
by Jimi Hendrix and Eric Clapton, called
off its IPO Thursday night. The compa-
ny blamed poor market conditions and
the weakening economy in Europe.
Palo Alto Networks and its sharehold-
ers raised $260.4 million in its initial
public offering of stock Thursday night.
The companys shares priced at $42
each, above the expected range of $38
and $40 per share. That indicates
investor demand was heavy.
Palo Alto Networks up in first day trading on NYSE
Venture funding falls 12 percent in 2Q to $7B
NEW YORK Funding for startups fell 12 percent
in the April-June period as venture capitalists poured
less money into fewer deals than a year earlier. But the
number of companies getting funded in the earliest
stages of development reached the highest level in more
than a decade a hopeful sign for the broader economy
and an indication that investors are willing to wait for
returns.
A report due out Friday says that startup investments
slipped to $7 billion in the second quarter, down from $8
billion in the same period a year earlier. The companies
getting funded were mainly in the software, Internet,
industrial, and energy sectors. There were 898 deals
completed during the quarter, down 15 percent from
1,057 a year earlier.
The MoneyTree study was conducted by
PricewaterhouseCoopers and the National Venture
Capital Association based on data from Thomson
Reuters. The study tracked four stages of venture capital
funding. Depending on how far along companies are in
development, they received either seed, early,
expansion or later-stage funding.
S&P downgrades debt rating on Campbell
SAN FRANCISCO Standard & Poors Ratings
Services lowered its debt ratings on Camden, N.J.-based
Campbell Soup Co. Friday following a recent acquisi-
tion.
The rating agency put the food maker on review for
downgrade in July after it announced that it was buying
natural-food maker Bolthouse Farms for $1.55 billion.
S&P lowered Campbells rating one notch to BBB+
from A-, leaving it in investment grade territory. The
companys A-2 short-term and commercial paper rat-
ings remain unchanged. The outlook is stable.
Campbell is paying for the acquisition primarily by
taking on new debt, and S&P said that it expected the
added debt will weaken the companys credit measures.
Campbell shares fell 39 cents to close at $33.19.
Business briefs
<< Despite dominance, U.S. women seek respect, page 13
Bel-Mateo 15U All-Stars season ends, page 12
Weekend, July 21-22, 2012
FREAK DEALING AGAIN: LINCECUM GOES SEVEN STRONG, CRAWFORD GOES YARD IN 7-2 WIN OVER PHILLIES >>> PAGE 12
By Tim Reynolds
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CORAL GABLES, Fla. Miami coach Al
Goldens second season at the school is beginning
much like his rst one, with new accusations of
rule breaking, the looming threat of serious
NCAA sanctions and no apparent end in sight for
the long probe into the Hurricanes compliance
practices.
Citing unidentied sources, Yahoo Sports
reported Friday that former Miami football
employee Sean Allen who has been linked to
one-time booster and now convicted Ponzi
scheme architect Nevin Shapiro through the
improper-benets scandal that broke last year
assisted members of Goldens coaching staff with
recruiting.
If true, that could be a major NCAA violation
by the troubled program, despite Goldens repeat-
ed insistence that he wants to get it xed.
Earlier Friday, two people with knowledge of
the situation told The Associated Press that NCAA
investigators visited Miami for several days earli-
er this month, just the latest round of the lengthy
inquiry into the Hurricanes athletic department.
The people spoke to the AP on condition of
anonymity because information about the probe
has not been publicly released. Shapiros claims
that he provided dozens of Miami athletes and
recruits with extra benets over an eight-year span
were published by Yahoo Sports last August.
The university did not have immediate com-
ment Friday.
Golden is scheduled to discuss the coming sea-
son at the Atlantic Coast Conference media days
in North Carolina early next week.
New staff,
same result
By Doug Ferguson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LYTHAM ST. ANNES, England Brandt
Snedeker plays fast and talks even faster, and he
was on a roll Friday in the British Open. He
raced up the leaderboard with ve birdies in a
seven-hole stretch, tied the 36-hole record for a
major championship and looked like he was bent
on running away from the eld at Royal Lytham
& St. Annes.
Not so fast.
Along came Adam Scott,
playing cautiously and pick-
ing his spots for three
birdies on the back nine to
pull within one shot. Not far
behind was Tiger Woods,
sticking to a conservative
game plan and delivering a
dramatic nish by holing out from the bunker to
set off a wild cheer from 6,000 spectators
crammed into the bleachers.
As the second round ended, this Open was just
getting started.
On another benign day when the only concern
was pools forming in the bottom of pot bunkers
from overnight rain, Snedeker became the latest
player to match the course record at Royal
Lytham with a 6-under 64 that gave him a one-
shot lead.
He has yet to make a bogey over 36 holes, the
rst player to go bogey-free in the opening two
rounds of a major since Woods won at St.
Andrews in 2000. Snedekers 10-under 130 tied
the 36-hole record set by Nick Faldo in 1992
when he won the Open at Muireld, and it broke
by four shots the 36-hole record at Lytham.
Snedeker at 10-under, Tiger four shots back
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Jennifer Agresti got into coaching volley-
ball almost on a whim. Since her epiphany
moment, Agresti has turned her passion for
the game into a career and her career path just
took a big leap forward: Agresti was named
the new varsity girls volleyball coach at
Notre Dame-Belmont.
Im so anxious to get down there and the
meet the kids, Agresti said. Anything better
than last year is good.
Agresti, a Belmont resident, replaces Jeff
Kim, who led Notre Dame to a 10-21 record
overall last year and just one win in West
Catholic Athletic League play.
Agresti has known noth-
ing but success in volley-
ball. A four-year varsity
volleyball and basketball
player, as well as a track
and field athlete at St.
Marys High in Stockton,
she earned a volleyball
scholarship to Washington
State.
After graduating, she
got a sales job in the Bay Area and was sitting
at her desk one day and thought, Ive been an
athlete since I was 9 years old, Agresti said
she remembers thinking. I said, I think I
Agresti named new volleyball
coach at Notre Dame-Belmont
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Things are coming together quite nicely for
the San Bruno Storm 14-under softball team.
With a trip to the Western National
Tournament in Fort Collins, Co. just around
the corner, the team with an already impres-
sive 25-5 summer record is really hitting their
stride according to manager Manuel Cotla.
And perhaps the most promising part is that
the Storm is accomplishing this with a rela-
tively new crop of players.
We have a lot of newer girls, Cotla said.
We had a lot of girls who went up a level so
we have a lot of new faces. But we can see the
growth in them as the summer goes on. I think
were peaking at the right time so we should
do very well up there.
National tournament play begins July 30
with 40 or so powerhouse teams convening in
Colorado. The Storm is preparing by upping
their practice time and heading to Rohert Park
this weekend for their nal tuneup.
I think the girls weve gotten who havent
played on a travel team as much are really
shining, Cotla said. Its made our team bet-
ter because theyre trying extra hard, because
its their rst time. I think its denitely helped
us this year although we had a very sharp team
last year, that the new girls are really tting in
good.
San Bruno ready for
the Western Nationals
University of Miamis
second-year regime
brokerecruiting rules
See AGRESTI, Page 13
Jennifer Agresti
See STORM, Page 14
See MIAMI, Page 15
Brandt Snedeker See OPEN, Page 13
Oakland stays hot
REUTERS
Oaklands Yoenis Cespedes steals second during the As 3-2 win over New York. Cespedes scored the winning run onBrandon Moss RBI
single in the bottom of the ninth.
By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND Brandon Moss hit a game-
ending RBI single with one out in the ninth
inning to give Oakland another dose of late-
inning dramatics as the Athletics beat the New
York Yankees 3-2 on Friday night for their
seventh win in eight games.
Yoenis Cespedes singled with one out in the
ninth off Cody Eppley (0-1) for his fourth hit
of the game and went to second on Jonny
Gomes ineld hit. Moss, who left the bases
loaded twice earlier in the game, lined a single
to right eld and Cespedes slid in safely ahead
of Andruw Jones throw.
That gave Oakland its 10th walk-off win of
the season and seventh in its past 14 home
games, bailing out All-Star closer Ryan Cook
(4-2), who allowed a game-tying homer to
Robinson Cano in the top of the ninth.
The Yankees were completely silenced by
Oakland rookie Tommy Milone, who struck
out a career-high 10 batters in seven scoreless
innings as the As took a 2-0 lead.
But Oakland failed to build on the single
runs scored in the third and fourth inning,
squandering numerous scoring chances. The
As left the bases loaded in the rst and sev-
enth inning with Moss making the nal out
both times and stranded 12 runners over the
rst eight innings.
That helped the Yankees tie the game with a
solo homer by Russell Martin off Jerry
See ATHLETICS, Page 14
As 3, Yankees 2
SPORTS 12
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By Rob Maaddi
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PHILADELPHIA Brandon Crawford hit
a grand slam and drove in ve runs, Tim
Lincecum threw seven sharp innings and the
NL West-leading San Francisco Giants beat
the Philadelphia Phillies 7-2 on Friday night.
Ryan Howard hit a solo homer for the last-
place Phillies, who have lost two in a row after
winning four straight.
Lincecum (4-10) looked
more like the pitcher who
was a two-time Cy Young
Award winner than the one
who entered the game with
a 5.93 ERA. He allowed
two runs and five hits,
striking out six.
Phillies starter Vance
Worley (5-6) gave up six
runs and six hits in six
innings, striking out nine.
The Giants broke it open with ve runs in
the sixth.
Ryan Theriot led off with a single, Melky
Cabrera singled and Buster Posey walked to
load the bases. Pablo Sandovals sacrice y
made it 2-1. Nate Schierholtz walked to re-
load the bases. Worley stayed in despite hav-
ing already thrown 105 pitches. Crawford
ripped the second pitch he saw out to right for
his second career slam to put the Giants up 6-
1.
Howard drove one out to almost straight-
away center to get the Phillies within 6-2 in
the bottom half. It was Howards second
homer in 25 at-bats since returning after miss-
ing the rst 84 games.
Crawfords RBI single off Jeremy Horst in
the eighth made it 7-2.
A balk by Lincecum forced in Shane
Victorino to give the Phillies a 1-0 lead in the
fourth. Victorino and Chase Utley hit consec-
utive hard singles to start the inning. After the
balk, Lincecum worked out of a bases-loaded
jam, retiring Placido Polanco on a bouncer to
third.
The Giants tied it at 1 on Eli Whitesides
two-out RBI double to deep right in the fth.
Lincecum has consecutive quality starts for
just the second time this season. He got a no-
decision in San Franciscos 3-2 extra-inning
win over Houston last Saturday when he
tossed eight scoreless innings.
Notes: The switch-hitting Crawford was in
a 1-for-20 slump against right-handers before
taking Worley deep. ... The Phillies are an NL-
worst 17-28 at home. ... The Giants are 19-13
in the opener of a series this season, including
10-1 in their last 11. ... Howard is 6-for-28
with four homers off Lincecum. ... The
Phillies had their 265th straight sellout,
including postseason. ... RHP Matt Cain (10-
3, 2.56) faces LHP Cole Hamels (11-4, 3.07)
in a matchup of All-Stars on Saturday after-
noon. San Francisco gave Cain the contract
Hamels is using as a barometer for the deal
hes seeking from the Phillies before he reach-
es free agency after the season.
Lincecum gets rare win
in another strong outing
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Being the third best team in Northern
California isnt too shabby.
And its for that reason the Babe Ruth Bel-
Mateo 15-Under team can hold their heads high
after a summer of baseball that ended after a
loss to Tri-Valley at the states NorCal tourna-
ment.
Its a very short season, said Bel-Mateo
manager Chris Hammond. We were together
just about one month, but the team grew a lot as
individuals and as a team. And thats all we can
ask for. They represented Babe Ruth and Bel-
Mateo extremely well.
Sure, theres a bit of disappointment consider-
ing the NorCal tournament began with a pair of
big wins against Vallejo and Ukiah games
where Bel-Mateo scored 29 runs.
But against Sonoma, Bel-Mateo lost that
offensive feeling.
Our bats just fell at at the wrong time,
Hammond said. Combined with a couple of
physical errors, that opened the door [for
Sonoma]. We competed, it was a tight ball game
into the fth and then the ood gates kind of
opened when we were short on pitching at the
end. The boys were still into it and honestly, our
roster got shortened. We lost two pitchers and
our starting catcher because of school commit-
ments.
Sonoma jumped out to a quick 2-0 lead,
fueled by an early walk and error. But Bel-
Mateo jumped right back into the game in sup-
port of Spencer Larsen by scoring three runs to
take the lead. Unfortunately for Bel-Mateo, after
Larsen was removed from the game, the wheels
completely fell off.
Our defense came up short, Hammond said.
To make matters worse, the loss set up a do-
or-die game against the two-time defending
champion in Tri-Valley.
Morgan Monashefsky kept Bel-Mateo in the
game early on, but the reigning champions
pulled away in the fth and went up 6-1. It then
scored seven more in the sixth inning against a
depleted Bel-Mateo roster.
Hammond said Larsen and Monashefsky
took their games to another level for Bel-Mateo
during the summer.
Spencer Larsen really stepped up as our No.
1, Hammond said. He showed that he could
compete at a very high level. Morgan
Monashefsky gave his team a chance to com-
pete. We had great contributions from Mitchell
Wright, Isaiah Todd-Fitzhugh who was a
strength in the 3-hole, and players like Zack
Pace who batted ninth for most of the summer,
but was in the lineup every day.
Hammond said the game against Tri-Valley
got chippy, with several hit batsmen as the con-
test got into its latter stages. With hitters being
plunked left and right, plus some choice words
by the opposing manager, Bel-Mateo kept their
cool so much so that they were recognized
after the tournament by the director for their
sportsmanship.
This Bel-Mateo team showed a lot,
Hammond said. Theyre accomplished ball
players. The way they played the game and how
they went about it in all their games, they
showed a lot of pride and represented the com-
munity really well.
Bel-Mateos under-15
season ends at NorCals Giants 7, Phillies 2
Brandon
Crawford
SPORTS 13
Weekend July 21-22, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
San Mateo County Office of Education
Career Technical Education
by
want to get into coaching. I know so much
about volleyball. I had played it for so long. I
felt this was something I could do really well.
It was during her rst season of coaching
that Agresti realized she might have a knack
for this coaching thing. Her team didnt win a
championship, but she saw steady improve-
ment throughout the season.
I took some small 12-year-old team. We
started out not winning a game in the rst part
of the season. At the end of the season, we
came around and beat the rst-place team,
Agresti said. That was kind of the start for
me.
It was a taste of validation.
Since then, Agresti has coached at some of
the best volleyball clubs in the Bay Area
including Vision and City Beach. She is cur-
rently the U17 Black coach at Payes Place.
Earlier this month, she helped guide her
Payes Place team to a bronze medal in the
U17 Open Division at the Junior Olympics.
Every player on the oor was a DI player,
Agresti said.
She also spent ve years as the junior varsi-
ty coach at St. Francis, capturing ve straight
WCAL JV titles.
St. Francis was a great experience. They
have great coaches. That was a huge part (of
my coaching training), Agresti said. I think
it was a great learning experience for me.
She took time off from St. Francis following
the 2009 season in order to focus more on her
young family. She knew she would eventually
get back into the high school coaching ranks
she just didnt think it would be so soon.
I thought down the road, more like when
my kids were in school, I would pick up a var-
sity gig. I didnt think it would be this year,
Agresti said. It just worked out. I was
ready to come out of hiding and take this
opportunity on.
I needed a couple days to really think
about it. Obviously family is important and
my kids are still pretty small. I had to think
about it long and hard.
Now that she is committed again to a high
school program, she asks only one thing of
her players leave it all out on the court.
My expectations are all about effort. As
long as these kids come in the gym and give
100 percent, at the end of the day, theyll be
winners in my book.
If they get better, in my eyes, it will be a
successful season, she said. The kids, I real-
ly like them, but you have to get them to buy
in. If they dont believe in what Im teaching,
theres going to be a disconnect. For me in
my coaching career, Ive connected with the
kids.
Carlmont makes honor roll
The American Volleyball Coaches
Association is one of the premiere organiza-
tions that caters to volleyball at the high
school and college levels. When the AVCA
hands out awards, its a big deal.
Friday, the AVCA handed out team academ-
ic awards for the 2011-12 school year and the
Carlmont program was one of 220 girls teams
across the country to receive the honor.
The Scots, with just ve players with varsi-
ty experience, went 12-2 in Peninsula Athletic
League Bay Division play and nished with
an overall record of 25-10, advancing to the
Central Coast Section playoff seminals for
the seventh time in eight years.
All while compiling a 3.73 GPA as a team.
Obviously, Im extremely proud of our
girls for the success they continue to have in
their studies, Carlmont coach Chris Crader
said in an email. I certainly enjoy winning
matches and watching our players improve,
but, rst and foremost, as a Carlmont High
School employee, Im very pleased with their
hard work in the classroom and their academ-
ic excellence.
Carlmont was the only school in San Mateo
County to win the award.
Continued from page 11
AGRESTI
Even more amazing? Snedeker hasnt hit into any of the 206
bunkers in two days.
No bogeys around here is getting some good breaks and play-
ing some pretty good golf, Snedeker said. My mantra all week
has been to get the ball on the greens as fast as possible. Once Im
on there, I have a pretty good hand for the speed of the greens. Just
going to try and keep doing that over the weekend.
Snedeker has never made the cut in three previous trips to the
British Open, though this brand of golf is nothing new. As a rook-
ie on the PGA Tour in 2007, he was 10 under through 10 holes on
the North Course at Torrey Pines before having to settle for a 61.
He picked up his third win there this year by rallying from a
seven-shot decit on the last day.
Brandt is a momentum-type guy, once he gets going and start-
ing making putts and hitting shots, said Mark Calcavecchia,
another player who doesnt waste time. He plays quick and hes
got the quick tempo and he putts quick. And they go in quick.
Thats awesome golf.
What does that get him?
A whole lot of nothing, Snedeker said. Weve got 36 more
holes to go. A lot can happen.
And that was before Scott, the 32-year-old Australian, began
making his steady move up the leaderboard. He bogeyed the third
hole for the second straight day, and then turned it around by
smashing a 3-wood that bounced off a hillock to the right of the
green on the par-5 seventh hole and set up a two-putt birdie. Scott
opened the back nine with back-to-back birdies, and then hit two
beautiful shots to 8 feet for another birdie on the 18th and a 67.
Scott, who had a 64 on Thursday, has never been in such good
shape at a major going into the weekend.
Why Ive played good this week is kind of a culmination of
everything Ive done over the last couple of years, Scott said. I
feel like this is the path Ive been going down, and just happens to
have happened here that Ive put myself in good position after two
days at a major.
Continued from page 11
OPEN
By Doug Feinberg
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ISTANBUL Diana Taurasi and the U.S.
womens basketball team feel a little over-
looked.
Theyve been on one of the most dominant
runs in Olympic history, winning four straight
gold medals the most in a traditional
womens team sport and 33 consecutive
games. They are favored to win their fth con-
secutive gold at the London Games.
Yet they feel unappreciated instead of cele-
brated.
I think its funny, Taurasi said. Were a
team thats won four gold medals in a row and
yet were still ghting for respect in our own
country. I think its a little sad. Thats a heck
of a motivator for all of us in the gym. Our
level is so high, it becomes normal and even
to the public its they should win the gold
medal. If they dont its a terrible year.
Taurasi joked that they should get shirts
made up with road to respect as the slogan
modifying the 2008 mens teams road to
redemption motto.
One of coach Geno Auriemmas goals in
London is to get the womens team the atten-
tion they feel they deserve.
If we win another gold medal its not going
to be a huge story, he said. I want to make it
a huge story because the respect that Dees
talking about that these kids deserve for hav-
ing done what theyve done and been able to
do it the way they do it should be appreciated.
Greatness should be appreciated and not taken
for granted.
People take us for granted.
Their opponents dont.
Only one team has come within single dig-
its of the U.S. since the unprecedented run
started in 1996. Theyve won by an average of
29 points a game. The Americans have only
lost once in major international competitions
since 1996 with the lone blemish coming
against Russia in the seminals of the 2006
world championship.
Were doing something that no one has
ever done, said Sue Bird, who will be playing
in her third straight Olympics. You dont
hear much about it and people take it for
granted that were going to win, assume its
going to happen. To go for a fth gold medal
in a row, thats unbelievable.
Despite the Olympic team not getting the
respect that the players feel theyve earned,
womens basketball has made great strides in
the U.S. since 1996. The WNBA began a year
later and is celebrating its 16th season. Three
of the teams in the league have turned prots
and attendance is up for the fth straight sea-
son.
While there is denitely still room for
improvement, the fact that the WNBA is still
around is a positive sign two womens pro
soccer leagues have folded despite Olympic
success by US teams.
American womens softball teams had a
resume almost as impressive as the basketball
squad, winning three of four gold medals
before seeing their sport removed from the
Olympics after the 2008 Beijing Games.
U.S. womens basketball team looking for respect
SPORTS 14
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Of the six tournaments under their belt, the Storm has won
four. Interestingly enough, Cotla points to one of the tourna-
ments they didnt win as the one that perhaps best exemplies
San Bruno softball. Despite going 1-3 at a tournament in
Southern California, Cotla said his team showed that they
might just be ready for the big stage.
Theyre kind of like the Mecca of girls softball, Cotla said
of Southern California. You kind of put your standards by
how you compete against them. So going down there this year
to play and even though we lost more than we won, but all the
games were close and it gave us a really good feeling that this
years Nationals are going to be strong for us and that our pro-
gram is getting to the elite status that they are down there.
San Bruno suffered two Saturday losses before turning
around and defeating the No. 2 seed of the tournament and
staying pitch for pitch against the No. 1 seed. It showed our
character and how far weve come, Cotla said. We left there
with a really good feeling.
The Storm carried that condence into a tournament in
Union City where they allowed only two runs.
The girls really focused through the week of practice,
Cotla said. Things just started to click. We started hitting the
ball, running the bases better and the defense just really
shined. We just were making really good plays and doing
things right, not making the big errors. It really was good.
Good is the perfect way to describe Storm pitchers Jena
Lacayo and Ra Dade, who Cotla said have really carried the
team. Shes just been pitching fantastic through the summer
for us, Cotla said of Lacayo. Theyve been just fantastic.
Theyre carrying a bunch of the load. We havent been scoring
a lot of runs for them but theyve been pitching their hearts out.
Without those two, our season would be kind of average.
Thats the reason weve gone a long way.
Cotlas expectations for the Western National tournament
are high. But he feels a strong showing is within his teams
reach.
Top 10 [nish] would be perfect, he said. I think that
would be a very successful season for us. Its going to be pret-
ty tough but I think we can do very well. If we can nish in the
top 10, that would be a very successful summer for us.
Syline tournament update
The Sweet 16 for the Skyline College High School basket-
ball tournament is set, with the Peninsula Athletic League
heavily represented.
Sweet 16 games are scheduled for Saturday.
In the days rst game, Lowell of San Francisco will take on
Mills at 9 a.m.
South San Francisco takes on Riordan of the West Catholic
Athletic League at 10 a.m.
An hour later, Balboa takes on Hillsdale.
The reigning PAL Bay Division champion El Camino Colts
have a noon date with Lincoln of San Francisco.
Half Moon Bay and Arroyo tango at 3 p.m., followed by
Woodside and California High School at 4 p.m.
Terra Nova will take on American at 5 p.m. and in the days
main event, Menlo-Atherton takes on Serra at 6 p.m.
Quarternal and seminal matchups are scheduled through-
out Sunday with the third-place game at 4 p.m. Monday fol-
lowed by the championship game at 6 p.m.
Continued from page 11
STORM
Blevins in the eighth and by Cano against Cook to lead off
the ninth. Cook has four blown saves in 14 chances.
Milone allowed seven hits and no walks and tied an
Oakland record with his 10 strikeouts against the Yankees.
He also helped end New Yorks streak of 43 consecutive
games with at least three runs the longest in the majors
since Clevelands 48-game run in 1994.
The rst two game of this series have been a far cry from
New Yorks rst visit to Oakland in late May when the
Yankees overwhelmed the As in a three-game sweep to
extend their winning streak at the Coliseum to nine games.
That was part of a nine-game overall losing streak for the
As, who have recovered since then to post the second best
record in the majors to the Yankees since June 2.
A pitching staff that leads the American League in ERA
this season is the biggest reason for the recent success that
has Oakland (49-44) ve games over .500 for the rst time
since April 2010 and only a half-game out of a wild-card
spot.
After leaving the bases loaded in the rst inning, the As
struck for single runs in the third and fourth innings against
Ivan Nova. Coco Crisp led off the third with a triple and
scored on Jemile Weeks sacrice y. Moss and Brandon
Inge then hit back-to-back doubles to open the fourth to
make it 2-0.
Continued from page 11
ATHLETICS
SPORTS 15
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East Division
W L Pct GB
Washington 53 38 .582
Atlanta 51 41 .554 2 1/2
New York 47 46 .505 7
Miami 44 49 .473 10
Philadelphia 41 53 .436 13 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cincinnati 53 40 .570
Pittsburgh 52 40 .565 1/2
St. Louis 48 45 .516 5
Milwaukee 44 48 .478 8 1/2
Chicago 38 54 .413 14 1/2
Houston 34 59 .366 19
West Division
W L Pct GB
San Francisco 52 41 .559
Los Angeles 50 44 .532 2 1/2
Arizona 44 48 .478 7 1/2
San Diego 40 55 .421 13
Colorado 35 57 .380 16 1/2
FridaysGames
Atlanta 11,Washington 10, 11 innings
Pittsburgh 4, Miami 3
San Francisco 7, Philadelphia 2
L.A. Dodgers 7, N.Y. Mets 6
Cincinnati 3, Milwaukee 1
St. Louis 4, Chicago Cubs 1
San Diego 9, Colorado 5
Houston at Arizona, late
SaturdaysGames
Atlanta at Washington, 10:05 a.m., 1st game
L.A. Dodgers at N.Y. Mets, 10:10 a.m.
San Francisco at Philadelphia, 1:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Washington, 4:05 p.m., 2nd game
Miami at Pittsburgh, 4:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at Cincinnati, 4:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at St. Louis, 4:15 p.m.
Houston at Arizona, 5:10 p.m.
Colorado at San Diego, 5:35 p.m.
SundaysGames
L.A. Dodgers at N.Y. Mets, 10:10 a.m.
Milwaukee at Cincinnati, 10:10 a.m.
Atlanta at Washington, 10:35 a.m.
Miami at Pittsburgh, 10:35 a.m.
San Francisco at Philadelphia, 10:35 a.m.
East Division
W L Pct GB
New York 57 36 .613
Baltimore 49 44 .527 8
Tampa Bay 49 45 .521 8 1/2
Boston 48 46 .511 9 1/2
Toronto 46 47 .495 11
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 50 43 .538
Detroit 50 44 .532 1/2
Cleveland 47 46 .505 3
Kansas City 39 53 .424 10 1/2
Minnesota 39 54 .419 11
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 55 37 .598
Los Angeles 51 43 .543 5
Oakland 49 44 .527 6 1/2
Seattle 40 55 .421 16 1/2
FridaysGames
Baltimore 10, Cleveland 2
Detroit 4, Chicago White Sox 2
Tampa Bay 4, Seattle 3, 14 innings
Toronto 6, Boston 1
Minnesota 2, Kansas City 1, 11 innings
Oakland 3, N.Y.Yankees 2
L.A. Angels 6,Texas 1
SaturdaysGames
Chicago White Sox at Detroit, 1:05 p.m.
Texas at L.A. Angels, 1:05 p.m.
Baltimore at Cleveland, 4:05 p.m.
Minnesota at Kansas City, 4:10 p.m.
Seattle at Tampa Bay, 4:10 p.m.
Toronto at Boston, 4:10 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees at Oakland, 6:05 p.m.
SundaysGames
Chicago White Sox at Detroit, 10:05 a.m.
Toronto at Boston, 10:35 a.m.
Seattle at Tampa Bay, 10:40 a.m.
Minnesota at Kansas City, 11:10 a.m.
Baltimore at Cleveland, 12:05 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees at Oakland, 1:05 p.m.
Texas at L.A. Angels, 5:05 p.m.
MondaysGames
Baltimore at Cleveland, 4:05 p.m.
Boston at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
NL STANDINGS AL STANDINGS
vs. Dodgers
7:15p.m.
NBC
7/27
vs.Seattle
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/11
@Montreal
4:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
8/18
vs.Rapids
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/25
vs.Chivas
6p.m.
NBCSN
9/2
@Chivas
7:30p.m.
CSN+
9/15
@WCaps
4p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/22
vs. Padres
12:45p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/25
vs.Fire
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/28
@Toronto
4:07p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/24
@Toronto
9:37a.m.
CSN-CAL
7/26
@Toronto
4:07p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/25
vs.Dodgers
6:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/28
@Orioles
4:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/27
@Orioles
4:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/28
@Phillies
1:05p.m.
FOX
7/21
@Phillies
10:35a.m.
CSN-BAY
7/22
vs.Padres
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/23
vs. Yankees
6:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/21
vs. Padres
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/24
vs. Yankees
1:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/22
A signicant portion of Shapiros
allegations from last year revolved
around Allen, who was an assistant
football equipment manager until
leaving the program last year.
Shapiro said he gave Allen more than
$200,000, most allegedly spent on
players and recruits, as well as a lux-
ury car. Allen denied those claims to
Yahoo Sports in 2011, and has not
responded to interview requests from
the AP.
Shapiros attorney, Maria Elena
Perez, also did not immediately
respond to requests for comment
Friday. She deposed Allen late last
year, shortly before court records
showed Miami entered into an agree-
ment with a bankruptcy trustee to
return $83,000 it said it received
directly and indirectly from
Shapiro.
Miami has been bracing for addi-
tional allegations, and was aware ear-
lier this week that they were coming.
In an e-mail obtained by the AP, uni-
versity President Donna Shalala told
trustees Thursday that someone who
had a low level position at one time
was expected to allege that Miami
assistant coach and former NFL play-
er Micheal Barrow committed
recruiting violations. Shalala said it
has already been investigated.
Yahoo Sports reported Friday that
Allen tried to aid both Barrow and
former assistant Aubrey Hill, who left
the Hurricanes less than a month after
Golden was hired and is now the
wide receivers coach and recruiting
coordinator at Florida. It cited Allens
phone records, detailing calls he
made to recruits often moments
before or after calling Barrow or Hill.
It also listed other alleged violations,
such as Allen giving recruits rides to
the Miami football ofces or to
restaurants for meetings with coach-
es.
Some current players were listed as
having contact with Allen during
their recruiting process, including
standout defensive lineman Anthony
Chickillo, cornerback Thomas Finnie
and incoming freshmen Randy
Duke Johnson and Herb Waters.
Chickillo, according to the new
Yahoo Sports report, was taken to a
strip club on his recruiting visit by
former Miami defensive end Olivier
Vernon, who decided after last season
to skip his nal season with the
Hurricanes and make himself eligible
for the NFL draft. Vernon was one of
the players sanctioned by the NCAA
last season for accepting money from
Shapiro.
Continued from page 11
MIAMI
NFL
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTSReleased WR Matt
Roark.
PHILADELPHIA EAGLESReleased DT Tevita
Finau and P Ryan Tydlacka.
SAN DIEGO CHARGERSAgreed to terms with
DT Aubrayo Franklin and RB Jackie Battle on one-
year contracts. Released G Kris Dielman from the
reserve-retired list.
TAMPABAYBUCCANEERSSigned S Mark Bar-
ron to a ve-year contract.
TENNESSEE TITANSAgreed to terms with S
Aaron Francisco on a one-year contract.
BASEBALL
National League
ARIZONADIAMONDBACKSReleased INF Geoff
Blum. Selected the contract of INF Ryan Wheeler
from Reno (PCL).
TRANSACTIONS
16
Weekend July 21-22, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/WORLD
Are you planning a trip in the next 90 days? Dont leave home unless you have a will and a trust. We can have your trust
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Friday, July 27
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1:30PM or 6:30PM
50 8th Street,
San Francisco, CA 94103
Stop at front desk for parking validation
Saturday, July 28
th
, Foster City
Courtyard by Marriott
11:00AM or 2:00PM
550 Shell Boulevard,
Foster City, CA 94404
Free hotel parking
Sunday, July 29
th
, Burlingame
Marriott Airport Bayside Hotel
11:00AM or 2:00PM
1800 Old Bayshore Highway,
Burlingame, CA 94010
Validated self parking
something people care about, said Van
Houten, who gets her materials from local and
European antique fairs.
People want to connect to a historical
moment, she said.
In the front shop window is a large white
marble sculpture of a womans body hugging
her legs to her chest. Nobody does marble,
said Bogdan, admiring the time-consuming
process of chiseling the perfect sculpture.
The marble piece was made by Ellen
Lowenstein, who teaches sculpture at Skyline
College. Lowenstein is not a self-promoter,
explained Bogdan. Thats the surprise of the
store: you get to bring people together in a
non-formal setting, she said. Its not formal
like a gallery.
Bogdan opened the store with more than a
dozen artists and now has many more. The
back showroom has bright photographs of
Cuba taken by a local judge.
For some people this is just their hobby,
they just like doing this stuff, said Bogdan. I
dont even have to look. They found me.
Atop Bogdans loom in the back of the shop
are three pieces that look as if they were found
in a wizards home. They were made by a
retired Stanford astrophysicist, said Bogdan.
His mystical objects are made using lenses
and metal rods from old equipment.
Since she opened for business in early May,
Bogdan is always being asked if she is
Penelope.
The name for her shop is a reference to
Homers Odyssey. The main character
Odysseus has a wife Penelope who is a weav-
er. She tells the people that she will give up
hope of her husbands return as soon as she
finishes her weaving. Secretly, Penelope
unweaves her textile each night.
As a weaver who lives on Kings Mountain,
Bogdan, 33, feels there is a great need for the
shop.
There is a huge art community here and
nowhere to sell it, she said.
She knows that these are tough economic
times, but believes that art is a necessity.
Art is essential because we cant devote
our whole lives to making money, said
Bogdan, who studied textile design as Moore
College of Art and Design in Philadelphia.
Her goal is to sell ethically made local art at
a reasonable price. She sells her woven tex-
tiles and silkscreen printed scarves and
American Apparel T-shirts.
Her Highway 35 printed T-shirt for $35 is
a hit with the bikers. Another design was cre-
ated on special request from the bikers: a
Highway 35 skull print.
Surprisingly, some of the more delicate
items are also a hit with the leather-clad
crowd. One biker managed to t four glass
pansy plates into her fanny pack, said
Bogdan.
Other items include goats milk fudge made
in La Honda, wooden mushrooms made by a
retired lumber worker, metal sculptures by
local Bill Sorich, jewelry made by Deb
Rockmore in Woodside and owers from a
neighboring family farm. So is there criteria
for the items in Penelopes Den?
I have to like it, said Bogdan of her col-
lection. Its cohesive, but reects the diversi-
ty of the community. We certainly are not one-
dimensional up here.
For more information visit
penelopesden.com.
Continued from page 1
DEN
could be covered through a bond measure. On
Tuesday, the board will decide whether to put
the measure before voters in November. Such a
measure requires two-thirds approval. If
approved, the bond measure would cost $30 per
$100,000 of a propertys value.
Superintendent Maggie MacIssac explained
the school facilities are an average of about 70
years old. A bond measure will allow the district
to provide up-to-date and safe places for the stu-
dents while updating the technology, she said.
In 2010, the Burlingame Elementary School
District purchased the vacant site of Hoover
Elementary School at 2220 Summit Drive to
help with growing enrollment.
In August, the board voted for a conceptual
design for Hoover which calls for the renova-
tion of the original 1930s building and removal
of the 1949 annex building allowing for a new
building in its place. This creates a school with
11 classrooms, one day-care room and a library
created from two of the smaller current class-
rooms. There will be a multipurpose room with
a new stage, main ofce, specialist spaces in the
new buildings and support spaces.
Estimates to upgrade the facility have ranged
from $6.87 million to $10.8 million, with the
current plan being on the higher end.
Measure A, a $48.3 million bond measure,
was passed in 2007. Purchasing the now-vacant
Hoover Elementary School at 2220 Summit
Drive for $4.85 million was one of the larger
purchases from the measure. Money from
Measure A has also been used for design work,
environmental analysis, surveying and prelimi-
nary engineering for the Hoover site.
Hoover was built in the 1930s, closed in 1978
and sold 10 years later. In 1989, Shinnyo-En
Buddhist Facility was granted a city permit but
later moved out of Burlingame. Since the pur-
chase of Hoover, the board has often discussed
a second bond as being needed to cover the ren-
ovation costs. Going for a bond could also make
the district eligible for state matching grants.
Burlingame could be the second district to
place a measure on the November ballot.
On Monday, the San Carlos Elementary
School District Board of Trustees voted unani-
mously to put a $72 million bond measure on
the November ballot. Such funds could be used
for updating technology, repairing schools,
improving trafc safety, reducing overcrowding
and upgrading energy efciencies to create
long-term savings, according to the district.
The San Bruno Park Elementary School
District has been toying with the idea of placing
a parcel tax on the November ballot. When dis-
cussed at the boards June 27 meeting, trustees
disagreed on the possible amount and duration
of such a measure.
The board meets 6 p.m. Tuesday, July 24 at
the District Ofce, 1825 Trousdale Drive,
Burlingame.
Continued from page 1
BOND
Thousands flee as Syrian
rebels wage guerrilla war
BEIRUT Rebels pressed their guerrilla
ght to topple Syrias regime deeper into the
capital on Friday, ambushing troops and attack-
ing police stations as thousands of terried
civilians ed to Lebanon and Iraq to escape
some of the worst violence of the 16-month
conict.
The two-day death toll was more than 470
people, marking some of the deadliest of the
uprising.
The U.N. refugee agency said between 8,500
and 30,000 Syrians had entered Lebanon in the
past 48 hours, and thousands of Iraqis have also
returned home, a bitter trip for many who ed
to Syria from their own countrys civil war.
In Damascus, Syrian forces recaptured one
battle-scarred neighborhood and proudly
showed reporters the dead bodies of rebel ght-
ers lying in rubble-strewn streets.
But rebels said they withdrew to expand their
guerrilla war, pointing to the difculty both
sides will have in achieving victory in
Damascus, the central bastion of President
Bashar Assads rule.
Israelis bury five
victims of Bulgaria attack
JERUSALEM Devastated mourners
grasped at dirt atop fresh graves and screamed
in agony Friday as they buried the ve Israeli
victims of a bombing in Bulgaria an attack
that Israel has blamed on Iran and its proxy
group Hezbollah.
Two days after the deadly blast in a popular
vacation spot, investigators in Bulgaria and in
several other countries were still struggling to
conrm the attackers identity.
Bulgarian prosecutors said the attacker had
short hair, not the long hair seen in the security
video footage captured of him at the airport. A
witness said he appeared to be wearing a wig.
The victims cofns were received early
Friday in a military ceremony at Israels inter-
national airport. Seventeen Israelis remain in
hospitals.
Around the world
By Chloee Weiner
W
hen I was in elementary school, I
had a lot of irrational fears, and
one of those fears was the concept
of a year-round school. Id
never met anyone who
attended a year-round
school, nor had I ever seen
one myself, but the idea of
adults taking away sum-
mer break was frightening
and downright sinister.
Like any kid, I still spend
many a tough winter day
at school longing for sum-
mertime, but a recent series of events has urged
me to legitimately consider the benets of a
truncated summer and a few more days of
school throughout the year. But before my sta-
tus as a true child is revoked, allow me to
explain how I developed this possibly shocking
point of view.
A few days ago, a particularly pessimistic
friend of mine reminded me that over half of
our summer break has already passed. With
this cheerful reminder, I decided to nally pick
up a summer reading book (the all too exciting
10 Steps to Repair American Democracy) so
as not to nd myself knee-deep in required
reading come the week before the rst day of
the fall semester. As I began to read, I could
barely get through a few pages without getting
distracted and I realized that after only a month
away from school, my attention span had
already shortened and my work ethic had
quickly deteriorated. I began to think about the
rst week of school in past years and remem-
bered that several days, if not more, were
always spent getting back into the routine of
classes and homework. Most teachers arent
cruel enough to assign a daunting 10-page
essay during the rst days back and in classes
involving foreign language or math, a review
of derivative rules or the French past subjunc-
tive has always been needed before learning
new material.
The summer months away from school de-
nitely make it dangerously easy to forget much
of the information learned from the previous
semester, and most students seem to come
back to class more readily able to answer ques-
tions about TV shows like House or
Breaking Bad than about what was covered
in English 11. Its because of this cycle of
learning and forgetting that Ive started to legit-
imately consider a concept that would appall
most students: year-round school.
Aside from the prevention of loss of aca-
demic progress, year-round schooling does
have the potential for more kid-friendly bene-
ts. With more days of total school dispersed
evenly throughout an entire year, more fre-
quent breaks and later start times (two changes
that students are always advocating) could
become real options. As if these benets
werent enough to make year-round school
start to sound at least somewhat desirable, a
change in the American schooling system real-
ly could help the countrys students ability to
compete academically on an international
Year-round school
Museum
gotta see um
Man Ray | Lee Miller: Partners
in Surrealism,at the Legion of
Honor in San Francisc
SEE PAGE 19
Connoisseurs Marketplace
Connoisseurs Marketplace, Menlo Parks
venerable festival of the arts, marks its 26th
year with live jazz, rhythm and blues, rock
n roll, a juried show with one-of-a-kind
crafts, chefs demos, festive food and drink
and a collector car showcase. 10 a.m. to 6
p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Santa Cruz
Avenue, Menlo Park. Free.
Cypress Lawn tour
Walk with Terry Hamburg to the nal
resting places of painters, architects and
novelists of the Bay Area. 1:30 Saturday.
Cypress Lawn Noble Chapel. 1370 El
Camino Real, Colma. Dress for Colmas
microclimate and wear comfortable
walking shoes for the hilly terrain. Light
refreshments served. 550-8811. Free.
Summer Concert Series
Summer Concert Series.Tom Rigney &
Flambeau perform Cajun style music and
Vocal Son performs rock from 1 p.m. to 4
p.m. Sunday in Twin Pines Park, 30 Twin
Pines Lane, Belmont. Bring a blanket. Food
available for purchase. 595-7441. Free.
Best bets
See Summer, Page 18
Beasts of the Southern
Wild one of years best
By Christy Lemire
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Beasts of the Southern Wild is sheer poetry
on screen: an explosion of joy in the midst of
startling squalor and one of the most visceral,
original lms to come along in a while.
The story of a little girl named Hushpuppy
(Quvenzhane Wallis) living on a remote, primal
strip of eroding land in the southernmost reach-
es of the Louisiana bayou is so ambitious and
so accomplished, its amazing that its only the
rst feature lm from director Benh Zeitlin.
Working from a script he co-wrote with long-
time friend Lucy Alibar, based on her play,
Zeitlin deftly mixes a sense of childhood
wonder with the harsh realities of the adult
world.
His lm is at once dreamlike and brutal
(the gorgeous work of cinematographer
Ben Richardson), ethereal yet power-
fully emotional. Fight it all you like,
but this movie will get to you by the
end. And hes coaxed some surprising-
ly strong performances from a couple
of inexperienced actors he had the
daring to place front-and-center.
Wallis, who was only 6 when
shooting began, has a erce pres-
ence beyond her years with her
See BEASTS, Page 18
By Christy Lemire
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The documentary The Queen of
Versailles begins life as a juicy guilty pleas-
ure, allowing us to gawk and cluck at the nou-
veau-riche ostentation of an elderly time-
share mogul and his much-younger trophy
wife as they build their dream home: a 90,000-
square-foot palace that would be the biggest
house in America.
And then the economy collapses. And sud-
denly, in some ways, David and Jackie Siegel
are just like us.
Sure, theyre stuck in their 26,000-square-
foot mansion in Orlando, Fla., which theyre
bursting out of with their eight kids, various
nannies, maids and animals and wall-to-wall
tacky furniture and artwork. Jackie, a buxom
and Botoxed former model and pageant queen
whos about 30 years younger than her hus-
band, rides in the back of a limo to pick up
`Versailles an escape that turns somber
The Siegels lifestyle is still outrageous, but the sensation of panic they experience and the
strain it puts on their marriage are relatable, turning The Queen of Versailles from a frothy
escape into a sobering reality.
See QUEEN, Page 18
18
Weekend July 21-22, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WEEKEND JOURNAL
4:30 PM - 8:30 PM
Bar Only
fries at McDonalds.
But theyre forced to lay off thousands
of employees at Westgate Resorts, the
company David founded and which
made him a billionaire after coming
from nothing. They face foreclosure.
They end up sending their kids to public
school and shopping at WalMart. Now,
they actually have to watch what they
spend; they have to adapt.
Documentarian and photographer
Lauren Greeneld just happened to be
there to capture it all; having spent three
years with this family, she found herself
in the serendipitous position of having a
dramatic, real-life story arc play out
right in front of her. She never mocks
them, never depicts them in cheesy real-
ity-TV tones, and they trusted her
enough to let her stick around once
things went bad. (Although David Siegel
since has sued Greeneld for defama-
tion.)
The Siegels lifestyle is still outra-
geous, but the sensation of panic they
experience and the strain it puts on their
marriage are relatable, turning The
Queen of Versailles from a frothy
escape into a sobering reality.
At times, its actually rather sad.
Jackie, all hair and boobs and ridicu-
lously tight clothes, has a warm and wel-
coming personality but shes clearly a
hoarder. Even when shes shopping at a
behemoth discount store, she still buys
eight of everything, and its all stuff no
one needs. An illness is evident here. Its
a waste, yes, but its also a distressing
compulsion. The fact that shes so can-
did and no-nonsense, having come from
humble beginnings herself, makes her
that much more of a vivid, accessible
gure.
And then theres David, who proudly
admits in high times that hes construct-
ing his own Versailles because he can,
and who slyly boasts that he helped get
George W. Bush re-elected through
means that may not necessarily have
been legal. By the end, hes hiding in his
study, eating dinner alone, working all
hours of the day and night trying to nd
money to keep his business aoat and
his people employed. The crown jewel
of his empire, a Las Vegas high-rise, fea-
tures time shares bought by vacationers
who couldnt afford them in the rst
place through subprime mortgages. We
all know how those turned out.
These are not horrible people, just
ones who ung themselves enthusiasti-
cally toward the American dream as so
many do. As for Versailles itself
which actually was modeled after the
French palace, with some touches bor-
rowed from the Paris hotel in Las Vegas
its unnished but on the market. And
the price has been reduced. So if youre
looking for a place with a grotto, bowl-
ing alley, ice skating rink and 10
kitchens including one for sushi
you may just be in luck.
The Queen of Versailles, a Magnolia
Pictures release, is rated PG for themat-
ic elements and language. Running time:
100 minutes. Three and a half stars out
of four.
The documentary The Queen of
Versailles begins life as a juicy guilty
pleasure, allowing us to gawk and cluck
at the nouveau-riche ostentation of an
elderly time-share mogul and his much-
younger trophy wife as they build their
dream home: a 90,000-square-foot
palace that would be the biggest house in
America.
And then the economy collapses. And
suddenly, in some ways, David and
Jackie Siegel are just like us.
Sure, theyre stuck in their 26,000-
square-foot mansion in Orlando, Fla.,
which theyre bursting out of with their
eight kids, various nannies, maids and
animals and wall-to-wall tacky furniture
and artwork. Jackie, a buxom and
Botoxed former model and pageant
queen whos about 30 years younger
than her husband, rides in the back of a
limo to pick up fries at McDonalds.
But theyre forced to lay off thousands
of employees at Westgate Resorts, the
company David founded and which
made him a billionaire after coming
from nothing. They face foreclosure.
They end up sending their kids to public
school and shopping at WalMart. Now,
they actually have to watch what they
spend; they have to adapt.
Documentarian and photographer
Lauren Greeneld just happened to be
there to capture it all; having spent three
years with this family, she found herself
in the serendipitous position of having a
dramatic, real-life story arc play out
right in front of her. She never mocks
them, never depicts them in cheesy real-
ity-TV tones, and they trusted her
enough to let her stick around once
things went bad. (Although David Siegel
since has sued Greeneld for defama-
tion.)
The Siegels lifestyle is still outra-
geous, but the sensation of panic they
experience and the strain it puts on their
marriage are relatable, turning The
Queen of Versailles from a frothy
escape into a sobering reality.
At times, its actually rather sad.
Jackie, all hair and boobs and ridicu-
lously tight clothes, has a warm and wel-
coming personality but shes clearly a
hoarder. Even when shes shopping at a
behemoth discount store, she still buys
eight of everything, and its all stuff no
one needs. An illness is evident here. Its
a waste, yes, but its also a distressing
compulsion. The fact that shes so can-
did and no-nonsense, having come from
humble beginnings herself, makes her
that much more of a vivid, accessible
gure.
And then theres David, who proudly
admits in high times that hes construct-
ing his own Versailles because he can,
and who slyly boasts that he helped get
George W. Bush re-elected through
means that may not necessarily have
been legal. By the end, hes hiding in his
study, eating dinner alone, working all
hours of the day and night trying to nd
money to keep his business aoat and
his people employed. The crown jewel
of his empire, a Las Vegas high-rise, fea-
tures time shares bought by vacationers
who couldnt afford them in the rst
place through subprime mortgages. We
all know how those turned out.
These are not horrible people, just
ones who ung themselves enthusiasti-
cally toward the American dream as so
many do. As for Versailles itself
which actually was modeled after the
French palace, with some touches bor-
rowed from the Paris hotel in Las Vegas
its unnished but on the market. And
the price has been reduced. So if youre
looking for a place with a grotto, bowl-
ing alley, ice skating rink and 10
kitchens including one for sushi
you may just be in luck.
The Queen of Versailles, a Magnolia
Pictures release, is rated PG for themat-
ic elements and language. Running time:
100 minutes. Three and a half stars out
of four.
Continued from page 17
QUEEN
level. Its no secret that the U.S. continues to fall behind in edu-
cation, and a more consistent school schedule that lasted for an
entire calendar year would help students retain and improve
upon their academic knowledge.
That being said, with all the pros of year-round school, there
are, of course, cons as well. Without extended summer vaca-
tions, families would have less time to travel and students
wouldnt be able to pursue independent interests at places like
camps. Schools, especially universities, also generate a lot of
income from summer programs and even if they didnt, there
would denitely be teachers who (like students) might not be
quick to give up their well-deserved vacation time.
A nationalization of year-round school is improbable, even if
plausible, in the near future, but I have to say that the concept
no longer makes it onto my list of irrational fears. However,
perhaps a few days spent on the beach this summer will make
me change my mind.
Chloee Weiner is a junior at Crystal Springs Uplands School. Student
News appears in the weekend edition. You can email Student News at
news@smdailyjournal.com
wild hair and bright eyes, but also a plucky, girlish sweetness.
This is Hushpuppys fairy tale but shes no damsel in distress,
which is clear from the rst moment we see her.
Hushpuppys mother left long ago; now she and her ailing,
alcoholic father, Wink (Dwight Henry), are living together on the
narrow and ruggedly beautiful Isle de Jean Charles, known affec-
tionately by the rag-tag locals in the lm as The Bathtub.As her
father becomes consumed by poor health and drink and with
a damaging storm on the way she must gure out how to sur-
vive on her own.
Even before these pressing problems arose, though, Wink was-
nt exactly the most traditional father. Living side-by-side in sep-
arate trailers propped up in makeshift fashion, the two are more
like next-door neighbors who pal around and share whatever din-
ner they can scrounge up. At best, Hushpuppys daddy is neg-
lectful; at worst, he disappears for days. Still, you know he loves
his daughter and when hes around he teaches her to be
strong and tries to protect her in his own feeble, erratic way.
The character and the unorthodox parental bond depicted are
sure to provoke mixed, complex responses from viewers, but
Beasts of the Southern Wild never judges Wink. Thats an
impressive feat in itself, but whats even more amazing is that
Henry had never acted before. Zeitlin found him at the bakery he
runs in New Orleans and persuaded him to take part in the pro-
duction. His presence, and that of all the good-time locals, adds
to the air of authenticity.
Obviously, these two arent going anywhere, and neither are
their friends; an unshakable sense of pride and territoriality forti-
es them. We saw this again and again as Hurricane Katrina bar-
reled toward southern Louisiana: folks who saw no reason to
leave. This was their home. They stood rm. Katrina is never
mentioned by name and it doesnt need to be. The idea of a land-
scape-altering storm is just one of the many mythical elements at
work here.
Some of the magical realism imagery may seem a little too lit-
eral, too obvious, and may not work for everyone. Hushpuppy,
who also narrates the lm, envisions giant, prehistoric beasts
storming toward her home from far away the fantastical man-
ifestation in her mind of the real-life threats that are imminent.
But theyre all of a piece in a lm thats wild and wondrous, and
one of the years best.
The only drawback is that some of the kids who could benet
the most from witnessing such a display of bravery and resource-
fulness are too young to experience it unless maybe they have
open-minded parents, too.
Beasts of the Southern Wild, a Fox Searchlight release, is
rated PG-13 for thematic material including child imperilment,
some disturbing images, language and brief sexuality. Running
time: 91 minutes. Four stars out of four.
Continued from page 17
BEASTS
Continued from page 17
STUDENT
David and Jackie Siegel.
WEEKEND JOURNAL 19
Weekend July 21-22, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL SENIOR CORRESPONDENT
MAN RAY AND LEE MILLER
TOGETHER AT SAN FRANCISCOS
LEGION OF HONOR. One of the art
worlds most complicated relationships
comes alive with Man Ray | Lee Miller:
Partners in Surrealism, on view at the
Legion of Honor. The exhibition consists of
approximately 115 photographs, paintings,
drawings and manuscripts that explore the
creative interaction between Ray and
Miller, two giants of European Surrealism.
Organized by the Peabody Essex Museum,
Salem, Massachusetts, this is the first exhi-
bition to focus exclusively on the pairs
artistic relationship and to show Miller as
an artist and Surrealist force in her own
right rather than merely as a muse for Ray.
Man Ray (born Emmanuel Radnitzky
(18901976), a leader in two pioneering
modern art movements, Surrealism and
Dada, thought of himself primarily as a
painter and as an artist wedded to no single
medium. His camerawork marked a turning
point in the integration of photography
among other visual art forms. Lee Miller
(19071977), who started her career as a
fashion model in New York, moved behind
the camera and went to Paris in 1929 to seek
out Ray as a teacher. Ray and Miller lived
together in Paris from 1929 through 1932,
first as teacher and student, and later as
lovers. (An exhibition highlight, from their
years together, is Rays A lheure de lob-
servatoire les amoureux (Observatory
TimeThe Lovers), ca. 1931.) After she and
Ray parted, Miller remained a photographer
for two decades, including serving as the
official war photographer for Vogue docu-
menting the Blitz. Miller was accredited
into the U.S. Army as a war correspondent
for Cond Nast Publications from
December 1942, traveled to France less
than a month after D-Day, recorded the first
use of napalm (at the siege of St. Malo), the
liberation of Paris and the horror of the Nazi
concentration camps at Buchenwald and
Dachau.
Ray and Millers relationship resulted in
some of the most powerful works of each
artists career, and helped shape the course
of modern art. The two artists inspired each
other equally, collaborating on several proj-
ects. Though they lived together for only
three years, Man Ray | Lee Miller: Partners
in Surrealism documents the lingering effect
each had on the others art. The works in the
exhibition are drawn primarily from the Lee
Miller Archives and Penrose Collection in
Sussex, England, augmented for the San
Francisco presentation by loans from impor-
tant public and private collections in the
United States. Included are selected works
by artists in Ray and Millers circle in Paris,
including paintings by Pablo Picasso, Max
Ernst, Roland Penrose and Dora Maar and a
small sculpture by Alexander Calder.
Among the intriguing items on display is a
chess set made by Ray and later sold to
Miller and her husband, the British surreal-
ist painter Roland Penrose. Ray had the
pieces made in a factory that produced mili-
tary parts during the Second World War. The
bishops are stylized agons of wine, sug-
gesting intemperance.
***
GIFTS FROM THE GODS. The Legion
presents Gifts from the Gods: Art and the
Olympic Ideal. Coinciding with the opening
of the 2012 Summer Olympics in London,
the Legion of Honor draws together out-
standing examples of art related to the
Olympics from its ancient roots until today
to reveal the continuity of the Olympic ideal
and the rich and diverse expressions of the
body in motion. Masterpieces of Greek and
Roman coinage that celebrate the Olympic
Games, the gods and the victorious athletes
are supplemented by additional works of art
from the Fine Arts Museums collections
inspired by modern-day Olympics.
***
The Legion of Honor Museum is located
in Lincoln Park, 34th Avenue and Clement
Street, San Francisco. Museum hours are
TuesdaySunday, 9:30 a.m.5:15 p.m.;
closed on Monday. For information about
admission prices and docent tours of the
exhibit, visit www.legionofhonor.org or call
(415) 750-3600. Man Ray | Lee Miller:
Partners in Surrealism is on view through
Oct. 14. Gifts from the Gods: Art and the
Olympic Ideal is on view from July 28
through Jan. 27, 2013.
Susan Cohn can be reached at susan@smdai-
lyjournal.com or www.twitter.com/susanci-
tyscene.
MUSEUM GOTTA SEE UM
TOM JUNG/DAILY JOURNAL
In attendance at the July 13 press preview of Man Ray | Lee Miller: Partners in Surrealism,
at the Legion of Honor in San Francisco, are (left) Anthony Penrose, son of the late
photographer Lee Miller,and Julian Cox,curator of photography for the Fine Arts Museums
of San Francisco. Penrose and Cox are seen examining a chess set made by Man Ray and
later sold to Miller and her husband, Roland Penrose. On the wall behind Penrose and Cox
is Man Rays Cactus Flower (1946), probably intended as an abstract portrait of Lee Miller
represented as a desert ower, capable of blooming under the most difcult conditions.
HOPE EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
600 W. 42nd Ave., San Mateo
Pastor Eric Ackerman
Worship Service 10:00 AM
Sunday School 11:00 AM
Hope Lutheran Preschool
admits students of any race, color and national or ethnic origin.
License No. 410500322.
Call (650) 349-0100
HopeLutheranSanMateo.org
Baptist
PILGRIM BAPTIST CHURCH
Dr. Larry Wayne Ellis, Pastor
(650) 343-5415
217 North Grant Street, San Mateo
Sunday Worship Services at 8 & 11 am
Sunday School at 9:30 am
Website: www.pilgrimbcsm.org
LISTEN TO OUR
RADIO BROADCAST!
(KFAX 1100 on the AM Dial)
Every Sunday at 5:30 PM
Buddhist
LOTUS
BUDDHIST CIRCLE
(Rissho Kosei-kai of SF)
851 N. San Mateo Dr., Suite D
San Mateo
650.200.3755 650.200.3755
English Service: 4th Sunday at 10 AM
Study: Tuesday at 7 PM
www.lotusbuddhistcircle.com
Buddhist
SAN MATEO
BUDDHIST TEMPLE
Jodo ShinshuBuddhist
(Pure Land Buddhism)
2 So. Claremont St.
San Mateo
(650) 342-2541
Sunday English Service &
Dharma School - 9:30 AM
Reverend Ryuta Furumoto
www.sanmateobuddhisttemple.org
Church of Christ
CHURCH OF CHRIST
525 South Bayshore Blvd. SM
650-343-4997
Bible School 9:45am
Services 11:00am and 2:00pm
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00pm
Minister J.S. Oxendine
Clases de Biblicas Y Servicio de
Adoracion
En Espanol, Si UD. Lo Solicita
www.church-of-christ.org/cocsm
Congregational
THE
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
OF SAN MATEO - UCC
225 Tilton Ave. & San Mateo Dr.
(650) 343-3694
Worship and Church School
Every Sunday at 10:30 AM
Coffee Hour at 11:45 AM
Nursery Care Available
www.ccsm-ucc.org
Non-Denominational
Church of the
Highlands
A community of caring Christians
1900 Monterey Drive
(corner Sneath Lane) San Bruno
(650)873-4095
Adult Worship Services:
Friday: 7:30 pm (singles)
Saturday: 7:00 pm
Sun 7, 8:30, 10, & 11:30 am,
5 pm
Youth Worship Service:
For high school & young college
Sunday at 10:00 am
Sunday School
For adults & children of all ages
Sunday at 10:00 am
Donald Sheley, Founding Pastor
Leighton Sheley, Senior Pastor
REDWOOD CHURCH
Our mission...
To know Christ and make him known.
901 Madison Ave., Redwood City
(650)366-1223
Sunday services:
9:00AM & 10:45AM
www.redwoodchurch.org
WEEKEND JOURNAL 20
Weekend July 21-22, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SATURDAY, JULY 21
Tour des Flueurs. Half Moon Bay. A
once-a-year opportunity to tour the
local nurseries/greenhouses, harbor,
and farms. Six packages available to
choose from. Each package takes you
to three different nurseries where will
you will get an hour long guided tour
at each. $20. For more information call
726-8380 ext. 100.
2012 American Cancer Society
Relay for Life of San Mateo. 10 a.m.
San Mateo High School Track and
Field, 506 N. Delaware St., San Mateo.
Celebrate survivors, honor those
currently battling cancer and
remember loved ones lost. There will
be various ceremonies, activities,
entertainment and fundraisers.
People will also take turns walking.
For more information email
sanmateorelay@gmail.com.
Friends of the Millbrae Library
Outdoor Bargain Book/Media Sale.
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Millbrae Library, 1
Library Ave., Millbrae. All books 25 to
50 cents each. Lots of mysteries,
cookbooks, Asian materials and
childrens Spanish books. For more
information call 697-7607.
Connoisseurs Marketplace,AFeast
for the Senses. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Santa Cruz Avenue (from El Camino
Real to Johnson Street), Menlo Park.
Presented by the Menlo Park
Chamber of Commerce, large crowds
are expected to pour onto the
downtown streets for this vibrant
celebration of visual, performing and
culinary arts. Free. For more
information visit
www.miramarevents.com.
Annual Edible Landscaping Tour. 11
a.m. to 4 p.m. Common Ground
Garden Supply and Educational
Center, 559 College Ave., Palo Alto.The
Edible Landscaping Tour will feature
organic food grown in local
neighborhoods as a means to inspire
our community to strengthen the
local food system. $35. For more
information call 493-6072.
Vintage Release Party and Winery
Open Day. Noon to 4 p.m. 2645 Fair
Oaks Ave., Redwood City. Star of the
show will be the 2010 Cabernet
Sauvignon Salinian Block. Five fresh
and local wines and one appetizer.
$10. Free for Wine Club Members. For
more information call 366-4104.
San Mateo Country History
Museum presents Janet McGovern,
Caltrain Expert. 1 p.m. San Mateo
County History Museum, 2200
Broadway, Redwood City. McGovern
will give an illustrated presentation
on her new book, Caltrain and the
Peninsula Commute Service. $5 for
adults. $3 for seniors and students. For
more information call 299-0104 or
visit www.history.smc.org.
San Carlos Childrens Theater
presents The Velveteen Rabbit. 1
p.m. Central Middle School, 828
Chestnut St., San Carlos. Seating is rst
come rst serve. $12 in advance and
$14 at the door. For more information
call 594-2730 or visit
sancarloschildrenstheater.com.
Planning Your Fall-Winter
Vegetable Garden. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Lyngso Garden Materials, 19 Seaport
Blvd., Redwood City. Registration is
required. Free. For more information
and to register visit
lyngsogarden.com.
Spinal Screenings. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
New Leaf Community Markets, 150
San Mateo Road, Half Moon Bay.
Offered by Dr. Valerie Spier, Network
Chiropractor, of the Sun Center for
Well Being. No appointment
necessary. Free. For more information
email info@newleaf.com.
The Fatigue Prescription: Four
Steps to Renewing Your Energy,
Health and Life. 2 p.m. Dove & Olive
Works Building, 178 South Blvd., San
Mateo. Dr. Linda Hawes Clever will
speak, take questions from attendees
and will be available to sign copies of
her book. Those who wish to attend
should RSVP. Free. For more
information and to RSVP email
craig@reachandteach.com.
Magical Fun-due at The Melting
Pot. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. The Melting Pot,
2 N. B St., San Mateo.
SeeLiveMagic.coms own David Miller
will be performing sleight-of-hand
and close-up magic. This event is free
to restaurant patrons. For more
information visit
www.seelivemagic.com.
San Carlos Childrens Theater
presents Little Shop of Horrors. 7
p.m. Central Middle School, 828
Chestnut St., San Carlos. Seating is rst
come rst serve. $12 in advance and
$14 at the door. For more information
and for tickets visit
sancarloschildrenstheater.com.
Elvis Show and Dance Party with
Manny. 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. San Bruno
Senior Center, 1555 Crystal Springs
Road, San Bruno.There will be singing,
dancing, light snacks and a cash bar.
$10 in advance. $12 at the door. For
more information call 616-7150.
Zydeco and Cajun Dance Party. 7
p.m. to 11 p.m. Boogie Woogie
Ballroom, 551 Foster City Blvd., Foster
City. Dance lesson from 7 p.m. to 8
p.m. and dance party starts at 8 p.m.
and goes to 11 p.m. $12 for the lesson
and dance party. $10 for dance party
only. For more information call 627-
4854 or visit
boogiewoogieballroom.com.
Aida: School Edition. 7:30 p.m.
Hillbarn Theatre, 1285 E. Hillsdale
Blvd., Foster City. $12. For more
information call 349-6411 or visit
hillbarntheatre.org.
One Step Beyond. 8 p.m. Club
Illusions, 26 S. California Ave., Palo Alto.
The event is for ages 21 and up only
and will feature alternative dance
music by the Frail, Stan Kent, Sean
Denton, Diego Cisternas and DJ Aaron
Axelson. $10. For more information
and for tickets visit
onestepbeyondreunion2012.eventbri
te.com.
SUNDAY, JULY 22
Connoisseurs Marketplace,AFeast
for the Senses. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Santa Cruz Avenue (from El Camino
Real to Johnson Street), Menlo Park.
Presented by the Menlo Park
Chamber of Commerce, large crowds
are expected to pour onto the
downtown streets for this vibrant
celebration of visual, performing and
culinary arts. Free. For more
information visit
www.miramarevents.com.
Target Family Days: Wildlife
Extravaganza Theme. 11 a.m. to 3
p.m. Courthouse Square, 2200
Broadway, Redwood City. Free. For
more information call 780-7340 or
visit redwoodcity.org/events.
Jack Cohen Benefit: A Little Help
for our Friend! McGovcerns Bar, 215
E. Fourth Ave., San Mateo. 12 p.m. to
9 p.m. Donation $25. Come enjoy
many blues artists along with rafes
and prizes. For more information
contact
Jackblues@yahoogroups.com.
San Carlos Childrens Theater
presents The Velveteen Rabbit. 1
p.m. Central Middle School, 828
Chestnut St., San Carlos. Seating is rst
come rst serve. $12 in advance and
$14 at the door. For more information
call 594-2730 or visit
sancarloschildrenstheater.com.
Music in the Park. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Washington Park, 850 Burlingame
Ave., Burlingame. Featuring OTR (top
hits from the 60s to today).
Summer Concert Series. 1 p.m. to 4
p.m. Twin Pines Park, 30 Twin Pines
Lane, Belmont. Tom Rigney &
Flambeau will perform Cajun style
music and Vocal Son will perform
rock. Those who plan on attending
should bring a blanket. Food will be
available for purchase. Free admission.
For more information call 595-7441.
Aida: School Edition. 2 p.m. Hillbarn
Theatre, 1285 E. Hillsdale Blvd., Foster
City. $12. For more information call
349-6411 or visit hillbarntheatre.org.
Maggie Shipstead reads from
Seating Arrangements. 3 p.m.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las
Pulgas, Belmont. Light refreshments
to be served. Open to public. Free.
Bay Area Bigfoot Group Meeting. 4
p.m. to 7 p.m. Round Table Pizza, 61
43rd Ave., San Mateo. Bay Area Bigfoot
Research monthly meeting. All are
welcome. We will discuss sightings of
bigfoot in northern California and
elsewhere. Meeting is fun and
informative for all levels of interest.
Free. For more information call (925)
858-9711.
Jokers and Thieves Rock/Soul. 5
p.m. to 7 p.m. Marlin Park, corner of
Neptune Drive and Cringle Drive,
Redwood Shores. For more
information visit
redwoodcityevents.com.
Lies My Mother Told Me. 6:30 p.m.
Angelicas Bell Theatre and Bistro, 863
Main St., Redwood City. Presented by
Dented Can Cabaret. Dinner seating
begins at 6:30 p.m. and show begins
at 7:30 p.m. $25 in advance. $30 at the
door. $15 menu minimum per person.
For more information call 365-3226
or go to angelicasbistro.com.
San Carlos Childrens Theater
presents Little Shop of Horrors. 7
p.m. Central Middle School, 828
Chestnut St., San Carlos. Seating is rst
come rst serve. $12 in advance and
$14 at the door. For more information
and for tickets visit
sancarloschildrenstheater.com.
MONDAY, JULY 23
Lecture: Laughter for Health. 10 a.m.
to 11 a.m. City of San Mateo Senior
Center, 2645 Alameda de las Pulgas,
San Mateo. Laughter Yoga is simple to
learn, free to practice and requires to
special equipment. Meet Monina
Maclang-Caros, director of Laughter
Yoga-Car Resource, who will enlighten
us about the numerous health
benets of therapeutic laughter. Free.
To register call 522-7490.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
The question is if two of the other three
remaining supervisors will also be on
board.
Four-fths is hard especially with a
dicey issue, said Tissier, adding she has
no idea if the support will be there at
Tuesdays meeting.
Supervisor Carole Groom was a vocal
opponent of a sales tax increase when the
idea was raised two years ago and said
Friday of the new recommendation that
she has not yet made up her mind.
Supervisor Dave Pine said he still needs
to think the proposal through before
deciding whether to support it.
The biggest need I have is more public
input, he said.
He is also weighing if the tax will drive
business elsewhere or limit other cities
ability to increase taxes.
Supervisor Rose Jacobs Gibson could
be reached for comment.
The tax would raise approximately $60
million annually for 10 years minus
any cost for the state administering it
and Tissier said it is sorely needed to
maintain the countys programs and serv-
ices. Unlike the three tax measures in
June, which were aimed at tourists
through parking, car rentals and hotel
stays, Tissier said this measure is focused
on county residents making contributions.
Im comfortable asking because at the
end of the day, they make the decision.
Were not saying its going to happen.
Were simply asking that voters consider
it, Tissier said.
Horsley, who in June preferred a sales
tax to the measures presented on that bal-
lot, said the county would particularly
need the extra revenue if the state tax
measure fails. He also thinks a county
measure has a greater shot at success.
Ive always felt that when people vote
for a state tax it ends up in the black hole
of Sacramento. People dont really see
how it affects them. When its a local tax
they know it directly benets them,
Horsley said.
The Board of Supervisors would have
complete say over how the proceeds are
used because it is a general tax but offer
the public a list of possibilities such as
public safety, parks, jail stafng, gang and
drug task forces and educational pro-
grams.
Tissier and Horsley also suggest using
some of the revenue to help Seton
Medical Center in Daly City with mandat-
ed seismic upgrades to stave off closure in
2020. Seton provides a signicant number
of long-term care beds for Medi-Cal pop-
ulations and losing them would have a
domino effect on other health providers,
including the San Mateo Medical Center
which is already challenged by increasing
client loads and waiting lists.
Seton ofcials have already approached
the county about receiving $10 million to
$15 million in annual funding but no com-
mitments have been made, Pine said.
Horsley said skeptical voters have to
realize they already subsidize health care
at private facilities and that when health
care reform kicks in the county must have
a solid physical network available.
The county has already tightened its
belt, although it can admittedly always do
more, Tissier said.
Ofcials are also aggressively pursuing
economic development but the planning
alone, let alone the fruition, will take
years, she said.
The tax, which is proposed as ending
after 10 years unless renewed, will pro-
vide much-needed funds during that gap
period, she said.
The tax increase proposal comes a
month after the Board of Supervisors ten-
tatively approved a $1.8 billion budget
that includes many capital needs, such as
improving a pair of ofce buildings the
county purchased last year for $40 million
and initial planning and building costs for
a new jail.
That same month a majority of voters
rejected an increase to the hotel transient
occupancy tax and a tax on commercial
parking in the unincorporated areas. A 2.5
percent tax on car rentals passed by less
than 200 votes and will bring in an esti-
mated $8 million annually.
The Board of Supervisors meets 9 a.m.
Tuesday, July 24 in Board Chambers, 400
County Government Center, Redwood
City.
Continued from page 1
TAX
The Corona and Bud Light signs hang-
ing inside Michoacan Market were taken
down, said Ortiz.
Volunteers helped owner Ruben Robles
put up a large plastic marlin over his meat
section for a new visual appeal that pro-
motes his sh.
Ortiz pointed to a front room of the
store that used to be piled with cardboard
boxes of fruit. Now the room has new bas-
ket shelves that neatly display mangos,
oranges, coconuts and other fruit.
Students from Gareld Elementary are
drawn to Michoacan Markets new dis-
plays, said Ortiz.
Kids come here from Gareld and see
the mangos and want to get them, he
said.
A major motivator for Ortiz, 20, is the
health of his three younger siblings.
I dont want them eating junk food, he
said.
Edwin Cano of the YLI led community
members to Pena Meat & Food Market on
Middleeld Road which has also received
a makeover. He pointed to a new veg-
etable refrigerator at the front of the store
and explained to a group of kids that the
new appliance is more energy efcient
and attractive. Cano also pointed out that
the store is brighter than before because
they scratched the dark paint off the win-
dows. The alcohol section now displays
signs informing customers that persons
under the age of 21 may not make pur-
chases.
La Guadalupana, the rst store to par-
ticipate, was made over in March 2011.
The store was chosen for the project
because it does not sell alcohol or tobac-
co, said Ortiz.
He showed off a bright produce case
with a new banner above it. This area used
to be dark and closed-off, he said.
La Guadalupana owner Yolanda
Hernandaz likes encouraging people to
have fresh fruit.
The customers noticed a change and
they like it, said Hernandez, who has
seen a few more customers since the
transformation.
People think store owners just want
money but they really care about commu-
nity health, said Ortiz.
A key factor in the project has been
developing relationships with the store
owners, said Ortiz.
Its not a one-time thing, he said. We
have to come often to make sure there is
trust.
Store owners are initially worried about
food costs but the makeovers are funded
by a two-year $150,000 grant from Kaiser
Permanente to Redwood City 2020.
The program aims to develop a network
so that the stores can eventually support
each other. The goal is to give the stores
collective buying power so that they can
buy quality produce at a low price, said
Ortiz.
The group is working on adding two
more stores to the network. One of the
perspective store owners is Lupe Lopez
who owns Arteagas Food Center on Fifth
Avenue. There is a problem with accessi-
bility of healthy foods for kids, said
Lopez.
Its important to be educated about eat-
ing healthy when you are little, she said.
Its hard to break habits of eating fried
foods, said Lopez, who struggles with
obesity. Then you have problems like I
have.
The availability of healthy food is key,
said Dr. Scott Gee, pediatrician with
Kaiser Permanente. We can educate peo-
ple about healthy eating all we want but if
the food is not available then it wont hap-
pen, he said.
The North Fair Oaks community has
high rates of obesity and heart disease, he
said. This generation is the rst to have
an expected life span shorter than their
parents, said Dr. Gee, who has seen his
patients obesity rate triple over his career.
But it doesnt have to be that way.
While many communities have tried
similar projects, few have been as suc-
cessful as this one, he said.
A major factor for the success of this
project has been the youths successful
relationships with the stores.
Without the owners involvement,
there is no success, he said.
Continued from page 1
STORES
SATURDAY, JULY 21, 2012
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- If you do not succeed
on your frst attempt, at least give yourself credit for
what you tried to do. After patting yourself on the
back, take a deep breath, regroup and try again.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- When your desires are
purely materialistic in nature, gratifcation is likely
to evade you. To get things back in proper balance,
think of ways to enrich your soul and spirit, not just
your wallet.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Friends usually do things
for us out of affection, not in order to incur an obliga-
tion. I doubt yours will be any different. Try using
smiles, not snarls, to induce cooperation.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- One of the best ways to
inhibit your progress is to take things too seriously.
Conversely, adopting a philosophical outlook could
put you in the winners circle.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Instead of leaving
an important matter to a friend who sometimes is
known to be unreliable, take control of the situation
yourself, even if youd prefer to do otherwise.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Be careful not to
insinuate yourself with people who arent in harmony
with your philosophy. If you do, you risk getting in-
volved in something that you dont want to be part of.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- If you have a tricky
assignment to take care of, analyze its potential
problems well in advance. Otherwise, you could end
up running around in circles without a game plan.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Try not to be too
possessive of someone to whom you are attracted.
Be relaxed and generous, and good things could
come about.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- In order to protect your
interests and position, chances are you might have
to do a bit of negotiating up front. It behooves you to
focus on your strongest areas.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- It will all depend upon
your attitude as to whether you succeed or fail. When
confronting a diffcult situation, seek out its positive
attributes and go from there.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- There is everything to
lose when involved in high-risk ventures. Conversely,
your chances of yielding a proft will increase by
proceeding along prudent, practical lines.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Although you might have
to deal with a lot of uncertainties early in the day, as
time ticks on, one by one they should gradually disap-
pear, and youll get everything under control.
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
COMICS/GAMES
7-21-12
fRIDAYS PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOkU
ANSwERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
kids Across/Parents Down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the numbers 1
through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes, called
cages, must combine using the given operation (in any
order) to produce the target numbers in the top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in the
top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Shriners hat
4 Note before la
7 Where hackles rise
11 Grande or Bravo
12 Rum-soaked cake
13 Not theirs
14 Sweet-smelling
16 -- -a-brac
17 Rousseau novel
18 Stop a train
19 Truckers radios
20 Pollen spreader
21 Chocolate bean
24 Gretels brother
27 Hatchet
28 Bombay nanny
30 Drawn tight
32 Spanish boy
34 Evening
36 Country addr.
37 Pressure
39 Eyed impolitely
41 Command to a mule
42 Belt makers tool
43 Toucan feature
45 Iffy attempts
48 Crib fller
49 CIA activity
52 Walk heavily
53 Declare
54 RV haven
55 Optimistic
56 Household member
57 Flow back
DOwN
1 Friars title
2 Gael republic
3 Climb sharply
4 Overfeeds
5 Kimono accessory
6 Shellac resin
7 Most high-minded
8 Mystique
9 Goody-goody
10 PC button
12 Rockys last name
15 Isinglass
18 Swamp
20 Words from Scrooge
21 Receptacle
22 Poles connector
23 Small change
24 Herrs abode
25 -- Scruggs of bluegrass
26 Troubadour prop
29 Inventory wd.
31 Cable honcho -- Turner
33 Thin crisp fabric
35 Bow and scrape
38 Mouse alert
40 Tickled pink
42 Knotted scarf
43 String tie
44 Winged god
46 Ten-speed
47 Stuck-up person
48 ER practice
49 Skip stones
50 Ms. Arden
51 Talk on
DILBERT CROSSwORD PUZZLE
fUTURE SHOCk
PEARLS BEfORE SwINE
GET fUZZY
Weekend July 21-22, 2012 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Weekend July 21-22, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
105 Education/Instruction
CALVARY
PRESCHOOL
OPEN
ENROLLMENT
Little Learners: age 2.5-3.5
Big Explorers: age 3.5-5
calvarypreschoolmillbrae.com
(650)588-8030
106 Tutoring
TUTORING
Spanish, French,
Italian
Certificated Local
Teacher
All Ages!
(650)573-9718
110 Employment
APPLY NOW- F/T WORK
Up to $900 wk
PAID TRAINING
INCENTIVE
IMMEDIATE START
No experience needed
Full Training provided
1-866-363-9895 1-866-363-9895
HEALTHCARE -
PHYSICAL THERAPIST, PHYSICAL
THERAPIST ASSISTANTS, RNs,
LVNs, OCCUPATIONAL THERA-
PISTS, SPEECH THERAPISTS and
MEDICAL SOCIAL WORKERS. Full
time to Part time. Competitive rates,
salaries, paid mileage.
Email resume to:
mcobb@homecarebythesea.com
Call (650)560-9844
110 Employment
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
NEWSPAPER
INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
RESTAURANT -
Mai Cuisine is hiring Sushi Chefs for a
new location in Redwood City,
Sushi/Asian Cuisine experience is prefer-
red but not required. Please
email job@genjiweb.com with your re-
sume.
RESTAURANT -
Experienced line, Night / Weekends.
Apply in person,1201 San Carlos Ave.,
San Carlos.
110 Employment
RESTAURANT -
Weekend Brekafast Cook, experienced.
Call Mary, (650)464-2916.
SALES -
WellnessMatters Magazine is seeking
independent contractor/advertising
sales representatives to help grow
this new publication for the Peninsula
and Half Moon Bay. WellnessMatters
has the backing of the Daily Journal.
The perfect contractor will have a pas-
sion for wellness and for sharing our
message with potential advertisers,
supporters and sponsors. Please
send cover letter and resume to: in-
fo@wellnessmattersmagazine.com.
Positions are available immediately.
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
TELEPHONE WORK
Appointment Setting -
From Leads
EXPERIENCE PREFERRED
not required
TOP PAY & BONUSES
Training Provided
Mr. Tempus
(650)570-7663
WEEKLY
SALARY + BONUS
Flexible Hour,
Outside Position,
Full Training
NO EXPERIENCE REQUIRED
to $38.75 per hour
Call Mr. Cannon
(650)372-2810
VETERANS WELCOME
127 Elderly Care
FAMILY RESOURCE
GUIDE
The San Mateo Daily Journals
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.
Every Tuesday
& Weekend
Look for it in todays paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 514118
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Angelina Sheri Franceschini
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Angelina Sheri Franceschini
filed a petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Angelina Sheri France-
schini, aka Angelina S. Franceschini, aka
Angelina Piccolotti, aka Angelina S. Pic-
colotti, aka Angelina Sheri Piccolotti
Proposed name: Angelina Sheri Piccolot-
ti
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on August 7,
2012 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2E, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 06/18/2012
/s/ Mark R. Forcum /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 06/14/2012
(Published, 06/30/12, 07/07/12,
07/14/12, 07/21/12)
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251148
The following person is doing business
as: Jolly Junkman, 851 N. Amphlett Blvd.
#315, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Jo-
seph Michael Lamoureux, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on .
/s/ Joseph Michael Lamoureux /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/29/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/30/12, 07/07/12, 07/14/12, 07/21/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251209
The following person is doing business
as: Bayshore Mobile Notary, 304 Dolphin
Isle, FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Steven
M. Cohn, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Steven M. Cohn /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/03/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/07/12, 07/14/12, 07/21/12, 07/28/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250792
The following person is doing business
as: Salmeron Painting, 2159 Ralmar
Ave, EAST PALO ALTO, CA 94303 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Noel A. Salmeron, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ Noel A. Salmeron /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/07/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/07/12, 07/14/12, 07/21/12, 07/28/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251220
The following person is doing business
as: Nesian Pride Creations, 563 Weeks
St., EAST PALO ALTO, CA 94303 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Lucia K. Musunamasi, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
/s/ Lucia K. Musunamasi /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/03/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/07/12, 07/14/12, 07/21/12, 07/28/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251150
The following person is doing business
as: Lyfestyle Ink, 1923-A South El Cami-
no RealSAN MATEO, CA 94401 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Daniel Hernandez, 475 B St, Colma, CA
94014. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Daniel Hernandez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/29/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/07/12, 07/14/12, 07/21/12, 07/28/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250898
The following person is doing business
as: Peninsula Furniture Assembly, 1013
Madera Ave # D, MENLO PARK, CA
94025 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Darryl L. Warren, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
06/13/2012
/s/ Darryl L. Warren /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/14/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/07/12, 07/14/12, 07/21/12, 07/28/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251096
The following person is doing business
as: Roosevelt Liquor & Grocery, 1700 El
Camino Real, REDWOOD CITY, CA
94063 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Seong Ik Kim and Hyun Jao
Hwang, 768 N. Rengstorff Ave., #118,
Moutain View, CA 94043. The business
is conducted by Husband and Wife. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Seong Ik Kim /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/26/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/07/12, 07/14/12, 07/21/12, 07/28/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250861
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Nor Cal DJs, 2) The Gomez Broth-
ers, 63 Mooring Lane, DALY CITY, CA
94014 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Hugo Gomez, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
/s/ Hugo Gomez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/12/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/07/12, 07/14/12, 07/21/12, 07/28/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251062
The following person is doing business
as: ASC Construction Services, 4080
Campbell Ave., MENLO PARK, CA
94025 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: RW Zukin Corporation, CA.
The business is conducted by a Corpora-
tion. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Scott Mennuccy /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/25/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/07/12, 07/14/12, 07/21/12, 07/28/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251362
The following person is doing business
as: Ozerfx, 23 Bennett Rd., REDWOOD
CITY, CA 94062 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Lee Ozer, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Lee Ozer /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/13/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/21/12, 07/28/12, 08/4/12, 08/11/12).
23 Weekend July 21-22, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
CITY OF SAN BRUNO
San Mateo County, California
NOTICE INVITING SEALED BID PROPOSALS FOR
SAN BRUNO STREET MEDIANS AND GRAND BOULEVARD
IMPROVEMENTS PROJECT
City Project No. 83904
Federal Aided Project No. CML-5226(018)
1. NOTICE: The City of San Bruno (the City) will receive sealed bids on the proposal forms
furnished by the City and in accordance with the plans and specifications on or before Monday,
August 13, 2012 at 2:00 p.m. PST by the Office of the City Clerk, located at 567 El Camino Real,
San Bruno, California 94066, for the following public work:
2. PROJECT DESCRIPTION:
The work includes, but is not limited to: The Work generally includes but is not limited
to, the removal and replacement of irrigation lines, and landscaping within existing medians
along El Camino Real and San Bruno Avenue in San Bruno including a plant establishment and
plant maintenance period.
All work items shall be constructed in accordance with the contract plans and
specifica-
tions. Bidding Documents contain the full description of the Work.
4. DISADVANTAGED BUSINESS ENTERPRISE (DBE) PARTICIPATION LEVEL: The DBE
participation level target for this project is 37.8% [17.8% Race Neutral, 20.0% Race Conscious
(UDBE)].
5. STATEMENT OF QUALIFICATIONS: Each Bidder shall be required to submit, in accordance
with Document 0021 00 (Instructions to Bidders) and Document 0045 13 (Statement of Qualifi-
cations (SOQ) for Construction Work), a Statement of Qualifications.
6. CONTRACT TIME: All work under this contract shall be completed within 120 Calendar days
from the Notice to Proceed effective date.
7. REQUIRED CONTRACTORS LICENSE(S): A California Class A or C27 contractors li-
cense is required to bid on this contract. Joint ventures must secure a joint venture license prior
to award of this Contract.
8. MANDATORY PRE-BID CONFERENCE: The City will conduct a mandatory Pre-Bid Con-
ference on Tuesday, August 7, 2012 at 1:30 p.m. at San Bruno City Hall, 567 El Camino Real,
San Bruno, CA. 94066. The Pre-Bid Conference is estimated to last approximately one hour.
Only those contractors who attend the Pre-Bid Conference will be allowed to submit bids
for this project.
9. PROCUREMENT OF BIDDING DOCUMENTS: Bidders may obtain bidding documents from
the Public Services Department, Engineering Division, located at 567 El Camino Real, San Bru-
no, California 94066, for the cost of sixty dollars ($60.00), or seventy dollars ($70.00) if mailed.
For information pertaining to the bidding documents, please contact the Public Services Depart-
ment, Administration & Engineering at (650) 616-7065.
10. INSTRUCTIONS: Bidders shall refer to Document 00 21 00 (Instructions to Bidders) for re-
quired documents and items to be submitted in sealed envelopes for deposit at the Office of the
City Clerk, 567 El Camino Real, San Bruno, California 94066, no later than the time and date set
forth in Paragraph 1 above.
11. BID SECURITY: Cash, cashiers check or certified check, payable to the order of the City of
San Bruno, of not less than ten percent (10%) of the bid, or a bond in said amount payable to
the City of San Bruno and signed by the Bidder and a corporate surety shall accompany the bid.
12. BID PREPARATION COST: Bidders are solely responsible for the cost of preparing their
bids.
13. SUBSTITUTION OF SECURITIES: The City will permit the successful bidder to substitute
securities for any retention monies withheld to ensure performance of the contract, as set forth in
Document 00 61 16 (Escrow Agreement For Security Deposits In Lieu Of Retention) and fully in-
corporated herein, in accordance with Section 22300 of the California Public Contract Code.
14. PREVAILING WAGE LAWS: The successful bidder must comply with all prevailing wage
laws applicable to the project, and related requirements contained in the contract documents.
15. SUBSTITUTIONS: Bidders must base their bids on products and systems specified in the
contract documents or listed by name in the addenda. Except as provided below, the City will
consider substitution requests only for or approved equal items. Bidders wanting to use or ap-
proved equal items may submit Document 00 43 25 (Substitution Request Form) no later than 7
days after the issuance of the Notice of Award. Restrictions on or equal substitution rights are
None.
16. RESERVATION OF RIGHTS: The City specifically reserves the right, in its sole discretion,
to reject any or all bids, to re-bid, or to waive inconsequential defects or minor irregularities in the
bids not involving time, price or quality of the work.
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal, July 21, 2012.
CITY OF SAN BRUNO
San Mateo County, California
NOTICE INVITING SEALED BID PROPOSALS
1. NOTICE: The City of San Bruno (the City) will receive sealed bids on the proposal forms
furnished by the City and in accordance with the plans and specifications on or before 11 a.m.
on Monday, August 13, 2012 by the Office of the City Clerk, located at 567 El Camino Real, San
Bruno, California 94066, for the following public work:
CITY OF SAN BRUNO
TRANSIT CORRIDOR PEDESTRIAN IMPROVEMENTS
CITY PROJECT NO. 82709
FEDERAL AIDED PROJECT NO. CML-5226 (019)
2. PROJECT DESCRIPTION:
The work includes, but is not limited to, construction of accessible concrete curb ramps, detecta-
ble warning surfaces and concrete driveway; installation of tree wells, trenching and installation
of irrigation lines; installation of irrigation controller, backflow, and drip irrigation system; planting
24-inch box trees; and provide one year of landscape establishment and maintenance service.
The project also includes bid alternate for additional landscaping improvements as shown on the
plans; and provide one year of associated landscape establishment and maintenance service.
All work items shall be constructed in accordance with the contract plans and specifications.
Bidding Documents contain the full description of the Work.
3. DISADVANTAGED BUSINESS ENTERPRISE (DBE) PARTICIPATION LEVEL: The DBE
participation level target for this project is 37.8% [17.8% Race Neutral, 20.0% Race Conscious
(UDBE)].
4. STATEMENT OF QUALIFICATIONS: Each Bidder shall be required to submit, in accord-
ance with Document 0021 00 (Instructions to Bidders) and Document 00 45 13 (Statement of
Qualifications for Construction Work), a Statement of Qualifications.
5. CONTRACT TIME: All work under this contract shall be completed within 60 calendar days
from the Notice to Proceed effective date.
6. REQUIRED CONTRACTORS LICENSE(S): A California Class A contractors license is re-
quired to bid on this contract. Joint ventures must secure a joint venture license prior to award
of this Contract.
7. MANDATORY PRE-BID CONFERENCE: The City will conduct a mandatory Pre-Bid Confer-
ence on Tuesday, July 31, 2012 at 10 a.m. Please RSVP to 650-616-7065. The Pre-Bid Con-
ference is estimated to last approximately one hour. Only those contractors who attend the Pre-
Bid Conference will be allowed to submit bids for this project.
8. PROCUREMENT OF BIDDING DOCUMENTS: Bidders may obtain bidding documents from
the Public Services Department, Engineering Division, located at 567 El Camino Real, San Bru-
no, California 94066, for the cost of fifty dollars ($50.00), or fifty-five dollars ($55.00) if mailed.
For information pertaining to the bidding documents, please contact the Public Services Depart-
ment, Administration & Engineering at (650) 616-7065.
9. INSTRUCTIONS: Bidders shall refer to Document 00 21 00 (Instructions to Bidders) for re-
quired documents and items to be submitted in sealed envelopes for deposit at the Office of the
City Clerk, 567 El Camino Real, San Bruno, California 94066, no later than the time and date set
forth in Paragraph 1 above.
10. BID SECURITY: Cash, cashiers check or certified check, payable to the order of the City of
San Bruno, of not less than ten percent (10%) of the bid, or a bond in said amount payable to
the City of San Bruno and signed by the Bidder and a corporate surety shall accompany the bid.
11. BID PREPARATION COST: Bidders are solely responsible for the cost of preparing their
bids.
12. SUBSTITUTION OF SECURITIES: The City will permit the successful bidder to substitute
securities for any retention monies withheld to ensure performance of the contract, as set forth in
Document 00 61 16 (Escrow Agreement For Security Deposits In Lieu Of Retention) and fully in-
corporated herein, in accordance with Section 22300 of the California Public Contract Code.
13. PREVAILING WAGE LAWS: The successful bidder must comply with all prevailing wage
laws applicable to the Federal-aid project, and related requirements contained in the contract
documents.
14. SUBSTITUTIONS: Bidders must base their bids on products and systems specified in the
contract documents or listed by name in the addenda. Except as provided below, the City will
consider substitution requests only for or approved equal items. Bidders wanting to use or ap-
proved equal items may submit Document 00 43 25 (Substitution Request Form) no later than 7
days after the issuance of the Notice of Award.
15. RESERVATION OF RIGHTS: The City specifically reserves the right, in its sole discretion,
to reject any or all bids, to re-bid, or to waive inconsequential defects or minor irregularities in the
bids not involving time, price or quality of the work.
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal, July 21, 2012.
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251270
The following person is doing business
as: V.S. Car Service, 1070 Carolan Ave
#212, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is here-
by registered by the following owner: Val-
ter Silas Da Silva, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A
/s/ Valter Da Silva /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/6/2012. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/14/12, 07/21/12, 07/28/12, 08/04/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250920
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Para La Comunitad, 135 W.
25th Ave., Ste #1109, SAN MATEO, CA
94403 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Armando Sandoval, and Mary
Beth Sandoval, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by Husband and Wife.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ Armando Sandoval /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/15/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/14/12, 07/21/12, 07/28/12, 08/04/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251426
The following person is doing business
as: DW105, 1053 Foster City Blvd., #A,
FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Jacque-
line Jean Walls, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Jacqueline Jean Walls /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/18/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/21/12, 07/28/12, 08/4/12, 08/11/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251460
The following person is doing business
as: NPI Service, 15 Mulberry Ct., BEL-
MONT, CA 94002 is hereby registered
by the following owner: David Higashi,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ David Higashi /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/20/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/21/12, 07/28/12, 08/4/12, 08/11/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251357
The following person is doing business
as: Live Joyfully Design, 533 Hazel Ave,
SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Eunice
Heewon Moon, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ Eunice Heewon Moon /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/13/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/21/12, 07/28/12, 08/4/12, 08/11/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251142
The following person is doing business
as:A-1 Moon dental Laboratory, 533 Ha-
zel Ave, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
YunHee Cindy Moon, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on.
/s/ Yunhee Cindy Moon /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/28/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/21/12, 07/28/12, 08/4/12, 08/11/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251371
The following person is doing business
as: Catharsis Estate Downsizing Serv-
ices, 599 Edgewood Rd., REDWOOD
CITY, CA 94062 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Lindamarie Roche
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Lindamarie Roche /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/13/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/21/12, 07/28/12, 08/4/12, 08/11/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251278
The following person is doing business
as: Taqueria El Nopal, 581 San Mateo
Ave., SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Maria
Ayar, 1126 Millbrae Ave., Millbrae, CA
94030. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Maria Ayar /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/09/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/21/12, 07/28/12, 08/4/12, 08/11/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251461
The following person is doing business
as: Kanelitamiel, 1784 S, Norfolk St.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Emanuela
Peccorini, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 07/20/2012.
/s/ Emanuela Peccorini /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/20/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/21/12, 07/28/12, 08/4/12, 08/11/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251440
The following person is doing business
as: Tsunami Boarding, 181 Second Ave.,
#307, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Sad-
hana Franchi, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on July 15, 2012.
/s/ Sadhana Franchi /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/19/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/21/12, 07/28/12, 08/4/12, 08/11/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251123
The following person is doing business
as: Giant Warrior Tickets, 1370 Willow
Rd., MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Mi-
chael Jaffee, 23 Bay St., Menlo Park, CA
94025. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
04/02/12.
/s/ Michael Jaffee /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/28/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/21/12, 07/28/12, 08/4/12, 08/11/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251416
The following person is doing business
as: Alexicor, 422 Clifton Ave., SAN CAR-
LOS, CA 94070 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Catheryne Nichol-
son, same address. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Catheryne Nicholson /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/17/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/21/12, 07/28/12, 08/4/12, 08/11/12).
24
Weekend July 21-22, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Steve Irwin
wildlife
documentary
series, with The
16 It may involve a
step
17 Senator,
perhaps
18 Hoppers
19 Lummoxes
20 You might
encounter a jam
in one
21 Luanda is its
cap.
22 The Keydets of
the Big South
Conf.
23 Constellation
near Virgo
24 Rainbow
features
26 Glee extras
28 Old Dodge
29 Williams of
Bathing Beauty
31 Get fouled up
33 Addl.
34 Blow smoke
35 Pet store
swimmers
38 Cab Calloways
signature line
41 1891 title
mother of an
infant named
Sorrow
42 One who
doesnt stay put
44 Investors
purchase
46 Scrub sites,
briefly
47 Kids usually
dont want to
hear them
48 Month after avril
49 Butter-yielding
tree
51 Keep an __ the
ground
53 Items from
drawers?
54 Valuable floor
coverings?
57 Questionable
prospects
58 Some
evaluations
DOWN
1 African
landmark near
the
Mediterranean
2 Entourage
3 Juicy fruit
4 Barracks
lineup
5 Brit. Award
6 Parsley family
herb
7 Freeze
8 Lentil, for one
9 Like some
traffic
10 British pianist
Dame Myra __
11 Address letters
12 Bracketology
org.
13 Like
figureheads
14 Abstruse stuff
15 Establish a fresh
foothold
25 Ballpark
figures
26 Janis Joplin or
Scott Joplin
27 All muscle
28 Social misfit
30 Ben-__
32 Developing
countrys need
35 Founder of
Sunnybank
Kennels
36 Scent
37 Recital pieces
38 Gets a move on
39 Big hit
40 Ready
41 Tough decision
for a bettor
43 Title professor in
a Mitch Albom
best-seller
45 Puts down
50 Oslos river
51 Middle-earth
creatures
52 Lummoxes
53 Like a button?
55 Internet __
56 Cartesian
conclusion
By Bruce Venzke
(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
07/21/12
07/21/12
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
203 Public Notices
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT # M-245110
The following person has abandoned the
use of the fictitious business name: Old
Growth Acvity Coaching. 1271 Foothill
St., Redwood City, CA 94062. The ficti-
tious business name referred to above
was filed in County on 06/3/11. The busi-
ness was conducted by: Lindamarie Ro-
che, 599 Edgewood Rd., REDWOOD
CITY, CA 94062
/s/ Lindamarie Roche /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 07/13/2012. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 07/21/12,
07/28/12, 08/4/12, 08/11/12).
210 Lost & Found
FOUND - Evan - I found your iPod, call
(650)261-9656
LOST - SET OF KEYS, San Mateo.
Reward. 650-274-9892
LOST - 2 silver rings and silver watch,
May 7th in Burlingame between Park Rd.
& Walgreens, Sentimental value. Call
Gen @ (650)344-8790
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST SIAMESE CAT on 5/21 in
Belmont. Dark brown& tan, blue eyes.
REWARD! (415)990-8550
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
294 Baby Stuff
B.O.B. DUALLIE STROLLER, for two.
Excellent condition. Blue. $300.
Call 650-303-8727.
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
295 Art
WALL ART, from Pier 1, indoor/outdoor,
$15. Very nice! (650)290-1960
296 Appliances
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
WATER HEATER $75, (650)333-4400
296 Appliances
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
RONCO ROTTISERIE - New model,
black, all accessories, paid $150., asking
$65., (650)290-1960
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24 wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SMALL SLOW cooker. Used once, $12
(650)368-3037
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER Eureka canister
like new, SOLD!
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
WASHER AND Dryer, $200
(650)333-4400
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
THULE BIKE rack, for roof load bar,
Holds bike upright. $100 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
"STROLLEE" WALKING Doll in Original
Box Brunette in Red/white/black dress
$25, (650)873-8167
1936 BERLIN OLYMPIC PIN, $99.,
(650)365-1797
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
3 MADAME ALEXANDER Dolls. $40 for
all. SOLD!
67 OLD Used U.S. Postage Stamps.
Many issued before World War II. All
different. $4.00, (650)787-8600
AMISH QUILLOW, brand new, authen-
tic, $50. (650)589-8348
ANTIQUE TRAIN set, complete in the
box from the 50s, $80 obo
(650)589-8348
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
298 Collectibles
BEANIE BABIES in cases with TY tags
attached, good condition. $10 each or 12
for $100. (650) 588-1189
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
COLLECTIBLE CHRISTMAS TREE
STAND with 8 colored lights at base / al-
so have extra lights, $50., (650)593-8880
COLLECTIBLES: RUSSELL Baze Bob-
bleheads Bay Meadows, $10 EA. brand
new in original box. (415)612-0156
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
COMIC BOOK Collection, Many Titles
from 60s, 70s, & 80s, $75 obo,
(650)271-0731
GAYLORD PERRY 8x10 signed photo
$10 (650)692-3260
GUMBIE AUTOGRAPH Newsletter Art
and Gloria Clokey, $40., (650)873-8167
JIM BEAM decorative collectors bottles
(8), many sizes and shapes, $10. each,
(650)364-7777
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK MCGUIRE hats, cards, beanie
babies, all for $98., (650)520-8558
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2,
all $40., (650)518-0813
POSTERS - Message in a Bottle Movie
Promo Sized Poster, Kevin Costner and
Paul Newman, New Kids On The Block
1980s, Framed Joey McEntyre, Casper
Movie, $5-$10., call Maria,
(650)873-8167
RAT PACK framed picture with glass 24"
by 33" mint condition $60. (650)871-7200
STACKING MINI-KETTLES - 3
Pots/cover: ea. 6 diam; includes carry
handle for stacking transit. Unique.
Brown speckle enamelware, $20.,
(650)341-3288
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
BILINGUAL POWER lap top
6 actividaes $18 650 349-605
300 Toys
LEGO'S (2) Unopened, NINJAGO, La-
sha's Bite Cycle, 250 pieces; MONSTER
FIGHTERS, Swamp Creature, ages 7-14
$27.00 both, SOLD!
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18 high, $70
(650)387-4002
CHINA CABINET - Vintage, 6 foot,
solid mahogany. $300/obo.
(650)867-0379
303 Electronics
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
32 TOSHIBA Flat screen TV like new,
bought 9/9/11 with box. $300 Firm.
(415)264-6605
46 MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
AUDIO SPEAKERS, (2) mint condition,
works great, Polt stereo for computer,
TV, $10.00 both SOLD!
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
H/P WINDOWS Desk Jet 840C Printer.
Like New. All hookups. $30.00
(650)344-7214
HP COLOR Scanner, Unopened box,
Scan, edit, organize photos/documents
480 x 9600 DPI, Restores colors,
brightness, $40.00 (650)578-9208
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
NINTENDO NES plus 8 games,Works,
$30 (650)589-8348
304 Furniture
2 DINETTE Chairs both for $29
(650)692-3260
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
4 DRAWER metal file cabinet, black, no
lock model, like new $50 (650)204-0587
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
CAST AND metal headboard and foot-
board. white with brass bars, Queen size
$95 650-588-7005
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHANDELIER WITH 5 lights/ candela-
bre base with glass shades $20.
(650)504-3621
COFFEE TABLE - 30 x 58, light oak,
heavy, 1980s, $40., (650)348-5169
COMPUTER DESK from Ikea, $40
(650)348-5169
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DESK SOLID wood 21/2' by 5' 3 leather
inlays manufactured by Sligh 35 years
old $100 (must pick up) (650)231-8009
DESK, METAL with glass top, rolls, from
Ikea, $75 obo, SOLD!
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CASE wood & glass 31 x 19
inches $30. (650)873-4030
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
DUNCAN PHYFE Mahogany china
cabinet with bow glass. $250, O/B.
Mahogany Duncan Phyfe dining room
table $150, O/B. Round mahogany side
table $150, O/B.SOLD!
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26L x 21W x
21H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8 x 30, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
304 Furniture
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
HAWAIIAN STYLE living room chair Re-
tton with split bamboo, blue and white
stripe cushion $99 (650)343-4461
KITCHEN TALE walnut with chrome
legs. 36x58 with one leaf 11 1/2. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
KITCHEN/BAR STOOL wooden with
high back $99 (650)343-4461
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36 Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable vi-
nyl medium brown $70, (650)368-3037
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SMALL STORAGE/ Hutch, Stained
Green, pretty. $40, (650)290-1960
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TWIN BEDS (2) - like new condition with
frame, posturepedic mattress, $99. each,
SOLD!
VANITY ETHAN Allen maple w/drawer
and liftup mirror like new $95
(650)349-2195
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $25 each or both for $40. nice
set. (650)583-8069
VINTAGE WING back chair $75,
(650)583-8069
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five avaial-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
6 BOXES of Victorian lights ceiling & wall
$90., (650)340-9644
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
CEILING FAN multi speed, brown and
bronze $45. SOLD!
DINING ROOM Victorian Chandelier
seven light, $90., (650)340-9644
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
FANCY CUT GLASSWARE-Bowls,
Glasses, Under $20 varied, call Maria,
(650)873-8167
IRONING BOARD $15 (650)347-8061
KITCHEN FAUCET- single handle,
W/spray - not used $19 (650)494-1687
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
307 Jewelry & Clothing
WE BUY GOLD
Highest Prices Paid on
Jewelry or Scrap
Michaels Jewelry
Since 1963
253 Park Road
Burlingame
(650)342-4461
308 Tools
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10,
4 long x 20 wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CLICKER TORQUE Wrench, 20 - 150
pounds, new with lifetime warranty and
case, $39, 650-595-3933
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
GENERATOR 13,000 WATTS Brand
New 20hp Honda $2800 (650)333-4400
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
SCNCO TRIM Nail Gun, $100
(650) 521-3542
STADILA LEVEL 6ft, $60
(650) 521-3542
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
309 Office Equipment
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
EPSON WORKFORCE 520 color printer,
scanner, copier, & fax machine, like new,
warranty, $30., (650)212-7020
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
10 PLANTS (assorted) for $3.00 each,
(650)349-6059
14 SEGA genius games 2 controllers
$20 (650)589-8348
2 CANES 1 Irish Shillelagh 1 regular $25
SOLD
20 TRAVEL books .50 cents ea
(650)755-8238
21 PIECE Punch bowl glass set $55.,
SOLD!
30 NOVEL books $1.00 ea,
(650)755-8238
3D MOVIE glasses, (12) unopened,
sealed plastic, Real 3D, Kids and adults.
Paid $3.75 each, selling $1.50 each
(650)578-9208
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes $100,
(650)361-1148
5 PHOTOGRAPHIC CIVIL WAR
BOOKS plus 4 volumes of Abraham Lin-
coln books, $90., (650)345-5502
6 BASKETS with handles, all various
colors and good sizes, great for many
uses, all in good condition. $15 all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42 X 18 X 6, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
9 CARRY-ON bags (assorted) - extra
large, good condition, $10. each obo,
(650)349-6059
AMERICAN HERITAGE books 107 Vol-
umes Dec.'54-March '81 $99/all
(650)345-5502
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BEADS - Glass beads for jewelry mak-
ing, $75. all, (650)676-0732
BEAUTIFUL LAMPSHADE - cone shap-
ed, neutral color beige, 11.5 long X 17
wide, matches any decor, never used,
excellent condition, Burl, $18.,
(650)347-5104
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK - Fighting Aircraft of WWII,
Janes, 1000 illustrations, $65., SOLD!
BOOK NATIONAL Geographic Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
BOOKS 20 HARDCOVER WW2 USMC
Korea, Europe. $50 (650)302-0976
BROADWAY by the Bay, Chorus Line
Sat 9/22; Broadway by Year Sat. 11/10
Section 4 main level $80.00 all.
(650)578-9208
CAR SUITCASES - good condition for
camping, car, vacation trips $15.00 all,
SOLD!
CEILING FAN - Multi speed, bronze &
brown, excellent shape, $45.,
SOLD!
CLASSIC TOY Train Magazines, (200)
mint condition, SOLD!
CLEAN CAR Kit, unopened sealed box,
7 full size containers for leather, spots,
glass, interior, paint, chamois, $25.00
(650)578-9208
FULL QUEEN quilt $20 (650)871-7200
25 Weekend July 21-22, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
310 Misc. For Sale
DELONGHI-CONVENTION ROTISSER-
IE crome with glass door excellent condi-
tion $55 OBO (650)343-4461
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
FREE DWARF orange tree
SOLD!
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10), (650)364-
7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
JAMES PATTERSON BOOKS - 3 hard-
back @$3. each, 5 paperbacks @$1.
each, (650)341-1861
JEWELRY DISPLAY CASE - Hand-
made, portable, wood & see through lid
to open, 45L, 20W, 3H, $65., SOLD!
JOHN K KENNEDY Mementos, Books,
Magazines, Photos, Placards, Phono-
graph Records, Ect. $45 all
SOLD!
LIMITED QUANTITY VHS porno tapes,
$8. each, (650)871-7200
MASSAGER CHAIR - Homedics, Heat,
Timer, Remote, like new, $45.,
(650)344-7214
MENU FROM Steam Ship Lurline Aug.
20 1967 $10 (650)755-8238
MIRROR, ETHAN ALLEN - 57-in. high x
21-in. wide, maple frame and floor base,
like new, $95., (650)349-2195
NATURAL GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM
- Alkaline, PH Balance water, with anti-
oxident properties, good for home or of-
fice, brand new, $100., (650)619-9203.
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OLD 5 gal. glass water cooler bottle $20
(650) 521-3542
ONE BOYS Superman Christmas Wrap-
ping paper $2., SOLD
OUTDOOR SCREEN - New 4 Panel
Outdoor Screen, Retail $130 With Metal
Supports, $80. obo, call Maria,
(650)873-8167
PICTORIAL WORLD History Books
$80/all (650)345-5502
PLANT - Beautiful hybrodized dahlia tu-
bers, $3 to $8 each (12 available), while
supplies last, Bill (650)871-7200
QUEEN SIZE inflatable mattress with
built in battery air pump used twice $40,
(650)343-4461
SESAME STREET toilet seat excellent
condition $12 650 349-6059
SF GREETING Cards (300 w/envelopes)
factory sealed $20. (650)207-2712
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48 x 69
$70 (650)692-3260
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE Christ-
mas Wrapping Paper Retail $6 selling $2
each 6-7 yards, (650)873-8167
STUART WOODS Hardback Books
2 @ $3.00 each. (650)341-1861
TABLECLOTH - Medium Blue color rec-
tangular tablecloth 70" long 52" wide with
12 napkins $15., (650)755-8238
TIRE CHAINS - brand new, in box, never
used, multiple tire sizes, $25., (650)594-
1494
TIRE CHAINS - used once includes rub-
ber tighteners plus carrying case. call for
corresponding tire size, $20.,
(650)345-5446
TO THE MOON The 1969 story in pic-
tures, text and sound. $35
SOLD!
TOILET SINK - like new with all of the
accessories ready to be installed, $55.
obo, (650)369-9762
TOTE FULL of English novels - Cathrine
Cookson, $100., (650)493-8467
VAN ROOF rack 3 piece. clamp-on, $75
(650)948-4895
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
310 Misc. For Sale
VICTORIAN DAYS In The Park Wine
Glasses 6 count. Fifteenth Annual
with Horse Drawn Wagon Etching $10
b/o (650)873-8167
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALL LIGHT fixture - 2 lamp with frost-
ed fluted shades, gold metal, great for
bathroom vanity, never used, excellent
condition, $15., Burl, (650)347-5104
WELLS FARGO Brass belt buckle, $40
(650)692-3260
WOOD PLANT STAND- mint condition,
indoor, 25in. high, 11deep, with shelves
$15.00, SOLD!
311 Musical Instruments
12 STRING epiphone guitar. New, with
fender gig bag. $150 firm SOLD!
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
3 ACCORDIONS $110/ea. 1 Small
Accordion $82. (650)376-3762.
BONGO DRUM with instruction $30
(650)341-8342
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
JENCO VIBRAPHONE - Three Octave
Graduated Bars, vintage concert Model
near mint condition, $1,750.,
(650)871-0824
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
312 Pets & Animals
HAMSTER HABITAT SYSTEM - 2 cage
system with interconnecting tunnels,
Large: 9 1/2 x 19 1/2; Small 9 1/2 x 9
1/2, with water bottles, food bowls, exer-
cise wheel, lots of tunnels & connectors
makes varied configurations, much more.
$25., (650)594-1494
REPTILE CAGE - Medium size, $20.,
(650)348-0372
SMALL DOG wire cage; pink, two doors
with divider $50.00 (650) 743-9534.
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BATHROBE MENS navy blue plush-ter-
ry and belt. Maroon piping and trim, 2
pockets. Medium size. $10., (650)341-
3288
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
BOOTS - purple leather, size 8, ankle
length, $50.obo, (650)592-9141
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
HARDING PARK mens golf dress shirts
(new) asking $25 (650)871-7200
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LEATHER COAT medium size (snake
skin design) $50 (650)755-8238
316 Clothes
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
LEVIS MENS jeans - Size 42/30, well
faded, excellent condition, $10.,
(650)595-3933
MEN'S SUIT almost new $25.
650-573-6981
MENS DRESS SHOES - bostonian cas-
ual dress tie up, black upper leather, size
8.5, classic design, great condition,
$60.,Burl., (650)347-5104
MENS PANTS & SHORTS - Large box,
jeans, cargos, casual dress slacks,
34/32, 36/32, Burl, $85.all,
(650)347-5104
MENS SHIRTS - Brand names, Polos,
casual long sleeve dress, golf polo,
tshirts, sizes M/L, great condition, Burl,
$83., (650)347-5104
NANCY'S TAILORING &
BOUTIQUE
Custom Made & Alterations
889 Laurel Street
San Carlos, CA 94070
650-622-9439
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
REVERSIBLE, SOUVENIR JACKET
San Francisco: All-weather, zip-front,
hood. Weatherproof 2-tone tan.; Inner:
navy fleece, logos SF & GG bridge.
$15.00 (650)341-3288
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
VINTAGE CLOTHING 1930 Ermine fur
coat Black full length $35 650 755-9833
WOMENS SUMMER 3 pc.SUIT:
blue/white stripe seersucker, jacket,
slacks, shorts, size 12, $10., (650)341-
3288
317 Building Materials
50 NEW Gray brick, standard size,
8x4x2 $25 obo All, (650)345-5502
FLUORESCENT LIGHT Fixture, New in
Box, 24, $15 (650)341-8342
TILES, DARK Red clay, 6x6x1/2 6
Dozen at 50 ea (650)341-8342
WHITE STORM/SCREEN door. Size is
35 1/4" x 79 1/4". Asking $50.00. Call
(650)341-1861
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $40., (650)368-3037
13 ASSORTED GOLF CLUBS- Good
Quality $3.50 each. Call (650) 349-6059.
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all 650-345-7132 Leave message.
BOOGIE BOARD, original Morey Boogie
Board #138, Exc condition, $25
(650)594-1494
BOYS BICYCLE with Helmet. Triax,
Good Condition, $50, San Mateo
(650)341-5347
COLEMAN "GLO-MASTER" 1- burner
camp stove for boaters or camping. Mint
condition. $35.00 (650)341-3288
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18 di-
meter, Halex brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GIRLS BIKE, Pincess 16 wheels. $50
San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BALLS - 155+, $19., SOLD!
GOLF SHOES women's brand new Nike
Air Charmere size 7m $45 SOLD!
ICE SKATES, Ladies English. Size 7-8
$50 Please call Maria (650)873-8167
NORDIC TRACK Treadmill, Model
ESP2000 Fold Up, space saver Perfect
condition $100, (650)284-9345
ONE BUCKET of golf balls - 250 total,
various brands, $25., (650)339-3195
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
THULE BIKE rack. Fits rectangular load
bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL PROFORM 75 EKG incline
an Staionery Bike, both $400. Or sepa-
rate: $150 for the bike, $350 for the
treadmill. Call (650)992-8757
TWO YOGA Videos. Never used, one
with Patrisha Walden, one by Rebok with
booklet. Both $6 (650)755-8238
WATER SKI'S - Gold cup by AMFA Voit
$40., (650)574-4586
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE AND
MOVING SALE
Everything Must Go
2104 Hale Dr.
Burlingame
Saturday, July 21
9am-5pm
Electronic Appliances,
Boys bed room
furniture, TVs, Stereo
Equipment, and
Clothing
MOVING SALE,
Saturday July 21
9am to 4pm
319 Highland Terrace,
Woodside.
Misc household items
RUMMAGE SALE
SAT * JULY 21
9am-3pm
Ralston/Alameda de las Pulgas
BELMONT
SAN MATEO PRO LIFE
THE THRIFT SHOP
BAG SALE !!!
July 14, 21, 28
10-2 pm Thurs. & Fri.
10-3 pm Saturday
Episcopal Church
1 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo 94401
(650)344-0921
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
HONEYWELL PENTAX 35mm excellent
lens, with case $65. (650)348-6428
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
345 Medical Equipment
FOUR WHEEL walker with handbrakes,
fold down seat and basket, $50.
(650)867-6042
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom $1550. 2 bedroom $1900.,
New carpets, new granite counters, dish-
washer, balcony, covered carports, stor-
age, pool, no pets. (650) 591-4046
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
93 FLEETWOOD Chrome wheels Grey
leather interior 237k miles Sedan $ 2,500
or Trade, Good Condition (650)481-5296
CHEVY HHR 08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
HONDA 10 ACCORD LX - 4 door se-
dan, low miles, $19K, (650)573-6981
MERCEDES 06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
TOYOTA 07 Corolla, 38k miles, one
owner, sliver, $10895, (650)212-6666
625 Classic Cars
DATSUN 72 - 240Z with Chevy 350, au-
tomatic, custom, $3,600 or trade.
(415) 412-7030
PLYMOUTH 72 CUDA - Runs and
drives good, needs body, interior and
paint, $8,000 /obo, serious inquiries only.
SOLD!
635 Vans
NISSAN 01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW 03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON 83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 ccs,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
VARIOUS MOTORCYCLE parts USED
call for what you want or need $99
(650)670-2888
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
PROSPORT 97 - 17 ft. CC 80 Yamaha
Pacific, loaded, like new, $9,500 or trade,
(650)583-7946.
650 RVs
73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
670 Auto Service
MB GARAGE, INC.
Repair Restore Sales
Mercedes-Benz Specialists
2165 Palm Ave.
San Mateo
(650)349-2744
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
2 RADIAL GT tires 205715 & 2356014
$10 each, (650)588-7005
2 SNOW/CABLE chains good condition
fits 13-15 inch rims $10/both San Bruno
650-588-1946
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
67-68 CAMERO PARTS - $85.,
(650)592-3887
ALUMINUM WHEELS - Toyota, 13,
good shape, Grand Prix brand. Includes
tires - legal/balanced. $100., San Bruno,
SOLD!
CAMPER/TRAILER/TRUCK OUTSIDE
backup mirror 8 diameter fixture. $30.
650-588-1946
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
31 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
318 Sports Equipment
316 Clothes 322 Garage Sales 317 Building Materials
Cabinetry Contractors
RISECON
NORTH AMERICA
General Contractors / Building
& Design
New construction, Kitchen-Bath Re-
models, Metal Fabrication, Painting
Call for free design consultation
(650) 274-4484
www.risecon.com
L#926933
SOMOZA
CASEWORK
INSTALLATION
Interior, kitchen cabinets,
counter tops, Crown molding,
Trim, Windows & Doors.
Our Number One Concern is
Customer Satisfaction.
(415) 724- 4447
scc.jsomoza@gmail.com
Cleaning Cleaning
MORANAS
HOUSECLEANING
Homes and Apartments
Excellent Service
30 Years Experience
Great Rates
(650)375-8149
Cleaning Concrete
POLY-AM
CONSTRUCTION
General Contractor
Free Estimate
Specializing in
Concrete Brickwork Stonewall
Interlocking Pavers Landscaping
Tile Retaining Wall
Bonded & Insured Lic. #685214
Ben: (650)375-1573
Cell: (650) 280-8617
26
Weekend July 21-22, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Pictures on Yelp
Qualing
Special
at & low
slope roofs
650-594-1717
Construction
De Hoyos
Framing Foundations
(650) 387-8950
General Framing
Doors & Windows
Siding
(Hardy Plank Specialist)
Dry Rot & Termite
Additions
Finely Crafted Decks
Repairs
Lic# 968477 Ins/Bons
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed Insured Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben at (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
Servicing Hillsborough,
Burlingame, Millbrae,
and San Mateo
We are a full service
gardening company
650 218-0657
to the
Burlingame
Leafblower
Law
Fully Compliant
Quality
Gardening
J.B. GARDENING SERVICE
Maintenance, New Lawns,
Sprinkler Systems, Clean Ups,
Fences, Tree Trimming,
Concrete work, Brick Work,
Pavers, and Retaining Walls.
Free Estimates
Cell: (650) 400- 5604
Flooring
DHA
WOODFLOORING
Wood Flooring
Installation & Refinishing
Lic.# 958104
(650)346-2707
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TOYOU.
FLOORING
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGOS
FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
Handy Help
ADW SERVICES
Small Jobs, Hauling, Car-
pentry, Flooring, Decks,
Dry Rot Repair, Siding,
Bathrooms
(650)438-0454
Lic. 968619
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Carpentry Plumbing Drain
Cleaning Kitchens Bathrooms
Dry Rot Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior Roof Re-
pair Base Boards New Fence
Hardwood Floors Plumbing Tile
Mirrors Chain Link Fence Window
Glass Water Heater Installation
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
HOUSE REPAIR
& REMODELING
HANDYMAN
Plumbing, Electrical, Carpentry,
Kitchen & Bath Rem, Floor Tile,
Wood Fences,Painting Work
Free Estimates
PLEASE CALL
(650)504-4199
SENIOR HANDYMAN
Specializing in Any Size Projects
Painting electrical
Carpentry Dry Rot
Carpet Installation
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
Refinish
High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
AM/PM HAULING
Haul Any Kind of Junk
Residential & Commercial
Free Estimates!
We recycle almost everything!
Go Green!
Call Joe
(650)722-3925
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$50 & Up HAUL
Since 1988 Free Estimates
Licensed/Insured
A+ BBB rating
(650)341-7482
JONS HAULING
Serving the Peninsula since 1976
Free Estimates
Junk and debris removal,
Yard/lot clearing,
Furniture, appliance hauling.
Specializing in hoarder clean up
(650)393-4233
Hauling
Interior Design
REBARTS INTERIORS
Hunter Douglas Gallery
Free Measuring & Install.
247 California Dr., Burl.
(650)348-1268
990 Industrial Blvd., #106
SC (800)570-7885
www.rebarts.com
Landscaping
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsulas Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
CRAIGS PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work w/
Reasonable Rates
Free Estimates
(650)553-9653
Lic# 857741
GOLDEN WEST PAINTING
Since 1975
Interior/Exterior,
Complete Preparation.
Will Beat any
Professional Estimate!
CSL#321586
(415)722-9281
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
LEMUS PAINTING
650.271.3955
Interiors / Exteriors
Residential / Commercial
Free Estimates
Reasonable Rates
Lic#913961
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Plumbing
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed Sat 12:00- 5:30pm, or by appt.
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
Marble, Stone & porcelain
Kitchens, bathrooms, floors,
fireplaces, entryways, decks,
tile, ceramic tile
repair, grout repair
Free Estimates Lic.# 955492
Mario Cubias
(650)784-3079
JZ TILE
Installation and Design
Portfolio and References,
Great Prices
Free Estimates
Lic. 670794
Call John Zerille
(650)245-8212
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tors State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
27 Weekend July 21-22, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Accounting
FIRST PENINSULA
ACCOUNTING
Benjamin Lewis Lesser
Certified Public Accountant
Tax & Accounting Services
Businesses & Individual
(650)689-5547
benlesser@peninsulacpa.com
Attorneys
* BANKRUPTCY *
Huge credit card debt?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650)363-2600
This law firm is a debt relief agency
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAYS
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Divorce
DIVORCE CENTERS
OF CALIFORNIA
Low Cost
non-attorney service
UNCONTESTED
DIVORCE
650.347.2500
520 So. El Camino Real #650
San Mateo, CA 94402
www.divorcecenters.com
Se habla Espaol
I am not an attorney.
I can only provide self help services
at your specic directions
Food
AYA SUSHI
The Best Sushi
& Ramen in Town
1070 Holly Street
San Carlos
(650)654-1212
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733 (650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
FIND OUT! FIND OUT!
What everybody is
talking about!
South Harbor
Restaurant & Bar
425 Marina Blvd., SSF
(650)589-1641 (650)589-1641
GOT BEER?
We Do!
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050 (650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
Food
GULLIVERS
RESTAURANT
Early Bird Special
Prime Rib Complete Dinner
Mon-Thu
1699 Old Bayshore Blvd. Burlingame
(650)692-6060
JACKS
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEALS COFFEE
SHOP
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
Senior Meals, Kids Menu
www.nealscoffeeshop.com
1845 El Camino Real
Burlingame
(650)692-4281
RED CRAWFISH
CRAVING CAJUN?
401 E. 3rd Ave.
@ S. Railroad
San Mateo
redcrawfishsf.com
(650) 347-7888
SUNDAY CHAMPAGNE
BRUNCH
Crowne Plaza
1221 Chess Dr., Hwy. 92 at
Foster City Blvd. Exit
Foster City
(650)570-5700
SUNSHINE CAFE
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
1750 El Camino Real
San Mateo
(Borel Square)
(650)357-8383
THE AMERICAN BULL
BAR & GRILL
19 large screen HD TVs
Full Bar & Restaurant
www.theamericanbull.com
1819 El Camino, in
Burlingame Plaza
(650)652-4908
THE MELTING POT
Dinner for 2 - $98.
4 Course Fondue Feast &
Bottle of Wine
1 Transit Way San Mateo
(650)342-6358
www.melting pot.com
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Fitness
DOJO USA
World Training Center
Martial Arts & Tae Bo Training
www.dojousa.net
731 Kains Ave, San Bruno
(650)589-9148
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STRESSED OUT?
IN PAIN?
I CAN HELP YOU
Sessions start from $20
Call 650-235-6761
Will Chen ACUPUNCTURE
12220 6th Ave, Belmont
www. willchenacupuncture.com
TOENAIL FUNGUS?
FREE Consultation for
Laser Treatment
(650)347-0761
Dr. Richard Woo, DPM
400 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AARP AUTO
INSURANCE
Great insurance
Great price
Special rates for
drivers over 50
650-593-7601
ISU LOVERING
INSURANCE SERVICES
1121 Laurel St.,
San Carlos
BARRETT
INSURANCE
www.barrettinsuranceservices.net
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
HEALTH INSURANCE
Paying too much for COBRA?
No coverage?
.... Not good!
I can help.
John Bowman
(650)525-9180
CA Lic #0E08395
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues,Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
A+ DAY SPA MASSAGE
$60 one hour
body massage + table shower
45 mins $50, Half hour $40
Open every day, 9:30am to 9:30pm
(650)299-9332
615 Woodside Rd #5
Redwood City
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
GRAND OPENING
ASIAN MASSAGE
$50 for 1 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING!
CRYSTAL WAVE SPA
Body & Foot Massage
Facial Treatment
1205 Capuchino Ave.
Burlingame
(650)558-1199
HAPPY FEET
Massage
2608 S. El Camino Real
& 25th Ave., San Mateo
(650)638-9399
$30.00/Hr Foot Massage
$50.00/Hr Full Body Massage
Massage Therapy
HEALING MASSAGE
SPECIAL $10 OFF
SWEDISH MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
SUNFLOWER MASSAGE
Grand Opening!
$10. Off 1-Hour Session!
1482 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(Behind Trader Joes)
Open 7 Days/Week, 10am-10pm
(650)508-8758
TRANQUIL
MASSAGE
951 Old County Road
Suite 1
Belmont
650-654-2829
YOU HAVE IT-
WELL BUY IT
We buy and pawn:
Gold Jewelry
Art Watches
Musical Instrument
Paintings Diamonds
Silverware Electronics
Antique Furniture
Computers TVs Cars
Open 7 days
Buy *Sell*Loan
590 Veterans Blvd.
Redwood City
(650)368-6855
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes Multi-family
Mixed-Use Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
ODOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
Seniors
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT &
ASSISTED LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
Massage Therapy
28
Weekend July 21-22, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Coins Dental Jewelry Silver Watches Diamonds
1Z11 80fll08M0 90 0J400
Expert Fine Watch
& Jewelry Repair
Not afliated with any watch company.
Only Authentic ROLEX Factory Parts Are Used
t%FBMWJUI&YQFSUTt2VJDL4FSWJDF
t6OFRVBM$VTUPNFS$BSF
XXX#FTU3BUFE(PME#VZFSTDPN
Tuesday - Saturday
11:00am to 4:00pm
www.BestRatedGoldBuyers.com
KUPFER JEWELRYsBURLINGAME
(650) 347-7007
$0
OFF ANY
ROLEX SERVICE
OR REPAIR
MUST PRESENT COUPON.
EXPIRES 7/31/12
WEBUY