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Operations Manual

Issue-09/01/2010

Forward Questions, Comments, and Suggestions to: Flight Standards Department Aerosim Flight Academy, INC. Orlando Sanford International Airport 2700 Flight Line Avenue Sanford, Florida 32773 Or Call: (407) 330-7020

OPERATIONS MANUAL

Table Of Contents
PREFACE Chapter 1 ........................................................................................................................ Introduction Chapter 2 ....................................................................................................................... Organization Chapter 3 ................................................................................................................. General Policies Chapter 4 ................................................................................................... Ramp & Taxi Operations Chapter 5 ........................................................................................................... Operational Policies Chapter 6 ................................................................................................................... Flight Planning Chapter 7 .............................................................................................................................. Weather Chapter 8 .......................................................................................................Emergency Procedures Chapter 9 .......................................................................................................................... Passengers Chapter 10 ........................................................................................................ Hazardous Materials Chapter 11 ..................................................................................................................... Maintenance Chapter 12 ...................................................................... Aircraft De-icing / Cold Weather Program Chapter 13 .........................................................................................................Flight Crew Policies Chapter 14 ......................................................................................... Safety Procedures & Practices Chapter 15 ......................................................................................................... Student Information Chapter 16 ..................................................................................................Master Base Supplement Chapter 17 ........................................................................................... Flight Instructor Information Chapter 18 ........................................................................................................................... Bulletins Chapter 19 ........................................................................................................ Employee Handbook

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RECORD OF REVISIONS ........................................................................................................................................ 3 LIST OF EFFECTIVE PAGES ................................................................................................................................. 5 TEMPORARY REVISION LOG ............................................................................................................................ 14 COMMENTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS ........................................................................................................ 16

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Chapter 2 Organization DATE PAGE 09/01/10 2-2 09/01/10 2-4 09/01/10 2-6 09/01/10 2-8 09/01/10 2-10 09/01/10 2-12 09/01/10 2-14 09/01/10 2-16 09/01/10 2-18 09/01/10 2-20

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Chapter 3 General Policies DATE PAGE 09/01/10 3-2 09/01/10 3-4 09/01/10 3-6 09/01/10 3-8 09/01/10 3-10 09/01/10 3-12 09/01/10 3-14 09/01/10 3-16 09/01/10 3-18 09/01/10 3-20 09/01/10 3-22 09/01/10 3-24 09/01/10 3-26 09/01/10 3-28

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Chapter 4 Ramp & Taxi Operations REVISION DATE PAGE REVISION ISSUE 09/01/10 4-2 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 4-4 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 4-6 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 4-8 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 4-10 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 4-12 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 4-14 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 4-16 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 4-18 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 4-20 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 4-22 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 4-24 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 4-26 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 4-28 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 4-30 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 4-32 ISSUE

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Chapter 5 Operational Policies REVISION DATE PAGE REVISION ISSUE 09/01/10 5-2 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 5-4 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 5-6 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 5-8 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 5-10 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 5-12 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 5-14 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 5-16 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 5-18 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 5-20 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 5-22 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 5-24 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 5-26 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 5-28 ISSUE

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Chapter 7 Weather DATE PAGE 09/01/10 7-2 09/01/10 7-4 09/01/10 7-6 09/01/10 7-8 09/01/10 7-10 09/01/10 7-12 09/01/10 7-14 09/01/10 7-16 09/01/10 7-18

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Chapter 8 Emergency Procedures REVISION DATE PAGE REVISION ISSUE 09/01/10 8-2 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 8-4 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 8-6 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 8-8 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 8-10 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 8-12 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 8-14 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 8-16 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 8-18 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 8-20 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 8-22 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 8-24 ISSUE

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Chapter 10 Hazardous Materials REVISION DATE PAGE REVISION ISSUE 09/01/10 10-2 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 10-4 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 10-6 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 10-8 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 10-10 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 10-12 ISSUE

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Chapter 11 Maintenance DATE PAGE 09/01/10 11-2 09/01/10 11-4 09/01/10 11-6 09/01/10 11-8 09/01/10 11-10 09/01/10 11-12 09/01/10 11-14 09/01/10 11-16 09/01/10 11-18 09/01/10 11-20 09/01/10 11-22

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Chapter 12 Aircraft De-icing / Cold Weather Program REVISION DATE PAGE REVISION ISSUE 09/01/10 12-2 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 12-4 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 12-6 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 12-8 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 12-10 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 12-12 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 12-14 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 12-16 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 12-18 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 12-20 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 12-22 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 12-24 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 12-26 ISSUE

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Chapter 13 Flight Crew Policies REVISION DATE PAGE REVISION ISSUE 09/01/10 13-2 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 13-4 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 13-6 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 13-8 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 13-10 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 13-12 ISSUE

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Chapter 14 Safety Procedures & Practices REVISION DATE PAGE REVISION ISSUE 09/01/10 14-2 ISSUE PREFACE

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Chapter 15 Student Information REVISION DATE PAGE REVISION ISSUE 09/01/10 15-2 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 15-4 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 15-6 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 15-8 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 15-10 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 15-12 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 15-14 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 15-16 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 15-18 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 15-20 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 15-22 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 15-24 ISSUE Chapter 16 Master Base Supplement REVISION DATE PAGE REVISION ISSUE 09/01/10 16-2 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 16-4 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 16-6 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 16-8 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 16-10 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 16-12 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 16-14 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 16-16 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 16-18 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 16-20 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 16-22 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 16-24 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 16-26 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 16-28 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 16-30 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 16-32 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 16-34 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 16-36 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 16-38 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 16-40 ISSUE

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OPERATIONS MANUAL PAGE 17-1 17-3 17-5 17-7 17-9 17-11 17-13 17-15 17-17 17-19 17-21 17-23 17-25 17-27 17-29 17-31 17-33 17-35 17-37 17-39 17-41 Chapter 17 Flight Instructor Information REVISION DATE PAGE REVISION ISSUE 09/01/10 17-2 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 17-4 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 17-6 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 17-8 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 17-10 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 17-12 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 17-14 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 17-16 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 17-18 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 17-20 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 17-22 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 17-24 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 17-26 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 17-28 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 17-30 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 17-32 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 17-34 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 17-36 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 17-38 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 17-40 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 17-42 ISSUE DATE 09/01/10 09/01/10 09/01/10 09/01/10 09/01/10 09/01/10 09/01/10 09/01/10 09/01/10 09/01/10 09/01/10 09/01/10 09/01/10 09/01/10 09/01/10 09/01/10 09/01/10 09/01/10 09/01/10 09/01/10 09/01/10

Chapter 18 Bulletins Consult the BULLETINS LOG for a list of all active Bulletins. The BULLETINS LOG should be placed before all Bulletins. Chapter 19 Employee Handbook REVISION DATE PAGE REVISION ISSUE 09/01/10 19-2 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 19-4 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 19-6 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 19-8 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 19-10 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 19-12 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 19-14 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 19-16 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 19-18 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 19-20 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 19-22 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 19-24 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 19-26 ISSUE ISSUE 09/01/10 19-28 ISSUE PREFACE

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Temporary Revision Log


TEMP REV NO. DATED TEMP REV NO. DATED

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Comments and Recommendations


Please make a copy of this page, or obtain this form from the Flight Standards department, to forward your comments, and recommendations concerning this manual. Attach a photocopy of the relevant pages of the manual and mark the areas that your comments apply to.
MANUAL CHANGE RECOMMENDATION TO BE FILLED IN BY PILOT AND FORWARDED TO FLIGHT STANDARDS DATE: __________________________________ PILOT NAME: ___________________________________________ EMPLOYEE NUMBER: ______________ MAILBOX NUMBER: ________________

NAME OF MANUAL: _________________________________________________________ MANUAL REVISION NUMBER: ___________ MANUAL CHAPTER NUMBER: ____________ MANUAL PAGE NUMBER: ________________ SUBJECT AREA (general): _____________________________________________________ CHANGE RECOMMENDATION: _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________
For additional space continue change recommendation on back.

SIGNATURE: _______________________________________ TITLE: _____________________________________________ ---------------------------------------------------------------------------TO BE FILLED IN BY FLIGHT STANDARDS FROM: ___________________________________________________________________________ TO: __________________________________________________ MAIL BOX #: _______________ Your Change Recommendation dated ________________ is acknowledged. It will be held for action.

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Chapter 1 - Introduction Table Of Contents


INTRODUCTION ....................................................................................................................................................... 3 MANUAL SYSTEM .................................................................................................................................................... 4 CONVENTIONS ......................................................................................................................................................... 4 SPECIAL NOTATIONS ............................................................................................................................................. 5 TEMPORARY REVISION PROCEDURE .............................................................................................................. 6 REVISION SYSTEM .................................................................................................................................................. 7 REVISION CONTROL .............................................................................................................................................. 7 BULLETINS ................................................................................................................................................................ 7

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Introduction
This Operations Manual has been prepared for the use and guidance of flight, ground, and management personnel associated with the Aerosim Flight Academy. It is a convenient source of Company Policy. Each Part contains instructions and information necessary for Aerosim Flight Academy personnel to perform their duties and responsibilities with the highest degree of safety. This manual will deal with the operation of all company aircraft operated under the provisions of 14 CFR Part 91, 141, and all other pertinent regulations. It is the responsibility of each flight crewmember to operate in accordance with the provisions of this document. Authority to deviate from the procedures in this manual will only be granted by the Senior Vice President or his designee and only in accordance with applicable regulations. However, this does not preclude a pilot from exercising the authority granted in 14 CFR Part 91.3. Should any conflict occur between the contents of this manual and the compliance of any applicable federal regulations, Federal Aviation Regulations will take precedence over other document. However, Company Policy may in some cases be more restrictive in nature and, therefore, would take precedence. The provisions of this manual apply to all personnel, including each person employed or used by the Company in revenue flight training operations or non-revenue flights. Any person who is onboard a Company aircraft being operated by the Company is also subject to the provisions of this manual. Operations policy and procedures contained in this manual apply to all Aerosim Flight Academy aircraft. All affected parties shall be knowledgeable of the contents of this manual and of job descriptions, as appropriate, as set forth in this manual and/or other departmental publications. Every effort has been made to avoid conflicts between manuals through a minimum of duplication. However, if a conflict exists, the manual with the most current revision date shall apply.

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Manual System
The Flight Standards Manual system contains the policies and procedures that govern the operation of all Aerosim Flight Academy aircraft. The manual system covers personnel associated with the Aerosim Flight Academy, including: flight instructors, students, ground service personnel, maintenance personnel, and management personnel. Aerosim Flight Academys manual system is divided into the following parts: Operations Manual Flight Standards Manual (aircraft specific) Communications Standards Manual

Aerosim Flight Academy manuals contain proprietary information and their receipt or possession does not convey any right to reproduce manual content. Manuals are not to be given to or shown to anyone outside the company without the express permission of the President. Reproduction of the contents of any manual without permission is prohibited. Manuals, or the appropriate portions of a manual, will be available to all areas of responsibility within the Company. Supervisors are responsible for determining that all personnel under their supervision have read and are familiar with the appropriate parts of the Aerosim Flight Academy manual applicable to their duties and responsibilities. Revisions to this manual will be issued when a change to the regulations or the operation occurs. A vertical bar (change bar) in the margin indicates a change, addition or deletion in the adjacent text for the current revision of that page only. The change bar is dropped at the next revision of that page. All manual holders are responsible for adding revisions and keeping their manuals current at all times.

Conventions
The word Flight Instructor has the same meaning as Pilot-in-Command. The words flight crewmember means both the Flight Instructor and Student. Masculine and/or feminine pronouns may be used interchangeably and refer to both male and female persons, unless stated otherwise. The words Company and Aerosim Flight Academy refer to and have the same meaning as Aerosim Flight Academy, Inc. and may be used interchangeably. The word manual means Flight Standards Manual, a part of the manual system.

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Special Notations

NOTE Expands on information that is considered essential to emphasize. Information contained in notes may also be safety related

CAUTION Provides information that may result in damage to equipment if not followed

WARNING Emphasizes information that may result in personal injury or loss of life if not strictly followed

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Temporary Revision Procedure


A temporary revision is intended to be made permanent on the next revision cycle. Temporary revision information will supplement and/or replace existing manual information. All temporary revisions will be printed on yellow paper. No white pages will be removed for a temporary revision. The yellow temporary revision shall be inserted so that its page number faces the corresponding page number in the manual. Instructions at the top of the temporary revision page will detail where the temporary revision information will be inserted and, as applicable, what information will be deleted. Although not required, it is suggested that replaced or deleted text be crossed out of the manual.

If a multi-page temporary revision replaces or supplements information on one white revision page, the first temporary revision page will have the appropriate page number (e.g. 2-77). Subsequent pages will have the page number followed by a letter (e.g. 2-77A, 2-77B). The group of yellow temporary revision pages shall be inserted facing the corresponding page number on the white revision. Temporary revisions shall only be removed when specified.

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Revision System
Operations Manual revisions will be issued in consecutive numbers; and each page of the new revision will contain the revision number and the date the revision was issued. It is the responsibility of all affected personnel to periodically review the Operations Manual to ensure that all current procedures are being followed. All revisions created after September 1st, 2010 will contain a preamble to record the purpose and the specific reasons for the revision in order to facilitate evaluation of subsequent purposed changes.

Revision Control
If a revision is missed contact the Flight Standards Department for a copy.

Bulletins
A Bulletin contains those items that must be relayed to applicable personnel immediately. The information is not intended to be a permanent revision to the manual. Bulletins have flexible expiration dates. All Bulletins will be printed on blue paper. All Bulletins created after September 1st, 2010 will contain a preamble to record the purpose and the specific reasons for the Bulletin in order to facilitate evaluation of subsequent purposed changes.

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Chapter 2 - Organization Table Of Contents


MANAGEMENT ......................................................................................................................................................... 3 STAFF TIME OFF POLICY ..................................................................................................................................... 3 SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT ..................................................................................................................................... 4 DIRECTOR OF FLIGHT OPERATIONS ............................................................................................................... 5 CHIEF FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR .............................................................................................................................. 6 GROUP MANAGER................................................................................................................................................... 7 GROUP LEADER ....................................................................................................................................................... 7 FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR ............................................................................................................................................ 8 GROUND INSTRUCTOR .......................................................................................................................................... 8 MANAGER OF FLIGHT STANDARDS .................................................................................................................. 9 FLIGHT STANDARDS GROUP MANAGER ....................................................................................................... 10 SENIOR STANDARDIZATION INSTRUCTOR .................................................................................................. 10 STANDARDIZATION INSTRUCTOR .................................................................................................................. 11 CHECK INSTRUCTOR ........................................................................................................................................... 11 FLIGHT SUPERVISOR ........................................................................................................................................... 12 DISPATCH SUPERVISOR ...................................................................................................................................... 13 FLIGHT DISPATCHER .......................................................................................................................................... 13 COURSEWARE DEVELOPMENT MANAGER AND FSTD MANAGEMENT REPRESENTATIVE ......... 14 COURSEWARE DEVELOPER .............................................................................................................................. 15 MANAGER OF SAFETY, SECURITY & ENVIRONMENTAL ......................................................................... 16 ORGANIZATIONAL CHART (FLIGHT OPERATIONS) .................................................................................. 17 ORGANIZATIONAL CHART (MAINTENANCE DEPARTMENT) ................................................................. 18 ORGANIZATIONAL CHART (STUDENT SERVICES) ..................................................................................... 19 ORGANIZATIONAL CHART (SALES AND MARKETING) ............................................................................ 19 ORGANIZATIONAL CHART (ADMINISTRATION) ........................................................................................ 20 ORGANIZATIONAL CHART (EDUCATION) .................................................................................................... 20

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Management
This chapter outlines the management structure of Aerosim Flight Academy. The following personnel fill the necessary Operations Department management positions. Senior Vice President Paul Woessner Orlando Sanford International Airport 2700 Flight Line Avenue Sanford, FL 32773 Director of Flight Operations Bob Joyce Orlando Sanford International Airport 2700 Flight Line Avenue Sanford, FL 32773

Chief Flight Instructor Michael Moran Orlando Sanford International Airport 2700 Flight Line Avenue Sanford, FL 32773

Manager of Flight Standards Ramy Guirgis Orlando Sanford International Airport 2700 Flight Line Avenue Sanford, FL 32773

Manager of Safety, Security & Environmental Michael Kern Orlando Sanford International Airport 2700 Flight Line Avenue Sanford, FL 32773

Staff Time Off Policy


Department/Divisional staff shall, while on vacation or away from the Academy, delegate their authority or responsibility to another appropriate Academy employee. This delegation of authority or responsibility shall be made known laterally within the department/division and vertically to responsible management.

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Senior Vice President

Reports To: Direct Reports:

President Director of Maintenance Director of Flight Operations Manager of Safety, Security, & Environmental Administers and coordinates and ultimately responsible for Flight Operations and Maintenance Department activities.

Basic Function:

Areas of Responsibility: Ensures systems are developed to monitor and analyze aircraft reliability and makes recommendations for improvements. Ensures that the entire Aerosim Fleet Maintenance Team and Flight Operations Team are aware of the Academys mission, their specific goals, and their performance versus those goals. Overall responsible for the safe and efficient operation of the Flight Operations and Maintenance Departments. Has the authority to exercise operational control over all aircraft operations. Must be highly knowledgeable of company manuals, FAA Regulations, Operation Specifications, Flight Manuals, and other pertinent information relating to his duties. Provides long-term planning and budget analysis for the Company on aircraft acquisition and the management of Flight Operations and Maintenance. Has the responsibility and authority to make all decisions in the Maintenance Department with respect to maintenance and appearance of Company aircraft. Has the authority to commit to the expenditure of funds to ensure necessary maintenance actions are accomplished. Responsible for the creation, planning, and execution of budgets for both the Operations and Maintenance Department. Acts in the capacity of Airman Certification Representative. Ensures that safety is consistently the first priority of Academy Operations.

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Director of Flight Operations


Reports To: Direct Reports: Senior Vice President Manager of Flight Standards Chief Flight Instructor

Basic Function: .

Administer, coordinate and ensure the safe operations of the daily flight activities.

Areas of Responsibility: Ensures that the entire Aerosim Flight Academy Flight Operations Team is aware of the Academys mission, their specific goals, and their performance versus those goals. Overall responsible for the safe and efficient operation of the Flight Operations Has the authority to exercise operational control over all aircraft operations. Must be highly knowledgeable of company manuals, FAA Regulations, Operation Specifications, Flight Manuals, and other pertinent information relating to his duties. Provides long-term planning and budget analysis for the Company on aircraft acquisition and the management of Flight Operations. Responsible for the creation, planning, and execution of budgets for the Flight Operations Department. Ensures that safety is consistently the first priority of Academy Operations. Oversees all flight-testing. Conducts continuous trend analysis of stage checks and flight tests. In conjunction with the Chief Flight Instructor and the Manager of Flight Standards, determines what improvements are necessary based on the results of the trend analysis. Analyses accidents and incidents within the industry and especially at the Academy. Ensures that all instructors and students receive a formal written briefing on accident causes and prevention. In conjunction with the Manager of Flight Standards, identifies the need for curriculum modification and instructor development Company wide. Work actively with other organizations to develop and coordinate meetings related to safety and practices. Develop standard operating procedures and policies and ensure the effectiveness of standardization training. Evaluates the suitability of aircraft and simulators and makes recommendations in consideration of those evaluations. Sits as a member of the ASAP committee. Responsible for motivation and continual training of all instructors.

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Chief Flight Instructor


Reports To: Direct Reports: Director of Flight Operations Managers of Training (All Locations)

Basic Function:

Oversees Domestic, International and College Flight Programs for the Academy. Ensures program quality and that the students graduate within course guidelines.

Areas of Responsibility: Oversees the conduct of flight and academic training. Develops and modifies curriculums. Ensures quality of program. In cooperation with the Manager of Flight Standards, identifies the need for curriculum modification and instructor development. Ensures that appropriate statistics are measured and reported. Conduct weekly meetings with Group Managers / Leaders as well as Monthly Safety Meetings. Coordinates instructor to student ratio. Evaluates suitability of aircraft and simulators and makes recommendations in consideration of those evaluations. Assists students who have difficulty with program to ensure their success. Responsible for motivation and continual training of all instructors. Monitors and evaluates instructor performance and productivity. Reviews all student progress reports to ensure proper corrective action is being taken. When Group Managers cannot correct a student problem, sets forth a plan of action and goals with the student, Group Manager, and Flight Instructor. Reports all impending problems to the Student Progress Monitoring Counsel. Evaluates Instructors monthly on the basis of the success of their students, productivity, and work habits. Ensures all student-training records are in order prior to their ACR date. Ensures all Flight Instructors act in accordance with the Operations Manual and the curriculum. Coordinates with the Manager of Flight Standards to ensure that all company policies are adhered to and all manuals are updated. Ensure that Flight Instructor training is conducted in a timely manner and assist if necessary. Assume all duties of Group Manager if one is not designated. Conduct the final review of new student flight records to ensure prior ratings were completed in accordance with 14 CFR Part 61 or 141. Perform additional duties, as assigned, by management.

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Group Manager
Reports to: Basic Function: Chief Flight Instructor This position is directly responsible for the day-to-day operations of flight training groups.

Areas of Responsibility: Maintain the quality of flight training. Ensure that all Group goals are met (e.g. pass rate, students completing on time, not exceeding student flight hours, student's training records completed on time) and if not, make recommendations to the Chief Flight Instructor for corrective action to be taken. Maintain the training standards as predicated by both FAA and Aerosim Flight Academy. Ensure the quality and completeness of student training records. Maintains the even distribution of Flight Instructor days off within the group(s). Ensure that the policies and procedures of the Operations Manual are maintained. Forward any problems, including student-training difficulties, to the Chief Flight Instructor for guidance and/or resolution.

Group Leader
Reports to: Basic Function: Group Manager This position is responsible for assisting the Group Manager in the day-today operations of the assigned flight training Group.

Areas of Responsibility: Maintain the quality of flight training for the assigned Group. See that all Group goals are met (e.g. pass rate, students completing on time, not exceeding student flight hours, student's training records completed on time), and if not, make recommendations to the Group Manager for corrective action to be taken. Maintain the training standards as predicated by both FAA and Aerosim Flight Academy. Ensures that the policies and procedures of the Operations Manual are maintained. Forward any problems, including student-training difficulties, to the Group Manager for guidance and/or resolution.

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Flight Instructor
Reports to: Basic Function: Group Manager and/or Group Leader This position is responsible for the conduct of the flight training of students.

Areas of Responsibility: Maintain the quality (pass rate) of flight training at or above 80%. See that all section goals are met, including pass rate, students completing on time, not exceeding student flight hours, student's training records completed on time, and if not, make recommendations to the Group Manager for corrective action to be taken. See that each assigned student is scheduled properly. Maintain the flight training standards as outlined by both FAA and Aerosim Flight Academy. Ensure that the policies and procedures of the Operations Manual are maintained. Ensure that the assigned student's training record and folder are kept in accordance with Aerosim Flight Academy and FAA policy.

Ground Instructor
Reports to: Basic Function: Chief Ground Instructor/Manager of Academics To instruct academic course material to students

Areas of Responsibility: Maintain a high level of quality of instruction during ground training of Academy students. Ensures that student ground training records are forwarded to the Manager of Training no later than two days after completion of their end-of-course test. Forward any problems including student-training difficulties to the Manager of Training.

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Manager of Flight Standards


Reports To: Direct Reports: Director of Flight Operations Flight Standards Group Manager

Basic Function:

Develops standardized procedures and manages Instructor Pilot training including but not limited to Instructor Qualification, Recurrent and Transition Training, and student evaluation among all aircraft types to ensure the highest standards of flight training and safety.

Areas of Responsibility: Coordinate the initial and continuing standardization training of all Instructor Pilots company wide Oversee all flight-testing through continuous trend analysis of stage checks and flight test results Selection, training and standardization of all Check & Standardization Instructors Ensure the proper application of instruction and standardization by all Instructor Pilots through Aerosim Flight Academy Check Instructor program as outlined in the Standardization Manual Monitors and evaluates check and standardization instructor performance and productivity Maintain standardization procedures system wide and fleet wide Maintain standard operating procedures and policies as outlined by the Director of Flight Operations and Chief Flight Instructor to ensure the effectiveness of standardization training. Develop procedures for special flight routines or conditions to be followed by all pilots as a need arises. Through collaboration with the Chief Flight Instructor and Safety and Security Programs Manager will analyze trends in performance and training and recommend improvements in procedures, as appropriate. Responsible for Flight Department FAA regulatory compliance. Oversees use of the company Operations and Flight Standards Manuals and implements all new policies and procedures, as appropriate Conducts bi-annual satellite base audits in compliance with 14 CFR 141 Ensures all line pilot regulatory documentation regarding the requirements of 14 CFR 141.79 are met Ensure entire company is in compliance with 14 CFR 141 Develop and oversee the running of continuous calibration training for all instructors Company wide ORGANIZATION 2-9

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Flight Standards Group Manager


Reports to: Basic Function: Manager of Flight Standards This position is responsible for the conduct of flight and ground evaluation of all Check Instructors Company wide.

Areas of Responsibility: Monthly backseats of Check Instructors during stage checks. Monthly evaluations of the Check Instructors. Bi-weekly meeting with Check Instructors. Monitors and evaluates check and standardization instructor performance and productivity. Monitor the pass rates of Check Instructors and End of Course Check Instructors. Conduct spot audit checks of the check and standardization pilots as well as line pilots, company wide. Ensures that the instructors have a comprehensive knowledge of the Aerosim Flight Academy procedures and that they are followed at all times. Perform additional duties, as assigned, by management.

Senior Standardization Instructor


Reports to: Basic Function: Manager of Flight Standards The Senior Standardization Instructor is responsible for maintaining standards through the use of accepted companywide policies and procedures while conducting flight and ground instructor evaluations.

Areas of Responsibility: Maintain the quality (pass rate) of flight training at or above 80% through consistent and comprehensive evaluation. See that each assigned instructor is re-scheduled if a standardization training delay occurs. Maintain accurate MISA records regarding evaluations. Maintain the flight training standards as outlined by both FAA and Aerosim Flight Academy. Ensures that the instructors have a comprehensive knowledge of the Aerosim Flight Academy procedures and that they are followed at all times. Conducts all new hire evaluation flights Company wide. Ensure that the policies and procedures of the Operations Manual are maintained. Conduct spot audit checks of line pilots company wide. Report findings to the Manager of Flight Standards and the Chief Flight Instructor. Serve in a Flight Instructor quality control capacity. Any additional duties assigned by Flight Standards.

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Standardization Instructor
Reports to: Basic Function: Manager of Flight Standards This position is responsible for the conduct of flight and ground evaluation of all instructors Company wide.

Areas of Responsibility: Maintain the quality (pass rate) of flight training at or above 80% through consistent and comprehensive evaluation. See that each assigned instructor is re-scheduled if a standardization training delay occurs. Maintain accurate MISA records regarding evaluations. Maintain the flight training standards as outlined by both FAA and Aerosim Flight Academy. Ensures that the instructors have a comprehensive knowledge of the Aerosim Flight Academy procedures and that they are followed at all times. Conducts ALL new hire evaluation flights Company wide. Ensure that the policies and procedures of the Operations Manual are maintained. Any additional duties assigned by Flight Standards. Conduct spot audit checks of line pilots company wide.

Check Instructor
Reports to: Basic Function: Manager of Flight Standards This position is responsible for the conduct of flight and ground evaluation of students.

Areas of Responsibility: Maintain the quality (pass rate) of flight training at or above 80% through consistent and comprehensive evaluation. See that each assigned student is re-scheduled if a training delay occurs. Maintain accurate MISA records regarding evaluations. Conduct student training record audits. Maintain the flight training standards as outlined by both FAA and Aerosim Flight Academy. Ensure that the policies and procedures of the Operations Manual are maintained. Any additional duties assigned by Flight Standards

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Flight Supervisor
Reports to: Basic Function: Chief Flight Instructor The Flight Supervisor is responsible for enhancing the safe operation of the Academys aircraft through continuous monitoring and analysis.

Areas of Responsibility: Inform the Operations Management Staff and the Shift Lead Mechanic of aircraft emergencies or other operational problems. Be familiar with and initiate Emergency Response Plan (ERP) as necessary Monitor all flight activities for operational safety and conformance with company, local, and FAA regulations. Work with Flight Dispatch on the appropriate release or holding of flight activities based on outside considerations. Confer with Flight Instructors and students regarding weather issues, cross-country routing, appropriate logbook endorsements, aircraft maintenance issues, etc. Consult the Aerosim Flight Academys Safety Practices and Procedures Manual for guidance as necessary. Periodically audit MISA entries to see if they match the Print Releases. Check aircraft ramp, and surrounding areas, when severe weather conditions are expected. Ensure the aircraft are properly secured (tied down, windows/doors closed, etc.). Look for and note any safety or security breaches (i.e. gates left open, suspicious characters, personnel without proper identification). Notify the Flight Standards Manager of flight crews needing to remain away from base overnight due to maintenance problems. Serve in a supervisory role to scheduling and dispatch staff to ensure the most efficient use and scheduling of the Academy fleet. Additional duties as assigned by Operations Management Staff.

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Dispatch Supervisor
Reports to: Basic Function: Manager of Flight Standards To enhance the safe operation of aircraft through monitoring

Supervises the day-to-day operational aspects and workload of the Dispatch staff. Oversees the maintenance of the 100 & 50-hour inspection report. Supervises and coordinates the MISA program and related issues with the IT (Information Technology) dept. Manages the rotation of aircraft from and to the College satellites for inspections and maintenance problems. Coordinates vacation and sick leave for Dispatch staff. Problem solves all equipment shortages. Performs daily Dispatch functions as a Dispatcher. Maintains department forms and supplies inventory. Cross-trained to assist the Scheduling department when short staffed.

Flight Dispatcher
Reports To: Basic Function: Dispatch Supervisor Operates the daily flight and simulator schedule.

Areas of Responsibility: Receives flight tickets and issues documents for aircraft and simulators. Operates in the MISA system; including pencil-ins, terminations, and moves scheduled events as required. Assigns all tail-numbers numbers for aircraft and simulators. Maintains 100 hour and 50 hour time remaining reports for the Maintenance Department. Opens and closes all campus buildings relative to their work shift. Prints Operations Department reports as required. Problem solves throughout the day for shortages of equipment. Performs additional duties required by management.

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Courseware Development Manager and FSTD Management Representative


Reports To: Basic Function: Senior Vice President Responsibilities of the Curriculum Development Manager consist of development, management, compliance, and recordkeeping of all academy related programs and courses. Curriculum management includes identification of curriculum modification, continuous improvement of curriculum, and compliance related to regulatory bodies, both foreign and domestic.

Duties and Responsibilities: Develop, modify and publish Training Course Outlines as approved by the company Develop new lesson plans and material to advance the company Responsible communicating and coordinating between Aerosim Flight Academy and the FAA Regulatory Affairs contact between Aerosim Flight Academy and the FAA Principle Operating Inspector for maintaining the currency of the FAR part 141 company Training Course Outlines Responsible for updating the current time and price sheet in MISA and ensuring the current prices reflects the current Training Course Outline. Maintain the Flight Departments Operation Specifications Responsible for Aerosim Flight Academy complying with the International Aviation Regulations and best practices and reporting any deviation from the regulation Monitor and responsible for the on-going qualification of assigned FSTDs Responsible for all matters regarding FSTD qualifications are being managed Responsible for the Quality Management System properly being managed, and maintained by overseeing the structure of the Quality Management System policies, practices and procedures are followed Brief leadership as necessary on the status of the on-going FSTD qualification program and the effectiveness and efficiency of the Quality Management System Serves as the primary point of contact for all matters between Aerosim Flight Academy and the National Simulator Program Manager regarding the qualification of that FTD as provided

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Courseware Developer
Reports To: Courseware Development Manager

Basic Function:

Responsibilities consist of assisting with developing new curriculum, revising current curriculum, and managing curriculum in the MISA database.

Duties and Responsibilities: Create training folder audit sheet checklist from Training Course Outline for Administrative Assistants within the Flight Department and for Supervisor of Airmen Certification Representative Audit data entry process to eliminate errors and train Aerosim Flight Academy employees on the revised process Responsible for reviewing student records in MISA on a daily basis and correcting the incomplete or incorrect records in order to meet the regulatory requirements Create, activate and update courses, certificates and programs in MISA database as revised Training Course Outlines are approved by the Courseware Development Manager Develop, modify, and write Training Course Outlines and individual lesson plans as directed by the Courseware Development Manager Develop and maintain existing relationships with all extended Aerosim Flight Academy bases

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Manager of Safety, Security & Environmental


Reports To: President (direct access) Senior Vice President (Duty oversight) Develop, implement, and maintain a customer oriented (internal & external customers) Corporate Safety, Security & Environmental Program.

Basic Function:

Areas of Responsibility: Manage Aviation Safety Action Program (ASAP). Develop, implement, and maintain the corporate Safety & Environmental program, for all Aerosim Flight Academy locations, Federal, State & Local compliance. Ensure company wide compliance with local, state, and federal workplace safety & environmental issues. Develop and coordinate physical security measures for all Academy locations in accordance with company directives. Gather and analyze operational incident and accident data to develop monthly Academy safety reports for the President, to be utilized in staff training and for the development of new programs. Develop standard operating procedures and policies relating to academy safety, security and environmental issues. Develop an annual internal SS&E audit program with web-based tracking & reporting system. Manage the Hurricane Evacuation Program. Develop and implement training/compliance programs based on audit results, as needed. Manage the authoring of all safety, security and environmental documents for the Academy. Attend various safety, security and environmental related events as directed by Management. Maintain fuel quality assurance & safety records. Assist in audits as directed.

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Organizational Chart (Flight Operations)

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Organizational Chart (Maintenance Department)

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Organizational Chart (Student Services)

Organizational Chart (Sales and Marketing)

CEO

VP Sales & Marketing

Manager of Student Admissions & Pilot Placement

Marketing Services Manager

Marketing Manager

Sky Shop Manager Research, Contracts & Proposals Administrator

Admissions Officers SFB

Admissions Officer HWO

Sales & Marketing Coordinator

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Organizational Chart (Administration)

Organizational Chart (Education)

Sr. Vice President

Director of Education

Director of Financial Aid

Manager of Academics

Manager of Bridge Program FAA Testing/LRC Supervisor Licensing and Records Specialist Academic Instructors Aviation English Instructor Test Proctor

Registrar

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Chapter 3 General Policies Table Of Contents


CERTIFICATES REQUIRED ................................................................................................................................... 3 GENERAL .................................................................................................................................................................. 3 PILOT CERTIFICATES ................................................................................................................................................. 3 MEDICAL CERTIFICATES ........................................................................................................................................... 4 FCC PERMIT ............................................................................................................................................................. 4 REPLACEMENT OF LOST CERTIFICATES .................................................................................................................... 5 CHANGE OF ADDRESS ........................................................................................................................................... 5 NAME/ADDRESS/PHONE NUMBER ............................................................................................................................ 5 PRINCIPAL BUSINESS OFFICE .................................................................................................................................... 5 EQUIPMENT .............................................................................................................................................................. 6 HEADSETS ................................................................................................................................................................. 7 FLASHLIGHT ............................................................................................................................................................. 7 INSTRUMENT APPROACH PLATES AND CHARTS ........................................................................................................ 7 EQUIPMENT STOWAGE IN THE CABIN ....................................................................................................................... 8 REQUIRED ITEMS FOR DISPATCH (GO/NO GO CHECKLIST) ...................................................................................... 8 COMMERCIAL FLYING & FLIGHT INSTRUCTION ........................................................................................ 8 CREW QUALIFICATION .............................................................................................................................................. 9 CREWMEMBER EXPERIENCE ..................................................................................................................................... 9 DETERMINATION OF PILOT-IN-COMMAND ................................................................................................... 9 LOGGING FLIGHT TIME ..................................................................................................................................... 10 HOBBS TIME ........................................................................................................................................................... 10 BLOCK TIME ........................................................................................................................................................... 10 HOBBS TIME DISCREPANCIES ................................................................................................................................. 11 FLIGHT TIME LIMITATIONS AND REST......................................................................................................... 12 DEFINITIONS ........................................................................................................................................................... 12 REST REQUIREMENTS ............................................................................................................................................. 13 FLIGHT TIME ........................................................................................................................................................... 13 FOOD AND DRINK.................................................................................................................................................. 14 INTOXICANTS AND ILLICIT DRUGS ................................................................................................................ 14 OFFENSES INVOLVING ALCOHOL OR DRUGS .......................................................................................................... 14 AEROSIM FLIGHT ACADEMYS ANTI-DRUG PROGRAM ........................................................................................... 17 ACADEMY STUDENT POLICIES ON ALCOHOL & ILLEGAL DRUGS............................................................................ 19 BLOOD DONATION OR LOSS OF BLOOD RESULTING FROM MINOR INJURIES ................................ 19 SMOKING POLICY ................................................................................................................................................. 20 CHECK FLIGHTS .................................................................................................................................................... 20 IN-FLIGHT OBSERVATIONS ..................................................................................................................................... 20 MAINTENANCE CHECK FLIGHTS ............................................................................................................................. 20 PROFICIENCY CHECKS ............................................................................................................................................ 20

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BASE INSPECTIONS ...............................................................................................................................................21 STANDARD ACADEMY FLIGHT POLICIES .....................................................................................................21 ALL AIRCRAFT ........................................................................................................................................................21 SINGLE-ENGINE AIRCRAFT .....................................................................................................................................22 MULTI-ENGINE AIRCRAFT ......................................................................................................................................22 COMPLEX AIRCRAFT ...............................................................................................................................................23 FLIGHT STANDARDS MANUALS .......................................................................................................................24 COCKPIT FAMILIARIZATION ............................................................................................................................24 STANDARD ACADEMY SCHEDULING AND DISPATCH POLICIES ...........................................................25 PASSENGERS ON TRAINING FLIGHTS ............................................................................................................26 AIRCRAFT PARKING AND SECURING .............................................................................................................26 AIRCRAFT INSPECTIONS ....................................................................................................................................27 REIMBURSEMENT FOR REFUELING EXPENSES ..........................................................................................28 USE OF CELLULAR PHONES...............................................................................................................................28 CREW COORDINATION........................................................................................................................................28

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Certificates Required
General Identification All persons onboard Aerosim Flight Academy aircraft that are above the age of 16 years old shall carry a form of government issued photo identification. Aerosim Flight Academy employees may not substitute the government issued identification with their employee ID badge, it is strongly recommended that both be carried due to airport security requirements. Examples of appropriate photo identification are: passports, driver licenses, military IDs, or state issued IDs.

Inspection Of Certificate Each person who is required to hold an airman certificate or a medical certificate must present it for inspection upon a request from the Administrator, an authorized representative of the National Transportation Safety Board or any Federal, State, or local law enforcement officer. Pursuant to Florida Statute Title XXV, Chapter 330, Paragraph 330.04, and for Florida operations only; the pilot's license required shall be kept in the personal possession of the licensee when he or she is operating aircraft within this state, and must be presented for inspection upon the demand of any passenger, any peace officer of this state, or any official, manager, or person in charge of any airport or landing field in this state upon which the licensee shall land. All Aerosim Flight Academy employed pilots must submit (by mail, in person, or by fax) a copy of their most recent government issued photo identification to the Flight Standards Department. All Aerosim Flight Academy employed pilots must submit (by mail, in person, or by fax) a copy of their most recent medical certificate to the Flight Standards Department. All Aerosim Flight Academy employed pilots must submit (by mail, in person, or by fax) a copy of their most recent pilot certificate, either temporary or permanent, to the Flight Standards Department. All Aerosim Flight Academy employed pilots must submit (by mail, in person, or by fax) a copy of their most recent flight instructor certificate, either temporary or permanent, to the Flight Standards Department.

Pilot Certificates No pilot may operate an aircraft owned or operated by Aerosim Flight Academy unless he holds a Pilot Certificate and if appropriate, a category and class rating or type rating for that aircraft. Each pilot must have his pilot certificate in his possession when exercising certificate privileges. GENERAL POLICIES 3-3

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Medical Certificates Crewmembers may not operate an aircraft of Aerosim Flight Academy if they know or have reason to know of any medical condition that would make them unable to meet the requirements for the medical certificate necessary for the pilot operation. Any medical condition that would prohibit them from working should be brought to the attention of the Chief Flight Instructor. Crewmembers that visit a medical professional for any condition that prohibits them from working shall obtain and provide to the Chief Flight Instructors office documentation returning them to flight status prior to conducting flight operations. The medical certificate copy must be submitted to the Flight Standards office no later than the close of business (1700 hrs.) on the last day of the month in which the certificate was issued. Crewmembers who do not provide a copy of their medical certificate by the last day of the month may not conduct any flight operations on the 1st of the next month. These crewmembers will be listed as Not Qualified.

Eye Glasses Pilots will wear, or have in their possession as specified by the pilots Medical Certificate, the required corrective lenses (i.e.: contacts or eye glasses) when on flight duty in accordance with 14 CFR Part 67. The pilot should carry a spare pair of corrective lenses. The use of a contact lens in one eye for distant visual acuity and a lens in the other eye for near visual acuity is not authorized while on flight duty. Frames for eyeglasses, corrective or sunglasses, should allow maximum peripheral vision. Wide temple pieces are not acceptable.

NOTE Sunglasses with short wavelength absorbing filter lenses (such as blue blockers) reduce color discrimination on some instruments. They may be used provided pilots can distinguish all cockpit color displays.

FCC Permit FCC Restricted Radiotelephone Operator Permits are required for all flights operating outside of the United States. Initial and Replacement FCC Radiotelephone Operator Permits are applied for by submitting a FCC forms: 605, Schedule E for form 605, 159 and 160. These forms may be obtained from the Flight Standards Department. NOTE The forms may also be downloaded from www.fcc.gov/formpage.html.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Replacement Of Lost Certificates Permanent replacement certificates must be requested as soon as possible. Telephone the FAA at (405) 954-3261 to obtain the required information for the replacement application or obtain information online at: http://registry.faa.gov/airmen.asp#content Airman Certificate Regular Mail Federal Aviation Administration Airmen Certification Branch, AFS-760 P.O. Box 25082 Oklahoma City, OK 73125 Overnight Mail, only Federal Aviation Administration Airmen Certification Branch, AFS-760 6500 S. MacArthur Blvd. ARB Bldg., Rm. 301 Oklahoma City, OK 73169

You may obtain a temporary certificate by fax for immediate use. Call the FAA, Airman Certification, at (405) 954-3261 and speak to an Examiner. You will receive a fax certification within two hours. The fax certification does not fulfill your obligation to apply for a permanent replacement certificate. The fax is valid for up to 60 days and must be carried by the crewmember while operating as a crewmember. Medical Certificate Regular Mail Overnight Mail, only Federal Aviation Administration Federal Aviation Administration Airmen Certification Branch, AFS-760 Airmen Certification Branch, AFS-760 P.O. Box 25082 6500 S. MacArthur Blvd. Oklahoma City, OK 73125 ARB Bldg., Rm. 301 Oklahoma City, OK 73169

Change Of Address
Name/Address/Phone Number All personnel shall inform Aerosim Flight Academy of any and all changes of name, address, and/or phone numbers immediately. Employees should contact the Chief Instructor, Human Resources, or the Flight Standards Department, as applicable, and complete an Aerosim Flight Academy Multi-Purpose Form. Pilots are also reminded of the requirements of FAR Part 61.60 regarding address changes. The FAA has now made changes to addresses available online at www.faa.gov. Principal Business Office Aerosim Flight Academy maintains its principal business office and operations base at the Orlando Sanford International Airport, Sanford, Florida. Any changes to the location of these offices will be reported to the FAA Certificate Holding District Office in a timely manner. 09/01/10 (ISSUE) GENERAL POLICIES 3-5

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Equipment
Each pilot shall have a Flight Standards Manual for the aircraft they intend to operate and is responsible for keeping it current by inserting all published changes. Crewmembers listed below must have the following equipment in their possession during flight operations: Flight Instructor: Appropriate Aircraft Checklists Current Instrument Approach Charts Current Aeronautical Charts (VFR/IFR) for the area of operation Current Airport/Facility Directory GATS Jar (for fuel sampling) View Limiting Device (if necessary for training) Student: Flight Standards Manual (refer to note) Operations Manual Appropriate Aircraft Checklists Current Instrument Approach Charts Current Aeronautical Charts for the area of operation Current Airport/Facility Directory GATS Jar (for fuel sampling) View Limiting Device (if necessary for training) Check Instructor: Appropriate Aircraft Checklists Current Instrument Approach Charts Current Aeronautical Charts for the area of operation Current Airport/Facility Directory GATS Jar (for fuel sampling) View Limiting Device Appropriate Plans of Action Appropriate Practical Test Standards

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OPERATIONS MANUAL All Crewmembers: Headset (refer to note) Flashlight NOTE Flights may be conducted without the use of headsets. For flight without the use of headsets, both crewmembers shall operate without headsets and ensure that the aircraft speaker and microphone system works properly.

NOTE The Operations Manual and the Flight Standards Manual must be readily available to the flight crew.

Headsets Flight crewmembers are required to supply their own approved headset equipped with a boom microphone. Flights should not be cancelled based on a lack of headsets. Valuable training experience may be gained by conducting operations without headsets. Some form of hearing protection should be used during operations without headsets. Inoperative flight crewmember headsets should be repaired as soon as possible.

Flashlight Each crewmember shall, on each flight, have readily available for his use a flashlight that is in good working order.

Instrument Approach Plates and Charts Aerosim flight Academy students are required to use Jeppesen Instrument Approach Plates and Charts for all training events in the primary state, i.e. Florida/Texas, in which flight training occurs. Reasons behind requiring the Jeppesen materials are two-fold; first, it allows the school to remain standard and consistent in training, second, being primarily an airline training academy, it allows the school to teach using materials that are used at most airlines. Aerosim Flight Academy instructors will be able to use the approach plates and charts that they are most comfortable with.

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Equipment Stowage In The Cabin Refer to Chapter 9 Passengers. All crewmembers will take precautions to ensure that all crew baggage, when not in use, will not become a hazard by shifting under load factors during training or emergency landing conditions. All crewmembers will take necessary precautions to ensure that no loose equipment is on the cockpit floor near the pilots feet.

Required Items For Dispatch (Go/No Go Checklist) Item Aircraft Flight Manual Operations Manual Flight Standards Manual Pilots Checklist (2) Take Off Data Card (completed) Go/No Go No-Go No-Go No-Go Go No-Go Substitute

8 x 11 in. paper copy or FSM Chapter 3

Commercial Flying & Flight Instruction


Aerosim Flight Academy pilots are NOT authorized to engage in commercial flying on other than Company owned and operated aircraft unless prior written approval is obtained from the Senior Vice President or his designee. Military or pleasure flying is exempt. Each pilot who wishes to engage in other commercial flying must submit a request in writing to the Senior Vice President or his designee each year. The request must include the circumstances of the other commercial flying and the estimated number of hours. When authorized to engage in other commercial flying, Aerosim Flight Academy pilots are required on a monthly basis to submit (in writing to the Senior Vice President or his designee) the total amount of flight time and date(s) when flown. Aerosim Flight Academy instructors may instruct only Aerosim Flight Academy students or other students as assigned by the Academy in Academy provided aircraft or aircraft assigned by the Academy. Aerosim Flight Academy instructors may not instruct students in aircraft provided by the student, or any other person, or agency. Any evidence that flight instruction is being given, outside of the Academy, will result in immediate termination from the Academy. This policy is in effect for the duration of any employment by Aerosim Flight Academy. Exemption from this policy can only be given by the Senior Vice President or his designee.

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GENERAL POLICIES

(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL Crew Qualification Crewmember Experience For initial, transition, or upgrades to a new aircraft model, each Pilot-In-Command must complete transitional ground training on the aircraft, a proficiency check on the aircraft, and pass a written aircraft limitations and emergency procedures test administered by the Flight Standards Department. Pilots may not act as Pilot-In-Command in a new model aircraft until this standardization training is complete. Flight Instructors must also meet the requirements of 14 CFR Part 141.79 regarding briefings on the objectives and completion standards of the course to which they are assigned. Pilots must conduct an annual proficiency check with the a member of the Flight Standards department if a period of greater than 12 months passes in which no transitions or upgrades occur. These checks must also meet the requirements of 14 CFR Part 141.79.

Recent Experience It is the responsibility of the pilot, prior to conducting a flight, to ensure that he meets the recency of experience requirements of 14 CFR Part 61.57. A pilot who does not meet the recent experience requirements shall notify the Chief Flight Instructor prior to conducting any flights. Any pilot who fails to meet this requirement must re-establish currency before he may again serve as a required flight crewmember.

Determination Of Pilot-In-Command
It is the policy of Aerosim Flight Academy that any time a Flight Instructor is aboard an Aerosim Flight Academy training flight acting as the student's instructor; the Flight Instructor will be considered the Pilot-In-Command of that flight. In the event that more than one Flight Instructor is aboard, the most senior instructor, as determined by flight experience, will be the Pilot-InCommand unless a written statement indicating who is to be the Pilot-In-Command is filed with Flight Dispatch prior to the flight in question. That statement must be signed by both of the Flight Instructors involved.

NOTE Should a Flight Instructor damage or allow a student to damage an Academy aircraft during the course of conducting a training operation, or any other operation in an Academy aircraft, the Flight Instructor shall be held responsible for damages associated with the outcome of that operation and may be subject to termination of employment from the Academy.

09/01/10 (ISSUE)

GENERAL POLICIES

3-9

OPERATIONS MANUAL

Logging Flight Time


Hobbs Time For beginning Hobbs time, record the ending Hobbs time from the previous flight. During aircraft preflight, check the Hobbs meter reading to be sure it agrees with the ending/beginning Hobbs record. If a discrepancy is noted, drop down a line and record the actual Hobbs reading. Flight Dispatch must be notified by radio, or in person, if a pilot finds the Hobbs or tachometer reading different from what is shown on the Daily Flight Time Worksheet. Failure to notify Flight Dispatch prior to starting the engine(s) could result in no adjustments. From time to time mistakes are made when Flight Dispatch carries over the ending time from the night before, or a pilot misreads the time. Flight Dispatch will not adjust any number that cannot be shown to be an obvious carry-over mistake, unless they were notified prior to the flight. For total Hobbs time, subtract ending Hobbs time from beginning Hobbs time. Record the difference in the Total block of the Daily Flight Time Worksheet. Pilots are reminded that a Hobbs or tachometer time that is half way rolled to the next number must be counted as the next number.

Block Time An aircraft is provided for a particular period of time in order to accomplish the dispatching of the aircraft, the pilot preflight briefing, the aircraft preflight, the flight, the return of the aircraft clipboard/can, and the pilot post flight debriefing. A pilot receiving instruction that is scheduled for a flight from 0800 to 1000 should arrive at Operations no later than 0700 in order to have all flight lesson/flight planning completed prior to the aircraft dispatch time (0800). After being dispatched an aircraft, the preflight should be completed so as to be able to accomplish engine start by 0818.

NOTE Pilots may be dispatched an aircraft earlier than the scheduled block time if the flight crew is ready and an aircraft is available.

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GENERAL POLICIES

(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL Plan the completion of the flight activity by returning to the airport and completing the aircraft shutdown and securing by approximately 0948. The aircraft clipboard/can must be returned to Flight Dispatch no later than 1000. This will result in 1.5 hours Hobbs time, which is the typical objective of a 2.0 hour scheduled block.

Scheduled Block Time Expected Time Of Flight 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5

For cross-country flights, plan .5 hours (30 minutes) ground time for refueling. There may be occasions when Flight Dispatch is unable to dispatch an aircraft on time. In this case, consult with the Flight Dispatcher to determine if the block time may be extended. If the scheduled aircraft block time cannot be extended, the flight crew must adjust the flight planning to return the aircraft clipboard/can to Flight Dispatch by the originally scheduled return time.

NOTE If during any flight it is determined that the aircraft return is going to be unavoidably late, contact Flight Dispatch immediately, by radio or telephone, and advise them of the new estimated return time.

Hobbs Time Discrepancies Some aircraft may temporarily have inoperative or deferred Hobbs meters at the time of aircraft dispatch. In an effort to standardize flight billing associated with these flights, Flight Dispatch will calculate ending Hobbs time in the following manner: Flights scheduled for 2 hours of block time or less will be calculated by using the total tachometer time 1.2 = Hobbs time. Flights scheduled for more than 2 hours of block time will be calculated by adding .3 hours to the total tachometer time = Hobbs time.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL

Flight Time Limitations And Rest


1. Flight time means the time from the moment the aircraft first moves under its own power for the purpose of flight until the moment it comes to rest at the next point of landing. Pilots will be responsible for maintaining flight time legality. Instrument time will be logged in accordance with 14 CFR Part 61.51.

Definitions Scheduled Flight Time - The combined daily total of all scheduled flights or training events. This flight time is reflected in the published flight schedule. Daily flight hour limits are based on actual flight time, not scheduled. Rest Period - Any period of time when the flight crewmember is not performing duties required of him by Aerosim Flight Academy or performing other commercial flying. A rest period begins 30 minutes after the final event accomplished in a scheduled day. The rest period ends when the crewmember reports to the airport to check weather, pre-flight, or accomplish any other specific task required by Aerosim Flight Academy. Transportation that is local in nature, to and from the airport, is considered to be part of the rest period. Flight Schedule - A schedule showing scheduled time out, block time, lesson number and description, equipment type, and flight crew assignment. Flight Assignment - A flight or series of flights within a single duty time period. Hours of Training Limitations In any 24-consecutive-hour period, a Flight Instructor may not conduct more than 8 hours of flight training. If a pilot is away from base and expects to exceed the hours of training limitation, they must consult the Chief Flight Instructors office or Operational Management Staff prior to departure. Duty Time - The duty period begins when the crewmember reports to the airport to check weather, pre-flight or accomplish any other specific task required by Aerosim Flight Academy.

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GENERAL POLICIES

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Rest Requirements It is the Flight Instructors responsibility to coordinate rest requirements with scheduling. Transportation that is local in nature, to and from the airport, is considered to be part of the rest period.

NOTE It is the sole responsibility of the Flight Instructor to determine daily hours flown and their necessary rest periods. Students must have one day of no scheduled flight activities in a seven day period. Exceptions to this rule may be made by the Chief Flight Instructor, or his designee. Any crewmember may cancel an activity, for safety reasons, due to fatigue. The Operations Department may still notify a flight crewmember during a rest period of a future assignment. Aerosim Flight Academy shall relieve each Flight Instructor from duty for at least 24 consecutive hours during any 7 consecutive days. NOTE No penalty exists (except for over flight of the 8-hours of flight instruction rule) for circumstances wherein actual flight time exceeds scheduled flight time However, reduced or compensatory rest periods are absolute and may not be reduced under any circumstances. Flight Time Daily and monthly flight time limits are determined by actual instructional aircraft flight hours, and must not exceed the parameters listed below. Daily (Dual Given Aircraft) 8 Calendar Month (Total Aircraft Flight Time) 150 NOTE It is the sole responsibility of the Flight Instructor to determine daily and monthly flight time limits and to inform the Operations Department of possible conflicts. Exceptions to this rule may be made by the Chief Flight Instructor, or his designee. Flight crewmembers may not do any flight instructing or commercial flying if that flying plus any Aerosim Flight Academy flying will exceed any flight time limitations. Refer to Commercial Flying. GENERAL POLICIES 3-13

09/01/10 (ISSUE)

OPERATIONS MANUAL

Food And Drink


Rules for flight crewmember consumption of food and beverages: 1. For safety, eating is not permitted during flight. 2. Water is the only beverage allowed in Aerosim Flight Academy aircraft. 3. Consumption will be discontinued if hazardous weather conditions exist or other flight duties exist that require the attention of the entire crew. It is the responsibility of the Pilot-In-Command to ensure that the aircraft is free of trash after the flight. Failure to provide a clean aircraft to an oncoming flight crew may result in disciplinary action against the Pilot-In-Command. Food poisoning and bacterial infections can cause total flight crewmember incapacitation within a few hours of consumption and are far more frequent than other illnesses such as heart failure. Use caution when eating at unfamiliar establishments.

Intoxicants And Illicit Drugs

WARNING Any use of an illegal or controlled substance by a certificated airman, on or off duty, will be cause for disciplinary action up to and including termination.

Offenses Involving Alcohol Or Drugs A conviction for the violation of any Federal or State statute relating to the growing, processing, manufacturing, sale, disposition, possession, transportation or importation of narcotic drugs, marijuana or depressant/stimulant drugs or substances is grounds for suspension or revocation of any certificate or rating issued under Part 61.

3-14

GENERAL POLICIES

(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL The Human Resources Department administers Aerosim Flight Academys Anti-Drug and Alcohol Program. The program includes provisions for pre-employment, post accident/incident, random drug screening and for suspicious circumstances.

Definitions For purposes of these rules, the following definitions shall apply: Report for Duty - A pilot is considered to have reported for duty when arriving at the airport or any Aerosim Flight Academy building: Before departure As listed on the Flight Schedule At the departure time as modified by Flight Dispatch for the purpose of preparing for his scheduled assignment.

Flight - Any revenue flight, ferry flight, test flight, training flight, reposition flight or delivery flight. Crewmember - Any individual serving as a student, Flight Instructor, Check Instructor or a Maintenance Technician. Reasonable Suspicion - A reasonable suspicion of alcohol or drug use test must be based on two employees (one of which must be at the managerial level or higher) specific observations concerning the appearance, behavior, speech or body language of the employee. Under Company policy, reasonable suspicion testing maybe conducted if there is a reason to believe in the opinion of Aerosim Flight Academy that an employee is under the influence or impaired by intoxicants or illicit drugs.

Guidance for impairment suspicion on the Ground Address the problem early and attempt to keep the person away from the aircraft if possible. If already on the ramp attempt to keep the person off the aircraft. Suggest the person in question call in sick and be evaluated prior to the flight. After boarding the aircraft but prior to start, the suspected person may be subject to disciplinary action. At this point leaving the aircraft and attempting to take the suspected crewmember with you is the best option. If any doubt exists about a crewmember's possible impairment, DO NOT allow any flight operation to begin. Notify the Chief Flight Instructors office or any member of the Operations Department Management staff. After start - The aircraft should immediately return to parking. If any symptoms of drug or alcohol impairment exist, inform Management.

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3-15

OPERATIONS MANUAL Guidance for impairment suspicion in flight Land the aircraft as soon as practicable, and contact the Chief Flight Instructors office or any member of the Operations Department Management Staff through Flight Dispatch for guidance.

Alcohol Use It is the responsibility of every pilot to ensure that the use of alcohol does not impair the individual's performance or judgment. It is imperative that every certificated airman strictly complies with the following rules and policies. A certificated airman will be subject to disciplinary action if he/she: Reports for duty with the presence of any amount of alcohol in his system. Consumes any alcohol within 12 hours of scheduled departure for a pilot. Purchases alcohol or consumes alcohol while in uniform. Is under the influence or shows evidence of alcohol consumption while in uniform. Reports for any company training or operational meeting, with alcohol in his system. Is acting as a crewmember, or knowingly permits any other crewmember to operate an aircraft with alcohol in his system.

Any flight crewmember that violates any alcohol related policy may be subject to disciplinary action, up to and including termination. Use common sense while in uniform and be aware of how actions might be perceived by the public. The fact that a certificated airman suffers from alcoholism will not excuse the violation of these rules. Regardless of whether a certificated airman is clinically diagnosed or diagnosable as an alcoholic, and regardless of whether a certificated airman is alcohol dependent or an alcohol abuser, every certificated airman is responsible for taking whatever action is necessary to avoid violating these rules.

Illicit Drug Use There is absolutely no tolerance for the use of unlawful substances by Aerosim Flight Academy personnel. Any certificated airman or other crewmember will be subject to termination if he: Reports for duty, and/or operates or intends to operate an Aerosim Flight Academy aircraft while under the influence or impaired by illicit drugs. Uses or possesses any illicit drug. Knowingly permits another certificated airman or crewmember to perform his duties under the influence or in a drug impaired condition.

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GENERAL POLICIES

(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL Medications Certain drugs, both prescribed and over-the-counter, can have an effect on crewmember performance along with varying degrees of impairment that could be detrimental to the crewmember's judgment and flying abilities. Flight crewmembers will consult an Aviation Medical Examiner regarding the possible effects of prescribed or over-the-counter medications. Flight crewmembers are authorized and expected to ground him or herself when the possibility of drug side effects exist or when physical or mental performance may affect their ability to perform their assigned duties. The flight crewmember must contact an Aviation Medical Examiner and, subsequently, provide the Chief Flight Instructor an estimate of when the crewmember may be able to resume flying duties.

Aerosim Flight Academys Anti-Drug Program The Academy is committed to a drug-free work environment and believes there is no place in the aviation industry for the use of drugs by employees. It is Aerosim Flight Academys policy to align this program to the standards outlined in 14 CFR Part 121 Appendix 1 regarding Anti-Drug Programs. Summary Of Program (condensed from the Human Resources Policy & Procedures Manual): Covers all employees. Provides for five types of testing: pre-employment, unannounced random, post-accident, reasonable suspicion, and return to duty. Establishes strict collection and Chain of Custody procedures to assure that urine specimens are properly identified. Provides that any employee whose drug test is positive can no longer perform any safetyconfirmed sensitive-related functions covered by the regulations. Our policy is to terminate any such employee.

Types Of Testing Five types of testing are described in the regulations. The five types of testing are: 1. Pre-employment Testing - Required for all new hires.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL 2. Random Testing - (See below.) 3. Post-Accident Testing - After aircraft accidents, Post-Accident Testing may be conducted within 32 hours for all covered employees who may have contributed to the accident. The FAA rule requires that the Company test those employees unless their performance can be completely discounted as a contributing factor to the accident. Final decisions on whom to test after an accident will be made only by the Vice President of the Department, after consultation with the Director of Human Resources, President and other management officials. 4. Based on Reasonable Cause - Any employee who performs one of the functions covered by the Anti-Drug Program and who is reasonably suspected of using a prohibited drug will be tested. Evidence of prohibited drug use must be specific contemporaneous physical, behavioral, or performance indicators of probable drug use. A final decision on whether to test an employee for the reasonable cause will be made by the Vice President of the Department and the Manager of Human Resources after consultation with other management officials including the Drug and Alcohol Program Manager. 5. Testing After Return to Duty - The FAA regulations provide that if and when an employee returns to duty after failing a drug test, he/she will be subject to unannounced drug tests for up to five years after return to duty. The Companys policy is to terminate the employment of those who test positive. Therefore, it is not anticipated that there will be any return to duty testing after failing a drug test. Random Drug Testing Random testing will be conducted during every calendar year. The Human Resources Department develops lists of those scheduled for random testing for each test period. Since the lists are random for each testing period, individuals may be tested two or more times while others may be not be tested even once during a year. Chances of being selected for random testing are equal for each employee for each test period, regardless of whether or not the employee has been tested before. If an individual is not available for testing, the Site Coordinator will clearly note the reason for unavailability on the test list and go on to the next name. The only acceptable reasons for not being available are The employee was not scheduled for work that day. The employee was ill and did not report to work that day. The employee was away on travel for the day.

Any employee who is present for duty is required to provide a specimen. Each of these employees is required to provide a specimen within three hours from the time the testing process begins. If the employee fails to provide a specimen in the time allotted, then he/she is required to provide medical documentation stating the reasons for the inability to provide a specimen. Refusal to provide a specimen will result in termination. 3-18 GENERAL POLICIES (ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL Academy Student Policies on Alcohol & Illegal Drugs No student will be permitted in Aerosim Flight Academy aircraft or facilities while under the influence of alcohol or within 12 hours of consumption. Academy students will comply with 14 CFR 91.17 concerning the use of alcohol. No student will possess or use any illegal drug or controlled substance, as that term is defined under applicable state and federal laws, during their enrollment and training at the Academy. Failure to comply with the above policy will result in immediate termination of enrollment and training at the Academy.

Blood Donation Or Loss Of Blood Resulting From Minor Injuries


Due to the temporarily reduced oxygen-carrying capacity following a blood donation or other substantial loss of blood, it is recommended that flight crewmembers do not give blood within 14 days prior to flight. In no case will a crewmember perform flight duties within 72 hours after a blood donation. Crewmembers giving blood donations, or who have experienced a substantial loss of blood, will report this fact to the Chief Flight Instructor and the Manager of Human Resources. Generally, providing a blood sample for medical tests is not considered a blood donation or a substantial loss.

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GENERAL POLICIES

3-19

OPERATIONS MANUAL

Smoking Policy
Crewmembers are prohibited from smoking and the use of chewing tobacco or snuff on any Aerosim Flight Academy aircraft, regardless of the operation. Smoking is only permitted at specifically designated locations on each campus. Additionally, the use of chewing tobacco is prohibited in any Aerosim Flight Academy building, in the presence of any customer, prospective customer or member of the public, and while in uniform.

Check Flights
In-Flight Observations In-flight observations of training may be conducted at any time. Generally, Flight Standards will conduct the observations, but management members of training groups may also observe. The Manager of Training or the Manager of Flight Standards may also schedule observations at other times. Maintenance Check Flights A maintenance check flight will be conducted when deemed necessary by the Maintenance Supervisor. Only essential personnel will be carried on maintenance check flights. A maintenance check flight may be conducted in day, night VFR unless authorized by appropriate Flight Department Management Personal. Refer to Chapter 11, Maintenance for specifics concerning completion of these flights. Proficiency Checks Proficiency checks (standardization flights) will be conducted by the Flight Standards Department. Proficiency checks may also be scheduled at other times by the Manager of Flight Standards and/or the Chief Pilot.

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(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL

Base Inspections
To ensure a safe operational training environment and to further ensure maintaining the highest level of training quality possible, the Academy will conduct systematic routine inspections at its main base of operation and other satellite bases. These inspections will be performed by the Flight Standards Department and may be conducted without prior notice. During a base inspection the following will be checked/observed: 1. Student and Instructor records 2. Aircraft Logbooks 3. General aircraft condition 4. Pre and Post flight briefings 5. Observing ("back seating") flight lessons A report of the results of each inspection shall be forwarded to the Manager of Flight Standards, Chief Pilot, and the appropriate Manager of Training for review. The Senior Vice President will maintain base inspection reports.

Standard Academy Flight Policies


Although the Aerosim Flight Academy Flight Standards Manuals detail many procedures and policies, the following is a highlighted list that ALL flight crewmembers will adhere to unless deviation is necessary to meet the needs of an actual emergency, or to take evasive action in avoiding a potential mid-air collision: All Aircraft 1. After departing an airport there will be no turns made at altitudes less than 400 feet AGL. 2. At no time will any aircraft be flown with less than one (1) flight hour of fuel reserve. 3. During taxi, both the student and the flight instructor must monitor the taxi to ensure that taxi area is clear. Neither pilot will have his/her head down (copying clearances, conducting a checklist, looking at a chart, etc.) while the airplane is moving.

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3-21

OPERATIONS MANUAL 4. The use of Portable Electronic Devices during flight operations shall comply with 14 CFR Part 91.21. Flight crews are cautioned about the use of any PED during IFR flight conditions. Aviation type portable GPS units shall be considered an exception under 14 CFR Part 91.21(b)(5). 5. Flight crews shall ensure that any time an equipment malfunction occurs while operating under IFR, the appropriate report is made as specified in 14 CFR Part 91.187. 6. Except for spin training conducted only during dual instructional activities for Flight Instructor certification, and any flight conducted during an upset recovery program with an approved aerobatics instructor, no aerobatic maneuvers, formation flying, or any careless or reckless style flying shall be performed in Aerosim Flight Academy aircraft. 7. Pilots shall not start engines by hand propping the propeller.

Single-Engine Aircraft 1. A simulated engine failure may only be accomplished with the closing of a throttle. 2. When practicing simulated emergency approach and landings, the minimum descent altitude will be no lower than 500 feet AGL, except when over an airport. Multi-Engine Aircraft 1. The simulated engine failure will occur at no less than 500 feet AGL. 2. A simulated engine failure may only be accomplished with the use of the throttle at altitudes less than 4,000 feet. Above 4,000 feet AGL, the means that will be used to simulate an engine failure will be with either the mixture or throttle. 3. Intentionally feathering the propeller for training purposes may not occur during IMC weather conditions. 4. A designated Aerosim Flight Academy multi-engine Flight Instructor must occupy a pilot seat on all multi-engine flights. The Flight Instructor must occupy a pilot seat from the beginning of the Before Starting Engine checklist through the completion of the Parking checklist.

NOTE The above policies have been implemented in the interest of safety. Failure of the Flight Instructor to adhere to these policies could result in termination of his/her employment from the Academy.

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GENERAL POLICIES

(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL Complex Aircraft Most gear up landings are the result of the flight crew becoming distracted. During instructional flights it is common for flight crews to become distracted from the operation of the aircraft. It is important to keep instructional communications to a minimum during traffic pattern operations. In the traffic pattern flight crews must focus on the task of preparing for and landing the aircraft. A reduction in unnecessary crew communication will maintain a Sterile Cockpit as much as possible. During instructional flights, primary task instruction should be accomplished prior to and after the flight during the pre and post flight briefing or during cruise segments. During instructional flights, it is the responsibility of the Flight Instructor to ensure that the landing gear is down and locked prior to landing. The landing gear down verification is a final check that will be accomplished at 200 feet AGL. The PF will visually verify that three green landing indicator lights are illuminated. If three green landing gear lights are illuminated, the PF will then state, 3 Green, Landing. If three green landing gear lights are not illuminated, or the gear unsafe light is illuminated, or the landing gear verification is not completed the flight crew will execute an immediate go-around. Further guidance on additional landing gear verification procedures is provided in Chapter 7, Maneuvers and Procedures of the Flight Standards Manual.

WARNING If the landing gear verification and callouts are not accomplished, the flight crew will execute an immediate go-around.

CAUTION During instructional flights, if the pilot in training does not verify landing gear down and make the appropriate callout on the final leg of the approach, it is the policy of Aerosim Flight Academy that the Flight Instructor order a go-around. This will reinforce the need to make a final check of the landing gear to the pilot in training.

09/01/10 (ISSUE)

GENERAL POLICIES

3-23

OPERATIONS MANUAL

Flight Standards Manuals


The Aerosim Flight Academy's Flight Standards Manuals were authored using the manufacturer's Approved Flight Manual and FAA publications. Although many other publications are very insightful and helpful, they are not the standard for the Aerosim Flight Academy. The purpose of Aerosim Flight Academy's Flight Standards Manuals is to ensure the standardization and uniformity of training by Academy Flight Instructors for their students. The Flight Standards Manuals are not intended to be a substitute for sound judgment and decision-making. However, at no time will the Flight Instructor or student disallow the use of the Flight Standards Manual simply because they wish to accomplish it some other way or that they do not understand the objective of a procedure and/or maneuver.

NOTE If an Academy Instructor finds any discrepancy or need for clarification in any of the Aerosim Flight Academy's Manuals, or they do not understand any part of the manual, they are required to bring this situation to the attention of the Manager of Flight Standards immediately for review.

Cockpit Familiarization
All students are encouraged to familiarize themselves with the actual cockpits of each aircraft they will be flying. Cockpit procedural training is an integral part of the training program. To ensure safety while conducting cockpit familiarization, prevent any mishaps, and maintain maintenance integrity of the aircraft, the following procedures must be followed when conducting cockpit familiarization: Notify Flight Dispatch of the intent to conduct cockpit familiarization. The Flight Dispatcher will assign an "N" number of an aircraft. While inside the cockpit, do not physically move any of the following switches/controls at any time: Landing Gear Selector Lever Starter Switch(es) Magnetos Throttle(s) Mixture Control(s) Battery Master Switch

Upon the completion of cockpit familiarization, check to see that the cockpit is in the proper and safe configuration before exiting the aircraft. Inform Flight Dispatch that the cockpit familiarization is complete. WARNING

NO pilot-in-training is permitted to undertake any form of cockpit familiarization in a complex aircraft without a flight instructor being present. 3-24 GENERAL POLICIES (ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL

Standard Academy Scheduling and Dispatch Policies


To remain in compliance with the Standards of Accreditation and United States Department of Education regulations, Aerosim Flight Academy must ensure that students meet the requirements of maintaining Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP). In addition, each day the student is in training at the Academy is additional expense to the student. In an effort to maximize the efficient use of the students time while training at the Academy and minimize delays in training, the Flight Instructors, Group Manager/Leaders, and Chief/Assistant Flight Instructors will comply with the following procedures: If the Flight Instructor has only one student scheduled for the day (other student(s) on LOA, PTO stage check, etc.) that student should be scheduled for a minimum of two activities with the Flight Instructor, or one if the student is in ground school. This would include flight lessons, simulator lessons, ground briefings and ground school. If a flight lesson is affected due to weather, that flight lesson must first be moved (pushed back) to a later time that day/night to take advantage of possible improving weather conditions. Some activities may need to be moved to the next day, if appropriate. If a flight lesson is affected due to an aircraft maintenance issue, it must first be pushed back to a later time that day/night. Students must be scheduled for stage checks the next day, if possible, after completing the previous lesson. If a flight activity has been canceled due to aircraft availability and a push back has been accomplished, the student will be given aircraft priority for the next scheduled day. The flight instructor will indicate the priority on the Activity Request Form (ARF). If a student has been affected two consecutive days due to weather and after being push backed the lesson ends up being terminated, then the Flight Instructor must inform the scheduling department (via the ARF), so the student may be scheduled for a more appropriate time the next day. (Example: afternoon thunderstorms, morning fog, etc). All flight and simulator terminations must be authorized and signed by the Flight Supervisor or other flight operations management. This procedure is an effort to put all resources together to be creative in getting the lesson accomplished that day without resulting in a termination. This procedure must in no way compromise safety.

09/01/10 (ISSUE)

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OPERATIONS MANUAL

Passengers on Training Flights


The only persons authorized on Aerosim Flight Academy aircraft are: Aerosim Flight Academy Instructors Enrolled Academy students Designated flight examiners on board to conduct FAA check rides. Or any person(s) authorized by Operations Department Management Staff

Aircraft Parking and Securing


Each type aircraft in the Academy's fleet is parked in specific areas on the ramp. Upon returning from any flight, return the aircraft to its designated parking area. Should the flight crew encounter any difficulty determining and/or locating an aircraft's parking location, contact Flight Dispatch for instructions. The Academy's tie-down system consists of permanent, stationary eyebolts that protrude approximately two inches above the ramp surface (some may be flush mounted). After untying an aircraft, coil or wrap each tie-down rope flatly around its respective tie-down eyebolt. During aircraft taxi operations, exercise caution when operating around these areas so as to avoid taxiing over any tie-down eyebolt. Always use a low power setting when taxiing around or in the immediate vicinity of any tie-down rope. Some Piper Aircraft types may utilize a chain and padlock for the tail tie-down (if installed).

NOTE No aircraft may taxi through a tie-down area. Certain locations prohibit swinging the aircraft into parking spaces and taxiing near fences.

CAUTION A tow bar will be used at all times when moving an aircraft.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL

Aircraft Inspections
Prior to each flight the Pilot-In-Command must verify that the aircraft to be flown must have had an Annual Inspection within the preceding twelve calendar months. This can be verified using the information provide on the appropriate aircraft's Inspection Summary. In addition, the Academy uses the tachometer time to record time in service for both the 100hour inspections and Airworthiness Directives (AD's). In all cases, over flying an AD or a cycle of a progressive inspection is not permissible without a Special Flight Permit. However, over flying the 100-hour inspection may be exceeded by not more than 10 hours while enroute to reach a place where the inspection can be done. (100-hour inspection times must not be intentionally over flown).

CAUTION Airworthiness Directives (ADs) may not be over flown. An aircraft over the 100-hour inspection, out of AD, or unairworthy for any other reason requires a Special Flight Permit.

NOTE Many Aerosim Flight Academy Aircraft have Airworthiness Directives (AD's) required at the 100-hour inspection intervals.

In order to determine the time remaining on a 100-hour inspection or AD, refer to the Hobbs Sheet. Both the time remaining until the next 100-hour inspection and the tachometer time until the next inspection can be found there.

NOTE It is the responsibility of the Pilot-In-Command to ensure that the aircraft is not flown if the inspection requirements are not met. Those time requirements will be found on the appropriate aircraft's Inspection Summary.

09/01/10 (ISSUE)

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OPERATIONS MANUAL

Reimbursement for Refueling Expenses


If, during an Academy training flight, a student must land to refuel at a location other than a designated location where an FBO account has been established to handle refueling expenses, it will be the student's responsibility to pay for the charges, obtain a receipt, and submit the receipt within five (5) business days from the day of the training flight to a Flight Department Manager. Reimbursement will comply with current policy and may be an amount less than the actual charge.

Use of Cellular Phones


All flight crewmembers and ground personnel are strictly prohibited from using portable electronic devices while on the ramp area. More specifically the use of cellular telephones is prohibited from the moment the ground personnel or flight crewmember exits the Flight Operations, Dispatch or Maintenance areas to gain access to the ramp area.

WARNING Use of electronic devices in the vicinity of aircraft may lead to distractions that result in serious injury and or death.

Crew Coordination
Whenever there is any degree of doubt, conflict, or confusion between flight crewmembers regarding an ATC clearance, the flight crew must query ATC on the assigned clearance. At no time shall a crew guess what the clearance is or pull rank on another crewmember disregarding their interpretation of the clearance. Flight crewmembers are required to query any confusing or conflicting clearance. This includes communication with ATC or an exchange between an instructor and a student. It is essential that the Pilot in Command (PIC) create a culture of openness and communication in the cockpit. At no time should a crewmember be unsure as to whether or not they can query another crewmember on any normal or abnormal situation.

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Chapter 4 Ramp & Taxi Operations Table Of Contents


STANDARD MARSHALLER HAND SIGNALS .................................................................................................... 3 REDUCED VISIBILITY TAXI OPERATIONS .................................................................................................... 15 SURFACE MOVEMENT GUIDANCE AND CONTROL SYSTEM (SMGCS) .................................................................... 15 STOP BAR LIGHTS ................................................................................................................................................... 16 RUNWAY GUARD LIGHTS ................................................................................................................................... 16 TAXIWAY CENTERLINE LIGHTING ................................................................................................................ 17 GEOGRAPHIC POSITION MARKINGS .............................................................................................................. 17 CLEARANCE BAR LIGHTS .................................................................................................................................. 17 SINGLE ENGINE TAXI .......................................................................................................................................... 17 TAXI SAFETY STANDARDS ................................................................................................................................. 18 AIRCRAFT LIGHTING ............................................................................................................................................... 18 AIRCRAFT REPOSITIONING ...................................................................................................................................... 18 GENERAL TAXI PROCEDURES .................................................................................................................................. 19 AIRCRAFT TIE DOWN .......................................................................................................................................... 20 GROUND OPERATIONS ........................................................................................................................................ 20 PRE-FLIGHT PLANNING ............................................................................................................................................ 20 PREFLIGHT INSPECTION ........................................................................................................................................... 22 COCKPIT MANAGEMENT.......................................................................................................................................... 23 ENGINE STARTING ................................................................................................................................................... 24 TAXIING .................................................................................................................................................................. 25 AFTER LANDING, ENGINE SHUTDOWN AND PARKING............................................................................................. 27 RUNWAY INCURSION AVOIDANCE PROCEDURES ..................................................................................... 28 APPLICATION ........................................................................................................................................................... 28 PLANNING ............................................................................................................................................................... 29 SITUATIONAL AWARENESS ...................................................................................................................................... 29 USE OF WRITTEN TAXI INSTRUCTIONS ................................................................................................................... 30 FLIGHT DECK COMMUNICATIONS............................................................................................................................ 30 ATC/FLIGHT CREW COMMUNICATIONS .................................................................................................................. 31

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Standard Marshaller Hand Signals

Parking Position Indicates the ramp area for arriving aircraft is clear of obstructions and provides a line for aircraft alignment. Use appropriate directional signals to position the aircraft.

Taxi Straight Ahead Indicates that the aircraft should continue straight ahead. Executed with upper arms 45 with elbow pointed slightly forward. Move fully extended arms slowly and continuously away from and towards the body.

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Slow Down Indicates that the aircraft must slow down or reduce engine power. Shown by lowering and raising wands in a parting motion.

Turn Left Indicates to the aircraft to turn left. The left arm is moved from a straight position to a 90 angle (beckoning motion) as illustrated until the aircraft has turned to the desired line. The rate of signal motion indicates to the flight crew the rate of aircraft movement desired. A slow signal indicates slow aircraft speed and an increased signal motion indicates increased aircraft speed.

Turn Right Indicates to the aircraft to turn right. The right arm is moved from a straight position to a 90 angle (beckoning motion) as illustrated until the aircraft has turned to the desired line. The rate of signal motion indicates to the flight crew the rate of aircraft movement desired. A slow signal indicates slow aircraft speed and an increased signal motion indicates increased aircraft speed.

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Normal Stop Indicated that the aircraft must come to a normal stop. Fully extend arms and wands 90 to sides and slowly move towards top of the head keeping arms extended until wands cross above head. The distance and speed of the marshal motion is relative to the distance and speed of the aircraft approaching the stop point.

Emergency Stop Indicates that the aircraft must make an immediate or urgent stop. Rapidly move the arms to the stop position and hold.

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Hold Position Indicates to the flight deck that aircraft must hold its current position. Execute signal standing stationary with arms pointed downward at the side at a 45 angle toward the ground.

Set Brakes Indicates request (ground to flight crew) or a confirmation (flight crew to ground or ground to ground) that aircraft brakes are set. Execute signal by going from open hands to clenched fists. The Pilot-In-Command will respond with clenched fist(s) or thumb(s)-up indicating brakes are set. NOTE A response from the flight crew of open hand(s) or thumb(s)-down indicates the crew cannot set brakes.

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Release Brakes Indicates request (ground to flight crew) or a confirmation (flight crew to ground or ground to ground) that aircraft brakes are released. Execute signal by going from clenched fists to open hands. The Pilot-In-Command will respond with open hand(s) or thumb(s)-up indicates brakes are released. NOTE A response from the flight crew of closed hand(s) or thumb(s)-down indicates the crew cannot release brakes.

Chocks In Indicates that the aircraft chocks have been inserted. Execute with arms and wands fully extended above the head in an upward and slightly forward position. Use a single inward jabbing motion until wands touch.

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Chocks Out Indicates that the aircraft chocks have been removed. Execute with arms and wands fully extended above the head in an upward and slightly forward position. Use a single outward jabbing motion. Do not remove chocks until the Pilot-In-Command has been notified to ensure the parking brake is set.

NOTE The Pilot-In-Command initiates this procedure. The marshaller will reply with an affirmative signal. A reply by the ground crew above the head indicates chocks have been removed. A signal below the waist is a ground-to-ground signal.

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All Clear Used by a wing-walker during aircraft movement to indicate the aircraft is clear of all obstacles. Execute by raising one arm above head.

Obstacle Clearance Used by a wing-walker during aircraft movement to indicate the amount of clearance between the aircraft and obstacles. Extend forearms upward with wands outstretched. The distance between wands is relative to the amount of clearance.

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Start Engine The Pilot-In-Command will initiate a request to start engine(s), by holding up one finger for engine one, or two fingers for engine two. The marshaller will check for engine clearance and then respond using either start engine (method A) or start engine (method B). Either point to the correct engine (method A) with the left hand, or use the correct number of fingers on the left hand to indicate the engine to be started (method B). At the same time, rotate the right hand in a circular motion above the head.

Stop Engine Used to advise Pilot-In-Command to stop engine(s). Extend arm with wand forward of body at shoulder level, move hand and wand to top of left shoulder and draw wand to top of right shoulder in a slicing motion across throat. If necessary, to indicate a specific engine to stop while using slicing motion the ramp agent indicates with left hand which engine to stop.

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Proceed Indicates to the flight deck that the aircraft must continue to proceed in the direction indicated. Use the right or left arm in a sweeping motion across the chest.

Proceed In Indicated Direction / Hand-off Indicates to the flight deck that the aircraft must proceed to the next marshaller or in the direction indicated by tower or ground control. Point both arms upward, move and extend both arms outward to side of body, pointing with wands to direction of next marshaller or taxi area.

NOTE Final marshaller will salute to indicate marshalling is complete.

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Final Marshalling / Cleared To Taxi This is the final signal initiated by the marshaller to the Pilot-In-Command that all ground equipment and personnel are clear and the aircraft is clear to taxi from the ramp without further marshalling. The final marshaller will initiate the salute to the flight deck indicating that the aircraft is ready to taxi without further ground marshalling. Perform a standard military salute with hand and/or wand. The Pilot-In-Command returns the salute indicating release of the marshaller. The marshaller will remain in position until the Pilot-In-Command returns the acknowledgment. If there is a delay between the time that the marshaller initiates the final salute and the time the crew acknowledges, the ground crew will return a final salute indicating the aircraft is still clear for taxi.

Ready For Marshalling Used by the flight crew to indicate to the marshaller that they are ready for marshalling to the taxiway. Point the index finger with movement of hand. The pilot may flash the taxi / landing light(s) to indicate they are ready to taxi.

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Engine Fire Indicates aircraft engine fire. Marshaller must indicate engine by pointing at the affected engine, or by indicating engine number with proper number of fingers on the left hand. Lower righthand wand to knee level and use a fanning motion with wand at the knee (may see a figure-8 motion). NOTE At night, the marshaller must point to the engine.

Connect / Disconnect Electrical Power Used to indicate a desire to have the external power connected or disconnected. Hold left wand pointing up with left hand above head and move right wand in towards left wand until right wand touches middle of left wand (connect), pull wand away (disconnect).

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Negative / Affirmative Used to indicate a negative or no response. Extend arm out with thumb or wand down. Used to indicate an affirmative or yes response. Extend arm out with thumb or wand up.

Attract Pilots Attention Indicates the representative wants the pilots attention. Hold clenched hand at eye-level and forearm parallel to body. From dusk to dawn, and during periods of poor visibility, use the same signal holding a wand displaying a series of short flashes.

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Reduced Visibility Taxi Operations


Aerosim Flight Academy has established low visibility taxi procedures as a measure to minimize the risk associated with taxiing aircraft during these conditions. Although it is unlikely that flight operations will take place during extremely low visibility conditions, the possibility of taxi operations remains. These procedures shall go into effect when the surface visibility is less than 1200 ft. RVR or a reported mile visibility. Flight crews must follow the taxi routes depicted on the Surface Movement Guidance and Control System (SMGCS) charts for the airport, if available. Low visibility taxi procedures are published in the Jeppesen Airway Manual and are located with the airport taxi chart(s). At any time visibility is less than previously stated, flight crews will adhere to the following taxi procedures: During reduced visibility taxi operations, the person at the aircraft controls must hold a pilot certificate (Private Pilot or higher and must be rated in the aircraft). Pilot(s) will be heads-up during taxi, monitoring aircraft movement. System tests, checks, and computation that are normally (but not required to be) accomplished while the aircraft is moving should be completed with the aircraft stationary. Pilots should plan to use time holding on a ramp or taxiway to complete required tasks. Pilot(s) must be familiar with the assigned taxi route prior to aircraft movement. If in doubt, question ATC.

Surface Movement Guidance And Control System (SMGCS) A low visibility taxi plan is required for any airport that has takeoff or landing operations with less than 1200 ft. RVR visibility conditions. Some airports have approved SMGCS plans in effect now. A brief detail of SMGCS features is listed below but SMGCS airports may not have all of these features. For additional SMGCS information, refer to the AIM or the particular airports SMGCS Low Visibility Taxi Route Chart.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Stop Bar Lights Stop bars are required at intersections of an illuminated (centerline lighted) taxiway and an active runway for operations less than 600 ft. RVR. These lights consist of a row of red unidirectional, in-pavement lights installed along the holding position marking. When extinguished by the controller, they confirm clearance for the pilot or vehicle operator to enter the runway. Controlled stop bars operate in conjunction with green centerline lead-on lights, which extend from the stop bar location onto the runway. Normal operation of stop bars include: When ATC issues a clearance to the pilot to enter the runway, they activate a timer. This action causes the red stop bar to be extinguished and the green lead-on lights to illuminate. After traveling approximately 150 ft. beyond the stop bar, the aircraft or vehicle activates a sensor. This sensor relights the red stop bar and extinguishes the first segment of the lead-on lights between the stop bar and the sensor. This protects the runway against inadvertent entry by a trailing aircraft or vehicle. The aircraft then activates another sensor at approximately 300 ft., which extinguishes the remaining lead-on lights. If either sensor is not activated within a specified time limit, the stop bar will automatically reset to ON and both sets of lead-on lights will be turned OFF. Should the pilot have a discrepancy between the condition of the stop bar or lead-on lights and the verbal clearance from the controller, the aircraft shall stop immediately.

WARNING Pilots must never cross an illuminated stop bar.

Runway Guard Lights


Runway guard lights, either elevated or in-pavement, will be installed at all taxiways which provide access to an active runway. They consist of alternately flashing yellow lights. These lights are used to denote both the presence of an active runway and identify the location of a runway holding position marking.

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Taxiway Centerline Lighting


Taxiway Centerline Lights guide ground traffic under low visibility conditions and during darkness. These lights consist of green in-pavement lights.

Geographic Position Markings


ATC will verify the position of aircraft using geographic position markings. The marking can be used either as hold points or for position reporting. These checkpoints or spots will be outlined with a painted circle and will be designated with a number, a letter or both. This system of markings may not apply to all location in which Aerosim Flight Academy aircraft operate.

Clearance Bar Lights


Three yellow in-pavement clearance bar lights will be used to denote holding positions for aircraft. When used for hold points, they are co-located with geographic position marking.

WARNING

Single Engine Taxi


Aerosim Flight Academy aircraft are approved for single engine taxi provided approved procedures are included in the specific aircraft Flight Standards Manual.

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Taxi Safety Standards


Aircraft Lighting Aerosim Flight Academy policy mandates that all aircraft, when taking position or holding in position on an active runway, must have appropriate lights illuminated. Once cleared to take the active runway the landing light(s) will be turned ON.

CAUTION Flight crews are reminded to utilize the taxi / landing light at all times during nighttime taxi operations.

Aircraft Repositioning A qualified person must be occupying a pilot seat during all aircraft ground movements. The left seat must be occupied by a pilot or mechanic qualified in the aircraft. A pilot or a mechanic may occupy the right seat but neither need be qualified in the aircraft type. It is not necessary to have a taxi-qualified mechanic in the right seat for aircraft repositioning. The person controlling the aircraft using the criteria discussed in Taxi Safety Standards below will determine the duties of the right seat occupant.

NOTE For taxi operations with a non taxi-qualified person in the right seat, only: Taxi-qualified left seat occupant will brief the person in the right seat on the following safety items: 1. Wing clearance procedures 2. Use extreme caution when crossing any runway, assuring the runway is clear 3. If in doubt of clearance state the problem immediately and, if necessary, apply brakes

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OPERATIONS MANUAL General Taxi Procedures Because of the confined ramp area at most locations, all employees must follow established policy of aircraft operations in order to prevent damage to equipment and possible personal injuries to our employees and passengers. Safety is, and must be, everyone's primary concern. Complacency must be avoided. Aerosim Flight Academy flight crews will use these guidelines as a safety standard to be adhered to at all times. No deviations are permitted. Taxi speeds into and out of the ramp parking area shall be conducted at a speed not to exceed that of a fast walk. Do not taxi between an aircraft taxiing and a parking spot unless on an established taxiway. Do not pass other aircraft on the ramp to taxi out. Follow in line until these aircraft have cleared. In congested parking areas at certain destinations, expect to see an aircraft marshaller. They will provide primary marshalling instructions to ensure wing clearance between the wing of the inbound aircraft and another aircraft or other obstructions. If no marshaller is present, the flight crew will exercise extreme caution. If wingtip clearance is unusually close, the crew will cease taxi operations. The flight crew shall follow the instructions of the marshaller. If in doubt as to the meaning of the marshallers instructions, wing clearance, or noting an unsafe situation, the aircraft will be brought to an immediate stop. Further operations will not be conducted until the reason for stopping the aircraft has been corrected.

As in all aircraft operations, it is the responsibility of the Pilot-In-Command to insist upon coordination between crewmembers as to the safety of the operations. In the event an unsafe situation develops, the crewmember noting the discrepancy will immediately either stop the operation or notify the other crewmember to stop. The pilot not at the controls must provide an additional set of eyes in confined areas, advising the pilot taxiing of the continual status of aircraft clearance and other possible hazards to continued operation.

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Aircraft Tie Down


The Pilot-In-Command must ensure that the aircraft is untied and the ropes must be coiled and placed around the tie down. Upon return, the aircraft must be taxied to the appropriate parking area. The aircraft will then be shut down, secured, and tied down. Use a low power setting when taxiing in and around the area of the tie down ropes. Flight Instructors shall conduct a briefing with students on this procedure.

Ground Operations
This section of the Operations Manual deals with the basic procedures and techniques essential to the safe operation of the aircraft prior to and after the flight. Special emphasis will be placed on precise aircraft control and sound judgment in aeronautical decision making.

Pre-flight Planning The flight crew will perform all necessary Pre-flight Planning as specified in Chapters 6A Weight & Balance and 6B Performance in the appropriate Flight Standards Manual. 1. One member of the flight crew, usually the student during training operations, will arrive at least 1 hour prior to the scheduled departure time for the flight. 2. On arrival a crewmember will verify the assigned aircraft. 3. Collect the necessary weather data for the intended route of flight. 4. If the flight is a cross-country requiring the use of an Aerosim Flight Academy Navigation Log, a crewmember will complete the remaining incomplete blocks, as specified in Chapter 6B Performance of the Flight Standards Manual.

NOTE The majority of the cross-country flight plan should be completed well in advance of the planned departure time.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL 5. The crewmember will then complete the Aerosim Flight Academy Takeoff Data Card, as described in Chapter 6A Weight And Balance of the Flight Standards Manual. 6. The Aircraft Dispatch Request must then be submitted to Flight Dispatch.

NOTE Aircraft Dispatch Requests must be submitted at least 1 hour prior to the planned time of departure.

7. On receipt of the aircraft Can, both crewmembers, if applicable, will check for any discrepancies or maintenance issues, verify the appropriate aircraft data, and ensure that all necessary inspections have been complied with. This will be accomplished when all other pre-flight planning tasks have been completed by the flight crew. 8. The VFR or IFR flight plan that was completed on the Aircraft Dispatch Request must then be filed with FSS, if appropriate. 9. On solo flights, the flight crewmember must have the completed Aerosim Flight Academy Navigation Log authorized by an appropriate Instructor Pilot, if applicable, and have a completed and signed Solo Authorization Form.

CAUTION While walking on the ramp area, extreme caution must be exercised for taxiing aircraft, operating aircraft propellers, moving fuel trucks and maintenance carts. Flight crews should keep a vigilant watch at all times. This becomes more difficult at night, and the use of a flashlight is recommended.

CAUTION It is possible to experience spatial disorientation while walking on an aircraft ramp at night due to the visual cues associated with aircraft movement and lighting (strobes). If dizziness or disorientation occurs, it is recommended to immediately lie flat on the ground (away from the movement areas of aircraft, if possible) until the sensation passes.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Preflight Inspection The flight crew will perform the necessary Preflight Inspection as specified in Chapter 3, Normal Procedures of the Flight Standards Manual. 1. When approaching the aircraft flight crews should check its general condition, specifically looking for major anomalies that could be pinpointed prior to the preflight checklist being completed (e.g. pools of oil and missing parts of the airframe). 2. After entering the aircraft, flight crews must ensure that all necessary equipment, documents and navigation charts are aboard to complete the planned flight.

CAUTION Headsets, navigation clipboards, kneeboards, checklists etc. must not be placed on the top of the instrument panel. After time this will scratch the windshield, reducing visibility.

3. Flight crews will perform the Aerosim Flight Academy preflight inspection checklist as specified on the Pilots Checklist. Further guidance can be obtained in Chapter 3, Normal Procedures in the Expanded Normal Procedures Checklist portion of the Flight Standards Manual.

NOTE It is essential that during a preflight inspection anything that is found to be out of the normal must be reported to Flight Dispatch, so that Aircraft Maintenance can be alerted, and the problem rectified.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Cockpit Management Flight crews will ensure that all materials and / or equipment are neatly arranged in an organized manner, in working order, and readily available, as specified in this chapter. 1. Seats should be adjusted so that the pilots knees are slightly bent, and the balls of the feet placed on the bottom of the rudder pedals with the heels on the floor. Flight crews should ensure that the same seat position is utilized on every flight. 2. If the seat cannot be adjusted to provide the necessary visibility, cushions should be used or an aircraft change requested.

NOTE It is important that flight crews are comfortable and have the necessary visibility when seated. Poor or uncomfortable seat position can lead to aircraft control problems, and when flying solely by the use of instruments, can cause scanning problems.

WARNING Flight crews must ensure that their seats are securely in position. Many accidents occur as a result of acceleration or deceleration during takeoffs and landings with unsecured seats suddenly moving too close or too far away from the controls.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Engine Starting Flight crews will perform the necessary Engine Starting procedure as specified in Chapter 3, Normal Procedures of the Flight Standards Manual. 1. Flight crews will perform the Aerosim Flight Academy Before Starting Engine and Starting Engine checklists as specified on the Checklist. Further guidance can be obtained in Chapter 3, Normal Procedures in the Expanded Normal Procedures Checklist portion of the Flight Standards Manual. 2. When ready to start the engine, flight crews will visually clear the area around the aircraft to ensure that nothing is, or will be in the vicinity of the propeller. 3. Once the engine has been started and is operating smoothly, the oil pressure must be checked. If it does not rise as specified in Chapter 3, Normal Procedures in the Expanded Normal Procedures Checklist portion of the Flight Standards Manual, then the engine must be shut down immediately. 4. After engine start, the flight crew will verify the operation of the headsets to ensure proper communications can be established. This is achieved by the flight crewmember that turns on the radios saying to the other flight crewmember, How do you hear me? The other flight crewmember will respond, Loud and clear, how me? The flight crewmember that initiated the challenge will respond, Loud and clear?

NOTE When passengers are in the back seat of the aircraft the same challenge must be made, as it is essential that they too are able to communicate to the flight crew.

WARNING Starting an engine by turning the propeller by hand (hand propping) is prohibited by Aerosim Flight Academy.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Taxiing Flight crews will perform the necessary Taxiing procedure as specified in Chapter 3, Normal Procedures of the Flight Standards Manual. 1. The pilot flying will utilize rudder pedal steering, or the system designed for the aircraft, to maintain directional control during taxiing. 2. The pilot flying should taxi with the heels of the feet resting on the cockpit floor and the balls of the feet on the bottom of the rudder pedals. 3. While exiting the parking area, the pilot flying will check the brakes and nose wheel steering by smoothly applying the brakes and rudder in the appropriate direction. Once this has been accomplished the controls should be exchanged to the pilot not flying so that the same checks can be completed. Once this has occurred the controls must be returned to the pilot who initiated the check. 4. Taxi speed must be controlled by the use of engine power. Taxi speed should be such that when the throttle is closed the airplane may be stopped promptly.

CAUTION Flight crews shall not taxi with excessive speed as this may lead to excessive wear on the brakes and may result in damage to the aircraft or injury to the flight crew.

5. While taxiing, the pilot flying will ensure clearance from any obstructions and other aircraft. Any time there is any doubt about wingtip clearance the aircraft must be stopped and assistance sought. If no assistance is available to verify the wingtip clearance, shut down the engine. 6. While taxiing, flight crews shall ensure that the flight controls are positioned relative to the direction of the wind in accordance with the Pilots Operating Handbook / Aircraft Flight Manual. 7. Having taxied the aircraft to the appropriate run-up area, the flight crew shall position the aircraft into the wind, if possible, with the nose wheel aligned with the longitudinal axis of the aircraft. This is to ensure that more accurate operating indications are obtained and to reduce the possibility of overheating.

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NOTE While taxing to the appropriate run-up area, flight crews shall remain in a non-movement area unless clearance has been received from ground control.

NOTE While taxiing, the flight crew will monitor ground control frequency at all times. Weather information may only be obtained when the aircraft is stationary.

WARNING When taxing in the vicinity of a fuel truck, flight crews will ensure that a distance of at least 20 feet is kept between themselves and the fuel truck. This is due to possible static discharge, leading to an explosion and / or fire.

WARNING Flight crews are not permitted to enter or exit the aircraft any time the engine is operating.

WARNING Any time there is poor visibility, the Pilot-In-Command will ensure that both members of the flight crew are heads-up during taxi. Systems tests and checks, computations and checklists which are normally (but not required to be) accomplished while the aircraft is moving should be completed with the aircraft stationary. Flight crews should plan to use the time spent holding on the ramp or taxiways to complete necessary tasks. Both members of the flight crew must be familiar with the assigned taxi route prior to aircraft movement. If in any doubt the flight crew must query ground control or the control tower.

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NOTE Aerosim Flight Academy policy mandates that all aircraft, when taxiing will have the beacon illuminated, if installed. During times of reduced visibility or after dusk, navigation lights must also be illuminated. Taxi lights may be used after dusk, but flight crews must be aware of other aircraft in the vicinity. When taxiing into position or holding in position on an active runway the strobe lights, if installed, and landing light will be illuminated.

After Landing, Engine Shutdown And Parking Flight crews will perform the necessary After Landing and Parking procedures as specified in Chapter 3, Normal Procedures of the Flight Standards Manual. 1. Flight crews will ensure that after landing the aircraft is taxied into the appropriate position, brought to a complete stop, and the Aerosim Flight Academy After Landing checklist as specified in the Flight Standards Manual is completed. Further guidance can be obtained in Chapter 3, Normal Procedures in the Expanded Normal Procedures Checklist portion of the Flight Standards Manual. 2. Flight crews will ensure that the appropriate clearance is received (if necessary) prior to taxiing back to the parking area. 3. Flight crews will then ensure that the Aerosim Flight Academy Parking checklist as specified on the Pilots Checklist are completed. Further guidance can be obtained in Chapter 3, Normal Procedures in the Expanded Normal Procedures Checklist portion of the Flight Standards Manual. 4. Flight crews will ensure that maintenance flags will be placed on the aircraft throttle if the aircraft is written up for a maintenance issue.

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NOTE Flight crews must ensure that the aircraft is properly secured after a flight. The aircraft will be secured using the approved wind knots only. Further guidance on this procedure can be found in the Aerosim Flight Academy Safety Procedures & Practices.

NOTE Ensure that all garbage has been removed from the aircraft and that the seat belts have been secured neatly across the seats. Upon exiting the aircraft ensure that all windows and doors are firmly closed. Failure to do so may result in serious damage to the aircraft.

CAUTION The Pilot-In-Command will ensure that aircraft are secured before being left unattended for any reason.

Runway Incursion Avoidance Procedures


This section provides flight crews with specific operational information associated with the mandatory crew procedures to be used during taxi operations at all airports. These procedures will be used at all times during operations in Aerosim Flight Academy aircraft. During instructional flights, it is the responsibility of the instructor pilot to ensure that these procedures are correctly followed.

Application The purpose of the procedures listed below is to enhance safety, eliminate runway incursions and to clearly outline the crew procedures that will be followed during taxi operations. It has been shown the overwhelming cause of runway incursions is loss of situational awareness. This is a by-product of the flight crew being unwilling to ask for clarification of instructions when unsure of the correct action to follow. Flight crews will ensure that before any flight activity, a thorough brief is conducted on the procedures that will be used at the airports of departure, arrival and possible enroute deviations. This brief will cover planning, situational awareness, use of written taxi instructions, flight deck communications, ATC/flight crew communications and taxiing. Each of these areas will enhance safety and reduce the probability of mistakes being made by the flight crew.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Planning Thorough planning for taxi is essential for a safe operation. Flight crews should devote as much attention to the airport surface movement as they would give to any other phase of the flight. Airport surface movements should be anticipated and planning for these movements can be enhanced by the use of the airport Automatic Terminal Information Service (ATIS) as well as prior experience at the airport.

WARNING A potential pitfall of pre-taxi and pre-landing planning is setting expectations and then receiving different instructions from ATC. Flight crews need to ensure that they follow the clearances or instructions that are actually given and not those that the flight crew expects to receive.

Flight crews should take the time to study the airport diagram, and once planning has occurred, the diagram should remain accessible to the flight crew in the cockpit.

Situational Awareness Flight crews should always be aware of the position of the aircraft and how it relates to the current airport operations in use. Therefore, teaching during taxi operations should be kept to a minimum. Prior to crossing runways, turning onto different taxiways or passing other traffic, flight crews will verify the position of the aircraft considering the airport diagram and the instructions given to the flight crew by ATC. Flight crews will stop taxiing if there is any difference or confusion among the flight crewmembers as to the correct action to be taken.

WARNING Do not stop on a runway. If possible, flight crews will taxi off the runway then initiate communications with ATC to regain orientation.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Situational awareness is also important immediately after landing. When exiting the runway after landing, the flight crew should again, when clear of the runway, stop taxiing if there is any difference or confusion among the flight crewmembers as to the correct action to be taken.

WARNING Unless otherwise instructed by ATC, flight crews will after landing, taxi clear of the landing runway even if that requires crossing or entering a taxiway or ramp area.

WARNING At airports with control towers, flight crews should never enter a runway without an appropriate clearance. If in doubt, STOP and ASK. At non-towered airports flight crews will scan both directions before crossing a runway. This is due to the fact that some aircraft are not radio equipped and may be landing on a runway contrary to the one in use.

Use Of Written Taxi Instructions At many airports, taxi instructions can be extremely complex, involving numerous taxiways, turns and transitions as well as runway crossing and hold short instructions. Misunderstanding or forgetting any part of the taxi instructions can lead to an unsafe situation. Writing down taxi instructions can reduce the pilots vulnerability to forgetting these instructions.

CAUTION All Aerosim Flight Academy flight crews will write down ALL taxi instructions, no matter how simple.

Flight Deck Communications It is essential that the flight crew correctly understands and agrees with all ATC ground movement instructions. Once a clearance has been acknowledged and written down, the PF will verbally repeat the taxi clearance and the PM will verify that they are correct. At that point, the aircraft may be taxied as instructed. Should any disagreement exist, clarification will be sought from ground control.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL ATC/Flight Crew Communications The primary way the flight crew and ATC communicate is by voice. The safety and efficiency of taxi operations at airports with operating control towers depend on this communication loop. Controllers should use standard phraseology and require read backs and other responses from the flight crew in order to ensure that clearances and instructions are understood. In order to complete the communications loop, the controllers must also clearly understand the flight crews read back and other responses. The flight crew can help enhance the controllers understanding by responding appropriately and using standard phraseology. Regulatory requirements, the AIM and the Aerosim Flight Academy Communications Manual provide information on the standard phraseology and communications requirements. Therefore, flight crews will acknowledge all traffic control instructions and clearances by reading back the entire clearance, not by merely responding Roger or Wilco. For example, in certain circumstances, when alerting tower to the readiness for departure, flight crews may be told merely to Hold Short. In this situation the responsibility of the flight crew is to read back a clearance that would include where they are holding short. In this situation the correct response would be, N166CA, holding short of runway 9L at Bravo 1.

NOTE While taxiing, the flight crew will monitor ground control frequency at all times. Weather information may only be obtained when the aircraft is stationary.

WARNING When taxing in the vicinity of a fuel truck, flight crews will ensure that a distance of at least 20 feet is kept between themselves and the fuel truck. This is due to possible static discharge, leading to an explosion and / or fire.

WARNING Any time there is poor visibility, the senior flight crewmember will ensure that both members of the flight crew are heads-up during taxi. Systems tests and checks, computations and checklists, which are normally (but not required to be) accomplished while the aircraft is moving should be completed with the aircraft stationary.

These procedures have been established to ensure that flight crews function as a wellcoordinated team and maintain the situational awareness necessary for the safe operation of the aircraft.

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Chapter 5 Operational Policies Table Of Contents


AIRCRAFT .................................................................................................................................................................. 3 AIRCRAFT CLEANLINESS ........................................................................................................................................... 3 PRE-FLIGHT INSPECTION ........................................................................................................................................... 3 ADDITIONAL PRE-FLIGHT INSPECTIONS .................................................................................................................... 4 PRE-DEPARTURE FUNCTIONS .................................................................................................................................... 4 MAINTENANCE .......................................................................................................................................................... 5 AIRCRAFT DEICING ................................................................................................................................................... 5 MECHANICAL IRREGULARITIES ................................................................................................................................. 5 POST-FLIGHT INSPECTION .................................................................................................................................. 5 DEFINITIONS .............................................................................................................................................................. 5 BACKGROUND ........................................................................................................................................................... 5 PROCEDURE ............................................................................................................................................................... 6 SECURING OVERNIGHT AIRCRAFT .................................................................................................................. 6 AUTOMATION PHILOSOPHY ............................................................................................................................... 7 DEFINITION ............................................................................................................................................................... 7 POLICY ...................................................................................................................................................................... 7 PRIORITIES ................................................................................................................................................................ 7 FLIGHT CREW COMMUNICATION & COORDINATION PROCEDURES ................................................... 8 GENERAL................................................................................................................................................................... 8 CREW BRIEFING ........................................................................................................................................................ 8 GROUND OPERATIONS ............................................................................................................................................... 8 EN ROUTE ................................................................................................................................................................. 8 BEFORE LANDING...................................................................................................................................................... 9 CREW RESOURCE MANAGEMENT .................................................................................................................... 9 AIRPORT SECURITY ............................................................................................................................................... 9 APPROACHES ......................................................................................................................................................... 10 RUNWAYS WITH PRECISION APPROACHES .............................................................................................................. 10 RUNWAYS WITH NON-PRECISION APPROACHES ..................................................................................................... 10 CONTACT APPROACHES........................................................................................................................................... 10 CIRCLING APPROACHES........................................................................................................................................... 10 LAND AND HOLD SHORT OPERATIONS ......................................................................................................... 11 OPERATIONS AT AIRPORTS WITHOUT AN OPERATING CONTROL TOWER ..................................... 11 PRE-FLIGHT REQUIREMENTS ................................................................................................................................... 11 GENERAL COMMUNICATIONS .................................................................................................................................. 11 ARRIVAL ROUTING .................................................................................................................................................. 12 ARRIVAL COMMUNICATIONS................................................................................................................................... 13 INSTRUMENT APPROACH CLEARANCES ................................................................................................................... 14 VISUAL APPROACH CLEARANCES ........................................................................................................................... 15 STANDARD VFR PATTERN ENTRY .......................................................................................................................... 15 DEPARTURE ............................................................................................................................................................. 16 DEPARTURE COMMUNICATIONS .............................................................................................................................. 16

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IFR DEPARTURE CLEARANCES ........................................................................................................................16 STABILIZED APPROACH POLICY .....................................................................................................................17 FUELING PROCEDURES .......................................................................................................................................18 PROCEDURES / SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS ...............................................................................................................18 SPILLAGE / CONTAMINATION PROCEDURES .............................................................................................................19 Spillage...............................................................................................................................................................19 Contamination ....................................................................................................................................................20 ALTIMETRY .............................................................................................................................................................20 ALTIMETER SETTING TERMINOLOGY .......................................................................................................................20 ALTIMETER CHECKING ............................................................................................................................................21 ATC COMMUNICATIONS .....................................................................................................................................21 CONDUCT DURING FLIGHT................................................................................................................................22 CRITICAL PHASES OF FLIGHT / STERILE COCKPIT ..............................................................................22 FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS AT CONTROLS ......................................................................................................23 MANIPULATION OF CONTROLS .......................................................................................................................23 TRANSFER OF AIRCRAFT CONTROL PROCEDURES ..................................................................................23 TAKEOFF AND LANDING OPERATIONS ....................................................................................................................23 EN ROUTE OPERATIONS...........................................................................................................................................24 STANDARD ALTITUDE AWARENESS CALL-OUT .......................................................................................................24 ENGINES ...................................................................................................................................................................24 BEFORE STARTING ...................................................................................................................................................24 ENGINE FAILURE / REPORTING REQUIREMENTS.......................................................................................................25 STARTING ................................................................................................................................................................25 NOISE ABATEMENT ..............................................................................................................................................25 RECORD KEEPING & PAPERWORK .................................................................................................................26 SEATBELT USAGE .................................................................................................................................................26 SINGLE-ENGINE TURNAROUNDS IN MULTI-ENGINE AIRCRAFT...........................................................26 STYLE OF FLYING .................................................................................................................................................27 SAFETY STANDARDS ............................................................................................................................................28 REPORTING OF ABNORMAL SITUATIONS.....................................................................................................28

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Aircraft
Aircraft Cleanliness The Pilot-In-Command is responsible for the cleanliness of their aircraft at all times. After each flight, crewmembers will clean the cabin to the maximum extent within the time provided. The following items should be accomplished as a minimum: Remove litter from seats, seat pockets, and floor areas. Arrange seatbelts on seats.

Pre-Flight Inspection It is the responsibility of the designated Pilot-In-Command to determine that all of the following requirements are met: [91.103] Determine that the aircraft is loaded in compliance with applicable weight and balance limitations per the appropriate Aerosim Flight Academy Takeoff Data Card or applicable information and graphs contained in the Aircraft Flight Manual or Flight Standards Manual. Ensure that all records and forms applicable to the particular flight operation have been properly completed and filed as required by Aerosim Flight Academy policy and appropriate Federal Aviation Regulations. Ensure that all required checklists, manuals, pertinent aeronautical charts and applicable special equipment are aboard the aircraft and ready to use. Ensure that the required airworthiness and pre-flight inspections have been made and that the aircraft has been properly dispatched for flight. Review the appropriate forms in the aircraft can including: Daily Flight Time Worksheet (Hobbs Sheet) Aircraft discrepancy sheet Aircraft Inspection Summary (Annual & 100 Hour) VOR Accuracy Check Placarded Items All mechanical discrepancies will be recorded in the Aircraft Maintenance Log Book. Entries in the Maintenance Log must be corrected or deferred prior to the next flight. All deferred items must be transferred to the Deferred Items List. Determine that a thorough pre-flight inspection of the aircraft has been performed in accordance with the appropriate Flight Standards Manual.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Additional Pre-Flight Inspections Additionally, a pre-flight inspection will be performed when any of the following conditions exist: Maintenance has been performed or aircraft servicing has taken place such as: 1. Cowlings opened 2. Other maintenance actions The flight crew has left the aircraft unattended. Between flight legs as determined by the Pilot-In-Command.

Immediately inform Flight Dispatch or Line Maintenance of any discrepancies discovered during the pre-flight process. All aircraft equipment and systems will be checked for proper operation applicable to the type of flight being conducted and in accordance with the approved aircraft checklist.

CAUTION Unsecured cowling latches and access panels cause unscheduled landings, structural damage, missed flights, inconvenienced customers and possible in flight safety considerations. Pre-flight actions must include the security of these items. Pay particular attention to aircraft that have had scheduled or unscheduled maintenance.

Pre-Departure Functions NOTE It is the responsibility of all flight crewmembers, Dispatchers, Line Maintenance, and Flight Operations Department management personnel to assist wherever possible to ensure that scheduled flight operations commence on-time.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Maintenance Aircraft undergoing maintenance may not be ready for release at the flight crews' scheduled time. It is the responsibility of the Pilot-In-Command to establish and maintain contact with the Maintenance Department or Flight Dispatch concerning the aircraft's planned release time from Maintenance. It is essential that the flight crew remain ready for flight to minimize delays upon release. Remain available for a possible change in aircraft assignment or to assist maintenance personnel.

Aircraft Deicing When the Aircraft De-icing / Cold Weather Program is in effect, the Pilot-In-Command must contact Flight Dispatch if delays to the expected departure time will occur. Flight Dispatch will annotate the new departure time. The Pilot-In-Command should assist in coordinating the aircraft de-icing procedures to meet the departure time. For additional information refer to the Aircraft De-icing / Cold Weather Program.

Mechanical Irregularities Refer to Chapter 11, Maintenance.

Post-Flight Inspection
Definitions Accepting Crew - A flight crew that is beginning a flight on a particular aircraft. Terminating Crew - A flight crew that is completing a flight on a particular aircraft (not necessarily the last flight of the day). Post-flight Inspection - An exterior walk-around. Attention should be directed, but not limited, to visible discrepancies such as tires, panels, fluids, etc. Make a final check of the aircraft can to verify that all required paperwork has been completed. A detailed pre-flight is not necessary.

Background Flight delays are often encountered when an accepting flight crew discovers a mechanical discrepancy at or near departure time. The sooner Maintenance responds (because of early notification) to an aircraft discrepancy, the more likely it is that the flight will depart on time. A discrepancy discovered by the terminating crew (versus notification by the accepting crew) will allow Maintenance more time to solve the problem.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Procedure After each flight, even on maintenance turns / run-ups, the flight crew must conduct a post flight inspection. All terminating flight crews shall perform a post-flight inspection, including aircraft changes with limited time between flights. At least one accepting crewmember shall arrive at the aircraft as soon as possible following its arrival and conduct the pre-flight inspection. Immediately notify Flight Dispatch or Line Maintenance if a mechanical discrepancy is discovered. Enter all discrepancies on an Aircraft Discrepancy Sheet.

Securing Overnight Aircraft


When securing and aircraft overnight and before leaving the airport, the flight crew shall accomplish the following items: Ensure that the aircraft Parking Checklist has been completed and that all electrical equipment has been turned off. Complete the Daily Flight Time Worksheet. Straighten seatbelts and remove trash from the cabin. Ensure that any necessary covers, control locks, tie-downs, or wheel chocks are installed and secure. Close all aircraft doors and windows.

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Automation Philosophy
Definition The word automation, where it appears in this statement, shall mean the replacement of a human function, either manual or cognitive, with a machine function. This definition applies to all levels of automation in all aircraft flown by Aerosim Flight Academy. The purpose of automation is to aid the pilot in doing his job. The pilot is the most complex, capable and flexible component of the air transportation system, and as such is best suited to determine the optimal use of resources in any given situation.

NOTE If using automation requires so much attention that it detracts from the pilot's situational awareness, the level of automation should be reduced to a level that is easier to manage.

Policy Pilots must be proficient in operating their aircraft in all levels of automation. They must be knowledgeable in the selection of the appropriate degree of automation, and must have the skills needed to move from one level of automation to another.

Priorities Automation should be used at the level appropriate to enhance the priorities of safety, comfort, schedule, training, and economy. In order to achieve the above priorities, all Aerosim Flight Academy training programs, training devices, procedures, checklists, aircraft and equipment acquisitions, manuals, quality control programs, standardization, supporting documents and the day-to-day operation of Aerosim Flight Academy aircraft shall be in accordance with this statement of philosophy.

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Flight Crew Communication & Coordination Procedures


General Simple, effective communication between flight crewmembers is essential in maximizing safety and standardization among crewmembers and different aircraft types. This section describes some of the methods of communication and coordination between the flight crew. All Aerosim Flight Academy operations shall follow these established procedures. Flight crewmembers will inform any passengers through a verbal announcement when practicable for abnormal situations such as delayed or rejected takeoff, unusual departure maneuvers, return to departure airport, extended holding, missed approach or diversion to an alternate. Additional flight crew communication procedures may be found in the Communications Standards Manual.

Crew Briefing The Pilot-In-Command will ensure that all crewmembers are properly introduced and that the following items have been included in a crew briefing to be conducted prior to the flight: Weather to be expected during flight Estimated flight time Possible delays Aircraft discrepancies Information necessary for the safe execution of the flight Aircraft security The use of seat belts shall be covered in accordance with the applicable Flight Standards Manual.

Ground Operations Aircraft movement signifies the commencement of Sterile Cockpit procedures.

En Route If possible based on available information, the flight crew should make an announcement to any passenger(s) if severe weather or expected turbulence is to be encountered.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Before Landing The flight crew should, workload permitting, make an announcement to any passenger(s) prior to, or during the descent, that the aircraft is about to land. Also, ensure that seat belts are fastened, as required.

Crew Resource Management


Pilot-In-Command - Responsible for the Crew Resource Management concept of: Authority with Participation. Responsible for providing leadership in a working environment of mutual respect and trust. The Pilot-In-Command will always retain authority; however the Pilot-InCommand will both elicit and welcome participation from others during the conduct of the flight. Pilot / Pilot Under Instruction - Responsible for the Crew Resource Management concept of: Assertiveness With Respect. The Pilot will be an integral participant in the safe conduct of the flight. The Pilot will interact with the Pilot-In-Command in a positive, consistent manner while still honoring the Pilot-In-Commands position.

Airport Security
Aerosim Flight Academy flights should not attempt to park or deplane the aircraft from a secure terminal area. Unless directly informed otherwise by airport personnel, flights should park and deplane from GA ramps. Flight crews cannot enter through an airport Security Identification Display Area (SIDA) without having passed through screening. Aerosim Flight Academy personnel may not enter the secure areas of an airport with another specific airport issued SIDA badge or an Aerosim Flight Academy badge.

NOTE Aerosim Flight Academy identification badges do not allow access to SIDA areas.

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Approaches
CAUTION The use of outdated or superseded en route or approach charts by a flight crewmember is strictly prohibited.

Aerosim Flight Academy requires each crewmember to carry current Instrument Approach Charts. Each crewmember is responsible for ensuring that all revisions issued are inserted properly and that the revision page (if used) is dated.

Runways With Precision Approaches When conducting a visual approach to a runway with an operative precision approach navigation facility, the navigational aids will be tuned and identified to the appropriate frequency. Course guidance will be used to ensure proper runway alignment and once intercepting the glide path the aircraft will remain at or above the glide slope until landing. Traffic pattern / repetitive landing operations are excluded from this requirement. Flight crews are also reminded of the requirements of 14 CFR 91.129 with regard to flight at an altitude at or above glide slope while approaching to land in Class D airspace. Runways With Non-Precision Approaches When conducting a visual approach to a runway with an operative non-precision approach facility, the navigational aids will be tuned and identified to the appropriate frequency to the extent possible. Course guidance will be used to ensure proper runway alignment. Contact Approaches Aerosim Flight Academy flight crews are not authorized to request or execute a Contact Approach at any time.

Circling Approaches Circling approaches at night are not authorized when weather conditions are below 1000' ceiling and/or 3 miles visibility. During day operations circling approaches may be conducted to the published minimums.

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Land And Hold Short Operations

CAUTION Extreme caution should be exercised during Land and Hold Short Operations.

Aerosim Flight Academy flight crews must inform ATC if the flight crew feels that it cannot safely conduct the operation. Flight crew should attempt to land in the shortest possible distance, consistent with safety, to assist ATC.

Operations At Airports Without An Operating Control Tower


Pre-Flight Requirements Thorough pre-flight planning is essential when operating at airports without an operating control tower. Flight crews should review the following as a minimum: Charts (include tower closed procedures). Flight plan with emphasis on Notes and NOTAMs. 1. Pilot controlled lighting (night or IMC conditions only); refer to the Airport/Facility Directory and appropriate airport page to determine lighting available. General Communications All ATC communications will utilize #1 VHF (if the aircraft is equipped with more than one radio). CTAF communications, normally Unicom or FSS, will utilize #2 VHF. All pilots will verify correct tuning of the CTAF. CTAF should remain on #2 VHF until it is no longer required. Initial calls on CTAF should be directed to the listed facility by name. Positive contact will verify the correct frequency selection. If contact cannot be established, attempt to contact other aircraft that may be operating on the same frequency to verify proper radio tuning. Use airport name, aircraft call sign and aircraft type in all CTAF transmissions. Transmissions must also include position, altitude (level, climbing, or descending) and intentions (e.g.: approach type, downwind, base, final). Additional communications guidance can be found in the Aerosim Flight Academys Communications Standards Manual.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL If a Unicom is monitoring CTAF, this information is essential to clearly identify arrival and departure intentions. If a FSS is monitoring CTAF, the airport name is essential as the FSS may be monitoring several airports. Frequent CTAF reports are necessary to maintain situational awareness for other aircraft in the area and for airport ground personnel who may be working on or near runways and/or taxiways. An ATC clearance to conduct an instrument approach does not relieve the crew from the responsibility to make all required CTAF radio reports.

EXAMPLE University Park traffic, N1234, Cessna 172, 10 miles south, 6000, descending for visual RWY 2, full stop, University Park.

WARNING There is no substitute for alertness while operating in the vicinity of any airport without an operating control tower. To achieve the highest level of safety, all aircraft will transmit and receive on CTAF.

Arrival Routing Anticipate and plan for entry into a non-radar environment, as Air Route Traffic Control Center (ARTCC) coverage limits are variable. Victor Airways provide the published altitudes and course guidance for a transition to the approach environment. Flights may be issued a cruise clearance to the airport. Clearance along a published airway provides a transition to the approach environment. Descent may be initiated at the pilots discretion to the applicable minimum IFR altitudes along the assigned route of flight. The flight is cleared to fly any available approach unless restricted by ATC. A Direct clearance to the airport or approach fix is not a clearance for descent until established on a published segment.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL After the aircraft is established on a segment of a published route or segment of the approach, published altitudes apply to descent within each succeeding route or approach segment unless a different altitude is assigned by ATC. Slower aircraft are to reduce turning radius and allow more time during approach.

WARNING If uncertain of clearance, immediately query ATC as to assigned route of flight and/or altitude.

Arrival Communications Monitor and transmit position and intentions no less than 10 miles from the airport of intended landing. If able, start monitoring the CTAF approximately 30 miles out. Position reports (e.g.: Downwind, Base, Final) are to be continued even after the initial broadcast on the CTAF whether broadcasting in the blind or contact has been established. Unless released by ATC, it is mandatory to report to ATC for a non-radar instrument approach when either: 1. Leaving the Final Approach Fix (FAF) inbound on final approach (Non- Precision), or 2. Leaving the Outer Marker (OM) or fix used in lieu of the OM inbound on final approach (Precision Approach) Pilots must close out flight plans as soon as possible after landing via: 1. Controlling agency if radio contact has been maintained, or 2. Any means available including telephone. Additional arrival communications guidance can be found in the Aerosim Flight Academys Communications Standards Manual.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Instrument Approach Clearances When ATC states, Cleared approach, the pilot may execute any published IAP. When cleared for the approach, maintain last assigned altitude until established on a segment of a published route or segment of the approach.

WARNING An IFR approach does not provide positive separation from, or priority over VFR traffic.

When clearance designates a particular runway for landing, any authorized approach to that runway may be used. When clearance designates a particular approach for landing, no other approach may be used unless clearance is given. Visual approaches are not authorized unless specifically cleared by ATC. When VFR conditions exist, all elements of a straight-in VFR pattern entry must be considered. Refer to Straight-In VFR Pattern Entry. Additional clearance communications guidance can be found in the Aerosim Flight Academys Communications Standards Manual.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Visual Approach Clearances A clearance for a visual approach is an IFR authorization and does not alter the need to cancel the IFR Flight Plan upon landing. A pilot is not cleared for a visual approach to an uncontrolled airport simply by stating to ATC that he has the airport in sight. Specific clearance must be issued. Additional clearance communications guidance can be found in the Aerosim Flight Academys Communications Standards Manual.

Standard VFR Pattern Entry Comply with visual approach limitations and restrictions. Plan for left traffic, unless otherwise specified, at 1000 ft. AFE. Other aircraft may be anywhere from 600 ft. to 1500 ft. AFE.

WARNING Be at traffic pattern altitude in level flight when entering the pattern. Stay clear of the traffic flow until established on the entry leg. Enter at a 45-degree angle to the downwind leg heading toward a point abeam of the midpoint of the landing runway.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Departure For all departures, use the Departure Priorities as described in this section. When obstacles are a factor, consider using best angle of climb Vx until above the minimum IFR altitude.

NOTE At airfields without a published departure procedure, the recommended departure procedure is to continue straight out, or exit with a 45 turn beyond the departure end of the runway, after reaching pattern altitude.

Departure Communications Monitor and transmit on CTAF from start of taxi until at least 10 miles from the airport (e.g.: broadcast intentions, position and departure direction). If Academy designated practice areas surround the departing airport then CTAF transmissions may be stopped earlier, once clear of the traffic pattern, to allow the flight crew to begin transmissions in the practice area on the appropriate frequency. When unable to communicate on CTAF, broadcast intentions and position on CTAF in the blind.

IFR Departure Clearances


IFR departure clearances can be obtained from: ATC before the taxi clearance ATC during taxi FSS by radio or telephone if unable to contact ATC by radio

If unable to obtain clearance on the ground, a VFR departure can be made in order to obtain an IFR clearance.

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Stabilized Approach Policy

NOTE Consult the appropriate aircraft Flight Standards Manual for specific aircraft procedures.

All approaches conducted in Aerosim Flight Academy aircraft must be conducted in accordance with the stabilized approach concept as outlined in the appropriate Flight Standards Manual. Aircraft must be in an approved landing configuration and must be established on the proper flight path before descending below the minimum stabilized approach height. A descent rate of approximately 700 ft. per minute will normally be considered the maximum allowable for a stabilized approach inside the final approach fix. Descent rates in excess of 800 ft. per minute will be cause for consideration to abandon the approach. Significant speed and configuration changes during an approach can seriously complicate tasks associated with aircraft control, increase the difficulty of properly evaluating an approach as it progresses, and complicate the decision of the proper action at the decision point. A stabilized approach means that the aircraft must be in landing configuration, must maintain the proper approach speed (-10, +10 knots) with the engine under power, and must be established on the proper flight path (not exceeding approximately 700 FPM rate of descent) before descending below the minimum stabilized approach height, as listed below. When the reported ceiling is 1,000 or higher and visibility is 3 miles or greater, the aircraft must be stabilized prior to 500 feet AGL. When reported ceiling is less than 1,000 or visibility is less than 3 miles, the aircraft must be stabilized prior to 1000 feet AGL.

If the approach is not stabilized in accordance with the above listed criteria a missed approach must be executed.

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Fueling Procedures
Procedures / Safety Considerations It shall be the responsibility of the Aerosim Flight Academy representative requesting fuel to check the amount of fuel and proper grade. The flight crew will correlate the amount with the total fuel as reported by the servicing agent and as indicated by the fuel gauges. Fueling for flights operating from airports that do not have Aerosim Flight Academy fueling must be supervised by a crewmember. Use caution when fueling during thunder/electrical storms. Operations will normally be suspended when lightning is within three miles of the airport, or an alert is provided by a lightening prediction system, unless airport regulations are more restrictive. The aircraft and dispensing units shall be bonded. Ground power or aircraft heating units will not be connected or disconnected during fuel servicing. Ground power units may be in operation during refueling provided the unit is not connected, disconnected, stopped or started during actual refueling. Aircraft ground power units will be located as far away from the fueling points as practicable. Power carts will not be placed under the wings or just aft of the trailing edge, except when the design of the aircraft permits no other location. No persons may be onboard the aircraft during refueling. No Smoking and no flames or fires shall be permitted within 50 ft. of an aircraft while refueling. Aircraft strobe lights will be off during fueling/de-fueling. Aircraft electrical switches that control circuits in the wings not necessary to the fueling operations will not be operated during fueling except in emergency. Fueling operations will not be conducted within 100 ft. of energized airborne radar equipment, or within 300 ft. of energized ground radar equipment installations. No electrical tools, such as drills or buffers, will be used on or near an aircraft during refueling/de-fueling. Flashlights used near the fueling points will be of a type approved by Underwriters' Laboratories for use in hazardous locations.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Aircraft batteries should not be installed or removed during fuel servicing. Caution will be exercised during fuel servicing to prevent damage to wings, and wing fixtures. Wing mats should be used whenever possible. No aircraft is to be refueled in a hangar. A fire extinguisher will be available prior to fueling/de-fueling.

Spillage / Contamination Procedures Spillage Careful operation of fuel servicing equipment will prevent the majority of accidental spills. If a spill does occur, the first thing to do is to stop the flow of fuel, if possible. Every member of the fueling and flight crew should be familiar with the location and operation of the fuel emergency shutoff. The prevention of spills entails considerable self-discipline on the part of each individual on the fueling crew. The hose nozzle must never be left unattended during over-wing fueling. The nozzle trigger must never be wedged or tied in the open position. The person at the nozzle must keep a secure hold on the nozzle at all times when fuel is being pumped into the aircraft tank. Under no circumstances will personnel be permitted to walk through the liquid area of a fuel spill, because of the extreme hazard of ignition. Fuel spills measuring 10 ft. in any direction must be washed down or cleaned up immediately by airport authorities. Clothing on which fuel has been spilled will be changed at once, due to the dangers of fire and skin irritation. No engine or spark producing machinery within the spill area will be started (including ground power units) before the spilled fuel is removed or made safe. If it is possible to move the fuel servicing equipment, personnel will make certain that any fuel hose, pipe, and/or grounding cables that were connected to the aircraft have been safely stowed. Aircraft on which fuel has been spilled will be carefully inspected by a flight crewmember for any accumulation of fuel or fuel vapors. Any fuel discovered will be cleaned up. When possible, the aircraft should be moved to an uncontaminated area before loading.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Contamination Aerosim Flight Academy will purchase fuel from approved vendors that have a procedure for determining fuel contamination. The Operations Department will check for fuel contamination at intervals required by the Fuel QA Program. Additional information on this program may be found in the Aerosim Flight Academy Fuel Training Manual.

Altimetry
Since hectopascals (hPa) are the ICAO standard unit for pressure settings, controllers are not required to include the word millibars when transmitting settings. Pilots must not abbreviate the millibars altimeter setting during a read-back or a checklist response. Pilots must state the complete numerical value of the altimeter setting whether it is issued in hectopascals or in. of mercury. For example, two niner niner two or one zero one three. Transition altitudes/levels vary by country and terminal area. They are identified on the ATIS, and/or DP and Approach Charts.

NOTE Extreme diligence is required to insure the proper reference (QNH/ QNE) is set prior to penetration of the transition altitude/level and for intermediate level offs.

Altimeter Setting Terminology QNE - Altimeter setting 29.92 in. of mercury (InHg), 1013 hectopascals (hPa) or millibars (MB). QNH - Altitude above mean sea level based on local station pressure. Hectopascals (hPa) - A term used for atmospheric pressure when setting the altimeter. This term has superseded millibars (MB). Both terms may be used interchangeably and flight crews may hear either terminology when listening to ATIS. Transition Altitude - Altitude climbing through which the altimeters must be set to QNE (29.92 InHg or 1013 hPa). May be called transition height. This is specified on the approach chart. Transition Level - Flight level descending through which the altimeters must be reset to QNH as required. The altimeter setting will be specified on ATIS or as communicated by ATC.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Altimeter Checking Altimeters will be checked when initially set to field barometric pressure prior to takeoff. Any discrepancy in excess of 75 ft. from a published elevation will be documented on a Maintenance Discrepancy Log.

NOTE Each altimeter may have a discrepancy of up to 75 ft. from a published field elevation.

Flight crews are reminded to check the altimeter setting often, and reset it as necessary, during cross-country flights.

ATC Communications
The following information is extracted from the Aerosim Flight Academys Communications Standards Manual and is included here for review. Good phraseology enhances safety. Jargon, chatter, and CB slang must not be used in ATC communications. However, concise phraseology may not always be adequate, use whatever words are necessary to get the message across. Usage of correct phraseology in accordance with the AIM is below: Altitude - Three digits preceded by Flight Level, or separate digits followed by Thousand and/or Hundred 27,000 ft. = Flight level Two Seven Zero 19,000 ft. = Flight level One Niner Zero (not Oh) 12,000 ft. = One Two Thousand 4,200 ft. = Four Thousand Two Hundred Direction - all three digits clearly stated 005 = Zero Zero Five Degrees 210 = Two One Zero Degrees (not Oh) Speed - separate digits plus Knots or preceded by Mach Point 190 Knots = One Niner Zero Knots Mach .74 = Mach Point Seven Four The pilot not flying will read back all air traffic control clearances, including route clearances, received from ATC. It is important that all clearances be read back as received, together with the full call sign. 09/01/10 (ISSUE) OPERATIONAL POLICIES 5-21

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Conduct During Flight


Paperwork of any kind should be accomplished only when the aircraft is stopped in a parking spot or during level cruise. The Pilot-In-Command will ensure that all checklists are used and adhered to by all crewmembers in the performance of their duties. The use of any non-essential reading material (e.g.: magazines, newspapers and novels) is prohibited in the cockpit during flight. The presence of non-essential reading material in the cockpit creates a most unprofessional impression on passengers, customers, and other employees. Therefore, all flight crewmembers must ensure that personal items, such as reading material, are kept from view and in the crewmember's flight case.

Critical Phases Of Flight / Sterile Cockpit


Critical Phase Of Flight - includes all ground operations involving taxi, takeoff and landing, and all other flight operations conducted below 2,000 ft., except cruise flight. Taxi is defined as movement of an aircraft under its own power on the surface of the airport. No flight crewmember shall perform any duties during a critical phase of flight except those duties required for the safe operation of the aircraft. No flight crewmember may engage in, nor may any Pilot-In-Command permit, any activity during a critical phase of flight which could distract any flight crewmember from the performance of his duties or which could interfere in any way with the proper conduct of those duties. Activities such as eating, pointing out landmarks, engaging in nonessential conversations within the cockpit, and reading publications not related to the proper conduct of the flight are not required for the safe operation of the aircraft. Contacting Flight Dispatch to give them return times of information on maintenance issues is permitted. This is a function of flight following and therefore is safety-related. Do not discuss other topics during this communication, such as those listed above. Any communication (e.g.: Maintenance, Flight Dispatch, or a longer than normal period of instruction) during any ground operation will only be conducted with the aircraft stopped and the parking brake set.

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Flight Crewmembers At Controls


Each required flight crewmember shall remain in a pilot seat at all times while the aircraft is taking-off or landing, and while it is en route unless the absence of one crewmember is necessary for the performance of duties in connection with an emergency situation. Each flight crewmember shall keep his seatbelt fastened when at his station.

Manipulation Of Controls
No person may manipulate the flight controls of an aircraft during flight unless he is: A qualified pilot employee of Aerosim Flight Academy. A qualified Maintenance Technician with a pilot certificate conducting a maintenance operation. A pilot receiving training as a student / trainee of the Aerosim Flight Academy. An authorized pilot Safety Representative of the National Transportation Safety Board or the FAA Administrator who has the permission of the Academy, is qualified in the aircraft, and is checking flight operations or training. The Vice President of Maintenance & Operations must specifically authorize such persons.

Transfer of Aircraft Control Procedures


Proper transfer of aircraft control is essential to safe operations. It is imperative to ensure that one pilot is tasked with flying the aircraft at all times. At anytime during flight that the control of the aircraft is transferred to the other pilot the following procedures must be adhered to: Takeoff And Landing Operations The only circumstances that warrant a transfer of controls during takeoff and landing below 1000 ft. AGL are pilot incapacitation and/or impending loss of control of the aircraft by the flying pilot. In the case of the pilot flying who realizes that he is about to lose control of the aircraft or about to become incapacitated, the phraseology should be You have the flight controls stated in the imperative tone to the pilot not flying. The pilot not flying will assume control of the aircraft and state I have the flight controls signifying that he understood the request and has taken the action requested. If the pilot relinquishing the controls is able, he should state, You have the flight controls completing the three-way positive exchange of controls.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL En Route Operations Transfer of controls during the en route phase of flight is a routine and common occurrence. It is the responsibility of the Pilot-In-Command to ensure that one crewmember is assigned the responsibility of flying the aircraft at all times. When it becomes necessary to transfer control between pilots, the flying pilot will state, You have the flight controls. In addition, the flying pilot will state the status of the autopilot (if installed) and the current configuration and flight path of the aircraft. Upon taking control of the aircraft, the non-flying pilot will state, I have the flight controls, which indicates that he has assumed the responsibility of the flying pilot. The pilot relinquishing the controls should state, You have the flight controls completing the threeway positive exchange of controls.

Standard Altitude Awareness Call-out The following call out will be made during all climbs and descents. During climb or descent, when 1000 feet from the assigned altitude, the PM will state 1000 to go. The PF will then state, the altitude leaving and climbing (descending) for the assigned altitude.

EXAMPLE The aircraft is climbing to 9,000 ft. Upon passing 8,000 ft., the PM states 1000 to go. The PF responds, 8,000 climbing 9,000.

Engines
Before Starting The flight crew will be in position in the aircraft in sufficient time prior to scheduled departure to: Perform before-starting checks. Assure that all equipment is functioning properly. Arrange for maintenance to correct any irregularities that may develop during the course of these checks.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Engine Failure / Reporting Requirements Whenever an engine of an aircraft fails, or whenever the rotation of an engine is stopped, to prevent possible damage the crew will declare an emergency with ATC, proceed to the nearest suitable airport, or field, at which a safe landing can be made. The Pilot-In-Command shall report, by any means possible, each stoppage of engine rotation in flight to Flight Dispatch as soon as practicable, and shall keep Flight Dispatch fully informed of their situation.

Starting CAUTION Approved Checklists must be used for all engine starts.

All flight crewmembers will adhere to the following standards regarding engine starting: Flight crews shall not start any engine(s) until positive that the area around the aircraft is clear of personnel and/or equipment.

Additional standards for specific aircraft are located in the appropriate Flight Standards Manual.

Noise Abatement
Noise abatement procedures and maneuvers should be observed as agreed upon for each given airport when conditions permit their safe usage, and should be subject to concurrence of the individual pilot and the controller. The final decision, where safety is involved, rests with the pilot. Aircraft descending for landing on a runway equipped with an ILS installation should remain at or above the glide slope altitude between the outer and middle markers. Aircraft should maintain the minimum power possible and practical and maximum glide slope practical when landing (VFR), over noise sensitive areas, exercising good approach procedures with gear and flap management so that low drag in is avoided. Stabilized approach procedures shall be observed.

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Record Keeping & Paperwork


The Pilot-In-Command is responsible for, and shall ensure, that: A properly completed Aerosim Flight Academy Takeoff Data Card is in the aircraft. All necessary training documents are available, if a training flight is being conducted. All necessary Navigation Logs are properly completed and available, if a cross-country flight is being conducted. At the completion of the flight all necessary paperwork is properly completed for both MISA and Flight Dispatch.

Seatbelt Usage
All flight crewmembers must continuously keep their seatbelt fastened while at their stations during any aircraft movement. The shoulder harness must be fastened at all times. [91.105]

Single-Engine Turnarounds In Multi-Engine Aircraft


Due to the hazards involved, single engine turn-around and passenger boarding with an operating engine is not authorized.

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Style Of Flying
All flight maneuvers shall be conducted with one thought always in mind, the safety of the flight.
[91.105]

Unless conducting a performance maneuver, all turns should be made with bank angles not exceeding 30 degrees. No turns are to be executed prior to 400 ft. AGL, unless specific departure procedures or the safety of the flight require a turn to be made prior to this altitude. Normal VFR descents in non-pressurized aircraft should normally be made in accordance with the following recommended limits: 1. 500 ft. per minute desired 2. 1000 ft. per minute maximum

No pilot may operate an aircraft in a careless and/or reckless manner so as to endanger life or property.

WARNING Flamboyant or cowboy type flying with Company equipment is strictly forbidden.

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Safety Standards
It is the intention and policy of Aerosim Flight Academy to establish and operate with the highest degree of safety. Employees must operate within the scope of all Company policies and Federal Aviation Regulations. The operations of the Company are governed by the applicable Parts of 14 CFR Parts 91, 141, and other pertinent Parts, and the Safety Procedures & Practices. All supervisory personnel will enforce a basic policy of safety, and safety will come first in all operations. All ground and flight equipment, and Company facilities, will be kept in top quality condition. Safety will be promoted by thorough training for personnel, strict attention to duty, and the exercise of good judgment in conducting all operations. Safety standards to be observed in day-to-day operations include, but are not limited to, the following: No pilot will land at other than approved airports, except in an emergency, without permission of the Chief Flight Instructor. A qualified person must be at the controls of an aircraft with any engine(s) running. A fire extinguisher must be available while the aircraft is being refueled.

It is the responsibility of each person to bring to the immediate attention of management any practice or operating condition leading to a violation or unsafe situation.

Reporting Of Abnormal Situations


If an accident / incident or abnormal event occurs during working hours, notify Flight Dispatch or a Flight Supervisor. These situations will include, but are not limited, to: Any accident or incident Personal injuries Situations not part of normal operations

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Chapter 6 Flight Planning Table Of Contents


BASIC FLIGHT PLANNING .................................................................................................................................... 3 CROSS-COUNTRY FLIGHTS.................................................................................................................................. 3 STUDENT PILOTS ....................................................................................................................................................... 3 PRIVATE PILOT CERTIFICATE OR HIGHER .................................................................................................................. 4 SOLO CROSS-COUNTRY FLIGHTS .............................................................................................................................. 5 CROSS-COUNTRY LESSONS ....................................................................................................................................... 5 OVER WATER OPERATIONS ................................................................................................................................ 6 GENERAL FLIGHT DISPATCH AUTHORITY .................................................................................................... 6 DISPATCHER & FLIGHT SUPERVISOR RESPONSIBILITIES ............................................................................................ 6 MINIMUM FUEL ....................................................................................................................................................... 7 HAZARDOUS CONDITIONS / IRREGULARITIES ............................................................................................. 7 MOUNTAIN FLYING ................................................................................................................................................ 7 DEFINITIONS .............................................................................................................................................................. 7 MOUNTAIN WEATHER PHENOMENON........................................................................................................................ 8 ADVERSE OPERATING ENVIRONMENTS ......................................................................................................... 9 CREW BRIEFING ........................................................................................................................................................ 9 CONTINGENCY PLANNING ......................................................................................................................................... 9 ARRIVAL PLANNING .................................................................................................................................................. 9 HIGH DENSITY ALTITUDE TERMINAL OPERATIONS................................................................................ 10 AIRSPEED ................................................................................................................................................................ 10 RUNWAY PERFORMANCE......................................................................................................................................... 10 MANEUVERING ........................................................................................................................................................ 11 HIGH TERRAIN OPERATIONS ........................................................................................................................... 12 EFFECTS OF ENGINE FAILURE EN ROUTE WITH A MULTI-ENGINE AIRCRAFT ........................................................ 12

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Basic Flight Planning


Before beginning a flight the Pilot-In-Command, in accordance with 14 CFR 91.103, shall become familiar with all available information concerning that flight including: Fuel requirements. Alternates available if the planned flight cannot be completed. Any known traffic delays relayed by ATC. Runway lengths at airports of intended use. Takeoff and landing distance data. NOTAM information. Weather reports for the route of flight including alternate(s). MEL items, if applicable, which affect the flight status of the aircraft. Minimum fuel required (which includes taxi, takeoff to arrival at the destination, approach and landing, missed approach, and if applicable, alternate, holding, and reserve fuel).

Cross-Country Flights
Student shall plan and prepare two (2) cross-country routes in anticipation of possible adverse weather situations. Students preparing to fly solo cross-country flights must present to their Flight Instructor, or Flight Supervisor if appropriate, the following items: Student Pilots A weather brief for the entire route. A completed Flight Plan and Navigation Log for each leg of the flight. A PRE-PRIVATE SOLO CROSS-COUNTRY AUTHORIZATION FORM listing ALL points of intended landing and/or refueling. FAA Medical and Student Pilot Certificate (ENDORSED). A Pilot Log Book (ENDORSED).

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Private Pilot Certificate or Higher A weather brief for the entire route. A completed Flight Plan and Navigation Log for each leg of the flight. A CROSSCOUNTRY AUTHORIZATION FORM listing ALL points of intended landing and/or refueling. FAA Pilot and Medical Certificates, or JAA Medical as appropriate.

NOTE Cross-country flight may be approved only for airports that are approved and listed. All other flights must submit a NON-STANDARD CROSS-COUNTRY AUTHORIZATION FORM and be signed by the Chief / Assistant Chief Flight Instructor.

After reviewing all appropriate items, the Flight Instructor will then approve the flight by signing the Authorization Form. A copy of the Flight Plan and the Authorization Form must be presented to Flight Dispatch in order to be issued an aircraft. Flight Dispatch will retain a copy of the flight plan and Authorization Form until the flight has been completed. A flight plan must be filed with FSS for all legs of the flight. In addition, all flight plans must be activated (opened) upon departure and closed upon return.

NOTE The above requirements are necessary for all solo flights with destinations greater than 50 nm from the base.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Solo Cross-Country Flights Students training for a Commercial Certificate must request permission to file an IFR flight plan prior to beginning cross-country solo flights. Only the Director of Flight Operations, Chief Flight Instructor, Manager of Flight Standards, an Assistant Chief Flight Instructor, or the Flight Supervisor can grant permission. This requirement does not preclude filing an IFR flight plan while airborne if conditions warrant and/or if safety is a factor. However, permission is required before continuing the flight if an intermediate stop is made. All Commercial students must request permission to file IFR prior to departure from any airport.

NOTE When away from base and unable to return due to weather, students and Flight Instructors are financially responsible for any food and/or lodging expenses incurred. Therefore, students and Flight Instructors are encouraged to ensure that sufficient money or credit cards are carried on cross-country flights.

Cross-Country Lessons Students are scheduled for cross-country lessons of various lengths of time in order to meet course objectives. Specific conditions are established to determine the cross-country times and refueling points. This guidance in no way relieves the Pilot-In-Command of the responsibility for proper planning to verify adequate fuel requirements. Conditions established for the routes are as follows: Aircraft Type Power Setting Fuel Reserve Time allocated for landing Cirrus SR20 or PA-44 75% 1-hour fuel reserve 30 Minutes with refueling 15 Minutes without refueling

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Over Water Operations


Aerosim Flight Academy single engine aircraft are not authorized to conduct extended over water operations without authorization of the Director of Flight Operations of his/her designee. Flight crews are reminded of the requirements of 14 CFR 91.205 concerning required equipment. Common ATC vectoring for instrument approaches to and around coastal airports is not considered extended over water operations.

NOTE Aerosim Flight Academy single engine flight crews in transit to the Florida Keys must fly over the island chain.

General Flight Dispatch Authority


Each aircraft operated by Aerosim Flight Academy will be specifically dispatched (released) by a Flight Dispatcher through the Flight Operations Department. No other Academy Department may dispatch aircraft for any flight type or operation.

Dispatcher & Flight Supervisor Responsibilities Flight Dispatcher shall provide flight crews, at the time of dispatch, airworthy aircraft ready for flight. Flight Dispatchers in conjunction with the Flight Supervisor shall, to the best of their ability, provide flight crews with any information that may affect the proposed flight. This information may include all available current reports or information on airport conditions and irregularities of navigation facilities that may affect the safety of the flight. However, responsibility of determining all appropriate information concerning the safe outcome of each flight remains with the flight crew. Flight Dispatchers and Flight Supervisors shall be readily available via radio to assist flight crews with ramp service issues, in-flight emergencies, and information necessary for the safe operation of aircraft.

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Minimum Fuel
Minimum fuel is a state where the fuel supply has reached a quantity where, upon reaching the destination, there cannot be any undue delay. The flight crew must advise ATC immediately should this happen. Be aware that this is not an emergency situation and does not imply a need for traffic priority, but merely an advisory that indicates an emergency situation is possible should any undue delay occur. If the remaining usable fuel suggests the need for traffic priority to ensure a safe landing, the flight crew should declare an emergency (attributing it to low fuel) and report fuel remaining in minutes.

Hazardous Conditions / Irregularities


Whenever the flight crew encounters a meteorological condition or an irregularity in a ground or navigational facility for which the Pilot-In-Command considers essential to the safety of other flights, he/she shall notify an appropriate ATC facility and Flight Dispatch as soon as practical. If Flight Dispatch is notified, it shall report the information to a Flight Supervisor immediately.

Mountain Flying
Definitions MORA (minimum off-route altitude) Jeppesen-derived data. Provides 1000 obstacle clearance in non-mountainous areas; 2000 obstacle clearance in mountainous areas. MEA Lowest published altitude between radio fixes within 4 nm from route centerline that meets obstacle clearance requirements and assures acceptable navigational signal coverage. MOCA Lowest published altitude between radio fixes within 4 nm from route centerline that meets obstacle clearance requirements and assures acceptable navigational signal coverage within 22 NMs of the VOR. MSA Minimum Safe Altitude / Minimum Sector Altitude Provides 1000 obstacle clearance within a 25 NM radius from the NAVAID upon which the MSA is predicated.

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Mountain Weather Phenomenon Mountain Wave - When wind blows over mountains a phenomenon may occur which is known as the mountain wave. Mountain waves are produced when stable air crosses a mountain barrier. Air flowing up the windward side is relatively smooth while wind flow across the barrier is laminar, that is, it tends to flow in layers. The barrier may set up waves in these layers, a diminishing succession of crests and troughs, much as waves develop on a disturbed water surface. The waves remain nearly stationary, while the wind blows rapidly through them. The wave pattern is a standing or mountain wave, so named because it remains essentially stationary and is associated with the mountain. The wave pattern may extend 100 miles or more downwind from the barrier. Wave crests extend well above the highest mountains, sometimes into the lower stratosphere. The longer the wave length, the stronger the wave. If sufficient moisture exists, clouds may mark the mountain wave; however, they are not always present. Always anticipate mountain wave turbulence when winds in excess of 20 knots blow across a mountain or ridge, and the air is stable. Any degree of turbulence can be anticipated in a mountain wave, with reports ranging from no turbulence to severe turbulence. The wave tends to be deceptive, since it is generally associated with 60 - 80 mile visibility, leading to the misconception that the air is smooth. The absence of characteristic cloud formations (rotor clouds, standing lenticular) may simply indicate low moisture content. If there is wind, expect mountain wave turbulence. Standing Lenticular Clouds - Associated with the mountain wave, when moisture is sufficient to produce clouds on the leeward side of the barrier, lens-shaped clouds, called standing lenticular altocumulus clouds are formed. They are formed on the crests of waves created by barriers in the wind flow (mountain waves). They form in the updraft and dissipate in the downdraft, so they do not move as the wind blows through them, hence the name standing. Wind, however, can be quite strong blowing through such clouds. They are characterized by their smooth, polished edges. The presence of these clouds is a good indication of very strong turbulence and should be avoided. The more lenticular stacking that exists, the stronger the wave. Rotor Clouds - Under each wave crest associated with the mountain wave, is a rotary circulation. The rotor forms below the elevation of the mountain peaks. Turbulence can be violent in the overturning rotor. Updrafts and downdrafts in the waves can also create violent turbulence. If sufficient moisture exists, the rotor may also be marked by a rotor cloud, under the crest of the wave. The rotor cloud is a sign-post of the sky, indicating avoidance of its area. Updrafts and downdrafts in excess of 5,000 ft. per minute have been encountered. Upslope / Downslope Conditions - An upslope refers to a weather condition where low level winds are pushing up against the front range. The result, when associated with moisture is heavy snow and/or low ceilings that are often localized. For example, Denver may get a large accumulation of snow, while Colorado Springs will not receive any accumulation or vice versa. A common producer of heavy snow events is a Low Pressure center in the region of Albuquerque, commonly referred to as the Albuquerque Low. A downslope is the wind pouring over the front range. In the Rocky Mountains, this wind is referred to as the Chinook. The air is heated as its moisture is condensed during the ascent on the windward slopes and then is heated even more by compression as it flows downhill from the high elevations. Following 6-8 FLIGHT PLANNING (ISSSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL the arrival of the Chinook wind, the temperature at a weather station near the base of the mountain may rise as much as 30 F in a few minutes. It can also result in turbulence over the front range and high wind conditions close to the front range. Valley Winds - In the daytime, air next to a mountain slope is heated by contact with the ground as the ground receives radiation from the sun. The air usually becomes warmer than the air at the same altitude but farther from the slope. Colder, denser air in the surrounding air mass settles downward and forces the warmer air near the ground up the mountain slope. This is called a valley wind, so called because the air is flowing up and out of the valley. At night, the air in contact with the mountain slope is cooled by terrestrial radiation and becomes heavier than the surrounding air. It sinks along the slope, producing the mountain wind that flows like water down the mountain slope. Mountain winds are usually stronger than valley winds, especially in the winter. The mountain wind often continues down the more gentle slopes of canyons and valleys and in such cases takes the name drainage wind. It can become quite strong over some terrain conditions and in extreme cases can create hazardous turbulence when flowing through valleys and canyons.

Adverse Operating Environments


Aerosim Flight Academy may operate aircraft in areas of high elevation terminal operations and/or mountainous terrain. To better prepare flight crews for these types of operations refer to the following guidelines: Crew Briefing When operating in adverse environments, Crew Briefings must be thorough and unambiguous. Pilots must know exactly what is planned and expected during all phases of flight. Performance and terrain avoidance must be briefed. Contingency Planning Contingency planning must precede and continue throughout the flight. Thoroughly review the anticipated route of flight, paying particular attention to Grid MORAs, MEAs, MSAs and MCAs. Read all chart NOTAMs. Develop plans to deal with emergencies such as engine failure en route, engine failure or other malfunction when below Grid MORA, or before reaching MEA or MSA on departure. Maintain situational awareness of high terrain. Arrival Planning Arrival planning must begin as soon as possible in the flight. Some airports will regularly change approaches and runways during the arrival phase. Loss of situational awareness when below the Grid MORA can easily occur if the crew is not thoroughly familiar with all approaches and arrivals. Planning must also include missed approach procedures and a review of navigation aids. Alternate planning must include weather, routing, fuel, altitude, and how the crew will climb to a safe altitude prior to proceeding to the alternate.

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High Density Altitude Terminal Operations


Operating at higher elevations during cruise is routine. Performing terminal operations at higher elevations requires extra planning and consideration. Recall that aircraft performance is directly related to the density altitude at which the aircraft is flying. Density altitude is the result of pressure altitude corrected for temperature (and, to a lesser extent, humidity). Increases in temperature and humidity cause the density altitude to be higher than that actual MSL altitude. Performance effects of high density altitude should be considered anytime the aircraft must: Operate from a runway whose MSL or DA is at or above 2000 ft. MSL. Maneuver for terrain avoidance at or above 2000 ft. MSL.

Airspeed The same indicated airspeeds will be calculated for a given weight, however less dense atmosphere means a higher true airspeed must be attained during the takeoff roll. Lower atmospheric density also means that lower engine thrust will be available. The result is a greatly increased takeoff roll and reduced climb capability.

Runway Performance High pressure altitudes result in high true airspeeds for a given indicated airspeed, and thus require greater stopping distances. Consider the relative importance of weight and velocity as it affects kinetic energy. The formula: KE=1/2 MV2 Where KE is kinetic energy, M=mass (aircraft weight), and V is velocity (True airspeed) It is apparent from the formula that a change in airspeed has a much greater effect on the aircrafts energy than a proportional change in aircraft weight. In other words, weight must be carefully and accurately calculated before every takeoff and landing. However, whether performing a stop from a landing or from a rejected takeoff, the pilot must manage airspeed very carefully. Careful braking is required. Since the runways often have reverted rubber, possibly with a film of water, braking will be limited on the last part of the runway. Slow down as early as possible. Crews rejecting a takeoff should be conscious of the higher kinetic energy being generated at high elevations. Any rejected takeoff must be executed using maximum performance braking, if necessary, and proper technique. Remember, reverted rubber will limit brake effectiveness at either end of the runway.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Maneuvering Whenever the aircraft is maneuvering to avoid obstacles at high density altitudes, it is necessarily operating closer to the edges of both its certified and absolute performance envelopes. Particular attention must be paid to the aircrafts performance characteristics. Best angle of climb Airspeed (Vx) is an airspeed which results in the greatest altitude attained for a given distance traveled. It occurs at a lower speed than best rate of climb airspeed (Vy). Obstacles or terrain may sometimes restrict the aircrafts maneuvering space. It is therefore important to understand how to safely turn the aircraft using the smallest turning radius possible. Turn radius is a function of velocity and bank angle. The greater the speed, or the shallower the bank, the greater the turn radius. Flap configuration only matters in that flaps permit the aircraft to operate at slower airspeeds. The following formula illustrates the relationship: R= (V2/11.26tan) Where R=radius (feet) V=true airspeed (knots), and = bank angle (degrees) Therefore, the slowest airspeed at which full bank angle can be used will yield the smallest turn radius. It is also essential to factor the effect of winds into the planning. Turns into the wind reduce turn radius relative to the terrain, while downwind will increase the turn radius.

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High Terrain Operations


The western United States present a challenging flight environment that includes significant areas of high terrain. Flights include significant periods of time when the aircraft is thousands of feet below the peaks of surrounding mountains. Some airports are surrounded by high terrain. Poor weather, lack of radar flight following, communications difficulties and darkness may further complicate the flying. Situational awareness is critical at all times. Be able to accurately determine the aircrafts position relative to the surrounding terrain. Always be aware of minimum en route altitudes, minimum safe altitudes, minimum off route altitudes and minimum obstruction clearance altitudes, as applicable. Never accept off route vectors when operating below Grid MORA unless the aircrafts position can be positively determined and the flight is under radar control. Manage airspeed carefully. High speed greatly increases turn radius and limits maneuverability. Carefully plan any diversion (e.g.: flight to an alternate airport). Many cases will require a climb in a holding pattern until reaching the MEA for the flight.

Effects Of Engine Failure En Route With A Multi-Engine Aircraft The aircraft will descend to the single-engine ceiling and the true airspeed will decrease. Be aware of icing conditions and weather conditions en route and at possible diversion airfields.

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Chapter 7 - Weather Table Of Contents


FLIGHT PLANNING ................................................................................................................................................. 2 GENERAL................................................................................................................................................................... 2 WEATHER SERVICES ............................................................................................................................................. 2 APPROVED WEATHER SOURCES ................................................................................................................................ 3 GENERAL WEATHER ANALYSIS ........................................................................................................................ 4 CONDITIONAL PHRASES / WEATHER FORECASTS ...................................................................................... 4 WEATHER MINIMUMS ........................................................................................................................................... 5 FACTORS TO CONSIDER WHEN OPERATING AT OR NEAR MINIMUMS ...................................................................... 5 REQUIRED REPORTS TO FLIGHT DISPATCH ................................................................................................. 5 EXTREME TURBULENCE ............................................................................................................................................ 5 UNFORECASTED SEVERE ICING ................................................................................................................................. 5 HYDROPLANING ...................................................................................................................................................... 6 PREVENTIVE MEASURES............................................................................................................................................ 6 VARIABLES ................................................................................................................................................................ 6 THUNDERSTORMS POLICY .................................................................................................................................. 6 THUNDERSTORM HAZARDS ....................................................................................................................................... 7 THUNDERSTORM DOS AND DONTS .......................................................................................................................... 8 TURBULENCE ........................................................................................................................................................... 8 AIRSPEED .................................................................................................................................................................. 9 EXTREME TURBULENCE ............................................................................................................................................ 9 INTENSITY DEFINITIONS ............................................................................................................................................ 9 NOTIFICATIONS ....................................................................................................................................................... 10 WINDSHEAR ............................................................................................................................................................ 10 COMMON GENERATORS OF WINDSHEAR ................................................................................................................ 10 WINDSHEAR AWARENESS AND RECOGNITION ........................................................................................................ 11 EXTERNAL WINDSHEAR INDICATORS ...................................................................................................................... 12 WINDSHEAR DURING TAKEOFF ROLL ..................................................................................................................... 12 WINDSHEAR IN FLIGHT ........................................................................................................................................... 12 WINDSHEAR DURING APPROACH AND LANDING .................................................................................................... 12 WINDSHEAR OPERATIONAL CONSIDERATIONS ........................................................................................................ 13 WINTER OPERATIONS ......................................................................................................................................... 14 DE-ICING/ANTI-ICING ............................................................................................................................................. 14 PRE-FLIGHT INSPECTION - WINTER OPERATIONS .................................................................................................... 14 BRAKING ACTION ................................................................................................................................................. 14 BRAKING ACTION REPORTS .................................................................................................................................... 14 RUNWAY FRICTION REPORTS .................................................................................................................................. 15 STANDING WATER, SLUSH AND SNOW .......................................................................................................... 16

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Flight Planning
General Each aircraft will be specifically dispatched (released) by a Flight Dispatcher. The Pilot-InCommand and the Dispatcher must agree that the flight can be conducted in accordance with the information on the Flight Release (flight lesson, aircraft, time sequence), the applicable CFRs, and Aerosim Flight Academy policies and procedures. The Pilot-In-Command will be thoroughly familiar with reported and forecast weather conditions on the route to be flown. The Flight Supervisor will provide the Pilot-In-Command with any current reports or information on airport conditions or irregularities of navigation facilities and/or any weather phenomena that may affect the safety of the flight. The Pilot-In-Command will ensure that the flight is accurately planned and that all pertinent weather information is obtained and analyzed prior to flight. The Pilot-In-Command will consider adverse weather conditions, takeoff weather, en route weather, landing weather, and any other information he deems appropriate. After analyzing all available information, the Pilot-InCommand must be satisfied that the flight can be completed safely.

Weather Services
Flight crews will obtain the most up-to-date weather data (including NOTAMS). Handwritten weather data is acceptable in case of computer malfunction. The flight crew may obtain the necessary weather information from any of the approved weather sources described below.

NOTE Aerosim Flight Academy flight crews are encouraged to obtain updated weather information during flight. While en route, the Pilot-In-Command is responsible for obtaining information on meteorological conditions and facility/service irregularities that may affect the safety of the flight.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Approved Weather Sources Flight Dispatch / Flight Supervisors - May be contacted on the appropriate dispatch frequency within range or by telephone from any ground station. Flight Service Station - The standard frequency is 122.2 or as depicted on the en route charts. En Route Flight Advisory Service (Flight Watch) on frequency 122.0 can provide the latest radar weather or current report. Flight crews are strongly encouraged to use these resources anytime updated weather information is required. On the ground, Flight Service can also be reached by telephone (1-800-WX-BRIEF or local telephone number) for updated weather. Clearances may also be obtained from Flight Service in the event the local ATC facility is closed. PIREPS - Flight crews are strongly encouraged to give pilot reports (PIREPS) on all flights of adequate length. Utilizing the FSS and Flight Watch will provide other flight crews with access to actual en route weather conditions such as icing, turbulence, winds aloft and cloud tops. PIREPS may also aid in the issuance or modification of AIRMETs and SIGMETs. PIREPS are particularly useful when weather conditions exist which could affect flight operations for a specific geographic area. The systems described or referenced in this paragraph can be used by Aerosim Flight Academy flight crews to obtain and disseminate aeronautical weather data for the control of flight operations. 1. Aeronautical weather information (current and forecast) that is prepared and disseminated by: a. National Weather Service b. Meterologix, LLC 2. Aeronautical weather information obtained from the above sources can be also be disseminated by: a. Aerosim Flight Academy Flight Dispatch b. Jeppesen Sanderson Inc. c. GTE Incorporated

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OPERATIONS MANUAL

General Weather Analysis


No flight may depart unless the takeoff, en route, and landing phases of flight can be conducted in accordance with the weather requirements described in the Aerosim Flight Academy Safety Procedures & Practices. The Pilot-In-Command will ensure that the appropriate weather reports or forecasts or any combination thereof indicate that the weather conditions at the estimated time of arrival (ETA) meet the weather requirements as described in this Manual. The predominant element of weather analysis is What will the weather conditions be at the ETA? The Flight Dispatcher / Flight Supervisor and the Pilot-In-Command must agree that weather reports or forecasts or any combination thereof indicate that the weather will be at least landing minimums or above at the ETA and winds will be within the designated maximums. If all concerned persons involved are in agreement that the weather conditions will in fact be within the approved standards, then the flight may be released based on the weather analysis.

Conditional Phrases / Weather Forecasts


Conditional phrases (eg.:PROB40 or TEMPO) in the remarks section of a forecast, in addition to the information contained in the main body of the forecast, are controlling for the purpose of a flight dispatch or flight release.

Updated Weather Information - The Pilot-In-Command will ensure, while en route, that he is in receipt of the most current relevant weather reports and forecasts for the destination and the alternate airports.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL

Weather Minimums
Weather minimums, including alternate airport weather requirements, shall not be less than the minimums specified in the Aerosim Flight Academy Safety Procedures & Practices. When approach minimums published on the approach chart are higher than the minimums specified in the Safety Procedures & Practices, the higher minimums shall apply. Factors To Consider When Operating At Or Near Minimums Turbulence - The difficulty of completing a satisfactory let-down procedure is considerably increased by turbulence in the overcast, especially if this condition exists in the lower levels. High wind velocities associated with turbulence is a factor which has at times caused serious errors. Precipitation - Rain, sleet or snow under the overcast when conditions are at or near minimums are an unfavorable factor because of the reduction in visibility when landing or circling for an approach to a landing. Thickness Of The Overcast - This becomes an unfavorable factor during landing maneuvers if ice is present in the overcast. Consider: 1. The possibility of having to climb up through the overcast while executing a missed approach procedure with airframe ice that accumulated during the descent. 2. The possible residual ice on the airframe, especially the tail, that may affect landing characteristics.

Required Reports To Flight Dispatch


The Pilot-In-Command will ensure that Flight Dispatch is immediately notified any time unforecast or hazardous weather conditions are encountered that may affect the safety of the flight and/or other Aerosim Flight Academy flights. Notification will be made as soon as flight conditions permit via local Flight Dispatch radio contact or telephone. Extreme Turbulence The Pilot-In-Command will make a Maintenance Log entry and notify Maintenance if extreme turbulence is encountered. Unforecasted Severe Icing Flight crews encountering unforecasted severe icing conditions will inform Flight Dispatch as soon as flight conditions permit. The report will include the nature of the conditions, altitude the icing was encountered, geographic location of the encounter and any actions taken.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL

Hydroplaning
Viscous - occurs when there is a thin film of water covering a smooth surface such as a painted or rubber coated portion of the runway. Viscous hydroplaning can occur at much lower speeds than dynamic hydroplaning. Dynamic - standing water is not displaced fast enough to allow tire to make complete contact with pavement. Causes tire spin-down or wheel rotation to stop. Loss of braking is experienced. It is caused by either smooth tires or an instance where fluid depth exceeds tread depth. Reverted Rubber - Reverted rubber (steam) hydroplaning occurs during heavy braking that results in a prolonged locked-wheel skid. Only a thin film of water on the runway is required to facilitate this type of hydroplaning.

Preventive Measures Lower the speed, less exposure to hydroplaning. Crosswind: maintain directional control and runway alignment (on approach and flare). Do not exceed approach speeds. Brakes: do not apply until after main wheel spin-up. Firm touchdown. Touch down near the threshold to assure maximum runway length. Avoid asymmetrical thrust on wet runways; use the rudder.

Variables Runway standing water depth Tire condition Tire inflation pressure Runway condition Aircraft touchdown: No drifting and proper touchdown point

Thunderstorms Policy
Aerosim Flight Academy aircraft shall not attempt to land or takeoff when a thunderstorm is over the airport, or on its final approach or initial departure paths. The Pilot-In-Command will delay takeoff or landing until such time as the takeoff or landing can be made clear of any thunderstorm and remain clear of any associated hazards such as significant turbulence, windshear, microbursts, etc.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Thunderstorm Hazards Squall Lines - The single most intense weather hazard to aircraft. A squall line is a narrow band of active (often steady-state) thunderstorms that develops on or ahead of a cold front in moist, unstable air. It may also develop in an area far removed from any front. It usually forms rapidly, generally reaching maximum intensity during the late afternoon and the first few hours of darkness. Tornadoes - Any cloud connected to a severe thunderstorm carries a threat of violent weather. Tornadoes occur with both isolated and squall line thunderstorms. Reports for forecasts of tornadoes indicate that atmospheric conditions are favorable for violent turbulence. Any aircraft inadvertently caught in IMC in a severe thunderstorm could encounter a hidden vortex. Turbulence - Potentially hazardous turbulence is present in all thunderstorms, and a severe thunderstorm can destroy an aircraft. Strongest turbulence within the cloud occurs with shear between updrafts and down drafts. It is almost impossible to hold a constant altitude in a thunderstorm, and maneuvering in an attempt to do so produces greatly increased stress on the aircraft. Stresses are least if the aircraft is held in a constant attitude and allowed to ride the waves. Icing - Thunderstorm icing can be extremely hazardous. Super cooled water freezes on impact with an aircraft. The abundance of large, super cooled water droplets makes clear icing very rapid between 0C and -15C and encounters can be frequent in a cluster of cells. Hail - Rain at the surface does not mean the absence of hail aloft. Anticipate possible hail with any thunderstorm, especially beneath the anvil of a large cumulonimbus. Hailstones larger than 1/2 in. in diameter can significantly damage an aircraft in a few seconds. Hail may be encountered in clear air several miles from dark thunderstorm clouds. Lightning - Nearby lightning can blind the flight crew rendering them momentarily unable to navigate either by instrument or by visual reference. Nearby lightning can also induce permanent errors in the magnetic compass and even distant discharges can disrupt radio communications on low and medium frequencies. A lightning strike can puncture the skin of an aircraft and can damage communications and electronic navigational equipment. Engine Water Ingestion - Severe thunderstorms may contain areas of high water concentration which could result in engine roughness or stoppage. Power changes may have an adverse effect on engine stall margins in the presence of massive water ingestion. Avoidance of severe storm systems is best for preventing exposure to this type of engine problem. Follow the aircraft Flight Standards Manual for severe turbulence penetration with special emphasis on avoiding power changes, unless excessive airspeed variations occur. Low Ceiling And Visibility - The difficulties of low ceilings and restricted visibility are increased many fold when associated with the other thunderstorm hazards of turbulence, hail and lightning which make precision instrument flying virtually impossible.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Thunderstorm Dos And Donts Never regard any thunderstorm lightly. Avoiding thunderstorms is the best policy. Below is a partial list of suggestions for operation in areas of thunderstorm activity. Avoidance Do not attempt to fly under a thunderstorm even if one can see through to the other side. Turbulence and windshear under the storm could be disastrous. Do avoid by at least 20 miles any thunderstorm identified as severe or giving an intense radar echo. This is especially true under the anvil of a large cumulonimbus.

Before Unavoidable Thunderstorm Penetration Tighten seatbelt, put on shoulder harness, and secure all loose objects. Plan and hold course to take the aircraft through the storm in a minimum time. To avoid the most critical icing, establish a penetration altitude below the freezing level or above the level of -15C. Establish power settings for turbulence penetration airspeed per the aircraft Flight Standards Manual. Turn up cockpit lights to highest intensity to lessen temporary blindness from lightning.

During Unavoidable Thunderstorm Penetration Keep eyes on the instruments. Looking outside the cockpit can increase the danger of temporary blindness. Do not change power settings; maintain settings for the recommended turbulence penetration speed. Do not turn back once in the thunderstorm. A straight course through the storm most likely will get the aircraft out of the hazards most quickly. Also, turning maneuvers increase stress on the aircraft.

Turbulence
It is the Pilot-In-Commands responsibility to avoid areas of turbulence whenever possible. While a certain amount of flying must, by necessity, be conducted in turbulent air, the effects may be minimized by careful selection of the flight path and altitude. Avoid flight in or near thunderstorms. Avoid flight through cumulous clouds - deviate as necessary. Avoid flight at lower altitudes near mountain ranges. Plan descent to minimize exposure to suspected low level turbulence. Avoid flight into known or forecasted areas of severe or greater Clear Air Turbulence.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Airspeed When a flight encounters moderate or greater turbulence, the airspeed will be reduced to the turbulent air penetration speed or maneuvering speed, in accordance with the aircraft Flight Standards Manual.

Extreme Turbulence The Pilot-In-Command will make a Maintenance Log entry and notify Maintenance if extreme turbulence is encountered (refer to the definition below).

Intensity Definitions Definitions indicating the degree of severity of turbulence are subject to opinion and may vary from pilot to pilot. For the purpose of establishing a standard reporting format, the following terminology will be used:

Light Turbulence - Momentarily causes slight, erratic changes in altitude or attitude. Chop - Slight, rapid and somewhat rhythmic bumpiness without appreciable changes in altitude or attitude. Reaction - Aircraft occupants may feel a slight strain against seatbelts. Unsecured objects may be displaced slightly. Moderate Turbulence - Similar to light turbulence but of greater intensity. Changes in altitude or attitude occur, but the aircraft remains in positive control at all times. Minor variations in indicated airspeed occur. Chop - Similar to light chop but of greater intensity. It causes rapid bumps or jolts without appreciable changes in aircraft altitude or attitude. Reaction - Occupants feel definite strain against seatbelts.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Severe Turbulence - Causes large abrupt changes in altitude or attitude. Large indicated airspeed variations occur. Any aircraft may become momentarily out of control. Reaction - Occupants are forced against seatbelts. Unsecured objects are tossed about. Extreme Turbulence - Aircraft is violently tossed about and is practically impossible to control. It may cause structural damage.

Notifications The Pilot-In-Command will ensure that any passengers are notified of expected turbulent conditions prior to encountering those conditions, if possible, including the duration of the turbulence. The passengers will also be advised to maintain their seatbelts securely fastened.

Windshear
Windshear is defined as any rapid change in wind direction or velocity. Windshear can occur at any altitude, but the effect on aircraft becomes more serious near the ground. The most critical area is from the surface to 1,500' AGL. Severe windshear is defined as a rapid change in wind direction or velocity causing airspeed changes greater than 15 knots or vertical speed changes greater than 500 feet per minute. Windshear may be associated with either a wind shift or a wind speed gradient at any level in the atmosphere.

Common Generators Of Windshear Thunderstorms - Thunderstorm-related windshear is usually severe and encountered close to the ground, where there is little time or altitude to recover. The magnitude of the shear is often very severe, especially in situations involving microbursts. Windshear can be encountered on all sides and directly under the thunderstorm cell. Temperature Inversion - The wind directions and velocities may be significantly different above and below a temperature inversion. Aircraft climbing or descending through an inversion can encounter significant windshear.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Jet Stream - Entering or exiting the jet stream will cause rapid changes in the indicated air speed. Mountain Wave - When wave conditions are established, extremely rough (rotor) or smooth (the wave itself) windshear conditions may be encountered. Dry Microbursts - In arid environments (western U.S. or high plains) severe microbursts may emanate from high based cumulus clouds accompanied by little or no precipitation. They are difficult to detect visually or with conventional ground or airborne radar.

NOTE This list is not all inclusive.

Windshear Awareness And Recognition Windshear should be avoided whenever possible. Analysis of the environment, including ground based windshear monitors, will frequently identify areas where windshear may occur. Takeoffs and landings should be delayed when windshear potential exists. DO NOT attempt to take off or land unless the existing conditions have been assessed thoroughly and a safe transition is assured. If windshear is encountered, two varieties exist, each having very different characteristics: Decreasing Performance Windshear Decreasing headwind Increasing tailwind Downdraft

Increasing Performance Windshear Decreasing tailwind Updraft Increasing headwind

It is essential that crews realize an increasing performance windshear may be the precursor to a decreasing performance windshear (as in flying through a microburst). In every case, windshear recognition is crucial to making a timely recovery decision.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL External Windshear Indicators Analysis of existing weather is a primary means of ensuring windshear recognition. Some systems exist outside the aircraft which will aid windshear recognition: Doppler Radar Low Level Windshear Advisory System Pilot Reports

Windshear During Takeoff Roll Evidence of windshear during takeoff roll may include: A stagnation in airspeed during acceleration (decreasing performance) An unusual increase in airspeed during acceleration (increasing performance)

Windshear In Flight The aircraft will experience marginal flight path control when in windshear. Marginal flight path control is characterized by uncommanded changes in excess of the following values (+/-): 15 knots indicated airspeed 500 feet per minute vertical speed 5 degrees pitch attitude 10 degree variation from nominal heading

Windshear During Approach And Landing In addition to the above in flight path changes, the following may be noted during approach and landing windshear encounter. Unusual throttle position for a significant period of time 1 dot displacement from the glideslope

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NOTE Any time a windshear condition is encountered below 1,500 ft. AGL (as identified by the above listed conditions) the recommended recovery procedure should be initiated. Always be prepared for further encounters. Windshear has been known to occur in groups. Anticipate that a large airspeed increase is often followed by an equally large airspeed decrease.

Windshear Operational Considerations Takeoff Planning - The following should be considered when planning a takeoff in a situation where windshear clues do not clearly dictate delaying, but can be interpreted to mean that conditions are right for windshear activity: Power Settings: Use maximum power for takeoff and climb to altitude. Runway: Use the longest suitable runway that avoids suspected areas of windshear. Flap Setting: 1. Greater flap settings provide the best performance for windshear encounters on the runway. 2. Lesser flap settings (and the resultant higher airspeeds) provide the best performance for airborne windshear encounters. Windshear During Takeoff Roll - Windshear encounters that cause a reduction in airspeed during takeoff roll require prompt and definite corrective action. In such a situation, the predetermined values for takeoff speed (Vr) and takeoff roll / length for that particular field are no longer applicable. Windshear During Approach - The approach phase of flight represents a unique problem, as the aircraft is intentionally being placed in a low energy regime with the engine(s) at reduced power. If executing an approach where windshear is remotely possible, it is important for the crew to operate the aircraft in a manner that maximizes the opportunity to identify windshear. The following procedures are recommended: Stabilize the approach as early as possible to allow observation of the aircraft's performance. The PNF will closely and continuously monitor the vertical flight path instruments and call out any deviations in the normal indications of approach speed, airspeed trend, rate of descent, pitch, glideslope and thrust. Avoid large power adjustment or trim changes to correct large speed changes.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Windshear During Landing - A windshear encounter once the aircraft is on short final, and particularly once the throttle(s) have been brought to idle in anticipation of landing, presents the crew with the worst possible scenario. Remember that a go-around from a balked landing is difficult in optimum conditions. The crew should consider using power and pitch to execute a controlled touchdown on the runway. A controlled touchdown on the runway may be a better alternative than attempting to perform an extreme low-energy windshear escape at low altitude. Windshear Recovery - Refer to Section 3A of the appropriate Flight Standards Manual for Windshear Recovery Procedures.

Winter Operations
Aerosim Flight Academy will not dispatch an aircraft, continue to operate an aircraft en route, or land an aircraft when, in the opinion of the Pilot-In-Command or Flight Supervisor, icing conditions are expected or met that might adversely affect the safety of the flight.

De-Icing/Anti-Icing Refer to the Aircraft De-icing / Cold Weather Program in this manual.

Pre-Flight Inspection - Winter Operations Pre-flights conducted during winter conditions take on a critical importance. There is a tendency during weather extremes to rush or abbreviate the inspection of the aircraft. While no one wants to be uncomfortable, a thorough pre-flight is essential.

Braking Action
Braking Action Reports When available, ATC furnishes pilots the quality of braking action received from pilots or airport management. The quality of braking action is described by the terms good, fair, poor, and nil, or a combination of these terms. When reporting the quality of braking action by using these terms, use descriptive terms that are easily understood, such as, braking action poor the first/last half of the runway, together with the particular type of aircraft.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL For NOTAM purposes, braking action reports are classified according to the most critical term (fair, poor, or nil) used and issued as a NOTAM(D). When tower controllers have received runway braking action reports which include the terms poor or nil, or whenever weather conditions are conducive to deteriorating or rapidly changing runway braking conditions, the tower will include on the ATIS broadcast the statement, braking action advisories are in effect.

NOTE When braking action is reported as nil, no Aerosim Flight Academy aircraft will attempt to takeoff or land. A nil Braking Report becomes invalid when meteorological conditions improve or when ground personnel take action to improve the braking conditions.

Braking action reports can vary depending upon aircraft performance characteristics, type, weight, and current weather conditions. Take this into consideration when deciding how a particular braking report may affect the aircraft. During the time that braking action advisories are in effect, ATC will issue the latest braking action report for the runway in use to each arriving and departing aircraft. Be prepared for deteriorating braking conditions and request current runway condition information if not volunteered by controllers. Also, be prepared to provide a descriptive runway condition report to controllers after landing.

Runway Friction Reports The friction numbers reported by ATC, denoted by the Greek letter m (pronounced, myew, replaced by MU for simplicity), provides a measure of the slipperiness of the runway surface. The reports for the MU Scale are rated from 100 to 0 (as correlated from 1.0 to 0.0 or 100% to 0%). The number may be thought of as a percent of normal braking where 100 is analogous to 1.00 or 100%, and where zero is the lowest friction value obtainable. The ATC report of friction measurements will contain the runway identifier followed by the MU number for each of the three runway segments, time of report and a word describing the cause of the runway friction problem. An example of a MU report in the format used by ATC is: Runway two seven, MU 39, 37, 38 at one zero one eight Zulu, ice. The accelerate-stop and landing performance data provided by an aircraft manufacturer is not presented in terms of the reported MU value. No precise correlation has been established between the MU numbers provided by the friction measuring devices and an aircrafts actual stopping performance.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL A report of MU 40 is commonly understood to mean that the runway friction is good, but that should not be misunderstood to mean that braking action will be as good as on clean, dry pavement. As MU values decrease below 40 braking performance begins to deteriorate and directional control becomes difficult. It is generally agreed that a friction report of MU 25 or less means that an aircraft may experience directional control and/or braking difficulties. There is also no recognized correlation between MU values and the subjective pilot braking descriptors of good, fair, poor and nil. Pilots should use the MU information together with other knowledge to determine runway suitability: Recent pilot braking action reports Aircraft performance characteristics, type and weight Previous experience Wind conditions

Standing Water, Slush And Snow


The best guide for these conditions is experience and common sense. Consider the following guidelines: Note performance reductions expected of the aircraft. Flight crews are encouraged to, prior to takeoff, ensure that all runway lighting systems are available (e.g. CL, HIRL, etc.). Verify that all engine inlet plugs, pitot covers and tie-down ropes are removed and not simply hidden by snow. Tires can freeze to the ramp. If the aircraft will not move under normal power, do not force it. The increased power required can blow ice, snow and people around the ramp and possibly cause tire distortion and deflation. The aircraft may break free but could move rapidly forward endangering the aircraft and personnel. Use a de-icing measure around the tire area to assist in freeing the aircraft. Increase the distance behind other aircraft when ramps and taxiways are contaminated. Exhaust from other aircraft can reduce the effectiveness of de-icing fluids, cause dry snow to melt and freeze on aircraft surfaces, and cause ice and sand to be blown onto the aircraft. Verify that flight controls have full freedom of movement prior to takeoff.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Flight tests have shown that severe icing is usually confined to an area 200 to 500 ft. in depth; change altitude immediately if severe ice is encountered. Radio static may occur in cumulus clouds at OATs between 0C and -15C. A change in airspeed or altitude may help alleviate the problem. Notify ATC of the situation if communications are adversely affected. During descent, the probability of encountering super cooled clouds at low altitude can increase the icing accretion potential. The probability of increased exposure time in holding patterns at high density airports can accentuate the problem. The aircraft should be flown to a firm touchdown at the aiming point. Do not allow the aircraft to float or attempt to grease-it-on. Land at the minimum safe speed. On ice-covered ramps the aircraft may exhibit a tendency to lunge forward even with chocks installed. Ensure that the gust lock is installed, if available. Verify that the parking brake is released to prevent frozen brakes on the next departure. Verify that all electrical power is OFF. Select an altitude that will place the aircraft on top of the clouds or at least at an altitude which reduces exposure to icing conditions. PIREPS, flight crew experience, and inbound flights are the best resources to use. Question returning crews, if available, and/or ATC about en route weather conditions.

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Chapter 8 Emergency Procedures Table Of Contents


GENERAL ................................................................................................................................................................... 3 DEFINITIONS .............................................................................................................................................................. 3 Flight Emergencies .............................................................................................................................................. 3 Medical Emergencies ........................................................................................................................................... 3 IMMEDIATE ACTIONS ................................................................................................................................................ 4 MANDATORY CONFIRMATION ITEMS ........................................................................................................................ 4 SURVIVAL KITS ......................................................................................................................................................... 4 OVERDUE AIRCRAFT ............................................................................................................................................. 5 FLIGHT CREWMEMBER DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES ........................................................................ 5 DUTY ASSIGNMENTS/EMERGENCIES ......................................................................................................................... 5 PILOT-IN-COMMAND ................................................................................................................................................. 5 STUDENTS AND PASSENGERS..................................................................................................................................... 5 EMERGENCY AUTHORITY .......................................................................................................................................... 6 Pilot-In-Command Authority ............................................................................................................................... 6 Operations and Flight Supervisors Authority ...................................................................................................... 6 REPORTING ................................................................................................................................................................ 6 COMMUNICATIONS AND CREW COORDINATION ........................................................................................ 7 COMMUNICATIONS BETWEEN THE FLIGHT CREW...................................................................................................... 7 COMMUNICATION WITH ATC AND FLIGHT DISPATCH .............................................................................................. 7 LOST COMMUNICATION ............................................................................................................................................. 7 EMERGENCY LANDING OR DITCHING ............................................................................................................ 8 CREW DUTIES AND COORDINATION FOR EMERGENCY LANDINGS ............................................................................ 8 EMERGENCY LANDING / NO WARNING ..................................................................................................................... 8 EMERGENCY EVACUATION COMMANDS .................................................................................................................... 9 DITCHING OVER WATER ......................................................................................................................................... 10 UNUSUAL SITUATIONS ........................................................................................................................................ 10 ENGINE FAILURE EN ROUTE .................................................................................................................................... 10 ONE ENGINE INOPERATIVE - APPROACH AND LANDING ......................................................................................... 10 FIRE ........................................................................................................................................................................... 11 FIRE HAZARDS ........................................................................................................................................................ 11 FIRE ON THE RAMP ................................................................................................................................................. 11 SURVIVAL ................................................................................................................................................................ 12 GENERAL SURVIVAL GUIDELINES ........................................................................................................................... 12 ADDITIONAL LAND SURVIVAL GUIDELINES ............................................................................................................ 13 ADDITIONAL WATER SURVIVAL GUIDELINES ......................................................................................................... 14 INTERCEPTION PROCEDURES .......................................................................................................................... 14 GENERAL................................................................................................................................................................. 14 INTERCEPT PHASES.................................................................................................................................................. 15 COMMUNICATION .................................................................................................................................................... 16 INTERCEPTING SIGNALS .......................................................................................................................................... 17 NORAD INTERCEPTION PROCEDURES .................................................................................................................... 18

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POST ACCIDENT / INCIDENT ..............................................................................................................................21 BEFORE LEAVING THE AIRCRAFT ............................................................................................................................21 BEFORE LEAVING THE SCENE ..................................................................................................................................22 INTERVIEWS / STATEMENTS .............................................................................................................................24 NEWS MEDIA ...........................................................................................................................................................24 U.S. GOVERNMENT AUTHORITIES ...........................................................................................................................24 FLIGHT CONTINUANCE ............................................................................................................................................24

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General
The procedures discussed in this chapter provide a basic plan of action in the event an emergency situation arises. No procedure can anticipate all possible emergency situations. If an emergency situation exists, remember to: Stay calm. Solicit help from all available sources. Keep other crewmembers informed. Think through the problem; do not act in haste unless time is critical.

Definitions Flight Emergencies Any situation, such as a malfunction of the aircraft, that requires immediate decision and action for the safety of flight is a flight emergency. Emergencies require special procedures to be taken beyond those normally utilized in flight operations. An emergency can be either a distress or urgency condition. Distress is a condition of being threatened by serious and/or imminent danger and of requiring immediate assistance. Urgency is a condition of being concerned about safety, and of requiring timely but not immediate assistance, a potential distress condition. Medical Emergencies Urgent medical conditions, except incapacitation of a member of the flight crew, do not constitute flight emergencies - they do not jeopardize the safety of flight. The correct response to a passengers urgent medical condition (e.g.: heart attack) is to: Inform ATC of the situation. Request medical assistance. Land at the nearest suitable airport.

Medical emergencies do not permit deviation from any regulations. The flight crew should advise Flight Dispatch of the circumstances and instruct them to have required medical assistance available on landing.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Immediate Actions An immediate action is an action that must be accomplished so expeditiously (in order to avoid or stabilize a hazardous situation) that time is not available for a crewmember to refer to a manual or checklist. Situations that require immediate action include, but are not limited to the following: Imminent threat of crewmember incapacitation. Imminent threat of loss of aircraft control. Imminent threat of destruction of a system or component, which makes continued safety of the flight and subsequent landing improbable.

Immediate action items are strictly limited to only those actions necessary to stabilize the situation.

Mandatory Confirmation Items Certain actions, except immediate action memory items, should be confirmed by a second crewmember before the steps are taken. The types of procedural actions and necessary guidance that require these confirmations are outlined in the appropriate Flight Standards Manuals.

Survival Kits Some Aerosim Flight Academy aircraft may be equipped with a Survival Kit. The flight crew is responsible for pre-flight of the Survival Kit to ensure that it contains the following: Fire Extinguisher First Aid Kit

If the kit is complete, close the kit and continue with the flight. If the kit is not complete, notify Flight Dispatch for a replacement kit. As a normal procedure, Operations staff or Flight Dispatchers should check the kits for completeness. If the kit is not complete, the missing items must be replaced prior to further dispatching of the kit.

CAUTION Tampering, pilferage, or any unauthorized use of the contents of the Survival Kit is strictly prohibited.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL

Overdue Aircraft
Any aircraft that is more than 30 minutes late to its destination is considered overdue. An overdue aircraft should be considered an emergency situation. Academy procedures for overdue aircraft are contained in the Flight Supervisors Manual.

Flight Crewmember Duties And Responsibilities


Duty Assignments/Emergencies It is the responsibility of all flight crews to remain current at all times in the knowledge of the following items of emergency equipment and procedures for their use: Fire Extinguishers First Aid Kit Flotation Equipment Emergency Exits Emergency Landing Emergency Evacuation Cabin Fire types and locations location and content type and location type, location, and operation duties and procedures duties and procedures duties and procedures

Pilot-In-Command The Pilot-In-Command's primary responsibility is to manage the conduct of the flight. The Pilot-In-Command may direct a student or passenger(s) to assist them, however, the safety and security risks of doing so should be carefully evaluated. Notify all persons onboard of the type of emergency, time available, special instructions, bracing signal, if any, and evacuation plans, if any. The appropriate Flight Standards Manual mandates complete aircraft specific emergency procedures.

Students and Passengers Assist the Pilot-In-Command and follow instructions. Secure loose articles in flight compartments. After landing, assist in evacuation, if required.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Emergency Authority Pilot-In-Command Authority In an emergency situation that requires immediate decision and action, the Pilot-In-Command may take any action that he considers necessary under the circumstances. In such a case, he may deviate from prescribed operation procedures, methods, weather minimums, and other rules to the extent required in the interest of safety.

Operations and Flight Supervisors Authority In an emergency situation arising during flight that requires immediate decision and action by appropriate management personnel or Flight Supervisor, and that such a situation is known to them, the personnel shall advise the Pilot-In-Command and shall have the decision recorded. If they cannot communicate with the Pilot-In-Command, they shall declare an emergency and take any action that they consider necessary under the circumstances.

Reporting

Whenever emergency authority is exercised, the Pilot-In-Command, Flight Supervisor, or the appropriate management personnel shall keep the appropriate ATC facility fully informed of the progress of the flight. The person declaring the emergency shall send a written report of any FAR deviation to the Administrator, through the Manager of Training, within 10 days after the flight is completed, if requested by the FAA.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL

Communications And Crew Coordination


Communications Between the Flight Crew The flight crew will keep the occupants of the aircraft informed of the status of emergency situations to the maximum extent possible. The crew should work together as a team, in order to provide the highest level of safety for the passengers, crew and aircraft.

Communication With ATC and Flight Dispatch The Pilot-In-Command will ensure that ATC and Aerosim Flight Academy Flight Dispatch are kept informed of the emergency situation to the greatest extent possible. ATC will be kept apprised of the progress of the flight. Aerosim Flight Academy Flight Dispatch, time and workload permitting, will be contacted as soon as practicable. The Pilot-In-Command must contact Flight Dispatch and the Chief Flight Instructor as soon as practicable after landing.

Lost Communication

If the aircraft loses voice communication with ATC, squawk 7600. Try alternative methods of re-establishing communication with ATC, such as FSS or any other ground station deemed appropriate. VFR Conditions - Land as soon as practicable at a suitable airport. IFR Conditions - Comply with the route, altitude, and clearance limit provisions of 14 CFR 91.185 and the Aeronautical Information Manual. All crewmembers must be familiar with these procedures.

In an emergency situation where normal communications are lost due to flight crewmember incapacitation or loss of electrical power, all crewmembers must rely on their own good judgment to initiate aircraft preparations and evacuation procedures as required.

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Emergency Landing Or Ditching


Crew Duties And Coordination For Emergency Landings The following are crew duties and coordination for all planned emergency landings, as applicable: 1. Pilot-In-Command The Pilot-In-Command's primary responsibility is to manage the actions of the crew and the conduct of the flight. The Pilot-In-Command may direct a student or passenger(s) to assist them, however, the safety and security risks of doing so should be carefully evaluated. Notify all persons onboard of the type of emergency, time available, special instructions, bracing signal, if any, and evacuation plans, if any. Signal the occupants of the aircraft to assume a bracing position by stating Brace, Brace, Brace.

2.

Students and Passengers Assist the Pilot-In-Command and follow instructions. Secure loose articles in flight compartments. After landing, assist in evacuation, if required.

Emergency Landing / No Warning Immediate action may be necessary in the event an emergency situation occurs with little or no time to prepare prior to landing. The Pilot-In-Command will: Notify the occupants of the aircraft that an emergency landing is imminent.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Emergency Evacuation Commands In any emergency situation where the possibility exists for evacuation of the aircraft, the following commands will normally be used: The Pilot-In-Command will direct the evacuation of the aircraft after it has come to a complete stop. This will be accomplished verbally by stating the term Evacuate. If the Pilot-In-Command does not want the aircraft evacuated, after the aircraft has come to a complete stop, he will announce, Remain seated. After the aircraft has come to a complete stop, initiate an uncommanded evacuation under the following circumstances: 1. 2. 3. No instructions from the Pilot-In-Command. Threatening fire or smoke. Severe structural damage.

Flight Crewmembers - complete passenger evacuation and verify aircraft is empty. Gather any emergency equipment that could be needed outside the aircraft (e.g.: fire extinguisher, first aid kit, personal survival gear). Assemble all occupants together a safe distance from the aircraft. Determine each passengers and crewmembers physical condition and administer first aid as necessary. Stop and think! Stay calm! Recognize that you might be in shock. Check your own physical condition. Do not allow anyone to re-enter the aircraft. If the aircraft is located in a remote area, consider removing the Emergency Locator Transmitter (ELT) if equipped. Remember, all situations are different. Your ability to keep a level head and improvise when necessary is the best emergency procedure to follow. Develop a positive mental attitude. It is common for crewmembers to begin self-incrimination shortly after an accident. Recognize that you still have duties to perform that must take precedence at this time. There will be plenty of time to reflect on the situation after the immediate crisis is under control.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Ditching Over Water If possible, land parallel to the major swells, preferably with a headwind component. The direction of the major swells is best assessed from an altitude of 500 to 1000 feet. Use the altimeter to determine height above the water. Attempt to impact the water at the slowest possible speed at a near zero rate of descent. Do not stall the aircraft. Give the bracing command prior to impact. The evacuation procedures for a water ditching are essentially the same as on land, with the following exceptions: Put on life vest prior to water landing (if available). Exit the aircraft. Water may need to enter the aircraft in order to reduce pressure preventing the doors from opening. Inflate life vest (if available). Assemble in a circle close to the floating aircraft and join arms.

Unusual Situations
Engine Failure En Route When an engine fails (single-engine) or is shutdown in flight (twin-engine), except during training operations, a landing must be made at the nearest suitable location or airport. The PilotIn-Command will ensure that ATC and Aerosim Flight Academy Flight Dispatch are kept informed of the emergency situation to the greatest extent possible. ATC will be kept apprised of the progress of the flight. Time and workload permitting, Aerosim Flight Academy Flight Dispatch will be contacted as soon as practicable.

One Engine Inoperative - Approach And Landing In the event of an engine inoperative landing, the flight crew will notify the control tower and declare an emergency during the initial radio contact.

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Fire
Initiate and follow the correct procedures. Consult the appropriate aircraft Flight Standards Manual or Emergency Procedures Checklist.

Fire Hazards Avoid loading hazardous or flammable materials on the aircraft. Ensure that personal belongings do not contain hazardous or flammable materials.

Fire On The Ramp If a fire is discovered, either inside or outside the aircraft while parked on the ramp: Notify other crewmembers if they are on the aircraft. Evacuate the aircraft on the side opposite the fire, if available. Be sure that propeller(s), if applicable, have stopped before directing occupants to exit aircraft. Direct occupants away from the fire area, either to nearby buildings, or a clear area on the ramp if necessary. Call airport fire department by any means available.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL

Survival
Any time an aircraft is overdue, missing or sends a radio distress call, the National Search and Rescue Plan is activated. The U.S. Coast Guard is responsible for all maritime rescues and the U.S. Air Force is responsible for inland rescues in the United States. A key factor in survival is the will to live. Will power alone has often been the key factor in reported successful survival incidents. Survival often depends on the ability to overcome stress and to continue to function effectively. Until rescued, aircraft occupants may be required to survive the elements with minimal resources. Whenever one is out of the aircraft, follow the appropriate survival guidelines outlined below.

General Survival Guidelines Stay near the aircraft and organize the group. Provide appropriate first aid. Assign individuals specific duties such as collecting food and firewood, looking for a water supply and designating a sanitation area. Seek shelter. On land, use aircraft resources, if possible. Inventory all usable emergency equipment. Organize signaling devices. Include ELT or fires. Establish procedures to ration food and water and avoid dehydration. 1. Do not drink water from a water fire extinguisher because it contains antifreeze. 2. When searching for water, consider collecting dew off the aircraft. Also keep in mind that animal trails may lead to water. 3. Do not consume water unless it has been purified. Boiling water for five minutes is the easiest method. 4. If possible, consume water about the same temperature as your body.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL NOTE Never eat snow. The snow crystals can cause damage to the mouth and tongue and will lower body core temperature. 5. Drink plenty of fluids, even if you dont feel thirsty. 6. Try not to eat unless you have ample water. Keep a log, if possible, of days and list names of survivors. If conditions are extremely cold: 1. Keep head and extremities covered, if possible. 2. Huddle together for warmth. 3. Be alert for hypothermia. 4. Avoid overexertion. Perspiration inside the clothing can decrease effective insulation and body temperature. Loosen tight clothing to maintain good circulation. If conditions are extremely hot: 1. Stay in shade. Stay under shelter in the heat of the day. If in a sandy environment, scrape away at least 6 in. of sand to take advantage of cooler ground temperatures. Cover eyes from harsh sun. 2. Limit your activity. Sleep during the day and work at night if there is enough light to see. 3. Wear clothing to retain sweat. Keep head, body and back of neck covered. 4. Be alert for heat-related illnesses. Additional Land Survival Guidelines Build a fire: 1. Provides light, warmth, protection and is used for signaling. 2. Position the materials to be burned so that plenty of oxygen can feed the fire. Several small fires heat more efficiently than one large fire. 3. Use to boil water for purification. 09/01/10 (ISSUE) EMERGENCY PROCEDURES 8-13

OPERATIONS MANUAL Additional Water Survival Guidelines

If survivors are in the water: Group Survivors close together. Keep as much body surface out of the water as possible. Keep limbs close to torso, and limit activity in the water.

Interception Procedures
General Identification intercepts during peacetime operations are vastly different than those conducted under increased states of readiness. Unless otherwise directed by the control agency, intercepted aircraft will be identified by type only. When specific information is required (e.g.: markings, numbers) the interceptor aircrew will respond only if the request can be conducted in a safe manner. During hours of darkness or Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC), identification of unknown aircraft will be by type only. The interception pattern described below is the typical peacetime method used by air interceptor aircrews. In all situations, the interceptor aircrew will use caution to avoid startling the intercepted aircrew.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Intercept Phases

Phase One - Approach Phase: During peacetime, intercepted aircraft will be approached from the stern. Generally two interceptor aircraft will be employed to accomplish the identification. The flight leader and wingman will coordinate their individual positions in conjunction with the ground-controlling agency. Their relationship will resemble a line abreast formation. At night or in IMC, a comfortable radar trail tactic will be used. Safe vertical separation between interceptor aircraft and unknown aircraft will be maintained at all times. Phase Two - Identification Phase: The intercepted aircraft should expect to visually acquire the lead interceptor and possibly the wingman during this phase in visual meteorological conditions (VMC). The wingman will assume a surveillance position while the flight leader approaches the unknown aircraft. Intercepted aircraft personnel may observe the use of different drag devices to allow for speed and position stabilization during this phase. The flight leader will then initiate a gentle closure toward the intercepted aircraft, stopping at a distance no closer than absolutely necessary to obtain the information needed. The interceptor aircraft will use every possible precaution to avoid startling intercepted aircrew. Additionally, the interceptor aircrews will constantly keep in mind that maneuvers considered normal to a fighter aircraft may be considered hazardous to crews of nonfighter aircraft. When interceptor aircrews know or believe that an unsafe condition exists, the identification phase will be terminated. As previously stated, during darkness or IMC identification of unknown aircraft will be by type only. Interceptor aircraft throughout this phase will maintain positive vertical separation. Phase Three - Post Intercept Phase: Upon identification phase completion, the flight leader will turn away from the intercepted aircraft. The wingman will remain well clear and accomplish a rejoin with the leader.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Communication

Communication interface between interceptor aircrews and the ground-controlling agency is essential to ensure successful intercept completion. Flight Safety is paramount. An aircraft that is intercepted by another aircraft shall immediately: Follow the instructions given by the intercepting aircraft, interpreting and responding to the visual signals. Notify the appropriate air traffic services unit, if possible. Attempt to establish radio communication with the intercepting aircraft or with the appropriate intercept control unit, by making a general call on the emergency frequency 121.5 MHz, giving the identity and position of the aircraft and the nature of the flight. If equipped with a transponder, select Code 7700, unless otherwise instructed by the appropriate air traffic services unit. If any instructions received by radio from any sources conflict with those given by the intercepting aircraft by visual or radio signals, the intercepted aircraft shall request immediate clarification while continuing to comply with the instructions given by the intercepting aircraft.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Intercepting Signals Intercepting aircraft signal Meaning Intercepted aircraft response Rocks wings and follows. (At night, the pilot will also flash the navigational lights at irregular intervals.) You may proceed. I understand and will comply. I understand and will comply. Meaning I understand and will comply.

Rocks wings. After You have been acknowledgement initiates a intercepted. slow level turn, normally to the Follow me. left, onto the desired heading. (At night, the pilot will also flash the navigational lights at irregular intervals.) Performs an abrupt breakaway maneuver consisting of a climbing 90-degree turn, or more, without crossing the intercepted aircraft's flight path. Circles airport, lowers landing gear, and overflies runway in the direction of landing. (At night, the pilot will also put the landing lights on.) Intercepted aircraft signal Meaning

Rocks wings.

Land at this airport.

Lowers landing gear, follows the intercepting aircraft and lands if the runway is considered safe. (At night, the pilot will also put the landing lights on.) Intercepting aircraft response

Meaning

If the intercepted aircraft is Raises landing gear while flying requested to go to an alternate over runway between 1,000' and This airport is airport, the intercepting 2,000', and continues to circle the inadequate. aircraft raises its landing gear airport. and uses the intercept procedures (listed above). (At night, the pilot of the intercepted aircraft will also flash landing lights while passing over the runway.) The pilot switches on and off all available lights at regular intervals. The pilot switches on and off all available lights at irregular intervals. Cannot comply. In distress. To release the intercepted aircraft, the intercepting aircraft will perform the breakaway maneuver listed above. Performs the breakaway maneuver listed above. Performs the breakaway maneuver listed above.

Understood, follow me.

Understood, you may proceed.

Understood.

Understood.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL NOTE Meteorological conditions or terrain may require the intercepting aircraft to take up a position slightly above and ahead of, and to the right of, the intercepted aircraft and to make the subsequent turn to the right.

NOTE If the intercepted aircraft is not able to keep pace with the intercepting aircraft, the latter is expected to fly a series of racetrack patterns and to rock its wings each time it passes the intercepted aircraft.

NORAD Interception Procedures

Interception procedures for peacetime operations are public information and are published in the Aeronautical Information Manual (AIM), Chapter 5, Air Traffic Procedures, Section 6, National Security and Interception Procedures. For security reasons, the AIM does not publish details of interception procedures during times of increased states of readiness, such as defense emergency or hijack. The information contained in this section relates to interception procedures for suspected hijack. NORAD as general information provides it to the FAA for crew training. Because of the sensitive nature of NORAD's interception procedures for hijack those procedures may be changed at any time without notice. This section briefly outlines the likely actions NORAD fighter pilots will take when intercepting a Track-Of-Interest (TOI). The first step in any civilian aircraft intercept is the FAA requesting military assistance. The request is passed through direct links between the FAA and military agencies. NORAD fighters will begin the intercept from either an airborne or ground alert posture.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL As the intercept begins two important actions occur: A conference call including key civilian and military decision-makers is convened. NORAD fighters start flying towards the TOI while the controlling agency deconflicts and points out factor traffic. Fighter pilots will comply with prevention of inadvertent Traffic Collision Avoidance System (TCAS) initiation procedures.

Fighter pilots will fly one of two intercept profiles: Mission ID: Fighter intercept places the fighters close enough to the TOI for identification by type and/or other characteristics as directed by the controlling agency. Although the intent is to remain covert, people on board the TOI may or may not see the fighters. Mission Shadow: Fighter intercept places the fighters in a covert position behind the TOI. People on board the TOI will not see the fighters. Fighters will not normally proceed inside of 500 feet to the TOI unless the controlling agency requests an action requiring them to be closer. Proceeding inside of 500 feet will not occur unless the fighter pilot can insure flight safety is not compromised. After the fighters have successfully rejoined on the TOI, the fighters may be directed to divert the TOI. Diversion actions include: Attempting radio contact with the TOI on assigned frequencies to include 121.5MHz. Fighter aircraft not VHF radio capable will attempt contact through the controlling agency. Visual signals from the fighters to the TOI using International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) Standard Intercept Signals. When directed by Commander-in-Chief (CINC) NORAD, fighters will fly in front of and slightly below the TOI and dispense warning flares. The warning flares do not represent a flight safety issue to the TOI. The desired action from the TOI is to turn in the direction of the flares. If the TOI appropriately responds to diversion attempts, NORAD fighters will escort the TOI through safe landing. With the TOI safely on the ground, fighter pilots will communicate their departure intentions to the controlling agency so as not to alarm the TOI's flight crew.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL If the TOI ignores diversion attempts and is deemed a threat to protected people or infrastructure by the National Command Authorities, the fighter pilots may be ordered to shoot down the TOI. The primary decision-maker to shoot down the TOI resides with President, Vice President or Secretary of Defense. In cases where time and conditions do not exist for NCA direction, CINC NORAD or his designated alternate (Major General or higher) have backup shoot down authority. THE FIGHTER PILOT NEVER HAS AUTONOMOUS SHOOT DOWN AUTHORITY AND WILL NOT FIRE ON THE TOI UNLESS A VALID AND AUTHENTICATED ORDER IS RECEIVED. Every opportunity will be given to the people on board the TOI to regain control or stop the hijack attempt prior to shooting down the TOI.

WARNING It can not be emphasized enough on the seriousness of NORAD fighters intercepting TOIs. This is the first step in a potential shoot down. It is imperative that the TOIs flight crew immediately complies with directions from either the controlling agency or fighters. Abrupt TOI maneuvers will not be used as criteria for shoot down unless this places the TOI's flight path in close proximity to protected people and points. The shoot down decision represents a difficult choice in precluding additional loss of life through a terrorist attack.

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Post Accident / Incident

NOTE The remaining pages in this chapter constitute the Post-Accident/Incident List and are to be removed from this manual following an accident/incident.

Before Leaving The Aircraft

NOTE The Pilot-In-Command or the next crewmember (senior student or passenger) in the chain of command is in charge until a management appointed company official relieves him.

Notify Flight Dispatch as soon as practical. Do not assume tower will notify Flight Dispatch. To the extent practical, remove emergency/medical equipment and other appropriate equipment that may be needed. Remove the aircrafts can, flight plan, weather, flight release, and any other relevant information or notes.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Before Leaving the Scene The primary responsibility of the Pilot-In-Command is the welfare of the student or passengers. Remain at the location of the incident or accident. Congregate a safe distance away from the aircraft (recommend 100 yards from the nose or tail). Determine each occupants physical condition and get medical attention, if required. Attempt to ascertain the location and status of all occupants. Safeguard the aircraft and its contents. Protect the area from trespassing and pilfering. Ensure no smoking in the area. Secure assistance from airport officials and the police to ensure vital evidence is not lost by unnecessary interference with the wreckage before the arrival of the official investigating team. Do not disturb or move the aircraft or wreckage. Do not remove from the scene any records involved in or pertaining to an accident or incident, unless an authorized representative of the NTSB grants specific permission.

NOTE Exceptions may be made to: Protect the aircraft or wreckage from further damage. Protect the public from injury.

NOTE Any request for movement of the aircraft or wreckage will be coordinated with the investigator in charge.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Accumulate and protect flight data. Collect all possible data and information as soon as possible after the accident or incident, emphasizing conditions that might be subject to change or destruction in the course of the recovery effort. Observe and record any perishable information that might relate to the accident or incident. This information might include, but is not limited to: Indication of ice on the control surfaces. Diagrams of the accident site. Location and diagrams of significant tracks or marks on the ground or in the snow. Measurements may be required. Signs of bird strikes (feathers, flesh, etc.) on the windshield, wings, stabilizer, fuselage, intakes, engines, etc. Obtain the names, addresses, telephone numbers and an outline of available facts from any witnesses, and/or the student or passenger(s). Coordinate the departure from the scene with Aerosim Flight Academy management. Aerosim Flight Academy management will coordinate all contact with regulatory authorities after the crew has departed the scene of the accident.

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Interviews / Statements
News Media Do not make any statements to either the public or press in relation to the accident/incident. Refer all questions to: Aerosim Flight Academy Inc. 2700 Flight Line Avenue Sanford, Florida 32773 (800) 822-6359 (407) 330-7020

U.S. Government Authorities Pilots are entitled to appropriate representation during any post-accident/incident interview with either the NTSB or the FAA. Pilots should not make any verbal statements nor permit themselves to be interviewed until representation is available from Operations management. All pilot statements must be submitted to the Director of Flight Operations, who will in turn supply copies to the FAA. Comply with reasonable requests from regulatory authorities, law enforcement officials, or NTSB investigators. Present the following for inspection, but do not relinquish: Pilot Certificate Medical Certificate Flight documents Aircraft documents (e.g.: log book, airworthiness certificate)

Aerosim Flight Academy management will coordinate the delivery of all pertinent documents to the regulatory authorities, law enforcement officials, or NTSB investigators.

Flight Continuance No crewmember involved in an aircraft accident or incident will continue a flight or originate any other flight without receiving authority to do so from Operations management. Consideration must be given to the airworthiness of the aircraft.

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Chapter 9 Passengers Table Of Contents


SUSPICIOUS STUDENTS OR PASSENGERS ....................................................................................................... 3 SEATBELTS AND AIRCRAFT MOVEMENT ....................................................................................................... 3 INTOXICANTS AND ILLICIT DRUGS .................................................................................................................. 4 PASSENGER COMMUNICATIONS & ANNOUNCEMENTS ............................................................................. 4 PASSENGER MEDICATION ................................................................................................................................... 4 APPARENT DEATH OF A STUDENT OR PASSENGER .................................................................................... 5 PORTABLE ELECTRONIC DEVICES (PED) ....................................................................................................... 5 POLICY ...................................................................................................................................................................... 5 PROHIBITED ITEMS THAT MAY NOT BE OPERATED AT ANY TIME ........................................................................... 5 PROCEDURES ............................................................................................................................................................. 5 SMOKING ................................................................................................................................................................... 6 CREW ACTION ........................................................................................................................................................... 6

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Suspicious Students Or Passengers


If a student on a scheduled training flight raises a concern about another student observing the flight as a passenger, and the concern appears to be unfounded, the Pilot-In-Command will address the issues of the student voicing the concern, with the assistance of Operations Management if necessary. If the concern appears to be based solely on race, color, national origin, religion, sex or ancestry, the Pilot-In-Command should work to establish a comfort level with the concerned student within the framework of Aerosim Flight Academys non-discrimination policy. If the concern is based on suspicious conduct, the Pilot-In-Command should request the assistance of the Manager of Safety & Security (MS&S), or in his absence a Flight Supervisor. The Pilot-In-Command will provide all known passenger information at the time of the concern. The MS&S will conduct a meeting with the Pilot-In-Command and the student assigned to the flight at a location away from the passenger to discuss the concern. The focus of the meeting should be to determine if the behavior in question poses a security concern to the operation. The MS&S will provide specific information that can help the Pilot-In-Command in making an informed, fact-based decision about whether the passenger represents a security threat to the flight. After conducting a thorough review of the facts with the expanded team, the Pilot-In-Command has the final authority on whether to remove the passenger based on suspicious behavior. If the passenger is to be removed, the MS&S will ask the passenger to deplane with all of his personal items. The MS&S will explain the situation to the passenger once he is off the aircraft and out of the view of other students and customers. Any suspicious passenger incident that results in removing a passenger, delaying the departure of the flight, canceling the flight or otherwise becomes a customer services issue, must be reported on an Incident / Accident Report. The report must include specific details regarding who was involved, what was observed, and why the observed behavior was felt to be a security issue.

Seatbelts And Aircraft Movement


Passengers must have their seatbelts securely fastened prior to and during any movement of the aircraft on the ground. This includes engine starting. If the flight crew becomes aware that a passenger does not have a fastened seatbelt, then the Pilot-In-Command will bring the aircraft to a complete stop. The passenger must fasten their seatbelt prior to any further movement of the aircraft. Aerosim Flight Academys seatbelt policies conform to 14 CFR 91.107.

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Intoxicants And Illicit Drugs


No crewmember may allow a person who is obviously under the influence of an intoxicating beverage or drug to be carried on Aerosim Flight Academy aircraft. No person may consume any alcoholic beverage onboard Aerosim Flight Academy aircraft. Any passenger who is determined, by the flight crew to the best of their ability, to be intoxicated after the flight has departed and whose behavior may jeopardize the safety of the flight or a crewmember will be reported to the authorities prior to arriving at the destination. Flight Dispatch will also be notified as soon as practical. The flight crew will notify ATC personnel via radio if law enforcement assistance will be required upon landing. The Pilot-In-Command shall submit a report in writing to the Chief Flight Instructor within 24 hours of completing a flight assignment anytime a passenger violates this alcohol policy.

Passenger Communications & Announcements


Precise, professional communication with the passengers is essential. Announcements made by the flight crew should be well conceived with special emphasis placed on a smooth delivery of the message. An unusual in flight situation that may be normal for the flight crew could be disconcerting to an inexperienced student or a passenger on Academy business. Some examples include: turbulence, wake turbulence, thunderstorms, missed approach/go-around, aborted takeoff, and in some instances, mechanical malfunctions. Flight crews will keep the passengers well informed. The content of announcements should be positive and not extremely technical when involving a mechanical problem.

Passenger Medication
Flight Instructors will not offer or dispense medication of any type to students or passengers. If they require assistance, they are to be referred to another source (i.e. Sky Shop, local pharmacy, medical center, etc.). However, this does not apply to the rendering of first aid as the result of an incident or accident.

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Apparent Death Of A Student Or Passenger


Aerosim Flight Academy personnel are not qualified to officially state the condition of a student or passengers health. In the event of an apparent death, the student or passenger should be considered unconscious and appropriate first aid administered or continued. The following actions should be taken: Request medical assistance. Contact Flight Dispatch. Land at the nearest suitable airport.

Portable Electronic Devices (PED)


Policy Portable Electronic Devices may only be used as described below. Use of a PED not in compliance with the following list is a violation of Federal Aviation Regulations. PEDs must not interfere with the aircrafts navigation and communications systems, as determined by Aerosim Flight Academy. Prohibited Items That May Not Be Operated At Any Time The following items may not be operated after engine start, during flight, until engine shutdown: Cellular Telephones AM / FM Radios Remote Control Toys Televisions Wireless Computer Peripherals

Procedures The flight crew will inform any passengers that all portable electronic devices must be turned off if it is suspected that a device may be causing interference with the aircraft systems. The Pilot-In-Command will report to the Chief Flight Instructor upon completing a flight if there have been instances of suspected or confirmed interference by a portable electronic device. This information must be forwarded to the FAA. Aerosim Flight Academy policy is to allow the use of battery operated portable computers, electronic games, and CD players in flight.

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Smoking
Aerosim Flight Academy has adopted a smoke free environment for all flights. In addition, the use of smokeless tobacco products such as snuff and chewing tobacco is not permitted. Good judgment must be used to dictate the action to be taken regarding passenger noncompliance due to ignorance of the rule or an unthinking reaction to the urge to smoke. For example, if a passenger lights a cigarette as a reflex action and when told smoking is not allowed, puts out the smoking material and does not light another one, no further action is necessary. Crew Action Crewmember action may be necessary if one of the following occurs: A smoker refuses to immediately extinguish smoking materials. A smoker becomes abusive.

If any one of these situations occurs, the Pilot-In-Command must: Advise the passenger that he is in violation of Academy policy and monitor the situation for escalation.

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Chapter 10 Hazardous Materials Table Of Contents


GENERAL ................................................................................................................................................................... 3 ACCEPTING PACKAGES, CARGO, AND PASSENGER BAGGAGE............................................................... 3 COMMON HAZARDOUS MATERIALS ................................................................................................................ 4 EXCEPTIONS TO THE HAZARDOUS MATERIAL REGULATIONS ............................................................. 4 EMERGENCY PROCEDURES ................................................................................................................................ 5 IMMEDIATE ACTIONS ................................................................................................................................................ 6 ASSISTANCE .............................................................................................................................................................. 6 HAZARDOUS MATERIAL LABELS ...................................................................................................................... 7 CLASS 1 - EXPLOSIVES .............................................................................................................................................. 7 CLASS 2 - GASES ....................................................................................................................................................... 8 CLASS 3 FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS ............................................................................................................................... 9 CLASS 4 - FLAMMABLE SOLIDS ............................................................................................................................... 10 CLASS 5 - OXIDIZING SUBSTANCES AND ORGANIC PEROXIDE ................................................................................. 11 CLASS 6 - TOXIC AND INFECTIOUS SUBSTANCES ..................................................................................................... 11 CLASS 7 - RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL ........................................................................................................................ 12 CLASS 8 - CORROSIVES ............................................................................................................................................ 12 CLASS 9 - MISCELLANEOUS DANGEROUS GOODS.................................................................................................... 12

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General
The following terms are considered synonymous: dangerous goods, hazardous materials, restricted articles, hazardous substances and dangerous materials. No employee or agent of Aerosim Flight Academy may perform any assigned duties or responsibilities involving the acceptance, handling, or carriage of baggage or cargo, considered hazardous, without the approval of a member of the Operations or Maintenance Department management staff. Specific consideration shall be given by management as to the necessity of flight crews to handle / transport hazardous materials. All other handling / transportation methods should be considered before the decision to transport hazardous materials by aircraft is made.

Accepting Packages, Cargo, And Passenger Baggage


Any package or cargo that displays a hazardous materials marking or label, or otherwise is known or suspected to contain a hazardous material, will not be accepted or loaded aboard Aerosim Flight Academy aircraft without the knowledge and acceptance of the Pilot-InCommand. A sample chart of Hazardous Materials Warning Labels is provided at the end of this chapter. The General Transportation Requirements of 49 CFR state that shippers of hazardous materials must properly declare any such material at the time it is offered for transportation to the carrier. Therefore, it is acceptable practice to assume that hazardous material packages may be recognized by their conspicuous markings and labels that are required to be displayed on the outside of the package. Aerosim Flight Academy flight crews accepting cargo, packages, and personal baggage will be especially vigilant in scanning all such items, and when appropriate, question persons offering cargo, packages, or luggage as to the contents and, thereby, prevent the inadvertent acceptance and transportation of such unauthorized materials. Any package, cargo, or piece of luggage found to contain hazardous materials after having been offered and accepted as other than a hazardous material will be removed from the aircraft environment to a safe location pending notification of management. Cargo packaged in unmarked containers may possibly have hazards that may not be apparent. Experience has shown that the declaration of contents must be questioned and checked against the hazard class definitions.

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Common Hazardous Materials


Chemicals found to be acids or flammables. Electrical equipment containing mercury. Materials such as paint and aerosols Batteries Vehicle fuels

Exceptions To The Hazardous Material Regulations


49 CFR Part 175.10 lists items which, although classified as hazardous, may be carried in limited quantities. The following items may be transported onboard Aerosim Flight Academy aircraft. 1. A tire assembly with a serviceable tire is not subject to the provisions of this sub-chapter provided the tire is not inflated to a gauge pressure exceeding the maximum rated pressure for that tire. 2. Toilet articles (including aerosols) may be carried in baggage when the total net quantity of all such articles carried by each passenger or crewmember does not exceed 4.4 pounds or 68 fluid ounces and the net quantity of each single article does not exceed 1.1 pounds or 16 ounces. Toilet articles include such items as hair spray, perfumes, colognes and medicines containing alcohol. 3. Human beings with an implanted medical device, such as a heart pacemaker, that contains radioactive materials or with radio-pharmaceuticals that have been injected or ingested. 4. Safety matches or a lighter intended for use by an individual when carried on one's person. However, lighters containing unabsorbed liquid fuel (other than liquefied gas), lighter fuel and lighter refills are not permitted on one's person or in baggage. 5. Perfumes and colognes carried by passengers or crew in baggage. 6. Alcoholic beverages in retail packaging of not more than 1.3 gallons.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL 7. A non-spillable battery that is removed from the unit it is designed to power and the battery terminals are insulated to prevent accidental short circuits. 8. A spillable battery that is removed from the unit it is designed to power and carried in strong, rigid packaging under the following conditions: The packaging must be leak-tight and impervious to battery fluid. An inner liner may be used to satisfy this requirement if there is absorbent material placed inside of the liner and the liner has a leak proof closure; The battery must be protected against short circuits, secured upright in the packaging, and be packaged with enough compatible absorbent material to completely absorb liquid contents in the event of rupture of the battery; and The packaging must be labeled with a CORROSIVE label, marked to indicate proper orientation, and marked with the words Wet Battery.

9. One small carbon dioxide cylinder fitted into a self-inflating life jacket, plus one spare cartridge, may be carried by a passenger or crew member in baggage. 10. A small medical mercury thermometer for personal use, when carried in the protective case. 11. Scuba tanks provided they contain 40 psi or less verified by a pressure gauge / regulator. If the tank pressure cannot be verified by use of a gauge, then the tank must be demonstrated to be empty by opening the valve.

Emergency Procedures
Even though Aerosim Flight Academy procedures do not permit the transportation of hazardous materials, the following is a guide for the use of flight crews in the event hazardous materials are inadvertently loaded on an Aerosim Flight Academy aircraft. A spill or leakage of hazardous materials in an aircraft during flight may be noticed in the form of fumes or smoke. Aside from using maximum air flows through the aircraft and standard firefighting procedures as applicable, the crews best and most effective procedure is to: Declare an emergency; if necessary, request radar vectors to the nearest suitable airport. Land the aircraft as soon as possible. Evacuate at least 300 feet upwind from the aircraft. Obtain assistance in fighting the fire if appropriate. If the aircraft is not on fire and there is no immediate threat to life, leave the aircraft and hazardous materials alone until expert help arrives. If the incident/accident involves poisons, corrosives, or radioactive materials, their emissions will be extremely dangerous.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Immediate Actions Evacuate all personnel to a safe distance. If an explosive is involved, this distance should be 1/4 mile (1320 ft.) or more. If clouds, vapor, fumes, etc., are present, move all personnel upwind. Avoid inhaling fumes, smoke, and vapors even if no hazardous materials are involved. Notify local fire and police departments. Make certain they are aware that hazardous materials are involved. Continue to keep all personnel away from the spill or accident area. Under no circumstances should anyone approach fire, residue, or pieces of containers. Do not assume that gases or vapors are harmless because of lack of smell.

Assistance CHEMTREC - (800) 424-9300 National Response Center - (800) 424-8802

The Pilot-In-Command must contact Flight Dispatch as soon as practicable. The Pilot-InCommand must also contact the Chief Flight Instructor as soon as practicable. The Chief Flight Instructor will obtain the information necessary to complete the required reports to the various government agencies. The Chief Flight Instructor, in conjunction with the Manager of Safety & Security, will be responsible to make all necessary reports in accordance with 49 CFR and 175.31, 175.45 and DOT Form 5800.1.

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Hazardous Material Labels


Class 1 - Explosives

Articles and substances having a mass explosion hazard

Articles and substances having a projection hazard but not a mass explosion hazard

Articles and substances having a fire hazard, a minor blast hazard and/or a minor projection hazard but not a mass explosion hazard

Articles and substances presenting no significant hazard.

Very insensitive substances having a mass explosion hazard

Extremely insensitive articles which do not have a mass explosion hazard

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Flammable gas

Non-flammable, non-toxic gas

Oxygen

Toxic Gas

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Class 3 Flammable Liquids

Flammable liquid

Combustible liquid

Gasoline

Fuel oil

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Class 4 - Flammable Solids Substances Liable to Spontaneous Combustion; Substances Which, in Contact with Water, Emit Flammable Gases

Flammable solid

Substances liable to spontaneous combustion

Substances which, in contact with water, emit flammable gases

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Class 5 - Oxidizing Substances and Organic Peroxide

Oxidizer

Organic peroxides

Class 6 - Toxic and Infectious Substances

Inhalation hazard

Poisonous

Toxic

Infectious substances

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Class 7 - Radioactive Material

Radioactive material

Class 8 - Corrosives

Corrosives

Class 9 - Miscellaneous Dangerous Goods

Miscellaneous dangerous goods

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Chapter 11 - Maintenance Table Of Contents


GENERAL ................................................................................................................................................................... 3 DEFINITIONS .............................................................................................................................................................. 3 MAINTENANCE POLICY ............................................................................................................................................. 5 SPECIAL MAINTENANCE INSPECTIONS .......................................................................................................... 5 ALL AIRCRAFT .......................................................................................................................................................... 5 AIRWORTHINESS .................................................................................................................................................... 6 MECHANICAL IRREGULARITY PROCEDURES .............................................................................................. 6 CIRCUIT BREAKERS, RESETTING TRIPPED, COLLARING ......................................................................... 7 GENERAL................................................................................................................................................................... 7 REPORTING MECHANICAL DISCREPANCIES ................................................................................................ 8 COMMUNICATIONS .................................................................................................................................................... 8 LINE SERVICE & MAINTENANCE ............................................................................................................................... 9 RECORDING DISCREPANCIES ..................................................................................................................................... 9 DISCREPANCY PRIOR TO TAKEOFF .......................................................................................................................... 10 DISCREPANCY AFTER TAKEOFF .............................................................................................................................. 11 SPECIAL FLIGHT PERMITS ................................................................................................................................ 12 AIRCRAFT STATUS AND PRE-FLIGHT ............................................................................................................ 14 AIRCRAFT INSPECTIONS .................................................................................................................................... 15 AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE LOG....................................................................................................................... 16 GENERAL................................................................................................................................................................. 16 LOGGING FERRY FLIGHTS ....................................................................................................................................... 18 TYPES OF CORRECTIVE ACTION .............................................................................................................................. 18 DEFERRED MAINTENANCE ITEMS (DMI) ...................................................................................................... 19 PROCEDURES FOR DEFERRING A MAINTENANCE ITEM ........................................................................................... 19 PROCEDURES TO COMPLETE A DEFERRAL PLACARD .............................................................................................. 20 LOGGING FLIGHT CHECKS ............................................................................................................................... 20 PROCEDURES FOR LOGGING A SATISFACTORY FLIGHT CHECK ............................................................................... 20 PROCEDURES FOR LOGGING AN UNSATISFACTORY FLIGHT CHECK........................................................................ 21 SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS .................................................................................................................................... 21 ELAPSED TIME CONVERSION TABLE ............................................................................................................. 22 AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE WARNING FLAGS ............................................................................................. 22

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General
Definitions Aircraft Maintenance Log/AML - Located in a binder maintained by the Maintenance Department. Contains a record of all discrepancies and the corrective action taken. Aircraft Out Of Service Statement - Procedure to ensure that required inspections, other maintenance, preventative maintenance and alterations that are not completed as a result of shift changes or similar work interruptions are properly completed before aircraft is released to service. Corrective Action - No certificate holder may operate an aircraft after maintenance, preventative maintenance or alteration are performed on the aircraft unless the certificate holder, or the person with whom the certificate holder arranges for the performance of the maintenance, preventative maintenance, or alterations, prepares or causes to be prepared an appropriate entry in the aircraft log. Deferred Maintenance 1. Provide for the operation of the aircraft with certain instruments and equipment in an inoperable condition. 2. Records identifying the inoperable instruments and equipment and the information required must be available to the pilot. Discrepancy - Each person who takes action in the case of a reported or observed failure or malfunction of an airframe, engine, propeller or appliance that is critical to the safety of flight shall make, or have made, a record of that action in the aircrafts maintenance log. Ferry Flight - A special flight permit with a continuing authorization may be issued for aircraft that may not meet applicable airworthiness requirements but is capable of safe flight for the purpose of flying aircraft to a base where maintenance or alterations are to be performed.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Flight Check - No person may carry any person (other than crewmembers) in an aircraft that has been maintained, rebuilt, or altered in a manner that may have appreciably changes its flight characteristics or substantially affected its operation in flight until an appropriately rated pilot with at least a private pilot certificate flies the aircraft, makes an operational check of the maintenance performed or alteration made, and logs the flight in the aircraft records. Signature and Certificate - The method of performing required inspections and a designation by occupational title of personnel authorized to perform each required inspection. The signature constitutes the approval for return to service only for the work performed. Maintenance Release 1. The maintenance logbook has been reviewed and all defects have been properly corrected or found serviceable. 2. That the required maintenance was completed and that no check has expired and all work was performed in accordance with the General Maintenance Manual. 3. All Required Inspection Items have been completed by an authorized Inspector. 4. No known condition exists that would make the aircraft unairworthy. 5. So far as the work performed is concerned, the aircraft is in a condition for safe operation. 6. Be signed by an authorized certificated mechanic. Mechanic Signature and Certificate - If the work performed on the aircraft, airframe, aircraft engine, appliance or component part has been performed satisfactorily, the signature, certificate number and kind of certificate held by the person approving the work. The signature constitutes the approval for return to service only for the work performed. Minimum Equipment List/MEL This is a separately approved document that may be contained in the aircraft Flight Standards Manual that gives procedures and guidelines for continued aircraft operation with certain instruments and equipment inoperative. Reposition Flight - Flight operated under 14 CFR Part 91 rules to reposition an aircraft between airports or bases.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Required Inspection Item - A designation of the items of maintenance and alteration that must be inspected (required inspections), including at least those that could result in a failure, malfunction, or defect endangering the safe operation of the aircraft, if not performed properly or if improper parts or materials are used. Station Code - The three digit station code where the maintenance is performed. UTC Flight Day - For the purposes of the Aircraft Maintenance Log, a flight day means a 24hour period (from midnight to midnight UTC) during which at least one flight is initiated for the affected aircraft.

Maintenance Policy It is Aerosim Flight Academy policy to maintain all aircraft in an airworthy condition using procedures set forth in the General Maintenance Manual, aircraft specific technical publications, and FAA approved aircraft specific maintenance program.

Special Maintenance Inspections


Some incidents will require certain special inspections. The Pilot-In-Command is responsible for creating an Aircraft Discrepancy Sheet entry and reporting the following conditions to Maintenance:

All Aircraft Hard/Overweight Landing Bird Strike (see note) Lightning Strike Engine Over Temperature Extreme Turbulence or Maneuver Flap Overspeed High Energy Stop or High Speed Rejected Takeoff (A High Energy Stop is defined as when the aircraft brakes are used severely during an aircraft stop). Engine Overspeed

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NOTE If a bird strike is suspected during flight, upon landing the PIC will perform a walk around check of the aircraft for evidence of, or obvious damage resulting from a bird strike. Emphasis should be placed on inlets, vents, leading edges, control surfaces, and antennas If airframe damage is observed or suspected, an Aircraft Discrepancy Sheet entry is required.

Airworthiness
Aerosim Flight Academy aircraft are maintained using a Continuous Airworthiness Maintenance and Inspection program. The philosophy behind this process is that the aircraft is inspected on regular intervals by the Maintenance Department. After scheduled maintenance, the aircraft receives an airworthiness release. Between scheduled maintenance, aircraft are maintained in an airworthy condition by flight crew pre-flights, the monitoring by flight crews of the operation of the aircraft and its systems. Discrepancies are discovered and corrected, or deferred, therefore maintaining the airworthiness condition of the aircraft between scheduled maintenance.

Mechanical Irregularity Procedures


It is the responsibility of the Pilot-In-Command to remain knowledgeable of the aircraft status while repairs are in progress and to keep Flight Dispatch informed. Systems checks, engine runs and aircraft repositioning are a few of the functions that may need to be performed in order to expedite the aircrafts return to service.

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Circuit Breakers, Resetting Tripped, Collaring


General This section provides flight crews with specific operational information associated with resetting tripped circuit breakers. This is due to the potential hazard of resetting an open breaker. In the event a circuit breaker trips or is found tripped flight crews will follow the procedure listed below. Description 1. The Pilot-in-Command (PIC) will determine by, consulting the Pilot Operating Handbook for the aircraft flown and considering the current flight conditions, whether the tripped circuit breaker is necessary for the safe completion of the flight. 2. If the circuit breaker is considered to be essential, reset the breaker only once and under the following conditions: Wait at least one minute prior to resetting the breaker; only if there is no smoke or burning smell; The affected system and equipment is needed for the operational environment. CAUTION Do not reset non-essential circuit breakers 3. Once a circuit breaker has tripped in flight, flight crews will make the decision to return to the originating base of operation if continued flight will not compromise safety. If the PIC determines that the flight must terminate due to safety concerns, the flight crew will divert and land as soon as practicable. NOTE In day VFR weather conditions, there may be no essential functions outside of communication that require electrical power, making continued flight back to the base of operation for maintenance intervention an option. WARNING If a circuit breaker is found tripped during preflight, flight crews will not reset the breaker and make a go decision without maintenance approval.

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Reporting Mechanical Discrepancies


The Pilot-In-Command must record, or have recorded, on an Aircraft Discrepancy Sheet any discrepancy that comes to his attention before, during or after each flight. The discrepancy must be recorded legibly and in sufficient detail to assist Maintenance personnel in determining proper corrective action. Describe discrepancies in sufficient detail, but do not state an opinion of what caused the component or system to fail. For example, state that the Landing Light is inoperative. Do not state that the bulb burned out. The problem could possibly be the switch or associated wiring. All Aircraft Discrepancy Sheet entries and responses must be written legibly in blue or black ink. No erasures are permitted. For additional information, consult Aerosim Flight Academy Safety Procedures & Practices in this Manual.

Communications Communication for mechanical discrepancies must be coordinated with the appropriate personnel to ensure the quickest resolution. At all locations, Maintenance should be contacted through Flight Dispatch on the appropriate radio frequency or by telephone, if necessary. The Pilot-In-Command must ensure that the Dispatcher is aware of all changes to the flight release, as well as any information that would delay or cancel a flight. It is essential that the Pilot-In-Command, Flight Dispatcher, and Maintenance Technician properly coordinate all communications regarding mechanical discrepancies to minimize delays and expedite maintenance procedures whenever possible.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Line Service & Maintenance Line Service personnel (Fuelers) are available each day and their shift times vary depending on location. It is their responsibility to provide service to include fuel and oil servicing for all aircraft. Line Maintenance personnel are available each day and their shift times vary depending on location. It is their responsibility is to respond to requests to repair or replace, as appropriate, any minor aircraft discrepancy. The following procedures must be used in order to access these services: Contact Flight Dispatch and advise them of the specific problem. Flight Dispatch will then forward the request to the appropriate service personnel. Standby on the frequency until Flight Dispatch advises you of the estimated time of arrival of the appropriate line personnel. Advise Flight Dispatch if the estimated time is not acceptable for allowing the completion of the lesson. A re-dispatching of another aircraft may be necessary to ensure completion of the flight lesson.

Recording Discrepancies The Pilot-In-Command is responsible for the reporting of any mechanical problem(s) found before, during, or after a flight. On dual flight lessons, the Flight Instructor will write-up any discrepancies. On solo flight lessons, the student will write-up any discrepancies. In an effort to provide guidance in communicating with aircraft maintenance personnel, it is requested that the following items be included, if appropriate, in any aircraft maintenance discrepancy: The time and circumstance under which the problem first occurred. The phase of flight (i.e.: taxi, takeoff, climb, cruise, descent, landing, etc.). How was the aircraft configured (i.e.: landing gear extended, prop full forward, etc.). What condition(s) or action(s) led up to the problem (i.e.: turning on the landing light, during flap extension, etc.). What were the pilot inputs to any aircraft system immediately prior to encountering the problem? What happened immediately after the problem was encountered? How and what other systems were affected?

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Was the problem continuous or intermittent? What steps, if any, did the pilot take to isolate and/or correct the problem, and what affect did those efforts have? What, if any, sound corresponded with the problem (i.e.: thump, thud, buzzing, hiss, etc.)? Where was the sound coming from? What did it feel like (vibration, bumping, etc.)? What did it look like? Was an odor associated with the problem?

In order to better communicate with maintenance professionals, students should learn as much as possible about the technical and maintenance aspects of the aircraft. This may include spending time with Flight Instructors in the Maintenance Department to get a first hand look at the systems of particular aircraft and the problems that can arise and affect a crew in flight.

Discrepancy Prior To Takeoff Should a mechanical discrepancy occur prior to engine start, the Pilot-In-Command will contact Flight Dispatch and record the discrepancy on an Aircraft Discrepancy Sheet. Any time a discrepancy is discovered before takeoff, the following applies: If a discrepancy is discovered before takeoff, takeoff is prohibited until the mechanic has accomplished the required procedures/inspections.

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Any discrepancy with an item will require a return to parking. Any communication (e.g.: Maintenance, Flight Dispatch) during any ground operation will only be conducted with the aircraft stopped and the parking brake set. The discrepancy must be recorded on an Aircraft Discrepancy Sheet. Takeoff is defined as the act of beginning flight in which an aircraft is accelerated from a state of rest to flight (advancement of throttle(s)).

Discrepancy After Takeoff When a discrepancy is detected, the Pilot-In-Command shall contact Flight Dispatch at his earliest convenience and when workload permits during cruise flight. In no instance shall the flight depart after landing (including: Touch & Go, Stop & Go, or a Low Approach where a landing is possible) for its next destination without recording the discrepancy and contacting Flight Dispatch / Maintenance. Early notification will permit Maintenance to either utilize the deferral process, or coordinate contract Maintenance at other stations, or expedite maintenance functions at a Maintenance base. The Pilot-In-Command shall not defer a discrepancy without first contacting Flight Dispatch / Maintenance.

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Special Flight Permits


A Special Flight Permit (commonly referred to as a Ferry Permit) may be issued to any U.S. registered aircraft that may not currently meet applicable Airworthiness Requirements but is capable for safe flight.

NOTE A Special Flight Permit is not an authorization to deviate from the requirements of 14 CFR Part 91. Special Flight Permits will be issued by the FSDO having jurisdiction over the geographical area in which the flight is to originate. If an AD requires compliance before further flight, and there is no provision for issuance of a Special Flight Permit, the operation of the aircraft to which it applies would not be appropriate. Therefore, a Special Flight Permit will not be issued.

The following is not all inclusive (refer to 14 CFR Part 21.197), but list the most common request for Special Flight Permits. Flying the aircraft to a base where repairs, alterations, or maintenance are to be performed, or to a point of salvage. Flying an aircraft whose annual inspection has expired to a base where an annual inspection can be accomplished. Delivering or exporting the aircraft. Evacuating aircraft from areas of impending danger. Conducting customer demonstration flights in a new production aircraft that have satisfactory completed production flight tests. To authorize the operation of an aircraft at a weight in excess of its maximum certificated takeoff weight.

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When applying for a Special Flight Permit, submit a statement on a FAA-Form 8130-6 and
indicate: 1. The purpose of the flight. 2. The proposed itinerary. 3. The essential crew required to operate the aircraft. Students shall not be considered essential crew. The Academy may request more that one Single-Pilot (i.e. mechanic) and should be prepared to provide justification to the FSDO. 4. The ways, if any, in which the aircraft does not comply with the applicable airworthiness requirements. 5. Any other information, requested by the Administrator, considered necessary for the purpose of prescribing operating limitations.

When using FAA-Form 8130-6, fill out sections I, II, VII and sign. Fax the completed form to the appropriate Flight Standards District Office. Additional items often requested by FSDOs to be faxed along with Form 8130-6 are: A current copy of the aircraft Airworthiness Certificate & Registration. A current copy of the front page of the aircraft and engine(s) log book, with all entries completed, (i.e. Aircraft / Engine(s) / Propeller(s) Manufactures, Model, serial number, etc.). A current copy of the Aircraft/Engine/Propeller/Appliance AD compliance status. A copy of the last Aircraft Log Book entry, stating that this aircraft has been inspected and is in a safe condition to fly/ferry and that all applicable ADs have been complied with and or a listing of the ADs that have not been complied with, signed by an FAA certificated A&P Mechanic or Part 145 Repair Station.

The Administrator may request to inspect the aircraft before approving or issuing a Ferry Flight Permit. The Administrator may also make, or require the applicant to make, appropriate inspections or tests necessary for safety. This means an FAA certificated Airframe and Power Mechanic or Part 145 Repair Station will be required to inspect the aircraft prior to flight. At the request of the applicant, the Ferry Permit may be transmitted, via fax. The aircraft operator must display, in the aircraft, the current Airworthiness Certificate and the Special Flight (Ferry) Permit along with its operating limitations. For additional information, refer to 14 CFR Part 21.197 or the local Flight Standards District office. Aerosim Flight Academy may conduct ferry flights for aircraft which may not currently meet applicable airworthiness requirements but are capable of safe flight for the purpose of flying the aircraft to a base where maintenance can be performed.

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NOTE Ferry flights shall be coordinated through, and approved by, both the Operations and Maintenance Departments. The ferry authorization is not valid for aircraft involved in an incident or accident.

Prior to using a ferry authorization, Maintenance, Flight Dispatch, Operations, and the Pilot-InCommand must agree that the aircraft is safe for flight.

Aircraft Status And Pre-Flight


Prior to beginning each flight, or series of flights, the Pilot-In-Command must accomplish the following items: Review the Aircraft Discrepancy Sheets to determine the airworthiness of the aircraft. Review other aircraft documents to determine if all required status items are in compliance (e.g.: VOR check, etc.). For specific documents, see the appropriate Flight Standards Manual. For aircraft returning from Maintenance, verify that a Maintenance Release has been signed by a Aerosim Flight Academy Maintenance Representative as a corrective action on the Aircraft Discrepancy Sheet.

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Aircraft Inspections
Prior to each flight the Pilot-In-Command must verify that the aircraft to be flown has had an Annual Inspection within the preceding twelve (12) calendar months. This can be checked using the information provided on the appropriate aircraft's Hobbs Sheet, but must be verified by viewing the Annual and 100 hour paperwork, if applicable. In addition, the Academy uses the Tachometer Time to record time in service for both the 100 hour inspections and Airworthiness Directives (ADs). Over flying an AD is not permissible. However, the 100 hour inspection may be exceeded by not more than 10 hours while enroute to reach a place where the inspection can be done. 100 hour Inspection times must not be intentionally over flown.

NOTE All Aerosim Flight Academy aircraft have Airworthiness Directives (ADs) that require inspections.

In order to determine the time remaining on a 100 inspection or AD, please refer to the Hobbs Sheet or Aircraft Inspection Summary paperwork. Both the time remaining until the next 100 Hour Inspection and the Tachometer Time until the next inspection can be found there.

CAUTION It is the responsibility of the Pilot-In-Command to ensure that the aircraft is not flown if the inspection requirements are not met. Those time requirements will be found on the appropriate aircraft's Hobbs Sheet or can be obtained from a Flight Dispatcher.

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Aircraft Maintenance Log


General This section provides flight crews with a description of the Aircraft Maintenance Log Book and the procedures for its use. The Aircraft Maintenance Log Book consists of a binder with the aircraft number and is labeled Aircraft Maintenance Log on the outside front cover. The aircraft logbook contains the following forms: Weight and Balance Record VOR Accuracy Check Aircraft Discrepancy Sheet Pages Deferral Placards

These forms serve several functions including a means for recording: Aircraft status Flight data Mechanical difficulties or irregularities Corrective maintenance or other maintenance performed

Aircraft Discrepancy Sheet Pages are serially numbered in consecutive order and bound in a book of 50 sets. Each set is comprised of the original and the copy. Copies of pages are removed for data entry into the maintenance computer system. Original of pages remain in the aircraft can to provide Maintenance personnel and pilots with a historical record during the period covered. Aircraft discrepancies are to be completed by the Pilot-In-Command, or by Maintenance personnel. List only one malfunction or work item in each block unless there is a definite indication that they are interrelated or a single inspection affects more than one area. All discrepancies, malfunctions and irregularities are to be recorded in a detailed, comprehensive and clearly legible manner. Irregularities pertinent to the operational requirements of the aircraft include, but are not limited to: Engine shutdowns for any reason. For engine problems, include engine instrument readings. Any indication of smoke or fire Any deployment or use of emergency equipment Exceeding any maximum certified operating parameter (e.g.: hard landing, overweight landing, airspeed, engine temp limit) Interior items Any discrepancy found by or reported to Maintenance All items requested by Maintenance Completion of a ferry flight

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OPERATIONS MANUAL The entry in the discrepancy block must be addressed by Maintenance before subsequent dispatch.

NOTE If information is entered in error on an Aircraft Discrepancy Sheet: Draw a line through the incorrect information Enter the phrase Entered in Error on the same line Enter the initials of the PIC on the same line

If the description of a discrepancy exceeds the allowable space, continue the discrepancy in the next discrepancy block. When continuing a description of a discrepancy in the second discrepancy block (same log page) the PIC will complete the following: Draw a diagonal line through the Corrective Action block next to the problem description, as that block will not be used due the length of the problem description continuing to an additional page. Enter the phrase Continued from (Page number and defect number). Complete the description of the discrepancy.

When continuing a description of a discrepancy in the discrepancy information section on a new Aircraft Discrepancy Sheet packet the flight crew will complete the following: Aircraft number Date Enter the phrase Continued from log page No. #####. Complete the description of the discrepancy

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Logging Ferry Flights Aerosim Flight Academy may be authorized to conduct a ferry flight for an aircraft that may not meet applicable airworthiness requirements but is capable of safe flight for the purpose of flying the aircraft to a base where maintenance can be performed. The Mechanic will make an entry in the corrective action block that the aircraft is safe for the intended ferry flight. Upon termination of the ferry flight, the PIC will enter the following information in the next discrepancy block of the Aircraft Discrepancy Sheet. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Defect No. Aircraft Type & Number Pilot Name Date when the discrepancy was discovered Notation of the completion of the ferry flight Original reason for ferry flight Reference to the page and item number of the discrepancy that initiated the ferry flight

Types Of Corrective Action A discrepancy entered in the discrepancy block must have a corrective action recorded by an authorized mechanic/repairman or pilot signature in the Corrective Action Block, prior to dispatch. There are only four corrective actions that can clear a discrepancy: 1. Transfer to deferral list (completed by either maintenance or the flight crew in coordination with Maintenance) 2. Correction of routine or non-routine discrepancy (only completed by Maintenance) 3. Release of the aircraft for a ferry flight (Maintenance releases the aircraft flight crew conducts the ferry flight) 4. Satisfactory completion of a flight check by the flight crew.

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Deferred Maintenance Items (DMI)

NOTE For operations without an MEL, refer to the appropriate Flight Standards Manual or the Maintenance Department.

The Maintenance Department will routinely defer the repair of mechanical discrepancies during the flight day. This practice accomplishes two objectives: 1. Maintain the integrity of the flight schedule 2. Schedule and utilize maintenance resources more efficiently Before a discrepancy may be deferred, it must first be determined that the malfunctioning component or system will not affect the airworthiness of the aircraft, or cause a subsequent flight schedule interruption later. When a discrepancy is found it may become necessary to defer the discrepancy. All deferrals must be processed through the Aerosim Flight Academy Maintenance Department. Only Maintenance Shift Leads, Directors / Managers of Maintenance, or Quality Assurance Inspectors or their designees may authorize a deferral.

Procedures For Deferring A Maintenance Item The PIC will enter or have entered in the Corrective Action block of the Aircraft Discrepancy Sheet the following information: 1. The phrase Deferred per the appropriate reference. 2. The reference used 3. Category of the deferral 4. Expiration date or A/C TT (Total Time) references. 5. Person authorizing the deferral (Maintenance). 6. Deferral DMI list number. 7. The PIC signature and certificate number in the body of the Corrective Action block. 8. A/C Total Time 9. Code for the deferral status (as assigned by maintenance). 10. Date and time of when the corrective action was taken. 11. Actual location where the corrective action was taken.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Procedures To Complete A Deferral Placard The following information will be entered on a deferral placard: Page Number of the deferral. The appropriate MEL reference, if appropriate. Aircraft number Date of the deferral Location of where the deferral was written up. Defect number of the deferral. A statement that includes the phrase deferred per (MEL item nomenclature) per the MEL reference number, if appropriate. Category of the deferral Expiration date, or A/C TT, per deferral references. Name of the person authorizing the deferral. Deferral DMI list number Short description of the discrepancy and any operational restrictions, parameters or indications required by the MEL or that may be evident to the flight crew. The name of the PIC (printed) and certificate number The PIC will place the self-adhesive placard in the aircraft can.

Logging Flight Checks


A flight check may be required after certain maintenance tasks have been performed. A flight check required for (reason) will be entered in the discrepancy block by Maintenance informing the flight crew of the need for a flight check. The PIC will make an entry in the corrective action block for all flight checks, satisfactory or unsatisfactory.

Procedures For Logging A Satisfactory Flight Check The following information will be entered in the corrective action information section of the Aircraft Discrepancy Sheet for a satisfactory flight check: 1. 2. 3. 4. The phrase flight check satisfactory The PIC signature and certificate number in the main body of the Corrective Action block Total time of the aircraft (in the A/C Total Time block) Date and time of when the corrective action was taken

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Procedures For Logging An Unsatisfactory Flight Check The following information will be entered in the corrective action information section of the Aircraft Discrepancy Sheet for an unsatisfactory flight check: The phrase flight check unsatisfactory A reference to a new discrepancy (including page and item number), describing why the flight check failed The PIC signature and certificate number in the main body of the Corrective Action block Aircraft total time (in the A/C Total Time block) Date and time of when the corrective action was taken.

Special Instructions
The following special instructions pertain to items requiring careful attention. Observe them in every case when handling the Discrepancy Sheets. Deferral Placards Placement - The self-adhesive placards will be installed on the inside of the aircraft can cover. The FARs require that airworthiness discrepancies be written in the logbook. Verbal reports can often lead to confusion and misinterpretation of discrepancies and do not relieve the Pilot-InCommand or Maintenance personnel of the responsibility to document any irregularities. Do not remove the yellow pages (carbon copies) from the Discrepancy Sheets packets. These pages must remain in the book until they are forwarded, as a package, to Maintenance. If a log page must be voided, write the word VOID in large letters in the flight data block. If any information (e.g.: date, servicing information, discrepancies) is recorded on the page, transfer the information to a new page and reference the page number of the replacement form (Example: VOID - see 101001). Check to ensure the aircraft number and date are recorded on the top line of the voided log page(s). Diagonal lines indicate areas not to be used on log pages. Do not use the reverse side of a Discrepancy Sheet when additional space is required. If the number of log entries requires additional log pages, enter the aircraft number, date, and the phrase continued from number 000001 in the block. If the description of the discrepancy or corrective action exceeds the allowed space, initiate a new sheet. In the Discrepancy Section, reference the original page number and defect number (e.g.: Continued from page number 00001log item 01).

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Elapsed Time Conversion Table


This table may be used to assign decimal values to minute intervals: Minutes = Decimal 00-00 = 0.0 01-09 = 0.1 10-14 = 0.2 15-20 = 0.3 21-26 = 0.4 27-32 = 0.5 33-38 = 0.6 39-44 = 0.7 45-50 = 0.8 51-56 = 0.9

Aircraft Maintenance Warning Flags


Each aircraft operated by Aerosim Flight Academy shall carry a colored propeller flag that indicates that the aircraft is grounded for a maintenance discrepancy. If a flight crew, or maintenance technician, grounds an aircraft for a maintenance problem, that person shall slip the flag over the propeller to alert other personnel of the aircraft status. Should an aircraft not have a flag, inform the Flight Supervisor or the Maintenance Department.

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Chapter 12 Aircraft De-icing / Cold Weather Program Table Of Contents


INTRODUCTION ....................................................................................................................................................... 3 GENERAL ................................................................................................................................................................... 3 DEFINITIONS............................................................................................................................................................. 4 FLUID DEFINITIONS ................................................................................................................................................... 7 ABBREVIATIONS ........................................................................................................................................................ 7 MANAGEMENT PLAN ............................................................................................................................................. 8 DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES ................................................................................................................................. 8 DIRECTOR OF FLIGHT OPERATIONS ........................................................................................................................... 8 MANAGER OF FLIGHT STANDARDS............................................................................................................................ 8 CHIEF FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR ....................................................................................................................................... 9 FLIGHT SUPERVISOR .................................................................................................................................................. 9 GROUND & FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS ............................................................................................................................. 9 PILOT-IN-COMMAND ............................................................................................................................................... 10 TRAINING FOR THE AIRCRAFT DE-ICING / COLD WEATHER PROGRAM .......................................... 11 PERSONNEL REQUIREMENTS ................................................................................................................................... 11 AEROSIM FLIGHT ACADEMY FLIGHT CREWS .......................................................................................................... 11 TYPES OF REQUIRED INSPECTIONS ............................................................................................................... 12 DE-ICING / PRE-HEATING PROCEDURES ....................................................................................................... 13 SNOW REMOVAL ..................................................................................................................................................... 13 PRE-HEATING PROCEDURES .................................................................................................................................... 13 NIGHTTIME AIRCRAFT PREPARATIONS .................................................................................................................... 14 MORNING AIRCRAFT PREPARATIONS ...................................................................................................................... 14 WING COVERS ......................................................................................................................................................... 15 COWL COVERS ........................................................................................................................................................ 16 RED DRAGON OPERATING PROCEDURES ................................................................................................................. 17 COLD WEATHER STARTING PROCEDURES.................................................................................................. 19 STARTING ENGINES IN COLD WEATHER BELOW 20 F (-7C) ................................................................................. 19 CIRRUS SR20 STARTING PROCEDURE - WITH OR WITHOUT PRE-HEAT .................................................................. 20 ENGINE DOES NOT START: ...................................................................................................................................... 21 POST FLIGHT OPERATIONS ...................................................................................................................................... 21 CESSNA 172 WITH PRE-HEAT ................................................................................................................................. 22 CESSNA 172 WITHOUT PRE-HEAT ........................................................................................................................... 23 PIPER PA-28R WITH OR WITHOUT PRE-HEAT ........................................................................................................ 24 PIPER PA-28R POST FLIGHT OPERATIONS .............................................................................................................. 25 PIPER PA-44 WITH OR WITHOUT PRE-HEAT .......................................................................................................... 26 PIPER PA-44 POST FLIGHT OPERATIONS ................................................................................................................. 26

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Introduction
The Aerosim Flight Academy Aircraft De-Icing / Cold Weather Program has been established in order to standardize the policies and procedures that must be followed by flight crews and any other affected personnel. It is the responsibility of all affected personnel to periodically review the Aircraft De-Icing / Cold Weather Program to ensure that all current procedures are being followed.

NOTE Copies of the company Aircraft De-Icing / Cold Weather Program can be obtained from the Flight Standards Department.

General
This chapter contains the approved Aircraft De-Icing / Cold Weather Program. This chapter ensures proper execution of the program by providing guidance to management, flight crews, aircraft dispatchers, and maintenance personnel in the proper performance of their duties. Being the controlling document for this Program, the applicable policies and procedures contained in this chapter must be incorporated into other appropriate manuals developed for use by management, flight crews, aircraft dispatchers, and maintenance personnel (e.g. Flight Standards Manuals). Aircraft De-Icing / Cold Weather procedures have the objective of: make it clean & make it warm. The decision to use de-icing by aircraft heating is the Pilot-In-Commands (PIC) responsibility. The decision to use de-icing fluids must be approved by the Manager of Training / Assistant Chief Flight Instructor. Ground personnel (Fuelers / Maintenance personnel) and other flight crewmembers are instructed to advise the Pilot-In-Command if they detect any contamination on any aircraft surface. All flight crews must have a thorough understanding of Aerosim Flight Academys Aircraft DeIcing / Cold Weather procedures in order to make informed decisions regarding the type of Aircraft De-Icing / Cold Weather procedures required.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL The Aircraft De-Icing / Cold Weather Program applies to all operations conducted in Aerosim Flight Academy aircraft, and contains the following areas: A management plan including a detailed description of the operational responsibilities and procedures associated with the implementation and conduct of the Aircraft De-Icing / Cold Weather Program. Guidance for initial and recurrent ground training and testing of all flight crewmembers, aircraft dispatchers and any other personnel deemed necessary by the Operations Department. An outline of Aircraft De-Icing / Cold Weather procedures and responsibilities, pre-takeoff check procedures and responsibilities, use and operation of de-icing & warming equipment, as well as pre-takeoff contamination check procedures and responsibilities. Specific procedures for each type of aircraft flown by Aerosim Flight Academy.

Definitions
Aerosim Flight Academy Employee A person employed by Aerosim Flight Academy. Contractor De-Icing Personnel not trained under the Aerosim Flight Academy Aircraft De-Icing / Cold Weather Program. The Pilot-In-Command will assume responsibility for ensuring compliance with this program. Cowl Blanket A fabric cover surrounding the engine cowling used to retain the heat created by the engine or a heating unit. Critical Aircraft Surfaces Aircraft surfaces that must be clear of contaminants before take-off. Critical aircraft surfaces are: propeller, windscreen, wings & control surfaces, flaps, vertical and horizontal stabilizers & control surfaces, trim surfaces, wheels & brake assemblies. De-Icing A procedure by which frost, ice or snow is removed from the aircraft in order to provide clean surfaces. The procedure can be accomplished by the use of fluids, mechanical means, or by heating the aircraft. De-Icing Fluids Mixtures of heated water and heated SAE / ISO Type I fluid, Type II, Type IV heated and undiluted.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Environmental Frost Frost caused by weather conditions. This usually occurs overnight or during the early hours of the day and is short lived in duration. Frost will form on numerous aircraft surfaces. Freezing Drizzle Fairly uniform precipitation composed exclusively of fine raindrops very close together. Drizzle appears to float while following air currents, although, unlike fog, it falls to the ground and freezes on impact. Freezing Fog Clouds or super-cooled water droplets that form a deposit of ice on objects in cold weather conditions. May also be referred to as ice fog. Freezing Precipitation Snow, sleet, freezing rain, drizzle or hail which could adhere to aircraft surfaces. Freezing Rain Water condensed from atmospheric vapor falling to earth in super-cooled drops, forming ice on objects. Frost A crystallized deposit, formed from water vapor on surfaces that are at or below 0oC (32oF). Active frost conditions exist when frost is forming on objects and the dew point is within 3oC (5oF) of the OAT. Ice Pellets / Snow Pellets / Snow Grains Frozen water droplets that may have sufficient mass to accumulate and impinge upon the layer of de-icing fluid on the aircraft surfaces. Post De-Icing Check The inspection performed immediately after de-icing operations to ensure that all contaminants have been removed from the aircraft. This check determines if the wings, control surfaces, propellers, cowling inlets, and other critical surfaces are free of frost, ice and snow before engine start and taxi. Performing this check at Aerosim Flight Academy requires a physical hands-on inspection. This check must be conducted by appropriately trained, and qualified personnel. Preflight Inspection The preflight inspection is part of the normal walk around conducted by a flight crewmember. This inspection will be used to note any aircraft surface contamination and to determine the requirement for use of de-icing equipment or procedures. Pre-Takeoff Check A check of the aircrafts wings or representative aircraft surfaces for frost, ice or snow conducted after de-icing has occurred and prior to takeoff. Pre-Takeoff Contamination Check (Tactile Check) A check to ensure that the aircrafts wings, control surfaces and other critical surfaces are clear of frost, ice and snow. It must be conducted within five minutes of takeoff.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Qualified Personnel Flight crews, Aerosim Flight Academy employees and Aerosim Flight Academy contract personnel who have been trained in accordance with the requirements stipulated in this chapter. Rain on Cold Soaked Wings Water droplets forming ice or frost on the upper wing surface when the temperature of the aircraft wing surface is at or below 0oC (32oF).

CAUTION An aircraft may experience cold soaked wings even when the ambient air temperature is well above freezing.

Rain or High Humidity on Cold Soaked Wing Fuel Tanks Water forming ice or frost may form on the wing surface when the temperature of the aircraft wing surface in the vicinity of the wing fuel tank is at or below 0oC (32oF) due to cold soaked fuel. Certain aircraft are susceptible to the formation of frost or ice on the upper surfaces when cold soaked fuel is in the main wing fuel tanks, and the aircraft are exposed to conditions of high humidity, rain, drizzle or fog at ambient temperatures well above freezing. Under some atmospheric conditions clear ice may form. Representative Aircraft Surfaces Aircraft surfaces that flight crewmembers can readily observe during day and night operations, to determine whether or not ice is adhering to that surface, and as a representative surface, can determine whether or not ice is adhering to other surfaces. Slush Partially melted snow or ice that can be splashed on the fuselage or landing gear by the aircrafts wheels. Snow Precipitation in the form of small ice crystals or flakes that may accumulate on, or adhere to, aircraft surfaces. Space Heater A heating unit used to pre-heat the engine and engine compartment prior to operations in cold weather. Tactile Inspection Physical check (hands-on) to ensure that the wings and control surfaces are free of contaminants (e.g. snow, ice, etc.). Appropriately trained personnel should accomplish it from outside of the aircraft.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Under-wing Frost Frost under the wing in the area of the fuel tanks caused by cold soaked fuel. No Aerosim Flight Academy aircraft are approved for flight, even after De-Icing, if under-wing frost is present. Wing Covers A mesh fabric cover used to prevent the accumulation of snow, ice, or frost on the wings and primary control surfaces of an aircraft.

Fluid Definitions Type I Fluids that are thin that form very thin wetting films on aircraft surfaces. They typically contain minimum of 80% glycol and are diluted prior to application unless purchased as a pre-diluted solution. Type II Fluids that are thickened, which decrease in viscosity when subjected to shear forces during takeoff roll. The aircraft manufacturer must approve the use of Type II fluids. If Type II fluids are to be used they will always be at 100% concentration. Type IV Fluids that are similar to Type II fluids, but have enhanced performance for DeIcing. If Type IV fluids are to be used they will always be at 100% concentration. Type IV fluids generally have a longer life under most conditions.

Abbreviations C F OAT FP SAE ISO Centigrade Fahrenheit Outside Air Temperature Freezing Point Society of Automotive Engineers International Standards Organization

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Management Plan
The management plan contains a breakdown of individual responsibilities, including a detailed description of the operational responsibilities and procedures associated with the implementation and conduct of the Aircraft De-Icing / Cold Weather Program.

Duties And Responsibilities The following section provides a breakdown of the individual responsibilities of each managers functions in the Aircraft De-Icing / Cold Weather Program.

Director of Flight Operations Overall responsibility for the approved Aircraft De-Icing / Cold Weather Program. Responsible for ensuring that all elements of the management plan and the Aircraft De-Icing / Cold Weather Program have been developed, properly integrated, and coordinated. Responsible for ensuring that the management plan and the Aircraft De-Icing / Cold Weather Program have been disseminated to all those persons who have duties, responsibilities and functions related to the plan. Responsible for ensuring that adequate management oversight of the Aircraft De-Icing / Cold Weather Program is maintained. Exercise operational control over all flight movements. Ensure that all contracting de-icing service vendors receive training and evaluation in accordance with the Aircraft De-Icing / Cold Weather Program.

Manager of Flight Standards Ensure that flight crewmember and dispatcher training contained in the Aircraft De-Icing / Cold Weather Program is conducted as specified in the approved program. Ensure that Ground / Flight Instructors possess adequate knowledge and understanding of the Aircraft De-Icing / Cold Weather Program to effectively conduct the appropriate procedures. Coordinate the implementation and enforcement of all policies and procedures relating to the Aircraft De-Icing / Cold Weather Program.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Chief Flight Instructor Advise the Director of Flight Operations and the Manager of Flight Standards of changes needed in the Aircraft De-Icing / Cold Weather Program. These changes may be initiated through guidance from the aircraft manufacturer that mandates changes, or other changes due to operational considerations. Ensure that flight crewmember and dispatcher training contained in the Aircraft De-Icing / Cold Weather Program is conducted as specified in the approved program. Ensure that Ground / Flight Instructors possess adequate knowledge and understanding of the Aircraft De-Icing / Cold Weather Program to effectively conduct the appropriate procedures. Coordinate the implementation and enforcement of all policies and procedures relating to the Aircraft De-Icing / Cold Weather Program with the Operations department. Ensures quality control over all de-icing including contract services. Ensure that all contracting de-icing service vendors receive training and evaluation in accordance with the Aircraft De-Icing / Cold Weather Program.

Flight Supervisor The Fight Supervisor is responsible for monitoring weather conditions at airports where Aerosim Flight Academy operations are expected to be conducted in conditions conducive to contamination of critical / representative aircraft surfaces. Initiate aircraft covering procedures in anticipation of inclement weather by alerting the evening and morning flight crews. Maintain adequate knowledge and understanding of the Aircraft De-Icing / Cold Weather Program in order to conduct safe and effective flights.

Ground & Flight Instructors Maintain adequate knowledge and understanding of the Aircraft De-Icing / Cold Weather Program in order to conduct safe and effective training flights.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Pilot-In-Command The Pilot-In-Command has the ultimate responsibility to determine if the aircraft is clean and safe for flight. This responsibility includes: The authority to request aircraft de-icing when icing conditions are present, or can reasonably be expected prior to takeoff. The determination of the necessity for ground de-icing procedures of the aircraft in accordance with the Aircraft De-Icing / Cold Weather Program. Knowledge and understanding of ground de-icing practices and procedures. Knowledge and understanding of engine pre-heating practices and procedures. Knowledge of critical areas of the aircraft and precautions that must be taken regarding damage to aircraft components and surfaces. The performance of a preflight inspection. Knowledge of the adverse effects of surface roughness or contamination on aircraft performance and flight characteristics. Ensures that the application of de-icing fluid is performed at the latest possible time before taxi and takeoff. Ensures that the pre-heating of the engine(s) occurs allowing sufficient time between the start of pre-heating and the desired time of departure. Knowledge that conducting operations in close proximity to other aircraft may result in snow, slush and other ice particles to be blown onto critical aircraft components and surfaces, or can cause dry snow to melt and re-freeze. Performing a pre-takeoff check before each takeoff when de-icing has been performed. Performing a pre-takeoff contamination check and taking off within five minutes of an All Clear tactile inspection. Conveyance of Aerosim Flight Academy approved de-icing procedures when in a location without approved contractor de-icing or qualified operating personnel. Installing cowl blankets and connecting power to space heaters during post-flight operations if the aircraft will not be operated for a time period of greater than 30 minutes after the flight.

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Training For The Aircraft De-Icing / Cold Weather Program


Training for the Aircraft De-Icing / Cold Weather Program includes initial and recurrent ground training for all affected personnel, detailing the duties, responsibilities, and operational usage of all equipment utilized in the program.

Personnel Requirements All personnel directly involved with the Aircraft De-Icing / Cold Weather Program, who de-ice, inspect, release or operate aircraft, must receive initial and recurrent ground training. These personnel include (but may not be limited to) flight crews, mechanics, aircraft dispatchers, Aerosim Flight Academy employees and Aerosim Flight Academy contract personnel. Initial training will cover the individuals duties, general procedures for use of equipment, aircraft specific information, and the guidelines covered in this chapter. Personnel performing the de-icing process will receive on-the-job training, and instructional training consisting of at least the following subjects: definitions, equipment familiarization / operation, fluid types, aircraft de-icing and pre-heating procedures, cowl and wing cover installation, and checks and communications procedures. Recurrent training will consist of a review of the areas covered in initial training and coverage of any changes in the Aircraft De-Icing / Cold Weather Program related to the employees responsibilities. Personnel performing de-icing will receive annual recurrent training within 12 calendar months of the last recurrent or initial training. If recurrent training cannot be scheduled before the 12 months have passed then the employee may not de-ice or pre-heat an aircraft unless they are supervised by an appropriately trained employee / approved contractor.

Aerosim Flight Academy Flight Crews At airports, other than those with approved facilities, where Aerosim Flight Academy aircraft have landed for any reason, and there is no Aerosim Flight Academy approved de-icing contractor, the Pilot-In-Command is responsible for having the aircraft de-iced / pre-heated, and ensuring that the aircraft is fit for flight.

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Types Of Required Inspections


The following section describes the different types of inspections that will be conducted at all times when operating Aerosim Flight Academy aircraft and the appropriate weather conditions exist. Flight Crew Preflight Inspection / Cold Weather Preflight Inspection This is the normal walk-around preflight inspection conducted by the flight crew. The flight crew shall note any aircraft surface contamination and initiate the required de-icing / pre-heating procedures, if appropriate. Post De-Icing Check This inspection will be performed immediately after de-icing operations have occurred in order to ensure that all contamination has been removed form the aircraft. This check determines that the wings, control surfaces, engine inlets, and other critical surfaces are free of frost, ice and snow before engine start and taxi. Performing this check at Aerosim Flight Academy requires a hands-on (tactile) inspection that will be conducted by the Pilot-In-Command. Pre-Takeoff Check This inspection will be performed by flight crews prior to takeoff. This check will be conducted from inside the cabin. The left and right wings, struts, if applicable, and stabilizer will be checked for frost, ice or snow contamination. Flight crews will use wing lighting or flash lights to determine that the wings are clear of frost, ice and snow during night operations. If flight crews are unsure that the aircraft is free and clear of all contaminants, then the engine will be shut down and another check of the aircraft will occur. If there is any doubt over the condition of the wings the aircraft will be de-iced again.

WARNING Flight into known icing conditions is prohibited for all Aerosim Flight Academy aircraft and flight crews.

NOTE A tactile inspection of both wings and control surfaces must be conducted. If qualified personnel are not available for a tactile inspection, the aircraft will be de-iced again.

WARNING If there is any doubt about the condition of the aircraft, flight crews will return to the ramp and abort the flight.

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De-Icing / Pre-Heating Procedures


The following de-icing / pre-heating procedures will be followed at all times.

Snow Removal Mechanical snow removal - If available, brooms and brushes may be used to remove large accumulations of snow from the aircraft. Having removed the snow, approved aircraft heating / de-icing fluid may be used to remove the remaining layer of snow and ice.

CAUTION Brooms and brushes used for snow removal from aircraft must be free of all debris (frozen broom bristles can damage aircraft surfaces). Do not use hard or sharp tools to remove ice from the aircraft surfaces, as this may cause damage to the aircraft.

Pre-Heating Procedures At times it will be necessary to pre-heat the aircraft engine. Should this be the case the following procedures will be followed at all times. Only personnel who have received the required training outlined earlier in this chapter may operate the space heaters. At no time should a non-qualified person (e.g. students) operate the equipment.

WARNING Only appropriately trained Aerosim Flight Academy personnel may operate pre-heating equipment. Handlers will ensure that they are familiar with all safety guidelines prior to operation.

WARNING All aircraft permanently assigned to satellite bases where icing conditions are frequently encountered, will be equipped with space heaters.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Nighttime Aircraft Preparations Prior to closing the facility for the evening, Flight Dispatch and the remaining nighttime flight crews will select the aircraft that are to be used for flight within the first three hours of the following day. These aircraft will be prepared in the following manner: 1. Obtain the cowl blankets, wing covers and extension cords from storage or from maintenance. 2. Connect extension cords to power source and attach to the space heater through the air inlet or engine access door on the engine cowling. 3. Install the cowl blanket and wing covers ensuring that all necessary parts of the aircraft are appropriately covered. 4. Complete the pre-heating sign off sheet.

Morning Aircraft Preparations Flight Dispatch will select the aircraft that are to be used for flight operations during the day. Any additional aircraft not prepared during nighttime aircraft preparations will be prepared in the following manner: 1. Obtain the cowl blankets, wing covers and extension cords from storage or from maintenance. 2. Connect extension cords to power source and attach to the space heater through the air inlet or engine access door on the engine cowling. 3. Install the cowl blanket and wing covers ensuring that all necessary parts of the aircraft are appropriately covered. 4. Complete the pre-heat sign off sheet.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Wing Covers Cirrus SR20 Wing Covers Surface covers and storage bags for this aircraft have been labeled with the aircraft model (SR20). After removing the four covers from the aircraft, fold each cover separately and place them neatly in the storage bag. Personnel should ensure that the appropriate storage bags are used. Cessna 172 Surface covers and storage bags for this aircraft have been labeled with the aircraft model (C172). The two aircraft share the same size covers and storage bags. After removing the four covers from the aircraft, fold each unit separately and place them neatly in the storage bag. Personnel should ensure that the appropriate storage bags are used. Piper PA-28R & PA-44 Seminole Surface covers and storage bags for these aircraft have been labeled with the aircraft model (PA-44 or PA-28R) and will only fit on the specific aircraft wings. After removing the covers from the aircraft, fold each unit separately and place them neatly in the storage bag. Personnel should ensure that the appropriate storage bags are used.

NOTE After removing the covers and placing them in the storage bag return the bag to the storage area. Do not carry the covers on flights.

NOTE If the covers are wet, inform Flight Dispatch upon returning them to the storage location to initiate drying. Do not place wet covers into the storage bags for long periods of time. Once covers have been removed, they will remain off until the nighttime crew returns or weather conditions necessitate their use during the day. Flight crews returning after Flight Dispatch has left for the evening are responsible for installing the covers.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Cowl Covers Cowl covers shall be used under the following conditions: If a space heater is installed on the aircraft and electricity is available on the ramp: Returning Flight Crew Retrieve, from storage, a cowl cover and an extension cord. Plug in the space heater and attach the cowl cover to the aircraft. If the aircraft is departing in the next 30 minutes, this action is not necessary. Departing Flight Crew Remove the cowl cover and unplug the space heater. Return the cover and extension cord to storage. If a space heater is NOT installed on the aircraft and electricity is NOT available on the ramp: Returning Flight Crew If the aircraft is to be dispatched within 30 minutes then no action is necessary because the next flight crew will not have to preheat or perform cold weather starting procedures. If the next flight is not dispatched or cancelled, then it is the responsibility of the oncoming flight crew that cancelled to place the cowl cover on the aircraft. If you return from a flight and the aircraft is not going out in the next 30 minutes, place a cowl cover on the engine and secure it properly. Departing Flight Crew The departing flight crew is responsible for determining how long the aircraft has been parked. If it has been parked, with a cowl cover installed, for less than 3 hours, preheating is not required. Remove the cover and return it to storage. Do not fly with cowl covers in the aircraft. If a cowl cover is on the aircraft and it has been more that 3 hours since the engine was operated, remove the cover, and return it to storage, and perform the appropriate preheat / cold weather starting procedures. Prior to each flight being dispatched, the departing flight crew is responsible for determining when the preceding flight returned and when the following flight will depart. Please remember to note the shutdown time on the aircraft clipboard / can so the next flight crew can determine what procedures need to be performed prior to engine start.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Red Dragon Operating Procedures Operators will contact an appropriately rated maintenance technician if questions or problems arise when using the Red Dragon heating unit. If the unit overheats or the blower stops for any reason, the operating personnel will immediately shut off the fuel at the fuel cylinder. Operating personnel will always shut the fuel off at the cylinder (tank) when the unit is stopped. Operating personnel will always store fuel cylinders in their proper upright position. Operating personnel will ensure that only qualified service personnel perform service work on the Red Dragon heater. Operating personnel will consult the return for repair procedure on page 10 of the Red Dragon operating manual. Maintenance personnel will be responsible for maintaining the Red Dragon manuals.

WARNING Operators will at no time leave the Red Dragon heater unattended when in use.

WARNING Operators will ensure that the Red Dragon heater is used with proper ventilation. Operators will always use the shortest run of ducting possible and avoid bends as much as possible. This improves the efficiency of the heater and saves fuel. Flight crews will under no circumstances, carry LP-gas aboard any Aerosim Flight Academy aircraft, without express permission from the Manager of Flight Standards / Chief Flight Instructor. Only personnel who have received the required training outlined earlier in this chapter may operate the Red Dragon heater. At no time should any non-qualified personnel (e.g. students) operate or be left alone to attend to the equipment during operation.

WARNING There will be a fire extinguisher in the vicinity at all times during all Red Dragon operations.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL 1. Obtain the heaters from storage or from maintenance. 2. Remove intake cap and insert hose into intake without cap. 3. Open valve on cylinder (tank). 4. Start fan motor By activating the fan switch.

CAUTION Operating personnel will ensure that the fan is running before igniting

5. Depress safety valve button and hold down. 6. Press igniter plunger and repeat until ignition occurs. 7. Continue to hold down red safety valve button for 15 seconds. 8. Release red safety button and burner should continue to burn. If burner goes out repeat steps 5 through 8 again.

WARNING Operators will at no time leave the Red Dragon heater unattended when in use.

NOTE Operating personnel will continue to monitor the operation of the heater while it is in use. If the fan should stop or if the unit becomes overheated, the fuel shut-off valve and the container valve will be closed immediately and the malfunction corrected. The 300 series heaters are equipped with high limit controls which stop fuel flow if overheat conditions are present.

9. Heat for a minimum of 15 min. 10. Turn propane cylinder (tank) valve off and let the flame go out. 11. Once the flame is no longer present turn off the fan. 12. Return heater storage or maintenance.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL

Cold Weather Starting Procedures


Pre-heat procedures are required for all Aerosim Flight Academy aircraft when the outside air temperature is below 32 F (0C). The normal starting procedures will be used until temperatures are below 20 F (-7C) with and without pre-heating. Aircraft that have flown in the previous hour do not require pre-heating. Starting engines without pre-heat below 32 F (0C) is prohibited without the consent of the Manager of Training / Assistant Chief Flight Instructor. Starting Engines In Cold Weather Below 20 F (-7C)

NOTE No more then two attempts should be made to start an engine without the assistance of maintenance.

CAUTION When pulling through propellers caution should be taken to ensure that the parking brake is engaged and a qualified person is at the controls. The person pulling the propeller through will ask for confirmation that the magnetos are off from the qualified person and that person should hold up the keys (make visible) to confirm that they are indeed off. In addition, care should be taken to safeguard against a return of the propeller due to the compression stroke. This could lead to serious injury.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Cirrus SR20 Starting Procedure - With Or Without Pre-Heat

C/R

STARTING ENGINE WITH OR WITHOUTOUT PRE-HEAT


OFF CONNECT HOLD ON (check voltage) ON FULL RICH FULL FORWARD PRIME, then BOOST NOTE In temperatures down to 20 F, hold Fuel (Boost) Pump switch to PRIME for 10 seconds prior to starting.

IGNITION SWITCH EXTERNAL POWER (if applicable) BRAKES BAT MASTER SWITCHES STROBE LIGHTS MIXTURE POWER LEVER FUEL PUMP

PROPELLOR AREA POWER LEVER IGNITION SWITCH

CLEAR OPEN 1/4 INCH START (release after engine starts)

NOTE No more then two attempts should be made to start an engine without the assistance of maintenance.

CAUTION Limit cranking to intervals of 20 seconds with a 20 second cooling period between cranks. This will improve battery and contactor life.

POWER LEVER OIL PRESSURE ALT MASTER SWITCHES AVIONICS POWER SWITCH ENGINE PARAMETERS EXTERNAL POWER (if applicable) AMP METER/INDICATION

RETARD CHECK ON ON MONITOR DISCONNECT CHECK

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Engine Does Not Start:

V/R

SECURING AIRCRAFT

Parking Brake ....................................................................................................................... SET Fuel Pump ..............................................................................................................................OFF Power Lever ......................................................................................................................... IDLE Mixture.............................................................................................................. IDLE CUT-OFF Lights / All Switches..............................................................................................................OFF Magnetos ................................................................................................................................OFF CAPS Handle Pin ..................................................................................... VERIFY INSERTED ELT................................................................................................... TRANSMIT LIGHT OUT Tachometer / Hobbs ...............................................................................................RECORDED Tiedowns .................................................................................................................... SECURED Pitot Cover ............................................................................................................. INSTALLED Parking Brake ......................................................................................................... RELEASED Doors ............................................................................................................................ LOCKED Post Flight Inspection ............................................................................................ COMPLETE Checklist.................................................................................................................. COMPLETE

Post Flight Operations

NOTE After each flight, and immediately after the Securing Aircraft Checklist, the cowling blankets (if available) shall be fitted to the cowling to ensure engine remains warm.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Cessna 172 With Pre-Heat

C/R
PARKING BRAKE IGNITION SWITCH THROTTLE MIXTURE KEYS PRIME PRIMER THROTTLE MIXTURE PROPELLER AREA MASTER SWITCH START ENGINE OIL PRESSURE Checklist

STARTING ENGINE WITH PRE-HEAT


SET OFF SET/CLOSED IDLE CUT-OFF VISIBLE 4 TO 8 STROKES (while propeller is hand turned) LOCKED (confirmed) OPEN 1/8 INCH RICH CLEAR ON COMPLETE CHECKED COMPLETE

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Cessna 172 Without Pre-Heat

C/R

STARTING ENGINE WITHOUT PRE-HEAT


SET OFF SET/CLOSED IDLE CUT-OFF VISABLE CAUTION Aerosim Flight Academy policy requires the person pulling the propeller through will ask for confirmation that the magnetos are off from the qualified person and that person should hold up the keys (make visible) to confirm that they are indeed off.

PARKING BRAKE IGNITION SWITCH THROTTLE MIXTURE KEYS

PRIME PRIMER MIXTURE PROPELLER AREA MASTER SWITCH THROTTLE THROTTLE START ENGINE PRIME OIL PRESSURE CARBURETOR HEAT PRIMER Checklist

6 TO 10 STROKES (while propeller is hand turned) RECHARGE (for priming after engine start) RICH CLEAR ON PUMP (rapidly 2 times to full open) OPEN TO 1/8 INCH COMPLETE AS REQUIRED (until engine runs smoothly) CHECKED ON (until engine runs smoothly) LOCKED (confirmed) COMPLETE NOTE

If the engine does not start during the first two attempts, or if engine firing diminishes in strength, it is probable that the spark plugs have been frosted over. Preheat must be used before another start is attempted. (Consult Maintenance)

CAUTION Excessive pumping of the throttle may cause raw fuel to accumulate in the intake manifold, creating a fire hazard in the event of a backfire. If this occurs, maintain a cranking action to suck the flames into the engine. Aerosim Flight Academy policy requires an outside attendant with a fire extinguisher be present for all cold weather starts without preheat.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL

Piper PA-28R With Or Without Pre-Heat

C/R

STARTING ENGINE WITH OR WITHOUTOUT PRE-HEAT


CAUTION

Flight Crews will ensure that the Master Switch and Magnetos are OFF prior to rotating each propeller through 10 blades manually during the preflight inspection.

PARKING BRAKE MASTER SWITCH ALL ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT IGNITION SWITHCH TERMINALS EXTERNAL POWER PLUG PROPELLER FUEL SELECTOR THROTTLE ELECTRIC FUEL PUMP MIXTURE STARTER MIXTURE THROTTLE OIL PRESSURE

SET OFF OFF OFF CONNECT INSERT IN FUSELAGE FULL INCREASE RPM DESIRED TANK 1/2 INCH OPEN ON PRIME THEN IDLE CUT-OFF ENGAGE FULL RICH LOWEST POSSIBLE RPM CHECKED

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OPERATIONS MANUAL NOTE If engine does not start, add prime and repeat above. When engine fires advance mixture smoothly to full rich. EXTERNAL POWER PLUG MASTER SWITCH Checklist WARNING Do not attempt flight if there is no indication of alternator output. Piper PA-28R Post Flight Operations DISCONNECT FROM FUSELAGE ON CHECK AMMETER COMPLETE

NOTE After each flight, and immediately after the Parking Checklist, the cowling blankets shall be fitted to the cowling to ensure engine remains warm.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Piper PA-44 With Or Without Pre-Heat

C/R

STARTING ENGINE WITH OR WITHOUTOUT PRE-HEAT


CAUTION

Flight Crews should ensure that the Master Switch and Magnetos are OFF prior to rotating each propeller through 10 blades manually during the preflight inspection. BATTERY MASTER SWITCH MAGNETOS EXTERNAL POWER FUEL PUMP MIXTURE PROPELLERS THROTTLE PRIMER MAGNETOS STARTER THROTTLES OIL PRESSURE NOTE If engine does not start, add prime and repeat above. When engine fires pump primer as required until engine is running smoothly. OFF OFF CONNECTED ON RICH FORWARD 1/4 INCH OPEN 5 TO 10 STROKES ON ENGAGE 1000 TO 1200 RPM CHECKED

WARNING Shutdown right engine when it is warmed prior to disconnecting the external plug. EXTERNAL POWER BATTERY MASTER SWITCH PRIMER Checklist DISCONNECTED ON LOCKED (Confirmed) COMPLETE

Piper PA-44 Post Flight Operations

NOTE After each flight, and immediately after the Parking Checklist, the cowling blankets shall be fitted to the cowling to ensure engine remains warm.

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Chapter 13 Flight Crew Policies Table Of Contents


UNIFORM POLICY ................................................................................................................................................... 3 INTRODUCTION ......................................................................................................................................................... 3 CONDUCT IN PUBLIC VIEW ....................................................................................................................................... 3 PROFESSIONAL APPEARANCE.................................................................................................................................... 3 UNIFORM WEAR ....................................................................................................................................................... 4 PERSONAL APPEARANCE .......................................................................................................................................... 5 UNIFORM PARTS ....................................................................................................................................................... 6 EPAULET TYPES AND DESIGNATIONS ....................................................................................................................... 9 LOST, MISSING, OR STOLEN ITEMS .................................................................................................................. 9 LOST & FOUND ....................................................................................................................................................... 10 IDENTIFICATION BADGES.................................................................................................................................. 10 FITNESS/READINESS ............................................................................................................................................ 10 MAILBOXES............................................................................................................................................................. 11

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Uniform Policy
Introduction This information has been prepared as a source of company policy concerning the conduct and responsibilities of all flight crew personnel. It is the responsibility of each flight crewmember to conform to the provisions of this document. There will be no deviation from the procedures and policies in this manual without specific permission from the Flight Operations senior management.

Conduct In Public View It is important that each uniformed flight crewmember and all other company personnel, when in the presence of the public, or when representing the company, conduct themselves in a dignified, courteous and alert manner. Potential customers and outsiders form their opinions of an aviation company largely as a result of their observations of its flight crews. All flight crewmembers are expected and required to conduct themselves in an appropriate manner, even during times away from campus.

Professional Appearance Aerosim Flight Academys image is projected by its flight crews and creates a perception about the professionalism of the Academy. At all times, each flight crewmember will display the utmost in professional conduct and appearance. Flight crews must be neat, clean, well groomed and courteous whenever they are in uniform in public, on campus, at company functions, and while conducting flight operations.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Flight crewmembers will wear the Aerosim Flight Academy uniform in the prescribed manner and will uphold Aerosim Flight Academy appearance and conduct standards, while in uniform, at all times. Failure to comply will lead to disciplinary action. There will be no exceptions to these Flight Crew Uniform Policies.

Uniform Wear The Aerosim Flight Academy uniform will only be worn while on duty, conducting flight operations, on special occasions requiring a uniform, and while en route to and from duty assignments. Crewmembers are expressly prohibited from wearing any part of the uniform, recognizable as a uniform part (e.g.: jacket, shirt with epaulets still attached, name badge, identification badge), in any bar or tavern or any other inappropriate establishment.

NOTE Flight crews are permitted to wear the Aerosim Flight Academy uniform in a restaurant that serves alcohol as long as they are not in the bar portion of the restaurant.

NOTE At no time are flight crewmembers permitted to consume alcohol when wearing any part of the Aerosim Flight Academy uniform.

While in public view, all parts of the complete uniform must be appropriately worn. Aerosim Flight Academy Flight Instructor Standardization Course candidates should wear appropriate business dress for the duration of the class. Bridge Course candidates and Multi-Engine Instructor Course candidates will wear business slacks (no denim jeans or combat/cargos), a collared shirt and appropriate shoes (no gym, running, canvas, open toed or like shoes) during their time as a candidate in the course. During the Flight Instructor Standardization Course, Bridge Course and the Multi-Engine Instructor Course, candidates are bound by all Aerosim Flight Academy employee policies. Operation Department Management staff are responsible for monitoring and counseling uniformed personnel when their uniform appearance does not meet the standards of professionalism expected from an Aerosim Flight Academy flight crewmember.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Personal Appearance General Jewelry will be worn sparingly and must complement the uniform. Tie pins may not be worn with the exception of Aerosim Flight Academy, AOPA, Wings program and appropriate aviation linked pins. Controversial tie pins are prohibited. Flight crews will not wear any other additional insignia on their uniform. Necklaces will not be worn outside the uniform shirt. A maximum of three rings, two on any one hand, are permissible. A wedding set (engagement ring and wedding band) is considered one ring. Nails and hands must be clean and well manicured. Nails must be neatly trimmed. Good posture will be maintained when wearing the Aerosim Flight Academy uniform in public at all times. Shoes must be clean, shined, in good repair, and showing adequate heel, sole and grip. All visible tattoos will be covered by the appropriate part of the prescribed uniform. Any tattoos that are not able to be covered by a prescribed uniform part will have to be removed. Males Hair shall not extend below the top of the ear or extend below the top of the shirt collar. Hair must not be of excessive bulk. Hairstyles must be compatible with wearing of a headset. Males must be clean-shaven while in uniform. Mustaches must be neat and may not extend beyond the corner of the mouth. No other facial hair is allowed (Beards of any description and Fu Manchu mustaches are prohibited). Sideburns must not be of excessive bulk and may not extend below the middle of the ear. Flight crews will ensure that they are clean-shaven at all times when wearing their Company uniform (for some personnel this may mean shaving more than the minimum of once per day). A crew neck or a V-neck white T-shirt / undershirt with short sleeves should be worn under the short sleeved white or blue uniform shirt, as appropriate. Earrings and visible body piercing, including tongue rings, are prohibited.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Females Cosmetics must complement skin tone and the uniform. Hair must be worn in a neat and conservative manner. Hairstyles must not interfere with vision during flight duty and must be compatible with wearing of a headset. Hair longer than the top of the shirt collar must either be styled up, or be securely controlled at the nape of the neck. Hair restraints, if worn, may not be visible. Hairpins, bobby pins and rubber / elastic bands are acceptable. Hairnets are not acceptable. Combs and barrettes must be dark colored. A crew neck or a V-neck white T-shirt / undershirt with short sleeves should be worn under the short sleeved white or blue uniform shirt, as appropriate. Earrings may be worn, but only one per ear, and may not exceed the size of the ear lobe. Gold or color coordinated stud earrings are acceptable. Any form of loop or dangling style earring is strictly prohibited. Visible body piercing, including tongue rings, is also prohibited.

Uniform Parts Belts - The belt will be plain, solid black leather with a gold or silver buckle of conservative size and design. Military-style black web belts with a gold or silver slide buckle are also permitted. Epaulets - The appropriate type and rank of epaulets will be securely fastened to the epaulet flap of the shirt and will be worn wide side out. Black and silver epaulets will be worn by employees and blue and light blue epaulets will be worn by Pilots-In-Training. The epaulet should sit as close to the flap joint as possible at all times. (See the Epaulet Types And Designations section of this manual). Footwear - The footwear will be black and properly shined. Shoes must be plain toed with no tassels, or high lift heels. Wing tip models, loafers, Wellington or low heel boots are acceptable. Womens shoes must be appropriate for wear with the uniform (wedge heels 1 inch or less) and present a professional image.

NOTE Athletic-type shoes, western style boots (e.g.: pointed toe, high heel), pointed toe shoes and boots with a suede finish and boots or shoes with large buckles are prohibited.

Gloves - When necessary, black gloves only may be worn as part of the uniform. Gloves do not need to be black for preflight inspections.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Identification Badges - Flight crewmembers will wear the appropriate identification badge(s) at all times. The identification badge(s) will be attached to an approved Aerosim Flight Academy lanyard worn around the neck. Jackets - During cold weather a black jacket for employees, and a blue jacket for Pilots-InTraining may be worn. These jackets must be Company approved.

NOTE Any time jackets are worn, flight crewmembers must ensure that their Identification Badges are worn on the outer most garment, on the upper portion of the torso and are clearly visible.

Mufflers or Scarves - During cold weather black mufflers or scarves for employees, and blue mufflers or scarves for Pilots-In-Training may be worn. These mufflers or scarves must be of an appropriate style, and be appropriate for the uniform. Name Tags - Aerosim Flight Academy nametags will be worn pinned to the center of the right-breast pocket flap. Black name tags with white writing will be worn by employees. Shirts - The shirt will be white for employees and light blue for Pilots-In-Training. The shirt will be short sleeved, and be of sufficient size to allow the top button of the shirt to be buttoned while wearing a tie. The shirts must be of an appropriate company style, purchased from the Aerosim Flight Academy Pilot Store. Shirts other than these Company approved styles are prohibited.

NOTE The shirts must not look yellowed or worn. Flight crews will ensure that the shirts are washed daily and are kept clean.

Socks - Socks must be plain, solid black. Females may wear black colored hose. Sunglasses - Conservatively styled sunglasses may be worn when conditions require. However they may not be worn inside any Aerosim Flight Academy building.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Sweaters - During cold weather a black V-neck sweater for employees, and a blue V-neck sweater for Pilots-In-Training may be worn. These sweaters must be of an appropriate company style, purchased from the Aerosim Flight Academy Pilot Store. Sweaters other than these Company approved styles are prohibited.

NOTE Any time sweaters are worn, flight crewmembers must ensure that their Identification Badges are worn on the outer most garment, on the upper portion of the torso and are clearly visible.

Ties - The tie will be black for employees, and dark blue for Pilots-In-Training. The ties must be of an appropriate company style, purchased from the Aerosim Flight Academy Pilot Store. Ties other than these Company approved styles are prohibited. The tie will be worn at all times when appearing in public and must be clean and in good condition. The shirt collar must be buttoned and the tie appropriately placed. The tie length will be such that the bottom of the tie touches the belt (+/- 2 inches). Trousers - The trousers will be black for employees and dark blue for Pilots-In-Training. The trousers must be of an appropriate company style, purchased from the Aerosim Flight Academy Pilot Store. Trousers other than these Company approved styles are prohibited. Wings - Aerosim Flight Academy issued metal wings will be worn on the shirt by all employees and Pilots-In-Training, with the insignias center over the center of the left-breast pocket, and the wings centered 1/4 - 1/2 inch above the top of the left shirt pocket.

NOTE Pilots-In-Training may only wear wings once they have completed the appropriate courses of training.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Epaulet Types And Designations Employee Epaulet Types Employee epaulets are black with silver bars. They are broken down into two different categories as follows: Four Bars - An employee wearing epaulets with four bars may be designated as one of the following positions within the Company: Chief Flight Instructor, Assistant Chief Flight Instructor, Check Instructor, and any Company pilot designated with management duties Three Bars - An employee wearing epaulets with three bars is designated as the following position within the Company: Flight Instructor

Pilot-In-Training Epaulet Types Pilot-In-Training epaulets are dark blue with light blue bars. They should be obtained prior to the commencement of training in any program, and are broken down into four different categories as follows: Three Bars - A Pilot-In-Training wearing epaulets with three bars must hold a Commercial Pilot license. Two Bars - A Pilot-In-Training wearing epaulets with two bars must hold an Instrument rating. One Bar - A Pilot-In-Training wearing epaulets with one bar must hold a Private Pilot License. No Bars - A Pilot-In-Training wearing epaulets without bars must hold a Student Pilot certificate.

Lost, Missing, Or Stolen Items


Aerosim Flight Academy is not responsible for any Academy employee or students lost, missing, or stolen personal or training related items. Each Academy employee is responsible for maintaining the security of his/her possessions while employed by the Academy.

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Lost & Found


Lost & found items are to be turned in to Flight Dispatch. If a person has lost or misplaced an item, notify Flight Dispatch of the lost or misplaced item to determine if the item may have been turned in, or to alert them of the lost item.

Identification Badges
For security purposes, Identification (ID) Badges, once issued by the Academy, must be worn at all times while on any campus property. In addition, no flight training equipment will be dispensed by Flight Dispatch without presenting the ID badge. Should a student lose, misplace, or have stolen an ID badge, that person should immediately report this situation to any of the following: Operations Department Management, Student Services, Admissions, or Human Resources. A new ID badge will be required to be issued. A charge will be assessed to replace a previously issued ID badge. Upon separation from the Academy the ID badge must be surrendered to the Academy. Visitor badges issued by the Academy do not allow unescorted access to the flight line or ramp. Should any Academy employee lose an ID badge, they should report immediately to the Human Resources Department for the issuance of a replacement.

Fitness/Readiness
All pilots are reminded of the importance of reporting fit and ready for work or training. The regulations require holders of medical certificates to continually maintain their physical/mental condition so as to meet the requirements of the medical they hold. Demands outside of Aerosim Flight Academy, such as business interests, commuting, and family concerns can reduce fitness and readiness to complete a flight or training evolution commitment to the Academy. Pilots are obligated to come to work or training properly rested in order to complete their duties in a safe and competent manner. Remember, flight crews should expect the unexpected and make allowances as necessary. Report for work or training well rested, allowing for the possibility of a long duty day. It is the pilots individual responsibility to ensure he receives a proper rest period prior to any flight assignment.

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Mailboxes
Pilot mailboxes are to be utilized primarily for the distribution of material related to Company operations and administration. However, the boxes may be used by pilots for personal correspondence such as: cards, notes, etc. The use of Company mailboxes for the distribution of solicitations is strictly prohibited.

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Chapter 14 Safety Procedures & Practices Table of Contents


INTRODUCTION ....................................................................................................................................................... 3 WEATHER MINIMUMS FOR DUAL AND SOLO FLIGHTS ............................................................................. 3 CIRCLING APPROACHES ............................................................................................................................................ 4 WIND RESTRICTIONS ................................................................................................................................................ 5 MAXIMUM DEMONSTRATED CROSSWIND COMPONENTS .......................................................................................... 5 MAXIMUM SURFACE WINDS (INCLUDING GUSTS) ..................................................................................................... 5 ADDITIONAL WIND RESTRICTIONS FOR SOLO OPERATIONS ...................................................................................... 5 OTHER WEATHER RESTRICTIONS ............................................................................................................................. 5 PROCEDURES FOR STARTING AND TAXIING AIRCRAFT ON THE RAMP ............................................. 6 STARTING ................................................................................................................................................................. 6 TAXIING .................................................................................................................................................................... 7 FIRE PRECAUTIONS AND PROCEDURES.......................................................................................................... 7 RE-DISPATCH PROCEDURES ............................................................................................................................... 7 AIRCRAFT DISCREPANCIES ................................................................................................................................ 8 MAINTENANCE RECORD ........................................................................................................................................... 9 SECURING AIRCRAFT WHEN NOT IN USE ..................................................................................................... 10 FUELING PROCEDURES & RESERVES ............................................................................................................ 11 FUELING PROCEDURES............................................................................................................................................ 11 FUEL RESERVES ...................................................................................................................................................... 12 AVOIDANCE OF OTHER AIRCRAFT................................................................................................................. 13 MINIMUM ALTITUDE LIMITATIONS ............................................................................................................... 14 PRACTICE AREA COMMUNICATIONS ............................................................................................................ 16 PRACTICE AREA DESCRIPTIONS ..................................................................................................................... 16

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Introduction
The purpose of Aerosim Flight Academy's Safety Procedures and Practices is to provide guidance for pilots during flight operations at the Academy and to ensure that safety is the number one priority. The following Safety Procedures and Practices pertain to the operation of all aircraft used by Aerosim Flight Academy pilots in the conduct of flight operations.

Weather Minimums for Dual and Solo Flights


Pilots are reminded of the need to remain within the privileges of their certificate and rating or limitations. The ceiling and visibility minimums for any flight are as follows: CONDITIONS VFR DAY DUAL Pattern Operations Local (Within 25 NM) Cross Country Upset Recovery Training VFR DAY SOLO PRE-PRIVATE Pattern Operations Local (Within 25 NM) Cross Country PRIVATE OR HIGHER Pattern Operations Local (Within 25 NM) Cross Country 1500 ft. 2000 ft. 2500 ft. 3 Miles 4 Miles 5 Miles 1500 ft. 2000 ft. 2500 ft. 5 Miles 5 Miles 7 Miles 1500 ft. 2000 ft. 2000 ft. 5000 ft. * 3 Miles 3 Miles 3 Miles 5 Miles CEILING (Ft AGL) VISIBILITY (SM)

* Ceilings must allow for recovery to be made no lower than 3000 feet AGL

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OPERATIONS MANUAL CONDITIONS VFR NIGHT DUAL Pattern Operations Local (Within 25 NM) Cross Country VFR NIGHT SOLO PRE-PRIVATE PRIVATE OR HIGHER Pattern Operations Local (Within 25 NM) Cross Country 1500 ft. 2000 ft. 2500 ft. 4 Miles 5 Miles 7 Miles Not Authorized to Fly SOLO at Night 1500 ft. 2000 ft. 2500 ft. 3 Miles 4 Miles 5 Miles CEILING (Ft AGL) VISIBILITY (SM)

IFR DAY DUAL

Ceiling and visibility (both reported and forecast) must be sufficient for completing an instrument or visual approach at the departure airport. The minimums at takeoff shall be the lowest minimums on the best operating approach for the current weather conditions. A legal destination alternate must be available within a onehour flight from the departure airport. 500 ft. 500 ft. 1000 ft. 1 Mile 1 Mile 2 Miles

IFR DAY SOLO IFR NIGHT DUAL IFR NIGHT SOLO

NOTE Any deviation from the published Weather Minimums must have approval from the Director of Flight Operations or their designee.

Circling Approaches Circling approaches at night are not authorized when weather conditions are below 1000' ceiling and/or 3 miles visibility. During day operations circling approaches may be conducted to the published minimums.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Wind Restrictions The maximum crosswind component for operation of any Aerosim Flight Academy aircraft will be the manufacturers maximum demonstrated crosswind component. Maximum Demonstrated Crosswind Components Cessna 172 PA-28R-201 PA 44-180 Cirrus SR-20 15 knots 17 knots 17 knots 21 knots

Maximum Surface Winds (including gusts)

Cessna 172 PA-28R-201 PA 44-180 Cirrus SR-20

30 knots 30 knots 35 knots 35 knots

Additional Wind Restrictions for Solo Operations All Pre-Private student pilots must have appropriate wind restrictions entered in their logbooks. The maximum entry for surface winds will be 20 knots and the maximum crosswind component will be 10 knots. The maximum gust factor allowed will be 10 knots. All Private or higher solo operations are restricted to a maximum surface wind of 20 knots and a maximum crosswind component of 10 knots. The maximum gust factor allowed will be 10 knots, or have a logbook entry from an appropriate flight instructor indicating higher limits are approved.

Other Weather Restrictions No flights shall be flown through areas of reported severe turbulence. Dual or solo flights in areas of forecast severe turbulence require prior approval of the Chief Flight Instructor or their designee. No flights shall be flown through an area of known icing. When an AIRMET has been issued for icing that covers any portion of the route and/or altitude of the flight, prior approval of the Chief Flight Instructor or their designee is required. No flights shall be flown in the area of a Convective SIGMET without the approval of the Chief Flight Instructor or their designee. All thunderstorms must be avoided by a margin consistent with safety. All severe thunderstorms should be avoided by at least 20 nautical miles.

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Procedures For Starting And Taxiing Aircraft On The Ramp


Starting

All Aerosim Flight Academy aircraft shall be started in accordance with the procedures established by the Academy, and the manufacturer's Pilot's Operating Handbook (POH) or Approved Airplane Flight Manual (AFM). No person may operate a civil aircraft unless it is in an airworthy condition. The pilot in command of a civil aircraft is responsible for determining whether that aircraft is in condition for safe flight. Pre-flight actions must be performed in accordance with 14 CFR 91.7 (a) and (b). All pilots must be aware of their legal responsibilities with regard to pre-flight actions. All pilots are to be in possession of and be conversant with the checklists for the type of aircraft to be flown. Before the aircraft is started, it must be positioned safely and in such a manner that the propwash is away from hangers, windows, etc. and that the aircraft can be safely and adequately maneuvered. Prior to starting any engine, pilots are to ensure a good lookout is made to ensure that no person is in close proximity to the aircraft. Just prior to engine start callout "CLEAR" or "CLEAR PROP" and wait momentarily, checking the immediate vicinity of the airplane, before engaging the starter. Avoid over-priming the engine before starting as this may cause an induction system fire on starting. Aircraft engines shall not be started when the aircraft is inside a hangar or when the slipstream will be directed through open hangar doors.

WARNING Pilots shall not start engines by hand propping the propeller.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Taxiing The primary requirement of safe taxiing is positive control, which is defined as: The ability to stop or turn the aircraft where and when desired. The taxiing speed should be such that when the throttle is closed, the airplane may be stopped promptly. While taxiing, clearance from all obstructions and other aircraft must be ensured. In addition, when taxiing the aircraft controls must be positioned relative to the wind direction in accordance with the manufacturer's Pilot Operating Handbook (POH) or Approved Airplane Flight Manual (AFM). All taxing shall be at a sensible speed and pilots are reminded to consider the possibility of brake failure at any stage. Particular care should be exercised to avoid unnecessary damage to aircraft components by confining taxiing to the approved portions of the maneuvering area. Pilots are responsible to use their judgment to avoid unmarked hazards or rough areas.

Fire Precautions And Procedures


Smoking is not permitted on the ramp, or within 50 feet of any aircraft parked or in motion on the ramp. In addition, no smoking is permitted within any aircraft owned or operated by Aerosim Flight Academy. During cold weather operations, the manufacturer's cold start starting procedure must be used while starting an Aerosim Flight Academy aircraft. In addition, if an aircraft and/or engine fire is suspected the aircraft manufacturer's procedure must be used. Fire extinguishers are located on the ramp, on all fuel trucks, along the fence and in the Maintenance Hangar(s). If needed, First Aid Kits are located inside the Operations Center and Maintenance Hangar(s).

Re-dispatch Procedures
For re-dispatch, or to report any incident, contact the appropriate Flight Dispatch by telephone, collect if necessary. Due to unforecasted conditions, or other in-flight considerations, it may be necessary to land at an airport other than originally planned and approved prior to the original departure. If this should occur, contact Flight Dispatch after landing to advise of aircraft location and situation. Upon review and evaluation of the situation, the Flight Dispatcher or Flight Supervisor may re-dispatch the flight, as appropriate. Should a landing occur at an off-airport site, secure the aircraft to prevent fire or damage, then contact Flight Dispatch as soon as practical to advise the Flight Dispatcher or Flight Supervisor of the situation and to receive further instructions. 09/01/10 (ISSUE) SAFETY PROCEDURES & PRACTICES 14-7

OPERATIONS MANUAL

Aircraft Discrepancies
All Aerosim Flight Academy aircraft maintenance discrepancies must be entered in a Maintenance Record. This Record is located within the aircraft "can" that will be issued when the aircraft is dispatched. Each sheet of the Maintenance Discrepancy Log is divided into two main parts: Left Side - used by the pilot to enter a discrepancy. Right Side - used by Maintenance personnel to state "corrective action" taken to clear the discrepancy. If the flight crew discovers a discrepancy during the preflight of an aircraft, return the "can" to Flight Dispatch and complete the Maintenance Record. Minor aircraft maintenance discrepancies may be corrected on the ramp with the assistance of the Maintenance personnel. If the discrepancy does not affect the airworthiness of the aircraft, Flight Dispatch will be responsible for consulting with the Maintenance Department to determine if the flight can continue under a deferred status and be returned to service. If a repair is deferred, the Maintenance Department will enter the appropriate notation in the Record. If a discrepancy occurs away from base, contact Flight Dispatch, collect if necessary, who will forward the call to the Maintenance Department to determine the status of the discrepancy. If Maintenance and the flight crew agree to defer the discrepancy, complete the appropriate Record (deferred), and continue the flight as planned or return the aircraft to base, as appropriate. Under no circumstances may a flight be initiated when an OPEN discrepancy exists in the Maintenance Record. The flight crew should ensure that any placards indicating inoperative equipment have been properly secured.

NOTE The Pilot-In-Command is responsible for the safety of the flight and is the final authority as to that flight. When the aircraft "can" is returned to Flight Dispatch, ensure that the Maintenance Record is clearly visible as the top document on the "can" and advise the Flight Dispatcher.

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SAFETY PROCEDURES & PRACTICES

(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL Maintenance Record

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SAFETY PROCEDURES & PRACTICES

14-9

OPERATIONS MANUAL

Securing Aircraft When Not In Use


It is the responsibility of the Pilot-In-Command to ensure that the aircraft is properly secured at the completion of each flight. After shutdown, attach the tie down ropes. Tighten the ropes using a double wind knot as shown below, so as to firmly secure the aircraft without overstressing it. Use a second double wind knot to secure the free end of the rope. When making a final check of the cockpit, ensure that the parking brake is released, ignition or magneto switches are in the OFF position, and that all trash has been removed. Ensure all doors are locked, windows, and vents are closed (and locked if appropriate) to prevent water damage from rain. NOTE Aerosim Flight Academy aircraft must be secured before being left unattended for any reason.

Wind knots = Rolling hitch

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(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL

Fueling Procedures & Reserves


Fueling Procedures It is the responsibility of the Pilot-In-Command to ensure that the airplane has an adequate supply of fuel before beginning any flight activity. Fuel must be measured using a dipstick or by using the manufacturers tabs. DO NOT rely on the aircraft fuel gauges. The aircraft fuel requirements are to be determined by the oncoming flight crew. Multi-engine aircraft will be re-fueled to operational requirements. A pilot must remain in attendance to ensure the correct type of fuel and the correct quantities are loaded during refueling operations away from base. Pilots must check for fuel contamination after refueling. All persons must vacate the aircraft during re-fueling. Attached to the airplane's tie down rope is a "flag". The flag can be moved up and down the rope. If the airplane has been re-fueled, the flag will be moved to the top of the rope by the fueler. After completion of the flight, to indicate that the airplane requires fuel, the Pilot-In-Command must ensure the flag is at the bottom of the rope. Before beginning the fueling operation of the airplane, the fueler must ensure that the master switch and magnetos are in the OFF position. The above procedure in no way relieves the Pilot-In-Command to ensure that the airplane has an adequate supply of fuel before beginning any flight activity.

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14-11

OPERATIONS MANUAL Fuel Reserves Fuel requirements for VFR conditions: No flight crew may begin a day or night flight in a Aerosim Flight Academy aircraft under VFR unless (considering wind and forecast weather conditions) there is enough fuel to fly to the first point of intended landing, and assuming normal cruising speed: to fly after that for at least 1 hour.

Fuel requirements for IFR conditions: Except as provided below (*), no flight crew may operate a Aerosim Flight Academy aircraft in IFR conditions unless it carries enough fuel (considering current weather reports, forecasts, and actual weather conditions) to: complete the flight to the first airport of intended landing. fly from that airport to the alternate airport; and fly after that for 1 hour at normal cruising speed.

* The above does not apply if: 1. 14 CFR Part 97 prescribes a standard instrument approach procedure for the first airport of intended landing; and, 2. for at least 1 hour before and 1 hour after the estimated time of arrival at the airport, the weather report or forecasts or any combination of them indicate: (i) (ii) The ceiling will be at least 2000 feet above the airport elevation; and Visibility will be at least 3 miles.

CAUTION For cross-country flights, planned aircraft HOBBS time between refueling shall not exceed 3.0 hours for any aircraft model except with prior approval from the Director of Flight Operations or their designee.

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(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL

Avoidance Of Other Aircraft


All flight crews shall maintain a continuous, vigilant watch for other traffic as the primary means of collision avoidance when flying in visual meteorological conditions (VMC). Flight crew should consider the following:

Keep attention outside the aircraft as much as possible. Be alert for distractions that may draw attention away from outside visual scanning. When flying with passengers they should be encouraged to assist with collision avoidance. Visually scan from as far behind as reasonable, sweeping in 10increments, for a time period of one second, around the front of the aircraft to as far behind as reasonable on the other side. Be aware of potential blind spots inherent to the type of aircraft flown. Make no turns without first scanning the area that may be blocked out by either wing. Make gentle turns left and right as necessary when climbing or descending to help see past the aircraft engine cowling. Be prepared to react appropriately to avoid a collision hazard by remaining in a normal flying position with hands and feet on the proper controls. Be especially alert for any aircraft in flight that appears on the horizon to be growing in size and remaining in the same relative position in the windshield. This aircraft is on a collision course. Take prompt action to avoid any possible traffic conflicts. Observe right-of-way regulations, but do not create a collision hazard by insisting on right-of-way. The anti-collision light(s) (strobe and/or beacon) must be ON during operations on the runway and in-flight. Landing lights must also be ON during takeoff and landing operations and in the vicinity of the landing airport (10nm). In addition, the landing light(s) may be utilized in other flight operations to enhance the "see and avoid" concept. Flight crews should be especially alert to the hazards of wake turbulence while conducting operations near larger aircraft. Pilots should note the rotation or touchdown point of the preceding aircraft. This will help the crew to visualize the wake location and thereby take appropriate avoidance precautions. Flight crews should be familiar with all obstruction locations in the local area, as well as any along the particular route of flight. Pilots are reminded to use the appropriate recommended traffic pattern entry procedures.

Statistics have shown that a high proportion of mid air collisions have occurred in good VMC close to or in the airport traffic pattern. Therefore, pilots are reminded to be especially vigilant for departing and pattern traffic, as well as other arriving traffic. In addition, pilots are to make appropriate radio calls regarding their position including arrival at Visual Reference Points, joining the pattern, downwind entry, turning final, or as directed by ATC.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL

Minimum Altitude Limitations


The minimum altitudes to be flown for all normal operations at Aerosim Flight Academy are in accordance with 14 CFR 91.119 (a through c), except as noted (*). However, if at any time, for any reason, the aircraft is forced to fly outside of this regulation, a written report MUST BE MADE IMMEDIATELY upon landing. This report shall be in accordance with Aerosim Flight Academy internal procedures and the NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System. Except when necessary for takeoff or landing, no person may operate an aircraft below the following altitudes: Anywhere: An altitude allowing, if a power unit fails, an emergency landing without undue hazard to persons or property on the surface.

Over congested areas: Over any congested area of a city, town, or settlement, or over any open air assembly of persons, an altitude of 1,000 feet above the highest obstacle within a horizontal radius of 2,000 feet of the aircraft.

Over other than congested areas: * An altitude of 500 feet above the surface.

Simulated emergency approach and landing operations may be conducted only during dual flight instructional periods. In addition, they must be performed in accordance with the appropriate Aerosim Flight Academy Flight Standards Manual. During simulated forced landings at locations other than an approved public-use airport, go around action must be taken before 500 feet AGL. Care must be taken to avoid populated areas. Other than in an emergency, no turns are to be made below 400 feet AGL after takeoff. Turns after takeoff are limited to a maximum of 30 degrees angle of bank, unless exceptional circumstances regarding safety of flight occur. For training, spins must be done with an instructor on board, with the provision that the maneuver is recovered by a minimum altitude of 3000 feet AGL. Additionally, for stall training, flight crews must select an altitude which allows recovery no lower than the recommended altitude in the airplanes respected flight standards manual. Additional limitations are imposed for multi-engine aircraft operations. Consult the appropriate Flight Standards Manual, Pilots Operating Handbook/Airplane Flight Manual, or Practical Test Standards.

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(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL The minimum planned altitude for VFR navigation shall ensure compliance with 14 CFR 91.119 & 91.159. Pilots are also to consider controlled airspace and special use airspace in their planning. Pilots are reminded of the need to increase minimum safe altitudes for night flights. For IFR flights, pilots are reminded of the need to comply with 14 CFR 91.177 & 91.179. It is essential that all flight crews are aware of the correct method for calculating minimum altitudes for their flight.

US Definitions: Minimum En Route IFR Altitude (MEA) The lowest published altitude between radio fixes that meets obstacle clearance requirements between those fixes and in many countries assures acceptable navigational signal coverage. The MEA applies to the entire width of the airway, segment, or route between the radio fixes defining the airway, segment, or route. Minimum Obstruction Clearance Altitude (MOCA) The lowest published altitude in effect between radio fixes on VOR airways, off-airway routes, or route segments which meets obstacle clearance requirements for the entire route segment and in the US assures acceptable navigational signal coverage only within 22 nautical miles of a VOR. Minimum Off-Route Altitude (MORA) This is an altitude derived by Jeppesen. The MORA provides known obstruction clearance within 10 nautical miles of the route centerline. Minimum Safe Altitude (MSA) Altitude depicted on an instrument approach chart and identified as the minimum safe altitude, which provides a 1000-foot obstacle clearance within 25 nautical mile radius from the navigational facility upon which the MSA is predicated. If the radius limit is other than 25 nautical miles, it is stated. This altitude is for EMERGENCY USE ONLY and does not necessarily guarantee NAVAID reception. When the MSA is divided into sectors, with each sector a different altitude, the altitude in these sectors are referred to as minimum sector altitudes.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL

Practice Area Communications


All Aerosim Flight Academy flight crews operating in the designated practice areas shall report their position to other aircraft when entering, when their position has changed sufficiently during maneuvers that they are no longer in the area initially announced, and when leaving the practice areas. The communication frequency to be used can be found in the appropriate base supplement. Position reports must state the practice area that the aircraft will be operating in, the aircraft tail number / call sign, aircraft type, the aircrafts position relative to the established reporting points, altitude, and general type of operation being conducted while in the practice area. Reports must indicate the aircrafts position in cardinal directions (north, southeast, west, etc.) relative to the established reporting points. A distance in nautical miles, from the reporting point, must also be provided in the report. Altitude reports must include the operating altitude, or if climbing and descending, the altitudes between which the flight will operate. The general type of operation must be indicated such as general flight maneuvers, ground reference maneuvers, returning to base, etc. Aircraft within Class B, C or D airspace or under the control of Approach Control are not expected to provide position reports, or monitor the frequency.

Practice Area Descriptions


Practice area descriptions as required by 14 CFR 141.93 are located in the Master Base Supplement included in Chapter 18, Base Supplements of this Operations Manual.

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(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL

Chapter 15 Student Information


Table Of Contents
CHAPTER 15 STUDENT INFORMATION ......................................................................................................... 1 LEARNING RESOURCE CENTER (LRC) ............................................................................................................. 3 STUDENTS WORKING WHILE ENROLLED ...................................................................................................... 3 NO-SHOW ................................................................................................................................................................... 3 PERSONAL TIME OFF (PTO) ................................................................................................................................. 4 REQUESTING PERSONAL TIME OFF (PTO) ...................................................................................................... 4 COURSE COMPLETION BREAKS (CCB) ............................................................................................................ 4 STUDENT INACTIVITY ........................................................................................................................................... 5 STUDENT ILLNESS .................................................................................................................................................. 5 SUFFICIENT FUNDS FOR TRAINING .................................................................................................................. 6 APPLICATION PROCEDURES FOR FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR EMPLOYMENT ........................................... 6 ELIGIBILITY ........................................................................................................................................................... 7 PHASE I INSTRUCTOR CANDIDATE SELECTION REVIEW BOARD .............................................................................. 7 PHASE II INSTRUCTOR CANDIDATE STANDARDIZATION CLASS ............................................................................... 7 STUDENT PROGRESS REVIEW FORM ............................................................................................................... 8 DISCIPLINARY PROBATION ............................................................................................................................... 8 ENSURING SUCCESS ............................................................................................................................................ 8 TRAINING GUIDANCE ......................................................................................................................................... 9 ACADEMIC ATTENDANCE .................................................................................................................................... 9 ACADEMICS ............................................................................................................................................................... 9 FLIGHT .................................................................................................................................................................... 10 BRIEFING PRE/POST FLIGHT ............................................................................................................................ 10 DAILY SCHEDULES ............................................................................................................................................ 11 GROUND SCHOOL CLASS HOURS ................................................................................................................... 11 SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS ........................................................................................................ 12 ACADEMICS ............................................................................................................................................................. 12 FIRST UNSATISFACTORY ACADEMIC EXAM ............................................................................................................ 12 SECOND UNSATISFACTORY ACADEMIC EXAM ........................................................................................................ 13 THIRD UNSATISFACTORY ACADEMIC EXAM ........................................................................................................... 13 FLIGHT ..................................................................................................................................................................... 14 FIRST UNSATISFACTORY ORAL STAGE CHECK ........................................................................................................ 14 SECOND UNSATISFACTORY ORAL STAGE CHECK .................................................................................................... 14 THIRD UNSATISFACTORY ORAL STAGE CHECK ....................................................................................................... 14 FIRST UNSATISFACTORY FLIGHT STAGE CHECK ..................................................................................................... 14 SECOND UNSATISFACTORY FLIGHT STAGE CHECK ................................................................................................. 14 THIRD UNSATISFACTORY FLIGHT STAGE CHECK .................................................................................................... 14 FAA KNOWLEDGE TEST ...................................................................................................................................... 15

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UNSATISFACTORY FAA KNOWLEDGE TEST ................................................................................................15 UNSATISFACTORY FAA PRACTICAL TEST ...................................................................................................16 FIRST DISAPPROVAL ................................................................................................................................................16 SECOND DISAPPROVAL ............................................................................................................................................16 UNSATISFACTORY FLIGHT LESSONS ............................................................................................................16 STUDENT TRAINING RECORDS .........................................................................................................................16 AFTER DUAL FLIGHTS .............................................................................................................................................16 AFTER SOLO FLIGHTS ..............................................................................................................................................16 BOTH DUAL AND SOLO FLIGHTS .............................................................................................................................17 COMPLETION OF DUAL AND SOLO LESSONS ............................................................................................................17 FAA PRACTICAL TESTS/ACR CERTIFICATION ............................................................................................18 STAGE CHECK CROSS-COUNTRY ROUTES ...................................................................................................19 CANCELLING PRACTICAL TESTS/STAGE CHECKS DUE TO WEATHER ..............................................19 FLIGHT LESSON CANCELLATIONS DUE TO WEATHER............................................................................19 AVIATION SAFETY ACTION PROGRAM (ASAP) ...........................................................................................21 STUDENT PROGRESS MONITORING COUNCIL ............................................................................................22 CANCELLATION POLICY ....................................................................................................................................22 WITHDRAWAL ........................................................................................................................................................22 REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION...............................................................................................................22 GRADUATION PROCESS ....................................................................................................................................23 STUDENT COMPLAINT POLICY ........................................................................................................................23 STUDENT COMPLAINT/GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE .....................................................................................24 PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE ..................................................................................................................................24

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OPERATIONS MANUAL

LEARNING RESOURCE CENTER (LRC)


The Learning Resource Center (LRC) is located in the Academics Building at the Sanford, Florida campus. The Houston campus LRC is located beside the dispatch desk. The LRC is open every day of the school week and a certificated Flight Instructor is available. It is designed for individual and group studying, student tutoring, and viewing of DVD training materials. Additional resources such as books, magazines, and aircraft parts are available. Smoking, eating, cellular phones, and idle conversation are prohibited. However, speaking in a low voice is permitted as long as it is directly related to aviation academic subjects. Students in training to become Flight Instructors are required to tutor other students as part of their CFI course. This tutoring will take place in the LRC. Flight Instructor candidates should use this time to increase their own knowledge by using all available resources as they are tutoring other students. Students who utilize these tutors should understand that none of the tutors are certificated as Flight Instructors. In addition, students are reminded that there is a certificated Academy Flight Instructor on duty during the times that tutoring is taking place.

STUDENTS WORKING WHILE ENROLLED


Aerosim Flight Academy considers its students to be full-time students, available for training according to the terms and conditions set forth in the Academys enrollment agreement. Students must be available for training at flexible and variable times. Therefore, the Academy strongly discourages students from working while enrolled.

NO-SHOW
A No-Show charge(s) will be assessed at the contracted rate multiplied by the scheduled block hour(s). A $65.00 charge will be assessed for a scheduled FAA Knowledge Test and a $400.00 charge for a scheduled FAA Practical Test, when one of the following occurs: -If a student fails to attend any of the scheduled events listed above. -If it is determined that a student is unprepared for any of the scheduled events listed above by a representative of the Academy. -If a student arrives in advance of the scheduled training activity, but fails to be available to begin the training activity on time.

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PERSONAL TIME OFF (PTO)


Student requests for Personal Time Off (PTO) are limited to a maximum of 30 days while enrolled. Any variation will need to be approved by the Manager of Education. Due to the course work required for graduation, Personal Time Off is discouraged. Personal Time Off requests must be put in writing by the student then turned into the Chief or Assistant Chief Flight Instructor 2 days prior to the departure date for approval. The Manager of Education and/or his/her designee must approve exceptions to the policy. The student will not be charged any additional charges during the approved Personal Time Off. If the student does not return following the personal time off period, or notify the Academy, within 5 days, the student will be dismissed and the Academy will apply the refund policy published in this catalog. REQUESTING PERSONAL TIME OFF (PTO) For continuity and proficiency, Aerosim Flight Academy strongly discourages students from taking Personal Time Off. Taking PTO will increase the length of time required to complete a course, and may increase the total cost of the training course. However, the Academy recognizes that there may be circumstances where students would need to request PTO. Therefore, students should use the following process when requesting PTO: -Complete the PTO form and meet with the group Manager. -The Manager must sign and approve the PTO prior to the students departure. -If the student does not return from PTO for a scheduled activity, he/she will be charged the appropriate No-Show fee. -If the student does not return from PTO, and does not notify the Academy within 5 days, he/she will be dismissed and the Academy will apply the refund policy published in this catalog. COURSE COMPLETION BREAKS (CCB) There will be a break at the completion of each course of training. The length of this break will vary depending upon the start date of the next ground school (the student will automatically be enrolled into the next ground school). If the student does not attend the next available ground school, this break will be considered PTO. Students must complete the appropriate information on the PTO form. The student must check the Course Completion Break block and indicate the name of the next available ground school and the date he/she will be attending.

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(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL

STUDENT INACTIVITY
Any student who is not on an approved PTO and has not received prior approval for absence will be considered inactive. Students who are inactive for a maximum of 14 consecutive business days will be dismissed and the Academy will apply the refund policy published in this catalog.

STUDENT ILLNESS
Student illness days will be deducted from the 30 days of allowed PTO. If a student becomes ill or has a medical issue, he/she is responsible for providing the Academy with appropriate documentation. If a student becomes ill, it is the students responsibility to do the following: -In order to avoid being charged a No-Show fee, the student must call Flight Dispatch two (2) hours prior to any scheduled activity. If Flight Dispatch is closed, a message must be left on the Flight Dispatch voicemail at least two (2) hours prior to any scheduled activity. Special rules apply to canceling an FAA Practical Test. Please see the Cancelling Practical Tests section in this catalog. Flight Dispatch will fill out the termination form. Failure to call Dispatch at least two (2) hours before a scheduled activity block time will result in a No-Show charge. -The student must call his/her Flight Instructor to inform them of the cancellation, discuss the next days schedule, and determine a plan of action to make up the lost training activity(s).

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SUFFICIENT FUNDS FOR TRAINING


As described in the enrollment agreement, students are responsible for maintaining sufficient funds on account for training. Students are also responsible for making themselves available for training on a full-time basis. It is possible to exhaust or nearly exhaust the training funds necessary to complete the total program and/or course. This situation may be caused by such things as PTOs, poor weather, and additional flight training time in excess of the projected time for any course. When a student is financially grounded due to insufficient funds on account, this causes delays in training, a decrease in flight proficiency, and an increase in training time, all resulting in an increase in overall cost. When applicable, students will be notified by the Bursar in writing, via the students Academy email, when their account balance falls to a dollar amount of $2,000 or less. Final notification by the Bursar will be made if a students account balance falls to a dollar amount of $700 or less. The Bursar will advise the student on the amount of funds that are necessary to complete training. Once a students account balance reaches $700 or less, the student is financially grounded and may not be scheduled for any training activities. Students who are financially grounded must see the Bursar to deposit funds into their account in order to return to flight status. Students, who are inactive for 14 business days, due to any reason, including financial grounding, will be dismissed from the Academy.

APPLICATION PROCEDURES FOR FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR EMPLOYMENT


Students that desire employment as an Aerosim Flight Academy Flight Instructor may obtain an employment application from the Human Resources Department. After the successful completion of the Flight Instructor-Instrument Airplane Rating, applicants must submit an application to the Human Resources Department along with the following: -Resume -Copy of U.S. Social Security Card -Copy of Drivers License or I.D. card issued by a State of the U.S. -Copy of current FAA Pilot and CFI Certificates -Copy of current FAA Medical Certificate -Copy of Visa Documentation (IAP-66 or I-20), International applicants only. -A local address and telephone number, or point of contact for at least 30 days after the application is made. 15-6 STUDENT INFORMATION (ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL ELIGIBILITY To be eligible for the selection process, an applicant must have a Commercial Pilot Certificate with Single and Multiengine Land ratings, an Instrument Airplane rating, and a Flight Instructor Certificate with an Airplane Single-Engine & Instrument rating.

Phase I Instructor Candidate Selection Review Board Upon completion of the Certified Flight Instructor, Instrument rating, students will be invited in writing to the Instructor Selection Review Board. The selection process includes a technical knowledge exam, a multi-dimensional aptitude battery exam, and a board-style interview. The Board convenes regularly, and typically reviews four (4) to six (6) candidates at each meeting. This candidate selection process will last an entire business day. After the meeting with the board, a decision will be conveyed in writing and mailed within seven (7) business days from the applicants Review Board date. If the interview is successful, applicants will be offered Flight Instructor employment, and placed in the next available Instructor Candidate Standardization Class. Phase II Instructor Candidate Standardization Class A Flight Instructor Candidate Standardization Class is scheduled to begin on an as-needed basis. The request to attend an Instructor Candidate Standardization Class is a conditional offer of employment as an Academy Flight Instructor. Only one request for attendance will be made. Should an applicant be unable to attend, no additional opportunities to attend a subsequent class will be offered and the applicants name will be removed from the pool of candidates. The Flight Instructor Candidate Standardization Class is a rigorous, demanding, and comprehensive program. The class focuses on the knowledge, understanding, and skills necessary to be a Flight Instructor for the Academy. Upon successful completion of the class, graduates will begin their employment as Flight Instructors immediately. Employment might be offered at any of the Academys training locations. The process for assigning personnel to the bases will be a two-phase process. Firstly, candidates will be called by the Human Resources Department (prior to attending class) and asked to volunteer for deployment at another location other than the one where their initial training was conducted. If no volunteers are found, then selection for base assignments will be done on a seniority in class system. This system works on the basis that those not selected for specific duties (e.g. ground school, LRC, etc.) will be placed in order of seniority based on interview time and date with the most senior person being the one who completed their interview first.

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15-7

OPERATIONS MANUAL The above mentioned system is subject to the demands of the Academy and time permitting will be followed. However, the demands of the bases may mean that base assignments happen while a class is in attendance at which point the seniority in class system will be implemented. The Human Resources Manager may alter this policy if it is deemed in the best interest of the Academy. Changing of a base once assigned may occur only through a one for one exchange of like qualified instructors. This exchange may only occur with the approval of the Human Resources Manager.

STUDENT PROGRESS REVIEW FORM


In order to maintain a safe and orderly training operation, the Student Progress Review Form is used to cite student progress in each course. This form may be used to document students who are excelling or struggling in the course. It may also be used to document students failing to adhere to the policies and/or procedures established and outlined in the Academy Operations Manual and the Academy Catalog. A copy of the Student Progress Review Form will be retained and become part of the permanent student record. DISCIPLINARY PROBATION Students are expected to conduct themselves in a professional manner while attending the Academy. Unprofessional behavior, violations of Academy rules, Federal Aviation Regulations, local, state or federal laws or general misconduct will not be tolerated and can result in the student being placed on Disciplinary Probation and/or dismissed from the Academy. The student will receive written notice via the Student Progress Review Form or a letter from the Manager of Education. Any repetition of this conduct or a single major violation could be grounds for immediate termination. Students who are terminated for unsatisfactory progress or disciplinary reasons must wait a period of one year from the termination date before requesting reinstatement to the Academy. Any exceptions must be approved by the Senior Vice President. ENSURING SUCCESS Students can ensure success by giving the maximum effort in the classroom, flight lesson activities, and by utilizing the Learning Resource Center (LRC). The entire staff and faculty are ready and willing to offer assistance in many ways, but it is the individual student who is responsible for his/her own success. Students must take an active role in their learning. Being an active participant means becoming part of the Academy by going beyond daily classes and flight lessons. Students must listen to Academy announcements, check bulletin boards for upcoming activities, read e-mails, establish daily study times, and ask for help when needed. Students should not hesitate to seek advice or assistance from a Flight Instructor, Academics Instructor, Manager/Captain, or the Chief/Assistant Chief Flight Instructor. The Academy encourages students best efforts and is confident that students will have a memorable experience in the process. 15-8 STUDENT INFORMATION (ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL TRAINING GUIDANCE The Academy maintains a training Manager(s) assigned to each facility to help provide training guidance for students or Flight Instructors with questions and/or problems. In addition, one or more training Captains may be assigned to assist the Manager. Managers and Captains may be found by contacting the Chief Flight Instructor or the Manager of Flight Standards.

ACADEMIC ATTENDANCE
The State of Florida specifically states that taking attendance is not required. This is in accordance with Title IV requirements. However, the State of Texas requires attendance at Post Secondary institutions in order to verify meeting the 90/10 rule. Students enrolled in the full time Professional Pilot Program will attend ground classes for each pilot rating and will participate in flight training activities for each pilot rating until completion as required by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and as described in the FAA approved Training Course Outline (TCO). The objective of the organized class and individual schedules is to assist the student in the completion of each course of training in a manner that both optimizes the learning experience and minimizes the time frame required for completion. Academics Students are expected to attend all scheduled ground classes until completion and must meet the specified amount of Academic hours as outlined in the time allocation table in order to complete a stage/course of ground school training. This minimum is mandated by the FAA approved 14 CFR Part 141 Academy Training Course Outline. Ground classes are typically scheduled 4-6 hours per day, 5 days per week with varying start and ending times. Ground class schedules are posted the two weeks preceding the class events. If the student is absent or tardy for a ground school class, that student will be assigned Academics Make-up time with his/her flight instructor equal to the time absent and will be charged at the current flight instructor hourly rate. Failure to make-up the absence prior to a scheduled ground school exam will result in the student being ineligible for the exam and he/she will be grounded from flight activities until the make-up time is completed and the exam is passed. If the student is absent from a ground school exam, that student will receive a grade of zero for the exam. Additionally, that student will be assigned Ground School Additional Instruction with his/her flight instructor and charged at the current flight instructor hourly rate. The student will be grounded from flight activities until the make-up is completed and the exam is passed. A retake exam fee will be charged based on scheduled exam hours times the current hourly ground school rate.

09/01/10 (ISSUE)

STUDENT INFORMATION

15-9

OPERATIONS MANUAL Make-up exams will be offered once a week at the discretion of the Chief Ground Instructor. Failure to attend a scheduled make-up exam will result in a grade of zero. After a student completes a course of training, he/she is required to attend the next available ground school course. Eligible students who wish to defer starting the next available ground school course must use Personal Time Off days until the next available ground school start date. Students who become eligible for the next course after a ground school has already begun will be placed on a Course Completion Break and must wait until the next available start date to begin class. Students may not drop-in to ground school after a course has already started. Exceptions to this policy will be at the discretion of the Chief Ground Instructor Flight Individual student activities are scheduled daily and can include aircraft, simulator/flight training device (FTD) and/or advanced aviation training device (AATD) and/or individual ground training events. Individual student activities are posted on a daily event schedule published the day preceding the events. Students are expected to be present at the time of the scheduled event and to be fully prepared for the lesson tasks. BRIEFING PRE/POST FLIGHT Pre/Post flight briefing is instruction received from a Flight Instructor prior to and after completing a flight/device lesson. This is not only required by Federal Aviation Regulations (14 CFR Part 141), but it is an important element of the learning process. One of the most essential elements of each flight/device lesson period conducted at the Academy is the time allocated for pre/post flight briefing. It is within this time that students and Flight Instructors are able to discuss the many facets of the lesson conducted. This is fundamentally important in ensuring that important points of training are understood prior to or after completion of the actual flight/device activity. During this time, students will also have the opportunity to discuss lesson performance and to preview the next lesson to be conducted. Because flight briefing is such an essential part of training, each Flight Instructor is to assure that students receive at least the minimum flight briefing time allocated for each flight/device lesson. The minimum time expected will be in accordance with the training syllabus, normally .5 hours, but is occasionally longer. For any flight/device event that repeats or reviews a syllabus lesson, or for any evaluation activity necessary to assist in student progress, flight briefing will be noted on the Flight Invoice as conducted by the student and Flight Instructor (.3 hour minimum). The training programs mandate that students should always be well briefed before and after any lesson activity. Should a student have any questions, concerns, or require any additional information regarding pre/post flight briefings, he/she should contact a training Manager/Captain, Chief or Assistant Chief Flight Instructor, or the Manager of Training.

15-10

STUDENT INFORMATION

(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL DAILY SCHEDULES The students Manager submits the students daily schedule to the Scheduling Department each day. The student will be scheduled for all activities, including flight/device lessons and ground school. The schedule is produced by 5 p.m. daily. It is available in Operations at that time for review. It is the students responsibility to check the schedule daily. Please note that students are encouraged not to call Flight Dispatch for their personal schedule. Flight Dispatch cannot handle the volume of calls requesting information on daily schedules. GROUND SCHOOL CLASS HOURS Classes are scheduled at various times from 7:00 am to 10:00 pm. Monday through Friday. No more than one, ten-minute break will be given during each hour (60 minutes) of classroom instruction.

09/01/10 (ISSUE)

STUDENT INFORMATION

15-11

OPERATIONS MANUAL

SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS


Students must demonstrate through their scholastic records that they are making satisfactory academic and attendance progress toward completion of their program in order to remain enrolled at the Academy. The state requires that a student have at least a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or better. Students receiving flight training through Aerosim Flight Academy must achieve a grade of Satisfactory to continue in the program. A student scoring less than Satisfactory will have remedial training to be brought up to a Satisfactory level. After two remedial lessons, the student will be re-evaluated and a Student Progress Review Form will be placed in the students file. If the student is not at a Satisfactory level after two additional remedial lessons, the student will be counseled by the Student Progress Monitoring Council or its equivalent and placed on Academic Probation if deemed appropriate. Students maintaining a grade of 80% or higher on school administrated written tests and a grade of Satisfactory in flight training are considered to be making satisfactory progress. The school uses a 4.0 scale with letter grades. Academics In academic classes, students must maintain a minimum grade point average of 1.0 at the end of the first 25% of the program, (after attempting 25% of the clock hours required for graduation) 1.5 at midpoint, and achieve a minimum 2.0 grade point average upon graduation. Students should not be permitted to exceed 1.5 times the normal calendar time required to complete the program. If a ground school exam is Unsatisfactory (less than 80% correct) for any reason, the following guidelines will apply: The student will be grounded from flight activities. The student will receive counseling and will be assigned Ground School Additional Instruction with his/her flight instructor and will be charged at the current flight instructor hourly rate. The student will be scheduled for the retake exam and a retake exam fee will be charged based on the scheduled exam hours times the current hourly ground school rate. Retake exams will be offered once a week at the discretion of the Chief Ground Instructor. Failure to attend a scheduled retake exam will result in a grade of zero. First Unsatisfactory Academic Exam The student will receive a ground evaluation of items that are found to be deficient areas on the exam. Additional study items or tasks may be assigned to the student in an effort to help the student satisfactorily complete the exam. The student will be briefed on study techniques and material covered on the exam to assist in the progress of the student.

15-12

STUDENT INFORMATION

(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL Second Unsatisfactory Academic Exam The students performance on the exam will be re-evaluated by the academic instructor. Certain deficiencies in knowledge areas may become more prevalent than before, and a meeting will be arranged with the flight/ground instructor and group manager. Again, the student will be briefed on study techniques and material covered on the exam to assist in the progress of the student. The student will be briefed on future actions of remedial training and the rules outlined for unsatisfactory ground school training. Third Unsatisfactory Academic Exam Upon reaching three unsatisfactory grades on any single ground school exam, the student will receive a letter from the Student Progress Monitoring Council. The actions to be taken will be one of two choices, and will be primarily the students decision unless overridden by the council. First, the student may choose to re-take the current ground school again, when available, at full cost. Or, second, if the student does not wish to re-take the entire ground school, the student will be terminated from the academy.

09/01/10 (ISSUE)

STUDENT INFORMATION

15-13

OPERATIONS MANUAL

Flight
If an oral Stage Check is unsatisfactory, the following guidelines apply: First Unsatisfactory Oral Stage Check The student will be scheduled for a review ground briefing with his/her current Flight Instructor. The student must be rechecked on the task(s) found to be deficient. Following an unsatisfactory task, the Check Instructor will brief the Manager/Leader so that cancelling of the flight portion of the exam can occur. Second Unsatisfactory Oral Stage Check The student, students Flight Instructor, and the appropriate Manager/Leader will meet for a ground evaluation. The entire Stage Check (oral) may be retaken at the discretion of the Chief Flight Instructor. The Check Instructor will brief the Manager/Captain so that canceling of the flight portion of the exam can occur. Third Unsatisfactory Oral Stage Check The students Flight Instructor, Manager/Leader, and the Chief/Assistant Chief Flight Instructor will meet to determine the best course of action. The student will be recommended for probation to the Student Progress Monitoring Council. The Check Instructor will brief the Manager/Captain so that canceling of the flight portion of the exam can occur. If a flight Stage Check is unsatisfactory, the following guidelines apply: First Unsatisfactory Flight Stage Check The student will be scheduled for a review flight and ground briefing (if appropriate) with his/her Flight Instructor. The student must be rechecked on only the tasks found to be deficient. Second Unsatisfactory Flight Stage Check If an area being rechecked is found to be unsatisfactory during the second Stage Check, the Stage Check will be terminated at that point. The student, students Flight Instructor, and the appropriate Manager/Leader will meet for a ground evaluation. A Flight Instructor change will be considered. The entire Stage Check (flight) must be retaken.

Third Unsatisfactory Flight Stage Check The students Flight Instructor, Manager/Leader, and the Chief/Assistant Chief Flight Instructor will meet to determine the appropriate course of action. The student will be recommended for probation to the Student Progress Monitoring Council.

15-14

STUDENT INFORMATION

(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL

FAA KNOWLEDGE TEST


All required FAA Knowledge Tests are available at the Sanford location and are to be taken at the Academy. In Houston, students are responsible for registering and taking the exam at a Lasergrade or CATS testing center. The Manager of Training is available for assisting students in this process. During these tests, programmable calculators/computers shall not be used. Also, personal electronic devices, including cell phones, are not permitted in the testing area. Proper identification is required of every test applicant. Acceptable forms of identification with the applicants FULL LEGAL NAME include: For a U.S citizen or resident alien, acceptable, current, and valid photo identification include: o U.S. territory or state issued drivers license o U.S. government identification card o U.S. military identification card o U.S. passport o U.S. alien residency card For a non-U.S. citizen, a current, valid passport AND one or more of the following photo identifications: o Drivers license o Identification card issued by any government entity o Military identification card

Acceptable forms of identification are subject to change and acceptance is at the discretion of the FAA and Testing Center Supervisor. UNSATISFACTORY FAA KNOWLEDGE TEST If the FAA Knowledge Test is unsatisfactory (less than 70% correct) for any reason the following guidelines will apply: The student will be grounded from flight activities. The student will receive counseling and will be assigned Ground School Additional Instruction with his/her flight instructor and charged at the current flight instructor hourly rate. The student must be endorsed by the flight instructor and scheduled for the retake exam. A retake exam fee will be charged based on the current FAA Knowledge Test rates. Each test taken is required to be submitted as part of the Pilot and /or Flight Instructor application(s), when appropriate, for certification.

09/01/10 (ISSUE)

STUDENT INFORMATION

15-15

OPERATIONS MANUAL

UNSATISFACTORY FAA PRACTICAL TEST First Disapproval A student must report to the appropriate Manager with the Notice of Disapproval on the day of the failed check ride. A ground evaluation with the student, the students Flight Instructor, and the Manager will be scheduled to determine the appropriate action needed for remedial training. Second Disapproval The student will be scheduled for ground briefings, or additional review flights, as appropriate. The students Flight Instructor, Group Manager/Captain, and the Chief/Assistant Chief Flight Instructor will meet to determine the appropriate course of action. The Manager will recommend probation to the Student Progress Monitoring Council. UNSATISFACTORY FLIGHT LESSONS If a student fails to meet the minimum flight lesson requirements after four attempts, or complete the training within the maximum time frame, the student will be dismissed unless conditions exist, which in the opinion of the Student Progress Monitoring Council, warrant placing the student on Academic Probation. If the student is unable to fulfill the conditions of probation in the allotted time frame, the student will be permanently dismissed.

STUDENT TRAINING RECORDS


An electronic Flight Release or Course Lesson Sheet must be completed for every training and evaluation flight. Lesson items to be completed are listed on the lesson sheet. After Dual Flights The appropriate items will be completed, the Flight Instructor will enter a Satisfactory, Unsatisfactory, or Incomplete grade, and the Flight Instructor and the student will sign the form electronically. After Solo Flights The student will complete all of the pertinent information on the Flight Release. Grade the flight as either Satisfactory or Incomplete. Students shall not grade themselves as Unsatisfactory. Students must sign the Flight Release electronically.

15-16

STUDENT INFORMATION

(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL Both Dual and Solo Flights A properly completed Flight Release or Lesson Sheet is kept electronically in the training record. Completion of Dual and Solo Lessons Dual and solo flight lessons must be flown in accordance with the flight time allocated in the appropriate syllabus. This ensures that the Training Course Outline (TCO) flight time minimums are obtained.

09/01/10 (ISSUE)

STUDENT INFORMATION

15-17

OPERATIONS MANUAL

FAA PRACTICAL TESTS/ACR CERTIFICATION


At the appropriate time, the students primary Flight Instructor will assist the student in completing his/her FAA Airman Application in IACRA. IACRA, which stands for Integrated Airman Certification and Rating Application, is the web-based certification/rating application that guides the user through the FAAs airman application process. After completing the End-ofCourse Test in courses that require certification by an FAA Designated Pilot Examiner (DPE), the Check Instructor who completes that final stage check will submit the training folder for final auditing. After the training records have been audited, the Chief/Assistant Chief Flight Instructor will sign the training folder certifying that the records are correct. At this time, the appropriate paperwork will be given to the Scheduling department to schedule the Practical Test with the FAA, Designated Pilot Examiner. Students are not permitted to schedule their own Practical Tests independently. Students may not request specific examiners, except under special circumstances. For example, if a student has failed a previous Practical Test, the student may request not to be scheduled with that DPE for the next Practical Test. This request must be communicated to the Chief/Assistant Chief Flight Instructor prior to the submission of the application for that Practical Test. Aerosim Flight Academy will try to honor that request; however, this request may delay scheduling of the Practical Test and could increase the time and cost required to complete the course. Practical Tests may be scheduled at any time following submittal of the application. Students may not know until 5:00pm the day prior to the Practical Test that it has been scheduled. Schedules are posted each day with Flight Dispatch. Once the daily Practical Test schedule has been published, students may not cancel that test without incurring the No-Show fee. If a student is unable to make the schedule due to illness or an emergency, the Academy will make every attempt to provide a substitute applicant. However, if the Academy is unable to find one, the student will be charged the No-Show fee. All Academy Practical Tests must be conducted in Academy aircraft. For courses having examination authority, the End-of-Course test (Stage Check) completes the course. Students will receive a Temporary Airman Certificate in these courses from the schools Airman Certification Representative (ACR).

15-18

STUDENT INFORMATION

(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL

STAGE CHECK CROSS-COUNTRY ROUTES


The student must contact the appropriate Manager/Captain the day prior to a Stage Check or End-of-Course Test to receive the cross-country assignments. At some Academy locations, this information is posted in Flight Dispatch.

CANCELLING PRACTICAL TESTS/STAGE CHECKS DUE TO WEATHER


Students are reminded that they must be present at the airport to cancel the flight portion of the test. Also, the student should expect to conduct the Oral portion of the test. Additional guidance may be found in Aerosim Flight Academys Safety Procedures and Practices.

FLIGHT LESSON CANCELLATIONS DUE TO WEATHER


Occasionally, adverse weather conditions may make it necessary to cancel a flight lesson(s) activity. This can occur on instructional (dual) as well as solo flight lesson activities. When a flight lesson is canceled, the students training progress is obviously delayed. This delay may cause an increase in calendar time and cost. Additional guidance may be found in Aerosim Flight Academys Safety Procedures and Practices. In an effort to help students minimize any weather related delays in their training, the following procedures will be followed: If the weather is forecast to be below the weather minimums, as established in the Aerosim Flight Academys Safety Procedures and Practices, for the local area or route (or alternate routes), as appropriate, and the weather is also forecast to remain below minimums during the duration of the scheduled flight lesson, the flight lesson will: -Be moved to another available time period to allow for completing all or part of the scheduled lesson activity, or -The lesson activity will be subject to termination. The flight termination form will be completed and signed by the student, Flight Instructor, and appropriate Flight Department personnel. If the weather is forecast to be at or above the weather minimums, as established by the Aerosim Flight Academys Safety Procedures and Practices, for the local area or route (or alternate routes), as appropriate, and the weather is also forecast to remain at or above the minimums during the duration of the scheduled flight lesson, the lesson activity will be expected to be accomplished. Should the student and/or Flight Instructor desire to terminate the flight lesson activity, the Flight Supervisor or a training Manager must be contacted for further guidance. Examples of the guidance that the Flight Supervisor or training Manager could provide are as follows: 09/01/10 (ISSUE) STUDENT INFORMATION 15-19

OPERATIONS MANUAL -Assistance with the selection of a more appropriate local area or route selection. -Rescheduling of the lesson activity for a time during the day when more favorable weather is forecasted. -Suggestion to file, if appropriate, an IFR flight plan to VFR On Top (dual flight lessons only). -If the flight lesson is a dual flight lesson and the students Flight Instructor is not able to reschedule later in the day due to other scheduled activities, the Flight Supervisor or training Manager may schedule the student with another Flight Instructor who is available to conduct the flight lesson(s) at the rescheduled time. Please note: a Flight Dispatcher is not authorized to approve a flight termination. The Flight Supervisor, or appropriate Flight Department personnel, must sign all flight terminations. If after discussion with the Flight Supervisor, it is determined that the flight must be terminated, a Flight Termination form will be completed and signed by the student, Flight Instructor, and the Flight Supervisor or appropriate Flight Department personnel. Please note: This guidance is provided to assist the student and Flight Instructor in making sound go/no-go decisions pertaining to flight operations at the Academy. However, it in no way relieves the Pilot-in-Command of their responsibilities outlined by the Federal Aviation Regulations.

15-20

STUDENT INFORMATION

(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL

AVIATION SAFETY ACTION PROGRAM (ASAP)


The FAA has joined with Aerosim Flight Academy to establish a program to foster a voluntary, cooperative, non-punitive environment for reporting safety concerns. The following are the main elements of this program. For complete information on the ASAP please consult the Memorandum of Understanding available from the Operations Department Management. -Covered individuals include students, Flight Instructors, and other select individuals, but only while conducting flights or operations at Aerosim Flight Academy. -Events that are not inadvertent or involve an intentional disregard for safety, criminal activity, substance or alcohol abuse, or intentional falsification are not included. -Events must be reported through Aerosim Flight Academys Accident/Incident Reporting Program. Reports may be filed at Flight Dispatch or at the Flight Supervisors station. -Events should be reported as soon as possible. Non-sole source reports (see below) should be completed within 24 hours from the end of training activities for the day it occurred, or within 24 hours of becoming aware of possible non-compliance with the regulations. Please note: The participation of Aerosim Flight Academy in this program does not diminish the right of the Academy to withhold training from, or terminate employment of, any individual covered under the ASAP. The ASAP process is as follows: -All reports will be reviewed by an Event Review Committee (ERC). That committee includes FAA representatives. -The program will be managed by the Aerosim Flight Academys Manager of Safety and Security (MSS). -The ERC will meet periodically to review reports submitted and the MSS will periodically present reports to the FAA and Academy, but those reports will not include the names of the individuals involved. -The FAA retains all legal rights and responsibilities.

09/01/10 (ISSUE)

STUDENT INFORMATION

15-21

OPERATIONS MANUAL

STUDENT PROGRESS MONITORING COUNCIL


The Student Progress Monitoring Council (SPMC) will consist of the Chief Flight Instructor, Manager of Education, Director of Flight Operations, and two members of the Executive Team. The Council will meet every Thursday to discuss the academic progress of current students. Written recommendations and probationary letters will be sent to students within 10 days of the meeting. Students will be allowed to appeal any Council decisions, in writing, within two weeks of receipt of the original Council action letter. Written appeals will be reviewed by the Council at the next available meeting. All decisions of the Council concerning an appeal will be final.

CANCELLATION POLICY
Applicants who have not visited the school prior to enrollment will have the opportunity to withdraw without penalty within three business days following either the regularly scheduled orientation procedures or following a tour of the school facilities and inspection of equipment where training and services are provided. All monies paid by an applicant must be refunded if requested within three days after signing an enrollment agreement and making an initial payment. An applicant requesting cancellation more than three days after signing an enrollment agreement and making an initial payment, but prior to entering the school, is entitled to a refund of all monies paid minus the registration fee of $150.00 and any applicable TSA fees.

WITHDRAWAL
A student may withdraw from the Academy at any time. When a student withdraws from the Academy, a meeting with the Student Services Manager must be accomplished to complete the Student Exit paperwork. Completion of this paperwork will initiate the start of the final auditing process of the students account to properly apply and identify any monies to be refunded. The day the Academy is notified of a students withdrawal is considered the termination date for the purpose of determining a refund. A student who withdraws from the Academy while on Academic Probation will receive the appropriate withdrawal grades for classes attended prior to withdrawal. Those grades may be considered when re-evaluating the students record in accordance with the Academic Probation policy.

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION


Once a student has successfully fulfilled all of the prerequisites and requirements, has paid all fees, and has completed all of Aerosim Flight Academys requirements, he/she will be conferred a diploma upon successful completion of the program. 15-22 STUDENT INFORMATION (ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL GRADUATION PROCESS When a student has completed training, a meeting with the Student Services Manager or the Registrar must be accomplished to complete the Student Exit paperwork. Completion of this paperwork will initiate the start of the final auditing process of the students account. This audit will ensure that all credits and debits to the students account were properly applied and identify any amount due the student or the Academy. Refunds shall be made within 30 days of the date that the school is made aware by the student that the student has graduated.

STUDENT COMPLAINT POLICY


Aerosim Flight Academy has a process for all students to receive guidance and advice when they have questions, concerns, or problems during their training. The key to achieving a favorable solution is to communicate the problem in a timely manner with the appropriate member of the Academy staff. Each student will also be assigned a flight instructor for each phase of training. The assigned instructor will manage the students training and will provide a majority of the flight, simulator and ground training for that phase. Each student should understand that he/she might also receive training from other instructors during the course of their training. This is both necessary and beneficial in that it exposes the student to other flying and instructional techniques. The Academy reserves the right to make changes in the students assigned instructor in cases where it is clearly in the best interest of the student or the Academy. If the students instructor is not available, or, the student feels it would be inappropriate to discuss a problem with his/her instructor, the student is encouraged to make an appointment with the Chief Flight Instructor. Questions pertaining to areas other than flight or academic training should be addressed to the Student Services Manager. The Student Services Manager will be able to answer the majority of student questions or direct students to someone who can. If a student does not feel that the Academy staff has adequately addressed a complaint or concern, the student may write a letter to the President of Aerosim Flight Academy. All complaints or concerns will be reviewed and acted upon within 10 working days.

09/01/10 (ISSUE)

STUDENT INFORMATION

15-23

OPERATIONS MANUAL

STUDENT COMPLAINT/GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE


Schools accredited by the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges must have a procedure and operational plan for handling student complaints. If a student does not feel that the school has adequately addressed a complaint or concern, the student may consider contacting the Accrediting Commission. All complaints considered by the Commission must be in written form, with the permission from the complainant(s) for the Commission to forward a copy of the complaint to the school for a response. The complainant(s) will be kept informed as to the status of the complaint as well as the final resolution by the Commission. Please direct all inquiries to: Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges 2101 Wilson Blvd. / Suite 302 Arlington, VA 22201 (703) 247-4212 A copy of the Commissions Complaint Form is available at the school and may be obtained by contacting the Manager of Education.

PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE
While Aerosim Flight Academy cannot guarantee employment upon completion of training, every reasonable effort is made to assist our graduates in attaining their goals. The following is a list of services the Pilot Placement office provides to our graduates: Instruction in the preparation of resumes and employment applications. A large network of Aerosim Flight Academy graduates who provide information concerning job opportunities to current students. Current aviation magazines, articles, job guides, and information available to all students to aid them in their job search.

15-24

STUDENT INFORMATION

(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL

Chapter 16-Master Base Supplement Table of Contents


SANFORD .................................................................................................................................................................... 2 APPROVED TRAINING AIRPORTS ............................................................................................................................... 2 AIRPORTS LESS THAN 50NM FROM SFB................................................................................................................... 3 AIRPORTS GREATER THAN 50NM, BUT LESS THAN 100NM FROM SFB .................................................................. 4 AIRPORTS GREATER THAN 100NM, BUT LESS THAN 250NM FROM SFB ................................................................ 5 AIRPORTS GREATER THAN 250NM FROM SFB ......................................................................................................... 6 APPROVED REFUELING STATIONS WITH ACADEMY ACCOUNTS ................................................................................ 6 PRACTICE AREAS ...................................................................................................................................................... 7 SANFORD PRACTICE AREAS ...................................................................................................................................... 8 SAMPLE POSITION REPORT ........................................................................................................................................ 9 APPROVED POSITION REPORTING POINTS FOR CENTRAL FLORIDA ........................................................................... 9 JACKSONVILLE ..................................................................................................................................................... 12 APPROVED TRAINING AIRPORTS ............................................................................................................................. 12 AIRPORTS LESS THAN 50NM FROM CRG ............................................................................................................... 13 AIRPORTS GREATER THAN 50NM, BUT LESS THAN 100NM FROM CRG ............................................................... 13 AIRPORTS GREATER THAN 100NM, BUT LESS THAN 250NM FROM CRG ............................................................. 14 AIRPORTS GREATER THAN 250NM FROM CRG ...................................................................................................... 15 APPROVED REFUELING STATIONS WITH ACADEMY ACCOUNTS .............................................................................. 16 PRACTICE AREAS .................................................................................................................................................... 17 JACKSONVILLE PRACTICE AREAS ............................................................................................................................ 18 SAMPLE POSITION REPORT ...................................................................................................................................... 19 APPROVED POSITION REPORTING POINTS................................................................................................................ 19 ELLINGTON ............................................................................................................................................................. 20 APPROVED TRAINING AIRPORTS ............................................................................................................................. 20 AIRPORTS LESS THAN 50NM FROM EFD................................................................................................................ 21 AIRPORTS GREATER THAN 50NM, BUT LESS THAN 100NM FROM EFD ................................................................ 21 AIRPORTS GREATER THAN 100NM, BUT LESS THAN 250NM FROM EFD .............................................................. 22 AIRPORTS GREATER THAN 250NM FROM EFD ...................................................................................................... 24 APPROVED REFUELING STATIONS WITH ACADEMY ACCOUNTS .............................................................................. 25 PRACTICE AREAS - EFD .......................................................................................................................................... 26 ASSIGNED PRACTICE AREAS ................................................................................................................................... 26 ELLINGTON FIELD PRACTICE AREAS ....................................................................................................................... 27 ELLINGTON FIELD PRACTICE AREAS ....................................................................................................................... 28 SAMPLE POSITION REPORT ...................................................................................................................................... 29 APPROVED POSITION REPORTING POINTS................................................................................................................ 29 HOLLYWOOD / NORTH PERRY ......................................................................................................................... 31 APPROVED TRAINING AIRPORTS ............................................................................................................................. 31 AIRPORTS LESS THAN 50NM FROM HWO.............................................................................................................. 32 AIRPORTS GREATER THAN 50NM, BUT LESS THAN 100NM FROM HWO .............................................................. 32 AIRPORTS GREATER THAN 100NM, BUT LESS THAN 250NM FROM HWO ............................................................ 33 AIRPORTS GREATER THAN 250NM FROM HWO .................................................................................................... 34 APPROVED REFUELING STATIONS WITH ACADEMY ACCOUNTS .............................................................................. 35 PRACTICE AREAS .................................................................................................................................................... 36 HOLLYWOOD / NORTH PERRY PRACTICE AREAS ..................................................................................................... 37 SAMPLE POSITION REPORT ...................................................................................................................................... 38 APPROVED POSITION REPORTING POINTS................................................................................................................ 38

09/01/10 (ISSUE)

MASTER BASE SUPPLEMENT

16-1

OPERATIONS MANUAL

Sanford
Approved Training Airports Aerosim Flight Academy aircraft may only operate to airports approved by the Chief / Assistant Chief Flight Instructor. The following lists are approved airports by base that are: Less than 50nm Greater than 50nm, but less than 100nm Greater than 100nm, but less than 250nm Greater than 250nm

In addition, information is provided to effectively plan for each required cross-country. Information is presented in the following areas: City Name of airport Identifier Distance

Airports not on this list must be approved by the Director of Flight Operations.

NOTE For additional information, refer to the current Airport/Facilities Directory (A/FD).

16-2

MASTER BASE SUPPLEMENT

(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL Airports Less Than 50NM from SFB CITY NAME OF AIRPORT IDENTIFIER (XO4)*** (COI)* (DAB)** (DED)** (ISM)*** (LEE)* (EVB)** (X50) (ORL)*** (MCO)*** (OMN)** (XFL)** (X21)* *** (TIX)* *** (X23)* DIST 18NM 39NM 25NM 17NM 31NM 30NM 22NM 20NM 15NM 21NM 32NM 41NM 23NM 27NM 23NM

Apopka, FL Orlando Apopka Cocoa, FL Merritt Island Daytona Beach, FL Daytona Beach Deland, FL Deland Taylor Kissimmee, FL Kissimmee Regional Leesburg, FL Leesburg International New Smyrna Bch, FL New Smyrna Beach New Smyrna Bch, FL Massey Ranch Airport Orlando, FL Orlando Executive Orlando, FL Orlando International Ormond Beach, FL Ormond Beach Palm Coast, FL Flagler Co. Titusville, FL Arthur Dunn Airpark Titusville, FL Space Coast Regional Umatilla, FL Umatilla Municipal For asterisk key (*, **, ***) see end of section

09/01/10 (ISSUE)

MASTER BASE SUPPLEMENT

16-3

OPERATIONS MANUAL Airports Greater Than 50NM, But Less Than 100NM From SFB CITY NAME OF AIRPORT IDENTIFIER (AVO)* (BOW)* (BKV)*** (CGC) (X35) (FPR) (GNV) (CRG)* ** (VQQ)* ** (42J)* (LAL)*** (X07)* (MLB) (OCF) (OBE) (28J) (SGJ) (PIE)* *** (SPG) (X26) (SEF)* (X39)*** (VDF)*** (TPA)* *** (X59) (VRB) (X60) (GIF)* (ZPH) DIST 72NM 57NM 66NM 70NM 62NM 89NM 77NM 94NM 94NM 76NM 62NM 56NM 51NM 57NM 92NM 58NM 71NM 92NM 95NM 69NM 79NM 68NM 74NM 83NM 60NM 80NM 73NM 50NM 59NM

Avon Park, FL Avon Park Executive Bartow, FL Bartow Municipal Brooksville, FL Hernando County Crystal River, FL Crystal River Airport Dunnellon, FL Marion County Fort Pierce, FL St Lucie County Intl Gainesville, FL Gainesville Regional Jacksonville, FL Craig Municipal Jacksonville, FL Cecil Field Keystone Heights, FL Keystone Airpark Lakeland, FL Lakeland Linder Regional Lake Wales, FL Lake Wales Municipal Melbourne, FL Melbourne International Ocala, FL Ocala International Okeechobee, FL Okeechobee County Palatka, FL Palatka Municipal St Augustine, FL St Augustine Airport St Petersburg, FL St Petersburg Clearwater Intl St Petersburg, FL Albert Whitted Sebastian, FL Sebastian Municipal Sebring, FL Sebring Regional Tampa, FL Tampa North Airport Tampa, FL Tampa Executive Airport Tampa, FL Tampa International Valkaria, FL Valkaria Airport Vero Beach, FL Vero Beach Municipal Williston, FL Williston Municipal Winter Haven, FL Winter Havens Gilbert Zephyrhills, FL Zephyrhills Municipal For asterisk key (*, **, ***) see end of section

16-4

MASTER BASE SUPPLEMENT

(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL Airports Greater Than 100NM, But Less Than 250NM From SFB CITY Arcadia, FL Adel, GA Albany, GA Alma, GA Bainbridge, GA Boca Raton, FL Brunswick, GA Brunswick, GA Claxton, GA Cross City, FL Fernandina Bch, FL Fitzgerald, GA Fort Lauderdale, FL Fort Lauderdale, FL Fort Myers, FL Hollywood, FL Immokalee, FL Jacksonville, FL Jekyll Island, GA Jesup, GA La Belle, FL Lake City, FL Live Oak, FL Marathon, FL Marco Island, FL Miami, FL Miami, FL Naples, FL Pahokee, FL Perry, FL Pompano Bch, FL Punta Gorda, FL Sarasota, FL Savannah, GA Stuart, FL Tallahassee, FL Thomasville, GA Tifton, GA NAME OF AIRPORT Arcadia Municipal Cook Co. Southwest Georgia Regional Bacon Co. Decatur Co. Industrial Boca Raton Airport Brunswick Golden Isles Malcolm McKinnon Airport Claxton-Evans Co. Cross City Fernandina Beach Municipal Fitzgerald Municipal Fort Lauderdale Executive Fort Lauderdale/Hollywood Page Field North Perry Immokalee Airport Jacksonville International Jekyll Island Co Jesup-Wayne Airport La Belle Municipal Lake City Municipal Suwannee Co. The Florida Keys Marathon Marco Island Airport Kendall-Tamiami Executive Opa Locka Executive Naples Municipal Palm Beach County Glades Perry-Foley Airport Pompano Beach Airpark Charlotte County Airport Sarasota/Bradenton Intl Savannah/Hilton Head Intl Witham Field Tallahassee Regional Thomasville Regional Henry Tift Meyers IDENTIFIER (X06) (15J)* (ABY)* (AMG)* ** (BGE)* ** (BCT)** (BQK)* ** (SSI)* (CWV)* ** (CTY) (55J)** (FZG)* (FXE)** *** (FLL)** *** (FMY)** (HWO)* ** *** (IMM) (JAX)** (09J)* (JES) (X14) (LCQ)** (24J)* (MTH)## *** (MKY) (TMB)* ** *** (OPF)** *** (APF) (PHK) (40J) (PMP)** *** (PGD) (SRQ)** (SAV)** (SUA) (TLH)** (TVI)* (TMA)* DIST 100NM 182NM 225NM 178NM 220NM 155NM 149NM 142NM 207NM 110NM 110NM 203NM 164NM 172NM 135NM 174NM 140NM 105NM 138NM 170NM 122NM 109NM 130NM 243NM 168NM 192NM 179NM 160NM 122NM 145NM 163NM 118NM 108NM 201NM 109NM 189NM 187NM 197NM

09/01/10 (ISSUE)

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16-5

OPERATIONS MANUAL Valdosta, GA Valdosta Regional Venice, FL Venice Municipal Vidalia, GA Vidalia Regional Waycross, GA Waycross-Ware County West Palm Bch, FL Palm Beach International For asterisk key (*, **, ***) see end of section

(VLD)* (VNC) (VDI)* ** (AYS) (PBI)**

160NM 120NM 213NM 160NM 139NM

Airports Greater Than 250NM From SFB CITY Americus, GA Atlanta, GA Augusta, GA Columbus, GA Dothan, AL Key West, FL Macon, GA Macon, GA * ** *** ## NAME OF AIRPORT Jimmy Carter Regional Dekalb-Peachtree Augusta Rgnl at Bush Field Columbus Metro Dothan Regional Key West International Middle Georgia Regional Macon Downtown IDENTIFIER (ACJ) (PDK)*** (AGS) (CSG)* ** (DHN)** (EYW)## *** (MCN) (MAC) DIST 251NM 343NM 278NM 294NM 267NM 254NM 265NM 270NM

Requires briefing on restricted areas and Military Operating Areas (MOA). Requires briefing on Class C airspace. Requires briefing on Class B airspace. Aerosim Flight Academy students must go to this airport via the Keys Island chain.

Approved Refueling Stations with Academy Accounts Flight Crews must check with Flight Dispatch prior to departure for a current list of approved refueling locations. WARNING At no time during any cross-country flight may aircraft HOBBS time Exceed 3.0 without Flight Operations Management Authorization Should an unplanned stop be necessary at an airport other than those listed, contact Flight Dispatch. If it becomes necessary to refuel at a location other than those listed, the flight crew must retain a fuel receipt for reimbursement.

16-6

MASTER BASE SUPPLEMENT

(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL Practice Areas Flight training will normally take place within the boundaries of the WOODRUFF, ORANGE CITY, LEESBURG, ASHBY, MASSEY, and BITHLO Practice Areas as defined by the East Coast Aviation Safety and Training Group (See Practice Areas Map). WOODRUFF Practice Area The WOODRUFF Practice Area has been designated to provide for dual flight instruction and solo operations practice. This practice area should be used for flight operations conducted northwest of Sanford International Airport. ORANGE CITY Practice Area The ORANGE CITY Practice Area has been designated to provide for dual flight instruction and solo operations practice. This practice area should be used for flight operations conducted west and northwest of Sanford International Airport. LEESBURG Practice Area The LEESBURG Practice Area has been designated to provide for dual flight instruction and solo operations practice. This practice area should be used for flight operations conducted west and southwest of Sanford International Airport. ASHBY Practice Area The ASHBY Practice Area has been designated to provide for dual flight instruction and solo operations practice. This practice area should be used for flight operations conducted north and northeast of Sanford International Airport. MASSEY Practice Area The MASSEY Practice Area has been designated to provide for dual flight instruction and solo operations practice. This practice area should be used for flight operations conducted northeast of Sanford International Airport. BITHLO Practice Area The BITHLO Practice Area has been designated to provide for dual flight instruction and solo operations practice. This practice area should be used for flight operations conducted east of Sanford International Airport. CAUTION Caution should be exercised when using the ORANGE CITY and ASHBY Practice Areas so as to not impede aircraft that are flying the CORLL ARRIVAL to Sanford International Airport.

09/01/10 (ISSUE)

MASTER BASE SUPPLEMENT

16-7

OPERATIONS MANUAL Sanford Practice Areas

16-8

MASTER BASE SUPPLEMENT

(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL Sample Position Report

Bithlo Area Traffic, Connection 200 or N1234Q, Skyhawk, 3 miles north of the Bithlo Towers, 3000 ft., Steep Turns Approved Position Reporting Points For Central Florida MATEO Practice Area Hastings ST. AUGUSTINE Practice Area St. Augustine Airport PALATKA Practice Area Kay Larkin CRESCENT Practice Area Crescent Lake Flagler Airport Bear Island SUMMER HAVEN Practice Area Summer Haven Flagler Pier HIGH BRIDGE Practice Area High Bridge DISSTON Practice Area Lake Disston Pierson ORANGE CITY Practice Area Marina Orange City Towers Deland Airport 46 Split

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MASTER BASE SUPPLEMENT

16-9

OPERATIONS MANUAL WOODRUFF Practice Area Lake Woodruff Lake Disston LEESBURG Practice Area Umatilla Airport Lake Yale Leesburg Airport Orlando Country Sorrento Racetrack Lake Apopka (N, S, E, W) Lake Weir ASHBY Practice Area Lake Ashby Massey Ranch Lake Monroe Leffler MASSEY Practice Area New Smyrna Massey Ranch Mosquito Lagoon BITHLO Practice Area Bithlo Towers Dunn Airport Lake Harney Christmas Titusville NOTE Flight crews shall monitor the frequency 123.50 MHz, if appropriate, while in practice areas south of an extended centerline of Runway 7L at Daytona Beach, FL (DAB). For operation north of that runway, monitor the frequency 122.85 MHz.

CAUTION This procedure in no way relieves the flight crews of their responsibility to exercise collision avoidance procedures.

16-10

MASTER BASE SUPPLEMENT

(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL

Intentionally Left Blank

09/01/10 (ISSUE)

MASTER BASE SUPPLEMENT

16-11

OPERATIONS MANUAL

Jacksonville
Approved Training Airports Aerosim Flight Academy aircraft may only operate to airports approved by the Director of Flight Operations. The following lists are approved airports by base that are: Less than 50nm Greater than 50nm, but less than 100nm Greater than 100nm, but less than 250nm Greater than 250nm

In addition, information is provided to effectively plan for each required cross-country. Information is presented in the following areas: City Name of airport Identifier Distance NOTE For additional information, refer to the current Airport/Facilities Directory (A/FD).

16-12

MASTER BASE SUPPLEMENT

(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL Airports Less Than 50NM From CRG CITY Brunswick, GA Cecil Field, FL Fernandina Bch, FL Jacksonville, FL Jekyll Island, GA Herlong, FL Keystone Heights, FL Palatka, FL St. Augustine, FL St. Marys, GA NAME OF AIRPORT Malcolm McKinnon Airport Cecil Field Airport Fernandina Beach Municipal Jacksonville International Jekyll Island Airport Herlong Airport Keystone Airpark Key Larkin Field St Augustine Airport St. Marys Airport IDENTIFIER (SSI)* (VQQ) (55J)** (JAX)** (09J)* (HEG) (42J)* (28J) (SGJ) (4J6) DIST 49NM 20NM 16NM 13NM 44NM 15NM 40NM 41NM 24NM 25NM

For asterisk key (*, **, ***) see end of section

Airports Greater Than 50NM, But Less Than 100NM From CRG CITY Alma, GA Brunswick, GA Bunnell, FL Daytona Beach, FL Deland, FL Dunellon, FL Gainesville, FL Jesup, GA Lake City, FL Leesburg, FL Live Oak, FL New Smyrna Bch, FL Ormond Beach, FL Plymouth, FL Ocala, FL Sanford, FL Valdosta, GA Waycross, GA Williston, FL Umatilla, FL NAME OF AIRPORT Bacon Co. Glynco Jetport Flagler Co. Daytona Beach Deland Taylor Dunellon Municipal Gainesville Regional Jesup-Wayne Airport Lake City Municipal Leesburg Municipal Suwanne, Co. New Smyrna Beach Ormond Beach Orlando Country Ocala Municipal Orlando-Sanford Valdosta Regional Waycross-Ware County Williston Municipal Umatilla Municipal IDENTIFIER (AMG) (BQK) (X47)** (DAB)** (DED)** (X35) (GNV) (JES) (LQC)* (LEE)* (24J) (34J)** (OMN)** (X04)*** (OCF) (SFB)* ** (VLD)* (AYS) (X60) (X23)* DIST 88NM 55NM 55NM 73NM 77NM 88NM 55NM 75NM 55NM 92NM 79NM 82NM 65NM 97NM 79NM 95NM 95NM 70NM 77NM 85NM

For asterisk key (*, **, ***) see end of section

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MASTER BASE SUPPLEMENT

16-13

OPERATIONS MANUAL Airports Greater Than 100NM, But Less Than 250NM From CRG CITY Adel, GA Albany, GA Americus, GA Arcadia, FL Augusta, GA Avon Park, FL Bainbridge, GA Bartow, FL Brooksville, FL Boca Raton, FL Charleston, SC Claxton, GA Cocoa, FL Columbus, GA Crystal River, FL Dothan, AL Fitzgerald, GA Fort Myers, FL Fort Pierce, FL Immokalee, FL Kissimmee, FL Lakeland, FL Lake Wales, FL LaBelle, FL Lantana, FL Melbourne, FL Macon, GA Macon, GA New Pt Richey, FL Okeechobee, FL Orlando, FL Pahokee, FL Perry, FL Plantation, GA Punta Gorda, FL Sarasota, FL Savannah, GA Sebastian, FL NAME OF AIRPORT Cook Co. Southwest Geo. Reg. Souther Field Arcadia Municipal Bush Field Avon Park Municipal Decatur Co. Industrial Bartow Municipal Hernando County Boca Raton Airport Charleston Executive Claxton-Evans Co. Merritt Island Columbus Metro Crystal River Airport Dothan Airport Fitzgerald Municipal Page Field St Lucie County Immokalee Airport Kissimmee Municipal Lakeland Municipal Lake Wales Municipal LaBelle Municipal Palm Bch County Park Melbourne Regional Middle Georgia Regional Smart Downtown Airport Tampa Bay Executive Okeechobee County Orlando Executive Palm Bch County Glades Perry-Foley Airport Plantation Airpark Charlotte City Airport Sarasota/Bradenton Savannah, Int'l Sebastian Municipal IDENTIFIER (15J) (ABY) (ACJ) (X06) (AGS) (AV0)* (BGE) (BOW)* (BKV)*** (BCT)** (JZI)* ** (CWV) (COI)* (CSG)* ** (X31) (DHN) (FZG) (FMY)** (FPR) (IMM) (ISM)*** (LAL)*** (X07)* (X14) (LNA)** (MLB) (MCN) (MAC) (RRF)*** (OBE) (ORL)*** (PHK) (40J) (JYL) (PGD) (SRQ)** (SAV)** (X26) DIST 111NM 155NM 173NM 189NM 183NM 164NM 165NM 144NM 122NM 248NM 161NM 113NM 127NM 218NM 104NM 211NM 121NM 225NM 180NM 234NM 122NM 143NM 146NM 215NM 236NM 141NM 178NM 182NM 141NM 187NM 107NM 217NM 108NM 138NM 206NM 184NM 108NM 160NM

16-14

MASTER BASE SUPPLEMENT

(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL Sebring, FL Stuart, FL Tallahassee, FL Tampa, FL Tampa, FL Thomasville, GA Tifton, GA Titusville, FL Titusville, FL Valkaria, FL Venice, FL Vero Beach, FL Vidalia, GA West Palm Bch, FL Sebring Regional Witham Field Tallahassee Regional Tampa North Airport Vandenberg Airport Thomasville Municipal Henry Tift-Myers Arthur Dunn Airpark Space Center Exec. Valkaria Airport Venice Municipal Vero Beach Municipal Vidalia Municipal Palm Beach International (SEF)* (SUA) (TLH)** (X39)*** (X16)*** (TVI) (TMA) (X21)* *** (TIX)* *** (X59) (VNC) (VRB) (VDI) (PBI)** 173NM 201NM 146NM 134NM 146NM 126NM 121NM 108NM 115NM 151NM 201NM 170NM 119NM 231NM

For asterisk key (*, **, ***) see end of section

Airports Greater Than 250NM From CRG CITY Atlanta, GA Fayetteville, NC Ft Lauderdale, FL Key West, FL Kendall, FL Marathon, FL Marco Island, FL Miami, FL North Perry, FL Naples, FL Pompano Bch, FL * ** *** ## NAME OF AIRPORT Dekalb-Peachtree Fayetteville Regional Ft Lauderdale Exec. Key West International Kendall-Tamiami Exec. Marathon Airport Marco Island Airport Opa Locka Airport Hollywood Airport Naples Municipal Pompano Bch Airpark IDENTIFIER (PDK)*** (FAY) (FXE)** *** (EYW)## *** (TMB) (MTH)## *** (MKY) (OPF)** *** (HWO) (APF) (PMP)** *** DIST 255NM 309NM 258NM 347NM 287NM 337NM 260NM 273NM 268NM 251NM 256NM

Requires briefing on restricted areas and Military Operating Areas (MOA). Requires briefing on Class C airspace Requires briefing on Class B airspace Aerosim Flight Academy students must go to this airport via the Keys Island chain.

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MASTER BASE SUPPLEMENT

16-15

OPERATIONS MANUAL Approved Refueling Stations with Academy Accounts Flight Crews must check with Flight Dispatch prior to departure for a current list of approved refueling locations.

WARNING At no time during any cross-country flight may aircraft HOBBS time between refueling exceed 3.0 hours without Flight Operations Management authorization.

Should an unplanned stop be necessary at an airport other than those listed, contact Flight Dispatch, collect if necessary, for guidance. If it becomes necessary to refuel at a location other than those listed, the flight crew must retain a fuel receipt for reimbursement.

16-16

MASTER BASE SUPPLEMENT

(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL Practice Areas Flight training will normally take place within the boundaries of the Practice Area as defined by the Aerosim Flight Academy Practice Area Map. The Practice Area has been designated to provide for dual flight instruction and solo operations practice. This practice area is defined to the north, by HIGHWAY 202, and to the south by a line starting east of REYNOLDS FIELD, extending to the coastline. The Western boundary is defined by the east shore of the ST. JOHNS RIVER (excluding the NAS Jacksonville Class D airspace) and the eastern boundary is defined by the coastline (excluding the St. Augustine class D airspace). This area should be used for flight operations conducted south of Jacksonville airport.

CAUTION Caution should be exercised when using the Practice Areas so as to not impede aircraft that are flying instrument approaches to Jacksonville International and Craig Airports.

NOTE All aircraft departing Craig airport will select an altitude at or above 2000 feet. All inbound aircraft will select an altitude below 1500 feet.

09/01/10 (ISSUE)

MASTER BASE SUPPLEMENT

16-17

OPERATIONS MANUAL Jacksonville Practice Areas

16-18

MASTER BASE SUPPLEMENT

(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL Sample Position Report

Big Fields Traffic, N1234Q, Skyhawk, 3 miles north of Deep Forrest, 3000 ft., Steep Turns

Approved Position Reporting Points Craig Airport Deep Forrest Palm Valley Bridge Reynolds Field St. Augustine Airport I-95 US Highway 1 Highway 202 Jacksonville Airport Big Fields Rectangular Lake 9A Bend

NOTE Flight crews shall monitor the frequency 123.45 MHz, if appropriate, while in the practice areas.

CAUTION This procedure in no way relieves the flight crews of their responsibility to exercise collision avoidance procedures.

09/01/10 (ISSUE)

MASTER BASE SUPPLEMENT

16-19

OPERATIONS MANUAL

Ellington
Approved Training Airports Aerosim Flight Academy aircraft may only operate to airports approved by the Chief / Assistant Chief Flight Instructor. The following lists are approved airports by base that are: Less than 50nm Greater than 50nm, but less than 100nm Greater than 100nm, but less than 250nm Greater than 250nm

In addition, information is provided to effectively plan for each required cross-country. Information is presented in the following areas: City Name of airport Identifier Distance NOTE For additional information, refer to the current Airport/Facilities Directory (A/FD).

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MASTER BASE SUPPLEMENT

(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL Airports Less Than 50NM From EFD CITY La Porte, TX Houston, TX Houston, TX Baytown, TX Houston, TX Baytown, TX Houston, TX Galveston, TX Houston, TX Houston, TX Angleton, TX Houston, TX Liberty, TX Winnie/Stowell, TX Cleveland, TX Houston, TX NAME OF AIRPORT La Porte Municipal William P. Hobby Pearland Regional Baytown Houston-Southwest R W J Airpark George Bush Intercontinental Scholes International Sugar Land Regional West Houston Brazoria County David Wayne Hooks Mem. Liberty Municipal Chambers County Cleveland Municipal Lone Star Executive IDENTIFIER (T41)*** (HOU)*** (LVJ)*** (HPY)*** (AXH)*** ++ (54T)*** (IAH)*** (GLS) (SGR)*** ++ (IWS)*** (LBX) (DWH)*** (T78) (T90) (6R3)*** (CXO)*** DIST 06NM 06NM 06NM 15NM 17NM 18NM 24NM 25NM 26NM 29NM 33NM 34NM 37NM 39NM 45NM 46NM

For asterisk key (*, **, ***, ++) see end of section

Airports Greater Than 50NM, But Less Than 100NM From EFD CITY Bay City, TX Wharton, TX Beaumont, TX Beaumont, TX Kountze, TX Huntsville, TX Brenham, TX Orange, TX Palacios, TX Edna, TX College Station, TX Bryan, TX Hallettsville, TX La Grange, TX Jasper, TX Sulphur, LA Port Lavaca, TX NAME OF AIRPORT Bay City Municipal Wharton Regional Beaumont Regional Southeast Texas Regional Hawthorne Field Huntsville Municipal Brenham Municipal Orange Municipal Palacios Municipal Jackson County Easterwood Field Coulter Field Hallettsville Municipal Fayette Regional Air Center Jasper County-Bell Field Southland Field Calhoun County IDENTIFIER (BYY) (ARM) (BMT) (BPT) (45R) (UTS) (11R) (ORG) (PSX)* (26R)* (CLL) (CFD) (34R) (3T5) (JAS) (L75) (PKV)* DIST 53NM 56NM 56NM 62NM 64NM 71NM 73NM 75NM 77NM 82NM 85NM 90NM 94NM 95NM 96NM 98NM 98NM

For asterisk key (*, **, ***) see end of section

09/01/10 (ISSUE)

MASTER BASE SUPPLEMENT

16-21

OPERATIONS MANUAL Airports Greater Than 100NM, But Less Than 250NM From EFD CITY Lufkin, TX Giddings, TX De Quincy, LA Victoria, TX Yoakum, TX Lake Charles, LA Newton, TX Smithville, TX Lake Charles, LA Pineland, TX De Ridder, LA Nacogdoches, TX Lockhart, TX Taylor, TX Leesville, LA Palestine, TX Rockport, TX Jennings, LA Austin, TX Jacksonville, TX Mexia, TX San Marcos, TX Center, TX Oakdale, LA Georgetown, TX Ingleside, TX Temple, TX Kenedy, TX New Braunfels, TX Eunice, LA Henderson, TX Austin, TX Lago Vista, TX Waco, TX Beeville, TX Athens, TX Killeen, TX Waco, TX Corsicana, TX Carthage, TX Waco, TX Abbeville, LA NAME OF AIRPORT Angelina County Giddings-Lee County De Quincy Industrial Airpark Victoria Regional Yoakum Municipal Lake Charles Regional Newton Municipal Smithville Crawford Muni. Chennault International Pineland Municipal Beauregard Regional A L Mangham Jr. Regional Lockhart Municipal Taylor Municipal Leesville Palestine Municipal Arkansas County Jennings Austin-Bergstrom Int. Cherokee County Mexia-Limestone County San Marcos Municipal Center Municipal Allen Parish Georgetown Municipal T P McCampbell Draughon-Miller Central Karnes County New Braunfels Municipal Eunice Rusk County Lakeway Airpark Lago Vista TX-Rusty Allen Tstc Waco Beeville Municipal Athens Municipal Skylark Field McGregor Executive C David Campbell Field Panola County-Sharpe Field Waco Regional Abbeville Chris Crusta Mem. IDENTIFIER (LFK) (GYB) (5R8)* (VCT)* (T85)* (LCH) (61R)* (84R) (CFW) (T24) (DRI)* (OCH) (50R) (T74) (L39) (PSN) (RKP) (3R7) (AUS)** (JSO) (LXY) (HYI) (F17) (L42) (GTU) (T43) (TPL)* (2R9)* (BAZ) (4R7)* (F12) (3R9)++ (5R3) (CNW) (3R0)* (F44) (ILE)* (PWG) (CRS) (4F2) (ACT) (0R3)** DIST 100NM 100NM 100NM 102NM 105NM 105NM 106NM 107NM 111NM 115NM 119NM 120NM 131NM 132NM 132NM 133NM 134NM 134NM 135NM 135NM 140NM 142NM 143NM 145NM 145NM 148NM 149NM 149NM 150NM 151NM 153NM 154NM 155NM 157NM 157NM 157NM 158NM 158NM 158NM 160NM 161NM 161NM

16-22

MASTER BASE SUPPLEMENT

(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL Mansfield, LA Tyler, TX Corpus Christy, TX Natchitoches, LA Longview, TX Lafayette, LA Alexandria, LA New Iberia, LA San Antonio, TX Burnet, TX San Antonio, TX Pineville, LA Marshall, TX Alexandria, LA Shreveport, LA Alice, TX Wills Point, TX Shreveport, LA Midlothian, TX Castroville, TX Terrell, TX Llano, TX Kingsville, TX Lancaster, TX Hamilton, TX Fredericksburg, TX Patterson, LA Mesquite, TX Cleburne, TX New Roads, LA Vivian, LA Dallas, TX Kerrville, TX Minden, LA Arlington, TX Fort Worth, TX Grand Prairie, TX Baton Rouge, LA Houma, LA Monroe, LA Texarkana, AR Rayville, LA C E Rusty Williams Tyler Pounds Regional Corpus Christy International Natchitoches Regional East Texas Regional Lafayette Regional Alexandria International Acadiana Regional San Antonio International Burnet Municipal Stinson Municipal Pineville Municipal Harrison County Esler Regional Shreveport Regional Alice International Wills Point Municipal Shreveport Downtown Mid-Way Regional Castroville Municipal Terrell Municipal Llano Municipal Kleberg County Lancaster Hamilton Regional Gillespie County Harry P Williams Memorial Mesquite Metro Cleburne Municipal False River Regional Vivian Dallas Executive Kerrville Municipal Minden-Webster Arlington Municipal Fort Worth Spinks Grand Prairie Municipal Baton Rouge Metropolitan Houma-Terrebonne Monroe Regional Texarkana Regional John J. Hooks Jr. Memorial (3F3)* (TYR) (CRP)** (IER)* (GGG) (LFT)** (AEX)* (ARA)** (SAT)* ** (BMQ) (SSF)** (2L0) (ASL) (ESF)* (SHV)** (ALI)* (76F) (DTN)** (JWY)*** (T89) * ** (TRL)*** (AQO)* (IKG)* (LNC)*** (MNZ)* (T82) (PTN) (HQZ)*** (CPT)*** (HZR)** (3F4)* ** (RBD)*** (ERV)* (F24)** (GKY) (FWS)*** (GPM)*** (BTR)** (HUM)*** (MLU) (TXK)* (M79) 164NM 165NM 165NM 166NM 168NM 169NM 170NM 172NM 173NM 173NM 174NM 175NM 180NM 183NM 183NM 188NM 189NM 190NM 193NM 193NM 194NM 195NM 195NM 195NM 197NM 198NM 199NM 201NM 202NM 202NM 204NM 204NM 205NM 206NM 208NM 209NM 209NM 215NM 234NM 237NM 238NM 245NM

For asterisk key (*, **, ***, ##) see end of section

09/01/10 (ISSUE)

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16-23

OPERATIONS MANUAL Airports Greater Than 250NM From EFD CITY NAME OF AIRPORT IDENTIFIER DIST 250NM 251NM 252NM 252NM 252NM 252NM 254NM 254NM 256NM 258NM 258NM 258NM 260NM 263NM 264NM 266NM 267NM 267NM 269NM 269NM 269NM 270NM 272NM 273NM 273NM 274NM 281NM 284NM 284NM 287NM 290NM 291NM 291NM 292NM 293NM 295NM 298NM

El Dorado, AR Downtown (F43)* Decatur, TX Decatur Municipal (LUD)*** Sherman, TX Sherman Municipal (SWI) Eastland, TX Eastland Municipal (ETN)* Hammond, LA Hammond Northshore Reg. (HDC)*** Brownsville, TX South Padre Island Int. (BRO)** Bridgeport, TX Bridgeport Municipal (XBP)*** Weslaco, TX Mid Valley (T65)** Galliano, LA South Lafourche (L49)*** Sherman/Denison, TX Grayson County (GYI) Laredo, TX Laredo International (LRD)* Idabel, OK McCurtain County Regional (4O4)* McComb, MS John E. Lewis Field (MCB) McAllen, TX McAllen Miller International (MFE)* Gainesville, TX Gainesville Municipal (GLE) Hugo, OK Stan Stamper Municipal (HHW)* Breckenridge, TX Stephens County (BKD) Durant, OK Eaker Field (DUA) Tallulah, MS Vicksburg Tallulah Municipal (TVR) Vicksburg, MS Vicksburg Municipal (VKS) De Queen, AR J. Lynn Helms Sevier County (DEQ) Camden, AR Harrell Field (CDH)* Crossett, AR Z M Jack Stell Field (CRT) Graham, TX Graham Municipal (RPH) Brookhaven, MS Brookhaven-Lincoln County (1R7) Bowie, TX Bowie Municipal (OF2) Slidell, LA Slidell (ASD)*** Bogalusa, LA George R Carr Memorial (BXA) Eagle Pass, TX Maverick County Memorial (5T9)* Abilene, TX Abilene Regional (ABI)** Ardmore, OK Ardmore Downtown Exec. (1F0) Picayune, MS Picayune Municipal (MJD) Sonora, TX Sonora Municipal (SOA)* Olney, TX Olney Municipal (ONY)* Raymond, MS John Bell Williams (M16)** San Angelo, TX San Angelo Regional (SJT) Monticello, AR Monticello Municipal (LLQ) * ** *** ++

Requires briefing on restricted areas and Military Operating Areas (MOA). Requires briefing on Class C airspace. Requires briefing on Class B airspace. Non-standard touch and go operations. Consult current A/F D for details.

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MASTER BASE SUPPLEMENT

(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL Approved Refueling Stations with Academy Accounts Flight Crews must check with Flight Dispatch prior to departure for a current list of approved refueling locations.

WARNING At no time during any cross-country flight may aircraft HOBBS time between refueling exceed 3.0 hours without Flight Operations Management authorization.

Should an unplanned stop be necessary at an airport other than those listed, contact Flight Dispatch, collect if necessary, for guidance. If it becomes necessary to refuel at a location other than those listed, the flight crew must retain a fuel receipt for reimbursement.

09/01/10 (ISSUE)

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16-25

OPERATIONS MANUAL

Practice Areas - EFD Assigned Practice Areas Flight training will normally take place within the boundaries of the DELTA, CHARLIE, BRAVO, and ALPHA practice areas (see the Aerosim Flight Academy Practice Areas Map). ALPHA Practice Area The ALPHA Practice area has been designated to provide for dual flight instruction and solo operations practice. This practice should be used for flight operations conducted East and North East of the Ellington Airport. Extreme Caution should be exercised when traversing or operating near Cedar Point. There may be a large volume of training aircraft present in this area. Caution should be used when conducting flights in the eastern portion of ALPHA, as this is an approach corridor for IAH, aircraft frequently travel from SE to NW. BRAVO Practice Area The BRAVO Practice area has been designated to provide for dual flight instruction and solo operations practice. This practice should be used for flight operations conducted East of the Ellington Airport. Caution should be used when conducting flights near or over the MHF VOR. CHARLIE Practice Area The CHARLIE Practice area has been designated to provide for dual flight instruction and solo operations practice. This practice should be used for flight operations conducted Southeast of the Ellington Airport. Be Alert to the approach corridors for Galveston Scholes Field Airport when operating in CHARLIE. DELTA Practice Area The DELTA Practice area has been designated to provide for dual flight instruction and solo operations practice. This practice should be used for flight operations conducted South of Ellington Airport.

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MASTER BASE SUPPLEMENT

(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL Ellington Field Practice Areas

09/01/10 (ISSUE)

MASTER BASE SUPPLEMENT

16-27

OPERATIONS MANUAL Ellington Field Practice Areas

16-28

MASTER BASE SUPPLEMENT

(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL Sample Position Report

Alpha Traffic, Cirrus 123DA, 2 miles South of Baytown, 3000 ft., Steep Turns, Alpha

Approved Position Reporting Points ALPHA Practice Area Baytown Airport Cotton Lake Lake Anahauc BRAVO Practice Area MHF Trinity VOR Bolivar Peninsula San Leon Point CHARLIE Practice Area Texas City Galveston Santa Fe I-45 DELTA Practice Area West Bay Alvin Chocolate Bayou

NOTE Flight crews shall monitor the frequency 123.50 MHz, if appropriate, while in the practice areas.

CAUTION This procedure in no way relieves the flight crews of their responsibility to exercise collision avoidance procedure

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OPERATIONS MANUAL

Hollywood / North Perry


Approved Training Airports Aerosim Flight Academy aircraft may only operate to airports approved by the Director of Flight Operations. The following lists are approved airports by base that are: Less than 50nm Greater than 50nm, but less than 100nm Greater than 100nm, but less than 250nm Greater than 250nm

In addition, information is provided to effectively plan for each required cross-country. Information is presented in the following areas: City Name of airport Identifier Distance NOTE For additional information, refer to the current Airport/Facilities Directory (A/FD).

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Airports Less Than 50NM From HWO CITY Boca Raton, FL Lantana, FL West Palm Beach, FL Ft. Lauderdale, FL Kendall, FL Miami, FL Pompano Beach, FL Fort Lauderdale, FL NAME OF AIRPORT Boca Raton Airport Palm Beach County Park Palm Beach International Ft. Lauderdale Executive Kendall-Tamiami Executive Opa Locka Airport Pompano Beach Airport Fort Lauderdale International IDENTIFIER (BCT)** (LNA)** (PBI)** (FXE)** *** (TMB) (OPF)** *** (PMP)** *** (FLL)** *** DIST 24NM 37NM 42NM 12NM 24NM 06NM 17NM 06NM

For asterisk key (*, **, ***) see end of section

Airports Greater Than 50NM, But Less Than 100NM From HWO CITY Fort Myers, FL Fort Pierce, FL Immokalee, FL LaBelle, FL Okeechobee, FL Pahokee, FL Stuart, FL Marathon, FL Marco Island, FL Naples, FL Vero Beach, FL NAME OF AIRPORT Page Field St. Lucie County Immokalee Airport LaBelle Municipal Okeechobee County Palm Beach County Glades Witham Field Marathon Airport Marco Island Airport Naples Municipal Vero Beach Municipal IDENTIFIER (FMY)** (FPR) (IMM) (X14) (OBE) (PHK) (SUA) (MTH)## *** (MKY) (APF) (URB) DIST 94NM 90NM 68NM 78NM 82NM 53NM 71NM 93NM 78NM 83NM 99NM

For asterisk key (*, **, ***) see end of section

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Airports Greater Than 100NM, But Less Than 250NM From HWO CITY St. Augustine, FL Bunnell, FL Daytona Beach, FL Deland, FL Dunellon, FL Leesburg, FL Ormond Beach, FL Plymouth, FL Ocala, FL Sanford, FL Williston, FL Umatilla, FL Arcadia, FL Avon Park, FL Bartow, FL Brooksville, FL Cocoa, FL Crystal River, FL Kissimmee, FL Lakeland, FL Lake Wales, FL Melbourne, FL Orlando, FL Punta Gorda, FL Sarasota, FL Sebastian, FL Sebring, FL Tampa, FL Tampa, FL Titusville, FL Titusville, FL Valkaria, FL Venice, FL Key West, FL New Smyrna, FL New Port Richey, FL NAME OF AIRPORT St. Augustine Airport Flagler Co. Daytona Beach Deland Taylor Dunellon Municipal Leesburg Municipal Ormond Beach Orlando Country Ocala Municipal Orlando-Sanford Williston Municipal Umatilla Municipal Arcadia Municipal Avon Park Municipal Bartow Municipal Hernando County Merritt Island Crystal River Airport Kissimmee Municipal Lakeland Municipal Lake Wales Municipal Melbourne Regional Orlando Executive Charlotte County Airport Sarasota/Bradenton Sebastian Municipal Sebring Regional Tampa North Airport Vandenberg Airport Arthur Dunn Airport Space Center Executive Valkaria Airport Venice Municipal Key West International New Smyrna Beach Tampa Bay Executive IDENTIFIER (SGJ) (X47)** (DAB)** (DED)** (X35) (LEE)* (OMN)** (X04)*** (OCF) (SFB)* ** (X60) (X23)* (X06) (AVO)* (BOW)* (BKV)*** (COI)* (X31) (ISM)*** (LAL)*** (X07)* (MLB) (ORL)*** (PGD) (SRQ)** (X26) (SEF)* (X39)*** (X16)*** (X21)* *** (TIX)* *** (X59) (UNC) (EYW)## *** (34J)** (RRF)*** DIST 245NM 214NM 196NM 193NM 216NM 189NM 204NM 177NM 218NM 176NM 234NM 191NM 112NM 118NM 143NM 190NM 142NM 212NM 152NM 153NM 135NM 129NM 164NM 190NM 150NM 110NM 106NM 175NM 165NM 160NM 154NM 119NM 135NM 123NM 186NM 183NM

For asterisk key (*, **, *** ##) see end of section

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Airports Greater Than 250NM From HWO CITY Brunswick, GA Fernandina Beach, FL Jacksonville, FL Jacksonville, FL Jekyll Island, GA Keystone Heights, FL Alma, GA Brunswick, GA Gainesville, FL Jesup, GA Live Oak, FL Valdosta, GA Waycross, GA Adel, GA Albany, GA Americus, GA Augusta, GA Bainbridge, GA Charleston, SC Claxton, GA Columbus, GA Fitzgerald, GA Macon, GA Macon, GA Perry, FL Savannah, GA Tallahassee, FL Thomasville, GA Tifton, GA Vidalia, GA Atlanta, GA Lake City, FL Dothan, AL * ** *** ## NAME OF AIRPORT Malcolm McKinnan Airport Fernandina Bch Municipal Craig Municipal Jacksonville International Jekyll Island Airport Keystone Airpark Bacon Co. Glynco Jetport Gainesville Regional Jesup-Wayne Airport Suwanne, Co. Valdosta Regional Waycross-Ware County Cook Co. Southwest Geo. Regional Southern Field Bush Field Decatur Co. Industrial Charleston Executive Claxton-Evans Co. Columbus Metro Fitzgerald Municipal Middle Georgia Regional Smart Downtown Airport Perry-Foley Airport Savannah International Tallahassee Regional Thomasville Municipal Henry Tift-Myers Vidalia Municipal Dekalb-Peachtree Lake City Municipal Dothan Airport IDENTIFIER (SSI)* (SSJ)** (CRG) (JAX)** (09J)* (42J) (AMG) (BAK) (GNV) (JES) (24J) (VLD)* (AYS) (15J) (ABY) (ACJ) (AGS) (BGE) (JZI)* ** (CWV) (CSG) (FZG) (MCN) (MAC) (40J) (SAV)** (TLH)** (TUI) (TMA) (UDI) (PDK)*** (31J)* (DHN) DIST 316NM 284NM 271NM 280NM 311NM 250NM 353NM 322NM 251NM 344NM 297NM 329NM 347NM 352NM 392NM 421NM 451NM 378NM 402NM 382NM 476NM 376NM 439NM 445NM 301NM 377NM 342NM 351NM 368NM 388NM 518NM 278NM 421NM

Requires briefing on restricted areas and Military Operating Areas (MOA). Requires briefing on Class C airspace. Requires briefing on Class B airspace. Aerosim Flight Academy students must go to this airport via the Keys Island chain.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Approved Refueling Stations with Academy Accounts Flight Crews must check with Flight Dispatch prior to departure for a current list of approved refueling locations.

WARNING At no time during any cross-country flight may aircraft HOBBS time between refueling exceed 3.0 hours without Flight Operations Management authorization.

Should an unplanned stop be necessary at an airport other than those listed, contact Flight Dispatch, collect if necessary, for guidance. If it becomes necessary to refuel at a location other than those listed, the flight crew must retain a fuel receipt for reimbursement.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Practice Areas Flight training will normally take place within the boundaries of the Practice Area as defined by the Aerosim Flight Academy. The Practice Area has been designated to provide for dual flight instruction and solo operations practice. This practice area is defined to the north, by the 26 MILE BEND over to the North West corner of the Alert Area A-291B, and to the south by the FORTY MILE BEND over to the intersection of KROME AVENUE & THE TRAIL. This area should be used for flight operations conducted west of North Perry airport.

CAUTION Caution should be exercised when using the Practice Areas so as to not impede aircraft that are flying instrument approaches to Miami International and Opa Locka Airports.

NOTE All aircraft departing North Perry airport will select an altitude at or above 2000 feet. All inbound aircraft will select an altitude below 1500 feet.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Sample Position Report

Trailer Park Traffic, N1234Q, Skyhawk, 3 miles north of the Trailer Park, 3000 ft., Steep Turns

Approved Position Reporting Points 26 Mile Bend Andytown Tollgate North-West Corner of Alert Area A-291-B Pumping Station Grass Strip Trailer Park Opa Locka West Airport CURVE Intersection Dade Collier Airport The Forty Mile Bend Krome Avenue And The Trail

NOTE Flight crews shall monitor the frequency 123.45 MHz, if appropriate, while in the practice areas.

NOTE Flight crews may contact flight dispatch on frequency 123.50 MHz for assistance. Proper radio etiquette will be used at all times.

CAUTION This procedure in no way relieves the flight crews of their responsibility to exercise collision avoidance procedure

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Chapter 17 Flight Instructor Information

Table Of Contents
CHAPTER 17 FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION ................................................................................. 1 CONDUCT OF EMPLOYEES .................................................................................................................................. 3 MAJOR RULE VIOLATIONS POLICY ................................................................................................................. 3 FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR PROFESSIONALISM ..................................................................................................... 4 INSTRUCTOR ACTIVITY AND MONTHLY EVALUATION ............................................................................ 5 ATTITUDE .................................................................................................................................................................. 6 STUDENT SERVICE ..................................................................................................................................................... 6 PARTICIPATION .......................................................................................................................................................... 6 RECORD KEEPING ...................................................................................................................................................... 6 STUDENT PROGRESS .................................................................................................................................................. 6 PASS RATE ................................................................................................................................................................ 6 RATINGS .................................................................................................................................................................... 7 FRATERNIZATION .................................................................................................................................................. 8 PERSONAL TIME OFF (PTO) REQUEST ............................................................................................................. 9 INSTRUCTOR MEETINGS .................................................................................................................................... 11 TERMINATING EMPLOYMENT FROM THE ACADEMY ............................................................................. 11 INSTRUCTOR PROFICIENCY PROGRAM ....................................................................................................... 12 COMPLETION DATES FOR REQUIRED REPORTS........................................................................................ 13 FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR MONTHLY EVALUATIONS ...................................................................................................... 13 ADMISSION SIMULATOR SESSIONS (SANFORD) .......................................................................................... 13 STUDENT MANAGEMENT ................................................................................................................................... 14 SCHEDULING .......................................................................................................................................................... 15 STUDENT ENROLLMENT .................................................................................................................................... 16 SCHEDULING ON A DAY OFF ............................................................................................................................. 17 SCHEDULING STAGE CHECKS .......................................................................................................................... 17 SCHEDULING FAA PRACTICAL TESTS ........................................................................................................... 17 REVIEW LESSONS ................................................................................................................................................. 18 RELEASING STUDENT PILOTS FOR SOLO FLIGHTS .................................................................................. 19 FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR ENDORSEMENT RESPONSIBILITIES.................................................................... 19 STUDENT TRAINING DIFFICULTIES................................................................................................................ 20 KNOWLEDGE AND PROFICIENCY ................................................................................................................... 21 ENROLLMENT CREDIT ........................................................................................................................................ 22 STANDARDIZATION FLIGHTS ........................................................................................................................... 23

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OPERATIONS FLIGHTS ........................................................................................................................................24 STUDENT RECORDS ..............................................................................................................................................24 GENERAL .................................................................................................................................................................24 RESPONSIBILITY ......................................................................................................................................................25 CREATING STUDENT TRAINING FOLDERS ................................................................................................................25 CREATING STUDENT FLIGHT TRAINING RECORDS ...................................................................................................26 MAINTAINING STUDENT RECORDS ..........................................................................................................................27 CLOSING STUDENT FLIGHT TRAINING RECORDS .....................................................................................................27 CLOSING STUDENT TRAINING FOLDERS ..................................................................................................................28 STORING STUDENT RECORDS ..................................................................................................................................29 STUDENTS TERMINATING FROM PART 141 COURSES ..............................................................................................29 LESSON SEQUENCE ..................................................................................................................................................29 GRADING .................................................................................................................................................................30 REVIEW FLIGHTS .....................................................................................................................................................30 EMPLOYEE PERSONNEL FILES .........................................................................................................................31 AIRLINE APPLICATION PROCEDURES FOR FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS....................................................31 WORKING BEYOND THE EMPLOYEE COMMITMENT ...............................................................................33 BOMB THREAT PROCEDURES ...........................................................................................................................34 CREW COORDINATION .............................................................................................................................................34 THREAT AGAINST SPECIFIC AIRCRAFT ON THE RAMP ............................................................................................34 THREAT AGAINST SPECIFIC AIRCRAFT TAXIING ......................................................................................................35 THREAT AGAINST SPECIFIC AIRCRAFT AIRBORNE...................................................................................................35 AIRPORTS WITH NO PROCEDURES............................................................................................................................35 INSPECTION PROCEDURES........................................................................................................................................36 FAA RECOMMENDED IN FLIGHT PROCEDURES FOR A SUSPECT DEVICE ONBOARD ...............................................36 STUDENT OR PASSENGER MISCONDUCT AND THREATENING SITUATIONS ....................................37 COMPANY POLICY ...................................................................................................................................................37 COMMON STRATEGY TACTICS .................................................................................................................................38 ONCE THE AIRCRAFT IS ON THE GROUND ..............................................................................................................38 INCIDENT / ACCIDENT REPORT ................................................................................................................................39 LEGAL ACTION ........................................................................................................................................................39 AVIATION SAFETY ACTION PROGRAM (ASAP) ...........................................................................................40

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Conduct Of Employees
Academy Flight Instructors or other personnel may not discuss any matter concerning Academy business or student performance difficulties with anyone except other Aerosim Flight Academy employees. Any such discussions must be conducted in such a manner as to ensure that no one can overhear the conversation. Any Flight Instructor or other personnel known to bad mouth, run down, promote gossip, discuss wages (his/her or anyone's), discuss student performance of a critical nature, or disagree with academy standardization policies and procedures in the presence of any student, or other customer or prospective customer, will be terminated immediately from the Academy.

Major Rule Violations Policy


Each employee must meet certain standards of conduct in maintaining safe and orderly working relationships with others. While most employees conduct themselves in an appropriate, business-like manner, occasionally an employee's behavior may be unacceptable. If such a situation occurs, an employee may have their employment terminated immediately. Major violations of Company Standards of conduct include, but are not limited to: Theft. Dishonesty, including falsification of company records. Altering or tampering with pay records, including clocking in or out for another employee or requesting another employee to do so. Failure to report an accident during the work shift. Violation of the drug and alcohol abuse free working environment. Rudeness or disrespect toward customers, the public or employees. Insubordination - refusing to do assigned duties, refusing to work assigned hours or failure to follow a supervisor's direction(s).

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Disclosing confidential company information without approval. Misuse of company benefits. Misuse, abuse, damage or unauthorized personal use of company property or equipment. This includes unauthorized personal use of company vehicles, telephone system, copy machines, or mailing system. Giving security codes, telephone codes or copy codes to unauthorized persons. Sexual or other illegal harassment. Possession of a gun, knife, weapon, explosive or other potentially harmful object not required for job duties. Disregard for safety procedures or regulations. Fighting.

Flight Instructor Professionalism


Flight Instructors are encouraged to use all possible diplomacy, tact and proper courtesy in their relations with students. This effort can be enhanced by the Flight Instructor's careful avoidance of distracting personal habits such as the use of profane language, smoking, unprofessional dress, or expressing or exhibiting personal prejudices during the conduct of flight instructional activities. Appropriate action in the above areas will reflect favorably on all elements of the aviation industry and will enhance the professional image the Academy wishes to project.

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Instructor Activity And Monthly Evaluation


INSTRUCTOR MONTHLY EVALUATION Group Assigned: Month: Month Total Sat % Total Total Sat % Year:

Instructor Name: Employee No.: First Time Recommendations Stage Checks FAA Check rides Overall Stage/FAA
EOC Examining Authority

# of Students recommended for EOC (PPC 26, IRC 31, CFI-A 18) since date of hire. Students must have completed the course.

Attitude Customer Service Participation Record Keeping Monthly Pass Rate Student Progress

4 4 4 4 4 4

3 3 3 3 3 3

2 2 2 2 2 2

1 1 1 1 1 1

0 0 0 0 0 0

Overall Rating: __________ Workdays Lost: LOA_____ PTO_____ Illness_____ Other_____ Evaluator Comments / Corrective Actions: ___________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________
Check as appropriate:

[ ] Any additional unsatisfactory performance may result in termination of employment. Instructor Comments: ____________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________
* Any additional comments may be written on plain paper and attached to this document.

Instructor Signature Manager Signature Chief/Asst. Chief Instructor Signature Manager of H.R. Signature

Date Date Date Date

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Attitude Interacts with students, other Flight Instructors, and management in a positive, professional manner. Accepts assignments and additional responsibilities, and is eager to help others. Conducts assignments in a timely manner and is punctual. Continually seeks to improve performance.

Student Service Works hard to accommodate the individual needs of all assigned students. Willing to help students of other Flight Instructors.

Participation Attends meetings, offers opinions, ideas, suggestions, and solutions to improve the quality of training and the organization.

Record Keeping Submits completed folders, progress reviews, and monthly evaluations on time. Keeps accurate MISA records.

Student Progress Accurately anticipates students progress, schedules and prepares accordingly to keep students on track. Willing to commit the time and effort, as necessary, to ensure student progression.

Pass Rate Based on the combined overall (first time) % for Stage Check, End of Course, and FAA check rides to fit within the following categories. May be raised or lowered at the discretion of the evaluator based upon varying situations (if raised/lowered, evaluator must elaborate in comments section). 100% - 95% 94% - 89% 88% - 80% 79% - 70% Below 70% =4 =3 =2 =1 =0

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Ratings

4 3 2 1 0

Outstanding: Consistently exceeds expectations. Good: Often exceeds expectations. Satisfactory: Consistently meets expectations. Needs Improvement: Needs improvement to meet expectations. Unsatisfactory: Does not meet expectations.

Overall Rating: Add all categories, with pass rate doubled to reflect the importance of a good pass rate to the success of the academy, divide by 7.

If a Flight Instructor's monthly pass rate falls below 80% for a particular month, the Flight Instructor will be counseled by the appropriate Group Manager / Leader on ways to improve this monthly pass rate. If a Flight Instructor's monthly pass rate falls below 70% for a particular month, the Flight Instructor will be counseled and given direction on needed improvements by Group Manager. This direction may include a flight or flight training device evaluation of the Flight Instructor by the Chief Flight Instructor. In addition, a member of the Operations Department management staff may observe and critique the Flight Instructor during dual instruction. If, after receiving counseling and assistance from the Chief Flight Instructor or Operations Department management staff, the Flight Instructor's monthly pass rate remains below 70% for an additional month, the Flight Instructor may be subject to disciplinary action up to and including termination.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL

Fraternization
It is the policy of Aerosim Flight Academy to discourage fraternization between students and Flight Instructors. Areas of specific concern to the Academy's image are: Dating between students and Flight Instructors. The sharing of living accommodations by students and Flight Instructors. Intimate relationships between students and Flight Instructors that could place the student, the Flight Instructor, or both, in a compromising position that would reflect unfavorably upon the individuals concerned and/or the Academy.

NOTE Students and Flight Instructors may be exempt from the aforementioned policy if the student and Flight Instructor were dating prior to beginning the training and/or employment with the Academy. However, this must have been brought to the attention of the Manager of Human Resources before beginning employment and/or training at the Academy.

If you are determined to fraternize with student(s) your employment will be terminated from the Academy. The Aerosim Flight Academy fraternization policy is in no way is meant to prohibit a Flight Instructor from developing positive, friendly relationships with students. Examples of areas that would be considered within the bounds of good taste that would encourage greater student/Flight Instructor professionalism and camaraderie and would not reflect unfavorably on the participants or the Academy are: Meetings at breakfast, lunch, dinner, etc. with student(s). Gatherings of assigned students with a Flight Instructor for other social activities (e.g. cookout, ballgame, movie, etc.).

The above-mentioned examples must not compromise the policy of no dating between students and Flight Instructors.

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Personal Time Off (PTO) Request


A request for a Personal Time Off must be submitted to the appropriate Group Leader/Manager on an Instructor (PTO) Form at least one (1) week in advance of the proposed PTO start date. Prior to submitting a PTO request, a student reassignment must be complete. Approval of a PTO request will be determined on the basis of the Flight Instructors current and projected student load. All emergency PTOs will be granted as quickly as possible. The Flight Instructor will receive a copy of the PTO request, signed by the Chief/Assistant Chief Flight Instructor, if the PTO request is approved.

NOTE Instructor PTOs are discouraged for obvious reasons (delay in student's training progress, Flight Instructor's loss of flight hours, etc). Therefore, Flight Instructors requesting PTOs, other than an emergency situation, prior to one year's length of employment service may not be approved.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL INSTRUCTOR LOA/PTO REQUEST Print Full Name _________________________________________________________________ I am requesting a LOA/PTO from (Day/Date) _________________________________________ through (Day/Date)_______________________Purpose of this leave ______________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ In case of emergency, I can be reached at this number __________________________________ Additional Comments ____________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ My students are reassigned as follows: STUDENT NAME / ID# INSTRUCTOR NAME (with signature)

________________________________TO_____________________________________ ________________________________TO_____________________________________ ________________________________TO_____________________________________ ________________________________TO_____________________________________ SIGNATURES REQUIRED ______________________________________________ Flight Instructor ______________________________________________ Manager/Leader ______________________________________________ Chief/Assistant Flight Instructor Distribution: Original to Payroll Office Copy to Flight Instructor Copy to Manager

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OPERATIONS MANUAL

Instructor Meetings
Each week a Flight Instructor meeting will be held for each training group. In addition, once a month a Safety Meeting will be held in addition to a training group's weekly meeting. Attendance at scheduled Flight Instructor meetings is mandatory. Failure to attend the appropriate meeting(s) without prior approval by the Group Manager/Leader will be grounds for disciplinary action. In the event of illness or an emergency, the appropriate Group Manager/Leader must be contacted prior to the start of the meeting. All other absences must be approved 24 hours in advance.

Terminating Employment From The Academy


A benefit of instructing for the Academy is to provide a Flight Instructor with a means to build flight hours. At the present level of Academy students, it takes approximately 12 to 18 months for low time Flight Instructors to acquire the necessary time to become marketable to a hiring airline. Once a Flight Instructor meets the necessary time requirement, it is necessary to inform the Academy of the employment plans of the Flight Instructor. The care of customer is of the utmost importance to the Academy; therefore the following policy has been implemented: If a Flight Instructor is currently seeking, or intends to seek other employment, that Flight Instructor must inform a Group Leader/Manager. This will allow the Academy to begin making plans for additional staff. As soon as a Flight Instructor knows that a new company has hired them, they must submit a resignation letter giving a two-week notice and stating the intended departure date. A copy of this letter must be provided to the Flight Instructors Group Manager, the Chief Flight Instructor. On the final day of employment, the Flight Instructor must go to the Human Resources Department and obtain an out-processing packet. 1. The first step in completing the packet is to turn in the following items: Aerosim Flight Academy employee ID badge. Any other property of Aerosim Flight Academy. A Human Resource Representative must sign the packet in the appropriate areas to indicate this step has been completed.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL 2. The second step in completing the packet is for the Flight Instructor to meet their Group Manager and make sure that all students have been re-assigned and their paperwork is complete. 3. The third and final step in completing the packet is to complete the rest of the personal information paperwork. This packet must then be turned into and signed by the Chief Flight Instructor.

If a two-week notice of ending employment is not given and/or out-processing is improperly completed, the following will apply: An employment recommendation from the Academy will not be received; and The Flight Instructor will not be eligible for re-hire by the Academy at any time.

Instructor Proficiency Program


In order to assist Academy Flight Instructors in maintaining their flight proficiency during their employment the following program has been developed. Each Academy Flight Instructor will be allowed three (3) hour of Operations Time. The training may be conducted in the Frasca 141, Frasca 142, FTD or AATD. The device will be scheduled on a pencil-in, space available basis only. Should a student require the device during the time it is in use by the Flight Instructor, the Flight Instructor must immediately return the clipboard "can" to Flight Dispatch for the student's use. When a device becomes available again the Flight Instructor may then fly the balance of the allotted time. If the Flight Instructor elects not to use a device in a given month, the three hours will be forfeited.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL

Completion Dates For Required Reports


In an effort to give specific guideline for the completion of required reports, the following will be the due dates for reports required by the flight department:

Flight Instructor Monthly Evaluations The Group or Base Manager will complete and submit to the Chief Flight Instructor the monthly Flight Instructor evaluations on or before the 6th of each month.

NOTE If for any reason the above due date requirements cannot be met, inform the Chief Flight Instructor.

Admission Simulator Sessions (Sanford)


The Admissions Department conducts tours of the Academy for prospective students Monday through Friday. During the tour, each prospective student has the opportunity to fly one of the Advanced Aviation Training Devices (AATD). This is in an effort to demonstrate the equipment to the prospective student. The following are additional policies and guidelines for the conduct of these sessions: Marketing will schedule Admissions Simulator Session and deliver a request to Scheduling for each required session. Scheduling will schedule Admissions Simulator Session time blocks, and make devices available according to that schedule. In the event that a Flight Instructor does not show up for a session, the affected marketing representative will notify Flight Dispatch. The Flight Dispatcher will contact a Flight Department Manager or Leader immediately. The Manager or Leader will locate a Flight Instructor to conduct the Admission Simulator Session. A Group Manager or Leader will conduct the session if no Flight Instructor is available. Any modification of this procedure will be made by the Chief Flight Instructor and signed off by all affected department heads before implementation.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL

Student Management
It is critical that Flight Instructors properly track a student's progress in any of the courses in which they are training. Flight Instructors are expected to know when their students are in an academic class, taking Knowledge Tests, on Personal Time Off (PTO), on the grounded list, and when they have been reassigned. Flight Instructors must meet with their assigned Group or Base Leader/Manager at least once every week to verify the following: The specific location of each student's position in the syllabus reference the programmed course completion date. The accuracy and completion of students training records

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OPERATIONS MANUAL

Scheduling
The Instructor's Activity Request Form (ARF) must be completed with the student's planned daily activities. The Flight Instructor is responsible and accountable to ensure that this form is turned into their Group or Base Leader/Manager no later than 9:00am every day for the following day's flight schedule. On the day before a scheduled day(s) off, the Flight Instructor shall turn in to their Group or Base Leader/Manager a completed ARF for their students activities on the Flight Instructors day(s) off, plus their first day back activities. In the event that a flight is cancelled, incomplete, or unsatisfactory, immediately notify Scheduling and reschedule the corrected activities. While during time off, a Leader/Manager will, if necessary, reschedule the correct activities for a student(s). Each student's flight/FTD lesson activity must be requested in accordance with the appropriate Scheduling Model. More activities than the Schedule Model lists may be scheduled, but not less. Each student's flight/FTD lesson(s) and ground school must be requested in the appropriate order or sequence that it needs to occur. Only the times that a student would not be available for the scheduling of a flight/FTD lesson must be listed. (Approved reasons for a student not being available to be scheduled would be: ground school or PTO).

NOTE All Activity Request Forms must be submitted no later than 1000 hrs. on the day preceding the next day's schedule.

Scheduling will process the requests, establishing a schedule in accordance with the information provided.

NOTE No requested times for activities will be honored. During Scheduling normal operating hours, changes to activity requests already submitted will be processed in the same manner as the original request. After Scheduling normal operating hours, changes must be submitted to a Group or Base Leader/Manager, or left with Dispatch for processing at the beginning of the next day.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Pencil-in activities are encouraged whenever an opportunity is available to advance a student's progress. However, pencil-ins will be allowed to occur only on the current day's schedule. All flight/FTD activities scheduled for the current day have priority over any pencil-in activity. All other ARF information (i.e. names, dates, I.D. and lesson numbers, lesson description, etc.) is still required to be completed to ensure the accuracy of what is scheduled. Any deviation from the above will require prior approval from the appropriate Leader/Manager. If a Flight Instructor is ill, and cannot work, they must call Flight Dispatch immediately. If the Flight Instructor calls in sick, the Flight Supervisor will attempt to assign a substitute Flight Instructor to the student(s). If unable to find a substitute, they will reschedule the student(s) on the Flight Instructors next available workday. If a substitute is assigned, they must advise Scheduling as to the next appropriate activity for the student.

Student Enrollment
When a Flight Instructor is assigned a student, the Flight Instructor must verify the student is properly enrolled in the appropriate course. In addition, the Flight Instructor must determine if the student is training under FAR Part 141 or 61. This may include a meeting with the Chief Flight Instructor or designated Assistant Chief Flight Instructor. If the student requires a certificate of enrollment the following will apply: 1. The certificate of enrollment must be typed using the student's full first, middle, last name, date of enrollment, and the name of the appropriate Chief/Assistant Flight Instructor. 2. Two (2) copies of the appropriate certificate of enrollment will be signed by the Chief/Assistant Flight Instructor. 3. The Group or Base Manager will provide the certificates to the Flight Instructor. 4. The Flight Instructor should verify that the student is properly enrolled in the appropriate course with the correct enrollment date. 5. The Flight Instructor will place one copy in the Student Flight Training Record and the other copy in the student's mailbox.

NOTE All Part 141 courses begin the first day of ground school.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL

Scheduling On A Day Off


A Flight Instructor must personally contact their student if that student is scheduled for a solo or dual flight lesson on a Flight Instructor's scheduled day off.

Scheduling Stage Checks


A student may not be scheduled for a Stage Check until all lessons are completed in that stage. The Flight Instructor will accomplish the scheduling of Stage Checks using the Stage Request Form. If the time between final Stage Check oral or flight and FAA Check ride exceeds 15 days, that portion of the final Stage Check that exceeded the 15 days must be retaken.

Scheduling FAA Practical Tests


Before a FAA Check ride may be scheduled, the student must have successfully completed the appropriate course of training and the course End-of-Course Stage Check. Upon completion of the End-of Course Stage Check, the Check Instructor will submit a records packet and flight training record for auditing. After the audit is complete, the packet and folder will be given to the Chief/Assistant Chief Flight Instructor for scheduling. The End-of-Course packet, to be given to the Check Instructor prior to completing the End-ofCourse Stage Check, must include the following items: Student's training record Completed and signed 8710/IACRA/Step Five of IACRA Your student's FAA knowledge test results (if applicable) A copy of your student's logbook showing the appropriate and current Endorsements as well as evidence showing that the student meets the FAA's aeronautical experience requirements for the appropriate certificate or rating sought.

09/01/10 (ISSUE)

FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Check Instructors must ensure that the above items are submitted for auditing. DO NOT allow students to schedule the check ride independently. If a Flight Instructor has any questions, consult with the Chief/Assistant Chief Flight Instructor. When this package is APPROVED, a notice will be forwarded to Scheduling by the Chief/Assistant Chief Flight Instructor to schedule the Practical Test. The application for a FAA Check ride must be in Scheduling by no later than 1200 each day in order for it to be acted upon that day. Flight Instructors and students may request specific examiners. Aerosim Flight Academy will try to honor that request, however, this request may delay scheduling of the Practical Test.

NOTE It is the responsibility of the Flight Instructor to ensure that the student receives notification of the FAA Practical Test.

Review Lessons
All Progress Review must be scheduled with the appropriate Group or Base Manager and a Student Progress Report submitted under the following conditions: Before a previously completed lesson may be reviewed. After any Stage Check has been unsatisfactory. If the Flight Instructor and/or student requests a review flight.

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(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL

Releasing Student Pilots For Solo Flights


It is the responsibility of the Flight Instructor to ensure that the student has read and understands the relevant sections of the Operations Manual prior to the students release for solo flight. When a Flight Instructor is ready to solo a student, ensure that the student has the endorsed certificate and endorsed logbook in their possession. When students are on a solo flight they must have in their possession, an endorsed Student Pilot Certificate, FAA Medical Certificate, government issued ID, and a current, properly endorsed logbook, including any limitations the Flight Instructor has placed on that student's solo activities. For a student pilot cross-country, the "cross-country" endorsement must appear on the Student Pilot Certificate and in the students logbook. In addition, a separate logbook endorsement for that particular cross-country is necessary.

Flight Instructor Endorsement Responsibilities


A Flight Instructor may not sign off any Aerosim Flight Academy student for a check ride unless all Academy curriculum requirements have been met for that certificate/rating. Deviation from the approved curriculum requires approval from the Chief or Assistant Chief Flight Instructor. Students must request to deviate or waive any portion of the training syllabus in writing. In addition to adherence to the approved curriculum, the Flight Instructor is directly responsible for, but not limited to, the following: Determining the currency of a student's Medical Certificate and Student Pilot Certificate, if applicable. The currency of the student's FAA Pilot Certificate with respect to 14 CFR Part 61.56 Flight Review as well as the validity of a temporary certificate. Cross Country time and mileage requirements for each course of training as required. Proper logbook endorsements to include review of Knowledge Test results, if appropriate. Logbook endorsement for each lesson in which instruction is given.

09/01/10 (ISSUE)

FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION

17-19

OPERATIONS MANUAL NOTE The Flight Instructor must endorse the students logbook immediately after the activity per 14 CFR Part 61.51(h) and 61.189. The Flight Instructor must never endorse a logbook that is not properly filled out.

Verification of all flight experience and flight training requirements as recorded in the student's logbook. Verification of all information as indicated on the student's Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application.

Student Training Difficulties


The following are considered student training difficulties: Two or more unsatisfactory, incomplete, or combinations of both, lessons within a stage of training. An unsatisfactory stage check. An unsatisfactory FAA check ride (Practical Test). Over-flying the flight hours policy for the course.

The following guidelines will be used if a student develops training difficulties during training. A Student Progress Review must be completed. If the Flight Instructor proposes a course of action and the Group or Base Manager agrees with that course of action, the Manager will sign the progress review and file it in the Student Training Folder. If the Group or Base Manager does not agree with the proposed course of action, or no course of action is proposed, the Manager will notify the Flight Instructor requesting a meeting with the Flight Instructor and student. This meeting must take place before the students next lesson.

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(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL The following are examples of courses of action that a Manager may suggest to the Flight Instructor: One additional dual lesson for the Flight Instructor to SAT the lesson. (For this example: Flight hour limitations must be placed; one activity not to exceed 1.5 hours then report the results to the Manager). The student will observe / backseat one or more lessons to observe and take notes, if appropriate. The Group or Base Manager will observe / backseat the next lesson that the student and Flight Instructor schedule, if appropriate. The Group or Base Manager may conduct a lesson or evaluation flight / simulator with the student. If the evaluation is conducted in a four-place aircraft, the student's Flight Instructor will also accompany the flight. The student will be assigned groundwork with the Flight Instructor or a LRC tutor. A Flight Instructor change.

Knowledge And Proficiency


When a student begins a course of training at the Academy, the cost and time estimated to complete a course has been based on the assumption that the student is at the knowledge and proficiency level of pilot certificate and rating held. If, after careful evaluation of the student on the initial training lesson(s), the Flight Instructor determines that the student is not at the necessary prerequisite level of knowledge and/or proficiency, the Flight Instructor must cease training and inform the appropriate Group or Base Manager. At the direction of the appropriate Manager, a meeting between the student, Flight Instructor, and the Chief/ Assistant Chief Flight Instructor will be scheduled so as to determine the appropriate course of action to be taken before resuming the student's contracted course of training.

09/01/10 (ISSUE)

FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION

17-21

OPERATIONS MANUAL Recommended courses of action may be, but are not limited to, the following: Assign backseat observation flights. Specific additional flight time to be used for the purpose of attaining the prerequisite level of skill/proficiency. Scheduled study activities.

The student must be advised that this course of action may increase the cost and time to complete the contracted training course. In addition, a Student Progress Review must be completed to indicate the results of the meeting.

Enrollment Credit
The following is the procedure that Aerosim Flight Academy will use when issuing training credit to a student enrolling in a 14 CFR Part 141 course of training. 1. A Chief/Assistant Chief Flight Instructor will review the student's logbook to determine how much training credit may be given to the student for prior experience. 2. The student may be credited not more than 25% of Aerosim Flight Academy's curriculum requirements based on previous experience and knowledge. However, 50% course credit may be transferred from one Part 141 certificated school to Aerosim Flight Academy if the training was conducted by the other school in accordance with that school's approved training course, and the student presents a valid school transcript from the transferring school at the time of transfer. 3. The Chief/Assistant Chief Flight Instructor will complete the Lesson Credit Sheet. This will include date of enrollment, student's full name (Last, First, Middle), and type of course to be enrolled in, student's flight hours, and the amount and type of credit to be given. This may include hours and/or lessons. 4. Before credit may be issued, the student must complete the Part 141 Evaluation Test and the test must be graded. 5. The Chief/Assistant Chief Flight Instructor will issue the approved credit to the student. The credit will be written on the Student Flight Training Record, page one and page two. In addition the Lesson Credit Sheet will be placed in the Student Training Folder (green folder) for reference. 6. The student's Flight Instructor will conduct the training based on the approved credit.

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(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL

Standardization Flights
The following procedures will be followed for the purpose of scheduling and conducting standardization flights: The Manager of Flight Standards will approve all standardization flight before they are scheduled, or in their absence the Chief Flight Instructor or the Flight Standards Department may grant approval. For operations at SFB, the Flight Standards Department will schedule all standardization activities. At other base locations, all standardization and non-revenue flights will be scheduled by the Base Manager / Base Check Group Leader. The standardization flight will be conducted in the minimum time necessary. The Piper Seminole (PA-44) standardization flight shall consist of two events (one simulator, one daytime). At the conclusion of the standardization flight, the Flight Instructor will be briefed on the results and areas of strength or weakness, where appropriate. If the Standardization Instructor finds deficient areas, they must immediately report this to the Manager of Flight Standards to determine the course of action to be taken. This may include additional flight(s) or simulator time to improve the Flight Instructor's skill or deficiency. Should a Flight Instructor conduct a standardization flight and be found to be seriously deficient or unprepared in the required knowledge and skill areas (e.g. Flight Standards Manual information) disciplinary action may be taken. NOTE The Flight Instructor may be asked to pay for any additional expense associated with conducting remedial flight training after a failed standardization flight. Non- Revenue Flights are all approved by the Director of Flight Operations, Manager of Flight Standards, or the Chief Flight Instructor. Maintenance flights may also be approved by the Director of Maintenance. All flights will be approved using Non-Revenue Flight request form and the evaluation pilot will use the MISA print release for all standardization flights. The Flight Standards Department will file the flight paperwork in the appropriate Flight Instructor's Part 141 records.

NOTE Strict control shall be maintained on these flights to ensure that individuals being standardized are eligible, and excessive flight time is not used.

09/01/10 (ISSUE)

FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION

17-23

OPERATIONS MANUAL

Operations Flights

If the flight is a standardization flight, Flight Standards will create and schedule the event If the flight is a maintenance flight, Maintenance will create the ticket. The ticket will be signed and MX will be written to the right of the word Course If the flight is an instructor training operation, or if a mistake was made by the Academy and the student is entitled to a credit flight, Flight Standards or the Chief Flight Instructor will create the ticket. The ticket will be signed and STD TRNG OPS will be written to the right of the word Course. Student credit flights must receive an approval from the Director of Flight Operations, Manager of Flight Standards, or the Chief Flight Instructor.

NOTE The approval of all operations/non-revenue flights must be granted by a Director level Operations Department staff member, the Manager of Flight Standards or the Chief Flight Instructor.

Student Records
General Students training at the Academy will generally require two types of records to maintain the paperwork associated with the training. The materials needed to create folders are generally located in the Student Records Office. The two folders are: Student Training Folder A green folder used to maintain all other records not associated with an individual course of training.

Student Flight Training Record A white folder used to maintain the records associated with an individual course of training.

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FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION

(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL Responsibility It is the responsibility of the Flight Instructor to create, maintain, and close all Student Flight Training Records. When a student completes a segment of training, is transferred to another Flight Instructor during the course of training, or terminates his training at the Academy, it is the responsibility of the Flight Instructor to ensure that all of the students records are completed and current. The following guidelines and policies are established for creating, maintaining, closing, and storing student records.

Creating Student Training Folders Student Training Folders will be constructed as follows: 1. A white peel and stick label will be placed at the top of the Student Training Folder. On this label, the Flight Instructor will print the student's name (last name first) using a black marker pen. Example: SMITH, GEORGE F. 2. Page 1 will contain the Student Enrollment Agreement, Training Summary, any PTO requests, flight terminations, and no-shows. 3. Page 2 will contain Student Progress Reviews, homework assignments, and any other student reports. 4. Page 3 will contain the monthly progress reports and student tracking sheets. These sheets must be placed in chronological order. 5. Page 4 will contain all review flights except those conducted after an unsatisfactory stage check or End-of-Course Test. The Student Training Folder will be stored alphabetically in the appropriate file cabinet.

09/01/10 (ISSUE)

FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION

17-25

OPERATIONS MANUAL Creating Student Flight Training Records A Student Flight Training Record is required for all students. For Part 141 courses this record is the official FAA training record. For a new student, the Student Flight Training Record may be obtained from the appropriate Manager. The Student Flight Training Record is to be kept inside the Student Training Folder. Student Flight Training Records will be constructed as follows: 1. All spaces on the front of the Student Flight Training Record are to be completed with the information requested to the extent possible at the time the student starts the course of training. 2. All students will be designated for training under Part 141 or 61 of the Federal Aviation Regulations. If a student is training under Part 141, the Chief/Assistant Chief Flight Instructor will provide the Flight Instructor with information on the number of hours or lessons to be credited, if any, on page 1 of the Students Flight Training Record. 3. If a student is training under Part 61, the Chief/Assistant Chief Flight Instructor will determine where within the syllabus the student will start his training and what lessons the student is to accomplish in that segment of training. This information will be indicated on page 1 of the Students Flight Training Record. 4. In building and maintaining the Student Flight Training Record, Flight Instructors will refer to the appropriate Course Audit Sheets. 5. Lesson sheets and student invoices will be attached to the Student Flight Training Record in chronological order as training occurs. Lessons will be recorded on page 2 of the Student Flight Training Record and lesson grades will be recorded appropriately.

NOTE Part 61 Student Flight Training Records must be kept in the same manner as Part 141 Student Flight Training Records except for the absences of a Certificate of Enrollment and Graduation Certificate for Certification purposes.

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FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION

(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL Maintaining Student Records Student Training Folders and Student Flight Training Records will not be removed from Academy property without the authorization of the Chief Flight Instructor. Flight Instructors shall keep student records current on a daily basis, but never more than three days behind. Records must be ready for inspection at any time by the FAA, Chief/Assistant Chief Flight Instructor, or Operations Management.

Closing Student Flight Training Records Student Flight Training Records will be closed out each time the student completes a course of training. Closing out a Student Flight Training Record means that the flight training record is complete; all items listed on the Course Audit Sheet have been accomplished checked and enclosed; that the required 8710/IACRA has been completed dated and signed by the student and Flight Instructor (if appropriate); that the required graduation certificates have been completed and signed by the Chief/Assistant Chief Flight Instructor; and the original embossed FAA written exam results (if required) are included. When a student completes a Part 141 training course, the student Flight Training Record must be reviewed and correctly closed out. If the student is to take an FAA check ride, the record must be closed out before the student is scheduled for the check ride. If the student is being certificated under examining authority, the review and close out must be accomplished before the Airman Certification Representative (ACR) can issue the certificate or rating. The following is the review and closure procedure for a Part 141 Student Flight Training Record: 1. At least 2 days prior (or as specified by a Base Manager) to the anticipated End-of-Course Test, following the appropriate Course Audit Sheet, the Flight Instructor will check to ensure that all required items are posted in the Student Flight Training Record and that the record is current. 2. A signed and undated 8710/IACRA, undated graduation certificate, and the original FAA written exam results will be included with the Student Flight Training Record at this time as specified on the appropriate Course Audit Sheet. Included in this packet will be complete copies of the students logbook, Pilot Certificate, Medical Certificate, and government issued identification. 3. When the End-of-Course Test is completed, the Check Instructor will make any necessary corrections, insert appropriate dates on 8710/IACRA and graduation certificate, and record the grade of the final stage check.

09/01/10 (ISSUE)

FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION

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OPERATIONS MANUAL 4. The Student Flight Training Record, including the packet of required documents, will be forwarded to the Records Department for auditing. 5. If correct and complete, the Records Department will forward the record to the Chief Flight Instructor for signing of the record, the graduation certificate, and make a final check of the 8710/IACRA for accuracy. The Chief Flight Instructor, if not using examining authority, will schedule the student for a FAA Practical Test and give the packet of required document to the Scheduling Department.

NOTE For satellite bases, the Student Flight Training Record, FAA Form 8710/IACRA, and Student Graduation Certificates will already be signed and completed prior to being sent to the Registrars Office for archiving.

6. If the student is to be certificated under examining authority, the record will be forwarded, after auditing, to the Chief Flight Instructor who will review all required documents, sign the recommendation on the back of the 8710/IACRA and then return the Student Flight Training Record and the packet of required documents to the ACR for completion of the certification process. The Review and Closing Procedure for Part 61 Course Records 1. When a student completes a course of training under Part 61 and has completed the Endof-Course Test, the Flight Instructor will forward the Student Flight Training Record along with a completed 8710/IACRA signed by the student and the Flight Instructor, and the original embossed FAA written exam to the Chief Flight Instructor. The Chief Flight Instructor will inspect the Student Flight Training Record, check the 8710/IACRA, and schedule the FAA check ride with scheduling returning the training record to the Flight Instructor.

Closing Student Training Folders Student Training Folders will not be closed out until the student has completed all the training contracted for completion at the Academy, or terminates from the Academy.

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(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL Storing Student Records For students receiving certification or ratings under examining authority, upon issuance of the appropriate certificate or rating, the ACR will return all items to the Registrars Office where they will be returned to the file and/or removed and stored as appropriate in containers in the student records archive.. Student records will be returned to the Registrars Office by the Chief Flight Instructor. For students required to take an FAA Practical Test, whether completing a Part 141 or Part 61 course, upon completion of the FAA Practical Test the Student Flight Training Record will be returned to the Registrars Office where it will be returned to the appropriate file cabinet and/or removed and stored as appropriate in the main student records storage area.

NOTE All Flight Instructors and Group Managers/Leaders are encouraged to review these procedures and provide suggestions to the Chief Flight Instructor wherever they find procedures and policies that they believe conflict and need to be changed or modified.

Students Terminating From Part 141 Courses If a determination has been made to terminate a student from a Part 141 training course, the student and student's Flight Instructor must complete the Part 141 Termination Request form and submit it with the current Student Flight training Record to the Chief Flight Instructor or Base Manager. The Flight Instructor will then create a new Student Flight Training Record appropriate to the flight training to be conducted and certify the Part 141 training record.

Lesson Sequence A sequence change may only be accomplished after it is approved by the Chief/Assistant Chief Flight Instructor or it is reviewed by the Flight Supervisor. All lessons will be flown sequentially unless specifically authorized to the contrary by the Chief/Assistant Chief Flight Instructor prior to the flight. Authorization will be given only where it makes sense, where it is logical, and where it is in keeping with the building block theory of learning. It will not be done as convenience to either the student or the Flight Instructor. No sequence change will occur on lessons that build new knowledge. Introductory tasks must be completed prior to review of those tasks.

09/01/10 (ISSUE)

FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION

17-29

OPERATIONS MANUAL Grading All maneuvers will be graded "4", "3", "2", "1", "O", or "I". All lessons will be graded Satisfactory, Incomplete or Unsatisfactory. All grading will be truthful and accurate and will always reflect as closely as possible the actual ability of the student as measured against the Completion Standards of the lesson. Once a grade of "1" or higher has been given for a maneuver in a lesson, that grade may not be changed. A grade assigned to a maneuver may only be changed if it is an "I" (incomplete) or a "0" (unsatisfactory). If the maneuver appears in a subsequent lesson and the student is unable to complete the maneuver satisfactorily, a grade of "0" could then be given. Within the same lesson, if there is a problem with the accomplishment of a maneuver and that maneuver is not shown on that lesson sheet, or it has already been graded "1" or above, the deficiency may only be resolved through a review flight approved by the Chief/Assistant Chief Flight Instructor. No additional maneuvers will be added onto or written into a lesson. This constitutes a modification of the TCO without approval of the FAA. Any maneuver on a lesson that is graded "1" or "0", will have an explanation for the grade inserted on the back of the lesson sheet or in the remarks area of the Flight Release. This explanation should be brief but should state the reason for the grade. A maneuver within a lesson that has essentially two parts (VR - to be accomplished visually, or IR - to be accomplished by reference to the instruments) will be graded a "0" if one of the two parts is accomplished unsatisfactorily. In addition, a circle will be placed around the portion that is performed unsatisfactory.

Review Flights A review flight may only be conducted after the Flight Instructor has received authorization to accomplish the review by the Chief/Assistant Chief Flight Instructor or Group Manager. All review flights are to be recorded in the Student Flight Training Record.

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FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION

(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL NOTE A lesson graded "I" or "U" occurring in a simulator may be completed in an airplane, if appropriate. Approval of the Chief / Assistant Chief Flight Instructor is required prior to this change. A lesson graded "I" or "U" occurring in an airplane may be completed only in an airplane.

Employee Personnel Files


Flight Instructors may review their Personnel File during normal working hours (0700 1700) Monday through Friday, except holidays. Requests for review must be made through the Human Resources Department.

NOTE Flight Instructor Pilot Records may be reviewed through the Flight Standards Department.

Airline Application Procedures For Flight Instructors


To receive the Application Package the applicant must possess: Minimum Flight Time: Total flight time of 800 hours Multi-Engine flight time of 50 hours Dual given in AEROSIM FLIGHT ACADEMY airplanes of 600 hours (may include Academy credit)

Minimum Flight & Medical Certificates: Commercial Certificate w / Multi-Engine & Instrument Rating First Class Medical Certificate Flight Instructor Certificate with Airplane Single & Multi-Engine and Instrument Airplane Ratings.

09/01/10 (ISSUE)

FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION

17-31

OPERATIONS MANUAL To receive the Release Letter and complete the airline interview process the applicant must possess:

Total flight time of 1000 hours Multi-Engine flight time of 100 hours Dual given in AEROSIM FLIGHT ACADEMY airplanes of 800 hours (may include Academy credit) Multi-Engine dual given in AEROSIM FLIGHT ACADEMY airplanes with enrolled AEROSIM FLIGHT ACADEMY students of 50 hours

Each month, the Pilot Placement office and Human Resources will meet to review the Crew Eligibility Roster to determine which Flight Instructors have met the requirements to receive an application package. Once a list has been developed, Pilot Placement office will send a letter to Flight Instructors inviting them to an initial interview briefing and to distribute the application package. The interview briefing will cover: A review of the pilot pre-screening and interview process Proper attire during pilot pre-screening and the interview process Instructions to thoroughly and accurately fill out the application The two weeks application preparation time period

Each month, the Director of Flight Operations, the Manager of Training, and the Pilot Placement Office will meet to review the Crew Eligibility Roster to determine which Flight Instructors have met the requirements to be released from the Academy and complete the airline interview process. Once a list has been developed, the Manager of Training will establish a release date for each Flight Instructor. The Manager of Training will send a letter to each Flight Instructor notifying them of the release date. The Pilot Placement office will establish an interview date for each Flight Instructor that qualifies. In order to prepare for the interview, the Flight Instructor may request up to seven days off prior to the interview date. Six days prior to the interview, the day of the interview, and one travel day immediately following the interview (if needed). Flight Instructors are required to return to work the following day after the interview, or travel day, regardless of any previously scheduled days off. Interview results and class dates will come directly from the airlines.

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(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL

Working Beyond the Employee Commitment


Once a Flight Instructor has received the release letter, it is that persons responsibility to complete all students on or by that date, or coordinate with their Manager to have the students that are not going to be completed by that date reassigned to another Flight Instructor. A Flight Instructor must request permission, in writing, from the Manager of Training to continue to work for the Academy past his or her release date. The Manager of Training, or Manager of Flight Standards for Check Instructors, will determine whether or not an appropriate position exists for the person to continue employment past the release date. Once the Flight Instructor has completed the interview and been assigned a class date, a new release date that is mutually agreeable to the Flight Instructor and the Academy will be established. Whatever release date is determined, the Flight Instructor must complete employee out-processing paperwork on that day, in person, at the Academy.

09/01/10 (ISSUE)

FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION

17-33

OPERATIONS MANUAL

Bomb Threat Procedures


Aerosim Flight Academy will make every effort to deter and/or prevent sabotage and related criminal acts. Aerosim Flight Academy has the discretion to disregard threats that are not considered to be directed against a specific aircraft or flight. When a specific aircraft or flight is not identified, Operations personnel will make the decision as to the action required and will notify the appropriate personnel. A specific aircraft is one identified in the bomb threat by tail number, departure time, or actual location at the time of the threat when the text of the threat also includes Positive Target Identification (PTI). PTI is specific information regarding the target such as an aircraft N registration number, a crewmembers full name, industry-type nomenclature, or any other normally non-public information included in a bomb threat indicating firsthand or unique knowledge of the target. Be alert to spot any items that are not normally carried onboard the aircraft, or any individual acting in a suspicious or threatening manner.

Crew Coordination ATC may give the Pilot-In-Command a description of the type of explosive device that could be onboard. If the time is available, the Pilot-In-Command should brief Aerosim Flight Academy Flight Dispatch of the situation.

Threat Against Specific Aircraft On The Ramp Inform the flight crew and Airport Operations, if applicable. Evacuate the aircraft and area around the aircraft within a minimum 100-yard radius. It may be necessary to tow the aircraft to the isolated search area where this safety radius can be achieved. Do not off-load any personal gear, pending search procedures.

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(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL Threat Against Specific Aircraft Taxiing Inform the Pilot-In-Command. Guide aircraft to designated isolation area where personnel deplaning can be performed. The Control Tower will know location of the designated area for this procedure. Perform normal evacuation of occupants. Do not remove personal gear.

NOTE In the event that a bomb or explosive device is actually found, standard emergency evacuation procedures should be employed to separate all personnel from the threat as rapidly as possible. Move to an isolated holding area at least 100 yards from the aircraft, pending search procedures.

Threat Against Specific Aircraft Airborne Inform the Pilot-In-Command. In case of a bomb threat specifying a pressure operated fuse, it is recommended that the aircraft be searched in flight, to the greatest extent possible, prior to landing or significantly changing altitude resulting in a change in cabin pressure.

Airports with No Procedures Notify the Airport Manager (if able). Land aircraft using runways that are cleared of other aircraft. Using cleared taxiways, guide the aircraft to an isolated area and perform a normal evacuation of all personnel.

NOTE In the event that a bomb or explosive device is actually found, standard emergency evacuation procedures should be employed to separate all personnel from the threat as rapidly as possible. Move to an isolated holding area at least 100 yards from the aircraft, pending search procedures.

09/01/10 (ISSUE)

FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION

17-35

OPERATIONS MANUAL Inspection Procedures A complete inspection of the aircraft should be completed. It is the responsibility of the Pilot-InCommand, with assistance from ground personnel, local maintenance personnel, and law enforcement agencies, if applicable, to inspect the aircraft. Inspection of baggage and personal belongings shall be accomplished with the aircraft occupants present at all times. Should an occupant object to the search of his baggage or personal belongings, they must be turned over to the law enforcement officer in charge.

FAA Recommended In Flight Procedures For A Suspect Device Onboard The following recommended procedures have been extracted from FAA guidance dated April 2001. If possible, descend, land, taxi to a remote site and evacuate the aircraft immediately.

If landing the aircraft and evacuating passengers within 30 minutes is not possible, implement the following: Contact the FAA Washington Operations Center (202-267-3333) through an air traffic control facility or Flight Dispatch to request assistance from an FAA explosives specialist. They will provide expert advice directly from an FAA Aviation Explosives Security Specialist (Bomb Technician). If possible, descend. Even if the crew is unable to land immediately due to the distance to a safe landing area. This will avoid amplifying the effects of an explosion, preclude the activation of an altitude-sensitive device and to assist in evacuation of smoke. After considering the aircraft's capabilities and the distance to the nearest suitable airport, slow to approach speed if possible, and configure the aircraft for landing, restricting maneuvering to a minimum. This may not be possible in all instances due to the distance to the nearest safe landing area. In the event of a detonation, the systems for lowering landing gear and other landing aids could be damaged. Reducing approach speed and level flight may enhance aircraft survivability.

WARNING Do not open or attempt to gain entry to the internal components of a closed or concealed device. Any attempt may result in an explosion. Booby-trapped closed devices have been reported as having been on board aircraft in the past. DO NOT CUT OR DISCONNECT ANY WIRES.

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FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION

(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL NOTE Though very sensitive vibratory-activated devices are not expected on board aircraft in flight, less sensitive types requiring a 90-degree change in attitude have been encountered. Keeping the device in the position found will reduce the chance of an accidental detonation. Land and taxi to a remote site, and evacuate the aircraft as soon as possible, avoiding exits on the device side of the aircraft to the maximum degree possible. Be prepared to provide the responding bomb squad with a description of the suspect device and a briefing on all actions taken by the crew.

Student Or Passenger Misconduct And Threatening Situations


Company Policy Student or passenger misconduct onboard an aircraft may jeopardize the safety of the flight and adversely affect the security or the crew. It is Aerosim Flight Academy's policy to take appropriate action, including involving law enforcement officials, against any student or passenger who engages in serious misconduct. Aerosim Flight Academy fully supports all employees in their handling of unruly students or passengers provided the employee acts in a prudent, reasonable and responsible manner. Company support ranges from requesting law enforcement personnel, to providing legal assistance during criminal proceedings against students or passengers. In the case of students or passengers bringing legal action against employees, Aerosim Flight Academy will indemnify and defend employees who acted reasonably and within the scope of their employment. The Aviation Security Act exempts individuals from damages in any action brought in a Federal or State court that arises from an act of the individual in providing or attempting to provide assistance in the case of an in flight emergency in an aircraft. Student or passenger misconduct, which constitutes interference with the duties of a crewmember, may be related to alcohol consumption. It is Aerosim Flight Academy policy, as well as an FAA requirement, that no student or passenger who appears to be intoxicated shall be allowed on an aircraft. In any suspected hijack the flight crew will attempt to maintain control of the aircraft at all costs, maintaining flight path guidance and communications to and from persons on the ground, and will land the aircraft as soon as possible at a time and place chosen by the PilotIn-Command. Once on the ground the aircraft will stay there.

09/01/10 (ISSUE)

FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Common Strategy Tactics Judgment is paramount. Presume the worst. Be alert to odd or suspicious behavior. Be suspicious about any student or passenger disturbance. The Pilot-In-Command is the In-Flight Security Coordinator and is in command. Communicate at all times. Watch for weapons. If a bomb is detected or suspected, follow bomb procedures. Communicate in plain English. Maintain control of the aircraft at all costs. In a suspected hijack, land as soon as possible. Set transponder code 7500 = Hijack. On the ground the aircraft should be blocked in place, or otherwise disabled from flight.

Once The Aircraft Is On The Ground Attempt to deplane. Make every attempt to delay. Stay calm (except in the event of an imminent threat of death or serious bodily injury, including a hijacking); show concern and a willingness to cooperate. Write down requests; ask to see weapon. Communicate with the hijacker(s). Do not allow passengers to interfere. Make actions visible to the hijacker(s).

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Incident / Accident Report The Pilot-In-Command will complete an Aerosim Flight Academy Incident / Accident Report after any intervention is required due to student or passenger misconduct. The report shall be given to Flight Dispatch as soon as possible and shall contain the following information, if available: Disruptive student or passenger's name and address. Witnesses' names, addresses, and phone numbers. A complete description of the incident.

Legal Action Misconduct of a student or passenger(s) may take a number of different forms. The types of serious misconduct warranting law enforcement intervention generally fall into three major classifications, specified below. In addition, law enforcement jurisdiction of each incident may vary depending on the type of offense and location of occurrence. Violations of state criminal statutes (e.g.: assault and battery, trespass, theft/damage to property). Violations of federal statutes (e.g.: hijacking, terrorist threats, serious physical violence). Violations of Federal Aviation Regulations (e.g.: disturbances constituting interference with crewmembers).

NOTE 14 CFR Part 91.11 prohibits any passenger from assaulting, intimidating, or threatening any crewmember so as to interfere with the performance of their duties.

Crimes against Aerosim Flight Academy - trespassing, (e.g.: refusing to leave an aircraft or other Aerosim Flight Academy property after being ordered to do so), theft or damage to Aerosim Flight Academy property. Management ordinarily files criminal charges.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Crimes against individuals - assault and battery and theft/damage to personal property.

The individual must personally press criminal charges and sign the complaint. The prosecuting authority will reside at either the federal, state or local level.

NOTE Abusive or suggestive language, if not utilized in a manner that creates the threat of violence or harm, is not considered an assault.

Also, at the discretion of the academy, the incident report may be submitted under either of the following programs: Aviation Safety Action Program (ASAP) NASA Aviation Safety Reporting Program

Aviation Safety Action Program (ASAP)


The FAA has joined with Aerosim Flight Academy to establish a program to foster a voluntary, cooperative, non-punitive environment for reporting safety concerns. The following are the main elements of this program. For complete information on the ASAP please consult the Memorandum of Understanding available from Operations Department Management.

Covered individuals include students, Flight Instructors, and other select individuals, but only while conducting flights or operations at Aerosim Flight Academy. Events that are not inadvertent or involve an intentional disregard for safety, criminal activity, substance or alcohol abuse, or intentional falsification are not included. Events must be reported through the Aerosim Flight Academys Accident/Incident Reporting Program. Reports may be filed at Flight Dispatch or at the Flight Supervisors station. Events should be reported as soon as possible. Non-sole source reports (see below) should be completed within 24 hours from the end of training activities for the day it occurred, or within 24 hours of becoming aware of possible non-compliance with the regulations.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL All reports will be reviewed by an Event Review Committee (ERC). That committee includes an FAA representative. The program will be managed by the AEROSIM FLIGHT ACADEMY Manager of Safety and Security (MSS). The ERC will meet periodically to review reports submitted and the MSS will periodically present reports to the FAA and Academy, but those reports will not include the names of the individuals involved. The FAA retains all legal rights and responsibilities. The FAA will use lesser enforcement action or no enforcement action to address an event involving noncompliance with the regulations. Apparent violations of the regulations that would not have otherwise known to the FAA (sole-source reports) will be addressed by the ERC and will not involve FAA action. Events reported by others (non-sole source) and containing enough evidence as reported by others to normally prove a violation, will be addressed with FAA Administrative Action (FAA Warning Notice or FAA Letter of Correction). All reporting individuals must complete any remedial training or other corrective action as determined by the ERC or the case will be referred to the FAA for appropriate action. The FAA will not use these reports to initiate FAA enforcement action but may conduct an independent investigation.

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Subject: Aircraft/FTD Discrepancies


All Aerosim flight Academy aircraft or flight training device (FTD, AATD, Frasca) maintenance discrepancies must be entered in a Maintenance Record. This Record is located within the aircraft/FTD "can" that will be issued when the aircraft/FTD is dispatched. Each sheet of the Maintenance Discrepancy Log is divided into two main parts: Left Side - used by the pilot to enter a discrepancy. Right Side - used by maintenance personnel to state "corrective action" taken to clear the discrepancy. If the flight crew discovers a discrepancy during the preflight of an aircraft or FTD, return the "can" to Flight Dispatch and complete the Maintenance Record. Minor aircraft or FTD maintenance discrepancies may be corrected on the ramp or in the FTD hall with the assistance of the proper maintenance personnel. If the discrepancy does not affect the airworthiness of the aircraft, Flight Dispatch will be responsible for consulting with the Maintenance Department to determine if the flight may continue under a deferred status and be returned to service. If a repair is deferred, the Maintenance Department will enter the appropriate notation in the Record. If a discrepancy occurs away from base contact Flight Dispatch, collect call if necessary, who will forward the call to the Maintenance Department to determine the status of the discrepancy. If maintenance and the flight crew agree to defer the discrepancy, the flight crew will complete the appropriate Record (deferred), and continue the flight as planned or return the aircraft to base, as appropriate. Under no circumstances may a flight or FTD event be initiated when an OPEN discrepancy exists in the Maintenance Record. The flight crew should ensure that any placards indicating inoperative equipment have been properly secured.

NOTE The Pilot-In-Command is responsible for the safety of the flight and is the final authority as to that flight. When the aircraft or FTD "can" is returned to Flight Dispatch, ensure that the Maintenance Record is clearly visible as the top document on the "can" and advise the Flight Dispatcher.

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Chapter 19 Employee Handbook Table Of Contents

Page
IMPORTANT NOTICES ........................................................................................................................................... 3 CHAPTER 1 WELCOME TO AEROSIM FLIGHT ACADEMY ...................................................................... 4 CHAPTER 2 WORK ENVIRONMENT AND POLICIES AGAINST DISCRIMINATION AND HARASSMENT ........................................................................................................................................................... 5 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY POLICY .................................................................................................. 5 AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) POLICY................................................................................... 5 SEXUAL HARASSMENT PREVENTION POLICY ................................................................................................... 5 FREEDOM FROM HARASSMENT POLICY............................................................................................................ 8 OPEN DOOR POLICY ......................................................................................................................................... 9

CHAPTER 3 PAY AND REIMBURSEMENT INFORMATION ....................................................................... 9 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. EMPLOYEE CLASSIFICATIONS .......................................................................................................................... 9 HOURS OF WORK POLICY .............................................................................................................................. 10 BREAK / MEAL PERIODS ................................................................................................................................ 10 RECORDING OF HOURS WORKED ................................................................................................................... 11 PAYDAYS AND PAYCHECKS ........................................................................................................................... 12 OVERTIME...................................................................................................................................................... 12 PAY CORRECTIONS ........................................................................................................................................ 12 DEDUCTIONS FROM WAGES ........................................................................................................................... 13 TRAVEL EXPENSE REIMBURSEMENT POLICY ................................................................................................. 13

CHAPTER 4 SUMMARY OF CURRENT BEENFITS...................................................................................... 15 OVERVIEW............................................................................................................................................................... 15 2. MEDICAL, DENTAL AND VISION PLANS ......................................................................................................... 16 3. SAVINGS AND INVESTMENT PLAN/401(K) ...................................................................................................... 16 CHAPTER 5 LEAVE OF ABSENCE AND OTHER TIME OFF FROM WORK .......................................... 16 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. PAID TIME OFF REGULAR FULL-TIME EMPLOYEES ..................................................................................... 16 PAID TIME OFF FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS ........................................................................................................ 17 HOLIDAYS ...................................................................................................................................................... 18 FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE OF ABSENCE (FMLA) .................................................................................. 19 PERSONAL LEAVE OF ABSENCE ..................................................................................................................... 26 MILITARY LEAVE ........................................................................................................................................... 26 JURY DUTY .................................................................................................................................................... 29 BEREAVEMENT PAY ....................................................................................................................................... 30 EVACUATION PAY .......................................................................................................................................... 30 PAY ADVANCES - EARLY VACATION PAY...................................................................................................... 30

CHAPTER 6 COMPANY PROPERTY AND INFORMATION ....................................................................... 31 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. NONDISCLOSURE OF CONFIDENTIAL INFORMATION ....................................................................................... 31 RETURN OF AEROSIM FLIGHT ACADEMYS PROPERTY .................................................................................. 31 SECURITY INSPECTIONS ................................................................................................................................. 32 BULLETIN BOARDS ........................................................................................................................................ 32 SOLICITATIONS AND DISTRIBUTIONS ............................................................................................................. 33

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6. 7. 8. PERSONAL PHONE CALLS/MAIL .....................................................................................................................33 ELECTRONIC COMMUNICATIONS MEDIA USE POLICY ....................................................................................33 SOCIAL NETWORKING POLICY .......................................................................................................................37

CHAPTER 7 CERTAIN SAFETY ISSUES .........................................................................................................39 1. 2. 3. WORK PLACE INJURY .....................................................................................................................................39 SAFETY AND HEALTH ....................................................................................................................................39 WORKPLACE VIOLENCE PREVENTION POLICY ...............................................................................................40

CHAPTER 8 DRUG TESTING & MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS ...................................................................40 1. 2. MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS......................................................................................................................40 DRUG TESTING AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE POLICY STATEMENT....................................................41

CHAPTER 9 ADDITIONAL EMPLOYEE POLICIES .....................................................................................48 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. EMPLOYMENT OF RELATIVES ........................................................................................................................48 PERSONNEL FILES / REFERENCES ...................................................................................................................49 PERFORMANCE EVALUATIONS .......................................................................................................................49 ATTENDANCE .................................................................................................................................................50 NON-UNIFORM DRESS CODE POLICY .............................................................................................................50 SMOKING........................................................................................................................................................52 DISCIPLINE .....................................................................................................................................................52

CHAPTER 10 BUSINESS CONDUCT AND ETHICS .......................................................................................54 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. GENERAL .......................................................................................................................................................54 STANDARDS ...................................................................................................................................................55 CONFLICT OF INTEREST ..................................................................................................................................55 GIFTS .............................................................................................................................................................56 INSIDE INFORMATION .....................................................................................................................................56

CHAPTER 10 RESIGNATION AND TERMINATION.....................................................................................56 1. 2. RESIGNATION .................................................................................................................................................56 EXIT INFORMATION ........................................................................................................................................57

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IMPORTANT NOTICES THIS HANDBOOK IS NOT A CONTRACT


This document is not an express or implied contract and is for informational purposes only. It is not all inclusive and is intended to offer only general guidelines. The policies, benefits, and operating procedures contained in this Handbook are not intended to create, and are not to be construed to create, any contract, agreement or legally binding obligation between Aerosim Flight Academy (Academy or the Company)and its employees. Any highlights of benefits contained in this Handbook are not intended to take the place of more detailed benefit plan documents. Descriptions in the plan documents will override the information in this document in the event the information presented in this Handbook conflicts with the information in the plan documents. This Handbook does not guarantee any specific level of benefits or continuation of any specific benefits.

THE COMPANYS RIGHT TO CHANGE THE HANDBOOK


This Handbook supersedes all prior handbooks, if any, distributed to Company employees. The Company may, without having to consult with any employee and without receiving any employees agreement, change, suspend, or discontinue any or all Handbook policies, benefits, or procedures (except the Companys at-will policy) as well as any other policies maintained by the Company, which are not contained in this Handbook. Revised handbooks may be issued from time to time. Final decisions as to the meaning and application of the policies rest entirely with the Company.

AT-WILL POLICY
Each employee at the Company is employed at-will, which means either the Company or the employee may terminate the employment relationship at any time, for any or no reason, with or without advance notice. No individual or representative of the Company can change this at-will relationship absent a specific, written contract signed by the Companys President.

COMPLIANCE WITH APPLICABLE LAW


In all circumstances, the Company will comply with applicable laws within each jurisdiction in which it does business. To the extent any provision of this Handbook conflicts with any applicable state or federal law, the Company will follow and comply with the applicable law and not this Handbook.

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CHAPTER 1 WELCOME TO AEROSIM FLIGHT ACADEMY


Welcome to Aerosim Flight Academy. This Employee Handbook has been developed to help you get acquainted and answer many of your initial questions. Please read the Handbook carefully and retain it for future use. We hope that you find this Handbook useful in helping you to understand the Company's policies and procedures. The policies, procedures and programs outlined in this Handbook serve as guidelines to keep you informed about the relevant information about your employment with Aerosim Flight Academy. In an effort to be responsive to the needs of a growing organization, changes or additions to this Handbook may be made at any time. The Company will keep you informed when these changes are made. If you have any questions, comments, or suggestions concerning the material in this handbook, please let us know. As a Company employee, the importance of your contribution cannot be overstated. Every interaction that you have is an opportunity to project the Companys reputation as a firstclass organization. You are an important part of this process and your work directly influences our Companys reputation. We are pleased you have joined us, and we hope you will find your work to be both challenging and rewarding. Each copy of this manual is the property of Aerosim Flight Academy and contains proprietary information of Aerosim Flight Academy. Without prior written authorization from the Human Resources Manager, no member of management or other Aerosim Flight Academy employee may copy or provide originals or copies of this manual or show it to individuals who are not employed by Aerosim Flight Academy.

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CHAPTER 2 WORK ENVIRONMENT AND POLICIES AGAINST DISCRIMINATION AND HARASSMENT


1. Equal Employment Opportunity Policy

The Company is an equal opportunity employer. All employment decisions and personnel actions at the Company are administered without regard to race, color, religion, creed, national origin, ancestry, sex, age, qualified mental or physical disability, sexual orientation, genetic carrier status, any veteran status, any military service, any application for any military service, or any other category or class protected by federal, state or local laws. All employment decisions and personnel actions, such as hiring, promotion, compensation, benefits, and termination, are and will continue to be administered in accordance with, and to further the principle of, equal employment opportunity. 2. Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Policy

The Company is committed to providing equal employment opportunities to its disabled applicants and employees. The Company will provide a reasonable accommodation to the known physical or mental limitations of a qualified individual with a disability unless the accommodation would impose an undue hardship on the operation of its business. Employees with a disability who believe they need a reasonable accommodation to perform the essential functions of their job should contact the Human Resources department. The Company encourages qualified individuals with disabilities to come forward and request reasonable accommodations. 3. Sexual Harassment Prevention Policy

All employees have the right to be free from sexual advances or any other verbal or physical conduct that constitutes sexual harassment. Sexual harassment, whether by management, supervisory personnel, or non-supervisory personnel, is unlawful and will not be tolerated.
Because the Company takes allegations of sexual harassment seriously, the Company will respond promptly to complaints of sexual harassment. Where it is demonstrated to its satisfaction that such harassment has occurred, the Company will act promptly to eliminate the harassment and impose such corrective action as is necessary, including disciplinary action where appropriate.

Please note that while this policy sets forth the Companys goals of promoting a workplace that is free of sexual harassment, the policy is not designed or intended to limit the Companys authority to discipline or to take remedial action for workplace conduct it deems unacceptable, regardless of whether that conduct satisfies the legal definition of sexual harassment. Sexual harassment is defined as sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature where: (a) submission to or rejection of such advances, requests or conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of employment or as a basis for employment decisions; or (b) such advances, requests or conduct have the purpose

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OPERATIONS MANUAL or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individuals work performance by creating an intimidating, hostile, humiliating or sexually offensive work environment. These definitions include any direct or implied requests by a supervisor for sexual favors in exchange for actual or promised job benefits, such as favorable reviews, salary increases, promotions, increased benefits or continued employment, as well as any sexually-oriented conduct that is unwelcome and has the effect of creating a workplace environment that is hostile to male or female workers. Examples of conduct that, if unwelcome, may constitute sexual harassment depending upon the totality of the circumstances, including the severity of the conduct and its pervasiveness, include the following: either explicitly or implicitly conditioning any term of employment (e.g., continued employment, wages, evaluation, advancement, assigned duties or shifts) on the provision of sexual favors; touching a sexual part of an employees body; touching any part of an employees body after that person has indicated, or it is known, that such physical contact is unwelcome; continuing to ask an employee to socialize on or off-duty when that person has indicated she or he is not interested; displaying or transmitting sexually suggestive pictures, objects, cartoons, or posters if it is known or should be known that the behavior is unwelcome; regularly using sexually vulgar or explicit language in the presence of a person if it is known or should be known that the person does not welcome such behavior; derogatory or provocative remarks about or relating to an employees gender, sexual activity or sexual orientation; coerced sexual acts.

The responsibility to investigate complaints of harassment has been assigned to the Human Resources Manager of Aerosim Flight Academy. Any employee who believes that he or she has been the subject of harassment should report the alleged act to the Human Resources Manager of Aerosim Flight Academy at 2700 Flightline Ave. Sanford, FL 32773 (407) 4304141or to his or her direct supervisor as soon as possible. The Human Resources Manager is available to discuss any concerns employees may have and to provide information about the Companys policy on sexual harassment and the complaint process. Employees should not allow an inappropriate situation to continue by not reporting it, regardless of who is creating the situation. An investigation of any such complaint will be undertaken promptly. The investigation may include interviews with the employee making the complaint, with witnesses, and with the person accused of sexual harassment. The investigation will be conducted in such a way as to maintain confidentiality to the extent practicable under the circumstances. When the Company 19-6 ORGANIZATION (ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL has completed its investigation, it will, to the extent appropriate, inform the person filing the complaint and the person alleged to have committed the conduct of the results of the investigation. If the investigation reveals that sexual harassment did occur, the Company will act promptly to eliminate the offending conduct. It is unlawful to retaliate against an employee for filing a complaint of sexual harassment or for participating in an investigation of a complaint for sexual harassment. The Company will not tolerate any such retaliatory conduct. If any employee believes that she or he has been subjected to retaliation for having brought a complaint or participated in an investigation of harassment, that employee is encouraged to report the situation as soon as possible to the Human Resources Manager at 2700 Flightline Ave, Sanford, FL 32773 (407) 430-4141 or to his or her direct supervisor. Any employee who has been found to engage in sexual harassment or in any retaliation prohibited by this policy will be subject to appropriate sanctions, up to and including unpaid disciplinary suspension and/or termination from employment. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) is the federal agency that investigates sexual harassment claims. The EEOC in Florida can be reached at: One Biscayne Tower 2 South Biscayne Blvd., Suite 2700 Miami, Florida 33131 Phone: (800) 669-4000 The Florida Commission on Human Relations is the state agency that investigates sexual harassment claims. The Commission can be reached at: Florida Commission on Human Relations 2009 Apalachee Parkway, Suite 200 Tallahasee, Florida 32301 (850) 488-7082

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For Employees in Texas The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) is the federal agency that investigates sexual harassment claims. The EEOC in Texas can be reached at: 207 S. Houston Street 3rd Floor Dallas, Texas 75202 Phone: (800) 669-4000 Fax: (214) 253-2720 The Texas Workforce Commission Civil Rights Division is the state agency that investigates sexual harassment and discrimination claims. This agency may be reached at: 1117 Trinity St. Room 144T Austin, Texas 78778 Phone: (512) 463-2642 or (888) 452-4778] We trust that all managers, supervisory personnel and employees will continue to act responsibly to establish a pleasant working environment free of sexual harassment and discrimination of any type. 4. Freedom from Harassment Policy

The Company has a fundamental commitment to treating its employees with dignity and respect. The support of equal employment opportunity includes the recognition that harassment of employees on account of race, color, religion, creed, sex, national origin, ancestry, age (40 and above), qualified mental or physical disability, sexual orientation, genetic carrier status, any veteran status, any military service, any application for military service or membership in any other category or class protected under the law will not be tolerated. All employees have the right to be free from slurs or any other verbal or physical conduct that constitutes such harassment. Because this Company views unlawful harassment as a sensitive and serious offense, the responsibility to investigate complaints of such harassment has been assigned to the Human Resources Manager at 2700 Flightline Avenue, Sanford, FL 32773 (407) 430-4141. Any employee who believes that he or she has been the subject of illegal harassment should report the alleged act to one of these individuals as soon as possible. If the employee would prefer to bring his or her concerns to the attention of his or her direct supervisor, the employee should feel free to do so. Employees should not allow an inappropriate situation to continue by not reporting it, regardless of who is creating the situation. Please note that while this policy sets forth the Companys goals of promoting a workplace that is free from harassment, the policy is not designed or intended to limit the Companys authority to discipline or to take remedial action for workplace conduct it deems unacceptable, regardless of whether that conduct satisfies the legal definition of harassment. 19-8 ORGANIZATION (ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL An investigation of any complaint will be undertaken promptly. The investigation may include interviews with the employee making the complaint, with witnesses (if any), and with the person accused of the harassment. The investigation will be conducted in such a way as to maintain confidentiality to the extent practicable under the circumstances. Further, it is unlawful to retaliate against an employee for filing a complaint of illegal harassment or for participating in an investigation of a complaint. The Company will not tolerate any such retaliatory conduct. If any employee believes that he or she has been subjected to retaliation for having brought a complaint or participated in an investigation of harassment, that employee is encouraged to report the situation as soon as possible to the Human Resources Manager] at 2700 Flightline Avenue, Sanford, FL 32773 (407) 430-4141or to his or her direct supervisor. We trust that all managers, supervisory personnel and employees will continue to act responsibly to establish a pleasant working environment free of discrimination and harassment. Any employee who has been found to have engaged in harassment or retaliation prohibited by this policy will be subject to appropriate sanctions, up to and including unpaid disciplinary suspension and/or termination from employment. 5. Open Door Policy

Aerosim Flight Academy attempts to resolve job-related concerns or problems in a prompt and impartial manner, consistent with personnel policies, practices, and principles. When an employee has a job-related concern or problem, he/she must first approach his/her immediate supervisor to try to work out a solution. If the problem is with the employees immediate supervisor then the employee should consult the Human Resources Manager. An employee who wants to discuss the matter further may contact the Manager, Director, Vice President, or President. In certain situations an employee may be referred to the Manager of Human Resources for final resolution. While Aerosim Flight Academy encourages an employee to work out problems with his/her supervisor, an employee may contact the Manager of Human Resources for assistance at any time.

CHAPTER 3 PAY AND REIMBURSEMENT INFORMATION


1. Employee Classifications

Each employee is classified into one of the categories defined below. Employee classifications are determined by departmental needs. The employees classification determines eligibility for certain employee benefits. Regular Full-Time Employee - An employee (who is not a flight instructor) who is regularly scheduled to work at least 32 hours per week.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Regular Part-Time Employee - An employee (who is not a flight instructor) who is regularly scheduled to work less than 32 hours per week. Temporary Employee - An employee hired for a specific period of time of limited duration (normally less than six months), a specific project, group of assignments, or on an oncall basis. Full or part-time employees classified as temporary are not eligible for benefits (e.g.: Co-op, Interns). Full-Time Flight Instructors A Flight Instructor who is regularly scheduled and is available to work a minimum of 32 hours per week. Part-Time Flight Instructor A Flight Instructor [who is not scheduled on a regular basis and is unable to work a minimum of 32 hours] and/or is enrolled at the College or University. 2. Hours Of Work Policy

Aerosim Flight Academy maintains work hours for its employees in accordance with federal and state regulations, customer needs, and the maintenance of an effective schedule of work. The law requires employers to maintain accurate records of hours worked. Administrative Office Hours The Administrative offices are normally open Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. This schedule may change from time to time. Because the Company provides services to customers on an irregular schedule, many employees may have to work weekends, shifts, holidays, overtime, or varying schedules. Supervisors will provide a schedule and will try to give advance notice if work hours need to change. Employees are required to work the hours scheduled or assigned. Changes to work schedules are at the Managers discretion. 3. Break / Meal Periods

Each employees meal period is established by his/her Supervisor. Meal periods normally last for either 30 or 60 minutes and are unpaid. Each employees break, if appropriate, is scheduled by the employees Supervisor, in keeping with work schedules and customer demands. Break periods normally last for 15 minutes and are paid by the Company. Meal and break periods are scheduled by Supervisors and departments. The time permitted for meals and breaks is based on each employees daily working schedule. Hourly employees must clock in and out for their lunch. The following is a guideline for the assignment of meals/breaks: NUMBER OF HOURS WORKED 0 - 3.9 Hours 4.0 - 6.0 Hours 6.1 - 7.4 Hours 7.5 - 10.0 Hours PERMITTED BREAK / MEAL PERIODS 0 Break/0 Meal 1 Break/0 Meal 1 Break/1 Meal 2 Breaks/1 Meal

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OPERATIONS MANUAL 4. Recording of Hours Worked

Hourly Employees All time records must accurately reflect the time worked by each employee each day. Employees must clock in and out daily. Time off during the day for lunch or handling personal matters must also be recorded, as well as sickness, holiday, vacation, bereavement, jury duty, etc. It is the responsibility of the Supervisor to make certain that no work is regularly performed by an hourly employee during non-work time such as before regular business hours, during lunch, or after regular business hours. If the Supervisor is aware of the employee working during non-work times, the matter may be addressed as a disciplinary issue. The employees must enter into the Time and Attendance their hours worked. The employee also must submit the time record to his/her immediate Supervisor for approval by the close of business at the end of each work week.

Salaried Employees Salaried employees are responsible for requesting time off at least 2 weeks in advance by submitting a completed Multi-use Purpose Form to their Supervisor. The Supervisor is responsible for reporting employees time off by sending a completed Multi-use Purpose Form to Human Resources. Human Resources will forward to Finance for processing. Salaried employees are expected to work a minimum of 40 hours per week.

Tardiness And Pay The Company pays hourly employees in quarter hour (15 minutes) increments for hours worked. An employee who is tardy does not suffer a loss of pay until he/she is late a full quarter hour (15, 30, 45, or 60 minutes). An employee who is tardy by less than a quarter hour will not suffer a loss of pay but may be disciplined for tardiness. A tardy employee will not normally be permitted to make up the missed time by working, whether during the lunch period or at the end of their scheduled work day. Under no circumstance is an employee permitted to clock in or out for another employee or request another employee to do so. Such activity will lead to disciplinary action up to and including termination of employment. Each employee is to remain on the job each day until his/her work assignments have been completed or he is authorized to leave by his/her immediate Supervisors.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL 5. Paydays And Paychecks

Procedure Aerosim Flight Academy pays employees on a regular basis and in compliance with Federal and State laws. Most employees are paid every other Friday. If the normal payday falls on a holiday, employees are usually paid on the weekday before the payday. A paycheck is generally released only to the employee who earned it. The employees paycheck may be released to another individual only with written authorization from the employee. Supervisors may release paychecks only after 12:01 a.m. on payday. Employees electing direct deposit must provide the appropriate completed forms to the Human Resource department. When direct deposit is initiated, it may take up to two pay periods to take effect. Normal paychecks will be issued until the direct deposit takes effect.

6.

Overtime

Aerosim Flight Academy establishes working hours as required by workload, customer service needs, and the efficient management of personnel resources. From time to time, it may be necessary to schedule employees to work overtime. Employees must work overtime when scheduled. A salaried employee is not paid overtime regardless of the number of hours worked in a workweek. An hourly employee is paid overtime for hours worked in excess of 40 in a workweek at one and one-half times the regular rate of pay. Each employees Supervisor schedules overtime. No employee is permitted to work overtime without the prior approval of his Supervisor.

When hourly employees work long hours one day, they may be scheduled to work shorter hours another day in that same work week with approval from their immediate supervisor. In this case, the time off is granted equal to the extra time worked within the same work week. 7. Pay Corrections

The Company attempts to ensure each employee receives the correct amount of pay for each paycheck. If an error occurs, Aerosim Flight Academy will make every effort to minimize inconveniences. The employee shall immediately call any suspected error in pay to the attention of his/her Supervisor (before the check is cashed if possible). ORGANIZATION (ISSUE) 09/01/10

19-12

OPERATIONS MANUAL After the Supervisor and the Payroll Department verify the error, a correction is made. 1. Underpayments are corrected on the next regular paycheck. Note: Serious underpayments (over $50) may be corrected sooner at the employees request and within the ability of Payroll to accommodate the request. 2. Overpayments are corrected on the next regular paycheck. Note: Serious overpayments (over $100) may be corrected on a repayment schedule that minimizes the inconvenience to the employee. The accounting Manager or the Manager of Human Resources may be contacted for assistance. 8. Deductions from Wages

The Company has an obligation to withhold certain amounts from an employees paycheck for federal and state income taxes, social security and as otherwise required by law. Additionally, employees may request or authorize the Company to withhold amounts for such things as employee contributions to Company-sponsored benefits. While other circumstances may arise in the course of an employees employment that require the Company to withhold or deduct from take-home pay (such as inadvertent overpayment of wages and unpaid disciplinary suspensions), the Company is committed to abiding by the requirements of the federal Fair Labor Standards Act and other applicable laws. The Company explicitly prohibits any and all improper deductions from employees paychecks. If an employee believes that his/her wages have been subject to improper deductions, he or she should contact his/her direct supervisor immediately. The Company will conduct an investigation into the challenged deductions and, if the deductions were indeed improper, the Company will reimburse the employee in full and take steps to prevent similar deductions from occurring in the future. 9. Travel Expense Reimbursement Policy

Aerosim Flight Academy recognizes that its employees may be required to travel or incur other expenses from time to time to conduct business. This policy is designed to act as a guideline for business travel and entertainment expense and miscellaneous expense reimbursement. Employees traveling for company business shall obtain manager approval in advance by completing a Travel Authorization Request form. The employee shall then submit the approved Travel Authorization Request form to the Executive Administrative Assistant to book and coordinate travel arrangements. Included on this form is Airfare, lodging, car rental, per-diem, travel advances (if applicable), and any other needs. Employees will be eligible for Per Diem when the employee travels on a business trip or is scheduled away from their normal work location for a project or off-site training. To be reimbursed, the employee must submit an expense report with the listed per diem type and days, 09/01/10 (ISSUE) EMPLOYEE HANDBOOK 19-13

OPERATIONS MANUAL project or purpose for trip, and Manager, Director, or Vice President approval. The per diem is as follows:
$25.00 per day for one day trips and travel days $35.00 for other days $55.00 per day for qualified international travel Example: 3 day trip, two nights = 2 travel days and 1 full day = $25+$25+$35=$85.00

If an employee has been issued a company credit card, they will not receive advanced per diem. Employees will use their company issued credit card for meals, but will follow the same schedule of per diem. As with any credit card purchase, original receipts will need to be submitted with the monthly credit card statement. While traveling on company business, employees should stay in a low to mid-priced hotel, motel, or similar lodging. The lodging selections should be part of your travel authorization form submitted prior to the travel date. When renting a car, employees are asked to be economical by renting a compact or midsize vehicle that will accommodate the number of people traveling and or the business requirements of the trip. Employees are to decline any additional insurances offered by the rental car company. Aerosim Flight Academy has purchased these types of insurance coverage directly from Aerosim Flight Academys insurance company. Employees should also decline any pre-paid gasoline options and should refuel prior to returning the rental car. The original fuel receipts should be noted Rental Car for processing purposes and attached to the expense report. Employees who are involved in an accident while traveling on business should promptly report the incident to their immediate supervisor. If a rental car is not needed, fares for shuttle or airport bus service, or costs of public transportation for ground travel will be reimbursed. Original receipts will need to be provided, attached to the expense report, and approved by a Manager, Director, or Vice President. Employees who are required to travel and do not have a company credit card may request a Travel Advance. A Travel Advance is a loan to the employee from the company and must be paid back in full. This can be done by personal check or by submitting expense reports with original receipts. All expense reports are to be signed by your department Manager, Director or Vice President before it can be applied toward the advance. The section on the expense report for cash advance must be filled in for the expense report to be applied toward the advance. If the amount of the receipts is less than the advance taken, the employee is responsible for paying back the difference within 3 business days of returning to work. When entertaining clients, employees should exercise good judgment when determining if such expenses are appropriate, necessary, and reasonable. To be reimbursed, employees must submit the original receipts including the names of the participants and the purpose for the entertaining attached to the expense report with an Executives approval. If the company credit card is used, the receipts must still be provided with the names of the participants and the purpose for the entertaining.

19-14

ORGANIZATION

(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL Employees may submit for reimbursement for mileage incurred on their personal vehicle when used during the normal course of business. Qualified mileage expense is the amount of mileage used from the normal work location to the business destination. Reimbursement for mileage is currently set at $.41 per mile. Verification of mileage should be provided with the expense report by using Mapquest.com or a similar site. In addition to mileage, employees will be reimbursed for tolls and parking. If the business trip requires employees to use overnight parking at the airport, please use an off-site location. All expenses must be documented on the expense report, be accompanied by the original receipt, and have a Manager, Director or Vice Presidents approval before being submitted. Aerosim Flight Academy reserves the right to limit reimbursement of an expense if it is determined the employee marginally exceeded the guidelines set forth. When travel is completed, employees should submit completed travel expense reports within 3 business days of returning to work. Finance will distribute the reimbursement check on the Friday following receipt of the expense report. Finance will have at least one week to distribute the reimbursement check. From time to time, a salaried employee may be required to travel on a weekend in addition to their work week. If such travel occurs, employees may be eligible for a Comp Day for the weekend days worked, as determined by his/her manager and/or the executive team in their sole discretion. Managers should request a Comp Day Certificate from Human Resources and indicate on the certificate the dates the Comp Day(s) are for and the date the certificate is awarded. After the appropriate signatures are on the certificate, it should be turned into payroll for tracking purposes. Comp Days are not earned, will not be paid upon termination, and may not be carried over from year to year.

CHAPTER 4 SUMMARY OF CURRENT BEENFITS


Overview The Company recognizes the importance of providing a full range of benefits to its employees and their eligible dependents. Plans are continuously evaluated and adjusted to ensure competitive coverage and the best cost-benefit ratio. The provisions of each plan are governed by the summary plan descriptions and other plan related documents. Summary plan descriptions may be obtained from the Human Resources Department. The highlights of benefits contained in this handbook are not intended to take the place of the more detailed benefit plan descriptions. Descriptions in the plan documents will override the information in this handbook in the event that the information presented in is conflict. Please note that the Company may modify or terminate benefits at any time in its sole discretion with or without notice. An employees eligibility for benefits will vary based on his/her status with the Company. In general, full-time employees who are not flight instructors are eligible for a more extensive benefits package than are employees who are employed as flight instructors or on a part-time basis.

09/01/10 (ISSUE)

EMPLOYEE HANDBOOK

19-15

OPERATIONS MANUAL 2. Medical, Dental and Vision Plans

Full-time employees who are not employed as flight instructors are eligible to participate in the Companys medical, dental and vision plans the first (1st) of the month following date of hire. Upon enrolling, eligible employees can choose either individual or family medical coverage through the Companys plans. Information concerning the details of the plans, eligibility requirements and enrollment materials may be obtained from the Companys Human Resources Department. 3. Savings and Investment Plan/401(k)

The Company supports employees in their efforts to provide for future financial security. As a result, a Savings and Investment Plan (401 (k)) and a Roth IRA Plan have been established. These Plans provide a means for employee and Company contributions to grow on a tax-deferred and after-tax basis. All employees are eligible to participate in the Companys 401K or Roth IRA Plans after completing twelve months of employment with the Company, subject to the terms and conditions of each plan, as may be modified from time to time. Details about the Plans, including the rate of the Companys contribution, if any, are available from the Human Resources Department. 4. Life Insurance Coverage

All full-time employees who are not employed as flight instructors are eligible for the Companys basic life insurance the first of the month following date of hire.

CHAPTER 5 LEAVE OF ABSENCE AND OTHER TIME OFF FROM WORK


1. Paid Time Off Regular Full-Time Employees

The purpose of vacation is to recognize each eligible employees length of service and performance and to show appreciation by providing time off with pay. The Company recognizes that employees will benefit mentally and physically by a period of rest and relaxation during the year. For these reasons, each eligible employee is encouraged to take all vacation to which he/she is entitled. If the employee takes time off and they have PTO available they must use their time. [Full-time employees are eligible for paid vacation after six months of work, beginning six months from the start of full-time service as outlined in the schedule below. If a part-time employees status changes to full-time, the PTO anniversary is the date of the status change, not the original hire date: Length of Full-Time Service 0-6 months 19-16 ORGANIZATION Annual Paid Vacation 0 hours (ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL 6 mo. 1 year 1-3 years Completion of 3-6 years Completion of 6 plus years 40 hours 72 hours 112 hours 152 hours]

[Employees may take half the annual vacation amount after every six months of work, beginning six months from the start of full-time service. This policy is a use it or lose it policy, if an employee does not use all of his/her vacation time up by their anniversary date, the remaining PTO balance is lost.]

Procedure Each Department has an established procedure for scheduling vacation. Should there be a conflict in scheduling vacation between employees in the same Department, the employee with the greater length of service will be given first choice. The Company may change or cancel a scheduled vacation or call an employee back from vacation. If this occurs, the employee will be granted time off at another time within their anniversary period. A holiday falling during an employees scheduled vacation time will be considered a holiday and not a vacation day. Vacation time must be taken within 12 months of the date that the employee becomes eligible. Failure to take vacation within the required time will result in forfeiture of that vacation time. If an employee takes time off, he/she must use their PTO if they have time available. If an hourly employee changes their regular scheduled workweek, with approval from their manager and meets the required 40 hours, their PTO will not be used.

Reference FMLA Leave, Personal Leave of Absence, and Military Leave of Absence, in this chapter for information about eligibility for vacation pay during these leaves of absence.

2.

Paid Time Off Flight Instructors

Full-time flight instructors are eligible for paid vacation after six months of work, beginning six months from the start of full-time service as outlined in the schedule below. Length of Service 0-6 months 6 mo. 1 year 09/01/10 (ISSUE) EMPLOYEE HANDBOOK Annual Paid Vacation 0 PTO 25 hours 19-17

OPERATIONS MANUAL 1-3 years Completion of 3-6 years Completion of 6 plus years

45 hours 70 hours 95 hours

Taking a specific day off requires managements approval and will be predicated on availability of coverage.

3.

Holidays

Aerosim Flight Academy recognizes ten paid holidays. If a holiday falls on a weekend, the nearest weekday is the celebrated holiday. Example: If a holiday falls on a Saturday, Friday will be the recognized holiday. If a holiday falls on a Sunday, Monday will be the recognized holiday.

Recognized Holidays: New Years Day (January 1) Presidents Day Memorial Day (last Monday in May) Labor Day (first Monday in September) Day After Thanksgiving Martin Luther King Day Good Friday Fourth of July (July 4th) Thanksgiving Day (fourth Thursday of November) Christmas Day (December 25th)

Each regular full-time employee is eligible for holiday pay. Regular part-time and temporary employees may be given time off without pay. Any full-time hourly employee scheduled to work the holiday will be paid for actual hours worked and their normal scheduled hours, as holiday pay. Salaried employees that work a weekend or a holiday may be eligible for a Comp Day, as determined by their manager and/or the executive team in their sole discretion. Comp Days are not earned, will not be paid upon termination, and may not be carried over from year to year. If an employees final day of employment falls on a holiday, and they work that day, they will be entitled to the holiday pay policy. Certain departments that are crucial to everyday operations will remain open during these particular holidays excluding Thanksgiving and Christmas Day. They are: Flight Operations and support staff. Employees are required to work their regular scheduled days immediately preceding and following the holiday in order to receive holiday pay. Exceptions will be made when an employee is in pay status such as paid vacation, paid jury duty, paid bereavement leave.

19-18

ORGANIZATION

(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL A holiday falling during an employees vacation period will be considered a holiday and not a vacation day. 4. Family And Medical Leave Of Absence (FMLA)

In accordance with the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), eligible employees may take unpaid job-protected leave each year for specified family and medical reasons, including certain military family leave entitlements. Employee Eligibility In order to be eligible for FMLA benefits, an employee must: (1) (2) (3) Have worked for the Company for a total of at least 12 months; Have worked at least 1,250 hours over the previous 12 months; and Work at a location where at least 50 employees are employed by the Company within 75 miles of each other.

Basic Leave Entitlement An eligible employee will be granted up to a total of 12 weeks of unpaid leave during a 12-month period (window period) for one or more of the following reasons: For the birth of a child and to take care of the newborn child. For the placement with the employee of a child for adoption or foster care. To care for an immediate family member (spouse, child, or parent) with a serious health condition (as defined below) The employee is unable to perform the functions of his or her job because of a serious health condition.

Military Leave Entitlement Qualifying Exigency Leave. Eligible employees with a spouse, son, daughter, or parent who are members of the Armed Forces or in the National Guard or Reserves on covered active duty in a foreign country or on call to covered active duty in a foreign country may use their 12-week leave entitlement to address certain qualifying exigencies. Covered Active Duty means: (a) in the case of a member of a regular component of the Armed Forces (i.e., not reserve or guard), duty during the deployment of the member with the Armed Forces to a foreign country; and (b) in the case of a member of a reserve component of the Armed Forces, duty during the deployment of the member with the Armed Forces to a foreign country under a call or order to active duty under a provision of law referred to in section 101(a)(13)(B) of title 10, United States Code. Qualifying exigency leave is generally available to an eligible employee for the following types of activities when such activities are necessitated by the active military duty or call to duty of the employees spouse, son, daughter or parent: Handling issues related to short-notice deployment, provided however that the leave must occur within seven calendar days of the date on which the military member is notified of the impending call or order to active duty; EMPLOYEE HANDBOOK 19-19

09/01/10 (ISSUE)

OPERATIONS MANUAL Attending certain military events and related activities, such as official ceremonies or family support or assistance programs offered by the military, military services agencies or the Red Cross; Making childcare arrangements, providing non-routine, urgent childcare, and enrolling in school or daycare or attending school meetings; Making financial and legal arrangements, such as executing powers of attorney for the military members affairs, obtaining military identification cards, or acting as the representative for the military member in relation to service benefits before a government agency; Attending counseling that is necessitated by or otherwise arises from the active duty or call to active duty; Spending time with the military member who is on short-term, temporary, rest and recuperation leave during deployment, provided however that only 5 days of leave may be taken for this purpose during each instance of rest and recuperation leave; and Attending to post-deployment issues and activities, such as official ceremonies which occur within 90 days of the termination of the military members active duty status, or issues arising from the death of the military member.

The above list is intended as an example of the types of activities that may qualify. If you have any questions about whether a certain activity may qualify, please contact the Human Resources Department. Military Caregiver Leave. FMLA also includes a special leave entitlement that permits eligible employees to take up to 26 weeks of leave to care for a covered servicemember during a single 12-month period (military caregiver leave). Military caregiver leave can be taken by a son, daughter, parent, spouse or next of kin of a covered servicemember. Next of kin is the nearest blood relative, other than the covered servicemembers spouse, parent or child, as prioritized by FMLA. A covered servicemember is: (i) a current member of the Armed Forces, including a member of the National Guard or Reserves, who has a serious injury or illness incurred in the line of duty on active duty (or an injury or illness that was incurred by the covered servicemember before the members active duty and was aggravated by service in the line of duty while on active duty) that may render the servicemember medically unfit to perform his or her duties for which the servicemember is undergoing medical treatment, recuperation, or therapy; or is in outpatient status; or is on the temporary disability retired list; or (ii) a veteran of the Armed Forces, including a veteran of the National guard or Reserves, who is undergoing medical treatment, recuperation, or therapy for a serious injury or illness and who was an active member at any time during the five-year period preceding the date on which the veteran undergoes medical treatment, recuperation or therapy and who is recovering from a serious illness or injury sustained in the line of duty during active military duty or who incurred an injury or illness prior to active duty that was aggravated by service in the line of duty. For purposes of military caregiver leave only, the single 12-month period is measured forward from the date an employees leave to care for the covered servicemember begins. Leave to care for a covered servicemember, when combined with other FMLA-qualifying leave, may not exceed a total of 26 weeks in a single 12-month period.

19-20

ORGANIZATION

(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL Calculation of 12-Month Period For the purposes of calculating the 12-month window period referred to above (excluding military caregiver leave), the Company will measure the 12-month period backward from the date of an employees request for FMLA leave. Each time an employee takes FMLA leave, the Company will determine the total amount of FMLA leave used by the employee during the preceding 12 months, and the remaining time available to the employee will be the balance of 12 weeks which has not been used. For example, an employee takes a 2-week FMLA leave between January 1 and January 15 of Year 1, and a 10-week FMLA leave between October 22 and December 31 of that same year. On January 1 of Year 2, the employee is entitled to one day of FMLA leave since measuring backward to the previous January 1 would show that he or she has exhausted 11 weeks and 4 days of FMLA leave for the 12-month period. On January 2 of Year 2, the employee would be entitled to another day and so on through January 15 of Year 2. On October 22 through December 31 of Year 2, the employee would be eligible for another 10 weeks of FMLA leave. Leave for the birth of a child or placement of a child for adoption or foster care must conclude within 12 months of the birth or placement. Any leave taken by an eligible employee for any of the reasons covered by this policy will be considered FMLA leave and will be designated as such by the Company even if the employee does not identify specifically the time off as FMLA leave. Intermittent or Reduced Leaves FMLA leave may be taken intermittently or on a reduced schedule basis whenever medically necessary to care for a family member with a serious health condition or because the employee is unable to work due to a serious health condition. Leave due to a military qualifying exigency also may be taken on an intermittent basis. Generally, FMLA leave will be counted in increments of one hour. If any employee is out of work for an hour or more on FMLA eligible leave, he or she should discuss this fact with the Human Resources Department. In order to calculate accurate records for these days, Human Resources will ask any employee who will be or is absent from work whether the employee is absent due to an FMLA-qualified reason and thus requesting FMLA leave. Employees needing intermittent or reduced schedule FMLA leave must make reasonable efforts to schedule their leave so as not to unduly disrupt the Companys operations. In addition, the Company may assign an employee to an alternative position with equivalent pay and benefits that better accommodates the employees intermittent or reduced leave schedule. Substitution of Paid Leave Time The Company will designate if an employees use of paid leave counts as FMLA leave based on information from the employee. Employees may choose and the Company may require employees to use accrued paid leave (e.g., vacation) to cover some or all of the FMLA leave. If FMLA leave is for a personal medical reason, the FMLA leave will run concurrently with sick leave during which an employee receives benefits under the Companys short-term disability policy. If the employees serious health condition is due to a work related injury, workers compensation leave also will be 09/01/10 (ISSUE) EMPLOYEE HANDBOOK 19-21

OPERATIONS MANUAL designated as FMLA leave. In order to use paid leave for FMLA leave, employees must comply with the employers normal paid leave policies. Definition of Serious Health Condition and Health Care Provider A serious health condition is an illness, injury, impairment or physical or mental condition that involves either an overnight stay in a medical care facility, or continuing treatment by a health care provider for a condition that either prevents the employee from performing the functions of the employees job, or prevents the qualified family member from participating in school or other daily activities. Subject to certain conditions, the continuing treatment requirement may be met by: a period of incapacity of more than three (3) consecutive, full calendar days, and any subsequent treatment or period of incapacity relating to the same condition, that also involves: (i) treatment two or more times, within 30 days of the first day of incapacity, unless extenuating circumstances exist, by a health care provider, by a nurse under direct supervision of a health care provider, or by a provider of health care services (e.g., physical therapist) under orders of, or on referral by, a health care provider; or (2) treatment by a health-care provider on at least one occasion, which results in a regimen of continuing treatment under the supervision of the health care provider; provided, however, that the first (or only) in-person treatment visit must take place within seven days of the first day of incapacity, incapacity due to pregnancy, or incapacity due to a chronic condition; incapacity or treatment for such incapacity due to a chronic serious health condition which: (1) requires periodic visits, i.e., two or more visits a year to a health care provider for treatment by a health care provider or by a nurse or physicians assistant under the direct supervision of a health care provider; (2) continues over an extended period of time (including recurring episodes of single underlying condition); and (3) may cause episodic rather than a continuing period of incapacity (e.g., asthma, diabetes, epilepsy, etc.); incapacity which is permanent or long-term due to a condition for which treatment may not be effective (examples include Alzheimers, severe stroke, or the terminal stages of a disease); or any period of absence to receive multiple treatments (including any period of recovery there from) by a health care provider or a provider of health care services under orders of, or on referral by, a health care provider, either for restorative surgery after an accident or other injury, or for a condition that would likely result in a period of incapacity of more than three (3) consecutive calendar days in the absence of medical intervention or treatment, such as cancer (chemotherapy, radiation, etc.) or kidney disease (dialysis).

19-22

ORGANIZATION

(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL Incapacity means inability to work, attend school or perform other daily activities due to the serious health condition, treatment therefore, or recovery there from. Treatment includes examinations to determine if a serious health condition exists and evaluations of the condition. Treatment does not include routine physical exams, or eye or dental exams. A regimen of continuing treatment includes, for example, a course of prescription (e.g. an antibiotic) or therapy requiring special equipment to resolve or alleviate the health condition. A regimen of continuing treatment that includes the taking of over-thecounter medications such as aspirin, antihistamines, or salves; or bed-rest, drinking fluids, exercise, and other similar activities that can be initiated without a visit to a health care provider, is not, by itself, sufficient to constitute a regimen of continuing treatment for purposes of FMLA leave. Health care provider means: Doctors of medicine or osteopathy authorized to practice medicine or surgery by the state in which the doctor practices; Podiatrists, dentists, clinical psychologists, optometrists and chiropractors (limited to manual manipulation of the spine to correct a sublimation as demonstrated by X-ray to exist) authorized to practice, and performing within the scope of their practices, as defined under state law; Nurse practitioners, nurse midwives, and clinical social workers authorized to practice, and performing within the scope of their practices, as defined under state law; Christian Science practitioners listed with the First Church of Christ, Scientist in Boston, Massachusetts; Any health care provider from whom the Company or the Companys group health plans benefits manager will accept certification of the existence of a serious health condition to substantiate a claim for health benefits; or A health care provider who practices in a country other than the U.S., who is authorized to practice in accordance with the law of that country, and who is performing within the scope of his or her practice as defined under such law.

09/01/10 (ISSUE)

EMPLOYEE HANDBOOK

19-23

OPERATIONS MANUAL Health and Other Benefits: The Company will maintain group health insurance coverage for an employee on FMLA leave whenever the employee received such insurance before the leave was taken on the same terms as if the employee had continued to work. If applicable, arrangements will need to be made for employees to pay their share of health insurance premiums while on leave. If an employee fails to pay his or her portion of health premiums while on leave for more than 30 days after the payment due date, the Company may cancel the insurance coverage during the remainder of the leave. In some instances, the employer may recover premiums it paid to maintain health coverage for an employee who fails to return to work from FMLA leave. In the event that any portion of an FMLA leave is substituted with vacation or any other paid time off the employees coverage under the Companys group life and long-term disability insurance policies will continue during that portion of FMLA leave which is substituted with vacation and/or paid time off. Job Restoration: Upon return from FMLA leave, most employees will be restored to his or her original job, or to an equivalent job with equivalent pay, benefits, and other employment terms and conditions. In addition, an employees use of FMLA leave cannot result in the loss of any employment benefit that the employee earned or was entitled to before using FMLA leave. Notwithstanding the above, an employee who has taken FMLA leave has no greater right to reinstatement or to other benefits and/or terms or conditions of employment than if the employee had been employed continuously during the FMLA leave period. For example, an employee will not be restored to the job if the employee was hired for a specific term or project which has expired and the Company otherwise would not have continued to employ the employee. Key Employee Exception to Job Restoration: Under specified and limited circumstances where restoration to employment will cause substantial and grievous economic injury to its operations, the Company may deny reinstatement to certain highly paid employees after using FMLA leave during which health coverage was maintained. In order to do so, the Company must: Notify the employee of his or her status as a key employee in response to the employees notice of intent to take FMLA leave; Notify the employee as soon as the Company decides it will deny job restoration and explain the reasons for this decision; Offer the employee a reasonable opportunity to return to work from FMLA leave after giving this notice; Make a final determination as to whether reinstatement will be denied at the end of the leave period if the employee then requests restoration once again. 19-24 ORGANIZATION (ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL A key employee is a salaried eligible employee who is among the highest paid 10% of employees within 75 miles of the employees worksite. Employees Responsibilities: Advance Notice, Medical Certification and Fitness-toReturn Certification: Employee seeking to use FMLA leave must request FMLA leave in writing using the Companys appropriate leave request forms to the Human Resources Department. When it is foreseeable, employees must provide 30 days advance notice of taking FMLA leave. When leave is not foreseeable, such as during a medical emergency, notice must be given as soon as practicable and generally must comply with the Companys normal call-in procedures. Employees must provide sufficient information for the employer to determine if the leave may qualify for FMLA protection and the anticipated timing and duration of the leave. Sufficient information may include that the employee is unable to perform job functions, the family member is unable to perform daily activities, the need for hospitalization or continuing treatment by a health care provider, or circumstances supporting the need for military family leave. Employees also must inform the employer if the requested leave is for a reason for which FMLA leave was previously taken or certified. When a leave is needed due to a serious health condition affecting the employee or the employees spouse, child, or parent, the employee must submit a medical certification form supporting the need for the leave. In certain circumstances, second or third medical opinions and periodic recertification (at the Companys expense) may be required as well as periodic reports during the FMLA leave regarding the employees status and intent to return to work. Employees returning from a continuous medical leave for their own illness may be required to provide a fitness-to-return to work certificate from their medical care provider prior to or on their first day back to work, and employees on intermittent leave may be required to provide a fitness-to-return to work certificate every 30 days if some intermittent leave has been used during that period and reasonable safety concerns exist. Other Provisions: Salaried executive, administrative and professional employees of covered employers who meet the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) criteria for exemption from minimum wage and overtime do not lose their FLSA-exempt status by using any unpaid FMLA leave. This special exception to the salary basis requirements for FLSAs exemption extends only to eligible employees use of leave required by FMLA. The FMLA protects employees from the unlawful interference with, restraint or denial of the exercise of any right provided by the FMLA. The Act also protects against unlawful discharge or discrimination against any person for opposing any practice or because of involvement in any proceeding related to the FMLA. The FMLA does not affect any other federal or state law which prohibits discrimination nor does it supersede any state or local law which provides greater family or medical leave protection.

09/01/10 (ISSUE)

EMPLOYEE HANDBOOK

19-25

OPERATIONS MANUAL

5.

Personal Leave Of Absence

An employee may request a personal leave of absence to attend to urgent personal matters. The Company, at its sole discretion, will grant or deny such requests for leave. . Procedure A regular, full-time employee may apply for a personal leave after six months of employment by submitting such request to his/her supervisor. Personal leaves of absences may be granted for up to 14 calendar days with each request judged upon its own merits. Cases in excess of 14 days (including requests for extensions) require the concurrence of the Department Vice President. Personal leaves of absence are without pay. Benefits will continue however it will be the employees responsibility to pay the premiums by the first of each month that they are out on leave. Employees are encouraged to use vacation time if available. The employees Supervisor will prepare a Multi-Use Personnel Form requesting a personal leave of absence and process it through normal channels.

6.

Military Leave

Short Term Military Leave with Pay: An employee who is a member of an officially-recognized reserve or National Guard unit or who enlists in the Uniformed Services of the United States is eligible for military leave with pay for the first [ten (10)] working days of any service period required for training purposes or active duty per year. An employee is eligible for paid leave only for the first [ten (10)] days of each period of continuous service or tour of duty. The employee will be paid his/her full gross salary/rate of pay for the hours he or she would have been regularly scheduled to work during this period less any compensation he/she received from the military during the same period of time. Employees will be required to provide the Company with documentation regarding the compensation received from the military and such sums shall be deducted from Company pay for the same period. Military Leave without Pay for Extended Active Duty: Employees who voluntarily enlist in the Uniformed Services of the United States, or a reservist called to active duty, shall be eligible for leave without pay for up to five (5) years while serving in the Uniformed Services, subject to certain exceptions. This leave without pay shall commence after the [10-day] military leave with pay has been utilized.

19-26

ORGANIZATION

(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL Procedures for Military Leave: An employee must provide written notice of his/her need for leave to his supervisor and the Human Resources Department at least two weeks prior to the commencement of leave. This notice should include the best approximation of the expected dates of the leave. If the employee is notified of his/her need for leave less than two weeks prior to his/her scheduled departure, he/she must provide written notice to his/her supervisor and the Human Resources Department as soon as possible. Employees must provide the Human Resources Department with a copy of their military orders or the notice they received from the National Guard or Uniformed Services unit. All employees are encouraged to give notice of their need for leave as early as possible. Benefits: During military leave with pay, employees will continue to accrue seniority and paid time off. Employees who are on military leave without pay will continue to accrue seniority but not paid time off. Employees who are reemployed following military leave will be eligible for benefits in accordance with the seniority level the employee would have attained had the individual remained continuously employed with the Company. During a military leave of less than 31 days, an employee is entitled to continued group health plan coverage under the same conditions as if the employee had continued to work. For military leaves of more than 30 days, an employee and covered dependents may elect to continue his/her/their health coverage for up to 24 months at the cost of 102% of the overall (both employer and employee) premium rate subject to certain terms and conditions. This continuation of coverage will run concurrently with applicable health insurance coverage under COBRA. Please contact the Human Resources Department for more information on benefits continuation. With respect to the Companys retirement plan, upon reemployment, the employee may, at the employees election, make any or all employee contributions that the employee would have been eligible to make had the employee's employment not been interrupted by military service. Such contributions must be made within a period that begins with the employee's reinstatement and that is not greater in duration than three times the length of the employee's military service, not to exceed five years. Reemployment/Reinstatement: Any employee whose absence from employment with the Company is necessitated by reason of military service in the uniformed services shall be entitled to all reemployment rights and benefits as set forth below in accordance with the federal Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act (URESSA) and other applicable federal or state laws. Upon an employee's prompt application for reinstatement (in accordance with the timeframes set forth below), an employee will be reinstated to employment in the following manner depending upon the employee's period of military service: 1. For a period of 1 to 90 days:

(A) in the position which the employee would have been employed if continuous employment with the Company had not been 09/01/10 (ISSUE) EMPLOYEE HANDBOOK 19-27

OPERATIONS MANUAL interrupted by such service, provided the employee is qualified to perform the duties of such position; or (B) if the employee is not qualified to perform the duties of the position referred to in subparagraph 1(A) after reasonable efforts by the Company to qualify the employee, then in the position of employment in which the employee was employed on the date of the commencement of the service in the uniformed services. 2. For a period of 91 or more days:

(A) in the position of employment in which the employee would have been employed if continuous employment with the Company had not been interrupted by military service, or a position of like seniority, status and pay, provided the employee is qualified to perform the duties of such position; or (B) if the employee is not qualified to perform the duties of a position referred to in subparagraph 2(A) after reasonable efforts by the Company to qualify the employee, then in the position of employment in which the employee was employed on the date of the commencement of military service services, or a position of like seniority, status and pay, the duties of which the employee is qualified to perform. 3. Employee with a service-connected disability:

If after reasonable accommodation efforts by the Company, an employee with a service-connected disability is not qualified for employment in the position he or she would have attained or in the position that he or she left, the employee will be employed in (i) any other position of similar seniority, status and pay for which the employee is qualified or could become qualified with reasonable efforts by the Company; or (ii) if no such position exists, in the nearest approximation consistent with the circumstances of the employee's situation. Prompt Application for Reinstatement: In order to be entitled to the reinstatement rights set forth above, an employee who has engaged in military service must submit an application for reinstatement in accordance with the following schedule: 1. If service is less than 31 days (or for the purpose of taking an examination to determine fitness for service) - the employee must report for reinstatement at the beginning of the first full regularly scheduled working period on the first calendar day following completion of service and the expiration of eight hours rest and after a time for safe transportation back to the employee's residence. 2. If service is for 31 days or more but less than 180 days - the employee must submit an application for reinstatement with the Human Resources Department no later than 14 days following the completion of service. 19-28 ORGANIZATION (ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL 3. If service is 181 days or over - the employee must submit an application for reinstatement with the Human Resources Department no later than 90 days following the completion of service. 4. If the employee is hospitalized or convalescing from a service-connected injury the employee must submit an application for reinstatement with the Human Resources Department no later than two years following completion of service. Exceptions to Reemployment/Reinstatement: An employee is not entitled to reinstatement/reemployment as described above in the following circumstances: 1. The Companys circumstances have so changed as to make reemployment impossible or unreasonable; 2. The employee's employment prior to the military service was for a non-recurrent period and there was no reasonable expectation that the employment would have continued indefinitely or for a significant period; or 3. 7. The employee did not receive an honorable discharge from military service.

Jury Duty

Employees selected for jury duty service will be granted leave time to complete their obligations. Employees will be expected to work all normally scheduled hours when not required to be in court. Procedure Regular, full-time employees are eligible for paid jury duty leave after six months of full-time employment. All other employees are eligible for unpaid jury duty leave. Each employee must notify his/her Supervisor as soon as possible after receiving a subpoena to jury service. A copy of the subpoena must be given to the Supervisor and is then forwarded to Human Resources. Jury duty pay will normally be limited to 24 hours (3 days) per year. Under unusual circumstances, the Department Vice President, with the concurrence of the Manager of Human Resources, may authorize additional jury duty pay. To account properly for the time of an employee during the workweek in which jury duty is performed, the employee must complete a time card or time sheet and submit it to his/her Supervisor. To account properly for the time of a salaried employee during the workweek in which jury duty is performed, the employee must report to his/her Supervisor, who will document the absence with a Multi-Use Personnel Form. EMPLOYEE HANDBOOK 19-29

09/01/10 (ISSUE)

OPERATIONS MANUAL 8. Bereavement Pay

Aerosim Flight Academy recognizes that employees may need time off from work in the event of the death of a relative. After six months of regular, full-time employment, an employee will be granted time off with pay in the event of the death of a member of the employees family. THREE DAYS Spouse Parents Children Brother/Sister 9. ONE DAY Employees grandparents/great grandparents Parents-in-law Employees stepparents Employees step brother/sister

Employees who do not qualify for paid time off may be given time off without pay. Scheduled workdays are eligible for bereavement pay or time off. If a member of an employees family dies during the employees paid vacation, bereavement pay will be used instead of vacation pay, as appropriate.

Evacuation Pay

Effective September 9, 2004 all flying pilots involved in evacuating our fleet will receive a guaranteed daily evacuation pay equal to four (4) hours of pay per day. This will be provided on your next regularly scheduled paycheck. In addition, for pilots involved in an evacuation the Company will provide a $30.00 per diem to each pilot to cover incidentals and meals. A meal plan with the hotel will not be provided. In addition to the logged flight time, the Academy will apply the daily evacuation hours (4) towards the 1,000 total time requirement for the guaranteed interview. [Shari--What does this mean?] 10. Pay Advances - Early Vacation Pay

The Company does not make pay advances or extend credit on unearned wages for any employee. An employee scheduled for a vacation on payday may request early delivery of his/her vacation check. This is not a pay advance but payment for vacation hours. Because special manual checks are not written for early vacation pay, requests for such pay must be made through the regular payroll process no later than the date all Multi-Use Personnel Forms are due (for the payday before the employees vacation).

19-30

ORGANIZATION

(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL

CHAPTER 6 COMPANY PROPERTY AND INFORMATION


1. Nondisclosure of Confidential Information

The Company places a high priority on the preservation and protection of its trade secrets and confidential and/or proprietary information. All records and files maintained by the Company are confidential and remain the Companys property. Confidential information includes, but is in no way limited to, financial information, personnel and payroll records (regarding current or past employees), information regarding customer transactions, customer account information, customer lists, customer preferences, marketing strategies, computer software, technology, data bases, vendor or supplier information or any documents or information regarding the Companys operations, finances, procedures, or practices. Unless expressly authorized by the Companys President or as required as part of employees duties on behalf of the Company, employees are strictly prohibited from using, disclosing, sending, transmitting, or otherwise disseminating any Company proprietary information, trade secrets, or other confidential information. If an employee is in doubt as to whether information should be divulged, he or she should err in favor of not divulging information and discuss the situation with his or her manager. Originals and all copies of such information shall be immediately returned to the Company upon an employees separation from employment. 2. Return Of Aerosim Flight Academys Property

The Company provides employees the materials necessary to safely and efficiently complete job requirements. These materials remain the property of the Company, may only be used for Company purposes and the Companys benefit, and must be returned upon termination of the employment relationship or upon request. Company-owned items that may be in an employees possession include, but are not limited to, the following: Credit Cards Phone Cards Manuals Pagers Uniforms Written materials Video and audio tapes Pass cards Telephones/Blackberry Keys Identification badges Protective equipment Tools Vehicles and Sun Pass/E-Pass if applicable Insurance cards Computer disks PCs or Laptops Other items deemed appropriate by the Company

The return of all such items will be verified during the termination process, or at other times as appropriate. In the event any of these items are not returned, the employee may be assessed an appropriate charge. The loss or theft of any of these items shall be immediately reported by the employee to his/her Supervisor. EMPLOYEE HANDBOOK 19-31

09/01/10 (ISSUE)

OPERATIONS MANUAL 3. Security Inspections

Aerosim Flight Academy maintains a safe and healthy work environment for all of its employees. Use or possession of a gun, knife, weapon, explosive, or other potentially harmful object not required for job duties is not permitted on Company property. Procedure The Company reserves the right to conduct searches or inspections of anything on Company property including the employees person, personal effects, vehicles, lockers, desks, and other storage devices for the purpose of determining if any employees are in possession of illegal or unauthorized items. Authorized Company Representatives without prior warning may make such searches from time to time. Articles of a strictly personal nature that an employee does not want subject to inspection should not be brought onto Company premises. The refusal by any Company employee to submit to a search or inspection of personal property may result in disciplinary action up to and including termination of employment.

Any Company employee found to be in possession of any such illegal or unauthorized items will be subject to disciplinary action up to and including termination of employment. 4. Bulletin Boards

The Company provides bulletin boards and these bulletin boards display legally-required postings in addition to other information pertinent to the employee group. Bulletin boards are an official means for communicating important information. All bulletin boards are Aerosim Flight Academys property. No employee is permitted to deface or tamper with postings: nor is an employee permitted to post unauthorized items. The posting of any material on bulletin boards is subject to review and prior approval by Human Resources. It is the responsibility of each employee to regularly check bulletin boards for messages and memos. Procedure An employee who wishes to place any item on a bulletin board must first receive approval from his/her immediate Supervisor. The approving Supervisor may review the information with the Manager of Human Resources before it is posted. Any unauthorized items or postings appearing on bulletin boards, or other Company property will be removed and discarded. Defacing or tampering with approved postings, or posting unauthorized items, may result in disciplinary action up to and including termination of employment.

19-32

ORGANIZATION

(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL 5. Solicitations And Distributions

Aerosim Flight Academy recognizes that employees have an interest in events and organizations outside the workplace. However, soliciting or distributing literature on behalf of these outside organizations can have a detrimental effect on productivity, morale, and housekeeping. Employees may not solicit for any cause or purpose during working time. This includes both the employee making the solicitation and the employee being solicited. Procedure Employees may not distribute literature or solicit for any cause or purpose in any work area at anytime and may not distribute literature in non-work areas during their working time. Persons not employed by the Company may not solicit or distribute literature in the workplace at any time for any purpose.

6.

Personal Phone Calls/Mail

Aerosim Flight Academy provides telephone service to conduct Company business. Personal phone calls during work hours can result in a significant expense to the Company and lower employee productivity and morale. Personal phone calls can also interfere with normal business operations. Employees should make every effort to limit personal, non-emergency phone calls and to limit personal electronic communications on Company equipment during work time. Communications of an emergency nature are always acceptable. Long distance calls of a personal nature may not be made on Company phones at any time. Such activity is considered a form of theft and may result in disciplinary action up to and including termination of employment. Where pay phones are available, employees should use the pay phones and deal with personal matters while on break or at lunch. Personal use of Company-paid postage or Company-paid carriers is considered a form of theft and may result in disciplinary action up to and including termination of employment.

7.

Electronic Communications Media Use Policy

This policy establishes guidelines for employees access to and use of the Companys electronic communication infrastructure, including electronic mail (e-mail), Internet use, voice mail and other electronic communication media. The computer, e-mail and voice mail systems belong to the Company, and as such, all communication and information transmitted by, received 09/01/10 (ISSUE) EMPLOYEE HANDBOOK 19-33

OPERATIONS MANUAL from or stored in this system are the property of the Company. All employees have the responsibility to use these resources in a professional, ethical and lawful manner. General Policy Use of the Companys electronic communication media is considered to be a non-private, business-related use of Company resources. Authorized representatives of the Company from time to time may monitor the use of such equipment and resources. Monitoring may include accessing, retrieving or deleting recorded messages and printing or reading data files or e-mails. Monitoring may also include review of files recording Internet use of employees, and regular auditing of all firewalls. These systems should not be considered completely secure, so please use discretion when sending or storing highly sensitive confidential information. Users are required to change passwords to a unique password every 90 days or when prompted by the system. Users should log out of the network before going home. Not logging out of the system may interfere with network backups and result in data not being backed up. Employees must not use passwords, access a file or retrieve any stored communication unless authorized to do so, or unless they have received prior clearance from an authorized Company representative. All passwords are the property of the Company. Employees should protect their passwords and security codes. All IT equipment will be purchased through the Information Technology department. Employees are responsible for attaining the approiate approvals for all expenditures before any purchases can be made. IT equipment includes but is not limited to: PCs, laptops, peripherals including printers, Blackberrys, software, software maintenance services and software consulting services. The computer, electronic mail, internet access and voice mail systems you use at the Company are intended for business purposes only. All communications through any of the Companys electronic communication media must be conducted in a professional tone and manner. Use of electronic communication media to transmit offensive, discriminatory or unprofessional messages will not be tolerated. To be clear, the Companys policies against sexual and other types of harassment fully apply to use of electronic communication media, including the use of instant message programs. Specifically, no communications should be created or sent that may constitute intimidating, hostile or offensive material on the basis of sex, race, color, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, age, pregnancy, childbirth or related medical condition, marital status or disability. The electronic communication media should not be used for soliciting outside business ventures, advertising for personal enterprises or soliciting for nonCompany-related purposes. ORGANIZATION (ISSUE) 09/01/10

19-34

OPERATIONS MANUAL Under no circumstances is any company property to be used to solicit, harass, offend or be used for any other purpose such as accessing or illegally distributing materials that are sexually explicit or otherwise inappropriate or unlawful. In addition, unauthorized downloading, reproduction or forwarding of copyrighted material of third parties is strictly prohibited. Employees are expected to comply with all aspects of the Companys electronic communication media policy. Any employee who becomes aware of misuse of the electronic communication system should promptly contact Human Resources. Employees who violate this policy may be subject to disciplinary action, up to and including termination.

E-Mail and Voice Mail E-mail and voice mail messages are not confidential, and the Company may read and retrieve all messages. Unauthorized employees may not read and retrieve others e-mail and voice mail messages. E-mail and phone-mail messages should be expressed clearly, briefly, and in a professional tone and manner. Because of the ease in dissemination of e-mail messages, great care should be exercised in transmitting confidential information via e-mail. Forwarding confidential and sensitive information outside the Company without a legitimate business need to do so is prohibited. Setting auto-forward of Company e-mail accounts to non-company accounts is prohibited. This includes programming or rule setting within the e-mail mailbox or forward e-mail to e-mail systems outside the company such as yahoo.com, aol.com, hotmail.com or any other e-mail provider. Phone-mail greetings should be kept professional, and should be updated to reflect an employees protracted absence from his/her workplace. .

Internet

Access to and use of the Internet constitutes consent to monitoring and/or auditing by the Company for any purpose. There may be a regular audit by the Company of all Internet firewalls. Please also note that consistent with applicable federal and/or state law, the time that an employee spends on the Internet may be tracked through activity logs for business purposes. All abnormal usage will be investigated thoroughly.

Access to the Internet must be through a controlled environment via an approved Company security firewall. The firewall protects the Company from unauthorized access to its network resulting in a release of private or sensitive data. In addition, a firewall ensures compliance with existing security procedures 09/01/10 (ISSUE) EMPLOYEE HANDBOOK 19-35

OPERATIONS MANUAL and logs Internet usage. As a result of these measures, access to some websites may be blocked. Because the Companys name and address will be associated with any communication (e.g., notes) sent on the Internet, commentaries that are inconsistent with Company business practices or personal opinions that would reflect poorly on the Company are unacceptable and must be avoided. Users must ensure that all communications do not violate any applicable law or regulation. Company employees shall not download or upload unauthorized software over the Internet. Company employees shall not use the Internet to view, disseminate, download and/or upload any pornographic or inappropriate material or content. Compliance with all other provisions stated within this policy relating to e-mail and voice mail also apply to Internet use. Instant messaging and chatting with external entities is prohibited. This includes, but is not limited to the use of AOL messenger, Yahoo messenger, MSN Messenger, Facebook, MySpace, and Twitter.

Remote Network Access Remote network access is currently available via VPN. This service requires Executive Management approval and is based on business needs. Remote access to the Companys network is only permitted with Company owned and supported assets. Vendor access to the Aerosim Flight Academy network requires the vendor to sign and agree to the terms of the IT Vendor Network Access Agreement.

Technology Moves And Installations Users are prohibited from installing non- Company owned hardware, software or peripherals, or connecting devices to the network without prior Information Technology approval. This includes vendor solutions and personally owned equipment. Company owned assets should only be installed and/or moved by an Information Technology Representative. Tampering with, intentional hacking or modifying of any software, standard workstation images, workstation security levels, modifying network wiring or unauthorized moving of hardware or peripherals is prohibited.

19-36

ORGANIZATION

(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL Cell Phones Personal cellular telephones should be turned to silent mode while an employee is working. Employees only may use personal cellular telephones on the Companys property during non-work times (i.e., lunch or other break times). Employees may not use the picture or photography feature in any cellular telephones in the workplace unless such use is for a work-related purpose and is expressly authorized by a manager. Employees are required to always exercise care and caution when using cellular phones. Any employee, who chooses to utilize a Company-provided cellular phone for any reason, or to use any other cellular phone in connection with performing Company job responsibilities, does so at the employees own initiative. The Company is not and will not be responsible for any consequences that may arise from an employees cellular phone use. Along these lines, the Company does not encourage or require employees to use cellular phones in connection with conducting Company job responsibilities while driving or while performing any other activity from which an employee might be distracted by using a cellular phone, so as to create a potential safety issue. In fact, the Company strongly discourages employees from using a cellular phone in any such situation, and no job in the Company requires employees to use a cellular phone to perform job responsibilities in any such situation. Employees should make every effort to limit personal electronic communications on Company equipment during work time. Communications of an emergency nature are always acceptable.

8.

Social Networking Policy

In general, the Company respects the right of employees to use social networking sites (e.g., Twitter, Facebook, MySpace, etc.), personal Web sites, and Weblogs (together, for the purposes of this policy, Networking Sites). If an employee identifies him/her self as an employee of the Company on a Networking Site, however, readers of the Networking Site may view the employee as a representative, agent or spokesperson of the Company. Accordingly, an employees online presence, conduct and communications may be attributed to the Company, and employees must be aware that their conduct can reflect negatively on the Company and create significant legal and financial exposure for the Company.

In light of this possibility, the Company requires, as a condition of employment, that employees observe the following guidelines when creating, posting, commenting, communicating, participating or engaging in any form of conduct with respect to any Networking Site:

09/01/10 (ISSUE)

EMPLOYEE HANDBOOK

19-37

OPERATIONS MANUAL

1. Communications on a Networking Site must contain clear disclaimers that the views expressed by the employee are the employees alone and do not represent the views of any other entity or person. Employees must make it clear in any communication that they are speaking for themselves and not on behalf of any other entity or person. Company logos and trademarks may not be used without the Companys prior written consent. The Company does not host or sponsor a Networking Site and the use of our Company name or logo is not allowed without prior written consent. 2. Communications on a Networking Site must comply with the Companys confidentiality policies, as well as any and all contractual, common law and statutory obligations of the employee regarding the protection of the Companys trade secrets and confidential and proprietary information. Employees may not identify or reference any of the Companys current, former or prospective clients, partners or customers without the Companys prior written consent.

3. Employees may not use Networking Sites to engage in conduct (or discuss engaging in conduct) that is prohibited by Company policy, including but not limited to Company policies regarding alcohol and drugs, sexual harassment, discrimination, inappropriate conduct, and electronic communications. Employees specifically may not use any Networking Site to harass, bully, or intimidate any other individuals (specifically including Company employees, customers, vendors and business partners), including but not limited to making any statements that are: (a) derogatory with respect to an individuals physical or mental characteristics, (b) sexually suggestive, (c) humiliating, (d) demeaning, or (e) threatening (whether of physical violence or otherwise).

4. Employees may not use any Networking Site in any way that violates any federal, state or local law or regulation.

5. Communications on a Networking Site must be respectful to the Company (including its officers, directors, employees, and consultants), as well as to the Companys clients, partners, customers and competitors. Aerosim Flight Academy strongly discourages any communication on Networking Sites between employees and customers. Employees will be held accountable for any and all content on their personal Social Networking Site.

6. Communications on a Networking Site must not disparage the Company, including but not limited to the Companys officers, directors, employees, products, business relationships, and finances.

19-38

ORGANIZATION

(ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL 7. Activities on a Networking Site should not interfere with an employees work commitments in any way.

Any employee found to be in violation of any portion of this Social Networking Policy will be subject to immediate disciplinary action, up to and including termination of employment.

This policy is intended to be construed and applied generally. The absence of, or lack of explicit reference to, a specific site does not limit the extent of the application of this policy. Where no policy or guideline exists, the Company expects employees to use their professional judgment, take the most prudent action possible, and comply with all relevant laws at all times. Employees with any questions regarding this policy should contact Human Resources.

CHAPTER 7 CERTAIN SAFETY ISSUES


1. Work Place Injury

All employees are covered if an injury occurs while working. Aerosim Flight Academy administers a Work Place Injury program in accordance with applicable state laws, rules, and regulations. It is the obligation of each employee to report all accidents, injuries, or illnesses immediately. The sick or injured employee must furnish information about the injury or illness by completing a First Report of Injury or Illness form within 24 hours of the date of injury. The Supervisor must insure that the form is completed and signed, indicating agreement or disagreement with the employees report of the incident. If there is a disagreement, the Supervisor must provide supporting documentation. All documentation should then be forwarded to Human Resources.

Note: A Report of Accident/Injury must be completed and forwarded within 24 hours to Human Resources to be attached to the First Report of Injury. 2. Safety And Health

Aerosim Flight Academy is committed to maintaining the highest level of safety possible for our employees and customers and to reducing and eliminating hazards associated with dayto-day operations. Our goal is to manage inherent risks with good common sense and reasonable cost efficiency. The prevention of incidents and accidents is a shared responsibility of every employee of the Academy. There can be no higher emphasis on our daily operation than safety for our valued employees, customers, and entire operation. The Company will comply with all applicable safety requirements of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and the Federal Aviation Administration laws and regulations. No job is so important and no job effort is so urgent that an employee cannot take the time to work safely. The following safety practices must be observed: 09/01/10 (ISSUE) EMPLOYEE HANDBOOK 19-39

OPERATIONS MANUAL All work-related injuries and illnesses, no matter how slight, must be reported immediately to your Supervisor. Occupational injuries/illness must be reported using the procedure outlined in the Workers Compensation Policy. All unsafe or hazardous conditions must be reported immediately to a Supervisor. Employees must follow all safe practices and procedures including the use of safety equipment when required. Violation of safe practices could subject an employee to disciplinary action up to and including termination of employment.

3.

Workplace Violence Prevention Policy

The safety and security of employees and assets are vitally important to Aerosim Flight Academy. Threats or violent acts including harassment, intimidation, and coercion affecting Aerosim Flight Academy personnel or property will not be tolerated. It does not matter where the threat or violent act occurs. The prohibition against threats or violent acts applies to all persons involved in Aerosim Flight Academys business. Procedure Any person who engages in a violent act on Aerosim Flight Academys property will be removed from the premises as quickly and safely as possible. The perpetrator will remain off Aerosim Flight Academy premises on suspension pending the outcome of an investigation. When a threat of a violent act occurs, the Manager of Human Resources and the Department management will investigate to determine appropriate action, up to termination of employment. Employees having concerns about personal safety should contact the Manager of Human Resources. If it is an immediate threat, employees should contact either their immediate Supervisor or the Airport Police.

CHAPTER 8 DRUG TESTING & MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS


1. MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS

For Applicants The Company may require an applicant to submit to a medical examination after he/she has been offered a position which involves physical responsibilities or safety-sensitive functions in order to determine that he/she is fit to perform the duties and responsibilities of the position. For Employees An employee returning from an approved medical leave of absence may be required to submit to a medical examination to confirm that he/she is fit to perform the duties and responsibilities of his/her position. ORGANIZATION (ISSUE) 09/01/10

19-40

OPERATIONS MANUAL An employee may be required to submit to a medical examination (including a drug or alcohol test; please see Section 2 below) where there is reasonable suspicion of impairment on the job, or following a work-related accident. An employee being considered for a promotion or a transfer to a position which involves more strenuous physical responsibilities or safety-sensitive functions may be required to submit to a medical examination to confirm that he/she is fit to perform the duties and responsibilities of the new position. DRUG TESTING AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE POLICY STATEMENT A. Notice of Policy and Testing

2.

THE COMPANY is committed to providing a safe work environment for its employees and to fostering their well-being and health. This commitment is jeopardized when any COMPANY employee illegally uses drugs on the job; comes to work under the influence; possesses, distributes or sells drugs in the workplace; or abuses alcohol on the job. The goal of this policy is to balance the Companys respect for employee privacy with the need to maintain a safe, productive and drug-free workplace. To advance its commitment to a safe and healthy work environment, DCA has adopted this Drug-Free Workplace Policy. This policy is implemented pursuant to the Drug-Free Workplace requirements set forth in Florida Statute c. 440.102 and Florida Administrative Rule 59A-24 of the Florida Agency for Health Care Administration. [As of November 1, 2010,] employees are on notice of this policy. Employees will be subject to drug testing under the standards of this policy [effective January 1, 2011], which is more than 60 days from the date on which employees received notice of this policy. Upon request, employees or applicants may obtain copies of this policy from the Human Resources Department during regular business hours. This policy also is posted on the employee bulletin board. B. Prohibition Against Drug and Alcohol Use and Possession in the Workplace

Employees are strictly prohibited from using alcohol and/or illegal drugs on Company premises or while engaged in any job-related activity, whether on or off Company premises. Consistent with this policy, the use, possession, distribution, purchase or transfer of alcohol or illegal drugs on Company premises is strictly prohibited. The employee also is strictly prohibited from performing work for the Company while impaired by or under the influence of alcohol or drugs. Any violations of this policy may result in the immediate termination of employment. For purposes of this policy, Drug means alcohol (including distilled spirits, wine, a malt beverage, or an intoxicating liquor); an amphetamine; a cannabinoid; cocaine; phencyclidine (PCP); a hallucinogen; methaqualone; an opiate; a barbituate; a benzodiazepine; a synthetic narcotic; a designer drug; or a metabolite of any of these substances. Prescription or nonprescription medication means a drug or medication obtained pursuant to prescription or medication that is authorized pursuant to federal or state law for general distribution or use without a prescription in the treatment of human diseases, ailments, or injuries. An Illegal Drug is any drug which (i) is not legally obtainable; (ii) which may be legally obtainable but 09/01/10 (ISSUE) EMPLOYEE HANDBOOK 19-41

OPERATIONS MANUAL has not been legally obtained; or (iii) which is being used in a manner or for a purpose other than as prescribed or as intended. C. Drug Testing

In an effort to ensure a drug-free workplace, THE COMPANY will conduct drug testing of employees and applicants for employment. This testing may be conducted by any chemical, biological or physical instrumental analysis administered by laboratories certified by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and/or licensed by the Florida Agency for Health Care Administration, including but not limited to, urinalysis or analysis of blood samples. The scope and description of each particular category of testing that will be conducted by the Company is described in further detail below: a. Testing of Applicants. All job applicants who are offered a position with the Company will be required to submit to a drug test as a condition of employment. Any applicant who has a confirmed positive test result will be denied employment. All prospective employment candidates will be provided with notice of the test. Prior to and after testing, applicants will be given an opportunity to confidentially report to a Medical Review Officer the use of any prescription or nonprescription medications which may alter their test results. Testing of Employees. The Company will conduct drug testing of employees as follows: Reasonable Suspicion Testing. The Company will require an employee to submit to a drug test when it has reasonable suspicion to believe that an employee is using or has used illegal drugs. Circumstances that could be indicators of illegal drug use or a substance abuse problem and considered grounds for reasonable suspicion include (but are not limited to) the following: Information that an employee has caused or contributed to an accident while at work or while using or operating Company property. An Accident includes any event which results in injuries to any person or damage to equipment or property of the Company or any other person or entity; Observable phenomena while at work, such as direct observation of drug use or drug-related activities, such as distributing, selling, or buying drugs or observation of the physical symptoms and manifestations of being under the influence of a drug; Abnormal conduct or erratic behavior while at work or a significant deterioration in work performance; A report of drug use by a reliable and credible source; Evidence that an individual has tampered with a drug test during his employment with the Company; and ORGANIZATION (ISSUE) 09/01/10

b. i.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Evidence that an employee has used, possessed, sold, solicited or transferred drugs while working or while on the Companys premises or while operating the Companys vehicles, aircrafts, machinery, or equipment.

Please note that if conducting a test based upon reasonable suspicion, the Company will record and document the circumstances which formed the basis of the reasonable suspicion determination. A copy of this documentation may be obtained by the employee upon request. ii. iii. iv. Post-Injury Testing. The Company will automatically require drug testing for any employee injured while working or on duty. Follow-Up Testing If the Company, in its sole discretion, determines that an employee who has obtained a confirmed positive test result should not be terminated from employment, the employee may be granted a leave of absence (without pay unless the employee has paid leave available) and must enroll in and successfully complete a drug or alcohol rehabilitation program at his/her own expense as a condition of returning to work. When the employee successfully completes the rehabilitation program, the employee, upon returning to work (if the position is available), shall be subject to followup drug testing on an unannounced random basis for a period of two years following the employees completion of the rehabilitation program. The employee also must provide a statement from a medical doctor that the employee has successfully completed an approved rehabilitation program. Follow-up testing will be conducted at least once per year but will not be conducted more than eight times over the two-year period. Fitness for Duty. Drug testing may be conducted as part of a routinely scheduled employee fitness for duty medical examination for all members of a job classification or group. Random Testing. Random testing will be conducted quarterly. Lists of those scheduled for random testing are developed for each test period by a third party. Since the lists are random for each testing period, individuals may be tested two or more times while others may not be tested even once during a year. Chances of being selected for random testing are equal for each employee for each test period, regardless of whether or not the employee has been tested before.

v.

vi.

D.

Consequences of a Confirmed Positive Test, Refusal to Submit to a Drug Test and Other Violations of the Drug-Free Workplace Policy

An employee/applicant who refuses to submit to a drug test is considered and treated the same as those who have received a confirmed positive result. Any employee who refuses to submit to testing or has a confirmed positive test result may be terminated from employment or otherwise disciplined by the Company. Individuals who refuse to submit to testing procedures shall be asked to sign a Refusal to Submit to Drug Testing Form. 09/01/10 (ISSUE) EMPLOYEE HANDBOOK 19-43

OPERATIONS MANUAL An employee who is injured on the job who refuses to submit to testing under this program or who has a confirmed positive test result automatically forfeits any and all medical and indemnity benefits for which he/she would otherwise be eligible under the Floridas Workers Compensation Statute and/or the Companys workers compensation insurance. A job applicants refusal to submit to a pre-employment drug test and/or confirmed positive test result shall constitute a basis not to hire that individual. Any employee who otherwise violates the Companys Drug-Free Workplace policy (e.g., by possessing, distributing, soliciting drugs while working, in the workplace or in Company vehicles) will be subject to discipline up to and including termination of employment. E. Substances Subject to Testing

The Company may test for any or all of the following substances: Alcohol Amphetamines: (Obetrol, Biphetamine, Desoxyn, Dexedrine, Didrex, Ionamine, Fastin) Cannabinoids: (Marijuana, THC) Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Phencyclidine (PCP) Methaqualone HCI (Quaalude) Opiates: (Paregoric, Parepectolin, Donnegel PG, Morphine, Tylenol with Codeine, Empirin with Codeine, APAP with Codeine, Aspirin with Codeine, Robitussin AC, Guiatuss AC, Novahistine DH, Novahistine Expectorant, Dilaudid (Hydromophone), M-S Contin and Roxanol (morphine sulfate), Percodan, Vicodin, Tuss-Organidin, etc.) Barbituates (Phenobarbital, Amytal, Menbutl, Seconal) Benzodiazepines (Librium, Valium, Halcion, Restoril) Synthetic Narcotics (Methadone-Polophine, Darvocet, Darvon-N, Dolene)

F.

Testing Policies and Procedures a. Confidentiality

All information, interviews, reports, statements, memoranda and drug test results, written or otherwise, received by the Company through the drug-testing program are confidential and will not be released or disclosed without the employees written consent, except (i) when the information is compelled by a hearing officer or court of competent jurisdiction or (ii) when such information is relevant to determining eligibility for unemployment or workers compensation benefits. Information on drug testing may not be used in any criminal proceedings against the employee or applicant. Notwithstanding the foregoing, nothing in this policy prohibits the Company, agent of the Company or laboratory conducting the substance test from having access to employee testing information or using such information when the information is relevant to its defense in a civil or administrative matter.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL b. Medical Review Officer and Laboratory

The Company has engaged a certified Medical Review Officer to assist it in implementing its Drug-Free Workplace Policy and drug testing procedures. The MRO is responsible for (i) interpreting drug test results; and (ii) communicating with an employee who has a confirmed positive result to ascertain if there is a plausible explanation for the positive result before reporting the result to the Company. (See Reporting Test Results and Challenging Test Results sections below). The MRO is not an employee of the Company. The contact information for the Companys MRO is: Total Compliance Network 5440 NW 33rd Avenue St. 106 Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309 (954) 677-1200

To ensure accuracy in specimen collection and test results, the Company contracts with a laboratory that is licensed by the Florida Agency for Health Care Administration and/or certified by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to conduct all of its employee drug testing. The contact information for this laboratory is as follows: Central Florida Regional Hospital 1401 W. Seminole Blvd (407) 302-7322

c.

Medication Reporting Procedures

Employees or job applicants may confidentially report to the Companys MRO the use of prescription or nonprescription medications both before and after being tested. The MRO will provide employees with a form to submit such information just prior to the test. Additionally, prior to testing, the MRO will notify employees and job applicants of the most common drugs and medications (by brand name or common name as well as chemical name) which may alter or affect a drug test. For employee reference, a listing of these drugs may be found at Appendix A to this policy. Employees and applicants also have the right to consult the Companys MRO for technical information regarding prescription and non-prescription drugs. d. Reporting of Test Results

Initially, the MRO will notify an employee/applicant if he/she has received a positive confirmed test result. Employees or job applicants who receive a positive confirmed test result may contest or explain the result to the MRO within 5 working days after receiving written notification of the test result. If the employees or job applicants explanation or challenge is unsatisfactory to the MRO, the MRO shall report a positive result back to the Company. If the employee or applicant has a plausible explanation, as determined by the MRO, the MRO will report the test result as negative to the Company. Within five working days after receipt of a positive confirmed test result from the MRO, the Company will inform an employee or job applicant in writing of the positive test result, the 09/01/10 (ISSUE) EMPLOYEE HANDBOOK 19-45

OPERATIONS MANUAL consequences of the positive test result, and the applicant/employees ability to provide the Company with an explanation. The employee/applicant may request a copy of the report. e. Challenges to Test Results

Within 5 days of receiving notice of a positive confirmed test result from the Company, an employee or job applicant also may submit information to the Company explaining or contesting the test result. If the employees or job applicants explanation or challenge to the positive test result is unsatisfactory to the Company, the Company will provide to the employee or applicant: (i) a written explanation of why the explanation is unsatisfactory and (ii) a copy of the report with the positive test result. This information shall be retained by the Company for at least one year and shall be kept confidential. The employee or applicant has 180 days after receiving written notification of a positive test result to have the sample retested at his/her own expense at another licensed or certified laboratory of his/her choice. If a workplace injury has occurred, an employee or job applicant may undertake an administrative challenge by filing a claim for workers compensation benefits with a Judge of Compensation Claims pursuant to Chapter 440 of the Florida Statutes. If no workplace injury has occurred, the person must challenge the test result in a court of competent jurisdiction. When an employee undertakes a challenge to the test result, it is the employees responsibility to notify the laboratory that the sample should be retained until the case is resolved. G. Contact Information for Employee Assistance Programs (EAP)

The Company does not offer an Employee Assistance Program (EAP). However, it does maintain a list of local providers of employee assistance, drug and alcohol treatment and family services that employees may access without Company involvement. This list is attached to this policy as Appendix B. Employees also may request a copy of this list from the Human Resources Department. The cost of seeking assistance from an EAP or other provider will be the responsibility of the employee and is subject to the provisions of the Companys health insurance plan. H. Collective Bargaining Agreement

This Company does not have an applicable collective bargaining agreement.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL APPENDIX A OVER-THE-COUNTER AND PRESCRIPTION DRUGS WHICH COULD ALTER OR AFFECT DRUG TEST RESULTS Note: The purpose of this form is to alert you of the possible influence that prescription drugs may have on the outcome of a drug test. You may direct any questions regarding this information to the Companys MRO at the following address and phone number: Name Address Phone Number Alcohol All liquid medications containing ethyl alcohol (ethanol). Please read the label for alcohol content. As an example, Vick's Nyquil is 25% (50 proof) ethyl alcohol, Comtrex is 20% (40 proof), Contact Severe Cold Formula Night Strength is 25% (50 proof) and Listerine is 26.9% (54 proof) Obetrol, Biphetamine, Desoxyn, Dexedrine, Didrex, Ionamine, Fastin Marinol (Dronabinol, THC). Cocaine HCI topical solution (Roxanne). Not legal by prescription. Not legal by prescription. Paregoric, Parapectolin, Donnagel PG, Morphine, Tylenol with Codeine, Emprin with Codeine, APAP with Codeine, Aspirin with Codeine, Robitussin AC, Guiatuss AC, Novahistine DH, Novahistine Expectorant, Dilaudid (Hydromorphone), M-S Contin and Roxanol (morphine sulfate), Percodan, Vicodin, Tussi-organidin, etc. Phenobarbital, Tuinal, Amytal, Nembutal, Seconal, Lotusate, Fiorinal, Fioricet, Esgic, Butisol, Mebral, Butabarbital, Butalbital, Phenrinin, Triad, etc. Ativan, Azene, Clonopin, Dalmine, Diazepam, Librium, Xanax, Serax, Tranxene, Valium, Verstran, Halcion, Paxipam, Restoril, Centrax. Dolophine, Metadose. Darvocet, Darvon N, Dolene, etc.

Amphetamines Cannabinoids Cocaine Phencyclidine Methaqualone Opiates

Barbiturates

Benzodiazepines

Methadone Propoxyphene

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CHAPTER 9 ADDITIONAL EMPLOYEE POLICIES


1. Employment Of Relatives

Aerosim Flight Academys goal is to avoid creating or perpetuating circumstances in which the possibility of favoritism, conflicts of interest, or impairment of efficient operations may occur. Relatives may not work in a relationship where one relative directly reports to the other. Procedure For purposes of this policy, a relative is defined as an employees spouse, parents, children, brother, sister, in-laws, domestic partners, or any dependent of the employee. Where one Aerosim Flight Academy employee directly reports to another and they intend to marry, the employees must choose which employee transfers into an available position suitable to his/her skills and experience. If there is no suitable position or between the two employees a decision cannot be made, the appropriate department Vice President and the Manager of Human Resources will become involved, and their decision (based on performance and seniority) will be final. Should two Aerosim Flight Academy employees who report to the same Vice President become relatives, they will not be scheduled to work together. In larger work groups, management may be able to arrange the schedules of related employees so that they work different shifts or in different work areas. If two related employees are scheduled to work together (normally in smaller work areas), the related employees must choose which employee transfers into an available position suitable to his/her skills and experience. If, within a reasonable time (usually 60 days or less), no suitable position is open or the two related employees cannot decide, the appropriate department Vice President and the Manager of Human Resources will become involved, and their decision (based on performance and seniority) will be final. In the event that related persons are employed by Aerosim Flight Academy, neither of the related persons may work in confidential positions such as certain positions in accounting, payroll, data processing, or Human Resources without prior approval of the appropriate department Vice President and the Manager of Human Resources. If an employee is related to a person that is employed by a competitor it is in the discretion of the President, Vice President and Human Resources Manager to decide what action to take with the employee. All attempts will be made to transfer the employee to another position that does not have company sensitive information. Managers may contact the Human Resources Manager for assistance in transferring/scheduling employees in accordance with this policy. ORGANIZATION (ISSUE) 09/01/10

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OPERATIONS MANUAL 2. Personnel Files / References

The official personnel file is maintained by Human Resources and contains original copies of documents. This file and the information in it is considered confidential and the property of Aerosim Flight Academy. The following procedures regarding personnel files apply: An employee may inspect his/her personnel file during normal business hours. The employee must contact his/her Supervisor to schedule an appointment with a Human Resources Representative. All parties must comply with the following conditions: o o o o All personnel files must be reviewed in the presence of a Human Resource Representative, or designee. Employees may request that information be updated or changed by Human Resources An employee may request photocopies of information from the file. An employee may not remove any information from the file.

Management personnel may review personnel records on a need-to-know basis and can only review the files of employees in their department or employees who have requested to transfer into his/her department. Human Resources personnel provide all responses to employment inquiries, references, and income verifications for existing or former employees. In responding to such inquiries, the Human Resources Manager will only verify job title, dates of employment, and full or part-time status. No other employee, including supervisors, is authorized to provide any information formally or informally, without a court order or other legal requirement to do so. The Human Resources Manager must be informed immediately if an employee receives a court order or other legal request for information on current or former employees. [Written requests for verification may include payroll information; however, the Company must have an employees written authorization before releasing such information.]

3. Policy

Performance Evaluations

Aerosim Flight Academy wants employees to know what is expected of them and how well they are doing in meeting such expectations. Formal performance evaluations are intended to supplement the day-to-day feedback employees receive regarding performance. The purpose is to evaluate total job performance and to assist each employee in achieving and maintaining higher levels of performance. In general, Aerosim Flight Academy conducts evaluations annually on or about January 15th. 09/01/10 (ISSUE) EMPLOYEE HANDBOOK 19-49

OPERATIONS MANUAL 4. Attendance

Aerosim Flight Academy has high attendance standards for its employees. Punctuality and regular and consistent attendance at work are essential job functions for all employees. If a personal situation or bad weather occurs, employees are expected to anticipate such conditions, make allowances for them, and make a good faith effort to get to work on time. Procedure As a general rule, Aerosim Flight Academy requires each employee to be in his/her assigned work area on time everyday and to stay until the scheduled leaving time or until the employee is authorized to leave by his/her Supervisor. Each day an employee is absent, he is required to notify (as appropriate) his/her Supervisor or Department before the shift begins. If an employee is going to be absent for an unavoidable reason in the future, this should be discussed with the employees Supervisor. Most Departments have a specific attendance policy. Supervisors are responsible for communicating these policies to Department employees. Employees are responsible for understanding and following the Department policy.

5.

Non-Uniform Dress Code Policy

Our Company's objective in establishing a business dress code is to allow our employees to work comfortably in the workplace. Yet, we still need our employees to project a professional image for our customers, potential employees, and community visitors. Business attire is the standard for this dress code. Because not all clothing is suitable for the office, these guidelines will help you determine what is appropriate to wear to work. Clothing that works well for the beach, yard work, dance clubs, exercise sessions, and sports contests are not appropriate for a professional appearance at work. Clothing should be pressed and never wrinkled. Torn, dirty, or frayed clothing is unacceptable. All seams must be finished. Any clothing that has words, terms, or pictures that may be offensive to other employees is unacceptable. Clothing that has the company logo is encouraged. Friday has been declared dress down day. On this day, jeans, polo shirts and other more casual clothing (no tee shirts or casual sandals/flip flops) is allowed. The Academys Picture Identification must be worn at all times. For easy identification, the badges are to be worn as follows: Uniformed Pilot hanging around the neck in the approved lanyard/clear pouch. Non-uniformed personnel on left breast pocket or hanging around neck resting on chest. Ramp personnel, fuelers, and aircraft technicians armband on left arm. 19-50 ORGANIZATION (ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL When not wearing your ID, (i.e. off Academy property), never leave your ID in a visible location in your vehicle or any location where it may be stolen. A lost or stolen ID must be reported immediately to Human Resources. Guide to Dressing for Work No dress code can cover all contingencies, so employees must use a certain amount of judgment in their choice of clothing to wear to work. If you experience uncertainty about acceptable, professional business attire for work, please ask your supervisor or your Human Resources staff. Slacks, Pants, and Suit Pants Slacks, cotton or synthetic material pants, wool pants, nice looking dress synthetic pants are acceptable. Inappropriate slacks or pants include Capri pants, jeans, sweatpants, exercise pants, all shorts, bib overalls, leggings, and any spandex or other form-fitting pants. Skirts, Dresses, and Skirted Suits Dresses, skirts, and skirts that are split at or below the knee are acceptable. Dress and skirt length should be at a length at which you can sit comfortably in public. Short, tight skirts are inappropriate for work. Mini-skirts, skorts, sun dresses, beach dresses, and spaghetti-strap dresses are inappropriate for the office. Shirts, Tops, Blouses, and Jackets Long sleeve button dress shirts, business appropriate blouses, sweaters, tops, and turtlenecks are acceptable attire for work. Most suit jackets or sport jackets are also acceptable attire for the office, if they violate none of the listed guidelines. Inappropriate attire for work includes polo style shirts (except on Friday or special marketing events with Company logo); tank tops; midriff tops; shirts with potentially offensive words, terms, logos, pictures, cartoons, or slogans; haltertops; tops with bare shoulders; sweatshirts, and t-shirts. Shoes and Footwear Loafers, clogs, boots, flats, dress heels, and leather deck-type shoes are acceptable for work. Flip-flops, sandals, slippers, and sneakers are not acceptable in the office (including casual Friday). Closed toe and closed heel shoes are required in the Maintenance hangar area. Jewelry, Makeup, Perfume, and Cologne Jewelry and makeup should be in good taste. Remember, that some employees are allergic to the chemicals in perfumes and make-up, so wear these substances with restraint. Two earrings in each ear are acceptable for women. It must be a simple, matched pair in gold, silver, or a color that blends well with the outfit. The shape of the earring must be in good taste and compliment the outfit. Earrings can be clip-on, pierced, dangle, or hoop and must be worn on the bottom of the earlobe. Earrings may not exceed one and one half inches in either diameter or length. No other pierced jewelry may be worn.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Hair Extremes in dyeing, bleaching, or coloring is unacceptable. Hair color and length shall be natural looking and well maintained. Hats are not acceptable. Conclusion If clothing fails to meet these standards, as determined by the employees supervisor and Human Resources staff, the employee will be asked not to wear the inappropriate item to work again. If the problem persists, the employee will be sent home to change clothes without pay.

6.

Smoking The Company observes the following rules regarding smoking in the workplace: Smoking by employees will be limited to the designated smoking area. At no time is smoking permitted within 50 feet of any aircraft. Applicable laws and ordinances regarding smoking will be obeyed.

7.

Discipline

The success of any organization depends largely upon the day-to-day performance and cooperation of its workforce. Equally important is the ability of the organization to maintain a favorable work environment for the individual to utilize effectively their talents and abilities. In order to attain those goals, it is important that you maintain proper standards of conduct at all times. Maintaining proper standards of conduct is necessary to provide uninterrupted services to the Companys customers, protect your safety and health, and protect the Companys good will and property, among other things. While every effort is made during the hiring process to employ individuals who will be able to perform to and conduct themselves in accordance with our standards, when an employees performance and/or conduct does not meet our standards, he or she will be subject to discipline, up to and including immediate termination. Consistent with its At-Will Policy, Aerosim Flight Academy reserves the right to terminate an employee at any time for any lawful reason with or without prior disciplinary counseling or notice, as more fully described below. Nothing in this Manual or any other Aerosim Flight Academy is intended to: Modify the at-will employment relationship; Promise progressive discipline or disciplinary counseling; or Promise notice in circumstances where Aerosim Flight Academy considers immediate termination or discipline to be appropriate. ORGANIZATION (ISSUE) 09/01/10

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Accordingly, the Company may take whatever disciplinary action against an employee that it deems appropriate under the circumstances. The Company recognizes that different circumstances will warrant varying degrees of discipline. The Company may, in its sole discretion, immediately and unilaterally terminate the employment of any employee at any time without any prior written notice to the employee. Major Rule Violations Each employee must meet certain Standards of Conduct in maintaining safe and orderly working relationships with others. While most employees conduct themselves in an appropriate, business-like manner, occasionally an employees behavior may be unacceptable. If such a situation occurs, an employee may be immediately terminated. Procedure Major violations of Company Standards of Conduct include, but are not limited to: Theft and dishonesty, including falsification of Company records. Altering or tampering with pay records, including clocking in or out for another employee or requesting another employee to do so. Failure to report an accident during the work shift. Violation of the Drug and Alcohol Policy. Rudeness, intimidation, disrespect or harassing and/or discriminatory conduct toward customers, the public, or fellow employees. Insubordination -e.g. refusing to do assigned duties, refusing to work assigned hours, or failure to follow reasonable request/direction. Disclosing confidential Company information without approval (Refer to Confidential Information in this Chapter). Misuse or unauthorized use of Company equipment. Walking off the job or desertion of duty without approval. Giving security or entrance codes to unauthorized persons or tampering with security systems. Illegal harassment, including but not limited to, sexual, verbal, physical harassment. Possession of a gun, knife, weapon, explosive, or other potentially harmful object not required for job duties. Refusal to comply with Company Security inspections. EMPLOYEE HANDBOOK 19-53

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OPERATIONS MANUAL Conviction of a felony or other misdemeanor involving theft or dishonesty while employed by Aerosim Flight Academy. Disregard for safety procedures or regulations, including horseplay that may result in serious injury. Misuse damage or willful destruction to Company, customer, or employee property. Fighting or inciting a fight. Failure to report or call in for three-consecutive scheduled workdays. Misuse of benefits including using sick leave, insurance, and/or workers compensation benefits when not sick or injured. Sleeping while on duty or taking unauthorized breaks. Unauthorized communication with the media. Failure to maintain job related licenses. Unauthorized recording of communication. Failure to report and return lost and found property. False accusations, malicious statements or providing untrue information during a Company investigation. Selling personal products while on campus for compensation.

Please not that this list is not exhaustive, but merely sets forth examples of misconduct that will result in the immediate termination of employment.

Chapter 10 Business Conduct And Ethics


1. General

This chapter outlines the conduct of business governing employees at every level of each organization of Aerosim Flight Academy. Aerosim Flight Academy is committed to the highest level of ethical conduct and proper legal behavior in every aspect of business at every level of the organization. While it is impractical to identify every ethical or legal question that might arise in the course of conducting business, each employee is responsible for proper ethical and legal practices. Any employee in doubt about the ethics or legality of any action must consult his/her Supervisor or a Vice President of the Company. Each Company operates within a framework of mutual obligations and responsibilities to customers, suppliers, employees, the law, shareholders, and the community. It is only by 19-54 ORGANIZATION (ISSUE) 09/01/10

OPERATIONS MANUAL properly meeting these responsibilities that Aerosim Flight Academy will prosper and enjoy long-range opportunities. 2. Standards

Customers Customers expect and must receive fair value and efficient services. Transactions with customers must be handled in the most effective and ethical manner. Each employee must honestly represent the Company, its products, services, and employees, as well as provide customers with clear and accurate information. Employees No employee can be required to perform his/her job in a way that violates ethical or legal principles. If an employee is instructed to do so, it is the employees responsibility to report this instruction to the proper Supervisor. There will be no retaliation or mistreatment of anyone who makes a valid complaint or provides accurate information as part of any investigation. However, a false accusation or providing untrue information may result in disciplinary action up to and including termination of employment. Suppliers Good supplier relations are essential to an effective business. It is our policy to deal fairly and impartially with suppliers of goods and services. The Academy employees must always be truthful when dealing with suppliers and must prohibit any employee from making threats of any unethical nature to secure an advantage. Aerosim Flight Academys choices of suppliers are made on the basis of price, quality, and the services offered. Our employees must not profit personally from the Companys business with suppliers. 3. Conflict of Interest

It is the duty of every employee to avoid a situation that is, or may seem to be, a conflict of interest between the employee and the Company. Employees may not benefit personally from the purchase of goods or services or derive any personal gain from transactions made on behalf of the Company. Any employee who has or contemplates any family business, financial, or special relationship with a supplier or competitive business must report fully such relationship to his/her Supervisor, Vice President, or the President. The conflict should be promptly resolved to protect the Companys interest. The following are illustrations of situations that could be considered as conflicts of interest, unless fully disclosed and authorized in advance: Ownership in a business, which competes with the Company (exclusive of modest investments in securities on listed or recognized security exchanges); EMPLOYEE HANDBOOK 19-55

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OPERATIONS MANUAL buying, leasing or selling property from or to the Company or near locations known to be of interest to the Company; accepting payments, services or loans from, or rendering consulting services to persons or concerns dealing or contemplating dealing with the Company; similar activities or interests by members of the immediate family of an employee; or the active commitment of time devoted to the management of any other business enterprise. 4. Gifts

Employees and members of their immediate families may accept gifts or favors (with a value under $25) from vendors or suppliers. Gifts over $25 are considered beyond ordinary business practices regarded as common courtesies. All gifts with a value over $25 must be reported to the Vice President, who shall determine the proper disposition of the gift. Employees may not accept cash gifts from anyone with whom the Company does business. Anyone offered a cash gift from a vendor must immediately report it to his/her Vice President. 5. Inside Information

Employees must not use, for personal gain or reveal outside the Company, information concerning Aerosim Flight Academy that is generally not known or available to the public. Academy Flight Instructors or other personnel may not discuss any matter concerning Academy business or student performance difficulties with anyone except other Aerosim Flight Academy employees. Any such discussions must be conducted in such a manner as to ensure that no one can overhear the conversation. Any Flight Instructor or other personnel known to bad mouth, run down, promote gossip, discuss wages (his/her or anyone's), discuss student performance of a critical nature, or disagree with academy standardization policies and procedures in the presence of any student, or other customer or prospective customer, will be terminated immediately from the Academy.

CHAPTER 10 RESIGNATION AND TERMINATION


1. Resignation

Employment is at the mutual consent of both the employer and the employee. Both parties have the legal right to terminate the relationship at any time, for any or no reason, with or without notice or cause. The following procedures apply: Aerosim Flight Academy requests at least a three-week written notice of resignation from employees at a Director level and above, and at least a two-week written notice of resignation from all other employees. If an employee does not provide advance notice as requested, he/she becomes ineligible for rehire. Once an employee gives notice of resignation, he is expected to work the entire period of notice. The department Vice President may make an exception with the concurrence of the Manager of Human Resources. No vacation may be taken ORGANIZATION (ISSUE) 09/01/10

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OPERATIONS MANUAL during an employees resignation period (two weeks/three weeks) unless it has been previously approved. Final paychecks are mailed only on the next normal payday for the period worked, unless special arrangements for pick up on payday are made between the former employee and the Supervisor. At the discretion of Aerosim Flight Academys Executive Leadership the two/three week notice period may be waived and employees would be paid through the notice period.

2.

Exit Information

An employee leaving the employment of Aerosim Flight Academy for any reason may be given or mailed an Exit Information form by Human Resources. An exit interview is provided by the Manager of Human Resources upon request of an appropriate member of management, or the employee, or in a special situation. Information gathered from completed Exit Information Forms and/or personal interviews may be shared with appropriate members of management.

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___________________________________________________________________ PRINT YOUR NAME HERE I certify that I have received on loan and been made aware that I will have access to a copy of the Aerosim Flight Academys Policy & Procedures Manual located in the Human Resources office and in my Supervisors office dated _______________,_______. At-Will Policy I acknowledge and agree that my employment with Aerosim Flight Academy is on an atwill basis. As a result, either I or Aerosim Flight Academy may terminate my employment at any time, for any or no reason, with or without prior notice. No individual or representative of Aerosim Flight Academy can change the at-will relationship, absent a specific written contract signed by the President. This Manual Is Not A Contract I understand that the policies, benefits and operating procedures set forth in the Manual are not a contract, and I understand that they are not intended to create, or to be construed to create, any contract, agreement or legally binding obligation between Aerosim Flight Academy and me. I also understand that to the extent this Manual contains descriptions of benefits, such descriptions or summaries are not intended to take the place of more detailed benefit plan documents. I understand that the descriptions in the plan documents will override the information in this Manual in the event the information presented in the Manual is in conflict with the information in the plan documents. Aerosim Flight Academys Right To Change Policies I further acknowledge that Aerosim Flight Academy may change, suspend, or discontinue any or all such Manual policies, benefits or procedures (except its At-Will policy) at any time in its sole discretion. I agree that Aerosim Flight Academy will make all final decisions as to the meaning and application of all policies, benefits or procedures. I agree that the policies in this Manual supersede those issued in previous Manuals.

___________________________________ ______________________ SIGNATURE DATE

To be returned to Human Resources within five (5) business days after receipt of this Manual.

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