LIFE.

AND HOW TO HA VE ONE

THE ins And OUTs Of TATTOOs

TEACHER’S PE(S)T
ENGAGED OR ANNOYING?

ELECTRIC PHOTOS
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// SEPTEMBER 8, 2011

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EDITOR’S NOTE

CE LAWREN

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DOWNTOWN - 10th & New Hampshire
tattoo. I also don’t have kids and a person close to me has never passed away, so I have no one to pay homage to in ink form. I then thought about all the little things that make me happy: Hello Kitty, a movie marathon on Netflix, smoothies. All of these things would make for pretty ridiculous tattoos — can you imagine someone with a smoothie sprawled across her back? OK, so my tattoo ideas are pretty terrible compared to the incredible ones I’ve seen, especially considering the art of tattooing has come such a long way. Did you know archeologists found mummies with tattoolike markings? And that a new type of ink actually fades over time? For more on the world of tattoos, check out Jack’s story on page eight. Who knows what tattoo I’d end up with if I were forced to get one. Let’s just hope it’s nothing I’d regret forever. In fact, let’s also hope it’s in that ink that eventually fades. EDITOR | GABRIELLE SCHOCK ASSOCIATE EDITOR | SARAH CHAMP DESIGNERS | ALEX MILBOURN, MAX AYALLA CONTACT | BAILEY ATKINSON, CHRISTINE CURTIN, TAYLOR LEWIS MANUAL | CHRIS NEAL, KATIE JAMES NOTICE | AMANDA GAGE, NADIA IMAFIDON, MATT GALLOWAY PLAY | DREW WILLE, JEFF KARR, MAX GREENWOOD HEALTH | BRE ROACH, CHRISTY NUTT, KYLIE NUTT CONTRIBUTORS | CHANCE CARMICHAEL, DYLAN DERRYBERRY, JAROD KILGORE, LANDON MCDONALD ,MAGGIE YOUNG, SAVANNAH ABBOT CREATIVE CONSULTANT | CAROL HOLSTEAD

If you were held at gunpoint and absolutely had to get a tattoo, what would you get? I read this question in a magazine recently and I started wondering what I’d do if I were in that position. What tattoo would I get if I were strapped to the artist’s chair, unable to escape until I received my ink? The people I know who have tattoos always say that no matter what the ink is, it should mean something to you. The name of a lost loved one or a religious symbol are both things you typically see tattooed on someone’s body. They have special meaning to those people who aren’t afraid to have those words or images permanently placed on thier bodies. I, however, had a hard time thinking of something that means enough to me that I’d want it permanently on my body. I’m not married so that rules out a wedding date

JAYPLAY

GABRIELLE SCHOCK | EDITOR

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CONTACT KANSAS IN HEAT // How to Have a one-nigHt Stand
> Tackling the sticky situation of relationships.
1. Don’t get drunk! The decisions you make under the influence may not be the same ones you make when sober. In The Journal of Studies on Alcohol, Antonia Abbey and her colleges found that, while under the influence, partner risk (risk of contracting a sexually transmitted infection), did not influence willingness to have unprotected sex. Even though there was an acknowledged risk of contracting a STI from this one-night stand, unprotected sex would still occur if the person had been drinking. 2. Be armed and ready for battle. Condoms are a must for sex with anyone other than a monogamous partner. Unfortunately, condoms don’t protect against all STIs. Let’s not forget that STIs can be transmitted through other ways. The medical profession has seen a growing trend of chlamydia and gonorrhea found in the throats of patients who participate in unprotected oral sex. Before you meet up with your one-night stand, use this check-list of sex armor: -Male condoms: lubricated, non-lubricated, spermicidal lubricant, magnums, for her pleasure, latex, and non-latex. Arm yourself with a smorgasbord. -Female condoms: unlike male condoms, can be inserted prior to sex play and provide protection for the outer part of the vagina. -Dental dam (a flat, square piece of latex used for a barrier during cunnilingus, fellatio, and anal play). If you can’t locate a dental dam, try this: carefully cut a condom length-wise from base to tip and spread out over the genitals. -A small vibrator. This allows for pleasure without genital, anal, or oral contact. 3. Be Honest. Discuss your sexual history past and current STIs. If you approach the subject of sexual history and possibility of transmitting or contracting STIs and your partner refuses to disclose, leave immediately! What do you have to lose except the not guaranteed possibility of orgasm? Can someone lie during a one-night stand? Absolutely! Which is why having your sex armor is so important. 4. Have foreplay with the lights on. In addition to the turn-on of seeing your partner being pleasured, having the lights on is a great way to further establish safe sex. In this brighter environment, you can explore your partners genitals and look for any sores, scars, bumps, or warts. If you notice anything out of the ordinary, you can politely excuse yourself. 5. Be prepared for bad sex! You cannot anticipate your partner’s sexual knowledge or skill. Be prepared for a less-thanenjoyable tryst. There are no guarantees for satisfying one-night stands. 6. Don’t exchange contact information. Don’t promise to call. If you discover a potential dating partner, don’t have a one-night stand with him or her! This is a one-time experience without emotional investment. Communication of expectations and having a mutual understanding of postcoital conduct is a must. Wait to have sex with Contributed photo Michelle MacBain is a graduate student from someone you fancy outside the bedroom. Kansas City. She studied sexuality, psychology and communiction studies at KU and The University of Amsterdam. |MICHELLE MACBAIN |

FIVE quESTIoNS// teCH n9ne & MiCHael deliCH
>Two people. Five Questions. See how they stack up.
|CHRISTINE CURTIN |

aaron “teCH n9ne “ yateS
> Rapper and Emcee from Kansas

MiCHael deliCH
> Senior from Kansas City, Ks.

My kids. They’re the biggest Tech N9ne fans that I know – all 3 of them! Christiania, Denmark. If you’ve ever been to Denmark and visited Christiania, you’ll know why. I can’t say in case my kids are reading this, but you’ll know.

Who’s your inspiration? Favorite place to visit? Are you a morning person or night person? Favorite fast food restaurant? What do you like best about Lawrence?

Gallagher, a comedian, because he smashed fruit for a living. Lake of the Ozarks. You never know what to expect when you spend a weekend down there, if you know what I mean.

I’m a night person because I’m a vampire, stupid – didn’t you know that?

Night person, because I can eat fourth meal at Taco Bell.

Five Guys. They’re the only place that I can find or create a barbecue hamburger. I like the vibe from all the fans, mostly female. They really love great music. I had my first paid show there when I was in my teens and it’s been wonderful ever since.

Taco Bell, obviously, because it stays open late.

Football gamedays. You’ll always find fun adventures on those days.

09 08 11

4

CONTACT

Teachers don’t always play favorites.

| BAiley ATkiNsON | Photo illustration by Chris Neal

• Talk to get the professor’s attention • Care more about the grade than the subject • Aren’t afraid to speak in class, regardless of statement’s importance • Dress to impress professor • Sit in the front row, center seat to get noticed • Make sure to show up to class as early as possible • Visit every office hour without a reason

The term “teacher’s pet” is often thrown around in a classroom setting.
everyone knows “that student” in class who always has to contribute and always sucks up. it’s pretty obvious how other students feel about those types of students, but how do the professors feel? Dr. Craig Martin, biology professor, thinks that the term is used mostly among students and not with professors. “i am always very impressed with a students who has a lot of questions and a lot of things to say,” Martin says. “But there is a line where they seem to be forcing questions or asking questions that aren’t as good as other ones and they seem to just be asking for asking’s sake.” Marilyn Rausch, a journalism lecturer, says a teacher’s pet is a student who thinks he or she will get favorable treatment by engaging the teacher in a certain way. Rausch says she follows a model taught by her third grade teacher: be proud of what you can accomplish and not what you can get away with. This means students must earn their grades from their work, not from the way they interact with the teacher. “My job is to teach you and your job is to be a professional student, so i prefer that the relationship stay at a professional level,” Rausch says. “you as a student have a professional obligation to do the best that you can, and i, as a teacher, to do the best that i can.” sarafina kankam, a senior from Overland Park and biology teaching assistant, defines a teacher’s pet as someone who tries to get a better grade or get on the good side of a teacher. she believes this happens especially at the end of a semester. kankam noticed students trying to suck up to her, either by starting pointless conversations or asking unnecessary questions, since she grades the weekly assignments. Journalism lecturer Rausch, like Martin, says they appreciate when a student is being engaging. The feedback from students makes the teaching experience more interactive and easy to follow. Rausch says she likes the feedback because when nothing is said during a lecture, she can’t gauge if the students are getting the information or not. Martin and Rausch both suggest that students take advantage of special opportunities that professors offer, such as office hours or study group sessions before exams. Teachers are not the only ones who want students to participate in more out-of-class opportunities. “ i wish i had developed a relationship with more professors earlier on by going into office hours,” says Meredith Walrafen, a senior from Overland Park. While the line between being an engaged student and a teacher’s pet is thin, the differences are clear. Professors and students agree that teachers’ pets are an annoyance and take away from the class.

• Ask questions to verify understanding • Are interested in topic • Only speak up in class if confused about topic • Dress to impress other student (or dress to personal comfort) • Sit in the front row, center seat because you cannot hear or see well • Get to class on time, but don’t rush • Visit office hours to verify lecture or discuss assignment

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CONTACT CaTCH Of THE WEEk // bAiley cArlson
> A weekly peek at a fish in the KU sea.

HOW WE MET // Abbie Keleher And MichAel Jolley
> All great relationships had to start somewhere.
Abbie Keleher, a senior from Bartlesville, Ok., came to college with the planning not to date until senior year. However, after an encounter with a half-naked sophomore the first month of her freshman year, the plan changed. Keleher and Michael Jolley, a graduate from Overland Park had an interesting start to their relationship. Keleher and friends went to visit a friend at his fraternity at the start of the year. The friend told his roommate, Jolley, that a few girls would be coming over later that night. “So, the showman that I was, thought that I should time my shower with their arrival,” Jolley says. Which Jolley planned perfectly; Keleher and friends were at the fraternity for only a few minutes before Jolley walked inside with nothing but a towel on. “I was like oh my gosh, I didn’t know you guys were going to be here, I am so embarrassed,” Jolley says. Keleher couldn’t help but notice Jolley, but questioned the timing. Keleher says that she

aBOUT ME
Name: Bailey Carlson Year: Senior Hometown: Lawrence, Kan. Major: Elementary Education Interested in: Men Contributed photo Interests: Cupcakes, “Criminal Minds,” football, fashion, Lady Gaga and tutoring children. Turn-ons: A man that is confident in himself and not scared to laugh at his own jokes. A guy that can liven up a boring situation with his self-confidence and ability to make people laugh. Turn-offs: I don’t like guys that look like they just rolled out of bed. They need to be put together; something they can be comfortable in all day but still look cute. Notice first in partner: The color of their eyes. I like green eyes! Perfect first date: A laid-back, nothing too fancy afternoon at the ballpark eating peanuts. Tailgating with friends before and then watching the fireworks afterwards. Why she’s a catch: I have a spontaneous outlook on life, love to watch football, and am willing to try new things. I love to laugh and always find the positive in situations. Hanging with the guys is not a problem and I love to have fun with anything and everything that I do. Spends the most money on: North Face apparel. I love to be warm and cozy and a good North Face always offers comfort on a drizzly day. | BAILEY ATKINSON |

Contributed photo is sure he did it on purpose. The two spent the rest of the night talking and planned to meet the next day at a tailgate. Soon the two started attending church together, which they still do almost three years later.

| BAILEY ATKINSON |

6TH & NEW HAMPSHIRE DOORS OPEN AT 9PM 18 TO ENTER, 21 TO DRINK ONLY OPEN THURSDAY NIGHTS

09 08 11

6

HEALTH
GOOD FOR YOU BAD FOR YOU// POPPIng YOuR JOInTS BETTER OPTIONS FOR BAD SITUATIONS > Sometimes it’s hard to tell. >If you’re going to do it, be smart. // E-CIGARETTES
Popping your joints may not be so bad for you after all, besides the people who will glare at you when they hear that popping sound. There isn’t evidence that says popping your joints will lead to joint deterioration, and there is inconsistent research to say you will get arthritis later in life, says Sandy Bowman, a physical therapist at Student Health Services. Popping your knuckles could make them bigger, but just because you do it every day doesn’t mean it will happen, Bowman says. People get the urge to pop because of joint stiffness or because it’s a nervous habit. When you pop a joint, there is a release of pressure, but sometimes it’s a tendon shifting over a joint, Bowman says. gabe Bellovin, a junior from Westchester, n.Y., says he pops his knuckles at least six times a day and he often pops his neck and back. He says it is a nervous habit and does not feel a difference. He said he’ll continue to do it unless evidence proves otherwise. If joints are popped time after time, the release of pressure gives an increase in comfort and motion, so you are inclined to do it again, Bowman says. Ligaments, which hold bones together, start out loose, so if your ligaments become too loose from popping, your joints might not give you full support. It is also possible for a joint in your neck or spine to pinch a nerve. If you find it difficult to stop popping, Bowman suggests trying not to do it frequently. If there is no pain when you attempt to pop any joints and you do not make any fast movements, then it is probably fine, she says. | KYLIE NUTT | Kara Roberts smoked a half pack of clove cigarettes daily before a co-worker turned her on to the electronic cigarette, or the e-cigarette. Two months after Roberts, a 24-yearold Lawrence resident, started using the e-cigarette, she quit smoking. “My smoking habit didn’t control my life anymore because there were no restrictions on where I could smoke, and I started not needing it as much,” Roberts says. For $25 you can buy an e-cigarette that has three parts: a re-chargeable battery, a atomizer and a cartridge. The battery fuels the atomizer to convert the liquid in the cartridge to vapor when the user inhales. One cartridge equals approximately one pack of cigarettes. It cost $7.50 for eight cartridges. The e-cigarette looks like a cigarette, taste like a cigarette and allows the user to inhale nicotine. But e-cigarettes use water vapor instead of smoke. There is no tar, carbon monoxide, second-hand smoke or mess. Sam Isaac, owner of Discount Tobacco in Lawrence, says the e-cigarettes contain only nicotine derived from plants, whereas traditional cigarettes consist of only 30 percent nicotine. The other 70 percent is additives. Roberts says after switching to the e-

Photo by Christy Nutt cigarette, she noticed she could taste again and began to breathe easier. “There was no mess, no smell and I immediately started saving money and feeling healthier,” she says. The transition from traditional cigarettes to the e-cigarette might not be easy for every smoker. “For heavy smokers who are use to strong cigarettes, the e-cig doesn’t always satisfy their cravings,” Isaac says. He says the e-cigarette is popular in his store with senior citizens and people that can’t smoke because of the health risk. The e-cigarette is not currently regulated by the FDA. | CHRISTY nuTT |

Photo by Kylie Nutt

THAT’S DISGUSTING // wEARING UNwAShEd CLoThES
>Dude...gross.
When trying on clothes in the fitting room, you If the underwear is packaged, it’s probably fine. usually don’t think they are dirty. You’re prob- This is why men usually don’t have to wash new ably not going to wash a shirt or jeans before underwear. you wear them. But, you might want to reconMarwa noaman, a senior from Jersey City, sider that. nJ., says she tries on a lot of clothing when she It is possible to catch antibiotic-resistant shops, but she takes caution when trying on unbacteria through the transfer of clothes, says derwear and swimsuits. Dr. Philip Tierno, a clinical professor of After people have tried on the same clothing, the sloughed off skin cells accumulate on microbiology and pathology at new York the inside of clothing. Organisms grow on them university’s School of Medicine. and begin to smell. Perspiration can also collect MRSA, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, is a staph bacterium in garments, which serves as food for bacterial that is resistant to some antibiotics, growth, Tierno says. according to the Centers for Disease Control | KYLIE nuTT | and Prevention. This bacteria can be caught wearing clothes without washing them first, even though the probability is very low, Tierno says. It is crucial to bandage any cuts or scrapes before trying on clothes. Open wounds can cause these dangerous bacterium. “It can prevent the problem of a disaster,” Tierno says. Keep your underwear on when trying on undergarments. There is a lot of contamination in underwear and swimsuits because many women try them on naked and remove the protective Photo by Kylie Nutt liners, Tierno says. If you buy non-packaged underwear, it is important to routinely wash them.

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FEATURE

AN INSIDE LOOK AT THE WORLD OF INK

| JACK RAFFERTY |

It took 11 months and nine appointments with Ben Alvarez, owner of Done-Rite Tattoos, for me to finish my sleeve. Each time I parked outside Alvarez’s shop, located in the Crossroads district of Kansas City, my stomach would flutter in anticipation. My excitement arose partly from seeing my vision become a reality, but also from my endless conversations with Alvarez about the fascinating world of tattoos.

ORIGIN
The 58 markings archeologists found on the knee and ankles of Otzi or “Iceman,” a 5,000-year-old mummified human body, places the origin of tattoos near 3,000 B.C. “Iceman,” found in 1991 in a glacier on a mountain between Austria and Itlay, remains the best-preserved Bronze Age corpse ever discovered, according to Smithsonian Magazine. Across Europe, archeologists have found clay discs and bone needles, believed to have been for tattooing during the Upper Paleolithic (3800 B.C. to 10000 B.C.) period.

HISTORY
Prior to the discovery of Otzi, the earliest examples of tattoos were Egyptian, discovered on female mummies dated to 2000 B.C. It wasn’t until the 17th century that tattooing was documented in North America. A French explorer documented his account of tattooing among the Hurons, a Native American tribe located in Eastern Canada in 1615. Inspired by Thomas Edison’s device designed to make painting and embroidery patterns in 1876, Samuel O’Reilly filed his patent for the first tattoo machine in 1891. Thirty-eight years later Percy Waters, a Detroit inventor, received a patent for a tattoo machine that resembles the one used today.

MODERN ERA
Since Percy Water’s invention of the tattooing machine in 1929, tattoos once considered taboo, are more popular than ever. Throughout his 19-year career as an artist, Alvarez has witnessed this first hand. “Tattooed folks used to be looked as military or ex cons, but these days it seems being tattooed, especially as a musician or sports star, often denotes status. Young people seem to no longer view being tattooed as anything other than success,” Alvarez says. With about six tattoos shops per 100,000 people, Kansas City is the most tattooed city in America. Alvarez’s shop has had a six-month waiting list for the past three years. Alvarez often has customers offer to pay double in an attempt to get bumped to the head of the line. “I don’t play favorites,” Alvarez says. “Everybody waits.” Not only has the tattoo clientele changed, but the tattoo world has seen its share of trends. “All around the world, tattoo trends change all the time,” says Martin Del Camino, artist and owner of Ichiban Tattoo Studio located at 1912 Massachusetts St. Del Camino began his tattoo career in Buenos Aires, before moving to the U.S. in 2000. “Just 10 years ago, lower back tattoos were very common for women," Del Camino says. "It’s sad, all those poor girls are now thought of as tramps.” Technological advancements in the past 30 years have contributed to another growing trend in the tattoo industry. No longer are people forced to bare a tattoo that they regret or no longer feel connected to. You can remove that constant reminder of an impulse decision, past relationship or wild night in Mexico.

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Photo illustrations by Travis Young

TATTOO REMOVAL
It is estimated that of the 10 million Americans that have at least one tattoo, more than 50 percent regret the decision and would like it removed. Before the development of “pulsed” lasers in the 1980s, effective tattoo removal wasn’t an available option. By directing the energy generated by highly concentrated color light beams, pulse lasers are capable of breaking apart ink particles in human skin. While laser removal has been proven effective at removing tattoos, it has often been a costly undertaking. Depending on the size, color and location, a full removal can range from several hundred dollars to several thousand dollars. However, the use of inks specially formulated for easier removal has increased. Since its limited release in 2009, InfinitInk is now available in 12 U.S. sates. The ink, initially developed by professors Bruce Klitzman and Kim Koger of Duke University, has been proven to remove from the skin three times faster than conventional inks during laser treatment. The ink consists of inert plastic beads, containing colored dyes. The energy generated by the laser ruptures the beads, resulting in the leaking and removal of the ink from the body. While InfinitInk expects to release a full color line in the distant future, only black ink is available for now.

TRADITIONAL TATTOOS
Known for its use of bright colors and bold outlines, this style is thought to have originated on military bases in the 1930s. Popular traditional designs include girls, roses, skulls and patriotic symbols. “Designs were made to b simple, but catch the eye and get sailors and the like to spend their money,” says Andrew Milko, artist at Mercy Seat Tattoo in Kansas City. This style has seen resurgence in recent years. “It seems like right now most people are pretty receptive to traditional tattoos," Milko says. "They will never go out of style, because there is something timeless about the designs.”

BLACK AND GRAY TATTOOS
Black and gray is a style of tattooing that uses shades of black to illustrate depth often associated with charcoal drawings. With an emphasis on detail, this style is typically used to express a realistic depiction of an image, such as a portrait. With colored ink unavailable to them, people in U.S. prisons began developing this style in the 1970s.

TRIBAL TATTOOS
Modeled after the bold geometric designs common in tribal culture, this style became a popular U.S. trend in the late 1980s. Done in black ink, the abstract symbols are designed to fit a specific part of the body.

THE TATTOO COMMUNITY
With an estimated 20,000 tattoo parlors in the United States, and a new one opening every day, the evolution of the tattoo industry is appearing on the covers of magazines across the world. “I believe that mainstream society has stopped looking at tattoos as the mark of their underbelly, and now that there is acceptance for the tattooed, perhaps society will take the next step and recognize tattooing as the new modern art, “ says Rocky Rakovic, editor of Inked magazine. Inked, a high-end glossy tattoo lifestyle magazine known for its avant garde photographs, debuted in 2004. It’s evident from the international magazine’s growing readership that many, like Rakovic, view tattoos as modern art. Inked readers get access to exclusive interviews with renowned tattoo artists and photographs of world-class work. The magazine’s coverage of the tattoo culture also includes celebrities. Recent celebs to appear on the cover include Avril Livigne, Ryan Phillippe, Pharrell Williams and Pink. Inked has a readership of 149,000 subscribers and has increased by more than 40,000 within the past year alone.

ORIENTAL
The oriental style of tattooing is known for using the entire body as one canvas. The images flow into each other across the body to create a mural effect. “The tattoos flow along the curves of the body to create the uniform effect,” Del Camino says. The most common images from this style include Koi fish, cherry blossoms, dragons and samurai. “One dragon tattoo I saw was done so well that when the man moved his shoulders, it looked like the dragon was alive,” Del Camino says. For some people, tattoos have the power to prolong feeling a connection to loved ones in a way no other art form can. Jacob Moffitt, an alumnus from Wichita, has a tattoo of a soldier wearing a combat helmet on his left calf. Moffitt got the tattoo last December in remembrance of his brother, Tom Moffitt, who was killed in action while serving in Afghanistan in October 2010. “I think tattoos express individuality and can display what is important and most dear to you in your life,” Moffitt says. While much has changed over the past 5,000 years, one thing that continues to be true is that tattoos are used to outwardly express what is internally important.

CARING FOR YOUR TATTOO
ON THE WEB
In July 2002, “tattoos” was the second most requested search term on the Internet and it has remained the most searched beauty term since 2003. The increased online presence of the tattoo community the last 10 years provides enthusiasts, such as myself, a place to engage with ink lovers from around the world. With hundreds of thousands of user-generated images and stories, BMEzine is the largest body modification website in the world. “BME contains the personal experiences of thousands of people all over the planet, in photo, video and text form. It serves to document the activities of the body modification community in as complete a fashion as possible,” says Jen Savage, site manager. Thousands of websites like BMEzine act as cyber galleries, showcasing artists' work for tattoo admirers from around the world. Similar to art forms, tattoos can be classified into distinct styles.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Remove bandage after a few hours to allow airflow. Treat with antibacterial ointment for about a week. Use warm water and unscented soap to clean the tattoo once a day. Do not swim or submerge the tattoo in water until it is fully healed. Do not pick at the tattoo. Scabbing may occur which could lift the color from the skin.

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MANUAL GET SOME CULTURE // SWING SOCIETY
and have fun. “It’s the perfect club,” Dodier says. In case this still doesn’t sound fun to you, you should know that the Swing Society even goes on road trips for what they call “dance weekends.” Currently, there are two teachers for the Swing Society, but on occasion, they will also have a guest teacher, says Stuart Becker, vice president of the Swing Society. Attendees are also very diverse, ranging from freshman to older people. So, if you feel like getting your groove on with Photo by Chris Neal some swing dancing on Tuesday nights, check Don’t know how to dance? No worries, out the Swing Society. Also, take a look at their Facebook page or website for more information you’ll get the “swing” of things. The KU Swing Society meets every Tuesday regarding times, locations and events. at the Kansas Union to teach newcomers how | CHRIS NEAL | to swing dance and let the experienced ones get their grove on. The best part about it? It’s free. Kaitlin Dodier, a senior from Fredonia, says it’s a good cultural thing to go to with all of the different types of dance styles you can learn. It doesn’t require anything but for you to come

> It’s not all about fast food and beer pong.

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> Absence makes the heart grow...?
As I walked to my first class of the day, the announcer in my head came on; “And now for our main event: Times New Roman versus Chris’ sloppy handwriting.” My sloppy writing was getting the snot kicked out of it 30 seconds in. Instead of trying to go between Facebook, email and my notes on my computer, I was furiously writing everything the teacher said, half of which I couldn’t even read afterwards. I was only 10 minutes into class and I was already checking the time on my phone. Long story short, not using a laptop in class sucked. But what about those students who don’t even own a laptop? I had trouble doing without mine for one class, but they do it on a daily basis. Leo Castro, a senior from Olathe, knows my pain. Although not having a computer keeps him from being distracted in class, he says it’s not worth the hassle of having to write a ten page paper in one sitting or asking someone for the notes because the professor is going too quicly. Some professors agree that laptop use in the

DOING WITHOUT// USING a LaPTOP IN CLaSS
classroom is a good thing, but not entirely. Margaret Severson, a social welfare professor, says students need laptops to take notes, but they are “seductive devices.” It’s hard to control students from abusing them in the classroom. In my opinion, going without a laptop did make me pay more attention in class, but not being able to keep up with the professor isn’t worth the hassle. | CHRIS NEAL |

CHECK OUT OUR DAILY SPECIALS! 9am – 2am 785.749.7699 601 Kasold Lawrence, KS 09 08 11

Photo by Chris Neal

10

HOW TO SHOOT LIGHTNING
When the thunder rolls, grab your camera.
| CHRIS NEAL |

MANUAL

Photo by Chris Neal

Everyone has seen an amazing picture of lightning at one time or another. Ever wonder how Wichita Eagle those photographers got that picture? It’s actually easier than you might think. Whether you have Trying to push the button over and over again won’t get you anywhere. “Rarely does that produce anything but a dark a point-and-shoot camera or an SLR camera, here’s the steps to be able to do it: frame,” Heying says. A clear understanding of weather Before getting into the technical stuff, a quick note on safety should be made. When taking pictures of is critical to shooting lighting. You need to know lightning, you always need to know where the storm is heading. Make sure you aren’t at the highest point what can put you at risk of being hit by a lightin the area because that’s where cloud-to-ground lighting will most always strike. Be aware of your surroundning strike. Heying also says that lightning is ings, because you don’t want to be stuck outside in a thunderstorm while lighting usually at the front of a storm, so try to is coming down on top of you. stay ahead of the storm you’re taking Also, stay away from metal objects. Until you know what you’re doing, don’t ever go pictures of. to the high points in an area or near a place with metal objects around. For point-and-shoot users, cameras have a manual setting that will allow you to freely Mike Yoder – Photo Editor of The Lawrence Jourchange the exposure settings on your camera. You will need to go into that setting in order to nal World shoot this kind of photo. With this in mind, you can safely take that sweet lightning picture. Yoder suggests a different way of controlling your shutYour first step is to have a way to steady your camera. The best choice would be to use a tripod, ter speed. Some cameras have a setting called “Bulb”, but you can always improvise. For example, the photo shown was taken using a bucket and phonebook. or “B.” In this setting, as long as you have the button pushed down, the shutter will stay open. When you I used the bucket as a base to set the camera on, and the phonebook to get the angle I wanted. As long as let go of the button, the shutter will close. He your camera is not going to fall, anything should work. suggests using this setting and covering the Secondly, setting your ISO is probably the easiest thing you’ll need to do. The higher your ISO is, the brighter front of the camera with a piece of black your photo is, and vice-versa. For this type of shot, you will want a lower ISO. Somewhere in the 100 to 200 range is cardboard. When lightning appears, fine, but feel free to experiment with it. move the cardboard away, and The next thing to do is set your aperture. Your aperture determines how large your depth of field is in your photo. Mike when it stops, put the cardYoder, photo editor at The Lawrence Journal World, suggests using an aperture of f8 for this shot. board back. This is anothNow for the most important thing: the shutter speed. Your shutter speed is crucial for capturing a lightning bolt. For these types er way to get several of shots, you will want a very slow shutter speed to allow more time for the lightning to strike while the bolts of lightning picture is still exposing. These two photos were taken by having the shutter stay open for 30 seconds. in one picture. Some cameras won’t be able to stay open that long, so just have the shutter stay open as long as possible. While the shutter is open, any lighting strike that happens within the frame of your camera will be captured. Now that you have the basics of how to shoot lighting, go out and give it a try. But always be aware of your surroundings and know where the storm is heading.

Travis Heying – Staff photographer at The

TIPS FROM THE PROS

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NOTICE

WESCOE WIT // > Lol.
GIRL: There are freaking scratch marks on my shoulder, Guy: Haha niiice. GUY: “It cracked his ass up!”

WhaT IT’S lIkE // to GIVE A LAP DANCE
> We know you’re curious ...
| BY KARMA AS TOLD TO NADIA IMAFIDON |

GIRL 1:”It’s by accident though.” GUY 2:”You’re getting your masters by accident?” GIRL 1:”Yeah…” GIRL 1: “My grandmother has old timers, it sucks” GIRL 2: “Old timers?” GIRL 1: “Yeah, old timers. You know, like, the disease.” GIRL 2: “You mean Alzhiemers?” Girl 1: “Oh! That’s why my professor was looking confused when I told him.” GUY 1:”I don’t know what she’s doing, something on the floor.” GUY 2:”I think she’s trying to fix her style.” GUY 1:”I documented it.” GUY: “She is one of the top five ugliest girls on campus…”

During the summer of 2011, a University of Kansas senior (stage name Karma) went with her friend to a strip club and walked away with a new job. Although her intention was only to act as emotional support for her friend’s audition, Karma was pressured by some of the girls working into auditioning herself. She has been dancing at the club since.

GIRL: “Being in class today had me confused about my faith…I need to go to church!”
| NADIA IMAFIDON | Conributed image

$

8

A L L Y O U C A N E AT

pasta,salad, & bread
5pm - CLOSE

CARAFES OF PA I S A N O ’ S

red, chablis, & sangria
2 1 1 2 W. 2 5 T H S T. 785.838.3500

At my job, I am an actress. I have a big dressing room where I get all dolled up and make good mone. It’s the way I go about getting money that bothers some people. I wear a yellow metallic dress with cut-outs on the sides and six-inch platform heels for six or seven hours a night. Generally married men provide me with a paycheck. They could tell me they invented a flying car that is going on the market next year and I’ll support them. I’ll stroke their arm and drape my legs over theirs. You do what it takes within bounds to get cash. A man was about to leave when I sat down next to him. He only asked for one dance and I wasn’t going to turn down $20. He ended up buying 12 or 13 dances. I led him into the VIP room. You may think that old guys have problems getting it up but that is not the case when a yougn, hot, half-naked girl is on top of them. I’m straddling him and rubbing up against him and I can feel it. He starts to breathe heavily. He tries to nibble on my ear and slip his hand down my thong to touch my crotch. I forcibly grab his wrists and push his hands down to his sides to make sure he understands that that is not allowed.

Just like that, I embrace my character. As Karma, I’m really into the lap dance, moaning loudly, gyrating against him, rubbing his face and grabbing his thighs. I’m not actually thinking about the fact that I am grinding up on a man in his sixties. I’m not thinking about the massive bruises that line my inner and outer thighs from long nights of pole dancing. Instead I’m spacing out, repeating one phrase to get me through the night. I’m making money, I’m making money. I go through the routine but I’m not actually there. I made between $250 and $300 on just this one guy. I’m young and I have a good body. People judge me for what I do but I don’t let it bother me. I make good money. It’s kind of dirty money, really.

You can read Karma’s anonymous blog at karmaschronicles.blogspot.com.

09 08 11

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NOTICE

Q&A // HYMN FOR HER
> Because we have questions. Celebrities have answers.
Lucy Tight and Wayne Waxing are “Hymn for Her,” a dynamic duo that has set out to take on the world by…trailer? It is exactly what it seems. This folk pop band travels around the country in a 1961 Bambi Airstream Trailer with their daughter, Diver, and their dog, Pokey. The two recorded their latest album “Lucy and Wayne and the AMAIRICAN STREAM” while on tour last year in the 16-foot trailer they have made into their home. With the married couple on numerous instruments like a handmade cigar box guitar, their sound is nothing that anyone has been able to pinpoint with just a few words. Hymn for Her is seeing their name placed next to band names like the White Stripes and the Black Keys with more of a country Americana vibe. Keep your eyes on the road because the Bambi Airstream trailer will soon be gracing us with their presence. Hymn for Her will be performing at Vulcan’s Forge in Kansas City, Mo on Sept. 25. Jayplay: Hymn for Her is a really creative name. How did you come up with this? Lucy: Wayne actually came up with it. He wrote a song called “Hymn for Her” a long time ago, a couple years ago actually, and then he thought it would be a really cool name for a band. JP: What’s the song about? L: The song was about a certain route a girl’s house that you love and then the route backward. JP: How would you describe your music to someone who has never heard it before? L: Sort of soul, funk, blues, blue grass. Totally unique. Something different that makes you feel good. JP: What are your musical influences? L: Well, mostly the road and traveling and friends. And AC/DC! And Led Zeppelin, Joni Mitchell, but mostly just traveling and friends and touring. JP: So I’ve read that you live out of your Airstream Trailer with your daughter. What is that like? L: Busy! We also travel with our dog, Pokey. He’s our 90 pound black lab. So there’s never a dull moment on the road. JP: What is the story behind the cigar box guitar that you play, Lucy? L: It’s a cigar box with three strings. One is a bass string, two are guitar strings. A broom handle for a neck. Pretty much you could use a broom handle or a toilet plunger. Our friend, John Lowe, made it and gave it to us as a gift. JP: How did you learn how to play it? L: I practiced fretting, you know. It was a lot of work, and I’m still working on it. I am still learning how to play it . JP: Which other instruments do you play in the band? L: Wayne plays the kick drum, hi-hat, banjo, guitar and harmonica. I play banjo and acoustic guitar. Sometimes the ukulele and the glockenspiel. JP: What can readers expect from your recent album, “Lucy & Wayne and the Amairican Stream”? L: Well I think the same thing as what I said about our music. Something that makes you smile, and just makes you feel good. JP: Why should students attend your show in Kansas City on Sept. 25? L: We sound like a full band on our album but we also sound like that live. What you see is what you get, whether it’s in the live setting or recording too.

| NADIA IMAFIDON |

Hymn for Her will be playing at Vulcan’s Forge at 8 pm in Kansas City, Mo., on Sept. 25. At the concert, the high energy of multi-instrumentalists Lucy Tight and Wayne Waxing, and the vintage slides from the ’60s playing in the background will most certainly give attendees a unique experience.

Contributed photo

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PLAY STAGE PRESENCE // MY BROTHER, THE VULTURE
> Feel free to swoon.

ESSENTIALS

Contributed photo

785‐841‐4122 913 N 2nd St Lawrence, KS 66044 www.lawrenceallstarsgentlemensclub.com

The guys from My Brother, The Vulture will be the first to tell you they’re at odds with what’s most popular in the Lawrence music scene right now. They’ll also be the first to tell you they don’t give a shit. In a time where synthesizers or mandolins seem like absolute requisites among local bands, these guys are producing some of the most gritty and unapologetic rock to come out of Lawrence for a long time. As singer Alec Hernandez says, “there’s not really a market for harder music in Lawrence right now,” but this hasn’t stopped the five-piece from getting its name out and earning a respectable level of notoriety.

Although they’ve only been a band since September of 2010, My Brother, The Vulture already has a lot to be proud of. They entered a nation-wide competition and won a spot at the Warped Tour in Kansas City. And as if that isn’t already enough excitement for a relatively new band, they recently recorded two new songs at Rubber Track Studio in New York City for free. The band is currently planning a tour that will kick off in January and it’s scheduled to play at the Kansas Union for Tunes at Noon on September 23. As for feeling slightly out of place among the folk and electronic wave that has taken over Lawrence, they don’t let it phase them. “If it doesn’t have a mandolin it better have a fat- ass beat,” says guitarist Jon Marzette. “Those are the rules of Lawrence right now, and we’re trying to break that mold.” Kudos dudes. Someone’s gotta do it. | JEFF KARR |

SCENE AND HEARD // JAVA BREAK
>New places. New faces.

FREE
SUSHITROLLS SUNDAY HURSDAY
W th Street www.kobeatlawrence.com

09 08 11

The painted murals and graffiti on the walls, the retro furniture, the old boxstyle TV from the 1970s — no, this isn’t your typical coffee shop. It’s The Java Break. For 17 years, students have trekked from campus to downtown, searching for a new place to study. Sometimes Anschutz library just doesn’t cut it, but The Java Break, 17 E. Seventh St., is the perfect spot to pull those annoying allnighters. The coffee shop is far from traditional with its cereal bar and al fresco food and drink menu, not to mention the lush, urban appeal. It’s a great excuse to grab a coffee, study, or just hang out and catch up with friends. “I’m an art student and I feel it’s more of a place where I fit in as opposed to going to the library,” says Nici Ashner, a junior from Overland Park.“I don’t do schoolwork outside of the studio very often, but when I do, this is where I choose to go.” By no means is the café a “hipster” hangout, but rather, an alternative option to other downtown studying spots. The

Photo by Max Greenwood

works of art plastered across the walls and tables were all drawn by former students, Lawrence residents and even the occasional staff member, further adding a historical element to the café. “I would like to think it’s our sandwiches and beverages that attract students,”owner Derek Hogan says. “But it’s probably the 24-hour service that’s our biggest attraction.” The Java Break also has free Wi-Fi, and the staff has an online blog. The coffee shop is open seven days a week, 24/7. | MAX GREENWOOD |

14

SPEAK

These Are My People
I had high hopes for my time abroad. Both sets of my dad’s grandparents emigrated from Italy, so 50 percent of my blood is legitimately Italian. After three semesters of studying the language in the States, I was ready to connect with my roots in the birthplace of the Renaissance: Florence. I just knew that once I set foot on the land of my ancestors, the language would osmose into my brain, my Italian blood would rise up, and I would blend right into Italian culture. In fact, they’d probably take one look at me, see my Italian nose, my big eyes, my olive skin, and think I was una locale (a local). Instead, my first week of four-hour language classes in Italy left me with hellacious headaches. The rapid-fire Italian shot at me from native Italian speakers was more than my brain could handle. I got accustomed to saying phrases like, “Ripeti, per favore?” (Could you repeat that, please?), “Mi scusi?” (Excuse me?), and most embarrassing of all was the oftrepeated, “Mi dispiace, ma non ho capito.” (I’m sorry, but I didn’t understand). Another blow came when my host dad said to me, “One of your parents is not Italian, right?” “Yeah, my dad’s Italian, but my mom isn’t.” “I can tell.” Seriously? Apparently I didn’t even look like a legit Italian! I tried to convince myself as I walked through the bustling streets that these people, this culture, this land somehow resonated inside of me. I strained to hear some ring in my soul of “Yes! We are one and the same! These are my people!” But it never came. I wasn’t in love with Italy the way my classmates were. My roommate was having the time of her life. Sweetly, she tried to help me feel my roots, saying, “Oh, I bet you’re more Italian than you think!” But I wasn’t feeling it. For three weeks I wasn’t feeling it. Don’t get me wrong – Italy certainly had its delights and I thanked God for the opportunity to experience them. I saw works by Boticelli, Michelangelo, Da Vinci, and Donatello. Most nights we chased our delectable three course meals down with fine wines, often followed by the dreamy goodness that is gelato. By day, I walked narrow cobblestone streets that were often filled with the sound of accordions or violins – just as you would imagine Italy. Yet somehow it all felt so empty to me. Everybody in my program seemed content to fill

Finding spiritual identity in Italy

Contributed photo While in Italy, DiDonato rediscovered her faith.

their days and nights with museums, shopping, bars and clubs and I wasn’t. I wanted something deeper. Something alive. Something eternal. So I talked to God – a lot. I told God how frustrated I was that my values didn’t sync up with the Italians’ the way I’d imagined. I missed my life in Lawrence, my friends, my family, and my church. One weekend I decided to meet up with a friend in Rome. I had a couple hours all by myself before meeting her. So I hopped on the B line and got off at the second stop: Il Colosseo, or, as we know it, the Colosseum. I floated along in the crowd of people exiting the station. The Mediterranean sunlight temporarily blinded me from what was just across the street. Within a few seconds, my eyes adjusted and focused on the ancient, arched building towering over me. Dumbfounded, I stood there a moment or two, just staring up at the Colosseum. How many times had I seen this building on cute elementary school atlases, on t-shirts, magnets and other cheap souvenirs? I gazed upon a centuries-old world icon as unexpected tears spilled down my cheeks. Why am I crying? And then I remembered what actually

happened just on the other side of that wall. The Colosseum has had various uses throughout history: it was a quarry, provided housing for monks and was built to be an amphitheatre for entertainment. But there was only one use that was running through my mind as I stood silently crying, staring up at it. I remembered that people who once walked the same ground I was standing on went inside that arena, never to come out again. I tried to imagine what it would be like to face brutal death simply for following Jesus. What were these people’s last thoughts as they watched the lions approach and heard the roar of thousands of people cheering for them to die? Did they feel at peace with their end, that they’d done exactly what they were meant to do in their time on earth? Did they realize that their choice to identify themselves with Christ, even in the face of death, would make one girl thousands of years later stand in awe? For the first time in Italy, my soul rang with, “Yes. We are one and the same. These are my people.” I walked away from the Colosseum that day with new perspective on my small life. I realized that, like these martyrs, the choices I make now will affect people generations away, whom I will

never see. I realized that stronger than my cultural heritage is the identity I have as a follower of Christ. It trumps everything, transcending time and bloodline, connecting me to Christians past, present, and future. I hope that my life will make the martyrs’ count for something as I live with the same dedication to Christ. There is a verse in the Bible, which says, “Therefore, since we are surrounded by such a huge crowd of witnesses to the life of faith, let us strip off every weight that slows us down, especially the sin that so easily trips us up. And let us run with endurance the race God has set before us.” (Hebrews 12:1) Since that day, I sometimes imagine myself in the arena, looking up at packed stadium seats and seeing the martyrs, my people, cheering me on to life. | JENNIFER DIDONATO |

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