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GOLackawanna

Sunday, September 16, 2012

INSIDE
Page 8 – What you’ll need on Election Day Page 20 – Crossword puzzles Page 26 – Riverside defeats North Pocono Page 29 – Dunmore squeaks by West Scranton Page 32 – Obituaries

YOUR SPACE

OUR TEAM
GO Lackawanna Editor Don McGlynn - 558-0113 dmcglynn@golackawanna.com Reporter Roger DuPuis II – 558-0483 rdupuis@golackawanna.com Sports Reporter Tom Robinson Photographer Jason Riedmiller Advertising Representative Jill Andes – 970-7291 jillandes@timesleader.com News Tips/Obituaries 558-0113 news@golackawanna.com Missed Paper – 829-5000 Classified 1-800-273-7130 Advertising – 829-7101 Subscriptions – 1-800-252-5603 Office Hours 9a.m. – 6p.m.; M-F; 109 New Street, Pittston, PA 18640

McGlynn

DuPuis

Robinson

Graduates of Saint Mary’s of the Assumption Class of 1962 gathered recently for their 50th high school reunion at the Minooka Community Center, 2929 Birney Ave., Scranton. Those who attended the reunion included, seated, from left, Meriann Patachnick Donelan, Sue Buzzinsky Gilday, Gail Uhl Neely, Sister Andrea Mary Miller, Nancy Brier Kenny, Joyce Martin Radar, and Rose Jennings Serowinski; standing, Frank Vaida, David Bert, Pat Piszek Wintermantel, Linda Moore Mulrooney, Donna Sporer Durland, Sue Steinmetz Neiroda, John Wright, Joe Mulrooney and Bobby Dougherty. If you have a photo you’d like to see in Go Lackawanna, email it to news@golackawanna.com, or mail it to 109 New St., Pittston, PA 18640.

Riedmiller

Andes

The Go Lackawanna Lower Valley edition publishes information about the communities in the Old Forge, Riverside and West Scranton school districts. Send your information to dmcglynn@golackawanna.com or 109 New Street, Pittston, PA 18640.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Editor:

Recently, I attended a Riverside School Board meeting, where I brought up many issues that fell on deaf ears. I asked if they were intending to renew or post the superintendent’s position, which is in the last year of his contract.. I was told that they could not discuss personnel issues. To obtain a copy of the district’s budget I was told I needed to submit a written request . There is also a 25 cent per copy fee for the paper. I asked why it is not readily available to the public. The response I received was they had legal protocol to follow. Meanwhile, I entered Old Forge School District the next day, and wasn’t even asked my name. I

walked out with the school’s final budget in hand, no problem, no fees. I asked Riverside School Board President Robert Bennie if all board members were made aware of the recent Q & A session hosted by the board at the school regarding Riverside’s role in pulling out of the CTC. Bennie said they were not, which leaves me to wonder what other information has not found its way to all members? I think our publicly elected officials need to remember that they are not running a military camp. It’s a public school, and it’s imperative, even legal in some cases, that our board is totally transparent on all issues for the residents of the district. They clearly are not.

COMMUNITY CALENDAR

Oct. 13. Information: www.lunginfo.org/ scrantonwalk.

ON THE COVER
Old Forge quarterback Brenden Wahl at Friday night’s game against Holy Redeemer. For the full story, see PAGE 27.

The West Scranton Hyde Park NeighAlzheimer’s fundraiser Oakwood Terrace borhood Watch will meet on Thursday, memory care community in Moosic will Sept. 20 at 7 p.m. at All Saints Audiconduct a special fundraiser at TGI Fritorium, 1403 Jackson St., behind St. Patrick’s Church. Info: http://hydeparkday’s, Scranton-Carbondale Highway in neighborwatch.wordpress.com. Dickson City all day on Thursday, Sept. 20. Enjoy a meal at TGI Friday’s that day The Junior League of Scranton will and hand in a special "fundraising card" host its fourth annual “Touch A Truck” to the server when paying for your meal on Saturday, September 22 from 11 a.m. and 15 percent of your total bill will be to 3 p.m. at Nay Aug Park in Scranton, donated to "The Walk to End Alzheimrain or shine. er’s.” For more information, call Sylvia at The League has more than 30 con451.3171, ext.116, or e-mail: sylviak@oakfirmed vehicles for the event. woodterraceinc.com. Tickets will be available to purchase at Lung Association event lunch. Join the American Lung Association for a complimentary “Kick Off Lunch and Learn’ at Uno’s Restaurant on Thursday, Sept. 13 at noon and learn about their upcoming Fight For Air Walk at Nay Aug Park. This luncheon will teach you how to put together a great walk team to support the lifesaving work of the American Lung Association. RSVP required: 823.2212. The Fight For Air Walk is planned for Sat.

+(ISSN No. 0896-4084) USPS 499-710

Issue No. 2012-260
829-7242 jbutkiewicz@timesleader.com Jim McCabe – 829-5000 jmccabe@timesleader.com
Published weekly by: Impressions Media 15 N. Main St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 Periodicals postage paid at Scranton, PA Postmaster: Send address changes to Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711

Newsroom

the event for $5 per person and are also available through Junior League members. Patrons will receive a JLS bracelet and each family will receive a gift bag. For more information, call 961.8120. The Annual Craft Fair will be held at John Adams Elementary, 927 Capouse Ave., Scranton, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 20. Vendors are need. Call 348.3655 or visit johnadamsbulldogspta@gmail.com.

Circulation

Eugene Gallagher Taylor

Sunday, September 16, 2012

GOLackawanna

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Preparing for a zombie attack

JASON RIEDMILLER/FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Rob Thomas and Shanta Lee will demonstrate self-defense techniques to be used against zombies during Infect Scranton.

Learning how to defend yourself against the undead
By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES For Go Lackawanna

Films and comic books may carry tips on the best ways to kill a zombie, but the best offense may be a good defense. That’s why Rob Thomas, 39, sensei of the 570 Dojo, R. 418 S. Main St., Taylor, is excited to present a unique brand of self-defense techniques on Saturday, Sept. 22 from 3-4 p.m. at Riverside Jr./Sr. High School, 310 Davis St., Taylor, during Infect Scranton. Thomas normally offers appointment-only classes in Tsunami self-defense, a co-ed reality-based, street smart course; Tsunami combative, a more aggressive form of self-defense; Girl on Guard, a women’s-only self-defense class; and Mushin-Do, the most

traditional self-defense system with a colored belt rank system. While he also holds community presentations on the importance of standard self-defense throughout the year, his course on preparing for the onslaught of the undead will be a first. “We’re taking real self-defense techniques that we would apply to anyone, and we’re tweaking those moves slightly to be more aware of teeth and fingernails so you can avoid becoming infected,” he said. “It’s going to be as real as we can make it.” Giving a real demonstration includes having his would-be attackers dressed as the living dead, including fellow instructor Shanta Lee and
See DEFEND, Page 11

Brunch to aid Taylor library
By ROGER DuPUIS II and RICH HOWELLS For Go Lackawanna

J

eanie Sluck isn’t fazed by the living dead. In fact, the Taylor Community Library’s director is ready to embrace zombies with open arms – after all, they’re helping to bring in readers and, next week, donations to aid the facility.

“I’ve seen lots of trends,” Sluck said. “Vampires have been done to

death.” “Zombies are so exciting,” she continued, gesturing toward a table full of books with the semi-skeletal undead leering from the covers. Each new book seems like manna for legions of new fans, ranging from youth to more than a few adult readers. “I talked to a woman in her 50s who is so excited about this,” Sluck said. “It’s amazing. It truly is amazing.” And it is that broad demographic organizers hope will turn out on Sunday, Sept. 23 for a 10:30 a.m.
See ZOMBIES, Page 11

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GOLackawanna

Sunday, September 16, 2012

REMEMBER
Nick Dunkailo plays “Taps.” Lackawanna County Commissioner Patrick O’Malley presents a plaque to Cynthia Slebodnik in honor of her son, Sgt. Eric Slebodnik.

Always

McDade Park hosts 9/11 ceremony
By DON MCGLYNN dmcglynn@golackawanna.com

M

embers of area police and fire departments, veterans, Lackawanna County commissioners, and members of the community gathered in McDade Park early last Tuesday morning to show their gratitude to the men and women who made the ultimate sacrifice over a decade ago. The annual 9/11 commemoration in McDade Park was held on Tuesday, Sept. 11, in honor of the 11th anniversary of the terrorists’ attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon that took place in 2001.
(of it), but I remember the teachers turning on the news, talking and debating on what to do,” said West Scranton’s Class President Kelsey Maconeghy. As the years went on, Maconeghy learned more about what had happened that day, and said she likes events like Tuesday’s that give her the opportunity to learn more. “I like learning about it. I like learning about who was on the flights, and having that connection, and I really do appreciate everyone that went in there,” said Maconeghy. And now that she’s learned more, it’s the hope of at least one of Tuesday’s speakers that she’ll go on and share what she learned. “It is our duty, all of us, here and across the nation, to keep those soldiers, those rescuers, the brave men and women who gave their lives, it’s our duty to keep those stories alive for generations to come,” said Cynthia Slebodnik. Slebodnik was one of the morning’s speakers, along with Vietnam veteran and Lackawanna
See REMEMBER, Page 6

DON MCGLYNN PHOTOS/GO LACKAWANNA

Eli Verchuk and Marie Schumacher attend the annual 9/11 commemoration in McDade Park on Tuesday, Sept. 11.

“Seven years ago we started this event, and every year since then we have had this ceremony. We do it to remember,” said Charles Spano, chairman of the September 11 Memorial Committee of Lackawanna County. In addition to those who gave their lives on Sept. 11, the event also honors those who took part in the war on terror that followed the attacks. “War is a fact of history, it’s a fact life, it’s not something we seek, but people get caught up in it, and sometimes it’s extremely necessary,” said Spano. West Scranton High School’s senior class officers, student council officers, senior football players and senior cheerleaders were also in attendance. Invitations are extended to the seniors each year. This year’s group was only in first grade during the time of the attacks, and many weren’t completely aware of what was going on at the time, but the day did leave a lasting impression on them. “I remember a couple kids leaving class early, because their parents wanted them to go home. I don’t really have a good memory

Sunday, September 16, 2012

GOLackawanna

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Taylor Community Library offers Polish lessons

ROGER DUPUIS II/GO LACKAWANNA

Instructor Irene Seegar discusses Polish vocabulary words during a class at the Taylor Community Library.

Students embrace their Polish roots
By ROGER DuPUIS II rdupuis@golackawanna.com

I

n the best Polish they could muster, the students duly recited the words for common bedroom furnishings. “Don’t forget to roll your tongue,” instructor Irene Seegar prompted after the chorus of voices fell a little flat with “obrazy,” the Polish word for pictures.

Yet no one seemed to stumble with “pierzyna,” as childhood memories soon came bursting forth about the indispensable feather beds that Polish families passed down the generations and dared not leave behind when they departed for America. For Wanda Lettieri’s immigrant grandmother, the valuable bedcovering served to protect something even more valuable while crossing the seas more than a century ago: her cherished portrait of Our Lady of Czestochowa, a beloved Polish

icon of the Virgin Mary. “I think it was such a dear story,” Lettieri said in relating her grandmother’s tale to Seegar and other students in the weekly Thursday afternoon Polish class at the Taylor Community Library, sponsored by the Polish National Alliance. “They couldn’t take much,” Lettieri added. And so it was that a simple vocabulary lesson spawned so many family memories among those gathered for the weekly lessons – including Seegar, 83, a West Scranton native who

has lived in Taylor for more than half a century. Born to Polish immigrant parents, Seegar spoke only Polish until she entered school as a young girl. Dawne Griffith, a local commissioner for the PNA, knew Seegar from PNA activities and immediately thought the retired nurse would be a perfect candidate to teach the new class. “Dawne came to me and asked, ‘how would you like to be a teacher,’” Seegar chuckled.
See ROOTS , Page 7

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GOLackawanna MOOSIC

Sunday, September 16, 2012

TAYLOR

Officials aim to attract new jobs to the area
By ROGER DuPUIS II rdupuis@golackawanna.com

Taylor officials are looking to move ahead with two projects which could revive plans to develop former coal mining lands owned by the borough. Council voted unanimously at its Wednesday, Sept. 12 meeting to authorize preparation of a site-development plan for the Colliery property and adjacent Feltsville area by engineers PennEastern in cooperation with Kaufman Engineering. In a separate move, council also asked Borough Manager Dan Zeleniak to investigate whether a temporary bypass road running through part of the Colliery land can be retained after replacement of a nearby bridge on North Main Street is complete. Wednesday’s motion approved spending up to $5,000 on the site plan. Zeleniak explained to Go Lackawanna that total cost for the work could be as much as $20,000, and ultimately should be covered through Colliery reclamation payments due to the borough under an agreement with Alliance Sanitary Landfill. According to the pact, a total of $200,000 will be paid to the borough based on a rate of 5 cents for every ton of refuse disposed of in the landfill’s Area 2A Expansion. Pending verification on the status of that cash, the borough will front the money to begin the work, Zeleniak said. The borough owns about 200 acres in the area running southwest from Main and Oak streets. Much of that land was home to the Moffat Coal Company operations, including the towering coal breaker that was a local landmark for decades. North of that, in the area around Oak and Third streets, was Feltsville, originally an independent mining village that was condemned in the 1960s due to subsidence and related problems. A preliminary redevelop-

ment proposal was unveiled about six years ago, Zeleniak noted, including commercial and residential development and a landscaped town center off Main Street. “A lot has changed in six years,” he said, from the national economic downturn to additional engineering work that has given the borough a better idea about conditions beneath the property. “I had a vision … of auditorium-sized voids down there,” he said. “And we didn’t find that.” Armed with this complied data, council President Kenneth Mickavicz said he hopes the plan will serve as a blueprint for actual development. “There should be enough data to come up with a sound recommendation,” he said, which would then be subject to planning and zoning review. Zeleniak stressed that the move is intended to return the land to the tax rolls and attract jobs and development. “The borough is not a developer,” he said. Meanwhile, council asked Zeleniak to contact state Sen. John Blake to ask about the future of the bypass road around the bridge project, which runs through part of the Colliery land. Borough officials weren’t immediately sure which agency would have jurisdiction, as the bridge is owned by Lackawanna County but the bypass was installed by PennDOT. “That road could come in handy for Taylor Borough,” Councilman Ed Derenick said. Contacted after the meeting, Lackawanna County spokesman Joseph D’Arienzo noted Commissioner Corey O’Brien has said retaining the bypass isn’t likely because the county would then have to reimburse the federal government and PennDOT for its construction, which would cost $1.03 million.

Residents are asked to help stop scrap metal theft
By MICHAEL VERBICKAS For Go Lackawanna

Borough officials unanimously approved a motion on Tuesday, Sept. 11 to pursue the owner of the former Rocky Glen Park in an effort to clean up the property. Officials are hoping to have the owner secure the property and explore the possibility of applying for state assistance to clean it up. The action follows a Sept. 2 incident in which 26 police units, responding from Luzerne and Lackawanna counties, made their way to the property following reports of gunshots Mayor James Segilia said. Council member Buddy Prusin-

ski said social media attracts people from outside of Moosic to the park to party, dump garbage or cause trouble and said the influx needs to stop. “The place is a disaster. It’s not a safe place,” Prusinski said. Council also addressed concerns over the rise of scrap metal theft in Moosic. Officials said they have caught and reported three people so far stealing scrap and Mayor Segilia encouraged citizens to be proactive in reporting any suspicious activity to police. “There’s been a rash of thefts not only in Moosic, (but in) Taylor and Scranton and Avoca. If you see something or hear something, you

have to call 911 immediately,” he said. In other business, Council President Joseph Mercatili and Mayor Segilia presented members of the Greenwood Fire Company with a plaque honoring the company’s dedication to community service. There will be a countywide tire collection Sept. 24 to 29 at the Lackawanna County Recycling Center. Officials passed a motion to go after area businesses that are not cooperating with the borough recycling ordinance. Those found in non-compliance will be fined $600. For more information on the ordinance, contact the borough office at 457.5480.

REMEMBER
Continued from page 4

County Court of Common Pleas President Judge Thomas J. Munley and Lackawanna County Commissioner Jim Wansacz. Slebodnik’s son, Sgt. Eric Slebodnik, was around the same age the West Scranton students in attendance are now the day of the attacks. “On September11, 2001, Eric was a senior in high school with all his hopes and all his dreams ahead of him, but when he learned of the terrorist attacks he was angry. He knew that he had to be involved in protecting our nation from this ever occurring again,” said Slebodnik. In November of 2001, Eric enlisted in the Pennsylvania Army National Guard. Eric and Staff Sgt. George Pugliese were among five Pennsylvania Army National Guardsmen who died in Iraq on Sept. 28, 2005 when their vehicle was struck by an improvised explosive device. “Twenty-one years, most of us here…have lived at least 21 years, and many of you here might say that Eric had only 21 years,” said Slebodnik. “My son turned 21 on August 2,

DON MCGLYNN/GO LACKAWANNA

Members of the community and students from West Scranton High School attended the annual 9/11 commemoration in McDade Park on Tuesday, Sept. 11.

2005 and gave his life in Ramadi, Iraq on September 28, 2005. In that short lifetime, he accomplished more than I have in my…life.” During the ceremony, the names of the names of Staff Sgt. Pugliese and Sgt. Slebodnik were added to a plaque on the back of the September 11 Memorial that is on display at McDade Park. “When we began this memorial the primary focus were the uniform services, the fire, the police, the EMS. We took this step today to acknowledge the military who served

and died,” said Spano. Following the ceremony, Spano said the names of soldiers from Lackawanna County, who lost their lives while fighting in the war on terror, will be unveiled annually at the event until all of the names are included. Currently, the September 11 Memorial Committee of Lackawanna County has seven names, including Eric and Pugliese. Anyone with any information regarding other soldiers that should be included on the list are asked to call 342.5390.

Sunday, September 16, 2012

GOLackawanna

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Riverside approves petition
By MICHAEL VERBICKAS For Go Lackawanna

TAYLOR – The Riverside school board voted to file a petition with the state Department of Education for a change of vocational education venue during its monthly meeting on Monday, Sept. 10. If approved, the decision would formally allow students to attend class at a Career Technology Center campus (CTC) in Wilkes Barre. Riverside students had been attending CTC in Lackawanna County prior to this year. The school district filed a lawsuit on Aug. 22 against the CTC of Lackawanna County to cut ties with CTC, seeking a judgment that it has the right to pull out under terms of the 1968 agreement that state the pact ends “when there are no capital expenditures outstanding.” The lawsuit came as a result of Riverside’s concerns over the cost of a planned CTC renovation project, with Riverside’s suit contending that the district “does not agree with the majority of the participating (CTC) members … that it is appropriate to incur debt of $18.1 million in order to reconstruct or rehabilitate the building housing the center.” As a result, Riverside vocational students are currently attending classes at the CTC campus in Wilkes Barre. Earlier in the year the board passed a budget which includes a line item to fund the CTC renovation project, Scranton Superintendent William King told Go Lacka-

wanna September 7 regarding the lawsuit. Forest City’s school board announced at its meeting on Sept. 10 that it would support the $18.1 million CTC renovation project with or without Riverside’s support. Superintendent John Kopicki said that it is uncertain what the financial impact of Riverside’s case will be until a court decision is reached. “If Riverside is in or out; we’re committed to it,” he said. Efforts to contact an education department spokesman were unsuccessful. In other news, parent Joe Mickavicz expressed concern about the impact teacher furloughs have made on Riverside’s foreign language department: increased competition for course offerings and a reliance on virtual classes to make up the difference. Superintendent David Woods said that while the district continues to offer both Spanish and German courses as world languages, elective courses not offered by staff would be available as online classes. The classes would cost a student’s family $232.50 per semester or $465 a year depending on the course and the funding available for reimbursement. Woods said reimbursement is not guaranteed for all courses. “If you want our students, to be in a foreign language for four years, like most decent schools like to see on a college transcript, this is something not all parents will be able to do,” Mickavicz said. words remembered from childhood. “Things are coming back to me from 50 years ago,” said Taylor resident Paul Salony, recalling his Polish grandparents. He also noted the similarities between Polish and the Slovak language spoken by other ancestors. Elaine Sporko, of Scranton, also came to learn about the language of her grandparents – a language she said immigrants’ U.S.-born children often shunned as they embraced American culture and the English language. Many in that generation “didn’t want anything to do with the traditional ways,” Sporko, 58, said. Indeed, hard-working immigrants might retain their mother tongue, but the old country became a distant memory. Seegar said her parents never returned to Poland. She only visited for the first time last year, to discover a country that is rapidly growing and much changed from the land her parents knew. “Everybody in Poland speaks English … Everybody smokes,” Seegar recalled. “And right now, the whole country is under construction.” “I thought I was in New York,” she laughed.

ROOTS
Continued from page 5

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“She’s really sweet,” Griffith said. Both women have been surprised and thrilled at the local response. Seegar said the class already has more than a dozen students, ranging from school age to 87. While the current session is full, Griffith said two sections will be offered in the spring, one for beginners and an advanced class. Already there is a waiting list, but Griffith said those interested in the free classes should call her at 562.1000. Griffith is a bit of an anomaly among the group. She married into Polish heritage and did not know the language. Impressed by her in-laws’ affinity for PNA and Polish community activities in years past, she became inspired to get involved and revive some lost traditions. “We needed to do something to reach out to the community,” Griffith said of the classes, adding that she hopes her three children will be able to join a future session. Many of the students bring at least some knowledge of Polish, even if only a few

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GOLackawanna

Sunday, September 16, 2012

Steamtown National Historic Site (NHS) in Scranton has planned several fall foliage rail trips for October. Steam-powered excursions to Moscow will depart the Steamtown NHS boarding platform at 12:30 p.m. on Oct. 6, 13, 14, 21, 27 and 28, with an expected return at 3:15 p.m. The Lackawanna & Wyoming Valley Chapter, NRHS, which leases the former Moscow passenger station and freight house, will offer light refreshments for sale during the train’s layover. Moscow excursion tickets are priced at $24 for adults 16 to 61, $22 for seniors 62 and older, and $17 for children aged 6 to 15. Children five and younger require no charge. A special diesel-powered excursion to Gouldsboro Station is planned for Oct. 7. The Coolbaugh Township Historical Association is planning a fun-filled “Great Gatsby” theme at the sta-

Steamtown announces fall foliage excursions

Voter registration in full swing

tion, with costumed characters dressed as flappers, Elliott Ness and Al Capone, and will feature 1920s-era music inside the former passenger station. While at the Gouldsboro Station, guests can meet the characters for photo opportunities, as well as purchase light refreshments. The station features a small museum that interprets the past life and experiences of Gouldsboro’s development. This special excursion will also include a brief stop at the Tobyhanna Station on the return trip. Departure from the Steamtown NHS Boarding Platform is at 11 a.m., with an expected 3:30 p.m. return. Ticket prices for the “Great Gatsby” excursion are $34 for adults 16 to 61, $29 for seniors 62 and older, and $22 for children ages 6 to 15. Children 5 and younger require a “no-charge” ticket.

JASON RIEDMILLER / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Tyler Kusma, 13, speaks about his petition against the state’s Voter ID law last week at Connell Park in Scranton. He collected 400 signatures through online efforts.

Junior League of Scranton presents ‘Touch a Truck’
The Junior League of Scranton will host its fourth annual “Touch a Truck,” a one-day fun-filled community event. The event allows children to touch and experience various trucks and vehicles while learning about safety and related themes on Saturday, Sept. 22 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Nay Aug Park in Scranton, rain or shine. The League has more than 30 confirmed vehicles for the event, welcoming vehicles from the City of Scranton Police and Fire Departments, the Dunmore Police Department, Scranton Department of Public Works, County of Lackawanna Transit System (COLTS), WNEP-TV, PennDOT, Cleveland Brothers, Summa & Iezzi Inc., J.P. Mascaro & Sons, Slusser Brothers, Caregivers America, Johnston and Rhodes, Keystone College, Road Scholar Transport LTL, Airline Petroleum Co. and Dunmore Oil. Also on hand to explore will be an old-fashioned milk truck, What the Fork food truck, a Harley Davidson motorcycle, Milewski’s and Redline tow trucks and more. “Touch a Truck” also will offer souvenirs and healthy snacks for purchase, music by DJ Cadillac, toys, games, art exercises and other activities. Tickets will be available to purchase at the event for $5 per person and are also available through Junior League members. Patrons will receive a JLS bracelet and each family will receive a gift bag. For more information, call 961.8120.

New ID law at issue
By ROGER DuPUIS II rdupuis@golackawanna.com
• UNC’s ten centers and buildings will be open to the public for voter registration during business hours through Tuesday, Oct. 9, including the West Side Senior Center, 1004 Jackson St., Scranton. For information, visit www.uncnepa.org or call 346.0759. • For information about how and where to vote, visit the official state website, www.votespa.com

It’s a familiar pattern for elections officials. Every four years, interest in presidential contests typically swells voter rolls, bringing a flurry of registration forms across their desks as Election Day approaches. But this year also brings at least one new wrinkle for Pennsylvania, in the form of a controversial new Voter ID law. For one area agency, that has meant coaching would-be voters through one more new and unfamiliar bureaucratic hurdle in the lead up to Nov. 6. On Sept. 4, United Neighborhood Centers of Northeastern Pennsylvania kicked off a new voter registration initiative across the agency’s sites around Lackawanna County. “Encouraging civic engagement is an important part of the mission of United Neighborhood Centers,” said Michael Hanley, executive director.

VOTER RESOURCES

“There is no more effective means of civic engagement than the ballot box.” At her office in the community services building on Olive Street last week, Community Services Assistant Director Jill Moyle moved among clients who had come to check out clothing and other services. “Are you registered to vote?” she asked three women. The answer was yes, but clearly there is a need: Her building alone had registered 30 new voters by

Friday, Sept. 14. The agency had taken in 60 overall, added Cathy Hardaway, director of older adult programs. “We try to educate people that voting is how you make a difference,” Moyle said. The last day to register is Oct. 9. UNC’s staff has been trained in the new state law, officials said, and the agency recognizes that some people may have trouble obtaining the necessary ID. UNC staff will work with any individual in need of the proper identification to vote. Moyle explained that registered voters who do not have one of the required ID forms are entitled to obtain one free of charge for voting purposes from a PennDOT Driver License Center. Hardaway said this week they already have plans to take eight
See VOTER , Page 11

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012

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$

250

*

877-834-6802
PA LIC# 093230
778343

10/19/12.

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GOLackawanna

Sunday, September 16, 2012

CRANTON –Jake Shoemaker and Nadalie Solomon led a field of about 550 runners, capturing overall male and female honors in the Race for the Cure 5K Run Sept. 8 at Courthouse Square in downtown Scranton. Shoemaker, 27, of Philadelphia, broke the tape in 17 minutes, 22 seconds. He outran second-place finisher, Mark Arzie, 16, of Scott Township, by 40 seconds.

Race for the Cure draws 6,500 participants S
By ROBERT MINER For Go Lackawanna

JASON RIEDMILLER / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Kathy Cathurilla of Old Forge and her dog Teddy participating in the Race for the Cure 5K Run.

“Everyone started fast,” said female cancer survivor to finish, Shoemaker, who ran track and clocking in at 38:56. This year’s race, according to cross country in high school, but not at the college level. “I just tried Dolly Woody, executive director of the Susan G. Koto keep an even men Foundation pace. I took confor Northeastern trol at around mile RUN/WALK Pennsylvania, drew 1. That’s when I SCHEDULE around 6,500 pulled in front. Af(about 550 runners ter that, I just Sunday, Sept. 16: Scranton Lupus Loop 5K Run/Walk at tried to settle into Nay Aug Park at 11 a.m. Info: 1 and the rest walkers) participants a good rhythm. I (888) 99-LUPUS or Lupus and raised around just tried to keep Foundation Pocono/North$200,000, between an even pace and east Branch, 558-2008 or sponsors and parsave energy for www.lupuspa.org ticipants. the hill at Coop- Saturday, Sept. 22: Wyoming Valley Striders End of “Last year, beer’s (bar and res- Summer 10K Run (final leg tween the race and taurant).” of Striders Triple Crown) at other events, we Solomon, 32, of Kirby Park at 9 a.m. Info: were able to fund Mountain Top, Vince Wojnar, 474-5363. around $270,000 won the female di- Sunday, Oct. 7: Steamtown education, vision in 20:36. Marathon, starting at Forest for City Regional High School at screening and She outraced sec- 8 a.m. and finishing at treatment grants to ond-place finisher, Courthouse Square, downnon-profit organiAbbie Kearns, 21, town Scranton. Info: 345zations throughout of Scranton and a 3481. 16 counties in student at the University of Scranton, by 54 seconds. Northeastern Pennsylvania,” said John Major, 49, of Scranton, Woody. “And it looks like we’re gowon the First Male Cancer Survi- ing to reach our goal of $275,000 vor to Finish the Run award, clock- for this year’s race.” Woody said, “It’s all about the ing in at 26:26. And Karen Gannon, 44, of Honesdale, won the hope – coming together. The enerFirst Female Cancer Survivor to gy and spirit of the day is outFinish the Run award with a 26:35- standing. This race is the largest 5K cause-related event in northtime. Jim Boettger, 62, of Duryea re- eastern Pennsylvania. And we’re ceived the overall male award in close to our goal.” Seventy-five percent of the the 5K walk, finishing in 37:05. Marisa Naughton, 45, of Scranton, money from the event stays in won top female honors in the northeastern Pennsylvania. The walk, clocking in at 39:11. Amanda other 25 percent goes for breast Jarrow, 25, of Jessup, was the first cancer research.

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HEINZ REHAB TO OFFER DISABILITY AND SPIRITUALITY CONFERENCE

DEFEND
Continued from page 3

IF YOU GO
For more information on Rob Thomas’ traditional self-defense classes, visit www.570dojo.com.

Allied Services Heinz Rehab Hospital will offer their 12th annual “That All May Worship” conference on Thursday, Oct. 18 in the Rose Brader Room of the hospital, beginning at 8:45 a.m. The theme this year is “Facing Progressive Disabilities: Keeping the Pace When Things Get Worse.” Speakers and panelists will address the challenges of various disabilities that are, at the time, incurable, such as Multiple Sclerosis, Parkinson’s Disease, Alzheimer’s Disease, ALS (Lou Gehrig’s Disease). Other presenters will examine the needs of caregivers - both family caregivers, as well as professionals such as nurses, social workers, chaplains and clergy members. Continuing education credit is available for social workers and chaplains, and is pending for nurses. For information on continuing education, please contact Chaplain Marianne C. Sailus at 830.2039. Members of the 2012 Conference Committee include, first row, from left, Atty. William Conaboy, CEO, Allied Services Integrated Health System; the Rev. Phyllis Pelletier; Sister Mary Beth Makuch, SS.C.M.; Juel Judge, Anna Deputy, BSN; Marianne C. Sailus, B.C.C. second row: Donna Lee Diltz; Archpriest Joseph Martin; the Very Rev. James Hayer, Conference Chairperson; Rabbi Larry G. Kaplan; Donna Kopicki, LCSW, CBIS; and Mary Ann Fedorczyk, CRRN, CBIS. For more information, call 348.2200.

some students from Riverside who have worked with Thomas in the past. Essential self-defense, whether it’s for the end of the world or the end of the week, rely on a few key points. “Being aware of your surroundings and the environment around you is key,” Thomas said. “You also should know who is around you. Is there more than one zombie or thug? Those things are key. All self-defense, before any techniques or martial arts moves are applied, start with how you conduct yourself and how (you) carry yourself in public. “In all seriousness, every move that we’re showing is a reality-based self-defense move.”

While the tactics are real, there’s a lot of fun to be had with the tongue-in-cheek preparation for the fallout. “It’s going to be a blast,” Thomas said with a laugh. “My biggest fear, actually, is that people who are hardcore zombie fans will say a certain move wouldn’t work against a zombie.” Should he find himself in Raccoon City, Evans City, or any other town plagued by the undead, Thomas said that he’d chose a “very large machine gun with a huge clip and lots of ammo” in order to get out alive. If one wasn’t available, he’d wield a samurai sword. “I trained in samurai swords, so I’m proficient in those. Last resort would be a machete,” he said.

ZOMBIES
Continued from page 3

VOTER
Continued from page 8

senior citizens from West Scranton to Dunmore to get IDs. The agency also will coordinate rides to the polls on Election Day for any community member not able to get there on their own, she added. Under the law, registered voters who do not have a photo ID will be able to cast a provisional ballot, with six days to provide an ID or make an affirmation to their county elections office. While the issue for UNC is purely one of assisting would-be voters, the six-month-old law has become a political football

for many across Pennsylvania, with critics charging it was a move by state Republicans to disenfranchise minority and low-income voters, many of whom vote Democratic. Its future was before the state Supreme Court late last week, with a ruling expected possibly by the end of this month. One Lackawanna County resident on Thursday, Sept. 13 was hoping to organize a rally against the law at Connell Park in Scranton. From there, Tyler Kusma planned a march to the nearby county elections office on Stafford Avenue. Kusma’s appeal didn’t attract any marchers, but his efforts did not go unnoticed. The 13-yearold Abington Heights Middle School student collected 400

names on an electronic petition against the law, which he launched Aug. 8 at SignOn.Org. It urges Lackawanna County Director of Elections Marion Medalis to “just say no to enforcing the Voter ID law to the fullest extent of your legal authority.” Kusma’s mother delivered the petition to Medalis on Friday, Sept. 14. “I’m disgusted with it,” Kusma said of the law, which he feels was pushed through so “not many people knew it was going to happen.” Medalis accepted the petition, but also told Go Lackawanna that her obligation was clear so long as the law remains in place. “We have to enforce the law, and that is my stance,” she said.

zombie brunch and discussion at Colarusso’s LaPalazzo on Birney Avenue in Moosic, with proceeds to benefit the Taylor library. The brunch is one of several events planned as part of Infect Scranton, a three-day “Zombiecon” that kicks off Friday, Sept. 21. And while the ghoulish event may have Scranton in its title, several of the key happenings will actually be in Taylor, including Saturday’s 5K run and convention events at Riverside High School. For zombie aficionados, this is a pretty big deal. Judith O’Dea is one of many guests at Infect Scranton who will be signing autographs on Saturday. She is one of the few actors to have had the privilege to act in the first ever flesh-eating zombie film, 1968’s “Night of the Living Dead.” “I did not start being invited to conventions until decades later, I think because I was out of sight, maybe I was out of mind,” O’Dea said in a telephone interview. “But I think it was maybe 15, 25 years before, ‘Oh, maybe we’ll invite Judy. I wonder if she’s available,’ kind of thing.” “Now, I really enjoy receiving the invitations because, in all honesty – please believe me when I say this – being able to talk to the people who have sustained this film is one thing I love more than anything else,” O’Dea added. “That’s really why I

ROGER DUPUIS II / GO LACKAWANNA

Taylor Community Library Director Jeanie Sluck is looking forward to the library’s Sept. 23 zombie brunch at Colarusso’s LaPalazzo in Moosic.

IF YOU GO
WHAT: Zombie brunch and discussion, featuring Meet Matt Mogk, author of “Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Zombies,” and others. WHEN: Sunday, Sept. 23, 10:30 a.m. WHERE: Colarusso’s LaPalazzo, 4500 Birney Ave., Moosic. COST: Tickets are $20 and include brunch. INFO: 562.1234. For a full schedule of Infect Scranton events, visit www.infectscranton.com

go to these conventions. I love talking to the people.”

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Sunday, September 16, 2012

GOLackawanna

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JMPP Invitational grows in its second year

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Actors, directors and playwrights working on Dyonisia ’12: Apocalypse, the second annual Jason Miller Playwrights’ Project Invitational include, first row, from left, Sarah Regan, Joe DeMuro, Jeff Boam, Kimmie Wraizen, Emily Thomas, Maureen McGuigan, Alicia Nordstrom, Jack McGuigan, second row, Hank Willenbrink, Ellen O’Brien, James M. Spock, Nicole Lopez-Isa and David James Baker.

Staging the end of the world
(JMPP) is giving theatergoers a chance to see how a few may handle the end of the world. Apocalypse is the theme for Dyonisia ‘12, the second annual JMPP Invitational scheduled for Thursday through Sunday, Sept. 20 through 30 at the Old Brick Theatre in Scranton. The JMPP will stage 12 oneact plays, written by regional writers, on alternating nights. “This year’s theme is the apocalypse, so all the plays are some sort of take on that theme, and we’ve got all different kinds of perspectives on the end of the world. We’ve got some really interesting stuff this year,” said Sarah Regan, who is directing three of the plays and performing in another. The plays range in genre, offering something for every taste. “There are a couple that are very funny,” said Regan. “Some of them are very serious, but there are a lot of things in there to laugh about … there is definitely a good variety in there.”
See JMPP, Page 14

By DON MCGLYNN dmcglynn@golackawanna.com

IF YOU GO

S

ince the beginning of time, there have been a number of different theories as to how and when the world might end. There are many who believe the Mayan calendar is predicting that the end of days will come December of this year. While we won’t know for a few months whether or not that turns out to be correct, the Jason Miller Playwrights’ Project

What: Dyonisia ‘12: Apocalypse, the second annual JMPP Invitational When: Thursday through Sunday, Sept. 20 to 30. Shows begin on Thursdays at 7 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 3 p.m. “Love or Rage, Anthem of the Apocalypse” by Maureen McGuigan, “Universal Applicant” by Hank Willenbrink, "I I I me me me I I I ” by Alicia Grega, “Love and the Apocalypse” by Mark Zdancewicz, “Surviving” by Amye Archer, and “Looking for Love Before World War III” by James M. Spock, will be presented Sept. 20, 22, 28 and 30. “Contemporary Saints” by Dawn Zera, “The Last Time” by Charles O’Donnell, “Dead to the World” by Jeff Boam, “The Grotto” by Jack McGuigan, “The Operatives of Game Theory” by K.K. Gordon, and “Patient/Fracture” by Kait Burrier, will be presented Sept. 21, 23, 27, and 29. Where: Old Brick Theatre, 128 W. Market St., Scranton Cost: Advance tickets are $12.50 each or $24 for two, $36 for three or $48 for four. Remaining tickets will be sold at the door on a pay-what-you-can $10-$15 sliding-scale basis. Info: 344.3656, email nepaplaywrights@live.com or visit subverseaphrodesia.com.

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Sunday, September 16, 2012

Although the ghosts and goblins haven’t officially been taken down from my attic, I am already starting to search for the best bargains on Halloween costumes. Just like anything, it’s always a good idea to plan ahead to save money. Three ways to save on Halloween costumes are by making your own costume, buying ahead on flash sale sites or participating in a Halloween costume swap. Homemade costumes are probably the best way to save, but sometimes the most time consuming. Try to think of costumes that don’t require you to

Plan ahead to save on Halloween costumes
DEAL DETECTIVE
JENNA URBAN
spend a lot of money on the materials needed to make the costume. A great resource for homemade costumes is costumeideazone.com. There are a number of children’s flash sale sites that offer free membership and up to 70 percent off Halloween costumes. Zulily.com is one of my favorite flash sale sites offering top-quality apparel, gear, toys and of course, costumes. The best part about Zulily is that you can earn $15 by inviting friends to join through email, Facebook and Twitter. Totsy.com is another site to find discounted kids’ costumes. It’s important to buy costumes ahead of time online for the right size. Allow enough time for exchanges to be made. Amazon.com also offers sales on Halloween costumes with free two day shipping when you spend $25 or more. Another way to save, which is my favorite, is to look through the paper for a local costume swap or create your own swap party. Parents can get together with a group of friends and each bring gently used Halloween costumes. Looking for a local costume swap? Eventful Moms has teamed up with GreenHalloween.com to celebrate National Costume Swap Day in Northeastern Pennsylvania. Visit a participating YMCA in Wilkes Barre, Scranton, Carbondale or Pittston between now and October 10 to donate a gently used Halloween costume at the front desk to receive a special token good to swap for a gently used Halloween costume on Oct. 13 at The Shoppes at Montage

from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The costume swap is open to the public, a $5 fee will be charged per token if a costume is not being swapped. This event is powered by Eventful Moms, a collaboration of mom bloggers in NEPA. For more information on Eventful Moms, visit Facebook.com/eventfulmoms For more ideas on how you can save money this Halloween, visit Bucktownbargains.com. Do you have any money saving tips for Halloween? Share them with us at facebook.com/golackawanna.

ANNUAL RIDE HONORS LOCAL WARRIORS

JMPP
Continued from page 13

Lackawanna County Commissioner Jim Wansacz presented Talia Walsh, organizer of the SGT Jan Argonish Memorial Ride, with a ceremonial proclamation marking the event, which was held on Sunday, Sept. 9. Since the SGT Jan Argonish Ride began in 2008, veterans and charities have benefited from generous contributions to honor the life of the Lackawanna County native, SGT Jan Argonish. The event was created by Walsh after her fiancé, Argonish, was killed in an ambush in Afghanistan on August 27, 2007 while serving in the Pennsylvania National Guard. The annual event benefits local injured soldiers, the SGT Argonish Memorial Fund and “Homes for Our Troops.”

JMPP held the inaugural Dyonisia last year, performing one program of nine plays for four nights. A positive reaction from last year’s audience, and word of mouth, helped increase interest in the event this year. As a result of the attention, the JMPP decided to increase the number of performances and plays this year. The decision was influenced partially by an increase in submissions from playwrights interested in staging their work at the festival, but more so as a way to help the event grow. “We did get a lot of great submissions, but basically we wanted to make it bigger and better than it was last year,” explained Regan. “We did nine plays last year. This year we wanted to do a little bit more. We thought one night might be a little bit too long… so we decided to do two programs this year.” The plays were split up by subject matter, with pieces dealing with the subject of art and murder being performed on Sept. 20, 22, 28 and 30, and pieces dealing with religion and science-fiction on Sept. 21, 23, 27 and 29. Writers with work in this year’s festival include Maureen McGuigan, Hank Willenbrink, Alicia Grega, Mark Zdancewicz, Amye Archer, James M. Spock, Dawn Zera, Charles O’Donnell, Jeff Boam, Jack McGuigan, K.K. Gordon and Kait Burrier. Regan, Alicia Nordstrom,

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Kathryn Priestash, left, and Alicia Nordstrom rehearse “Patient/Fracture” by Kait Burrier.

Zdancewicz, Grega and Scranton Public Theatre Executive Director Bob Shlesinger will each be directing pieces. Boam, Nordstrom and Regan are also part of the cast, which includes Nicole Lopez-Isa, Tim McDermott, Conor O’Brien, Kathryn Priestash, Maggie O’Brien, Kimmie Wraizen, Eric Lutz, Jer Tobin, Emily Thomas, David James Baker, Pat McNichols, Kathleen Patrizi, Joe DeMuro, Ellen O’Brien, Dante Giammarco and Conor McGuigan. Some of the writers, directors and actors are new to the JMPP, but a good number have participated in either last year’s Dyonisia or in another JMPP production. The company holds performances all year round, but Dyonisia is a little different from what the group normally does. “We do a lot of staged readings (through the year) where

the actors have the scripts in their hands, and there’s a minimum set, sometimes the actors are in costume, and sometimes we have other multimedia elements and we have a little reception after, but we can’t do full-fledged productions all year round as much as we’d like to,” said Regan. “They’re time-consuming, they cost money, but at the same time we want to nurture local playwrights and get people to the next step which they might not necessarily have if they hadn’t had their play read in public." Last year’s Dyonisia helped Regan get her own work to the next level. She’s expanded the work she submitted to the festival last year, “The Resurrection of Campbell Colgate,” into a full-length play. The Old Brick Theatre will host a performance of the piece in November. Theatergoers will have to wait and see whether or not any of the writers participating in Dyonisia ‘12 feel inspired to follow in Regan’s footsteps, and if they do, Regan said the JMPP will do what they can to help them with the process. “If they’re inspired to write a full-length play from their work in this production, then we’re all for it. We’ll help nurture them any way we can,” said Regan. For more information on the JMPP, call 591.1378 or email nepaplaywrights@live.com. Those interested in attending are encouraged to purchase tickets in advance. Tickets can be purchased at www.subverseaphrodesia.com.

Sunday, September 16, 2012

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ARTS CALENDAR
VISUAL ARTS
ArtWorks Gallery and Studio, 503 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton. Info: 207.1815, www.artworksnepa.com. “Riverworks III: Lackawanna River Corridor Association, Celebrating 25 Years” will be held through Sept. 29. Vintage Theater, 326 Spruce St., Scranton. Info: scrantonsvintagetheater.com Various pieces by artists Heidi Van Lueven and Jenna Casaldi will be on display to Sept. 30.

Rock Opera:” Oct. 7, doors open at 6 p.m., show starts at 7 p.m. Cost: $25/reserved, $40/VIP special reserved, includes meet and greet following show. Info: 800.836.1691, glassprismband.com. Vintage Theater, 326 Spruce St., Scranton. Info: scrantonsvintagetheater.com Staged reading of Ted LoRusso’s “A Lie Is A Venial Sin” on Sunday, November 11.

CONCERTS
Covenant Presbyterian Church, 550 Madison Ave., Scranton. Info: Timothy Smith, 346-6400. ‘Simple Gifts,’ international folk music, Sun., Oct. 7, 3 p.m. Cost: Free, donations accepted. New Visions Studio and Gallery, 201 Vine St., Scranton. Info:

THEATER
Actors Circle at Providence Playhouse, 1256 Providence Rd., Scranton, Info: 342.9707, actorscircle.org. “Bell, Book & Candle” by John Van Druten will run September 20 to 23 and 28 to 30.

878.3970. Conversations With Enemies, Trust us We’re Doctors, Empire of the Sea, Taking Back Tomorrow will perform Saturday, Sept. 22, doors open at 7:30 p.m., show The Gaslight Theatre Company, starts at 8 p.m., Cost: $7. Info: 824.8266, visit gaslightKite Party, Three Man Cannon, theatre.org,gaslightWicca Phase, Halfling will perform theatre@gmail.com. Saturday, Sept. 29, doors open at “[Title of Show]:” Jan. 4-5, 7:30 p.m., Jan. 6, 2 p.m., Mellow Theater, 7:30p.m., show starts at 8 p.m., 501 Vine St. Scranton. Not suitable Cost: $7. for children. Cost: $10. Scranton Cultural Center, 420 N. Vintage Theater, 326 Spruce St., Scranton. Info: scrantonsvintaWashington Ave., Scranton, Info: getheater.com (570) 344-1111, www.scrantonculThose Clever Foxes will perform turalcenter.org. with Edelweiss and Shop Local! on The Glass Prism “Resurrection: A Saturday, Sept. 22.
PHOTO COURTESY OF ALEX CENA

Originally from West Pittston, Jenn Bell has made her home and studio in Scranton. Her work will be exhibited in the 42nd Annual Fine Craft Fair at the Sussex County Fair Grounds in Augusta, N.J.

P

Scranton artist exhibits her work in New Jersey
eters Valley Craft Center announced that Scranton artist, Jenn Bell, will be included as one of the exhibitors in its 42nd Annual Fine Craft Fair, Sept. 29 and 30 at the Sussex County Fair Grounds in Augusta, N.J. Bell, originally from West Pittston, has made her home and studio in Scranton since graduating from Kutztown University.
This will be her second time exhibiting her unique enameled metal wall tiles in this juried art fair. While she is quick to admit that being an artist is, “not all glitter and wine,” she has enjoyed dedicating her life to beautifying other people’s surroundings with her tile installations and never gets tired of seeing people react to them. Bell and Peters Valley invite everyone to come and see her work in person and say hello. The Fine Craft Fair, which is open 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday, hosts 150 exhibiting artists, live music, artist demonstrations, food and a kids’ art activity area each day. Admission is $9 per person. For more information about the craft fair as well as the organization, and a $1 off coupon, visit www.petersvalley.org. Visit www.jennbell.com to learn more about Bell’s work.

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GOLackawanna

Sunday, September 16, 2012

WSHS graduate set to star in ‘West Side Story’

DON MCGLYNN/GO LACKAWANNA

Theo Lencicki is starring as Riff, the leader of the Jets, in “West Side Story.” The play will run from Nov. 2 through 4 at the Scranton Cultural Center.

A WEST SIDER’S STORY
he Scranton Cultural Center and the Broadway Theatre League of NEPA gave season ticket holders a chance to take their seat for a test drive last week. The Cultural Center hosted “Test Drive Your Seat” on Monday, Sept. 10. Patrons had the chance to walk through the theater, see where their seats were going to be for the 2012-13 season and take a tour of the building.

T

By DON MCGLYNN dmcglynn@golackawanna.com

Broadway Theatre League staff members were on hand to answer any questions on the season, as was West Scranton High School graduate, and one of the stars of the Broadway Theatre League’s opening show, “West Side Story,” Theo Lencicki. Lencicki, who plays Riff, the leader of the Jets, in the play that runs from Nov. 2 through 4, had a few days off before rehearsals begin for “West Side Story” and was asked by the Theatre League to be a part of the open house. “We thought it would be nice for people to come and meet him, add a little spice to the af-

ternoon,” said Tony Nicosia, executive director of the Broadway Theatre League of NEPA. Lencicki said he jumped at the chance to help promote the upcoming season, as it gave him an excuse to come back to his hometown. “I love coming back home. If I’m not in the city or doing a show, it’s always nice to come back and see the old friends and stay at my house, and help out and promote anything. Clearly I love the hometown crowd. It’s great to come back,” said Lencicki. A graduate of Penn State Uni-

versity, where he studied theater and dance, Lencicki currently resides in New York City, when he’s not on the road traveling with a show. “I never thought I would travel as much as I have,” said Lencicki. “Last summer I was in Japan with the international tour of ‘A Chorus Line,’ so I’ve been to South America, Japan, Mexico, Canada, Alaska, all over the place.” “The first thing I did actually, when I graduated, was dance on a cruise ship in South America
See STORY , Page 17

Sunday, September 16, 2012

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Promoting responsible eating
By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES For Go Lackawanna

IF YOU GO
What: Second annual Farm To Table dinner When: Fri., Sept. 21, 6:30 p.m. Where: Everhart Museum, 1901 Mulberry St., Scranton Cost: $100, 21 and over Info: www.everhart-museum.org, 346.7186.

Friday’s event on the front lawn of the Everhart Museum, 1901 Mulberry St., Scranton, does as much to help the museum as it does to promote a variety of healthy foods produced in northeastern Pennsylvania. The second annual Farm To Table dinner will take place at 6:30 p.m. on Sept. 21. The inaugural event was closely tied to the museum’s “Buds, Blooms, and Berries” exhibit in Sept. 2011. “We were looking to do something that celebrated local agriculture; fresh, organic, whole foods; and responsible eating,” explained Cara Sutherland, executive director of the Everhart. “We specifically targeted produce and foods created within a 100 mile radius.” The result is a menu filled with items picked just days before. Sutherland said Friday’s menu wouldn’t be finalized until Wednesday to guarantee the highest quality goods make their way to the table. The first event welcomed about 130 people, despite heavy rains from the remnants of Tropical Storm Lee. Organizers are

hoping for better weather for Friday’s rain-or-shine event. Event co-chair Katharine Weis, of Clarks Summit, said that participating farms and businesses include No Bull Ranch in Mount Cobb, Hillside Farms in Dallas, Catherine Hynes from the Susquehanna Beekeepers’ Association, Susquehanna Brewing Company, and Epicurean Delight of Tunkhannock. Eckel’s Farm in Clarks Summit is also donating hay bales that will be transformed into seating areas for the event. “I love the whole idea of the fellowship of it – a community coming together to celebrate local food and drink,” added event co-chair Ali Duffy, who is also providing interior decoration services. “It’s a festive occasion to get to meet your neighbors. It’s terrific.”

The family-style dinner aids the Everhart Museum’s original exhibits and programming – like next year’s planned vampire- and skateboarding-themed exhibits – while keeping admission fees low. “If you think about it, we’re trying to replace the loss of more than $50,000 in state funding with the complete elimination of funding through the (Pennsylvania Historical & Museum Commission),” Sutherland said. In addition to the menu filled with regional refreshments, music will be provided by DJ Steven Wallace. Organizers have also added an auction to this year’s event. Offerings include the chance to win your own Farm To Table event catered by Be Life Café and Marketplace of Clarks Summit, an overnight stay at Hotel Fauchère in Milford and an antique piece of furniture. Tickets for Friday’s dinner, which is open to adults age 21 and over, are $100 per person and are available at www.everhartmuseum.org or by calling 346.7186. Sutherland recommends “country casual” attire, and jeans are preferred.

STORY
Continued from page 16

KOMEN RECOGNIZED FOR ’GOOD WORKS’

"Good Works in Lackawanna County" is a new initiative created by the Commissioners to recognize and honor organizations who make a difference through their unselfish actions, innovative programs and total commitment to the area’s residents. The local chapter of the Susan B. Komen Foundation was the first recipient of the award for its role in breast cancer awareness and women’s health. Commissioners recently presented Dolly Woody, executive director of the area’s Komen Foundation, with the award, in attendance for the presentation, from left, Commissioners Corey D. O’Brien and Jim Wansacz, Woody and Commissioner Patrick M. O’Malley.

for seven, eight months. It was sort of crazy that that was the first experience. I went to one of my first New York auditions, and they said, ‘Do you want to go to South America?’ and I said, ‘Sure, when?’ It was a great experience to have, but I didn’t even have a passport. I didn’t have anything…but when an opportunity like that comes, you can’t pass it up.” Lencicki gives some of the credit, with his even having a shot at these opportunities, to a strong group of educators who helped foster and nurture his talent and a love for musical theater. “(West Scranton High School’s) Annette Palutis… the first musical I ever did was ‘South Pacific’ my freshman year, and that just sort of opened my eyes to the whole world of musical theater. And, from there, when I went to the Arts Alive program as a student it was Dr. Catherine Richmond-Cullen from the NEIU, who runs that program, as well as Joanne Arduino, Nancy Hasty…all those women have really opened my eyes to the opportunities that can lead from being in the performing arts,” said Lencicki. Understanding what having a group of good teachers did for him is making Lencicki think about a possible career change somewhere down the road, so he can do for students what those women did for him. “I think, ultimately, I’ve been involved with the Arts Alive program here in Scranton, and was able to teach, and teaching to me is the ultimate goal,” said Lencicki. “I like to promote the arts and bring the arts to kids who may not normally have that opportunity, and it just gives me that high that I don’t find from anywhere else, aside from being on the stage. “I think ultimately, after a couple years of performing…I

“I love coming back home. If I’m not in the city or doing a show, it’s always nice to come back and see the old friends and stay at my house,”

definitely want to go back to grad school for directing and choreography and either be at a university level or even a high school level just promoting the arts and being an insight into the business to a younger generation.” While it is an admirable goal, fans of Lencicki’s can rest easy in knowing that it’s a few years down the road, and it definitely won’t happen until after he opens The Broadway Theatre League’s season in “West Side Story.” “My dad always says, ‘It’s perfect. You’re from West Side and it’s the ‘West Side Story.’ It’s great, it’s a great homecoming,’ And, yeah it is,” said Lencicki. Lencicki has had the opportunity to perform at the Scranton Cultural Center before, coming home twice, once in 2010 with “Hairspray” and again last season with “Young Frankenstein.” And, while it might not be as exotic as some of the other locations he has been to, he said he’s always more than happy to take the stage in Scranton. “It’s crazy, especially with the media of today like Theo Lencicki Facebook… email and texting, I feel like (once) somebody finds out the show is coming through, the outpouring of support from everybody who used to know me through school or church is great, it’s just great… the support that the people show is awesome.” The Broadway Theatre League actually booked the show prior to Lencicki even auditioning; when they found out he had earned a spot in the cast, it made the opening night show that much more special. “It’s always good to have a local boy in the show in a touring company. It makes it all the more exciting,” said Nicosia. Other shows on the schedule for this year include, “The Adams Family,” “The Midtown Men,” “Peter Pan,” “Dreamgirls,” “Stomp” and “Hair.’ For more information on this year’s season or to purchase tickets, call 342.7784 or visit www.broadwayscranton.com.

PAGE 18

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GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012

PAGE 21

22

GOLackawanna

Sunday, September 16, 2012

FARMER’S MARKET

Butler heads a crossbow dynasty

DON MCGLYNN/GO LACKAWANNA

Trevor Brown of Purple Pepper Farms.

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Terry Butler, grandson Brandon McDermott and daughter Ashley Rampulla all share a love of archery.

All in the family
Marywood University’s Elizabeth Maguire and Katie Abrahamsen prepared a meal at the West Side Farmer’s Market using items that were available for sale.

T

By Roger DuPuis II

rdupuis@golackawanna.com

he awards just keep on coming for crossbow champion Terry Butler and his family. Coming off his most successful crossbow competition season to date, the Old Forge resident, 65, counts among his accolades for 2012 his third consecutive Crossbowman of the Year honor from the National Crossbowmen of the USA, based on being the top overall scorer at the sport’s U.S. nationals.
was the first boy to compete in the Crossbow Division of the Pennsylvania State Archery Association, placing first during the recent indoor championship earlier this year. Brandon’s efforts received a state House of Representatives citation from state Rep. Sid Kavulich. The awards are nice -- ribbons, medals, certificates and news clippings decorate the walls of several rooms in Butler’s Kohler Avenue home, relics of a sporting career which has taken him across the country and across the seas -- but those laurels are not why Butler competes, and not why he got into archery. “Our main purpose is the camaraderie,” Butler said , gesticulating broadly for emphasis as he leaned back in a dining room chair. Perhaps the most profound camaraderie of all is that which the sport helped foster between Butler and his daughter in the
See CROSSBOW, Page 23

Karin Foster helped organize the West Side Farmer’s Market, which is held Tuesdays in Allen Park.

Daughter Ashley Rampulla, 26, has been a formidable competitor in her own right, currently the NFAA National Female Crossbow Champ, Pennsylvania State female crossbow regional and state champ and record holder and the 2012 Pennsylvania Keystone Games Champion. She also is ranked second in the world as a female crossbow shooter. And now there’s grandson Brandon McDermott, 10, a Riverside Elementary student who

Sunday, September 16, 2012

GOLackawanna
own right. Both have represented the U.S. in international competition. Butler still holds among his most treasured memories the 2009 WCSA World Crossbow Championships in Portugal – not for medals he and the other Americans brought home, but at being chosen to hoist his country’s flag during the opening ceremonies. “To me, it’s an honor,” Butler said. He also qualified to represent the United States at the WCSA World Crossbow Championships in Sweden in 2013, but acknowledged that the prohibitive cost of transportation logistics may rule that out next year. “We are not funded by a big organization,” Butler explained, such as the federations which support many other sports, notably teams in many other countries. “A lot of people do not consider crossbow archery,” he added wistfully. Whatever people think of the sport, it does seem to have strengthened this family’s ties, and even indirectly led Rampulla to the altar. During her senior year at East Stroudsburg University, she took tennis as an elective. Her partner mentioned that his best friend was involved in archery. As a 12-year-old Ashley Butler was in a competition at Atlantic City where she struck up a conversation with another young competitor, Jason Rampulla. They talked, she recalled, but went their separate ways. Now, she learned, he was transferring to ESU. “Immediately, I knew exactly who he was.” The couple still shares each other’s company and a mutual love of the sport, with Jason recording strong showings in crowded fields of competition at national meets in Las Vegas. They support one another at meets, but “when we shoot together, we actually get pretty competitive,” Rampulla said of her husband. Her sister’s son, meanwhile, seems poised to take up the family mantle. The oldest of four children, Brandon was “really close to my dad,” Rampulla said, when, at just 7 or 8, he asked, “Grandpa, can I try it?” As with his aunt and grandfather before him, Brandon seemed to take to the sport with speed and vigor. Having set a record in the regional tournament, with a score of 386, he went on to set a state record of 438. With that, Brandon also joined his kin to become the first three-generation competitors to win state and regional championships, as well as simultaneously holding records in both in the same division. Rampulla chuckled when asked if she wanted to add another member to the third generation in the family pastime. “When she gets old enough, we’re definitely interested to see if she would want to get into it,” Rampulla said of daughter Cheyenne, who’s just 20 months old. Some youngsters get into the sport as early as age four, she added. In the meanwhile, she does believe that depictions of archery in recent films such as “The Hunger Games” and “Brave” are stirring up interest among the younger set. To hear his grandfather tell it, young Brandon is eager to reach new heights. “I’m going to be a world champion some day, before grandpa,” the young man proudly announced after one of his first events. “By the time you’re a world champion, I’ll be dead,” his grandfather quipped back. “You mean I have to wait that long,” came the boy’s reply. However long that might be, Butler has but one wish for his final moment. “I want to die shooting my crossbow,” he said, “with a smile on my face.”

23

CROSSBOW
Continued from page 22

wake of a tragic loss. After his wife Francine died in July 1996, Butler sought an activity that would give his grieving young daughter something to focus on, but not necessarily a team sport. “We had never shot a bow in our lives,” recalled the retired North Pocono math and science teacher, who opted for archery as a father-daughter bonding activity. It worked. Rampulla was just five when Mrs. Butler was diagnosed with cancer and 10 when she died, and recalled those difficult years when family life revolved around spending as much time as possible with her ailing mom. “We weren’t that close before,” she said of her relationship with her father. Older sister Donielle, she added, “was a teenager, so she kind of had her own thing going on. She was never really a sporty kind of person.” The only sport Rampulla had played before was community basketball – she liked it, but also knew it wasn’t something she would do forever. Then her dad started “trying to get me out of the house a little bit” through archery. “From the first night I went in there, I was hooked from the first time I shot the bow,” Rampulla said in a telephone interview from her Palmerton home. “It helped me relax.” “Every night she wanted to go to practice,” Butler recalled. “She loved it.” Nearby Lonesome Road Archery became their home away from home, and very much still is. “We became range rats,” Butler chuckled. Before long, father and daughter were traveling widely and winning awards in their

ROGER DUPUIS II / GO LACKAWANNA

Scranton Police Officer Kyle Kemp chats with West Scranton resident Mike Bonevitch and his son Tyler about his four-legged partner Ecko prior to Saturday’s 5K run.

5K race generates support for city’s K9s
By ROGER DuPUIS II rdupuis@golackawanna.com

“From the first night I went in there, I was hooked from the first time I shot the bow.”

-- Ashley Rampulla

They came to run with the pack to benefit the dogs. Saturday morning, Sept. 15 saw 150 participants turn out for the third annual 5K run to support the work of the Scranton Police K9 Unit. “Every penny helps to fund the unit,” Acting police Chief Carl Graziano said of the race, which kicked off at 10 a.m. from the 100 block of Wyoming Avenue. “It raises money and it brings the community together,” Graziano added. For runners, the event was a chance to hone their craft as well as support a valuable community resource. Warming up before race time, Tyler Bonevitch said he returned home from Dover, Del. to take part in the event. “It’s for a good cause,” said Bonevitch, a 2011West Scranton graduate now serving in the U.S. Air Force. “You know, we have two dogs at home, so why not?”

“And he runs every day,” Mike Bonevitch added of his son. Father and son also had a chance to chat with one of the unit’s officers, Kyle Kemp, who brought out his K9 partner, Ecko. Kemp, a 10-year veteran of the department, paired up with the Belgian shepherd last year. “It’s like night and day,” he said of K9 work. “To me, there’s no better job in the world.” How much was raised for the unit was not immediately available at press time on Saturday. Tickets were $20 in advance and $25 on race day, but corporate donations also have to be tallied, Graziano said. Graziano said the overall winner was Timothy McGurrin, with a time of 19:30, while Michelle Corrington was the top female finisher at 21:05. Full results were not available on Saturday morning, but will be posted at Fastfinishes.net, Graziano said. “It went very, very well,” he added.

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Sunday, September 16, 2012

FAMILY FUN T
he Felittese Association held its annual Felittese Festival Friday through Sunday, Sept. 7 through 9, at the Felittese Chapel grounds. This year marks the 25th anniversary since the festival was revived in 1987. The festival is modeled after one that is held the same weekend in Felitto, a town in the province of Salerno, Italy. Both festivals are held to honor Our Lady of Constantinople, who has been venerated in the town of Felitto since 1790. The Felittese Festival in Old Forge is designed to bring descendants of Felitto together for a weekend of good food, music and prayer, with a Mass held on Sunday at Prince of Peace Parish followed immediately by a procession of the carrying of the statue of Our Lady of Constantinople to the chapel grounds. For more information on upcoming events hosted by the Felittese Association, email Felitteseassociation@gmail.com.

25 years of Felittese

BILL TARUTIS/FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Caroline Revello, 4, of Old Forge, blows bubbles at the Felittese Festival.

JASON RIEDMILLER/FOR GO LACKAWANNA

JASON RIEDMILLER/FOR GO LACKAWANNA

John and Joann Graziano.

Brandon Yescavage

BILL TARUTIS/FOR GO LACKAWANNA

BILL TARUTIS/FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Joseph Revello, 2, of Old Forge, tastes a spoon of cavatelli and broccoli from his mom Heather.

Ginny Pezzuti of Old Forge prepares a bowl of gnocchi.

Tom Carro the Felitte

Sunday, September 16, 2012

GOLackawanna

25

JASON RIEDMILLER/FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Cecelia, Grace, Olivia Amico and McKenna Brazil.

JASON RIEDMILLER/FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Gaetano Toraldo, Tyler Dunkailo, Abby and Bella Toraldo.

BILL TARUTIS/ FOR GO LACKAWANNA

ll of Cincinnati, Ohio, holds the flag during the singing of "God Bless America" in the opening ceremony of ese Festival in Old Forge on Friday evening.

First row, from left, Camilla Rinaldi, Meghan Fitzpatrick, second row Christine Fitzpatrick, Sophia Rinaldi, Donny Rinaldi and Tommy Fitzpatrick.

JASON RIEDMILLER/FOR GO LACKAWANNA

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Sunday, September 16, 2012

RIVERSIDE 57, NORTH POCONO 47

Vikings find a way to win
deficit in the fourth quarter. Dave Sweetman made big contriNick Dranchak, Michael Loftus butions to the comeback with14 carand Tyler Armillay stood in the Riv- ries for 175 yards and three toucherside Fieldhouse late Friday night downs and five catches for 172 yards taking turns trying to explain the un- and two more scores. Ricky Goodall scored three firstexplainable. The Vikings had arrived home in quarter touchdowns for North PocoTaylor after 11 p.m. following their no on an 87-yard kickoff return and three-hour plus football game at touchdown runs of 21 and 59 yards. Goodall’s kickoff return was the North Pocono. second special teams Riverside overcame a touchdown of the game. potentially disastrous BY THE Riverside punted after night on the special NUMBERS three plays to start the teams for the second • Riverside finished night and Ricky White straight week, shook off with 27 first downs, scooped up a blocked 34 first-quarter points nine of them in the punt, returning the ball by North Pocono, then first quarter. 24 yards for the first put together another • The Vikings piled score. comeback in the fourth up 630 yards total The Vikings ultimatequarter for a 57-47 victo- offense. • Dranchak went ly fell behind for the last ry. 16-for-37 passing with time on another special “There were lots of two interceptions. team’s score when they ups and downs,” said • Tucker had three Dranchak after provid- catches for 193 yards mishandled a punt snap and Matt Nawrocki caring many of those ups by and two scores. ried it in from the 3. passing for 475 yards • Goodall led North Dranchak threw for and five touchdowns. Pocono with 111 yards on nine carries. • The “We kept fighting and Trojans had 213 yards more than 100 yards in three of the four quarkept clawing our way on 43 carries and ters, slowing down only back. finished with 307 in the third quarter after “We gave up 47, but yards total offense. Riverside had used 21unstill found a way to win.” • Riverside turned answered points in the Loftus found an oddi- the ball over five times and North ty when trying to point Pocono turned it over second to seemingly take control with a 42-34 halfout the key points in the twice. time lead. comeback. Sweetman caught a “I don’t remember how it happened except just the big 69-yard pass for an early 7-6 Riverstops we made on fourth downs,” side lead just two plays after the blocked punt started the scoring. He Loftus said. The Vikings kept the winless Tro- added a 10-yard touchdown run late jans from converting on fourth-and- in the quarter before scoring on a 61three in the final minute of the third yard run and a 66-yard pass in the quarter and three more fourth-down second quarter. When the Vikings found themsituations in the fourth quarter. Three of those four stops came in selves behind for the last time, they took just one play to respond. Riverside territory. Jim Tucker, who earlier had an 80“We have a lot of experience,” said Armillay, a junior who is already in yard touchdown catch, pulled in his third year as a starting lineman, pass on a crossing pattern and went including in Riverside’s 16-game 77 yards for the game-winning score. Sweetman added a 35-yard touch2010 season that ended in the state championship game. “We know down run between the last two defensive stops and the Vikings escapwhat it takes to come back.” The Vikings showed it after falling ed with a 2-1 record. Riverside plays at Susquehanna behind by 13 points three times in the first quarter and facing another (1-2) on Saturday, Sept. 22.
By TOM ROBINSON For Go Lackawanna

JASON RIEDMILLER/FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Nico Munley was the only Lackawanna Football Conference player with multiple-interception games each of the first two weekends of the season.

One look at the intensity that made him one of the Lackawanna League’s top defensive basketball players as a sophomore would provide a good indication that Nico Munley had some of the traits necessary to transition to secondary play in football. Consider his family background and there was more reason to think the 5-foot-10, 170-pound junior could “help us win some football games,” this

Making an impact
KEEPING SCORE
TOM ROBINSON
season, as Riverside coach Evan Prall predicted in the preseason. Munley is the grandson of Mid Valley coach Frank Pazzaglia, who ranks fourth in Pennsylvania high school football history with 341 wins. But, even a proud grandfather who was in the bleachers for every one of the Riverside basketball games last winter, was not quite ready to predict
See IMPACT , Page 28

the impact Munley had for the Vikings in the first two games. “My biggest surprise is he’s doing as well as he has this early with being away from football the number of years he has been,” said Pazzaglia, who gets updates from his wife Diane when she returns from viewing her grandson’s game and the coach gets home from his Mid Valley game each Friday night. “I knew once he got a pretty good amount of time under his belt, he would do pretty well because he’s a good

Sunday, September 16, 2012

GOLackawanna

27

OLD FORGE 56, HOLY REDEEMER 7

SPORTS BRIEFS
McMyne finishes strong Old Forge graduate Kyle McMyne finished strong in his second professional baseball season after struggling late in the regular season. McMyne had three appearances, each featuring two scoreless innings, during September. One came in his final regular season game before the hard-throwing relief pitcher struck out five in four playoff innings. McMyne gave up five hits and two walks during Bakersfield’s threegames-to-two loss to Modesto in the California League semifinal playoffs. After struggling to a 14.34 earned run average in 10 August appearances, McMyne finished 2-3 with six saves and a 7.02 ERA in 35 regularseason games with the Blaze. In 41 innings, he allowed 47 hits and 28 walks while striking out 31. McMyne was 3-2 with two saves and a 2.59 ERA with Dayton of the Midwest League earlier this year. In two pro seasons, he is 5-5 with eight saves, a 5.37 ERA and 53 strikeouts in 65 1/3 innings. SWB Yankees end season Pawtucket piled up seven runs in the second inning Sept. 2 to bring an end to the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees’ season with a 7-1 victory for a three-games-to-one triumph in the best-of-five International League playoff semifinals. The season on the road came to an end for the Yankees in Rochester, N.Y., the most frequent of their temporary, rotating home stadiums while PNC Field in Moosic is being reconstructed. Vidal Nuno, who started the season in Single-A Tampa, was called up from Double-A Trenton to make his debut with the team in the playoffs. He got the start on the mound but was knocked out of the game with two outs in the second inning. Nelson Figueroa, who started the season with the Yankees before being released, retired the first 10 Yankees and got the win. Corban Joseph homered with one out in the fourth for the only run by the Yankees. While away from Moosic, the Yankees went 84-60 in the regular season to win the IL North Division title. Junior Knights open at home The Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Knights will host the New York Bobcats Friday, Sept. 21 at 7 in Pittston to open the season.

JASON RIEDMILLER/ FOR GO LACKAWANNA

OLD FORGE SETS RECORD
By DOM DELLOS Times Leader Correspondent

Running back Brian Tomasetti breaks the tackle of Holy Redeemer’s Eric Kerr.

O

ld Forge scored on three straight offensive plays in the first quarter and set a school record for points in a half Friday night, Sept. 14 while rolling to a 56-7 rout of Holy Redeemer in its home opener. The Blue Devils opened a 56-0 lead at halftime with the help of four touchdowns by Brian Tomasetti, who ran for 213 yards on 10 carries. Tomasetti also intercepted two passes, including one he returned for the final Old Forge score.

Old Forge set the tone on the opening drive on the way to 373 yards rushing. Tomasetti capped a sevenplay drive with a 3-yard touchdown less than two minutes into the game. Old Forge fumbled a punt to set up Holy Redeemer in Blue Devils territory. Tony DeSanto’s fourthdown sack ended the threat. Brenden Wahl then hit Anthony Piccolini with a 62yard touchdown pass to start the scoring streak. The Blue Devils scored 20 points in a little over four minutes for a 27-0 lead with 3:34 left in the first quarter. Tomasetti went 63 yards up the middle and Warren Welsh recovered a fumble at the Holy Redeemer 5 to set up a Shane Schuback touchdown. Old Forge poured it on

MORE ONLINE

Results of Saturday games involving Abington Heights, Scranton Prep, Mid Valley and Holy Cross can be found online at golackawanna.com/sports.

with 29 second-quarter points. Tomasetti broke tackles along the left sideline on the way to turning a fourth-and-inches play into an 80-yard touchdown and 35-0 lead. “It started off with the offensive line,” Tomasetti said. “Every game, they give me a great opportunity to get to the second level and I just went from there.” Brandon Yescavage had a 37yard touchdown run and Jorden Sekol scored from 22 before Tomasetti returned an interception 45 yards. “Tomasetti is a special kid, no doubt about it,” Old Forge coach Mike Schuback said. “He can do

everything offensively, defensively and special teams-wise. He’s a real big leader for us. “As our featured tailback, we’re really happy with the amount of production he gets out of his carries.” Eric Shorts ran four yards in the fourth quarter for the only Holy Redeemer touchdown. The win sets up Old Forge to face visiting Dunmore Friday at 7 p.m. in a meeting of unbeaten, state-ranked Class A teams. Dunmore entered the weekend ranked third while Old Forge was seventh, according to the Harrisburg Patriot-News.

AROUND THE LFC Scranton, Valley View, Delaware Valley and Lackawanna Trail all won Friday night to improve to join Dunmore and Old Forge in improving to 3-0.
See OLD FORGE, Page 29

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Sunday, September 16, 2012

A-Division:

Junior League Football standings

7 194

CE SIN

• Olyphant 35, Moosic 0 • Lakeland 2, North Pocono 0 • Pocono Mtn Cardinals 2, Pocono Mtn Panthers 0 • Dunmore 39, West Side 34 • Old Forge 2, Wallenpaupack 0 • Taylor 2, Wayne Highlands 0 B-Division: • Olyphant 34, Moosic 0 • Lakeland 20, North Pocono 13 • Pocono Mtn Panthers 42, Pocono Mtn Cardinals 12 • Dunmore 26, West Side 0 • Wallenpaupack 40, Old Forge 0 • Wayne Highlands 33, Taylor 0 C-Division: • Olyphant 6, Moosic 0 • North Pocono 13, Lakeland 7 • Pocono Mtn Cardinals 12, Pocono Mtn Panthers 6 • Dunmore 24, West Side 6 • Old Forge 27, Wallenpaupack 13 • Wayne Highlands 12, Taylor 7
PHOTO COURTESY OF ROBERT TORBA JR.

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Moosic Raiders running back Noah Matsko tears up the turf in a recent contest between the Moosic Raiders and Olyphant Lions.

IMPACT
Continued from page 26

athlete.” Munley was the only Lackawanna Football Conference player with multiple-interception games each of the first two weekends. In addition to having all four of Riverside’s interceptions in the first two games, he also caught the gamewinning touchdown pass in the final minute of a 32-28 victory over Carbondale for the team’s first win during Week Two. He grabbed his fifth interception of the season Friday, Sept. 14 in Riverside’s 57-47 win over North Pocono. The same traits he showed on the basketball court have translated to success as a two-way player in a more physical game. Other than having a little trouble holding on to the ball on offense in his debut, Munley has been producing positive results while quickly stepping into a prominent role. “I like to make plays on the ball,” said Munley, who made his first interception on the first drive of the season, added his next two in the

end zone to stop threats and came up with his fourth to set up a Riverside score. “I like to go up and get it. “I feel like I have the ability to get a jump ball over virtually anyone.” Munley had the chance to be one of the league’s top golfers this fall. Instead, after not playing football since seventh grade, he is proving to be a defensive standout in a new sport. “He gets in your face, but in a very sportsmanlike way,” Pazzaglia said of his grandson’s traits as a defender in basketball. “He was always very competitive. “Whoever he was on was in for a tough night scoring.” Week Two showed that Munley is ready to make an offensive impact as well with two receiving touchdowns. The game-winning score with 48.7 seconds left against Carbondale was a case of the Chargers appearing to be in all the right places defensively but being unable to stop a brilliant effort by Riverside quarterback Nick Dranchak and Munley. Munley ran past two defenders and Dranchak lofted a pass over

them to hit him in stride on a post pattern at about the 5-yard-line on his way to completing the 44-yard touchdown. “I knew they were playing a prevent defense because we were down and we had to score,” Munley said. “I found a seam between the corner and the safety and I took it. “I broke away from the defense and the quarterback threw a great ball.” The catch was not the first gamewinning play Munley has made in front of a big crowd. He made a buzzer-beating, 3-pointer to help the Vikings advance in the state tournament last winter. After accomplishing the first of his goals in the winter sport, Munley was ready to add to his busy athletic schedule. “I made a choice to try to get a starting role on the basketball team,” Munley said of his original decision to stay away from high school football. “But, I thought about it and didn’t want to look back after graduating and say I wished I had played. “I knew my ability. I made the decision to come out and it has paid off.”

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Sunday, September 16, 2012

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29

DUMORE 7, WEST SCRANTON 6

OLD FORGE
Continued from page 27

JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTOS/FOR GO LACKAWANNA

West Scranton’s Joe Devine returns a punt, he is pursued by Dunmore’s Matt Rogan.

By TOM ROBINSON For Go Lackawanna

Bucks defeat Invaders
CRANTON – Dunmore’s defense still has not given up a touchdown. More importantly, it has not allowed a point. After West Scranton turned to special teams to score the first points against Dunmore this season, the Bucks used a defensive stop by Austin Seamon on the two-point conversion attempt to hold on for a 7-6 victory in a meeting between unbeaten rivals in a Friday night high school football game at Memorial Stadium. Joe Devine returned a punt 43 yards for West Scranton’s only touchdown with 1:18 left, giving the Invaders a shot at the win. “He has great speed,” West Scranton coach Joe Gerek said of Devine. “He gives us everything he has. “He’soneofourcaptainsandevery week he comes up with some kind of big play.” Following a Dunmore timeout and a confusing sequence to sort out a penalty that would not be marked off until the kickoff, West Scranton went for the winning points. Marquis Brownlee appeared to have a chance to get around the left end. Seamon, Dunmore’s top running back, had suffered an ankle injury on the game’s first play. After carrying again on the second play, he left the game and did not return until he was needed on defense in the fourth quarter. Seamon returned in time to help preserve the win. He fought off a block and, as the only Buck with a chance to stop the play, made the tackle before Brownlee could cross the line of scrimmage. “Thekidmadeagreatplay,”Gerek said. “Seamon’s a real tough kid to come back and make a game-winning play like that.” Dunmore turned away West Scranton drives that reached the Bucks 19 and 11 earlier in the fourth quarter. “I’m just so proud of our kids,”

S

Abington Heights and Scranton Prep took 2-0 records into Saturday afternoon home games. Jake McCarthy carried 18 times for 276 yards and all five touchdowns for Scranton, which gave up its first points of the season but had little trouble in defeating Wyoming Valley West, 34-14, in a rematch of a District 2-4-11 Class AAAA Regional playoff last season. Valley View rallied for the third straight game to defeat Honesdale, 49-21. Bryan Schor celebrated his commitment to a Miami of Ohio scholarship this week by going 12-for-13 for 251 yards and four touchdowns as Delaware Valley routed Hazleton Area, 49-12. Jeremy Greenley carried 12 times for 142 yards and two touchdowns while also catching a 68yard pass in Lackawanna Trail’s 3513 victory over Meyers. Kyle Kiehart completed six of seven passes for 166 yards and two touchdowns to lead Lakeland to a 34-15 victory over Hanover Area. GAR stopped a two-point conversion pass attempt with 15 seconds left to send Carbondale to its second straight heart-breaking defeat, 20-19. A week ago, the Chargers were stopped at the 2 with no time on the clock in a 32-28 loss to Riverside.

BY THE NUMBERS
• Each team had 14 first downs. • Old Forge more than doubled Holy Redeemer in total yardage, 465230.• Tomasetti has scored 11 touchdowns while helping Old Forge outscore its first three opponents, 148-27. He has 455 yards and eight touchdowns on 44 carries, has intercepted four passes and returned two of them for touchdowns and has another score on one of his two receptions for 51 yards. • Brandon Vahey carried three times for 46 yards and three other Blue Devils ran for at least 25. Yescavage was 2-for-38 while Sekol and Tyler Salerno were 5-for-25. • Brenden Wahl went 3-for-4 passing for 92 yards. Piccolini had two catches for 70 yards. • Holy Redeemer passed for 118 yards on 30 attempts. Pat Villani led the Royals in rushing with 61 yards on seven carries. Eric Kerr caught 11 passes for 109 yards. • Matt Mancuso was 4-for-5 on extra-point kicks and Old Forge went 2-for-3 on two-point attempts.

See INVADERS , Page 30

Demitris Garcia smashes through the Dunmore defense.

30

GOLackawanna HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS NOTEBOOK

Sunday, September 16, 2012

INVADERS
Continued from page 29

Dunmore coach Jack Henzes said. “They played their hearts out. “It was a typical West Scranton-Dunmore game – very physical.” Neitherteamwasabletomanageasmanyas four yards per play in the defensive battle. The first four possessions produced just nine total yards, but the Bucks began to move the ball late in the first quarter. A 16-play Dunmore drive that carried into the second quarter was stopped when West Scranton stuffed a pair of plays from the 1 on third and fourth down. The Bucks kept the Invaders pinned and needed to move only 26 yards for what proved tobethewinningscore.MikeKolcharnotooka counter play from his wingback position 23 yards for the touchdown on third-and-seven with 4:41 left in the half. Mike Boland added the extra point. The Bucks made it back to the 10 before the half ended, but Tyaire Quiller intercepted a pass with 11 seconds left. Dunmore tackles Jake Korgeski and Boland made consecutive tackles for losses to shut down West Scranton early in the fourth quarter. MattSawka’sinterceptionatthe2endedthe next threat. “Earlier in the fourth quarter, when I thought we had a good drive going and were going to score, I told the guys I wanted to go for two and they all agreed,” Gerek said. “If I thought, a high school extra point (kick) was automatic, it might be a different decision. West Scranton (2-1) will try to bounce back Friday night in its first Lackawanna Football Conference Division 1 game when it plays at North Pocono (0-3).

West gets first wins in cross country
By TOM ROBINSON For Go Lackawanna

The West Scranton cross country teams picked up their first wins of the season while Riverside’s Cassie Semyon set a school record in her team’s only Lackawanna League home meet of the season Tuesday, Sept. 11. West Scranton went 1-1, defeating Riverside, 22-39, and falling to Dunmore, 22-35, in the boys’ portion of the cluster meet that also included runners from Scranton and Mid Valley. The Lady Invaders downed Riverside, 19-41, in their only team competition of the meet. Semyon finished third in the girls race, covering the 3.07-mile course in 22:55. Dunmore runners finished first in each race. Matt Murray won in 17:34, 43 seconds ahead of teammate Brandon Murray. Megan Connors finished in 22:31 for first place in the girls’ race. Emily Tuffy was 16 seconds back, helping West Scranton place two runners in the top four, three in the top six and four in the top nine. Tristen Grant was fourth, Rebecca Price sixth and Brittany Creegan ninth. West Scranton’s Austin Martinelli was third and Riverside’s Nick Strenkoski fourth in the boys race. Kevin Green added a seventh-place finish for the Invaders. Dunmore swept Scranton, West Scranton and Mid Valley while Riverside lost to the same three teams in boys. Riverside picked up a 15-50 forfeit win over the Scranton girls, who are part of the league standings but did not have five runners available for Tuesday’s meet. Mid Valley defeated the Lady Vikes, 19-42.

Austin Martinelli finished in third place for West Scranton on Tuesday, Sept. 11.

GOLF

BY THE NUMBERS
• Dunmore had slight statistical advantages of 9-8 in first downs, 136-124 in rushing yards and 181-145 in total offense. • West Scranton had the game’s top two rushers. Demetris Garcia had 49 yards and Brownlee had 47 with each carrying 12 times. • Dunmore spread the carries around with Seamon out. Kolcharno carried seven times for 39 yards, Sawka carried six times for 34 yards and Sal Marchese carried 11 times for 33 yards. • Kolcharno also had two catches for 24 yards. • Boland, Korgeski, Shakal Blackwell and Sawka led the Dunmore defense. • Boland had six tackles, including a sack, four assists and a batted-down pass. Korgeski had seven tackles, including one for a loss, and three assists. Blackwell had seven tackles and broke up a pass. Sawka had three tackles, two assists and an interception. • Quiller, Collin Lipowich and Cullen Fanning led the West Scranton defense. • Quiller had seven tackles, including one for a loss, five assists and an interception. Lipowich blocked a punt and had two tackles, including one for a loss, and five assists. Fanning had four tackles and six assists.

Carl Pugliese and Shawn Soroka swept all three points in the first foursome Monday to lead Riverside to a 5-4 victory over Old Forge in a Lackawanna League Division 2 match. Pugliese shot even-par, 36 on the front nine at Pine Hills while beating Jordan Ohler, 2 up. Soroka defeated Vince Talerico, 3 and 2, while combining with Pugliese for a better-ball victory over Ohler-Talerico by the same score. Adam Leasure shot a 1-over-par, 37 while helping produce the other two points the Vikings needed for the win. He beat John Vols, 3 and 2, while combining with Aaron Oustrich to defeat Cameron CarpenterVols, 3 and 2. Old Forge took all three points in the second foursome. A.J. Cantarella beat Mackenzie Evanusa, 4 and 2. Robert Donovan downed Sal DeFrancesco, 2 and 1. Cantarella-Donovan defeated Evanusa-DeFrancesco, 3 and 2. The other Old Forge point came in Carpenter’s win over Oustrich, 4 and 2. Riverside also won at Elk Lake Wednesday to finish the week at 4-5 and tied for Old Forge for seventh place in the 13-team division.

Details from Saturday’s Lackawanna County Commissioners’ Cross Country Invitational can be found online atwww.golackawanna.com/sports. The District 2 tournament schedule has been set. Action begins with singles play October 4 at 9 a.m. at Kirby Park. The tournament continues with the semifinals the next day at 1, tentatively at Kirby Park, although Kingston Racquet Club and the Birchwood Racquet Club are potential sites, if indoor courts are needed. The doubles tournament follows the same format. Early rounds are Oct. 9 with the semifinals and finals the next day. The team championships will feature quarterfinals Oct. 12 at the higher seed’s home court. The semifinals and finals are Oct. 16, beginning with the Class AAA semis at 11 a.m. The Class AAA tournament is actually a Regional because it includes Williamsport from District 4. A singles seeding meeting will be held Oct. 1 at Dunmore High School.

MORE ONLINE

JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTOS/FOR GO LACKAWANNA

GIRLS TENNIS

Riverside’s Nick Strenkoski finished in fourth place on Tuesday, Sept. 11.

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012

PAGE 31

32

GOLackawanna

Sunday, September 16, 2012

OBITUARIES
FRANK J. PALMASANI SEPTEMBER 5, 2012 Frank J. Palmasani, 87, formerly of Scranton, a resident of Wesley Village, passed into eternal rest and peace on Wednesday, September 5, 2012. His wife of 63 years was the late Laura Modeste Palmasani. He was born in Scranton on June 19, 1925, son of the late Michael and Angela Salalmida Palmasani. He was educated in Scranton public schools. He joined the U.S. Marines at age 16, and proudly served his country in World War II. He was a decorated war veteran. He was employed as the business manager of Plasterers and Cement Masons Local 100 of Scranton for many years. He later worked as a plaster instructor at Keystone Job Corps. Until he retired, he was the coordinator for Plasterers and Cement Masons Job Corps Training Program. Frank served as Treasurer of the Lackawanna Human Development Agency for over 30 years. He was a loving husband, father, grandfather, and greatgrandfather. Frank loved to garden, spend time with his grandchildren and watch his favorite baseball team, the New York Yankees. Also surviving, daughter-inlaw, Millie Palmasani, Pittston; son Gary and wife Rosanna, Pittston; son Frank Palmasani, Scranton; four grandchildren, Dr. Ariane Conaboy and husband Atty. Kevin Conaboy, Moosic; Joshua Ceres and wife Christine, Clarks Summit; Gary and Christian Palmasani, Pittston; two great-grandchildren, Claire and Kevin Conaboy Jr., Moosic. He was preceded in death by a son, Michael J. Palmasani. A blessing service was held Saturday, Sept. 8 in the CarlucciGolden-DeSantis Funeral Home Inc., 318 E. Drinker St., Dunmore, by Msgr. Philip A. Gray. As an expression of sympathy, preferred memorial contributions may be made to the family in care of Gary Palmasani, 400 Westport Circle, Pittston, PA 18640, in lieu of flowers or prepared foods. To send the family an online condolence or for further information, please visit www.DunmoreFuneralHome.com MAE LUCILLE GOWER BREZA SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 Mae Lucille Gower Breza, 82, Ransom Twp., died Tuesday, Sept. 4, at the Jewish Home in Scranton after a lengthy illness with cancer. She was the widow of the late Paul John Breza, who died Oct. 27, 1987. The couple had been married more than 37 years. Born Aug. 30, 1930, in Scranton, she was the daughter of the late Harold and Eldora Mae Brink Gower. A lifelong resident of the Newton-Ransom area, she was a 1949 graduate of Newton High School and attended Hahnemann School of Nursing, Scranton. She was a member of Our Lady of the Snows Parish, Clarks Summit and formerly a member of Immaculate Conception Church. She was an avid bowler and was a member of area ladies bowling leagues. A loving and devoted wife, mother and grandmother, she enjoyed happy times with her family and friends. She was a faithful and dedicated volunteer at Community Medical Center for more than 20 years. A person to give of herself and to share with others, she was always willing to lend a helping hand. Mae had a great fondness for her cats. Her caring PAUL HYDUCHAK SEPTEMBER 8, 2012 Paul Hyduchak, 61, of Taylor, died Saturday afternoon, Sept. 8, at Geisinger Community Medical Center. Born in Taylor, on February 10, 1951, he was the son of the late Michael and Verna Lukachko Hyduchak and was a 1969 graduate of Riverside High School. Prior to his illness, Paul worked for Clarks Summit Sate Hospital and also was an orderly at the former Mercy Hospital. He was a lifelong parishioner of St. George’s Orthodox Church, Taylor, where he served as trustee for many years and was a devoted altar server his whole life, always there to lend a helping hand to the parish priests and other Orthodox clergy in the surrounding area. He served as the catering manager at St. George’s Center and was a member of St. George’s Social club, holding several offices over the years. For all his dedication, gentleness will be sadly missed by all who loved her. The family wishes to express their heartfelt appreciation for the care given to their mother by the staff of the Jewish Home and Compassionate Care Hospice. Surviving are three sons, Paul and wife, Laurie, Old Forge; Raymond, Clarks Summit; and Thomas and wife, Linda, Moosic; four daughters, Juanita Stanton and husband, James, Clarks Summit; Lisa Wahl and husband, Joseph, Scott Twp.; Lora Gulla, Old Forge and Patricia Bryk and husband, William, Succasunna, N.J.; a sister-in-law, Mary Cresta, Perryhall, Md.; 13 grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; nieces and nephews. She was also preceded in death by daughter, Susan Breza, on July 6, 2010; an infant grandson, Christian Gulla; three brothers, Henry and Charles Llewellyn; and William Gower; a sister, Edna Race; and a brother-in-law, Fred Cresta. Memorial contributions may be made to American Cancer Society -Lackawanna Unit, 712 S. Keyser Ave., Taylor, PA 18517, or Griffin Pond Animal Shelter, 967 Griffin Pond Road, Clarks Summit, PA 18411. To send an online condolence, visit www.jenningscalvey.com.

GETRUDE ANNA ULIAS SEPTEMBER 8, 2012 Getrude Anna Ulias, 88, of Old Forge, died Saturday, September 8, 2012. Born on August 5, 1924, she was a daughter of the late John and Sophia Dembiczak Ulias. Preceding in death were brothers, Frank, Joseph, Peter, John, Henry, Walter and infant, Adam Ulias; sisters, Julia Pernot, Catherine Gurz, Ethel PoJOHN E. RASCAN SEPTEMBER 11, 2012 John E. Rascan, 78, of Old Forge, died Tuesday, September 11, 2012, at Moses Taylor Hospital, Scranton. He was a son of the late Joseph and Teresa Farkas Rascan. Surviving are companion, Junie Riviello Andrews; daughters, Jac-

tosky, Stella Soltysik, and infant, Helen Ulias. She is survived by many nieces and nephews, including Robert Potosky and wife, Phyllis, Old Forge; niece, Rose Marie Kloss and husband, Thomas, Taylor. Funeral services were held on Wednesday, September 12 in Thomas P. Kearney Funeral Home Inc., 517 N. Main St., Old Forge, with a Mass of Christian Burial in St. Mary of the Assumption Church, Prince of Peace Parish, 123 W. Grace St., Old Forge. would like to thank Dr. Mark Lyons for his compassionate care. A funeral was held Saturday, Sept. 15 in the Louis V. Ciuccio Funeral Home, 145 Moosic Rd., Old Forge, followed by a Mass at the Prince of Peace Parish- St. Mary’s Church, West Grace and Lawrence Sts., Old Forge.

queline Cortez and husband Juan, Jill Thomas and Kent Smith, Meribeth Cipriano and husband David; brother, Steve Rascan; five grandchildren, Christopher and Chase Cortez; Gianna, Patrick and Maria Cipriano; close friends, Albert, Robert, Gerald, Edward Riviello; nieces and nephews. The family

HELEN GEDMAN SEPTEMBER 11, 2012 Helen Gedman, 92, formerly of West Scranton, died Tuesday, September 11, 2012, in Dunmore Health Care Center after an illness. Surviving are her son, Charles Edward Gedman, and wife Catherine (Kay), with whom she resided; two grandsons, three granddaughters and 11 great-grandchildren. A Mass of Christian Burial and committal was held

Thursday, Sept. 13 in Immaculate Heart of Mary Chapel, Oram Street, West Scranton. Interment was in Cathedral Cemetery. Arrangements are by Kearney Funeral Home Inc., 125 N. Main Ave., West Scranton. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made in Helen’s name to the Food Pantry at St. Patrick’s Church, 1403 Jackson St., West Scranton. Visit www.KearneyFuneralHome.com for directions or to leave an online condolence.

JOHN C. YAZURLO JUNE 12, 2012

John C. Yazurlo, 78, of Flagler Beach, Fla., died peacefully June 12, 2012. Originally, from Old Forge, he was a graduate of Penn State University. In 1986, John retired as director inspector general

of the U.S. Department of Education. He then accepted a position as finance director of Daytona Beach Shores. John was a United States Army Veteran. He was preceded in death by daughters, Lisa and Len. He is survived by his wife of 50 years, Charlene; daughters, Lory and Leslie; five grandchil-

dren; three great-grandchildren; nieces and nephews, including Michael Yazurlo III, "the son he never had." A memorial Mass will be held in St. Mary’s Church, Old Forge, Saturday, September 22, at 10 a.m. followed by a mercy meal at Arcaro and Gennell.

Paul was tonsured a reader by His Eminence The Most Reverend Metropolitan Nicholas. He was a member of the Ukrainian American Veterans Club and Acacia Lodge Free and Accepted Mason #579, Taylor. Paul was an avid Pittsburgh Steelers and Pirates Fan. Also surviving are a brother, John, San Lewis, CA; his caregiver and devoted friend, Eleanor Dorin, Taylor; Nieces, Nephews and Cousins. He was also preceded in death by a brother; Michael. A funeral was held Friday, Sept. 14 from the Semian Funeral Home, 704 Union St., Taylor followed by Divine Liturgy in St. George’s Orthodox Church, 743 S. Keyser Ave., Taylor, by the Very Rev. Protopresbyter Mark Leasure. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to t St. George’s Orthodox Church, 743 S. Keyser Ave., Taylor, 18517 Please visit www.semiancares.com to share memories or extend condolences.

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012

PAGE 33

PAGE 34

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012

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PAGE 35

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PAGE 36

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409 Autos under $5000

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GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012

PAGE 37

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PAGE 38 412 Autos for Sale 415 Autos-Antique & Classic 439 Motorcycles 451 Trucks/ SUVs/Vans 536

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AEP Industries, Inc., a leading supplier of flexible packaging has immediate openings for

Part-Time
Penguin Group (USA) Has part-time entry level warehouse labor positions available for 2nd shift (3:00PM to 10:30PM) Monday thru Thursday. Job duties required are, Freight Prep, Order Picking and general industrial duties. These positions require a High School diploma or GED, basic reading and math skills. Other requirements are standing, reaching, twisting and repetitive lifting of up to 30 pounds. Qualified candidates may send a resume or apply in person at the address below: Penguin Group (USA, Inc. Human Resources Dept. 1 Commerce Road Pittston Twp., PA 18640 Email- ptjobs@us. penguingroup.com Phone: 570-6555965 ext 5355 Fax 570-655-3907 E.O.E. M/F/D/V “We are a drug-free workforce” “Penguin Group (USA) values the array of talents and perspectives that a diverse workforce brings. We are an Equal Opportunity Employer.”

timesleaderautos.com

removable hard top, power windows, AM /FM radio with cassette player, CD player, automatic, 4 new tires. Champagne exterior; Italian red leather interior inside. Garage kept, excellent condition. Priced to Sell! $23,000. Call 570-825-6272

MERCEDES-BENZ `73 450SL with Convertible

12,000 miles. With windshield. Runs excellent. Many extras including gunfighter seat, leather bags, extra pipes. New tires & battery. Asking $4,000 firm. (570) 814-1548

YAMAHA ‘97 ROYALSTAR 1300

Too many options to list. Runs & looks excellent. $10,995 570-655-6132 or 570-466-8824

NISSAN `04 PATHFINDER ARMADA Excellent condition.

876 Schechter Dr.

Hampton Inn & Suites Wilkes-Barre

MACHINE OPERATORS
Starting at $ 9/hour – PLUS .50¢ /hour night shift differential; Working Fulltime 12 hours shifts alternating 3 & 4 day work weeks. Every other weekend a must. As a Machine Operator you will remove, inspect, and pack finish product to specifications. You must be able to do some heavy lifting, know how to use a tape measure and scale, and be a TEAM PLAYER. Previous manufacturing experience preferred. Benefit Package includes: Medical, Dental, Vision, Life Insurance, Vacation, Holiday pay Applications accepted daily @ AEP INDUSTRIES, INC. 8 a.m. until 4 p.m. 20 Elmwood Ave Crestwood Industrial Park Mountaintop, PA 18707 Email: grullony@ aepinc.com EOE * A drug free workplace

seeking highly responsible & outgoing people to join our Front Desk team. Full Time available for 2nd shift. Responsibilities include: *Creating computerbased reservations & guest check-ins *Answering phones in a professional manner *Providing top quality customer service If you are a motivated, dependable, team player looking for a great place to work, PLEASE APPLY IN PERSON between 8am & 4pm

FRONT DESK We are currently

www.myfoxnepa.com

421

Boats & Marinas

442 RVs & Campers

542

Logistics/ Transportation

FISHING BOAT. Like new. 16 1/2’ Trophy Fiberglass. 25 HP Johnson motor, 48 lb thrust, trolling motor with foot control. Recharger, pedestal front seat, carpeted floor. Live well, storage compartment. Excellent condition. $4500. 570-675-5046 after 12 noon

Model 8526RLS Mountain Top,PA $18,500 570-760-6341

FOREST RIVER`08 5TH WHEEL

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

427

Commercial Trucks & Equipment

To place your ad call...829-7130

Only 12,000 miles. Vehicle in like new condition. $19,000. 570-288-4322

CHEVY ‘08 3500 HD DUMP TRUCK 2WD, automatic. CHEVY ‘08 3500 HD DUMP TRUCK 2WD, automatic.

To place your ad call...829-7130

Red, XLT, Original non-smoking owner, garaged, synthetic oil since new, excellent in and out. New tires and battery. 90,000 miles. $7,500 (570) 403-3016

FORD ‘02 EXPLORER

Find the car you want in your own backyard.

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!
533 Installation/ Maintenance/ Repair

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Drivers
CDL-A Ironclad Logistics, located in Gouldsboro, PA, is having an Open House on Saturday the 22nd of September, from 8 am to 12 noon. Recruiters and Managers will be available to discuss driving opportunities with our company. Applications and Road Tests will be available. Come in, have a coffee, and take part in our hourly drawings. Looking forward to seeing you, please enter thru Employee Entrance, 91 First Street, Covington Industrial Park, Gouldsboro, PA. EOE

460 AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE DIRECTORY
468 Auto Parts

6speed, collectors, this baby is 1 of only 750 GTS coupes built in 2002 and only 1 of 83 painted Race Yellow it still wears its original tires showing how it was babied. This car is spotless throughout and is ready for its new home. This vehicle is shown by appointment only. $39,999 or trade. 570-760-2365

DODGE ‘02 VIPER GTS 10,000 MILES V10

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130
439 Motorcycles

Only 12,000 miles. Vehicle in like new condition. $19,000. 570-288-4322

6cylinder 5 speed stick. Inspected to 6/13. $7500 call or text 570-204-3817 LAND ROVER ‘97 DISCOVERY inspected runs well $1800. RANGE ROVER ‘95 CLASSIC runs well not inspected $1500. 570-239-4163 or 570-675-9847 leave message

JEEP ‘03 WRANGLER 4.0 110000 mi.

HARLEY ‘10 DAVIDSON SPORTSTER CUSTOM Loud pipes.
Near Mint 174 miles - yes, One hundred and seventy four miles on the clock, original owner. $8000. 570-876-2816

All Junk Cars & Trucks Wanted
Highest Prices Paid In CA$H

570-574-1275

FREE PICKUP

Automotive Technician: The qualified candidate should be experienced in alignments, air-conditioning, and diagnostics. State inspection license and ASE certifications preferred. Valid PA Driver License a must! Health Insurance, Vision & Dental, 401-K Retirement Plan, paid holidays, vacation, closed Sundays, Employee training programs and discounts! Positions are available at our Dallas location. Apply now by phone or web at 1-877-WORK 4 JW or online at www.jackwilliams. com. EOE

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. DRIVERS NOW HIRING It’s a showroom in print! SCHOOL BUS DRIVERS Classified’s got Best pay. Will train if necessary. the directions! Pace Transportation
570-883-9797

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130
600 FINANCIAL
630 Money To Loan
“We can erase your bad credit 100% GUARANTEED.” Attorneys for the Federal Trade Commission say they’ve never seen a legitimate credit repair operation. No one can legally remove accurate and timely information from your credit report. It’s a process that starts with you and involves time and a conscious effort to pay your debts. Learn about managing credit and debt at ftc. gov/credit. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC.

566

548 Medical/Health

Sales/Retail/ Business Development

Part-Time Orthodontist Assistant Immediate opening Monday, Thursday and Friday 8am-4pm EMAIL RESUME TO CASEYDENTAL@ COMCAST.NET

START NOW Experience Required. Good Pay - Great Benefits Contact Lester Knight at (570) 343-1221 ext 115 or email lknight@ tomhesser.com Tom Hesser Chevrolet Scranton

AUTO RECON MANAGER

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012 551 Other 551 Other 551 Other 551 Other 710 Appliances 720

PAGE 39

700 MERCHANDISE
708 Antiques & Collectibles

All Major Brands. Over 25 years experience. Honest Professional Affordable Service. Appliances, Mowers, Snow-blowers, Garage Door Openers, Exercise Equipment and more. Call 570-954-7608

COM TECH REPAIR

Cemetery Plots/Lots

744

Furniture & Accessories

CHAPEL LAWN, DALLAS, PA 3 Cemetery Lots together. Value $1,100 each. Selling for $600 each. 570-696-2076

744

Furniture & Accessories

712

Baby Items

Technical Support/Sales Customer Service/Sales and Inbound Sales
Join us at the Career Fair at the Kingston Armory, Tuesday, September 18 10am - 5 pm

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130
SEWING MACHINE Vintage Singer treadle in cabinet $50. 570-823-0026

I am selling my entire collection of Steelers items including helmets, autographs, photos, prints, lithographs, starting lineups, many one of a kind items. Too many to list. Prices from $5 to $1500. Serious inquiries only! Call 570-9056865 to set up time to review collection.

PITTSBURGH STEELERS MEMORABILIA

Crib, brown with mattress, $25. 570-474-5492 GET RID OF YOUR BABY FAT AND STRETCH MARKS NOW! Tightens, Tones & Firms stomach, arms, thighs,hips, neck and face. No pain, bruising or surgery! Naturally based contouring treatment. Helps minimize the appearance of cellulite and lose skin. The ultimate body applicator and amazing diet products. www. getfit2012.itworks.net or call (570) 855-9722

BEDROOM SET twin, mahogany, double dresser with mirror, chest, nigh table complete. $500.570-822-3581

American Drew dining table and chairs and matching china closet. Approximately 20 years. Old in good condition chairs need reupholstering $550 OBO. (570) 654-9012 COUCH, $100. Chair, $50. Recliner, $50. Rocking Chair, $30. 570-474-5492 SOFA LazyBoy $50. Lazy boy loveseat, $50. both recline. 570-824-0591

Excellent condition. Asking $500. 570-592-3657

BEDROOM Broyhill SET-OAK 6 Piece

944

Commercial Properties

944

Commercial Properties

716

Building Materials

TUB Jacuzzi whirlpool corner tub with heater & faucet $550. 823-0026

3593 MEMORIAL HIGHWAY (RT. 415) 2625 SF BUILDING GREAT OPPORTUNITY FOR OFFICE OR BUSINESS SOME UTILITIES INCLUDED AVAILABLE 11/1/12 CALL JOHN 690-0610
566 Sales/Business Development 566 Sales/Business Development

COMMERCIAL BUILDING FOR LEASE

DALLAS

566 Sales/Business Development

566 Sales/Business Development

566 Sales/Business Development

566 Sales/Business Development

566 Sales/Business Development

566 Sales/Business Development

Keystone Automotive Operations
Keystone serves the diverse interests and needs of auto enthusiasts and their installers across North America. It has 28 locations serving over 23,000 customers. Keystone offers the largest assortment of specialty products in the automotive aftermarket industry including 275,000+ stocking SKUs from over 650 suppliers. The Company operates 4 distribution warehouse centers (1.5M sq ft) and 23 non-inventory stocking cross-docks in the United States and Canada. The truck fleet supports over 32 million delivery miles per year through its logistics distribution network. Delivery service is provided by 350 trucks/trailers that visit customers in 48 states and Canada, as well as exporting to more than 40 countries.

Job Description

Title: Sales Representative

-Drive sales growth and profitability in a defined territory by understanding the requirements of the customers and suppliers. -Sell the KAO portfolio of products and related services and identify target customers. -Effectively manage time and account base to maximize selling efforts during the work day. -Manage product mix in order to increase profitability and increase market share. -Business Development -Attend manufacturer training seminars to gain increased knowledge in various areas -Interact with category management to drive specific vendor programs and expand new and existing markets.

-Sales experience 2-5 years -Exhibits strong qualifying, closing, and developing skills -Documented track record of exceeding sales goals -Experience in establishing customer relationships -Excellent communication skills both oral and written -Proficient in Microsoft Office products -Ability to prioritize tasks and meet deadlines -Strong analytical skills -Enjoys a competitive team oriented work environment

Job Requirements

Education

-BA/BS or equivalent work experience

PAGE 40 941 Apartments/ Unfurnished 542 Logistics/ Transportation 542 Logistics/ Transportation 542 Logistics/ Transportation 950 Half Doubles 950

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012 Half Doubles 953 Houses for Rent 953 Houses for Rent

Growth Creates Opportunity...Start A New Career!
to wall carpet, washer/dryer hookup, gas heat, off street parking. $475/month plus utilities. Application & background check required. Lease security references. No Pets. 570-430-8527

Hiring Experienced Forklift Operators $12.25 hourly, WYOMING 2 bedroom, 1 bath after completion of 90 day probation period. with sun porch wall
***STRAIGHT DAY SHIFT OR NIGHT SHIFT (12 hour shifts ave. 42 hours per week) ***75 cent night shift pay differential offered. ***Pay increase based on skill development. Take charge...LEARN AND EARN!

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130
950 Half Doubles

2 bedroom, newly renovated, custom oak kitchen cabinets, tile floors, paddle fans, 1.5 baths. Off street parking, deck and patio, $800 + utilities; gas, electric and water, washer dryier hookup. References required, no pets or smoking. 570-779-4609 570-407-3991

FORTY FORT

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130
Spacious 3 bedroom, 1 bath with Victorian charm with hardwood floors, neutral decor, stained glass window, large kitchen. Washer /dryer hook-up, off-street parking. $700 month + utilities, security & lease. NO PETS. 570-793-6294

Sprague Ave. Charming, spacious 6 room, 2 bedroom duplex, includes 2nd & 3rd floor. Ample closets. Washer /dryer hook-up. $575/ month + utilities, security & lease. NO PETS. 570-793-6294

KINGSTON

4 bedrooms, 3 baths, full modern house, off street parking. Pet friendly $1,200 month. Call Will @ 570-417-5186

ASHLEY CAREY’S PATCH

6 SPACIOUS ROOMS
Freshly painted, newer carpeting, full basement, yard, gas heat, adequate closets. $635 month + security and utilities. No smoking. Some pets okay. 908-392-2494

EDWARDSVILLE

MUST HAVE 1 YEAR FULL TIME EXPERIENCE Skills Required: • High School Diploma/GED • Computer Skills • Valid Driver’s License • Criminal Background Check • Pass Pre-Employment Drug Screen & Physical *Mehoopany Location * Benefits Available *

EVERY THURSDAY 12-4, EXCEPT FOR SEPTEMBER 20 WHICH IS 1-4

JOB FAIR!

2 bedroom, 1 bath, 1st floor duplex, New w/w carpeting & hardwood floors. Convenient to Wyoming Ave. Washer/dryer hookup, basement storage. Reduced! $520/month + utilities, security, lease. NO PETS. 570-793-6294

KINGSTON Sprague Ave.

PLAINS

3 bedroom single house 1 & 3/4 bath, garage, washer/ dryer, new flooring, porch, $900 + utilities. NO PETS. (570)991-5190

KINGSTON

Interested Applicants can Apply Online at www.XLCServices.com. Interviews scheduled Monday thru Friday. Call 800-472-1013 or walk-ins welcome at Job Fairs.
522 Education/ Training 522 Education/ Training 522 Education/ Training

HALF DOUBLE For Rent. Huge Living Room. 2 Large Bedrooms Call: 570-262-1660 $575.00 a Month First and Last Month Rent

WILKES-BARRE REGENT STREET

Academy Street Well maintained in move-in condition. 6 room house with 3 bedrooms & 1 1/2 baths. Gas forced air heat. No pets. 1 year lease. Credit check.$625 + utilities & security. Call 908-510-3879

WILKES-BARRE

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!
3 1.5 baths, all appliances, fenced in yard, off street parking, near school, Beautiful home. $950 / month 1st, last, security. (570) 714-3693 or (570) 301-2458

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

52 SLYVANUS St. Single family home for rent. 1,450 sq ft. 3 bedrooms with closets. First floor tile bath, 1st floor washer/dryer hookup, new gas water heater, new carpets, modern kitchen, ceiling fan, new gas stove, dead bolt locks, enclosed front porch, basement, residential street, fenced yard, 1 car private driveway, 1 car garage. 1 year lease. 1 month security. Background checks. $790 plus utilities. call Bill 215-527-8133

WILKES-BARRE

KINGSTON bedrooms,

522

Education/ Training

542

Logistics/ Transportation

542

Logistics/ Transportation

542

Logistics/ Transportation

542

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!
Logistics/ Transportation

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

1298 Keystone Blvd. Pottsville, PA 17901 Phone: 570-544-3140 • Fax: 570-544-8084
Fanelli Brothers Trucking has established a new and increased driver pay package and an increased sign on bonus. Due to additional business, Fanelli Bros. Trucking Co. is adding both regional and local drivers to our Pottsville, PA terminal operation. Drivers are home most nights throughout the week. Drivers must have 2-3 years of OTR experience, acceptable MVR and pass a criminal background check.

• .39 cpm for qualified drivers • $1,500 sign on bonus • Paid vacations and holidays • Health/Dental/Vision Insurance • 401K Plan

Contact Gary Potter at 570-544-3140, Ext. 156 or visit us at 1298 Keystone Blvd. • Pottsville, PA

778384

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012 744 Furniture & Accessories 784 Tools 815 Dogs 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale
PRESSURE WASHER, Troybilt & manual, 2500 psi, Honda motor plus 100ft never kink cord, never used with hose rack, $295. 570-636-3151

PAGE 41

CHAIRS, (2) Genuine leather, custom made recliners. Taupe color, like new. $550 each. SOFA, CHAIR, OTTOMAN, 3 TABLES, great for den. Wood and cloth, all in excellent condition. $450. Call after 12 noon 570-675-5046

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

baseball, football, basketball, hockey & non-sports. Sets, singles & wax. Also buying comics. 570-212-0398

BUYING SPORT for CARDS Pay Cash

Female, to a good home. Purebred, blue, longhair, 2 years old, spayed. Good with kids. Loveable, needs someone with time & patience. High energy, requires physical activity. References required. $200. 570-654-4690 PET SITTING: Do you need someone reliable to walk your dog(s)? Are you going away for the day or is your day filled with meetings and appointments? If you need someone to let your dog(s) out, take them for a walk and /or feed them while you are gone, call Barbara at 570-335-8361 References are available. Limited to Scranton and the Abingtons.

WIEMARANER

HANOVER TWP. TUNKHANNOCK AREA 3 bedroom home,

915 Manufactured Homes

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

* NELSON * * FURNITURE * * WAREHOUSE * Recliners from $299 Lift Chairs from $699 New and Used Living Room Dinettes, Bedroom 210 Division St Kingston Call 570-288-3607

FURNISH FOR LESS

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 12 TO 2 New Construction. Lot #2, Fairway Estates. 2,700 square feet, tile & hardwood on 1st floor. Cherry cabinets with center island. $399,500. For more details: patrickdeats.com 570-696-1041

2 baths, concrete porch 3/4 around the house, garage. On six acres. Stonework, stone fireplace, heat with wood or oil. Commercial cook stove. Beautiful view. Well above flood or high water. Some farm equipment, track loader. With gas & oil rights. $350,000 570-665-9054

HOMES AVAILABLE Homes available
in Birchwood Vil lage Estates. 2 Estates and 3 bedrooms. Rent-to-own available. CALL TODAY! 570-613-0719

AVAILABLE NOW!
3-4 bedrooms, 2 full baths, dining room, large living room, kitchen, stove, off street parking. Heat and water included. $875/month, security, credit check & references. 917-753-8192

JENKINS TWP.

LUZERNE

ATTRACTIONS
UNITS in process, 2 bedrooms, quality brick building, maple kitchens, all appliances with laundry, tiled baths, covered carports, gas fireplaces, large enclosed porches, hardwood and wall to wall. 2 YEAR LEASES $750 + UTILITIES Managed AMERICA REALTY, NO PETS/SMOKING/ EMPLOYMENT APPLICATION. 570-288-1422

COMING

800 PETS & ANIMALS
815 Dogs

To place your ad call...829-7130

750

Jewelry

for sale, asking $975. 14K yellow gold, 0.54 ct round center stone. Band has 24 small round channel-set diamonds, in two rows of 12 diamonds each. Appraised for $3,000. Serious inquiries only, please call 570814-7614 or email aykbutterfly@ gmail.com

ENGAGEMENT RING

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

HUNTING/FISHING RETREAT

HUNLOCK CREEK

PAWS
TO CONSIDER....
ENHANCE YOUR PET CLASSIFIED AD ONLINE Call 829-7130
Place your pet ad and provide us your email address This will create a seller account online and login information will be emailed to you from gadzoo.com “The World of Pets Unleashed” You can then use your account to enhance your online ad. Post up to 6 captioned photos of your pet Expand your text to include more information, include your contact information such as e-mail, address phone number and or website. AUSTRALIAN Shepherd Puppies. AKC. Merles & Tri’s available. $850. 570-280-5082 Cute & Playful. Call (570) 943-2184 for more information.

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!
Spectacular, remodeled, two story house situated on 110 wooded acres. It’s an outdoor’s persons dream come true. Featuring a 20+ acre fishing lake & four small ponds, woods & fields with deer, turkey, bear & grouse. Home boasts breathtaking views of the lake & woods. Perfect for Hunt Club or very special home. Most furnishings included. Serious, pre-qualified inquiries only. Asking $575,000. Call Jim Stachelek or email jims@prudential keystone.com Prudential Keystone Properties 215-896-8860

WILKES-BARRE

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

237 Courtdale Ave. Recently refurbished. 1 & 1/2 bedrooms, includes heat & hot water. $565. month + security deposit 570-401-9124

COURTDALE

E. W alnut St. A vailable Oct. 1 2nd floor. Located in quiet neighborhood. Kitchen, living room, dining room. Sunroom. Bath. 3 bedrooms; 2 large & 1 small. Lots of closets. Built in linen closet & hutch. Hardwood and carpeted floors. Fireplace. Storage room. Yard. Washer / dryer, stove / fridge. Heat and hot water included. One year lease+ security. $950 570-283-4370

KINGSTON

WILKES-BARRE

758 Miscellaneous
AIR PURIFIER, Oreck XL Professional, $149. 570-636-3151 BEDROOM SUITE walnut, Bassett 5 piece $250. 6 piece wood cloth den furniture $325. Two 6’ Christmas trees $35. each. Health Ride $25. 2 drawer file cabinet $20. 4 drawer file cabinet $35. Chrome & leather chairs $60. 2 Schwinn bicycles $35. each. Bench & barbells $30. Wood& fabric stools $25, each. 570-675-5046 DISHES, Noritake, 8 piece set, blue & white, $35. Fireplace Screen, $25. Wood Basket, fireplace, $25. Fireplace Accessories: shovel, poker, etc, $25. 570-474-5492

900 REAL ESTATE FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble paying your mortgage? Falling behind on your payments? You may get mail from people who promise to forestall your foreclosure for a fee in advance. Report them to the Federal Trade Commission, the nation’s consumer protection agency. Call 1-877FTC-HELP or click on ftc.gov. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC.

REDUCED Parsons Section 166 Matson Ave. $25,000. 5 bedroom, 1 bath. Garage. Corner lot. Nice location. Out of flood zone. Call 570-814-7453

909

Income & Commercial Properties

Repossessed Income Property & Duplex Home. Out of flood area On same lot. 7 apartments, 5 in excellent condition. Hardwood floors. $119,000 570-822-9697

HANOVER

PITTSTON TWP.

912 Lots & Acreage

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130
Deloomis Park Section. Half Double. 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, washer/dryer hookup, off street parking, no smoking/pets. Security & lease. $550. 732-501-0455

Newly renovated, great neighborhood. 2nd floor. Non smoking. Oak composite floors, new wall-to-wall carpeting in bedrooms., new windows. 4 paddle fans, bath with shower. New Stove, new fridge & new dishwasher. Off street parking, coin-op laundry. $600 + gas, electric & water. References required, no pets. 570-779-4609 or 570-407-3991

FORTY FORT

KINGSTON MUST SEE!! Elegant 3rd floor of historic home in charming neighborhood. 2 bedrooms & full bath. Kitchen with all stainless steel appliances, washer/dryer. Newly renovated, hardwood floors, private deck, 2 car garage, air, security system, wifi, intercom & keyless entry. Pets negotiable/no smoking. Utilities included. $1,300 + security & references. Call 570-288-6686.

Mayflower Crossing Apartments 570.822.3968 2, 3 & 4 Bedrooms
- Light & bright open floor plans - All major appliances included - Pets welcome* - Close to everything - 24 hour emergency maintenance - Short term leases available

Call TODAY For AVAILABILITY!! www.mayflower crossing.com
Certain Restrictions Apply*

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

To place your ad call...829-7130

BICHON FRISE PUPS

Highland Hills Development .88 Acres. $70,000 570-947-3375 23 Ridge Street 4 Bedroom Colonial Home in Pocono Ridge Estates. Large 2 Car Garage, Paved Driveway, Electric Heat & Central Air, 1.5 Baths, Large Eat in Kitchen & Dining Room. Double Deck with Hot Tub. Low Taxes. $219,000 Call 570-212-1404

JENKINS TOWNSHIP Prestigious

HANOVER TWP.

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

To place your ad call...829-7130
Pure bred & mixed. male only. $500 570-436-3792

Various household items for sale in Pittston area including a 6 year old oil furnace & water heater. Please call for info. 570-654-6146

SHIH-TZU PUPPIES

36 Hemlock Street Brick Front Ranch on quiet dead end street 3 bedrooms, 1 1/2 baths, new carpet, large kitchen, finished basement with plenty of storage on 125x125 lot. $144,000. call 675-0537

DALLAS FOR SALE BY OWNER

915 Manufactured Homes

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

SALE PENDING

2 bedroom. Clean. Needs no work. Remodeled throughout. $16,000. Owner Financing. 570-851-6128 or 610-767-9456

PITTSTON TWP

remodeled, no pets. $500 plus utilities, security and references Call 570-287-5491

KINGSTON 1/2 DOUBLE 2 bedroom, clean,

refrigerator & stove, washer/ dryer hookup, laundry room, off-street parking, no pets or smoking. $700/ month + electric, gas & hot water, 1 month security, references & background check. 570-592-2902

TRUCKSVILLE 3 bedrooms,

371 Scott Street 1st floor. Newly remodeled 2 bedroom, new bath & kitchen, wall to wall carpet, offstreet parking. $625/month + 1 st & security. 570-793-5501

WILKES-BARRE

PAGE 42 554 Production/ Operations 554 Production/ Operations 554 Production/ Operations 554 Production/ Operations 554 Production/ Operations 554

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012 Production/ Operations 554 Production/ Operations 554 Production/ Operations

A Proud American Manufacturer
Golden Technologies, Inc. has been manufacturing durable medical equipment in our area over 27 years. We are proud to be the largest facility in the world dedicated solely to the manufacturer of lift chairs. We provide many local jobs which help strengthen our region’s economy. We have a location in Kingston and in Old Forge PA. We are seeking candidates for Production positions in; Quality, Warehouse, and Assembly. We also employ more skilled positions as Sewers, Upholsterers, Customer Service Representatives, Technical Service Representatives, Sales and other Office Positions. We offer Competitive Wages, Medical, 40lk, Paid Time off, and Holidays. Please stop by our booth at the job fair and see what opportunities are available, Send your resume or apply in person at our Old Forge Facility between 9am-4:30pm M-F: jobs@goldentech.com Golden Technologies, Inc. 401 Bridge Street Old Forge, PA 18518
542 Logistics/ Transportation 542 Logistics/ 542 Opportunity/Affirmative Action/Drug Free Workplace Employer Logistics/ Logistics/ Logistics/ Logistics/ Logistics/ An Equal Transportation 542 Transportation 542 Transportation 542 Transportation 542 Transportation Transportation 542 Logistics/ Transportation

Great Careers Begin with the Right Training.
CDL Truck Driving - Heavy Equipment Operations - Logistics/Forklift Safety Training
One-to-One Driver Instruction Day and Evening Classes Financial Aid for Those Who Qualify

Training Done Right.
Lehigh Career & Technical Institute 877.440.7544 - lcti.org Train in Schnecksville, or receive CDL training at these additional locations: Berks Career & Technology Center and CAT-Pickering Campus in Phoenixville

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012 548 Medical/Health 548 Medical/Health 548 Medical/Health 548 Medical/Health 548 Medical/Health 548 Medical/Health 548 Medical/Health

PAGE 43 548 Medical/Health

PAGE 44 548 Medical/Health 548 Medical/Health 548 Medical/Health 548 Medical/Health 548 Medical/Health

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012 548 Medical/Health 548 Medical/Health

1000 SERVICE DIRECTORY
1015 Appliance Service

25 Years Experience fixing major appliances: Washer, Dryer, Refrigerator, Dishwasher, Compactors. Most brands. Free phone advice & all work guaranteed. No service charge for visit. 570-706-6577

ECO-FRIENDLY APPLIANCE TECH.

Coding Supervisor In-Patient Specialist

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

Nurse Manager RN’s: Emergency Department, Home Health, Hospice, ICU, Med Surge, OR, Wound Care LPN’s: Home Health, Wound Care CNA’s

Admitting Clerks Environmental Services Associates Hospital Biller Medical Technologists Physical Therapist Physical Therapist Assistant Pharmacy Tech Staff Occupational Therapist

Find that new job.
The Times Leader Classified section.

The Regional Hospital of Scranton has been recognized throughout the US and PA as one of the Best Hospitals in the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Area, 2011/2012 from U.S. News and World Report. Also recognized by America’s Top 50 Hospitals 2007-2012 by HealthGrades™, a leading provider of information that helps consumers make informed decisions about physicians or hospitals. We offer excellent working conditions, competitive compensation and a comprehensive benefit package including a generous paid time-off plan, and tuition reimbursement.

Interested candidates, stop by our booth at the Career Fair and/or please visit the appropriate URL below to apply:

Regional Hospital of Scranton
www.regionalhospitalofscranton.net

www.specialcarehospital.net
ONLY ONE LEADER. LEADER. ONLY N LE NL E
timesleader.com

Special Care Hospital

Call 829-7130 to place an employment ad.

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012 548 Medical/Health 548 Medical/Health 548 Medical/Health 548 Medical/Health 548 Medical/Health 548 Medical/Health 548 Medical/Health

PAGE 45

548 Medical/Health

Join Our Team at Allied Services!
Direct Care Workers Certified Nursing Assistants Licensed Practical Nurses Registered Nurses PTs, OTs & SLPs Much More...
• • • • • RNs & LPNs Certified Nurse Aides Physical Therapists/PT Assistants Occupational Therapists/COTAs Speech Therapists

Variety of positions available in the Wilkes-Barre and Scranton Area:
• • • •

Behavioral Health Workers Direct Care Workers Resident Assistants Food Service Workers

Competitive Salary commensurate with experience. Full Benefits package including medical, dental and vision coverage, tuition reimbursement, 401k. If interested, please apply online at: www.allied-services.org Allied Services Human Resource Department 100 Abington Executive Park, Clarks Summit, PA 18411 Fax (570) 348-1294 For more information, please contact Human Resources at (570) 348-1348 or 1-800-368-3910

www.caregiversamerica.com

570-587-4444 ext. 117

Miracles in rehab performed daily.™
Bi-lingual applicants are encouraged to apply. Allied Services is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Where do you want your talent to take you?
Chances are you can get there from here.

NURSES • CNAs DIETARY
Golden Living Center Summit 50 N. Pennsylvania Ave.
EOE

Apply at the Career Fair on Sept. 18 • 570-825-3488

PAGE 46

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012

Do you...

wonder how ecommerce can work for you?

The solution has never been easier!

Contact us at 570-970-7307 • localmantra.com • contact@localmantra.com

GET IT TO GO.
Search the app store and install The Times Leader mobile app now for when you need your news to go.

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012

PAGE 47

DISTRIBUTION CENTER

Are You Looking for a Career with a Growing and Stable Company? Do You Want the Opportunity to be Part of a Winning Team? Are You Driven to Work in a Fast Paced Environment?
If this sounds like you, we may be your ideal company. As one of the most successful retail companies worldwide, we are eager to share our success with you. Whatever your individual talents or interests, it’s more than likely that we have exactly what you are looking for. With an extensive range of career options, The TJX Companies, Inc. stand out as one of the most successful retail companies worldwide and we are eager to share this success with you. Located in Pittston, just minutes from the PA Turnpike and I-81, we are a company committed to variety and diversity. Currently, positions are available in the following areas:

DISTRIBUTION SUPERVISORS DC SUPERVISORS GENERAL WAREHOUSE GENERAL WAREHOUSE
T.J. Maxx offers advancement opportunities, medical, dental and life insurance, 401(k), paid vacation and paid sick time, in-store discounts, and a clean, safe working environment. Interested applicants may obtain position information and apply on-line at: www.careers-tjx.com General Warehouse applicants may apply in person at: 4000 Oldfield Blvd. Pittston, Pa 18640 For directions, please call 570-603-5890
Applicants will be subject to a pre-employment drug screen and background check. T.J. Maxx is an equal opportunity employer committed to workplace diversity. All programs/bonuses are subject to change at any time due to business necessity.

PAGE 48

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2012

K E N P OL L OCK N IS S A N
2012 N IS S A N S E N TRA 2.0S S E DA N
STK# N 22430 M O D EL# 12112 V IN # 756446 M SR P $19, 420
4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, PW , PD L , Cr is e, T ilt F lo o r u , M a t & S p la s h Gu a r s ! s d

TH E NU M BER 1 D EAL ER I N N. E. AND C ENTRAL PENNS YL V ANI A* *

2 A T T H IS IS P R IC E ! IC

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$

W / $ 2 0 0 0 N IS S A N R EB ATE & $ 5 0 0 N M A C C A P TIV E C A S H

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*

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*
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18 9

L EA S E FO R

* $189 p erm o n t p lu s t x, 39 m o n t lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r Res id u a l= $10,292.60; h a h ; m u s tb e a p p r ved t u N M AC @ T ier1; $2000 ca s h d o w n o rt a d e eq u it . (+ ) p lu s o hr r y r egis t a t n f r io ees ; t t l d u e @ d eliver $2202.50. o a y=

2013 N IS S A N A L TIM A 2.5 S E DA N
STK# N 22468 M O D EL# 13013 V IN # 125432 M SR P $22, 410
4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, PW , PD L , T ilt , Zer Gr vit o a y S ea t , F lo o rM a t s s & M u ch M o r e!

SA VE $$$
O N TH E NEW A LTIM A !!!

WE’RE SCHOOLING THE COMPETITION

2012 N IS S A N ROGUE S FW D

O NLY 50 2012 R O G U ES R EM A IN H U R R Y !
STK# N 21596 M O D EL# 22112 V IN # 274973 M SR P $23, 050
4 Cyl, CVT , A/C, PW , PDL , Cr is e, T ilt S p la s h Gu a r s , u , d F lo o rM a t & M u ch M o r s e!

SA VE OR M ORE O N A L L 2012 R O G U ES!!

$4000

7 A T T H IS IS P R IC E ! IC

$

W / $ 15 0 0 N IS S A N R EB ATE & $ 5 0 0 N M A C C A P TIV E C A S H
* $199 p erm o n t p lu s t x, 39 m o n t lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r Res id u a l= $12,908; h a h ; m u s tb e a p p r ved t u N M AC @ T ier1; $2000 ca s h d o w n o rt a d e eq u it . (+ ) p lu s o hr r y r egis t a t n f r io ees ; t t l d u e @ d eliver $2202.50. $1000 N is s a n L ea s e Reb a t in clu d ed . o a y= e

18 ,995

B U Y FO R

*

OR

+ T/T

$

19 9

L EA S E FO R

*

P ER M O.

2012 N IS S A N P A TH FIN DE R S

4X4
STK# N 22166 M O D EL# 25012 V IN # 625154 M SR P $32, 315
V6, Au t , A/ C, PW , o PD L , Cr is e, T ilt u , AM / F M / CD , Allo ys , F lo o rM a t s & M u ch M o r e!

2 A T TH IS T H IS P R IC E ! IC E!

$

* $259 p erm o n t p lu s t x, 39 m o n t lea s e; 12,000 m iles h a h p eryea r Res id u a l= $11,837.80; m u s tb e a p p r ved t u ; o hr N M AC @ T ier1; $2000 ca s h d o w n o rt a d e eq u it . (+ ) p lu s r y r egis t a t n f r io ees ; t t l d u e @ d eliver o a y= $2202.50.

20 ,410

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259

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SA VE O R M O R E O N A LL 2012 P A TH FINDER S IN STO C K!! L EA S B U Y FO R OR

$6500

6 A T TH IS T H IS P R IC E! IC E !

$

W / $ 2 5 0 0 N IS S A N R EB ATE, $ 5 0 0 N M AC C A P TIV E C A S H & $ 10 0 0 S EP T B O N U S C A S H
* $259 p erm o n t p lu s t x, 39 m o n t lea s e; 12,000 m iles h a h p eryea r Res id u a l= $15,834.35; m u s tb e a p p r ved t u ; o hr N M AC @ T ier1; $2500 ca s h d o w n o rt a d e eq u it . (+ ) p lu s r y r egis t a t n f r io ees ; t t l d u e @ d eliver o a y= $2702.50. $1750 N is s a n L ea s e Reb a t & $1000 S ep tBo n u s Ca s h in clu d ed . e

2 5 ,8 15

*

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$

259

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2012 N IS S A N M U RA N O S A W D
S TK # N 22119 M O D EL# 23212 V IN # 227913 M S R P $32, 580

2012 N IS S A N M A XIM A 3.5S L IM ITE D E DITION HURRY!

V-6, CVT , A/ C, PW , PDL , Cr is e, T ilt u , Allo ys , AM / F M / CD & F lo o rM a t ! s

STK# N 22368 M O D EL# 16112 V IN # 861635 M SR P $34, 435

TH IS 5 A T T H IS IC E ! P R IC E!

$

W / $2 0 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE, $5 0 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H & $5 0 0 S EP T B O N U S CAS H
* $279 p erm o n t p lu s t x, 39 m o n t lea s e; 12,000 h a h Res id u a l= $17,593.20; m u s tb e a p p r ved t u N M AC @ o hr d o w n o rt a d e eq u it . (+ ) p lu s r r y egis t a t n f r io ees ; t t l o a $2202.50. $1500 N is s a n L ea s e Reb a t & $500 S ep tBo e m iles p eryea r ; T ier1; $2000 ca s h d u e @ d eliver y= n u s Ca s h In clu d ed .

2 6 ,5 8 0

B U Y FO R

SA VE O R M O R E O N A LL 2012 M U R A NO S IN STO C K!!
*

$6000
OR + T/T

$

2 79

L EA S E FO R

SA VE

*

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$

2 7,4 3 5
W / $350 0 N IS S A N

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SR P !

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* $289 p erm o n t p lu s t x, 39 m o n t lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r Res id u a l= $19,627.95; h a h ; m u s tb e a p p r ved t u N M AC @ T ier1; $2000 ca s h d o w n o rt a d e eq u it . (+ ) p lu s o hr r y r egis t a t n f r io ees ; t t l d u e @ d eliver o a y= $2,202.50. $1000 N is s a n L ea s e Reb a t in clu d ed . e

2012 N IS S A N 2.5S CO U P E
S TK # N 22155 M O D EL# 15112 V IN # 260196 M S R P $31, 530

LOW FINANCING!
2 A T T H IS IS P R IC E ! IC

TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR TRADE!

A L TIM A

4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, L ea t her Pr , em iu m Pa cka ge, F o g L ight , s M o o n r o f Bo s e S o u n d , Cn v Pkg, & M u ch M o r o , . e!

SA VE

$

26,530
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N E W N IS S A N S A V A IL A BL E

300
HUGE SAVINGS ON ALL NEW 2012 NISSAN’S
le rin N .E.

OV E R

2012 N IS S A N S 4X4
S TK # N 21979 M O D EL# 24212 V IN # 513857 M S R P $30, 525

XTE RRA

V6, Au t , A/ C, Va lu e Pkg, AM / F M / CD , PW , o PD L , Cr is e, T ilt Allo y , & M u ch M o r u , s e!

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6 A T T H IS IS SA VE O R M O R E O N A LL P R IC E ! IC 2012 XTER R A ’S IN STO C K!! L EA S E FO R B U Y FO R

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26,525

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