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The Times Leader

WILKES-BARRE, PA SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 $1.50


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INSIDE
A NEWS
Local News 3A
Nation/World 5A
Obituaries 7A, 10A
B PEOPLE
Community News3-7B
Birthdays 8B
C SPORTS
Outdoors 12C
Weather 14C
D BUSINESS
Stocks 3D
E VIEWS
Editorials 3E
F ETC
Puzzles 2-3F
Movies 4F
Books 5F
Travel 6F
G CLASSIFIED
Lions roar
PSU rallies past
Northwestern.
Story, 1C
The majority of municipal pen-
sion plans in Luzerne County are
in better shape than two years
ago, but many communities still
face challenges in ensuring they
can meet financial obligations
owed to current and future reti-
rees, according to a recently re-
leased state report.
The report by the Public Em-
ployee Retirement Commission
shows 22 of the 55 municipalities
andother government entities re-
viewed had pension plans that
are in a distressed financial state.
Thats down from 28 communi-
ties that had distressed plans in
2010.
While thats good news, the da-
ta shows many communities suf-
fered setbacks that caused the
overall financial health of their
plans to decline. Of the 55 plans,
26 saw a decline in the plans
overall value.
PERC evaluates defined-bene-
fit pension plans based on their
funding ratio, which measures
the percentage of liabilities cov-
ered by a plans assets. The more
the liabilities exceed assets, the
lower a plans funding ratio.
The funding ratio plays a key
role in determining how much
taxpayer mon-
ey known as
the minimal
municipal obli-
gation -- a mu-
nicipality must
put into the
fund to ensure
it remains sta-
ble. The worse
a plans condition, the more mon-
ey that must be paid in.
Plans with funding ratios of 90
or higher are considered not dis-
tressed; ratios between 70 and 89
are minimally distressed; ratios
of 50 to 69 are moderately dis-
tressed while a ratio below 50 is
severely distressed.
In Luzerne County, nine com-
munities on the distressed list in
2010 bettered their bottom lines
to the point they are no longer
Hazleton
Ross Twp.
Hughestown
West Pittston
Nanticoke
Rice Twp.
Edwardsville
Butler Twp.
Bear Creek Twp.
West Wyoming
Union Twp.
Sugarloaf Twp.
Newport Twp.
Hazle Twp.
Hunlock Twp.
Got worse Improved
Severe distress Moderate distress Minimal distress Not distressed
Source: Public Employee Retirement Commission Mark Guydish/The Times Leader
PENSION FUNDS THAT CHANGED STATUS SINCE 2010
Public pensions
face obstacles
Some Luzerne County
municipalities improve, others
decline in funding for plans.
By TERRIE MORGAN-BESECKER
tmorgan@timesleader.com
See PENSIONS, Page 14A
INSIDE: Battered pensions threaten
government budgets, Page 2A
The worse a
plans condi-
tion, the more
money that
must be paid
in.
The financial condition of mu-
nicipal pension plans statewide
showed overall improvement
from2010 to 2012, but economic
experts caution the upswing is
not a sign troubles plaguing the
pension systems are over.
A report by the Public Em-
ployees Retirement Commis-
sionrevealedthe number of pen-
sion plans statewide in a dis-
tressed financial state de-
creased from 662 in 2010 to 638
in 2012. The overall combined
deficit of the plans also de-
creased from roughly $2 billion,
to $1.9 billion.
Those are positive signs, but
economists remain concerned
that numerous issues with the
funding structure of pension
plans mean they will not be able
to keep up with
rising de-
mands as more
people retire.
Its a ray of
sunshine in the
coming storm
clouds, but it is
not over yet by
any means, said Gerald Cross,
executive director of the Penn-
sylvania Economy League.
There are still fundamental
weaknesses. The long-term out-
look has not changed.
Cross said the improvement
between 2010 and 2012 was
largely based on asset apprecia-
tion. Statewide the plans sawas-
sets increase from$7.5 billion to
Experts: Pension plans
not yet out of danger
Rosy return assumptions and
too many plans among issues
seen as troubling.
By TERRIE MORGAN-BESECKER
tmorgan@timesleader.com
See DANGER, Page 14A
Wagner Dreyfuss
Cross
TUNKHANNOCKIt was the
summer of 1971 when Charlie
Kraynack entered Gays True
Value Hardware Store to buy a
swimming pool kit to replace
chemicals in an old kit that had
driedup. Thats whenhe met Ge-
orge Gay.
Mr. Gay said, Oh, dont
spend all that money for a whole
new kit. I can
order you the
refills, Kray-
nack said.
Gay took a
small scrap of
paper from his
shirt pocket
and scribbled a
note. Kraynack
and his daugh-
ter followed
himtothe back
of the store,
where Gay
opened a foot-
locker-sized
chest contain-
ing a big pile of
similar notes.
He tossed
in our note,
turned to us
and said, We
will call you
when it comes
in. Sure enough, in about a
weeks time, we got a call from
Gays. The chemicals were in
and the message left said they
would be on the steps of the
store for Kraynack to pick up.
Now thats service, Kray-
nack said.
That was 41 years ago Ge-
orge Papa Gay died in 2004.
The store, now in its 100th
year of operation, is run by Pa-
pas two sons Doug, 69, and
Dave, 65.
Despite the legacy, the future
of Gays is uncertain.
CVS Pharmacy Co. wants to
buy the property andbuilda new
store.
If the negotiations are resolv-
ed and CVS takes ownership of
the property, Dave will retire and
travel, Doug said.
But DougGay whohas a son,
Rick, at the business and anoth-
er, Dan, who will return to work
there soon -- wants to reopen at a
new location out of the flood
plain.
And the 20-plus employees of
Gays and just about everybody
in the greater Tunkhannock area
feel the hardware store where
everybodyknows your nameand
sells everything anybody would
ever need must stay
A T U N K H A N N O C K L A N D M A R K
Value of tradition
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Doug Gay, co-owner of Gays True Value Hardware in Tunkhannock, may relocate the store that first opened in 1913. The business
was heavily flooded in 2011. Many say Gays has items that just cannot be found anywhere else.
Gays contemplating a new location
By BILL OBOYLE
boboyle@timesleader.com
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Gays True Value Hardware employee Carol Grimes, right, waits on customer Dewitt Abrams on
Thursday. The store on Bridge Street has legions of loyal customers.
Doug Gay
wants to re-
open at a new
location out
of the flood
plain. And the
20-plus em-
ployees of
Gays and just
about every-
body in the
greater Tunk-
hannock area
feel the hard-
ware store
must stay
open some-
where.
See GAYS, Page 9A
TUNKHANNOCK Gays
opened in1913 and the store has
beenat its current location the
former Old Woolen Mill -- for 69
years.
The hardware store was
founded by M.C. Gay Marble
Charles Gay -- a musician who
played at the 1892 Worlds Fair
in Chicago.
He played the trombone,
said his grandson, Doug Gay.
And a damn good trombone
player at that.
The story goes that all of
M.C.s clothes and money were
stolen while he was at the
Worlds Fair.
Doug said his grandfather
had to hop a freight train to get
back home to Tunkhannock. He
became a traveling
Family patriarch set
a pattern of service
Marble Charles Gay went
from trombone player to
salesman to founder.
By BILL OBOYLE
boboyle@timesleader.com
See FOUNDER, Page 9A

PAGE 2A SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com


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Stuttle, Richard
Swoboda, Elaine
Vopicelli, Anthony
Waskiewicz, Stanley
Zegarski, Joseph
OBITUARIES
Page 7A, 10A
AN INCORRECT PHOTO of
Wilkes-Barre Police Sgt. Mat-
thew Stash was published
with a story on Page 1A of
Saturdays newspaper.
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Issue No. 2012-281
Daily Number, Midday
Sunday: 7-6-1
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Tuesday: 0-5-0
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Big Four, Midday
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Quinto, Midday
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Thursday: 2-7-2-0-0
Friday: 6-9-7-9-6 (4-2-1-7-2,
double draw)
Saturday: 5-3-3-3-5
Treasure Hunt
Sunday: 03-08-11-21-24
Monday: 02-03-05-11-20
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Daily Number, 7 p.m.
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Big Four, 7 p.m.
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Tuesday: 3-3-5-8 (9-7-9-0,
double draw)
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Match 6 Lotto
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Tuesday: 10-11-20-42-55
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Powerball
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powerball: 35
LOTTERY SUMMARY
PROVIDENCE, R.I. Retired
social worker Jim Gillis was told
his $36,000 Rhode Island state
pension would increase by $1,100
next year to keep up with infla-
tion. But lawmakers suspended
annual increases, leaving Gillis
wondering howhell pay medical
bills and whether hed been be-
trayed by his former employer.
When youre working, youre
told youll get cer-
tain things, and you
retire believing that
to be the case, Gil-
lis said. He and oth-
er retirees are chal-
lenging the pension
changes in a court
battle thats likely
to have national im-
plications as other
states follow Rhode
Islands lead.
Cities and states
around the country
are shoring up bat-
tered retirement
plans by reducing
promised benefits
to public workers
and retirees. All
told, states need
$1.4 trillion to fulfill
their pension obligations. Its a
yawning chasm that threatens to
wreck government budgets and
prompt tax hikes or deep cuts to
education and other programs.
The political and legal fights
challenge the clout of public-sec-
tor unions and test the venerable
idea that while state jobs pay less
than private-sector employment,
they come with the guarantee of
early retirement and generous
benefits.
The actions taken by states
vary. California limitedits annual
pension payouts, while Kentucky
raised retirement ages and sus-
pended pension increases. Illi-
nois reduced benefits for new
employees and cut back on auto-
matic pension increases. New
Jersey last year increased em-
ployee retirement contributions
and suspended pension increas-
es.
Nowhere have the changes
been as sweeping as in Rhode Is-
land, where public sector unions
are suing to block an overhaul
passed last year. The law raised
retirement ages, suspended pen-
sion increases for years and cre-
ated a newbenefit plan that com-
bines traditional pensions with
something like a 401(k) account.
This saved $4 billion for the
people of Rhode Island over 20
years, said state Treasurer Gina
Raimondo, a Democrat who
crafted the overhaul. Rhode Is-
land is leading the way. I expect
others to follow, frankly because
they have to.
Public employee unions say
Rhode Island is reneging on
promises to workers.
What they did was illegal,
said Bob Walsh, executive direc-
tor of the National Education As-
sociation Rhode Island. Were
deep into a real assault on labor.
It worries me that people who
purport themselves as Demo-
crats do this.
The court case foreshadows
likely battles else-
where as states
grapple with their
own pension prob-
lems. In the past
two years, 10 states
suspended or cut
retiree pension in-
creases; 13 states
now offer hybrid re-
tirement plants that
combine pensions
with 401(k)-like
plans.
Forty-three
states from 2009 to
2011did something,
but in many cases
something was not
enough, said Da-
vid Draine, a re-
searcher who tracks
pension changes at
the Pew Center on the States.
States are discovering the po-
litical challenge of reining in pen-
sions is only one step in a battle
ultimately won or lost in the
courts.
A plan to enroll new Louisiana
state workers in a 401(k)-like re-
tirement planis being challenged
by retirees. New Hampshire is
defending a law that cuts pen-
sion benefits and increases em-
ployee contributions.
California Gov. Jerry Brown
last month approved higher re-
tirement ages and contribution
rates for some state workers and
a $132,000 cap on annual pension
payouts. The states two main
pension funds the California
Public Employees Retirement
System and the California State
Teachers Retirement System
are underfunded by $165 billion.
Brown said the changes may
lead to bigger pension reforms in
the future. Unions are ready for a
fight.
Any additional pension re-
form they try to do will be met
with serious opposition, said
Dave Low, of Californians for Re-
tirement Security, which repre-
sents 1.5 million public workers.
Public employees have become
the whipping boy.
States are reducing
pension benefits
All told, states need $1.4
trillion to fulfill their pension
obligations.
By DAVID KLEPPER
Associated Press
Nowhere have the
changes been as
sweeping as in Rhode
Island, where public
sector unions are
suing to block an over-
haul passed last year.
The law raised retire-
ment ages, suspended
pension increases for
years and created a
new benefit plan that
combines traditional
pensions with some-
thing like a 401(k)
account.
WILKES-BARREThemusic
and flavor of the Emerald Isle
permeated the F.M. Kirby Cen-
ter for the Performing Arts on
Saturday as the Irish singing
group Celtic Thunder brought a
greatest hits tour to town.
The five-mangroupis another
of those PBS phenomena, much
like countryman Daniel ODon-
nell and the similar Celtic Wom-
an. Since making its debut in
Dublin in August 2007, Celtic
Thunder has sold millions of
CDs and DVDs, starred in six
PBS specials and was named the
Billboard Top World Artist
twice.
Saturdays show was a bit dif-
ferent thanthe last fewtimes the
group has been in the area. For
starters, two of its members
have changed (original singers
Paul Byromleft tostart a soloca-
reer andDamianMcGinty left to
become a star of TVs Glee),
and they are now under the di-
rection of David Munro instead
of longtime musical director
Phil Coulter.
But the more things change,
the more they stay the same.
For the first half of the show,
Celtic Thunder alternated nice-
ly between group numbers and
solo spotlights, andbetweentra-
ditional favorites and original
material. In the second half,
they also mixed in some more
contemporary tunes such as
Garth Brooks Friends in Low
Places, Billy Joels Shes Al-
ways a Woman andMichael Bu-
bles Home.
And the group members
now consisting of originals Ge-
orge Donaldson, Ryan Kelly and
Keith Harkin plus newer
recruits Emmet Cahill andColm
Keegan(andjoinedandtimes by
Neil Byrne) also played instru-
ments on stage for the first time.
Harkin, the groups resident
heartthrob with his long, blond
hair, was the first to speak to the
Kirby Center crowd, telling
them the group did a poll to see
what fans wanted to hear on this
tour and they quickly found out
the fans wanted to hear all seven
Celtic Thunder albums in their
entirety. He sang old favorite
The Island after that, andlater
in the showstrummed an acous-
tic guitar on Nilssons Everybo-
dys Talking and Dont Forget
About Me, the first single from
his recently-releasedfirst soloal-
bum.
Kelly later assured the audi-
ence that the greatest hits tour
did not signal the end of Celtic
Thunder.
We are currently working on
a totally new show, with 30
tracks you have never heard by
Celtic Thunder before, he said.
You will be able to see that in
February or March, and we will
be happy to come back to
Wilkes-Barre, if you will have
us.
The audience was into the
performance from the opening
minutes, even clapping along to
the instrumental prelude. They
heartily sang along to the
groups old favorites, and stood
and clapped enthusiastically
during some of the evenings
numbers.
Highlights of the first half in-
cluded Isle of Hope, Isle of
Tears, a song the group has bor-
rowedfromCeltic Woman, The
Galway Girl (with all five mem-
bers of the group playing instru-
ments), Black Velvet Bands
and Remember Me.
Standouts after the intermis-
sion included the aforemen-
tioned cover tunes plus the
group number Dulaman and
Donaldsons solo onCats inthe
Cradle.
If you missed Celtic Thunder
on Saturday evening, there are
two more shows within driving
distance: Oct. 11 at the Broome
County Arena in Binghamton,
N.Y., and Oct. 13 at the Tower
Theatre in Philadelphia.
Or you can surely catch them
again on PBS.
Irish roar of thunder
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Irish singer and songwriter Keith Harkin performs with Celtic
Thunder at the F.M. Kirby Center Saturday night.
Five-man group brings
greatest hits to Kirby Center
with some changes.
R E V I E W
By BRAD PATTON
Times Leader Correspondent
BRAS ACROSS THE BRIDGE ALL ABOUT SUPPORT
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
At Bras Across
the Bridge on
Saturday, bras
were linked to-
gether to stretch
across the Mar-
ket Street
Bridge. Attend-
ees brought bras
and paid a $5
donation. There
were also bras
autographed by
Katy Perry, Kelly
Clarkson, Carly
Rae Jepsen and
others that were
auctioned off. All
proceeds benefit
the American
Cancer Societys
Making Strides
Against Breast
Cancer of Wyom-
ing Valley. For
Click photos, see
Page 12A
HAZLETON City police
are investigating the reported
theft of a handgun and other
items during a break-in at a
storage garage in the 800
block of South Church Street.
The burglary occurred
between July and Saturday,
police said. Taken were: a
.45-caliber semi-automatic
pistol, a girls green bicycle,
an unknown number of
DVDs, a Toshiba DVD player,
a Bose surround system and a
Compac computer. Anyone
with information about the
burglary is asked to contact
Hazleton Police at 570 459-
4940.
BEAR CREEK TWP.
State police said they cited
Joseph Anthony Powell, 53, of
Scranton, with harassment
after he allegedly pushed a
46-year-old woman to the
ground at the former Bear
Convenience Mart on Route
115 at 3:45 p.m. Wednesday.
POLICE BLOTTER
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 PAGE 3A
LOCAL
timesleader.com
PLAINS TWP.
Officer out of hospital
The Wilkes-Barre police officer
wounded in a gunfight that killed a
man wanted for attempted homicide in
Philadelphia was released from Geis-
inger Wyoming Valley Medical Center
Saturday.
Sgt. Matthew Stash, 43, was shot in
the leg while he and five other mem-
bers of a fugitive task force made up of
federal, state and local law enforce-
ment officers served a warrant Friday
morning for Robert Montgomery at his
fathers apartment in the Sherman Hills
high-rise building.
Montgomery, 29, was killed in the
shootout and his father, 61-year-old
Robert J. Montgomery, was wounded.
The elder Montgomery was listed in
serious condition at the medical center
Saturday night.
Luzerne County District Attorney
Stefanie Salavantis said based on a
preliminary investigation by state po-
lice, Stash and the other task force
members involved in the shooting were
cleared of charges. However, she did
not rule out filing a charge of harboring
a fugitive against the elder Montgom-
ery and said the investigation is ongo-
ing.
SHICKSHINNY
Mayors husband fined
A district judge last month found
Gary Moore, the husband of Shickshin-
ny mayor Beverly Moore, of North
Canal Street guilty of two summary
offenses related to building in a flood
plain and imposed fines and costs total-
ing $208.
District Justice John E. Hasay held a
hearing on Sept. 25 on the charges of
building/alterations in a flood plain
without a permit and accessory struc-
tures in a flood plain to be anchored.
The charges were filed on July 31 by
borough zoning and code enforcement
officer Rick Harmon.
A message left Saturday with the
mayor was not returned.
WILKES-BARRE
ChalkFest is rescheduled
ChalkFest, originally scheduled for
Saturday at the Wilkes-Barre River
Common, will be held this Saturday,
Oct. 13, 11 a.m. until 3 p.m.
ASHLEY
Democrats to hold picnic
The Luzerne County Democratic
Committee will hold its Fall Picnic
today beginning at noon in the Cathol-
ic War Vets Grove on Old Ashley Road.
EXETER
Suicide programs planned
The Wyoming Area School District
in conjunction with Childrens Service
Center of Wyoming Valley will conduct
30-minute informational sessions
geared for parents on suicide preven-
tion. The sessions will be held at dis-
trict buildings and be conducted by
mental health workers/counselors.
The locations, times and dates are:
Montgomery Avenue and Sarah J.
Dymond schools parents - 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday at the Sarah J. Dymond
School, 635 Sutton Creek Road, Hard-
ing
Seventh- and eighth-grade parents
6 p.m. Wednesday at the Secondary
Center, 20 Memorial St., Exeter
Ninth- and 10th-grade parents - 6
p.m. Thursday at the Secondary Center
11th- and 12th-grade parents - 6
p.m. Oct. 17 at the Secondary Center
HAZLETON
Man faces more charges
A man who was wanted by police
now faces additional charges after he
allegedly fought with and injured a
police officer.
City police responded to the area of
135 E. Noble St. at about 8:30 p.m.
Thursday for a report of a suspicious
male, who possibly had a warrant out
on him, standing outside.
Upon arriving, police came into
contact with Bryant Peguero, who,
after giving police a false name, struck
an officer and tried to flee, police said.
Peguero remained combative while
officers tried to take him into custody,
police said. One officer was injured and
later treated at Hazleton general Hospi-
tal.
Peguero faces additional charges of
aggravated assault, simple assault,
resisting arrest, providing false identifi-
cation to law enforcement, possession
of drug paraphernalia, possession of
small amounts of marijuana, posses-
sion of synthetic drugs, harassment
and disorderly conduct, police said.
I N B R I E F
WILKES-BARRE Once it was a fast
machine, steeped in local racing glory.
Powered by a lawnmower engine and
shaped like a pint-size F1car, the mini rac-
er oncecartedformer Wilkes-BarreMayor
Tom McGroarty around the corners of
Public Square in a head-to-head and knee-
to-knee race with Kingston Mayor Jim
Haggerty, part of the Arthritis Foundation
Mini Grand Prix held throughout the late
90s in Wilkes-Barre and Kingston.
Saturday, the go-kart was pulled down
fromashelf at thecityDepartment of Pub-
lic Works garage and put up for auction
with about 20 other vehicles at the DPW.
City Purchasing Direc-
tor Ron Trimble said
that evena decade later
after its last checkered
flag, the racer has mus-
cle.
The mayor of King-
ston won once, Trim-
ble said. That was it;
the guys from the city
souped it up. That car
runs and it runs fast.
The racer was sold
for $375 at auction to a
telephone bidder
whose identity was not
revealed. It fetched
about thesameamount as most of thefull-
size Jeep Cherokees and police cruisers
that also crossed the auction block, prob-
ably due to its superior condition.
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Joe Sherrill of Larksville, left, and Walter Sims of Shickshinny look over police
vehicles to be auctioned at the Wilkes-Barre Department of Public Works on
Saturday morning.
Going once, going twice,
sold at W-B city auction
Mini racer once driven by former
Mayor McGroarty among vehicles,
equipment under the hammer.
By MATT HUGHES
mhughes@timesleader.com
See AUCTION, Page 6A
Haggerty
McGroarty
WILKES-BARRE Part of the actual
wheel from the television game show
Wheel of Fortune was just one of the
nearly 200 items up for bid during the
Salvation Armys Fall Flea Market and
Celebrity Silent Auction Saturday.
The piece was part of a raffle basket
that included four VIP tickets to see a
live taping of the show in California.
The event was a first, said auction
organizer Dee
Polinski, of
Wilkes-Barre,
who donated
more than 40
autographed
items from her
own celebrity
memorabilia
collection, such
as an auto-
graphed poster
and T-shirt from the rock band
Heart.
Much of the collection came from
the celebrities themselves, or their
Can I buy a vowel and the wheel?
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Kathy Silvi
of Kingston
puts a bid
in on an
auto-
graphed
photo of
Tom Selleck
at the Sal-
vation
Army Fall
Flea Market
and Celeb-
rity Silent
Auction
Saturday.
TV game show items and other
celebrity fare up for bid at Salvation
Army auction in Wilkes-Barre.
By CAMILLE FIOTI
Times Leader Correspondent
See SALVATION, Page 6A
Auction organizer
Dee Polinski of
Wilkes-Barre donat-
ed more than 40
autographed items
from her own celeb-
rity memorabilia
collection.
HANOVER TWP. A creative, fun
and healthy way to raise money and
awareness to fight Lou Gehrigs dis-
ease, alsoknownasALS, istoconduct a
zumbathon, according to Justus Wa-
nyo, a17-year-oldsenior at Hanover Ar-
eaHighSchool. It is alsoawaytohonor
a family member who lost the battle
against the disease.
OnSaturday morning, zumba enthu-
siastsdanced, sweated, exercisedtoLa-
tinmusicandgenerallyhadagoodtime
inHanoverAreasgymatthethree-hour
zumbathonWanyo organizedas part of
her senior project.
Overall, an estimated100 people vis-
ited the event, some to move and
groove, some just to offer their support
or bid on an array of generous gift bas-
kets provided by supportive local busi-
nesses, Wanyo said. Money raised will
be sent to the ALSAssociation.
After discussing some options with
her teachers about her senior project,
Wanyorealizedtheideaof thezumbath-
ontofight ALSseemedaperfect oppor-
tunity. It gaveher achancetohonor her
great-grandmother, Ann Kosloski, who
passedawayduetoALS, aswell tofulfill
her curricular requirements.
Plus, it allowed her to sponsor an ac-
tivity that she felt was the direct oppo-
site of ALS.
Zumba gets people moving, while
ALS caused muscles to shut down, she
said. The zumba participants danced
for those who cant, she said.
Overall, she was pleased with how
her project went.
It was a success, Wanyo said. It
was really fun.
Getting the zumbathon event going
required petitioning local business
sponsors, preparing gift baskets, can-
vassing for donations, making posters
andessentiallyensuringeverythingran
smoothly, Wanyo said.
William Kane, assistant principal at
thehighschool andsenior project coor-
dinator, was impressed with the initia-
tive shownby the young girl.
It takes a lot of work to put some-
Z U M B AT H O N
Moving steps to help ALS
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Alex Seasock instructs the zumbathon participants at Hanover Area High School for a senior class project by Jus-
tus Wanyo. All of the money raised will go to fight ALS.
Dance event honors great-grandmother
By RALPH NARDONE
Times Leader Correspondent
INSIDE: Click Photos, Page 12A
Im so proud of her and how
she worked. Shes been plan-
ning this since June. Im ve-
ry touched.
Joan Blaum
Justus Wanyos grandmother
See ZUMBATHON, Page 7A
WILKES-BARRE Candidates in the
11th and 17th Congressional Districts
will outline their positions and debate
face-to-face for the first time this elec-
tionyear at twocommunityforums host-
ed this week by The
Times Leader and
Wilkes University.
Incumbent U.S. Rep.
Lou Barletta and Gene
Stilp, the candidates
for the 11th Congres-
sional District, will
take part Monday at 7
p.m., while Matt Cart-
wright and Laureen
Cummings, candi-
dates for the 17th Con-
gressional District,
will square off on
Wednesday at 7 p.m.
The forums will be
open to the public and
will be held at Wilkes
University in Room
101 of the Stark Learn-
ing Center, 150-180 S.
River St. Seating in
the auditorium-style
room will be on a first-come, first-serve
basis. Each forumis expected to last one
and a half to two hours.
The Times Leader is glad to work
with Wilkes University and take the lead
to organize forums, Times Leader Vice
President and Executive Editor Joe But-
kiewicz said. We want people of this re-
gion to have the opportunity to hear the
U.S. House
candidates
will meet
for forum
Barletta and Stilp in the 11th and
Cartwright and Cummings in the 17th
will air their views on issues.
By MATT HUGHES
mhughes@timesleader.com
20 1 2
ELECTION
Stilp
Barletta
See FORUM, Page 7A
C M Y K
PAGE 4A SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 PAGE 5A
NEW YORK
Suspects appear in courts
A
partially blind Egyptian-born
preacher and four other terrorism
suspects appeared in federal courts
Saturday, hours after they lost year-
slong extradition fights in Britain and
were transported to the U.S. under
tight security to face trial.
The preacher, Abu Hamza al-Masri,
entered no plea to charges of conspir-
ing with Seattle men to set up a terror-
ist training camp in Oregon and of
helping abduct 16 hostages, two of
them American tourists, in Yemen in
1998.
Al-Masri has hooks in place of hands,
but he came into court without them
and both arms exposed through his
short-sleeved blue prison shirt. His
court-appointed lawyer, Sabrina Shroff,
asked that his prosthetics be immedi-
ately returned so he can use his arms.
WAYNE, N.J.
12 hurt when bus overturns
A tour bus from Canada carrying
about 60 people bound for a New York
City church event overturned on a
highway exit ramp in northern New
Jersey, slid down an embankment and
landed on its side early Saturday, in-
juring about a dozen who were aboard,
authorities said.
Some windows burst during the
crash and their frames pinned three
people, but they were quickly freed and
taken to hospitals with the other vic-
tims. None of the injuries were consid-
ered life-threatening, according to state
police, and most of the victims were
being treated for cuts, bruises and
soreness. The driver told authorities he
had a gash in his arm.
Passengers told the Star-Ledger of
Newark that they were Seventh-day
Adventists headed to an event in
Brooklyn.
JERUSALEM
Israeli jets down drone
Israel scrambled fighter jets to in-
tercept a drone Saturday that crossed
deep into Israeli airspace from the
Mediterranean Sea, shooting the air-
craft down over the countrys southern
desert, the military said.
The incident marked the first time in
at least six years that a hostile aircraft
has penetrated Israels airspace, and
Israeli officials said they were taking
the incident seriously, raising the possi-
bility of retaliatory action.
It was not immediately clear who
launched the drone, but suspicion
quickly fell on the Lebanese Islamic
militant group Hezbollah. The Iranian-
backed group is known to have sent
drones into Israeli airspace on several
previous occasions.
DETROIT
Recalls for Chrysler, Honda
Chrysler says its recalling Ram1500
and Dodge Dakota trucks from the
2009-2010 model year because a lack of
adhesive may cause the rear axle pin-
ion nut to loosen.
The National Highway Traffic Safety
Administration said Saturday that if
that happens, the axle can lock up, and
the vehicle could lose control and
crash.
Honda Motor Co. is recalling CR-V
crossovers from the 2002 to 2006 mod-
el years because an electrical switch in
the drivers side door could melt and
cause a fire.
Government and company officials
say there have been 15 reports of rear
axle failure, including four that result-
ed in a loss of vehicle control. The
driver crashed into a concrete barrier
in one case. There have been three
minor injuries.
I N B R I E F
AP PHOTO
Last-minute campaigning for Chavez
An election campaign sticker promot-
ing Venezuelas President Hugo Cha-
vez covers another in support of op-
position presidential candidate Hen-
rique Capriles on a wall in Caracas,
Venezuela, Friday. Venezuelans head
to the polls today to vote in their
countrys presidential election.
HARRISBURG Jerry Sandusky
should be sent to prison for life when a
judge sentences him Tuesday, according
to several of the jurors who convictedthe
former Penn State assistant coach of mo-
lesting several boys over a period of
years.
None of the jurors interviewed by The
Associated Press said they have had sec-
ond thoughts about their June verdict,
and several plan to attend the sentenc-
ing.
There isnt a sentence that I believe is
harsh enough for what he has done and
how it has affected the university, said
Joan Andrews, a juror who has worked
for Penn State for 41
years and held football
season tickets since
1969. I dont think
theres been one indi-
vidual in this entire
campus that has not
been affected by this.
Four jurors said they
plan to be in the courtroom when Sand-
usky, 68, learns the penalty for sexually
abusingboyshemet throughacharityfor
at-riskchildren. Sanduskys ownattorney
expects his client to be handed a long
sentence from Judge John Cleland after
conviction on 45 counts.
Although a list of jurors has not been
released by Cleland, the AP was able to
contact five of them. They said they re-
cently received a letter fromthe court in-
forming them about the sentencing and
offering to have a court official meet
them outside the courthouse.
Acourt systemspokesman said the ju-
rors are guaranteed a seat but wont nec-
essarily be sitting together.
Only one of the five, retiredPennState
soil sciences professor Daniel D. Fritton,
said he would not attend.
Idjust liketostayout of thelimelight,
for one thing, Fritton said. I figure I
could read in the paper what happens.
Gayle Barnes, a homemaker and for-
mer school district employee, said she
thinks a lot about the victims, particular-
ly the eight who testified against Sand-
usky and provided what she considers
the critical evidence of guilt. She said he
deserves life in prison.
I do still feel good, what we as jurors
did, Barnes said. I didnt go there say-
ing off the bat hes guilty. I needed to lis-
ten to every single thing that was said.
Barnes saidshe has beenintouchwith
a fifthjuror andanalternate juror who al-
so plan to attend the sentencing.
High school science teacher Joshua
Harper, who has bachelors and masters
degrees from Penn State, said that he
takes pride in having served on the jury,
andthat theguiltyverdict was not a close
call. He wants Sandusky put away for
the rest of his life, really.
This is what prisons are for, you
know, Harper said. I mean, I dont think
you let a guy loose like that.
He also felt the victim testimony was
pivotal.
It was such a consistent pattern of be-
havior, Harper said. It was just so solid.
The defense was just so thin. There was
no evidence that these kids were lying.
Even the minor inconsistencies that the
defensetriedtobringupanddidbring
up that made it more convincing.
Through a relative, juror Ann T. Van
Kuren said she also plans to attend.
Barnes and Harper both said they
hoped to learn more about what Penn
State officials did or did not do in 1998
and 2001 after getting complaints about
Sandusky showering with boys.
Jurors favor life for Sandusky
None of the jurors interviewed had
second thoughts about June verdict
and some will attend sentencing.
By MARK SCOLFORO
Associated Press
Sandusky
WASHINGTON A month
before Election Day, President
Barack Obamas campaign and
Democrats postedanimpressive
fundraising haul, easing the par-
tys concerns that he would face
a significant money disadvan-
tage against his well-financed
Republican rival in the crucial
closing days. Romney shrugged
off a drop in unemployment, an
issue at the heart of the race,
contending its crystal clear a
jobs crisis endures.
Bolstered by the Democratic
National Convention, Obama
and his party Saturday reported
a combined take of $181 million
for September, their best fun-
draising month of the campaign
and just short of their record of
$190 million in the 2008 cam-
paign, also in September. Rom-
neys campaign has not released
its report for the month yet.
It was oddly quiet one month
out. Obama took time off for a
20th anniversary celebration
with his wife, Michelle, post-
poned from the day of the first
presidential debate last week,
while Romney devoted time to
preparing for the next debate,
Oct. 16 in Hempstead, N.Y., be-
fore a Saturday evening rally in
Apopka, Fla..
But the money machine was
grinding relentlessly. Republi-
can running mate Paul Ryan
scheduled an evening fundraiser
in Milwaukee, Wis., and neither
party let up in their appeals for
cash for the frantic final weeks
ahead. Ryan and Vice President
Joe Biden go head-to-head in a
debate Thursday inDanville, Ky.
There is exactly one month
left to go until Election Day,
Obama campaign manager Jim
Messina said in an email pitch.
The stakes are toohighfor us to
take our foot off the gas now.
The president was scheduled to
launch a lucrative and celebrity-
studded fundraising swing to
Los Angeles and San Francisco
onSundayandMondayfollowed
by a campaign rally in battle-
ground Ohio.
Republicans and Romney
himself have seemed invigorat-
ed by his spirited leadoff debate
performance against a subdued
president, whichplayedout for a
huge national TV audience, esti-
mated at more than 67 million,
just as voters at-large are tuning
in to the campaign.
But then came the report Fri-
day showing unemployment fell
inSeptember from8.1percent to
7.8 percent, marking the first
time the rate dippedbelow8per-
cent since the start of Obamas
presidency.
Obama
gets cash;
Romney
in Florida
With a month before Election
Day, thoughts turn to
fundraising and jobs.
By KEN THOMAS
Associated Press
VATICAN CITY A painful and da-
maging chapter in Pope Benedict XVIs
papacy closed Saturday with the convic-
tion of his former butler on charges he
stole the pontiffs private letters and
leaked them to a journalist. But ques-
tions remain as to whether anyone else
was involved in the plot, and when the
pope will pardon his once-trusted aide.
Paolo Gabriele, until recently affec-
tionately dubbed Paoletto by his in-
timate pontifical family, stood stone-
faced as Judge Giuseppe Dalla Torre
read out the conviction and sentenced
him to 18-months in prison for the grav-
est Vatican security breach in recent
memory.
The decision, reached after just two
hours of deliberations, capped a remark-
able weeklong trial that saw the popes
closest adviser, Monsignor Georg Gaen-
swein, and a half dozen Vatican police
officers testify about a betrayal of the
pope that exposed the unseemly side of
the Catholic Churchs governance.
The highest-profile case to come be-
fore a court that usually handles 30
cases of petty theft a year ended none
too soon: On Sunday, Benedict opens a
two-week synod, or meeting of the
worlds bishops, summoned to Rome to
chart the churchs future evangelization
mission and celebrate the 50th anniver-
sary of the Second Vatican Council. By
putting the embarrassing leaks scandal
behind it, the Vatican has removed a
major and unwelcome distraction.
Gabriele was accused of stealing the
popes private correspondence and pass-
ing it on to journalist Gianluigi Nuzzi,
whose book revealed the intrigue, petty
infighting and allegations of corruption
and homosexual liaisons that plague the
Vaticans secretive universe.
Gabriele has said he leaked the docu-
ments because he felt the pope wasnt
being informed of the evil and corrup-
tion in the Vatican, and that exposing
the problems publicly would put the
church back on the right track.
In his final appeal to the court Sat-
urday morning, Gabriele insisted he
never intended to hurt the church or the
pope.
The thing I feel strongly in me is the
conviction that I acted out of exclusive
love, I would say visceral love, for the
church of Christ and its visible head,
Gabriele told the court in a steady voice.
I do not feel like a thief.
The sentence was reduced in half to
18 months from three years because of a
series of mitigating circumstances, in-
cluding that Gabriele had no previous
record, had acknowledged that he had
betrayed the pope and was convinced,
albeit erroneously, that he was doing
the right thing, Dalla Torre said.
Gabrieles attorney, Cristiana Arru,
said the sentence was good, balanced
and said she was awaiting the judges
written reasoning before deciding
whether to appeal.
AP PHOTO
The popes butler Paolo Gabriele, center, flanked at right by his lawyer, Cristiana Arru, leaves the Vatican tribunal at the
Vatican after the verdict Saturday.
Papal pardon is expected for butler
Paolo Gabriele was sentenced to 18
months in prison for gravest Vatican
security breach in recent memory.
By NICOLE WINFIELD
Associated Press
PARIS Police carried out raids
across France onSaturday after DNAona
grenade that exploded last month at a ko-
sher grocery store led them to a suspect-
ed jihadist cell of young Frenchmen re-
cently converted to Islam.
The man whose DNA was identified,
named by police as Jeremy Sydney, was
killed by police after he opened fire on
them, slightly wounding three officers in
the eastern city of Strasbourg. Officials
saidhe hadbeenunder surveillance since
last spring around the time a French
Islamic went on a shooting rampage
against a Jewish school and French sol-
diers, killing seven people.
Eleven other suspects were arrested
across the country Saturday, accordingto
the Sipa news agency. One man was car-
rying a loaded gun, and police found
weapons, cash and a list of Paris-area Is-
raeli associations during the raids.
Paris prosecutor Francois Molins said
all the arrested suspects were French and
recent converts to Islam. They were all
born in the 1980s or early 1990s. Four of
the men involved in the raid had written
wills.
You can imagine what their other
plans couldhavebeen, counterterrorism
official Eric Voulleminot said at a news
conference with Molins.
The prosecutor described 33-year-old
Sydney, sentencedin2008 to two years in
prison for drug trafficking, as a delin-
quent who converted to radical Islam.
A statement from President Francois
Hollande praised the police for the raids
andsaidthe state wouldcontinue topro-
tect the French against all terrorist
threats.
Last months firebombing of the groce-
ry, in a Jewish neighborhood in the Paris
suburb of Sarcelles, happened on Sept.
19, the same day a French satirical paper
published crude caricatures of the Proph-
et Muhammad.
1 dead, 11 arrested in French anti-terror sweep
AP PHOTO
French police officers
stand guard Sat-
urday at the en-
trance of a building
in Strasbourg as
plain-clothed officers
carrying evidence
leave after a suspect
was shot dead for
firing at police during
anti-terrorism raids
that were conducted
nationwide.
By LORI HINNANT
Associated Press
N A T I O N & W O R L D
PAGE 6A SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
N E W S
Incumbent U.S. Rep.
Lou Barletta and Gene Stilp,
11th Congressional
District Candidates
Matt Cartwright
and Laureen Cummings,
17th Congressional
District Candidates
Monday, October 8 at 7 p.m. Wednesday, October 10 at 7 p.m.
A NEWLOOK FOR THE LION IS BREWING
AIMEE DILGER PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
S
tephen Co-
razzi of SPC
Painting of
Peckville has been
working on the
outside of the
Lion Brewery in
Wilkes-Barre,
painting the walls,
lettering and lion.
The Lion has not
been painted in a
year and was
quite a task with
re-pointing of the
brick needed after
scraping the paint.
Corazzi used his
cellphone quite a
bit to take photos
along the way and
rematch the lion.
managers, said Polinski.
When she sent letters to the
various NASCAR drivers, musi-
cians, actors and reality show
stars, the response was over-
whelming.
I wrote to them and told
them that the economy was bad
in this area and it would be a
blessing if they could help the
people in the community, she
said.
Polinski, 43, said funds raised
during the event would help the
church continue to provide
community outreach programs.
Helping out at the busy con-
cession stand, Lieutenants Ted
and Sharon Tressler, who serve
as the churchs corps command-
ing officers, said the need for
donations is great this year.
In addition to hosting a num-
ber of community groups at its
facility on Pennsylvania Ave-
nue, including a senior citizen
social group and a childrens
character-building group, the fa-
cility is also home to a food
pantry, which serves hundreds
throughout the year.
Between the communitys
generosity and Gods blessings,
we have been able to meet the
needs of our families, said Lt.
Ted Tressler.
SALVATION
Continued from Page 3A
Trimble said most of the other
vehicles, which dated from the
mid 90s to early 2000s and came
from the police, parking enforce-
ment and Public Works depart-
ments, had worn out their shelf
life and would have cost more
than their value
to repair.
Most were
purchased by
Harrys U-Pull-
It, a Hazleton
scrap yard.
An auction is
held every two
years by the
Public Works Department to liqui-
date vehicles that have broken
down or been replaced by newer
models.
In addition to the go-kart, a uni-
loader sold for $3,200, an emer-
gency management trailer sold for
$1,150 and various pieces of
grounds keeping equipment rid-
ing mowers, snow blowers and
seeders soldfor between$10 and
$160 Saturday.
In total, Trimble said, the city
grossed about $14,000 from the
sale, 10 percent of which will go to
auctioneer Leo A. Glodzik Jr. It
was a bigger take than at the de-
partments last auction in 2010,
when the city raised $8,500.
We got something other than
what we wouldhave got walkingit
over to the junkyard and selling it
for scrap, Trimble said. This, as
far as Im concerned, was a good
auction, a big success.
Bits and pieces of retired city in-
frastructure also went up for sale
at the auction.
Jay Gilbert of Bloomsburg
bought morethan20trafficsignals
for between $3 and $7 each. He
planned to sell them at a consign-
ment auction he hosts, where he
said they can fetch $100 each.
In my area Ill usually buy a
truckload of them, Gilbert said.
UsuallyI payalot morefor them.
Dave Grunza, owner of DJs
Landscaping in Olyphant, bought
four light-up tinsel holiday decora-
tions that once hung from city
light postsandutilitypolesfor Hal-
loween, Valentines Day, Easter
and the Fourth of July. Price: $1
each.
Im just putting them in my
yard, Grunza said. I do landscap-
ing, so Ill probably be putting
them in other peoples yards too.
Whilenearlyall of themorethan
50different items for sale soldout,
one big-ticket item remained un-
sold.
The city hoped to pocket $1,500
for a street sweeper, but no bids
were received at that level. Glod-
zik said he was negotiating with a
potential buyer, but that the
sweeper would not be sold Satur-
day.
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Members of L.A.G. Auction Services take bids on surplus equip-
ment at the Wilkes-Barre DPW on Saturday morning.
AUCTION
Continued from Page 3A
If you missed Wilkes-Barres public
works auction Saturday but are
interested in used vehicles or
construction and grounds keeping
equipment, check out Kingstons
municipal surplus equipment
auction Saturday at 10 a.m. at 455
Church St. Items for sale include
two dump trucks with plows and
spreaders, police vehicles and a
bucket truck. For more informa-
tion and pictures, visit www.la-
gauctions.com.
U P C O M I N G A U C T I O N
Trimble
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 PAGE 7A
N E W S
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R
ichardG. (Dick) Evans Jr., 73, of
Dallas, died Friday evening, Oc-
tober 5, 2012, at his home.
Born in Wilkes-Barre, he was a
son of the late Richard G. Sr. and
Frances Evans.
Dick was a graduate of GARHigh
School at age 16, Class of 1956, and
was a member of the marching
band. He received his bachelors de-
gree in Commerce and Finance
from Wilkes University and attend-
ed the University of Hawaii.
Dick served his country in the
United States Air Force.
Dicks family was the founders
and former owners of WYZZ radio
station, where he served as vice
president. He and his wife, Mary
Lou, were the founding partners of
Sew Fine Draperies and Interiors.
Dick was a member of the Irem
Temple Shrine, Dallas Lions Club,
board member for the Back Moun-
tain Library and Auction, board
member of the Luzerne Merchants
Association and a member of the
Newberry Home Owners Associ-
ation.
Surviving are his wife, the former
Mary Lou McKeown, Dallas; son,
Dr. Richard Evans III, and his wife,
Cheryl, Lewisberry; daughter, Su-
san Naperkowski, and husband
Mark, Ashley; son Robert J. Evans,
Eagan Minn.; son Justyn Newman
and wife, Tanya, Spring Hill, Fla.;
brother, Robert L. Evans, and wife,
Mary Ann, Wilkes-Barre; grandchil-
dren, Arianne, Patrick and Oliva
Evans; Mark, Erica and Ryan Naper-
kowski; Andrew, Caroline and Mat-
thew Evans; and Justyn Newman
Jr.; nephews, nieces and Dicks
Best Friend, Magic.
Dick had a great passion for his
family and friends. He loved music,
food and golf and had fond memo-
ries of his travels to Hawaii and An-
tigua.
The family gives special thanks
to Dr. Patrick Kilduff, Dr. David
Greenwald and associates, the kind
nurses from Erwine Hospice and
Home Healthand, last but not least,
Dr. Calese, his Guardian Angel.
A Life Celebration for Dick
will be announced.
Memorial donations if desired
may be made to Back Mountain Li-
brary Association
ALOHA MY DICK
Arrangements are entrusted to
the Corcoran Funeral Home Inc.,
Plains. Online condolences may be
made to www.corcoranfuneral-
home.com.
Richard G. Evans Jr.
October 5, 2012
D
orothy A. Abromavage passed
away into eternal peace on
Wednesday, October 3, 2012.
Born in Wilkes-Barre, she was a
daughter of the late Stanley and
AnneBednar Martin. Alifelongresi-
dent of East End section of Wilkes-
Barre, she was educated in the
Wilkes-Barre city schools and was a
devoted member of Holy Saviour
Church, Wilkes-Barre. Prior to be-
coming a mother and homemaker,
she was employed by Bell Tele-
phone Company and, before retir-
ing, worked for Wilkes-Barre Area
School District.
Precedingher indeathwerebroth-
ers, Thomas (Pete) and Stanley
(Stu) Martin, along with sister, Jean
Manley.
Dorothy is survived by daughters,
Karen Webster, Mary Ellen Perry,
Melanie Abromavage; son, Robert
and his wife, Gerri Martin.
Memorial service will be held
Monday from6 to 8 p.m. fromMam-
ary-Durkin Funeral Service, 59 Par-
rish St., Wilkes-Barre.
Those who desire may give me-
morial contributions to the Ronald
McDonaldHouse, 332Wheeler Ave.,
Scranton PA18510.
Dorothy A. Abromavage
October 3, 2012
A
nthony Volpicelli, 82, was a man
full of personality, quick wit,
love, curiosity and strong will.
He hada tremendous enthusiasm
for life, a fighting spirit and a sense
of fun that will be remembered by
thosewhohadthepleasureof know-
ing him.
Among those people are the hun-
dreds he served through his more
than 20 years of service at Saint
Francis of Assisi Parish, Nanticoke.
In addition to his preparation of
Thanksgivingdinners at thechurch,
he also treated the community to
his authentic spaghetti dinners.
He was a proud veteran of the Ko-
rean War and achieved several ser-
vice decorations.
His handsome voice and conge-
nial attitude will be joyfully remem-
beredby those who lovedhimmost,
his daughter Linda Walkowiak, and
her husband, David; granddaught-
ers, Jaclyn Moser and her husband,
Seth; Lindsey Sears and her hus-
band, Will.
Private funeral services
were held at Kearney Funeral
Home Inc., 173 E. Green St., Nanti-
coke. Interment was in St. Francis
Cemetery.
Anthony Volpicelli
October 4, 2012
Frank R. Hen-
ry, 74, of West
Nanticoke, died
Saturday, Octo-
ber 6, 2012, at
the Hampton
House, Hanover
Township.
Born in
Wilkes-Barre General Hospital, he
was a sonof the late Jennie Niay and
Frank Henry, of Wilkes-Barre. Frank
was a graduate of GARHighSchool,
Class of 1957. He was a United
States Army Veteran, stationed in
Germany, from1958to1961. He also
was a military police officer, receiv-
ing several medals, such as Sharp
Shooter in Rifle-Pistol, and he was
an expert in Carbine. He also was a
recipient of the GoodConduct Med-
al. Frank was a member of the Ply-
mouth American Legion, the Elks
Lodge of Pringle and the Larksville
American Legion. During his 21-
year membership, he servedas com-
mander for two terms and adjutant
for three terms. He was employedas
a truck driver for Nicholas Trucking
for 38 years, and was a truck driver
instructor for 10 years at Luzerne
County Community College.
Frank was preceded in death by a
son, Frank Henry Jr.; sisters, Do-
rothy Novicki, Carol Dellacroce and
Debbie Mikula.
Surviving are his wife of 36 years,
Dorothy Henry, of West Nanticoke;
sons, Thomas Keener and his wife,
Tara; Dean; Byronandhis wife, Deb-
bie; and daughter, Lori Keener. He
was also survived by a son, John
Henry, of Ransom; numerous nieces
and nephews that he loved dearly.
Military Services will be
held Tuesday at 6 p.m. from
theS.J. Grontkowski Funeral Home,
530 W. Main St., Plymouth, with
prayers at 6:45p.m. Friends maycall
Tuesday from 4 to 7 p.m.
In lieu of flowers, contributions
may be made to the American Can-
cer Society. Please visit
www.sjgrontkowskifuneralhome-
.com for directions or to submit on-
line condolences to Franks family.
Frank R. Henry
October 6, 2012
M
rs. Marion D. Cheatley, age 65, of
Johnson Road, Shickshinny, died
Saturday morning, October 6, 2012,
at the Geisinger Wyoming Valley
Medical Centerl, Plains Township.
She was born in York, Pa., a daugh-
ter of the late Joseph and Shirley
Schooley Rudaski.
Mrs. Cheatley was a member of the
Christ United Presbyterian Church of
Hanover Township.
She was an avid lover of sewing,
baking, gardening and fishing.
She was preceded in death by
brothers, Edward and Butch.
She is survived by and will be sadly
missed by her husband of eight years,
George A. Cheatley; sons, Robert Jen-
kins andhis wife, Renee, Luzerne; Joe
Jenkins and his wife, Charly, Texas;
FrankEyerman, Plymouth; TerryEye-
rman and his wife, Tammy, Wilkes-
Barre; a daughter, Tracy Swartz, and
her husband, Wayne, Plymouth; 14
grandchildren, two great-grandchil-
dren; brothers, Walter, Falls; Robert,
Hanover Township; Dale, Wilkes-
Barre; a sister, Trudy, Hanover Town-
ship; several nieces and nephews.
A funeral service will be held
Monday at 8 p.m. at the William A.
Reese Funeral Chapel, rear 56 Gay-
lord Ave., Plymouth, with the Rev.
Ann Emery officiating. Friends may
call Monday from 6 to 8 p.m.
Memorial Contributions may be
sent to the Christ United Presbyter-
ian Church, 105 Lee Park Ave., Ha-
nover Township.
Marion D. Cheatley
October 6, 2012
More Obituaries, Page 10A
candidates who want to repre-
sent the area in Washington.
Times Leader Editorial Page
Editor Mark Jones, moderator of
the forums, said he will ask the
candidates questions about the
most important issues affecting
the lives of Northeastern Penn-
sylvania residents, and economic
and pocketbook issues will pre-
dominate.
Were billing it more as a can-
didate forum than a debate, hop-
ing there would be more on the
side of substance rather than on
fireworks, Jones said, so that
the people in our area have the
important information they need
to make their decision.
Some of the questions Jones
will ask were submitted by read-
ers of The Times Leader. Each
candidate will be given two min-
utes to answer each question,
andJones saidhewill befirmer in
enforcing the time limits than
moderator Jim Lehrer was dur-
ing last weeks presidential de-
bate.
Free parking for the forums is
available in the Wilkes lot behind
the Henry Student Center, locat-
ed at 84 W. South St.
Both forums can be seen live
on WYLN-TV Channel 7 starting
at 7 each night.
FORUM
Continued from Page 3A
thing like this together, Kane
said. Most people dont realize
howmuch, he added.
Kane pointed out Wanyo gar-
neredalotof helpfromherfriends
andfamily, whichwas paramount
to its success.
It was a great learning experi-
ence, he said.
Joan Blaum, Wanyos grand-
mother, became emotional when
talking about the efforts of her
granddaughter.
Im so proud of her and how
she worked. Shes been planning
this since June, Blaumsaid. Im
very touched.
Wanyo said she heard her
whole life about how wonderful
her great-grandmother was. She
wanted to do something in her
memory, she said.
Kane made a point tothankthe
staff at the school district who
helped set up the gymnasium for
the event. They worked around a
busy schedule and rotated their
shifts without question, he said.
ZUMBATHON
Continued from Page 3A
C M Y K
PAGE 8A SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 PAGE 9A
N E W S
open somewhere.
High water, low ebb
The CVS purchase of the site
and building hasnt been the only
challenge to the Gays tradition.
In September 2011, flooding
caused by Tropical Storm Lee in-
undated the hardware store,
which is next to the Susquehan-
na River. Gays had been dam-
aged by Tropical Storm Agnes in
1972, but the water was higher in
2011.
After the water receded from
Bridge Street volunteers wasted
no time removing merchandise
and flotsam from the front of
Gays True Value. The flood wa-
ters were about 10 feet high in
the store, one volunteer said dur-
ing the clean-up in 2011. Some
feared the store would not reo-
pen.
Doug Gay said a lot of mer-
chandise was lost. We cant take
another one, he said. Wherever
we end up, it will be out of the
flood plain.
But moving isnt something
Doug and Dave and the employ-
ees are looking forward to. Its
breaking our hearts, Doug said.
Theres a lot of our blood, sweat
and tears in this place.
Most of the employees have
logged decades of service at
Gays.
LynnBrooks has beenthere for
42 years in the parts department.
Howard Batron has managed
the tool and hardware depart-
ment for 32 years.
Carol Grimes has 30 years at
the checkout counter.
Lori Clark has been there 20
years.
Glenda Chapin and Carol Vo-
grin each have 13 years at the
store.
Mary Ann Bucky Morgan
has been a cashier/bookkeeper
for 40 years. She was very close
to Papa Gay and Ruth Mom-
ma Gay. Momma would come
in every Wednesday and work
with us at checkout, she said.
We all grew up together here
were family.
Gays has about 24 employees,
full and part time. Over the 100
years, Doug estimates hun-
dreds have worked for the fam-
ily. Thats a lot of paychecks anda
lot of bread on kitchen tables.
We enjoy our customers we
enjoy people, Doug said. We
knowmost everybody. We like to
think if were gone, people will
miss us. I know a lot of people
want us to continue.
The employees say they have
stayed because they love their
jobs, the family they work for and
the people they serve.
Were the base of Tunkhan-
nock, Morgan said.
Impact on many
The Gays True Value building
on Bridge Street has 15,000
square feet of space on four
floors. The top two floors are
used mainly for storage; the sec-
ond floor is for parts and service.
The first floor is filled with aisle
upon aisle of merchandise and
departments from tick remov-
ers to Christmas lights and from
sporting goods to baby dolls,
wagons and bikes.
There are stuffed heads of tro-
phy game mounted everywhere.
Two trophy deer hang in Dougs
office. A black wildebeest hangs
next to a blue wildebeest at the
entrance to the sporting goods
department, where David
Moon Miller was putting to-
gether a crossbow for display.
They have every conceivable
bolt, nut and screwused today or
in the past, Kraynack said.
Need a body mount cushion for
your 1948 Studebaker? Go see
Brooks upstairs in the small en-
gine repair department, and you
and he can hunt around for a
piece of the roll of flat machinery
belt that they havent sold a
length of in 40 years.
And what would that cost?
Doug would say, Does a dol-
lar seem OK? Just tell Sharon at
the register, Kraynack said.
The selection and service keep
people and dogs pets are wel-
come -- coming to the store.
Bobbie Lee Morris has lived in
Tunkhannock since 1972 and has
shopped at Gays almost every
day. She came in Thursday to
buy six gallons of paint she left
with a bowl and a platter for
Thanksgiving dinner and some
Halloween and Christmas deco-
rations. She carried no paint.
Ill get that next time, she
said.
Dominick Talerico and Leo
Hart have an apartment mainte-
nance company. Sometimes I
feel like I work here, Im here so
often, Talerico said. He said if
Gays doesnt have what he
needs, which is rare, the store
will get it.
I once bought a glass top for
an old style coffee percolator
here, he said.
On Thursday Hitomi Com-
stock was shopping with her son,
Corey, who grabbed an interest-
ing looking gadget off a display
rack. It was a clothesline spread-
er. Comstock didnt buy it yet.
She said she will come back
when she decides where to hang
a clothesline.
Her husband, also named Co-
rey, grewup in Tunkhannock; Hi-
tomi is from Japan and she loves
Gays.
This is my favorite place in
America, she said. This is
something that is real.
Her husband bought his first
hunting license at Gays when he
was 12 hes now 37.
They sell taps for maple trees
here, he said. Where else
would you even look for that?
Vermont?
Rick Cord, a steady customer,
said people bring broken things
into Gays, where the staff will
make repairs.
If Gays doesnt reopen some-
where, he said, it will leave a
huge void in this community.
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Hitomi Comstock carries her son, Corey, in her arms while perusing the small kitchen appliances at Gays True Value Hardware in
Tunkhannock. Comstocks husband, also named Corey, grew up in Tunkhannock; Hitomi is from Japan and she loves Gays. PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Doug Gay, foreground, co-owner of Gays True Value Hardware in
Tunkhannock, helps customer Dewitt Abrams locate spare parts
for a home plumbing project.
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Brothers-in-law Dominic Talerico, right, and Leo Hart browse the
aisles recently at Gays True Value Hardware in Tunkhannock.
GAYS
Continued from Page 1A
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
David Moon Miller, left, sporting goods manager at Gays True
Value Hardware in Tunkhannock, chats with the stores co-owner
Doug Gay underneath two mounts of wildebeest.
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Gays True Value Hardware employees Mary Ann Bucky Morgan,
left, and Glenda Chapin.
We enjoy our customers we enjoy people. We
know most everybody. We like to think if were
gone, people will miss us. I know a lot of people
want us to continue.
Doug Gay
Co-owner of Gays True Value Hardware in Tunkhannock
salesman selling farming
equipment all over the country.
And eventually he founded
the store that became a part of
the Tunkhannock community.
Doug Gay said the Gay fam-
ily philosophy is based on help-
ing people and the community.
Weve always felt giving
back to the community is an
important part of our busi-
ness, Doug said.
Charlie Kraynack, a long-
time customer, said that when
he entered Gays True Value
Hardware Store with his wife,
George Papa Gay, Dougs fa-
ther, would greet them with,
Hello, Charlie. I see you
brought along your beautiful
daughter today. Kraynack
said the people at Gays are a
lot more sincere than the gree-
ters at the big box stores.
He said the last time he saw
Papa Gay was at the annual free
screening of Its a Wonderful
Life at the Dietrich Theater
less than a year before his pass-
ing in 2004. The movie ends
with the entire family singing
Old Lang Syne.
George, who was sitting di-
rectly behind me, broke into
song and led us all in a sing-
along to that refrain, Kray-
nack said.
An old basketball and base-
ball buddy of Dougs nowliving
in Hudson, N.Y., wrote a letter
to Doug thanking him for his
help on his recent visit to Tunk-
hannock.
David Thaddeus Dobrosiel-
skis car broke down and Doug
loaned him his truck. Doug al-
so tuned up his lawn mower
and brought it back to him. He
also helped him get his car
fixed.
It was a big deal to Dobrosiel-
ski, but Doug just shrugged his
shoulders and said, We do that
sort of stuff here all the time.
Carol Vogrin has been a
bookkeeper at Gays for 13
years. Her father-in-law
worked at Gays, as did her fa-
ther and uncle.
Marble Gay used to drive her
father-in-law, Al Vogrin, to
baseball games. He used to
practice pitching with him in
the back of the property, Vo-
grin recalled.
And then Marble Gay per-
formed another act of kindness
for Al Vogrin. Marble showed
up at my father-in-laws house
one day with a cow, Carol Vo-
grin said. He told him that
with three little kids he needed
a cow.
Doug Gay,
co-owner of
Gays True
Value Hard-
ware in
Tunkhan-
nock,
waves
good-bye to
regular
customer
Dominic
Talerico on
Thursday.
FOUNDER
Continued from Page 1A
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
PAGE 10A SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
O B I T U A R I E S
The Times Leader publish-
es free obituaries, which
have a 27-line limit, and paid
obituaries, which can run
with a photograph. A funeral
home representative can call
the obituary desk at (570)
829-7224, send a fax to (570)
829-5537 or e-mail to tlo-
bits@timesleader.com. If you
fax or e-mail, please call to
confirm. Obituaries must be
submitted by 9 p.m. Sunday
through Thursday and 7:30
p.m. Friday and Saturday.
Obituaries must be sent by a
funeral home or crematory,
or must name who is hand-
ling arrangements, with
address and phone number.
We discourage handwritten
notices; they incur a $15
typing fee.
O B I T U A R Y P O L I C Y
M .J. JUD G E
M ON UM EN T CO.
M ON UM EN TS -M ARK ERS -L ETTERIN G
8 2 9 -4 8 8 1
N extto the Big Co w o n Rt. 309
Estate & Medicaid Planning; Wills; Revocable and Irrevocable Trusts: Estate
Probate and Administration; Guardianships; and Special Needs Trusts.
ATTORNEY DAVID R. LIPKA
Certied As an Elder Law Attorney by the National Elder Law Foundation
50 East Main Street, Plymouth, PA (570) 779-5353
IF NURSING HOME PLACEMENT BECOMES
NECESSARY DONT PRESUME ALL IS LOST!
Even under current law, there ARE still ways to legally protect your home and
other hard-earned assets from being spent down on long term care when you, your
spouse or a loved one are either in or about to enter a nursing home.
Can you save your residence?
Can you transfer assets within the ve year look-back period?
How can annuities help?
Can more income be protected for the spouse at home?
STRAIGHTFORWARD ANSWERS TO COMPLEX QUESTIONS!
THE SOONER YOU ACT, THE MORE YOURE ABLE TO SAVE!
NOTICE
TOALL
VETERANS
and ex-service personnel who have loyally
served their country in peace and in war.
If you were honorably discharged and
live anywhere in the State of
Pennsylvania, you are now entitled to a
burial space at no cost in the veterans
memorial section at
Chapel Lawn Memorial Park
RD 5 Box 108, Dallas, PA 18612
This offer is available for a limited time
only. Special protection features are
available for your spouse and minor
children with National Transfer
Protection. This limited time offer is
also extended to members of the
National Guard and Reserve.
Space is limited.
Conditions - Burial spaces cannot be for
investment purposes. You must register
for your free burial space.
1-800-578-9547 Ext. 6001
In Loving Memory
HENRY TUROSKI
Coach Hank
Who Passed Away One Year Today
Oct. 7, 2011
Since that very sad day,
Its been one year
Since you went away,
God saw you were tired
From your long and hard ght,
And he whispered in our sweet ear
Henry, come toward the light.
So He closed your eyes
And took you by the hand,
With His shoulder to lean on
You went to a better land.
When we saw you were sleeping
We knew you were free from pain.
It would not be fair
To wish you back again.
But Henry, our hearts are broken
Because we miss you so.
It really is hard
To let you go.
Gone, but not forgotten
Love always and forever
Wife Mickey, Daughter Kim,
Son Henry & Wife Melissa,
Daughter Kristen & Husband Rich,
Granddaughter Savannah, Princess
Tillie, Brother Michael, Sisters
Leona & Sharon, Family & Friends
BARBER Lottie, funeral 10 a.m.
Monday in Betz-Jastremski Funer-
al Home Inc., 568 Bennett St.,
Luzerne. Friends may call 5 to 8
p.m. today in the funeral home.
BECHETTI Felix, funeral 11:15 a.m.
Monday in Corcoran Funeral
Home Inc., 20 S. Main St., Plains
Township. Mass of Christian
Burial at noon in St. Maria Goretti
Church, Laflin. Friends may call 1
to 3 p.m. today.
CRONICK Eleanor, funeral 10 a.m.
Monday in Lehman Family Funer-
al Service Inc., 403 Berwick St.,
White Haven. Friends may visit 6
to 8 pm. today.
HOSSAGE Justin, funeral 11 a.m.
Monday in Bloomingdale Bible
Church, 238 Silo Road, Ross
Township. Friends may call 2 to 6
p.m. today in Curtis L. Swanson
Funeral Home Inc., corners of
Routes 29 and 118, Pikes Creek.
KABARA Stanley, funeral 9:30
a.m. Monday in Wroblewski Fu-
neral Home Inc., 1442 Wyoming
Ave., Forty Fort. Mass of Christian
Burial 10 a.m. in St. Elizabeth Ann
Seton Roman Catholic Parish, 116
Hughes St., Swoyersville. Friends
may call 3 to 5 p.m. today in the
funeral home.
KIVLER William, friends may call
3 to 5 p.m. today in Yeosock
Funeral Home, 40 S. Main St.,
Plains Township. Services at 5
p.m.
KORDIS Peter Jr., funeral 9:30
a.m. Monday in Stanley S. Stegura
Funeral Home Inc., 614 S. Hanover
St., Nanticoke. Mass of Christian
Burial 10 a.m. in the Main Site of St.
Faustinas Parrish, 520 S. Hanover
St., Nanticoke. Friends may call 5
p.m. to 7 p.m. today.
MATTICK Robert, Mass of Christian
Burial 9:30 a.m. Monday in Holy
Saviour Church, Wilkes-Barre.
Friends may call 4 to 7 p.m. today
in Corcoran Funeral Home Inc.,
Plains Township.
ORAVEC Paul, funeral 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday in Wroblewski Funeral
Home Inc., 1442 Wyoming Ave.,
Forty Fort. Mass of Christian Burial
to 10 a.m. in St. Elizabeth Ann
Seton Parish, 116 Hughes St.,
Swoyersville. Friends may call 8:30
to 9:30 a.m. Tuesday in the funeral
home.
SCHEVETS Frank, funeral Monday
with a Mass of Christian Burial
9:30 a.m. in St. Maria Goretti
Church, Laflin.
SHELLHAMER Dorcas, memorial
service 2 p.m. Oct. 14, in First
Reformed Church, Willow Street,
Plymouth.
SINAVAGE Mary, funeral 9:30 a.m.
Monday in Jendrzejewski Funeral
Home, 21 N. Meade St., Wilkes-
Barre. Divine Liturgy 10 a.m. in St.
Vladimir Ukrainian Greek Catholic
Church, Zerby Avenue, Kingston.
Friends may call 4 to 7 p.m. today
with Parastas services at 6:30 p.m.
FUNERALS
CARL J. MANSFIELD, 73, of
Plains Township, died Thursday,
October 4, 2012, at his residence
following an illness. Born in
Wilkes-Barre, January 8, 1939, he
was a son to the late Jack and An-
gela Wiss Mansfield. He attended
school in the Plains area and was a
graduate of Plains Memorial High
School, Class of 1957. Carl worked
foe most of his life at Bethlehem
Steel as a tool-and-die maker and
as a machinist. He was precededin
death by his parents. Carl is sur-
vived by several cousins.
The funeral will be held at the
convenience of the family. Condo-
lences can be sent to the family at
www.yanaitisfuneralhome.com.
Arrangements by the Yanaitis Fu-
neral Home, Plains Township.
SCOTT R. MITCHELL, 45, of
West Green Street, Nanticoke,
diedunexpectedly Friday, October
5, 2012, at his home.
Funeral arrangements are
pending fromthe George A. Strish
Inc. Funeral Home, 105 N. Main
St., Ashley.
AMY OSENKARSKI, 31, a resi-
dent of Jenkins Township, died
Thursday, October 4, 2012, at her
home.
Funeral arrangements have
been entrusted to the H. Merritt
Hughes Funeral Home Inc., a
Golden Rule Funeral Home, 451N.
Main St., Wilkes-Barre. A full obit-
uary will be published later this
week.
HENRIETTA ROSE, age 69, a
resident of Pittston Manor and for-
merly of Taylor, passed away Sat-
urday, October 6, 2012. She is sur-
vived by many friends, including
Angelo Bufalino of Pittston.
Private arrangements are un-
der the care of the Thomas P. Kear-
ney Funeral Home Inc., 517 N.
Main St., Old Forge. Condolences
may be sent at www.kearneyfuner-
alhome.com.
RONALDSEAGER, 57, of New-
town section of Hanover Town-
ship, died late Friday evening, Oc-
tober 5, 2012, at home.
Arrangements are by Lehman
Family Funeral Service Inc., 689
Hazle Ave., Wilkes-Barre. For
more information, visit the funeral
home website at www.lehmanfun-
eralhome.com or see a full obitu-
ary in Mondays edition of The
Times-Leader.
RICHARD C. STUTTLE, 79, of
Nicholson Street, Wilkes-Barre
Township, died Friday, October 5,
2012, at his home.
Arrangements are in pro-
gress with McLaughlins The
Family Funeral Service. Full obitu-
ary information will be published
in Mondays edition of this news-
paper and later today at www.ce-
lebratehislife.com.
J
amie Alan Noble, age 19, of Pitt-
ston, died Thursday, October 4,
2012, at home.
Born in Tunkhannock, Jamie is a
son of Kimberly VaowStofko, of Pitt-
ston, and the late Timothy Noble.
Jamie is also survived by four
brothers, Robert, of Mehoopany;
Joshua, of West Pittston; Jon, of
Tunkhannock; TJ, of Lake Carey; one
sister, ShannonNoble, of Lake Carey;
maternal grandparents, Wanda and
Dennis DAdama; cousins, Heather,
Brandon; also several nieces, neph-
ews, aunts and uncles.
Funeral servicewill beMondayat
4p.m. inthe Charles H. LitwinFuner-
al Home, 91 State St., Nicholson,
with services by the Rev. James Co-
hen of Waverly Free Methodist
Church.
A viewing will be held on Monday
from 2 p.m. until time of service.
Tosendanonlinecondolence, visit
www.litwinfuneralhome.com.
Jamie A. Noble
October 4, 2012
F
rances Mary (Occipenti) Luon-
go, of Laflin, passed away peace-
fully at home Saturday, October 6,
2012.
Born April 20, 1922, in Pittston,
she was a daughter of the late Mary
(Miraglia) Occipenti and Anthony
Occipenti. She was a graduate of
Pittston High School, Class of 1938.
Frances was a devoted and loving
mother, grandmother and great-
grandmother. She enjoyed cooking,
sewing, and most of all, taking care
of her family.
She was preceded in death by her
husband, Anthony J. Luongo; sister,
Gertrude Scarantino.
Surviving are son, Frank A. Luon-
go, Laflin; granddaughters, Cristina
Luongo, Collingswood, N.J.; Lor-
raine and her husband, Rodney
Shupe, Magnolia, N.J.; great-grand-
sons, Jayce Shupe, Colby Shupe, Jo-
seph Luongo; great-granddaught-
ers, Abigail Frances Shupe, Alyssa
Lynn Shupe; and sister, Rosemary
Schillaci, Laflin.
Viewing hours will be held on
Monday from 5 to 8 p.m. at Grazia-
no Funeral Home Inc., Pittston
Township. Funeral services will be-
gin at the funeral home on Tuesday
at 9 a.m. A Mass of Christian Burial
will be held at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday in
St. Maria Goretti R.C. Church, La-
flin. The St. Maria Goretti Bereave-
ment Group will recite the Devine
Mercy Chaplet and The Rosary in
the church at 9 a.m. Tuesday prior
to the funeral Mass. Interment ser-
vices will followat St. Roccos Cem-
etery, Pittston Township.
In lieu of flowers, donations can
be made in Frances name to the do-
nors charity of choice. To submit
online condolences or for directions
to our funeral home, please visit
www.grazianofuneralhome.com.
Frances M. Luongo
October 6, 2012
H
allie Lee Herba, 74, of Glenview,
Ill., suddenly passedaway as a re-
sult of a brain hemorrhage on Sep-
tember 29, 2012.
Born September 27, 1938, in
Wilkes-Barre, she was a daughter of
the late Fred and Ruth Hally Lee.
Hallie worked in the mammogra-
phy area of the X-ray department at
Rush-Presbyterian-Saint Lukes Hos-
pital in Chicago, where diagnostic as-
sessments for breast tumors were
made. It was there that she met her
husband, Dr. EdwardHerba, aneurol-
ogist at the hospital. They married in
Wilkes-Barre on May 24, 1969.
Hallie was also involved in the pa-
tient-family relations department of
the hospital, addressing issues and
problems related to patient care in
the hospital setting. This role was
unique for its time and remains an
early model for the patient advocate
of today. She was also a member of
the Womens Board of the former
Grant Hospital in Chicago.
She will be greatly missed by her
husbandof 43 years, Edward; a broth-
er, Fred, and his wife, Ginny Lee, of
California; nieces, nephews and im-
mediate members of the Kupstas and
Lee families.
Celebration of Hallies Life will
be held Tuesday at 9:30 a.m. from
McLaughlins The Family Funeral
Service, 142 S. Washington St.,
Wilkes-Barre, with Funeral Mass at
10:30 a.m. in the Church of Saint Ma-
ry of the Immaculate Conception. In-
terment will be in Saint Marys Cem-
etery in Hanover Township.
Memorial donations to local brain
stroke programs are preferred. Per-
manent messages and memories can
be shared with Hallies family at
www.celebrateherlife.com.
Hallie Lee Herba
September 29, 2012
STANLEY WASKIEWICZ, 86,
of Wyoming, passed away Satur-
day, October 6, 2012, in his home.
Arrangements are pending
from the Metcalfe-Shaver-Kopcza
Funeral Home Inc., 504 Wyoming
Ave., Wyoming.
JOSEPH M. ZEGARSKI, 49, of
Nanticoke, passed away Saturday,
October 6, 2012, at General Hospi-
tal, Wilkes-Barre. Born in Long Is-
land, N.Y., he was a son of Joseph
Zegarski Sr. and the late Joan Silk-
owski, who passed away in 1996.
He was employed as a factory
worker for Dove Window, Hanover
Township. Presently surviving, in
addition to his father, Joseph Sr.,
are wife, former Teri Grenewicz;
sons, Joseph III and Justin, at
home; brothers, Michael, Nanti-
coke; David, Moscow; sisters, Bar-
bara Jason, Honey Pot; Amy Pe-
troski, Nanticoke; nieces and ne-
phews.
The Funeral will be held at the
discretion of the family.
ELAINE SWOBODA, of Hanov-
er Township, passed away Satur-
day, October 6, 2012.
Arrangements are pending
from Mamary-Durkin Funeral Ser-
vice, 59 Parrish St., Wilkes-Barre.
B
rian C. Polak, 25, of Windsor,
Va., formerly of the Wyoming
Valley, died Thursday morning, Oc-
tober 4, 2012, at home.
His wife is the former Sheri A.
Reedy Polak. The couple married in
2006. BorninKingston. Sonof Jean-
nette L. Tilley, Naples, Fla., and the
late Donald Polak Sr., he was a Navy
veteran, having served on the USS
Enterprise for six years. He was a
graduate of Wyoming Area High
School in 2005.
Brian was a true family man, lov-
ing father, devoted husband and
dedicated friend. He was always
there for those he knew and giving
to those he didnt. He was hard-
working and gifted with his hands.
If it was broken, he would find a way
to fix it. He was loving and easygo-
ing, wearing a smile everywhere he
went. He will truly be missed and
never forgotten.
Also surviving are a son, Chris-
topher Jacob Polak; daughter, Cas-
sandra Cassie Eleanor Polak, both
at home; a sister, Andrea J. Polak,
Wyoming; maternal grandmother,
Joan Tilley, West Pittston; and a
niece, Avaline C. Kizis.
In addition to his father, he was
also preceded in death by a brother,
Donald Polak Jr.; maternal grandfa-
ther, Russell Tilley Sr.; paternal
grandparents, John Jake and Mar-
garet Peg Polak.
The funeral will be on Tues-
day at 9:30 a.m. fromthe Law-
rence E. Young Funeral Home, 418
S. State St., Clarks Summit, with
church services at 11a.m. fromTrin-
ity Episcopal Church of West Pitt-
ston, 220 Montgomery Ave., West
Pittston. Interment with military
honors will be in Wyoming Cemete-
ry. Friends may call Monday from 4
to 8 p.m. at the Lawrence E. Young
Funeral Home.
In lieu of flowers, memorials may
be made to the Polak family, 418 S.
State St., Clarks Summit, PA18411.
Online condolences may be sent to
www.lawrenceeyoungfuneralhome-
.com.
Brian C. Polak
October 4, 2012
M
artha Danko, 92, of Wesley Vil-
lage, Jenkins Township, for-
merly of Alden, passed away at Wes-
ley Village on Friday, October 5,
2012.
Born in Alden, she was a daugh-
ter of the late Harry and Pauline
Chorney Urchak and attended New-
port Township schools.
Martha was a member of Trans-
figuration of Our Lord Ukrainian
Catholic Church, Hanover Section
of Nanticoke.
She was employed by Western
Electric until her retirement in
1976. After retirement, she worked
for her church until 2005.
She was preceded in death, in ad-
dition to her parents, by her hus-
band, Stephen C., in1973; brothers,
Peter, John, Michael; sisters, Mary,
Anna, Pearl, Eva, Elizabeth and He-
len.
Presently surviving are nephews,
a great-nephew and a great-niece.
Funeral services will be held
Tuesday, with Panachida at 10 a.m.
at the Grontkowski Funeral Home
P.C., 51-53 W. Green St., Nanticoke,
with Devine Liturgy at 11 a.m. in
Transfiguration of Our Lord Ukrai-
nian Church, Hanover Section of
Nanticoke. Entombment will follow
in St. Marys Cemetery, Hanover
Township. Friends and relatives are
invited to calling hours Tuesday
from 9 a.m. until time of service.
Martha Danko
October 5, 2012
R
ichard J. Antolik Sr., 84, passed
away peacefully Friday morning
October 5, 2012, at Hospice Com-
munity Care, Wilkes-Barre, sur-
rounded by his loved ones.
His beloved wife was the late
Eleanor Zionkowski Antolik, who
passed away December 8, 1989.
Born February 7, 1928, in Nanti-
coke, Dick was a son of the late El-
izabeth Dzuris Antolik and Andrew
Antolik.
Dick graduated from Nanticoke
High School and served in the U.S.
Army before earning an apprentice-
ship as an operative plasterer and
cement mason. He lived in Hanover
Township throughout his adult life
and worked for Culp Brothers and
Local 150. He was anavidfisherman
and looked forward to his annual
fishing trip to Deer Horn Lodge in
Canada since 1972. Dick was a
member of the AMVETS Post 59
and American Legion Post 609.
In addition to his parents, Eliza-
beth and Andrew Antolik, and his
wife, Eleanor, Dick was preceded in
death by sisters Esther Antolik, El-
izabeth Marietta; brothers George,
Dan and Robert Antolik.
Dick is survived by three chil-
dren, Deborah C. Jones and hus-
bandFrederick, Hanover Township;
Denise Kokinchak and husband
John, Aurora, Ohio; RichardJ. Anto-
lik Jr. and wife Renee, Colorado
Springs, Colo. Hehas fivegrandchil-
dren, Kristen and Kelsey Jones,
Alexandra and Jonathan Kokinchak
and Taylor Antolik. Also surviving
are brothers AndrewandJohnAnto-
lik, Nanticoke; and a sister, Ruth
AnnFassig, West Nanticoke; several
nieces and nephews.
Relatives and friends are re-
spectfully invited to attend
the funeral, which will be conduct-
ed at 10 a.m. Monday from the
Grontkowski Funeral Home P.C.,
51-53 W. Green St., Nanticoke, and
will be conducted by Pastor Debra
A. North. Friends and family are al-
so invited to attend calling hours to-
day from 6 to 8 p.m. at the funeral
home. Interment will be at the con-
venience of the family.
In lieu of flowers, the family asks
donations are made tothe AMVETS
Post 59 and to Celtic Hospice Com-
munity Care, Wilkes-Barre.
Richard Antolik Sr.
October 5, 2012
F
elix Bechetti, 97, of Bear Creek
Township, died Thursday morn-
ing, October 4, 2012, at United
Methodist Homes, Wesley Village
Campus, Jenkins Township.
Born in the Keystone section of
Plains, he was a sonof the late Raele
and Genoeffa Bensi Bechetti. Felix
attended Plains Memorial High
School and was an Army Veteran of
World War II, serving in the Pacific
Theater.
He was employed as a truck driv-
er for Addy Asphalt of Keystone un-
til his retirement. Felix was record-
ing secretary for the United Steel
Workers of America for 25 years. He
was a member of St. Maria Goretti
Church, Laflin, and the Plains
American Legion Joseph E. Conlon
Post 558 and the Perugia Beneficial
Society, Keystone.
Felix is preceded in death by his
brother Frank Casaia and sister, Jo-
sephine Pascucci.
Surviving are his wife of 61years,
the former Lillian Pascucci, Bear
Creek Township; sons, Daniel and
his wife, Susan, Bear Creek Town-
ship; Geno and his wife, Holly, Chi-
no Valley, Ariz.; grandchildren,
Chris and Greg Naylor, Dan Bechet-
ti Jr.; great-grandchildren, Cody,
Harmony, Miles; brother Fred Ca-
saia and wife Jean, Duryea; neph-
ews and nieces.
Funeral with Military Hon-
ors will be held Monday at
11:15 a.m. from the Corcoran Funer-
al Home Inc., 20 S. Main St. Plains,
witha Mass of ChristianBurial at 12
p.m. in St. Maria Goretti Church,
Laflin. The Parish Rosary Group
will recitetheDivineMercyChaplet
and Rosary in the Church at 11:30
a.m. before the Mass. All are invited
to join them. Interment will be in
Italian Independent Cemetery,
West Wyoming. Friends may call to-
day from1 to 3 p.m.
Onlinecondolences maybemade
at www.corcoranfuneralhome.com.
Felix Bechetti
October 4, 2012
More Obituaries, Page 7A
Elizabeth J.
Klepac, of Ha-
nover Township
and formerly of
Beech Street,
Wilkes-Barre,
passed away
peacefully with
family at her
side Friday, October 5, 2012 at
Wilkes-Barre General Hospital.
Born July 31, 1928, in Wilkes-
Barre, she was a daughter of the late
William and Grace Thomas Lowe.
Knownas Bettie, shewas agradu-
ate of G.A.R. High School, class of
1946, and was employed for many
years at RCA Mountain Top. She
was a caring mother and truly self-
less person. She will be greatly mis-
sed.
Bettie was preceded in death by
her husband, Ben Klepac, and her
brother, Keith Lowe.
Surviving are her three children,
Eric L. and his wife, Kathy Klepac,
of Louisville, Colo.; June Lynn and
her husband, Charlie Bond, of Ply-
mouth; Brian C. Klepac, of Hanover
Township; grandson, Chris Klepac;
granddaughter, Lauren Klepac; sis-
ters, Rawleen Leeds, of Laurel Run;
Jean Boyle, of Wilkes-Barre; her
brothers, WilliamLowe, of Sarasota
Fla.; Larry Lowe, of Mountain Top;
several nieces and nephews.
The familyis grateful tothe surgi-
cal intensive care unit staff at
Wilkes-Barre General Hospital and
the staff at Eye Care Specialists of
Kingston. In lieu of flowers, please
consider donations to the Chronic
Disease Fund www.cdfund.org.
Funeral will be held at the conve-
nience of the family from Mamary-
Durkin Funeral Service, 59 Parrish
Street, Wilkes-Barre. Friends may
call Monday from 5 to 7 p.m. at the
funeral home.
Elizabeth J. Klepac
October 5, 2012
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 PAGE 11A
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PAGE 12A SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
C L I C K
WILKES U. GOLD BAR CLUB
5K RUN/WALK
BRAS ACROSS THE BRIDGE
CANCER EVENT
HANOVER AREA
ZUMBATHON FUNDRAISER
BILL TARUTIS PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Wilkes University Gold Bar Club, which supports students aspir-
ing to become Air Force officers, hosted a 5K run/walk at Kirby
Park last Sunday to raise money for the Wounded Warriors Pro-
ject, which assists injured servicemen. Caleb, left, Bryan and
Joseph Flynn, Wilkes-Barre, and Lee Kozokas, Dallas, attended.
Nicole Marek of Plains Township, left, and Alan Klapat of Wilkes-
Barre
Thomas Gernhart III, 7, left, and his dad, Thomas Jr., Glen Lyon
Mike Tereska of Harveys Lake, left, and Joe Nalepa of Nanticoke
AIMEE DILGER PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
KRZ radio station sponsored its annual Bras Across the Bridge
Saturday along the Market Street Bridge in support of Breast
Cancer Awareness Month. Participating were Aldrin Soriano, left,
Kelly Johnson, Brittany Jones, Jennifer Natishak and Katie San-
toro
Lexie Padavan, left, Briana Scorey, Gaetano Buonsante and Lind-
sey Scorey
Linda Soha, left, and Kelly Dyanick
Danielle, left, and Judy Vallely
AIMEE DILGER PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
Hanover Area senior Justus Wanyo, 17, organized a Zumbathon to
raise money for the ALS Association, an organization dedicated
to raising awareness about and fighting Lou Gehrigs disease. The
three-hour event, featuring Zumba dancing, was held in honor of
her great-grandmother, Ann Kosloski. Wanyo is at right with her
grandmother, Joan Blaum.
Barbara Kosloski, left, and Cathy Rose
Wendy Yedlock, left, and Jocelyn Holodick-Reed
Lauren Richmond, left, and Megan Milford
C M Y K
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PAGE 14A SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
N E W S
distressed: Edwardsville and
West Wyoming boroughs and the
townships of Bear Creek, Butler,
Hazle, Hunlock, Newport, Sugar-
loaf and Union. In addition, Rice
Township improved its status
from being moderately to mini-
mally distressed.
West Wyoming had the biggest
turnaround. In 2010, the plan had
a deficit of $265,049. That was
turned into a $29,479 surplus in
2012 a more than $235,000
change to the good. That
bumped the plans funding ratio
from 73 to 104.
The news wasnt good every-
where, however.
Hazleton citys pension plan is
inthe worst condition of all coun-
ty municipalities. It fell from be-
ingmoderatelydistressedin2010
to severely distressed in 2012
theonlymunicipalityinthecoun-
ty to receive the lowest rating.
Four other towns sawtheir sta-
tuses decline: West Pittston, Nan-
ticoke and Hughestown were not
distressed in 2010, but are in
2012. Ross Township fell from a
minimally distressed to moder-
ately distressed.
The Hughestown pension plan
saw the most significant drop in
funding ratio of all plans in the
county, decreasing from 102 to
84.
Many variables at work
Why did some plans perform
so much better than others?
Its difficult to pinpoint exact
reasons, as many variables deter-
mine a plans health. Data from
PERC indicates that many of the
plans that improved saw an in-
crease in assets that was fueled,
in part, by an upswing in invest-
ment returns.
All but eight of the 55 commu-
nities saw their assets increase.
Hazle Townshipreportedthe big-
gest percentage increase in as-
sets, from$123,023 to $217,344
a 76.6 percent increase. Rice
Township had the second largest
percentage increase, from
$428,988 to $680,737, or 58.6
percent.
Other communities benefited
from a decrease in liabilities.
Twelve of the 55 communities
saw liabilities drop. Lake Town-
ship reported the biggest per-
centage change, dropping from
$422,391 to $203,161, a 52 per-
cent decrease. It was followed by
Harveys Lake, which reduced lia-
bilities by 25.5 percent; West
Wyoming, 24.7 percent and Free-
land, 16.5 percent. For some mu-
nicipalities the increase in assets
was wiped out by higher liabili-
ties. That was true for four of the
five municipalities that dropped
into a distressed status in 2012.
Hazleton, for instance, saw its
assets increase by $1.5 million,
but the gain was dwarfed by lia-
bilities that surged by $5.9 mil-
lion. That caused the plans def-
icit to swell from$23.9 million to
$28.4 million.
Wilkes-Barre citys pension
plan, which is minimally dis-
tressed, also fared poorly, though
not enough to change its distress
level status.
Wilkes-Barre was one of the
eight communities that saw as-
sets decrease, from $84.1 million
to $83.7 million. In addition, lia-
bilities rose from $108 million to
$115.4 million. That caused the
deficit to increase from$23.9 mil-
lion to $31.7 million, a 33 percent
jump, dropping its funding ratio
from 78 to 73.
Although the decrease did not
change the plans distressed sta-
tus, its still a cause for concern,
said Bernard Kozlowski, deputy
director of programs for PERC.
If you keep dropping year to
year, is your plan for administra-
tion appropriate and correct?
Kozlowski said. Its five points
right now, if two years from now
you drop another five, youre
headed in the wrong direction.
Factors change numbers
Municipal officials offereda va-
riety of explanations why their
pension plans fared better or
worse over the two-year period.
In West Wyoming, council
President Eileen Cipriani said
the positive turnaround was tied
primarily to the overall increased
financial health of the borough.
In the past several years, the
boroughwas plaguedby financial
problems that left it unable topay
its required allotment into the
pension.
We owed the pension close to
$150,000, Cipriani said.
The borough entered the early
intervention program with the
Pennsylvania Economy League,
which allowed it to regain a
sound financial footing. That al-
lowed it to catch up on the back
money it owed to the plan, she
said.
We hadsomany issues admin-
istratively with the pension plan.
They helped us straighten it out
and make correct decisions, she
said.
Officials in communities that
saw their distress level rise cited
various issues, including poor in-
vestment choices, generous ben-
efit packages and an imbalance
between the number of people
paying in versus receiving bene-
fits.
In Wilkes-Barre, which has five
separate pension plans, city ad-
ministrator Marie McCormick
said one of the major issues is
that insome plans, the number of
retirees receiving benefits signif-
icantly outweighs the number of
current employees paying into it.
We have one pensionwith382
people collecting and 280 active
employees paying into it,
McCormick said. Trying to fund
the pension for all people is very
difficult.
McCormick said investment
returns plans were also lower
than had been anticipated. Part
of that problem was the pension
boards meeting quarterly, which
meant they sometimes missed
out on opportunities to alter in-
vestment strategies.
Its timing. Sometimes we did
not pick up on fluctuation in the
markets, she said. What we did
to improve that is we went to a
financial manager and have an
agreement for them to make
changes as we go along so we
arent missing the ups and downs
in the market.
The problems in Hazleton are
more complex.
Mary Ellen Lieb, city adminis-
trator, said Hazletons problems
stem largely from a generous
early-retirement benefit package
that was offered to employees in
the late 1990s that provided life-
time health benefits to the em-
ployee and their families.
Hazleton also pays the benefit
costs from the pension plan,
which has a major impact on lia-
bilities. Other municipalities pay
those costs fromthe general fund
budget.
Hazleton has taken several
steps to address the funding
woes, including gaining court ap-
proval to dedicate 0.4 percent of
earned income taxes to the pen-
sion plan, according to a correc-
tive action plan submitted to
PERC. Its also negotiating with
employees to increase their con-
tributions.
Hughestown was hurt by a sig-
nificant increase in liabilities,
which rose by $43,056, or 20 per-
cent, between 2010 and 2012. As-
sets, meanwhile, increased by
just $750, or 0.3 percent. That
caused the plans $3,451 surplus
to turn into a $38,855 deficit in
2012.
The borough has been cited by
the state Auditor Generals Office
for paying an unauthorized pen-
sion benefit to the widow of its
former police chief, George De-
Lucia. Its not clear howmuchim-
pact that had on the pension
plans health. That issue is ex-
pected to be addressed in the
2012 actuarial report, which has
not yet been released.
Wayne Quick, council presi-
dent, said he believes the pri-
mary issue was poor investment
performance. He said council is
currently shopping around for
a new investment adviser to try
to improve performance
We were only getting a mini-
mum amount of interest, Quick
said. We are looking into shop-
ping around to get better rates.
InNanticoke, Donna Wall, ben-
efits and financial coordinator,
said city officials anticipated the
plans fundingratiowoulddropin
2012 because it chose to spread
large investment losses that oc-
curredin2008over a five-year pe-
riod.
Even though the plan dropped
intodistressedstatus, Wall saidit
is very stable.
Were not overfunded, but
overall our plans are in very good
shape, she said.
Ross Township secretary Terry
Davis said the township was hurt
by poor performance of invest-
ments, which were in a fixed-rate
fund at the time they were as-
sessed by PERC. It has since
changed financial managers in an
attempt to get better returns.
Savino Bonita, borough man-
ager for West Pittston, said the
small decrease in assets was pri-
marily the product of technical
accounting change utilized by
the plans actuary.
Bonita said he believes the
plan is in good shape considering
the economy, noting its funding
ratio is just under the threshold
to be declared distressed.
Aiming too high a worry
The fact a pension plan is dis-
tressed does not mean it cant
meet its obligations, but its anin-
dicator of issues that need to be
addressed to ensure it remains
viable, Kozlowski said.
Municipalities are required to
deposit their minimal obligation
to the plans, which comes from
the general fund budget, by Dec.
31 each year. The amount that
must be paid is determined by
each municipality in conjunction
with the actuary that evaluates
the plans.
State law requires municipal-
ities to meet the minimum obli-
gation. If a municipality fails to
make the deposit, it will be noted
as a finding in the audit of the
plan the state auditor general.
The retirement commission
beganrating plans in2010 to help
municipalities identify issues
sooner so that corrective action
could be taken before the prob-
lems worsen, Kozlowski said.
We are making them take a
look at their pension plans. Our
mainconcernis they dont ignore
these things, he said.
One issue that remains a con-
cern is the investment rate of re-
turn municipalities are predict-
ing.
Kozlowski said its important
those returns be realistic. Its
tempting to predict a higher rate
of return because that will lessen
the amount of money the munici-
palityhas tocontributeeachyear,
but that will catchupsome point.
Nobody wants to put extra
money in. The way to not put in
money is to make the (invest-
ment return) assumptions high,
Kozlowski said. (But) if you
dont make it, that means youll
be putting in more money in the
long run.
Ashley Borough $1,197,760.00 $1,205,951 $799,877 $760,384 $397,883 $445,567 0.7% -4.9% 12.0%
Avoca Borough $346,918.00 $384,063 $96,942 $90,448 $249,976 $293,615 10.7% -6.7% 17.5%
ConynghamBorough $583,521.00 $824,273 $554,511 $606,304 $29,010 $217,969 41.3% 9.3% 651.4%
Dallas Borough $1,119,328.00 $1,243,439 $1,046,925 $1,147,366 $72,403 $96,073 11.1% 9.6% 32.7%
Dallas Township $4,237,918.00 $4,601,645 $3,466,352 $3,634,050 $771,566 $967,595 8.6% 4.8% 25.4%
Dupont Borough $726,384.00 $915,119 $190,066 $221,516 $536,318 $693,603 26.0% 16.5% 29.3%
Duryea Borough $877,009.00 $939,078 $732,528 $804,414 $144,481 $134,664 7.1% 9.8% -6.8%
Freeland Borough $1,469,959.00 $1,432,745 $1,315,043 $1,097,591 $154,916 $335,154 -2.5% -16.5% 116.3%
Freeland Borough
Municipal Authority $1,664,855.00 $1,815,963 $1,312,673 $1,508,677 $352,182 $307,286 9.1% 14.9% -12.7%
Harveys Lake Borough $865,068.00 $832,398 $297,885 $221,947 $567,183 $610,451 -3.8% -25.5% 7.6%
Hazleton Public
Transit Authority $174,062.00 $168,884 $140,058 $130,808 $34,004 $38,076 -3.0% -6.6% 12.0%
Huntington Township $498,163.00 $558,536 $419,956 $491,258 $78,207 $67,278 12.1% 17.0% -14.0%
Jenkins Township $997,295.00 $1,059,111 $975,654 $934,796 $21,641 $124,315 6.2% -4.2% 474.4%
Kingston Township $2,421,861.00 $3,387,054 $2,355,482 $2,888,349 $66,379 $498,705 39.9% 22.6% 651.3%
Lain Borough $263,577.00 $328,307 $202,207 $293,219 $61,370 $35,088 24.6% 45.0% -42.8%
Larksville Borough $2,230,263.00 $2,380,602 $1,648,888 $1,843,003 $581,375 $537,599 6.7% 11.8% -7.5%
Lehman Township $384,923.00 $522,696 $223,823 $310,361 $161,100 $212,335 35.8% 38.7% 31.8%
Luzerne Borough $216,846.00 $217,851 $190,469 $202,211 $26,377 $15,640 0.5% 6.2% -40.7%
Pittston Township $486,666.00 $589,443 $481,569 $541,650 $5,097 $47,793 21.1% 12.5% 837.7%
Shickshinny Borough $408,041.00 $423,948 $59,749 $53,808 $348,292 $370,140 3.9% -9.9% 6.3%
Swoyersville Borough $1,611,517.00 $1,975,653 $1,280,885 $1,416,969 $330,632 $558,684 22.6% 10.6% 69.0%
White Haven Borough $729,538.00 $776,369 $547,712 $607,533 $181,826 $168,836 6.4% 10.9% -7.1%
Bear Creek Township $76,106.00 $103,828 $85,282.00 $104,555 -$9,176 -$727 36.4% 22.6% -92.1%
Butler Township $1,292,639 $1,732,228 $1,708,495 $1,832,040 -$415,856 -$99,812 34.0% 7.2% -76.0%
Edwardsville Borough $1,754,109.00 $2,172,628 $1,964,396 $2,222,925 -$210,287 -$50,297 23.9% 13.2% -76.1%
Exeter Borough $1,138,096.00 $1,319,778 $1,157,446 $1,406,467 -$19,350 -$86,689 16.0% 21.5% 348.0%
FairviewTownship $1,106,695.00 $1,154,628 $1,311,906 $1,630,276 -$205,211 -$475,648 4.3% 24.3% 131.8%
Forty Fort Borough $2,660,804.00 $2,717,527 $3,404,447 $3,602,603 -$743,643 -$885,076 2.1% 5.8% 19.0%
Greater Hazleton Joint
Sewer Authority $984,718.00 $1,115,721 $1,512,762 $1,647,608 -$528,044 -$531,887 13.3% 8.9% 0.7%
Hanover Township $7,213,933.00 $7,634,091 $10,982,721 $12,209,711 -$3,768,788 -$4,575,620 5.8% 11.2% 21.4%
Hazleton City $26,005,241.00 $27,515,466 $49,927,819 $55,919,902 -$23,922,578 -$28,404,436 5.8% 12.0% 18.7%
Hazleton City
Water Authority $1,732,560.00 $2,163,348 $2,885,426 $3,303,985 -$1,152,866 -$1,140,637 24.9% 14.5% -1.1%
Hunlock Township $217,605.00 $288,535 $327,791 $313,443 -$110,186 -$24,908 32.6% -4.4% -77.4%
Jackson Township $500,506.00 $633,632 $602,632 $792,308 -$102,126 -$158,676 26.6% 31.5% 55.4%
Kingston Borough $13,209,165.00 $13,933,986 $17,109,839 $18,453,081 -$3,900,674 -$4,519,095 5.5% 7.9% 15.9%
Lake Township $353,277.00 $157,522 $422,391 $203,161 -$69,114 -$45,639 -55.4% -51.9% -34.0%
Luzerne County
Transportation Authority $4,647,892.00 $4,626,176 $6,753,131 $7,516,320 -$2,105,239 -$2,890,144 -0.5% 11.3% 37.3%
Nanticoke City $6,735,235.00 $6,912,192 $7,466,972 $8,386,777 -$731,737 -$1,474,585 2.6% 12.3% 101.5%
Pittston City $7,139,881.00 $7,141,308 $9,596,300 $9,775,183 -$2,456,419 -$2,633,875 0.1% 1.9% 7.2%
Plains Township $5,885,313.00 $6,225,256 $7,921,498 $8,730,247 -$2,036,185 -$2,504,991 5.8% 10.2% 23.0%
Rice Township $428,988.00 $680,737 $709,788 $791,088 -$280,800 -$110,351 58.7% 11.5% -60.7%
Ross Township $252,104.00 $297,287 $346,659 $458,228 -$94,555 -$160,941 17.9% 32.2% 70.2%
SalemTownship $215,578.00 $318,466 $263,224 $355,983 -$47,646 -$37,517 47.7% 35.2% -21.3%
West Hazleton Borough $1,443,354.00 $1,518,910 $2,297,561 $2,407,314 -$854,207 -$888,404 5.2% 4.8% 4.0%
West Pittston Borough $1,864,928.00 $1,798,819 $1,894,023 $2,029,643 -$29,095 -$230,824 -3.5% 7.2% 693.3%
Wilkes Barre City $84,120,920.00 $83,704,642 $108,006,954 $115,389,957 -$23,886,034 -$31,685,315 -0.5% 6.8% 32.7%
Wilkes Barre Township $3,270,517.00 $3,635,064 $4,208,212 $4,654,664 -$937,695 -$1,019,600 11.1% 10.6% 8.7%
Wright Township $2,630,377.00 $3,006,871 $3,122,097 $3,599,567 -$491,720 -$592,696 14.3% 15.3% 20.5%
Hughestown Borough $209,587.00 $210,337 $206,136 $249,192 $3,451 -$38,855 0.4% 20.9% -1225.9%
Plymouth Borough $1,407,473.00 $1,311,755 $1,322,896 $1,354,862 $84,577 -$43,107 -6.8% 2.4% -151.0%
Hazle Township $123,023.00 $217,344 $141,189 $212,222 -$18,166 $5,122 76.7% 50.3% -128.2%
Newport Township $1,251,299.00 $1,417,232 $1,403,233 $1,366,365 -$151,934 $50,867 13.3% -2.6% -133.5%
Sugarloaf Township $735,962.00 $924,354 $858,000 $789,102 -$122,038 $135,252 25.6% -8.0% -210.8%
Union Township $98,766.00 $152,228 $124,025 $140,748 -$25,259 $11,480 54.1% 13.5% -145.4%
West Wyoming Borough $722,557.00 $773,518 $987,606 $744,039 -$265,049 $29,479 7.1% -24.7% -111.1%
Wyoming Borough $698,758.00 NOREPORT $1,210,109.00 NOREPORT -$511,351 NODATA NODATA NODATA NODATA
Municipality 2010 2012 2010 2012 2010 2012 change change change
ASSETS LIABILITIES SURPLUS/DEFICIT(-) Asset Liability Def./Sur.
THE SHIFTING STATUS OF MUNICIPAL PENSION FUNDS
Not distressed
Minimally distressed
Moderately distressed
Severely distressed
Improved
Got worse
Funding Ratio
2010 2012
150 159
358 425
105 136
107 108
122 127
382 413
120 117
112 131
127 120
290 375
124 129
119 114
102 113
103 117
130 112
135 129
172 168
114 108
101 109
683 788
126 139
133 128
89 99
76 95
89 98
98 94
84 71
78 75
65 68
66 63
52 49
60 65
66 92
83 80
77 76
84 78
69 62
90 82
74 73
74 71
60 86
73 65
82 89
63 63
98 89
78 73
78 78
84 84
102 84
106 97
87 102
89 104
86 117
80 108
73 104
58 NA
NO2012DATA
SURPLUS BOTHYEARS
DEFICIT BOTHYEARS
SURPLUS TODEFICIT
DEFICIT TOSURPLUS
Source: Public Employee Retirement Commission Mark Guydish/The Times Leader
A pension funding ratio is the percent of a funds liabilities covered by its assets. The
state mandates some actions and recommends others be done voluntarily depending on
the level of distress a funding ratio shows.
PENSIONS
Continued from Page 1A
Nobody wants to put extra money in. The way to
not put in money is to make the (investment re-
turn) assumptions high. (But) if you dont make it,
that means youll be putting in more money in the
long run.
Bernard Kozlowski
Deputy director of programs for PERC
$8.3 billion, according to PERC.
Economists are skeptical that
investment returns will contin-
ue to be strong enough to cover
increased liabilities.
This is entirely built on asset
appreciation, Cross said. Re-
member the other side of the
coinis that liabilities will contin-
ue to grow. Theres still a basic
imbalance between the money
coming in and the money thats
required to fund the plans.
Rick Dreyfuss, a business con-
sultant and actuary who has
worked closely with the Econo-
my League, said most munici-
palities work off an assumption
that the pension plans will
achieve an 8 percent investment
return.
I have very serious concerns
about the ability to achieve
those types of returns, Drey-
fuss said. I still think the as-
sumptions are too rosy For
long-term viability theyve got
to take a sobering look at the in-
vestment expectations. Id like
to see themcloser to 6 percent.
Dreyfuss has joined with the
Economy League and state Au-
ditor General Jack Wagner in
urging the state legislature to
enact pension reforms.
In a report issued in Septem-
ber, Wagner said one of the key
issues with Pennsylvania is the
number of individual pension
plans. The state has 3,200 pen-
sionplans, of which2,600are au-
dited by his office. Thats seven
times more than any other state.
About two-thirds of 2,600
plans the office audits have few-
er than10 members. Hes calling
for legislation that would con-
solidate municipal pension
plans into a statewide system.
Consolidation would result in
higher investment returns be-
cause the fund would have more
money to invest and would also
reduce administrative expenses,
Wagner said. That would reduce
the amount of money taxpayers
must pay into the funds.
The Economy League says
even more needs to be done.
Among the most controversial
suggestions is altering the types
of plans municipalities can offer
and modifying benefits paid to
retirees.
In testimony before PERC in
September, c, suggested freez-
ing benefits for existing retirees
and increasing the vesting peri-
od, retirement age and length of
service requirements for public
employees.
The Economy League is also
pushing for legislation that
would enable municipalities to
shift away from defined benefit
plans and into defined contribu-
tion plans.
Most of the municipal pension
plans in Pennsylvania are de-
fined benefit plans, which pay
retirees a set percentage of their
pre-retirement salary for life.
Municipalities must fund those
plans, regardless of their invest-
ment performance, to ensure
they can meet obligations.
The plans differ from defined
contributions plans, which are
similar to a 401(k) plans in the
private sector. In those plans,
the payment to retirees is con-
tingent on investment perform-
ance.
Such changes cant be made
automatically, however. They
must be negotiated with unions
as part of the collective bargain-
ing process.
Drefyuss said he understands
thats a challenge, but munici-
palities must make the effort.
The current system we have,
in the long term, is unsustaina-
ble, he said. We have to have
pension reform on the table.
DANGER
Continued from Page 1A
The current system we have, in the long term, is
unsustainable. We have to have pension reform on
the table.
Rick Dreyfuss
Business consultant and actuary
C M Y K
PEOPLE S E C T I O N B
timesleader.com
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012
Y
ears agothere was a radioshow
calledI Love a Mystery. Geneal-
ogists are probablytodays greatest
lovers of mysteries because theyplunge
soreadilyintothe unknown, oftenspend-
ingdecades ina quest.
Lets see if we canhelpNeil andDo-
rothyWeir, whofounda century-old
familyphoto, bearinga Wilkes-Barre
photostudios name, but little other in-
formation.
We have a photoof five childrenwhose
names we thinkwere William, Beatrice,
Harry, Charles andFred. We donot have
the surname of these children, but we
thinkthe mothers maidenname may
have beenClara Appleton, andshe was
bornabout1860inPhiladelphia.
The Weirs have a familystorythat
Claras people emigratedtoAmerica
about1856andwere involvedinjelly/jam
manufacturing.
Neil andDorothy, I didspot an1874
Genealogyof the AppletonFamily
online. It lists manyAppletons inBritain
of the early1800s. Let me knowif youfind
anythingfamiliar init.
If youhave informationyouthinkcan
helpthe Weirs contact me at the email
address at the endof this column.
Progress Report: RecentlyBrinley
Crahall wrote tome for helpinidentifying
the familythat left a quantityof letters
andother papers ina home that Crahalls
familybought inCourtdale. Inresponse,
Ronalee Schall sent me a collectionof
sources andother informationthat she
believes couldbe of helptoCrahall inhis
quest. Brinley, ImforwardingRonalees
informationtoyouimmediately.
Resources: The Northeast Pennsylva-
nia Genealogical Societyhas startedits
project of digitizingoldHazleton-area
newspapers. The grouphas alsoadded
the FortyFort Cemeteryinterment book
andlot bookandthe WyomingCemetery
lot cards. Alsodigitizedare several years
of the oldNanticoke Sentinel newspaper
fromthe1930s.
Tip: Ive saidit before andIll sayit
again: Youll finda lot of helpfor your
genealogical pursuits inthe pages andthe
online offerings of FamilyTree Magazine.
The bi-monthlypublicationoffers reams
of articles, websites, webinars, courses
andother helps includingsome highly
specializedones suchas researchinspe-
cific cities ineveryissue. Take a lookat
its website at www.familytreemagazine-
.com.
News Notes: Take a walkonthe weird
side whenthe Luzerne CountyHistorical
Societyopens its 2012series of Down-
townWilkes-Barre Ghost Tours. The
walks are at night, of course. Theyll be
heldonFridayandSaturdayevenings,
startingthis week, withmore scheduled
for the followingtwoweekends. Reserva-
tions are required, socall the societyat
823-6244ext. 3or gotofacebook.com/
luzernehistory.
TracingQuaker ancestors? Checkout
FindingFriends inPennsylvania, a
webinar offeredthroughthe Genealogical
Societyof Pennsylvania. Its set for 7-8:30
p.m. onOct. 24. The cost is modest.
Register online at www.genpa.org.
Dont miss TomJessos talkon
Shawnee Cemetery: ACemeterySteep-
edinHistory at the next meetingof the
Northeast Pennsylvania Genealogical
Society. The meeting, opentothe public,
is at 7p.m. onOct. 23inRoom106of the
McGowanBuilding, Kings College. The
McGowanBuildingis at NorthRiver and
West Unionstreets indowntownWilkes-
Barre. Jessoheads the Shawnee Ceme-
teryPreservationAssociation.
JonathanStayer will discuss Genea-
logical Resources at the Pennsylvania
State Archives at the next meetingof the
Genealogical Societyof Northeastern
Pennsylvania. The meetingwill be at1
p.m. onOct. 20at the societys Research
Center, 1100MainSt., Peckville. Contact
the societyat 383-7661toreserve a seat.
The wesbsite is www.grsnp.org.
TOM MOONEY
O U T O N A L I M B
Help the Weirs
solve mystery
of family photo
Tom Mooney is a Times Leader genealogy
columnist. Reach him at tmooney2@ptd.net
G
race ElizabethWashney is a fourth-grade student at Wyom-
ing Area TenthStreet Elementary. Washney, 9, is the reign-
ing Little Miss Library for the Wyoming Free Library. She lives
in West Wyoming with her parents, Robert and Jennifer.
What exactly does it mean to
be Little Miss Library? How did
you win the honor? A group of
kids at my school entered es-
says on what they like about
the Wyoming Free Library. It
came down to three essays
being the best. I was finally
picked as Little Miss Library
and the runners up are part of my
court. They are Abby Tirva and
Eliana Para. I amthe second Little
Miss Library and I get to wear a
crown too; it is a great honor.
I seeyouhaveyour winninges-
say with you. Can we share it
with the public? Sure, here it is:
I like the Wyoming Free Library
because of the books. They can
take you to new places. Every
time you turn the page there is a
newmystery to solve, and adven-
ture to follow, or knowledge to
gain. When you go to this library, all
of that can be found. On a day when
youresador angry, cometothelibrary
and you will forget about everything.
So get a ride to this library, find a good
book, and hold on tight.
What kind of events have you par-
ticipated in since being crowned? I
was in the Memorial Day Parade and I
got to ride in a car with the librarian. I
also worked with my elementary
school and Junior Friends of the Li-
brary and the Book Club there to co-
sponsor various events at the library.
One of the interesting things you
are working on helps to benefit the li-
brary. Can you tell us a bit about the
HighFivetheLibrary?Well, I amin
avideothat my parents postedonYou-
tube called, High Five at the Wyoming
Free Library with Grace Washney. We
are hoping that it can go viral and will
help bring more people to the library
and events here so we can raise funds
to support it. High Five the Library is
where anyone can come to the library
and pick a paint color of their choice
and make a handprint or two on a can-
vas which will be seen for years to
come. Its only five dollars and really
helps the library. We actually sent the
videotothe EllenDeGeneres showand
are waiting to hear back from her. We
invited her to send us two framed
handprints. One would be for the wall
at the library and the other would be
auctioned off to benefit the library.
You mentioned that there are oth-
er events coming around the holi-
days. Will we hear Santas reindeer
come December? Santa Claus will be
here. He will be in the library on Dec. 1.
Youknowhowthere are always lines at
the mall to see him? Well, for a mini-
mum donation of five dollars you can
arrange to have an appointment with
himand spend time with him. You also
get your picture taken with Santa.
When you growup even more, what
would you like to do? I would like to
gotocollegeinStroudsburg. I lovethat
area. I would then like to be a teacher
of the third- or fourth-grade and try to
followin the past footsteps of teachers
that helpedmeinthepathof learning.
Sobeinganavidreader, what books
doyoulikebest?I loveToKill aMock-
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See MEET, Page 2B
MEET GRACE ELIZABETH WASHNEY
P
HILADELPHIA Clarissa Dillon
used to mortify her teenage son by
wearingher workclothesacoloni-
al-style getup while driving him
somewhere.
Hed say, Oh for Gods sake, Mom, you
look like a baby in that bonnet! she recalls.
But Dillonwas and, at 79, remains un-
moved. Thats because for this ardent devotee
of 18th-century domestic arts in Southeast-
ern Pennsylvania, everything about ordinary
life at that time, in this place, is worth explor-
ing.
If that means wearing funny clothes and
sporting what looks remarkably like a baby
bonnet at thewheel of her car, toobad. Andby
theway, itsnot abonnet. Itsacap, andondays
when shes doing a program on medicinal
plants or cheese-making, shell be wearing it
and other authentic stuff everywhere she
goes.
I onlyget dressedonceaday,sheexplains.
Last week, for example, Dillon dressed as a
successful, middling sort of Chester County
farm wife for a midmorning meeting at the
1696 Thomas Massey House in Broomall,
where she tends the kitchen garden and does
her programs.
By the time she arrived, shed already been to
BrynMawr Trust to do some banking. Later, she
planned to clip the ivy thats trying to eat the
sidewalk in front of her house in Haverford.
That means what the bank tellers saw that
morning, and what her neighbors would see in
theafternoon, was thesamecentury-bustingout-
fit she wore to the Massey House. And why not?
Its comfortable.
But dont call it a costume.
Wonder Woman wears a costume, Dillon
sniffs.
Shewearsperiodclothing, madeof linenand
hand-sewn by herself. It consists of another of
those teenage angst-inducing white caps, a well-
worn apron I carry wood and plants in this
two ankle-length petticoats, and a short
gown worn over and pinned to a shift.
Ontop, underneaththe other layers, shes held
together by work stays that unlike their
criminally tight cousin, the corset provided
welcome back support.
And no, shes not uncomfortable. Im not as
hot as people wearing polyester underwear, she
says.
Dillon is a historian, a retired elementary
school teacher (31years)andanauthor. Shehasa
political science degree from Bryn Mawr Col-
lege, and a masters and a doctorate in American
history fromthe University of Chicago and Bryn
Mawr, respectively.
Her dissertation was about, what else, 18th-
century kitchen gardens in southeastern Penn-
sylvania, an interest sparked when she arrived at
Bryn Mawr fromher hometown of Chicago.
There was Valley Forge. There was Brandy-
wine. There was this sort of thing everywhere,
says Dillon, who is drawn to colonial history for
other reasons, too.
She loves the smell of woodsmoke. She enjoys
blacksmithing, sewing, and cooking, following
cluesandlookingthingsup. Itslikebeingateach-
er, very addictive, she says.
Dillonfits right inat the Massey House, one of
the oldest English Quaker homes in Pennsylva-
nia and in the garden, where she tills the soil
withgrubbing hoe andwoodenshovel andtends
an unruly collection of plants with culinary, me-
dicinal, and household uses.
They include Rosa gallica and rue, black cur-
rants and root vegetables like Gilfeather turnips,
skirret, vipers grass, and lemon balm, whose
leaves were made into tea that Dillon says was
good for tired brains.
A lot of a colonial womans life revolved
AP PHOTO
Clarissa Dillon, 79, dressed in the garb of a woman of the 1700s, is in the kitchen at the Thomas Massey House in Broomall, Pa.
DRESSES THE PART
See COLONIAL, Page 9B
By VIRGINIA A. SMITH
The Philadelphia Inquirer
Colonial domestic arts doyenne
A LOT OF a colonial womans life revolved around the kitchen garden.
She was responsible for the health and maintenance of her family, so you need
to know what she does all day to see the whole picture.
Clarissa Dillon
PAGE 2B SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
P E O P L E
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Jeffrey P. DAndrea, D.O., F.A.C.C.
Is pleased to announce the opening of his new
Cardiology Practice:
CURRENT and NEW PATIENTS may call to
schedule an appointment with Dr. DAndrea
at his new location:
WATERFRONT PROFESSIONAL PARK
672 NORTH RIVER STREET
SUITE 101
PLAINS, PENNSYLVANIA 18705
PHONE: 570-371-3536
CARDIOVASCULAR CARE CENTER
Medical Oncology Associates
October, 2012 marks more than
25 years as National Breast
Cancer Awareness Month. The
purpose of this month is to educate
women about early breast cancer
detection, diagnosis and treatment. In
honor of this special month, Medical
Oncology Associates is reaching
out to women with educational activi-
ties and events throughout the month
as well as conducting our annual
rafe.
All proceeds benet the Medical
Oncology Prescription Assis-
tance Fund. This fund was estab-
lished to assist patients who cannot
382 Pierce Street Kingston, PA 18704 570.288.7231
Breast Cancer Awareness Raffe
Special Open to the Public dates: Tues. Oct. 9, Wed. Oct. 17,
Thurs. Oct. 25 & Tues. Oct. 30 from 6-9pm
afford to pay for prescriptions during
their chemotherapy process. 100%
of donations go to cancer pa-
tients. There are no administrative
fees.
This year we have 120+ gifts for
the rafe including a grand prize of:
One week stay in 2 bedroom con-
dominium in Kissimmee/Orlando area
of Florida, near Disney World through
Sundance Vacations. $1500.00 Value.
Expires May 1, 2013
We invite you to visit us during any
of our special rafe dates of Tues-
day, Oct. 9, Wednesday, Oct. 17,
Thursday, Oct. 25 and Tuesday, Oct.
30 from the hours of 6-9pm. Rafe
tickets are $2 each or 3 for $5 and
are available throughout the month of
October with the drawing on Friday,
Nov. 2nd.
158 Memorial Hwy. Shavertown 1-800-49-SHOES
With a genuine
Swarovski crystal button
(available in black and gray)
ingbird, the Harry Potter series,
The Adventures of TomSawyer
and Huckleberry Finn and Era-
gon.
What television shows or
movies do you enjoy? I like
Victorious on TV and Mulan II
as one of my favorite films.
How about favorite foods? I
love pierogies, chicken wings
and Goldfish crackers.
Do you have any favorite
quotes or sayings? To be or
not tobe, that is thequestion. I
like to say, what evs, too. Thats
short for whatever.
Do you have any heroes or
role models? Benjamin Fran-
klin is my hero because he in-
ventedthings like me whenI was
little. I want to be like my cousin,
Gabrielle because she is really
smart and funny. She is my role
model.
Other than the Wyoming
Free Library, where do you like
to visit or travel to? I love my
school library, especially on
rainy days. I like that feeling of
reading during study hall while
hanging out there. I love to go to
the beach, too. I love Bethany
Beach in Delaware. Someday I
would like to visit Rio. I saw it in
the movie Rio and I think it
would be so beautiful there.
Who is your favorite musi-
cian? It used to be Hannah
Montana. Now it is Selena Go-
mez.
What was a proud moment in
your life so far? I was at a
council meeting once and re-
ceived a Good Ambassador
awardfor addressingthecouncil
about litter and ways to combat
it. I had the No Trash Day idea
where people would pick up 20
pieces of litter and bag it with
their name on it. They would
then deposit it in a big tub at the
end of the street. The mayor al-
so put his handprint on our High
Five banner.
How old were you when you
began to read? I was two when
I asked when can I read to my
parents and my dad started to
sound words out with me.
Where is the library and how
canpeopleget intouchwithit?
It is at 358 Wyoming Avenue in
Wyoming and the phone num-
ber is 693-1364.
MEET
Continued from Page 1B
John Gordon writes about area
people for the Meet feature. Reach
him at 970-7229.
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 PAGE 3B
C O M M U N I T Y N E W S
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The Pennsylvania Association for College Admissions Counseling (PACAC) is sponsoring the Luzerne
County Regional College Fair on Oct. 18 at the Luzerne County Community College Campus Center. Rep-
resentatives from close to 100 colleges, universities, post-secondary technical schools and the armed
services will be at the program to speak with prospective college students and parents about educational
opportunities and admission requirements. Representatives from the colleges financial aid office will be
available to discuss federal and state financial aid programs. The annual fair is coordinated by PACAC
with the assistance of LCCC and the Luzerne County Counselors Association. The program is free and
open to the public. For more information, call 740-0340 or 800-377-LCCC ext. 7340. Some of the LCCC
participants, from left, first row: Mark Carpentier, assistant director, financial aid; Francis Curry, director,
admissions; and Phyllis Johnson, admissions data processing assistant. Second row: Jim Domzalski,
director, enrollment management; Krista Nice, admissions recruiter; and Mary Kosin, director, financial
aid. Third row: Rosana Reyes, dean, enrollment management and student development; Robert Bogdon,
director, marketing; and Edward Hennigan, assistant director, admissions.
College Fair set at LCCC for Oct. 18
PAGE 4B SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
O C C A S I O N S
B
ethany Phillips and Daniel
Fiske II were united in mar-
riage on Aug. 10, 2012, in an out-
door ceremony in Los Angeles,
Calif.
The bride is the daughter of
Sheldon and Margaret Phillips of
Wilkes-Barre, Pa. She is the
granddaughter of the late Viola
and Casper Hager and the late
Sheldon and Elsie Phillips, all of
Wilkes-Barre, Pa.
The groom is the son of Julie
Rempe, Los Angeles, Calif., and
the late Daniel Fiske. He is the
grandson of Richard and the late
Barbara Rempe, Los Angeles,
Calif., the late Carole Jaras, Phoe-
nix, Ariz., and the late Theodore
Cechota, Chicago, Ill.
The bride was given in mar-
riage by her parents. Her sister,
Sherralee Barnak, was her maid
of honor. Attendants included
Marina Barnak, niece of the
bride; Lucas Barnak, nephew of
the bride; and friends Victoria
Hoffman and Susan DelVecchio.
Flower girl was Lina DelVecchio.
The groom chose Dr. Justin
Spooler as his best man. Attend-
ants included Gary Rempe, broth-
er of the groom; Christopher
Fiske, brother of the groom; and
friends St. John Coln and Denise
Ruzicka.
The bride is a 1986 graduate of
Coughlin High School. She gradu-
ated from Georgetown University
with a Bachelor of Arts degree in
English and did her masters work
at UCLA. She works as a writer.
The groom is a 1998 graduate
of Santa Monica High School. He
graduated from the Art Institute
of California, Los Angeles, with
an associates degree in 3-D ani-
mation. He is employed as a
course director and animation
teacher at the Los Angeles Film
School.
The couple will honeymoon in
Scotland. They reside in Los An-
geles, Calif.
Fiske, Phillips
L
indsey Olson and James Kovalik
were united in marriage on June
9, 2012 at Our Lady of Hope Parish,
Wilkes-Barre. The ceremony was
officiated by the Rev. Reginald Tho-
mas and Father James Alco.
The bride is the daughter of Ken-
neth and JoAnn Olson. She is the
granddaughter of Russell and Linda
Olson and the late John and June
Jones.
The groom is the son of Grace
Kovalik, and the late Joe Kovalik. He
is the grandson of Joe Kovalik and
the late Florence Kovalik, and Alice
and Henry F. Kruzel.
The bride was given in marriage by
her father. She chose her best friend
Maggie Wilde as her maid of honor.
Bridesmaids were Samantha Raub,
Kyley Henry, Paige Koncewicz, Jessi-
ca Johns, Tiara Moye, and Heather
Pekol.
The groom chose his friend Steve
Janick as his best man. Groomsmen
were Ian Kovalik, Kenny Olson, Dha-
val Patel, Andy Olshefski, Carmelo
Pawelzik, and Matt Lloyd.
Derek Whitesell and Chase Jerson
were ushers, Faith Sanders was the
flower girl, and Eli Trocki was the
ring bearer. The readings were given
by Sarah Sabulski.
The bride is a 2009 graduate of
Coughlin High School and a student
at Kings College where she is work-
ing on her bachelors degree in math-
ematics and secondary education.
The groom is a 2007 graduate of
Coughlin High School and earned a
bachelors degree in surveying engi-
neering in 2011 from Penn State Uni-
versity. He is employed by Borton
Lawson Engineering.
Following the ceremony, a recep-
tion was held at St. Maria Goretti
Church in Laflin.
The couple honeymooned in Mon-
tego Bay, Jamaica. They reside in
Wilkes-Barre.
Kovalik, Olson
S
tephanie Nicole Monson and
Jonathan Ian Wills were united
in marriage on July 26, 2012, in
Woodinville, Wash.
Mrs. Wills is the daughter of
Penny Monson and the late Chris-
topher Monson, Everett, Wash.
She is the granddaughter of Joan
Gerrish and the late Gayle Ger-
rish, Monroe, Wash., and Nancy
and Don Monson, Everett, Wash.
Stephanie is pursuing a degree in
education at Western Washington
University. She is employed by
Nordstrom.
Mr. Wills is the son of Tom and
Michelle Wills, Plains Township.
He is the grandson of the late
Paul and Mary Sisko and the late
Ernest and Margaret Wills, all of
Wilkes-Barre. Jonathan is employ-
ed as a software development
engineer for Microsoft Corpora-
tion.
The bride chose her cousin Cor-
rinna Kessler as maid of honor.
Bridesmaids were Chrissy Schef-
fler, Daniela Coniglio and Brook-
lynn York, friends of the bride.
Ava Jones, niece and godchild of
the groom, was flower girl.
The gloom chose Benjamin
Simpson as best man. Groomsmen
were Brad Williams, Russell Al-
leen-Willems and Colin Nicholds,
friends of the groom.
An outdoor evening ceremony
was held at the picturesque Delille
Cellars, Woodinville, Wash., fol-
lowed by a reception. A rehearsal
dinner was held at Redhook Brew-
ery, Woodinville, Wash.
Following a honeymoon to San
Francisco and Napa Valley, the
couple was honored at a reception
at the Frederick Stegmaier Man-
sion in Wilkes-Barre.
The couple resides in Bothell,
Wash.
Monson, Wills
T
ogether with their families, Melis-
sa Jane Gunshannon and Tim-
othy Brandon Graham announce
their engagement and upcoming
wedding.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of
Charlotte and Michael Gunshannon,
Kingston. She is the granddaughter
of Mary Gunshannon and the late
Thomas Gunshannon, Kingston, and
the late Charlotte and William Davis,
Wilkes-Barre.
She is a 2005 graduate of Bishop
OReilly High School and a 2009
graduate of Penn State University
where she earned a Bachelor of Arts
degree in media studies. She current-
ly works as a scribe/technician at Eye
Care Specialists.
The prospective groom is the son
of Gloria and Richard Brown, Dallas.
He is the grandson of Berta and Char-
les Graham, Blue Springs, Mo., the
late Beverly Graham, Smithville, Mo.;
and Dorothy and the late Ronald
Brown, Factoryville.
He is a 2002 graduate of Harrison-
ville High School. Following high
school, he spent four years on active
duty with the United States Marine
Corps and currently serves as a ser-
geant in the United States Army
Reserves while he completes his
Bachelor of Science degree in in-
formation sciences and technology at
Penn State Wilkes-Barre.
The couple will exchange vows
October 2013.
Graham, Gunshannon
S
am and Geri Piemontese, Duryea,
recently celebrated their 35th
wedding anniversary. They were
married on Sept. 3, 1977, by the late
Rev. Carlin in St. Marys Church,
Avoca.
They are the proud parents of two
children, Maria Moorman and her
husband, Chad, Edgewater, Md., and
Daniel, Drexel Hill, Philadelphia.
They have one grandchild, Dean
Moorman, and are anticipating the
arrival of another grandchild in Feb-
ruary 2013.
The couple celebrated with a Cana-
dian cruise, and upon arrival home,
they were treated to a family dinner
in Annapolis, Md.
The Piemonteses
M
ark and Debbie Robbins of
Mountain Top celebrated
their 10th anniversary on Oct.
12, 2012. They were married in
St. Patricks Church, Wilkes-
Barre, on Oct. 12, 2002.
Mrs. Robbins is the daughter
of Anthony and Carol George,
Wilkes-Barre.
Mr. Robbins is the son of Har-
ry and Joan Robbins, Lake Silk-
worth.
They have two daughters, Ri-
ley and Addison.
Mrs. Robbins is employed as
an accounting manager at Metz
Culinary Management, Dallas.
Mr. Robbins is employed as a
teacher with Pocono Mountain
School District, Swiftwater, Pa.
The Robbinses
C
harles and Mary Ann Marcella,
Sheatown, celebrated their 50th
wedding anniversary Oct. 6, 2012.
They were married in St. Francis of
Assisi Church, Nanticoke, by the Rev.
Joseph J. Adonizio.
Mrs. Marcella is the former Mary
Ann Cardone, daughter of the late
Anthony and Mary Cardone. She is a
retired beautician.
Mr. Marcella, son of the late An-
drew and Helen Marcella, is retired
from the State Correctional Institu-
tion at Dallas.
They are the parents of two chil-
dren, Paul Marcella, Emmaus, Pa.,
and Ann Marie (Mrs. James) Petroch-
ko, Mountain Top, Pa. They have
three grandsons, Kevin, Collin and
Derek Petrochko.
The couple was honored at a fam-
ily dinner hosted by their children at
Maps Restaurant in Nanticoke. They
have planned a trip to Italy in Novem-
ber.
An anniversary Mass was cele-
brated at St. Faustina Parish, Nanti-
coke, by the Rev. James R. Nash.
The Marcellas
C
assandra KnorekandMatthew
WilliamDavis, together withtheir
families, announcetheir engagement
andupcomingmarriage.
Thebride-to-beis thedaughter of
Carl andMargaret Knorek, Mountain
Top. Sheis thegranddaughter of Carl
andBernadineKnorek, Nanticoke, and
Halina Bilicka, Poland.
Theprospectivegroomis thesonof
Robert andMelanieDavis, Wapwallo-
pen. Heis thegrandsonof thelateWil-
liamandCharlotteDavis, Wapwallo-
pen, andthelateGeorgeandStella
Belleba, Michigan.
Cassandra is a 2006graduateof
CrestwoodHighSchool anda 2009
graduateof BloomsburgUniversity,
whereshereceivedher bachelors de-
greeinearlychildhoodandelementary
education. Sheis currentlypursuingher
masters degreeat Kings Collegein
readingandESL. Sheis employedby
Childrens ServiceCenter.
Matthewis a 2006graduateof Crest-
woodHighSchool andis currently
pursuinga bachelors degreeinbiology
fromMisericordia University. Heis
employedbyBayada HomeHealth
Care.
Thecouplewill behappilyunitedin
marriageonJune15, 2013, at Our Lady
Helpof Christians ParishinDorrance,
witha receptiontofollowat Carmens
CountryInn, Drums.
Davis, Knorek
L
auren Ann Lokuta and Jeffrey
Allen Janoski, together with their
families, announce their engagement
and upcoming marriage.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of
Cheryl and Michael Lokuta, of Du-
pont, and the granddaughter of the
late Geraldine and Joseph (Frosty)
Ceresi and Joan Lokuta and the late
Frederick Lokuta. She is the great-
granddaughter of the late Jessie and
Al Bellomo.
Ms. Lokuta is a 2007 graduate of
Pittston Area High School and will
graduate from Misericordia Uni-
versity in May 2013 with a master of
occupational therapy and a bachelor
of psychology.
The prospective groom is the son
of Judy Janoski, of Browns Mills, N.J.,
and Jerry Janoski, of Troy. He is the
grandson of Mary and Jerome Ja-
noski and the late Florence and Ray-
mond Marriggi.
Mr. Janoski is a 2004 graduate of
Pittston Area High School and is
currently employed by City Mager in
Wilkes-Barre.
The couple will be united in mar-
riage on Sept. 24, 2013, at Sacred
Heart of Jesus Church, Dupont.
Janoski, Lokuta
J
ason Hoffman, formerly of Exeter
Township, and Katie Zimmerman,
York, were united in marriage on
May 26 at Sandals Negril, Jamaica.
They were joined by family and
friends.
A reception was held in York on
June 30 in celebration of their mar-
riage.
The couple resides in York.
Zimmerman, Hoffman
M
r. and Mrs. William J. Kilcullen,
Hughestown, celebrated their
40th wedding anniversary on Sept.
30. They were married in St. John the
Evangelist Church, Pittston, by the
Rev. Lawrence P. Homer.
Their attendants were Rosalie
Flynn, sister of the bride, matron of
honor. Bridesmaids were Regina
Bauman and Ruth Charnogursky,
sisters of the bride, and Judy McDon-
nell Wendoloski, friend of the bride.
Jim Kilcullen, brother of the groom,
was best man. Ushers were Pat
McCann, Luke Acquino and Joe Spe-
razza.
Mr. Kilcullen is the son of the late
James and Margaret Kilcullen.
Mrs. Kilcullen is the daughter of
the late Joseph and Rosalie Tischler.
The couple has been blessed with
three daughters, attorney Tracey
Kilcullen, Philadelphia; Tara Kilcul-
len, Daytona, Fla.; and Kristen Kilcul-
len, West Wyoming.
They have one grandson, Jake
Pietrowski.
Mr. Kilcullen is retired from Kraft
Foods Inc. and Mrs. Kilcullen is em-
ployed by Eye Care Specialists, King-
ston.
A cruise to the Mediterranean
marked the occasion.
The Kilcullens
The Times Leader allows you to decide how your wedding notice reads, with a few ca-
veats. Wedding announcements run in Sundays People section, with color photos, free
of charge. Articles must be limited to 220 words, and we reserve the right to edit an-
nouncements that exceed that word count. Announcements must be typed or submitted
via www.timesleader.com. (Click on the "people" tab, then weddings and follow the
instructions from there.) Submissions must include a daytime contact phone number
and must be received within 10 months of the wedding date. We do not run first-year
anniversary announcements or announcements of weddings that took place more than
a year ago. Drop off articles at the Times Leader or mail to: The Times Leader, People
Section, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA1871 1. Questions can be directed to Kathy Swee-
tra at 829-7250 or emailed to people@timesleader.com.
SOCIAL PAGE GUIDELINES
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 PAGE 5B
O C C A S I O N S
J
acqueline Dell Genetti and Mi-
chael Patrick Sullivan II were
united in marriage in an evening
candlelight ceremony on April 14,
2012 at the Genetti Best Western
Convention Center, Wilkes-Barre.
The Rev. Ann Marie Acacio offici-
ated. The bride was escorted down
the aisle by her father and wore a
white chiffon gown with a beaded
strapless bodice and a full length
skirt.
An Oyster reception with dinner
and dancing was held directly after-
wards at the hotel. The reception
began with cocktails and hors
doeuvres held at Oysters Poolside
Cabana.
The bride and groom entered the
ballroom for the first time as hus-
band and wife to the sounds of a
traditional Irish bagpiper. Guests
were treated to a delectable stations
dinner in Genettis Grand Ballroom,
which was elegantly draped in flow-
ing white curtains and uplit in ambi-
ent blue tones.
Guests dined on a delectable Sta-
tions dinner featuring hand rolled
sushi, carved filet mignon, make
your own pasta and antipasto sta-
tions. Irish Meade was served as a
toast to bless the new couple. A
flaming dessert display took place
before the guests were introduced to
a surprise Willy Wonka inspired
candy room. Guests enjoyed every
treat a sweet tooth could hope for
including hand spun cotton candy, a
four-foot lollipop, fresh made pop-
corn, a chocolate fountain, and
handmade Viennese desserts. A
candy buffet featured over 40 differ-
ent types of candy and was ruled
over by two of the worlds largest
gummy bears, each weighing in at
over 10 pounds and being complete-
ly edible. Guests danced the night
away to the upbeat sounds of the six
piece live band, The Deena Miller
Band.
Cathy Genetti-Sansone, the
grooms sister, was matron of honor.
Patricia Genetti, Maria Genetti sis-
ters of the bride, as well as Ilene
Parlin and Jenine Bressner, friends
of the bride, served as bridesmaids.
Julia Sansone, the brides niece was
the flower girl. They wore gowns
made of silk dupioni.
Daniel Sullivan, the grooms
brother, performed the duties of best
man. James Braddock, Dave La-
mountain, Russell Faria and Crystle
Vieira, served as groomsmen. Nico
Vincent Sansone, nephew of the
bride, was the ring bearer.
The bride is the daughter of Gus
and Val Genetti, Wilkes-Barre.
The groom is the son of Carol C.
Piscapo of Woonsocket, R.I., and
Michael P. Sullivan of Rehoboth,
Mass.
The bride is a 1997 graduate of
Wyoming Seminary. She earned her
Bachelor of Fine Arts degree with a
concentration in graphic design at
Maine College of Art, Portland,
Maine. She is employed by Whole
Foods Market in Providence, R.I., as
a graphic artist.
Michael is a 2001 graduate of West
Warwick High School. He is a certi-
fied carpet cleaning technician for
All Star Cleaning Services of War-
wick, R.I.
The couple honeymooned in Nas-
sau, Bahamas. They reside in Paw-
tucket, R.I.
Genetti, Sullivan
M
aria Claire Favichia and Dr. Da-
niel Luke Golaszewski were
united in marriage July 15, 2012, at
The Mansion at Timber Point, Great
River, N.Y. The ceremony was offici-
ated by the Rev. Dominick Scibetta.
The bride is the daughter of Antho-
ny and Clarissa Favichia, Manorville,
N.Y. She is the granddaughter of the
late Anthony and Marie Favichia and
Alfred and Claire Sardi, New York.
The groom is the son of Dan and
Elaine Golaszewski, Wilkes-Barre. He
is the grandson of the late Walter and
Sophie Golaszewski, Wilkes-Barre,
and Frank and Olga Zarutskie, Frack-
ville.
The bride was given in marriage by
her father. She chose her niece, Anas-
tasia King, as maid of honor. Brides-
maids were Kim Blakla, Darcy Malo-
ney, Dominica Scibetta, friends of the
bride; Christine Liardi, cousin of the
bride; and Melody Golaszewski,
sister-in-law.
The groom chose his brother, Da-
vid Golaszewski, as best man.
Groomsmen were Nathan Golaszew-
ski, brother of the groom; Anthony
and Michael Favichia, brothers of the
bride; and Matthew Finn, friend of
the groom.
An afternoon reception was hosted
by the parents of the bride at The
Mansion at Timber Point. A rehearsal
dinner was held at Lombardis on the
Bay in Patchogue, N.Y., hosted by the
parents of the groom. The bride was
honored with a bridal shower in New
York hosted by the brides mother
and in Wilkes-Barre hosted by Elaine
and Melody Golaszewski.
The bride is a graduate of Leonard
E. Burkett High School, Moriches,
N.Y., and Centenary College of New
Jersey with double major Bachelor of
Science degrees in equine science
and communications. She is employ-
ed as a sales representative for Verti-
cal Pharmaceuticals.
The groom is a graduate of Meyers
High School; Penn State University,
with a Bachelor of Science degree in
kinesiology; and New York College of
Chiropractic, Seneca Falls, N.Y., with
a Doctor of Chiropractic degree. He
went on to train with the Pettibon
Institute, receiving advanced certifi-
cation in spinal scoliosis, pediatrics,
nutrition and detoxification. He is
owner of Power Chiropractic, Hanov-
er Township, and host of his own
weekly radio show, Maximize Your
Health, aired every Saturday on
WILK News Radio.
Following the wedding, the couple
honeymooned in Saint Lucia.
Golaszewski, Favichia
J
aclynn Klush and Michael Kendzor
were united in marriage on Oct. 1,
2011, at Skytop Lodge, Skytop, Pa., by
the Rev. Roger E. Griffith.
The bride is the daughter of James
and Diane Klush, Pittston, Pa. She is
the granddaughter of the late Edward
and Genevieve Klush and the late
Joseph and Rita DeSanto, all of Pitt-
ston.
The groom is the son of Paul and
Carol Kendzor, Pittston, Pa. He is the
grandson of the late Stanley and Vio-
let Kendzor, West Wyoming, and the
late John and Pauline Cheremsak,
Swoyersville.
The bride was given in marriage by
her father. She chose her sister, Dr.
Dana E. Klush, as her maid of honor.
Bridesmaids were Olivia Klush, sister
of the bride; Jill Stronski, sister of the
groom; Sarah Armitage, niece of the
groom; and Kate Yanchis and Crystal
Kane, friends of the bride. Flower girl
was Ashlynn Armitage, godchild of
the groom.
The groom chose his good friend,
Sean Burke, as best man. Groomsmen
were Ken Stronski, brother-in-law of
the groom; Michael DeSanto, cousin
of the bride; and Vincent DePalma,
Corey Cortese and Patrick Mullin,
friends of the groom. Ring bearer was
Chase DeSanto, godchild of the bride.
Scriptural readings were given by
Joseph Costantino and Samantha
Cortese, friends of the bride and
groom.
A shower was given by the sister
and mother of the bride at The Colon-
nade, Scranton. The rehearsal dinner
was hosted by the parents of the
groom at Baileys Steakhouse, Mount
Pocono. A cocktail hour and reception
were held at Skytop Lodge following
the ceremony.
The bride is a 2008 graduate of
Kutztown University, where she
earned a bachelors degree in market-
ing. She is employed as a recruiter for
GUARD Insurance Group, Wilkes-
Barre, Pa.
The groom is a 2007 graduate of
The Pennsylvania State University,
where he earned his bachelors degree
in meteorology. He is employed as a
help desk supervisor at C3i, Wilkes-
Barre, Pa.
The couple honeymooned in Ha-
waii. They reside in Yatesville, Pa.
Klush, Kendzor
J
acqueline Pasternak and Adam
Sweet were married at noon on
Sept. 1, 2012, at Dutch Mountain, Pa.,
by John Hovan.
The bride is the daughter of Marti-
na and John Pasternak.
The groom is the son of Kelley and
Dallas Sweet.
The bride chose Shannon Danow-
ski as her matron of honor. Brides-
maids were Amy Tyszko, Christine
Minich and Annette Frank. Emily
Tyszko was the flower girl.
The groom chose Brian Danowski
as his best man. Groomsmen were
Ryan Wojciechowicz, Ronald Pas-
ternak and Rodger Sweet. Wesley
Seigfried was the ring bearer.
The couple honeymooned in Flor-
ida.
Pasternak, Sweet
A
nnJasnoski andJohnMcArdle
were unitedinmarriage onOct. 1,
2011, at the Nativity of Our LordParish
inDuryea. The Rev. AndrewSinnott
officiatedthe ceremony.
The bride is the daughter of Ellen
Toshandthe stepdaughter of David
Tosh, of West Pittston, andthe daugh-
ter of Charles Jasnoski andthe step-
daughter of Marie Jasnoski, of Deltona,
Fla. The groomis the sonof Edward
andSusanMcArdle, of Duryea.
Escorteddownthe aisle by her father,
the bride chose her sister, Sara Pencek,
as her matronof honor. Bridesmaids
were Kate Warhurst, Laura Judy,
friends of the bride; andJennifer Zapko,
sister of the groom. The flower girl was
MadisonPencek, niece of the bride.
The groomchose his close friend,
RonaldRebovich, as his best man.
Groomsmenwere Vincent Kassa Jr.,
DonaldHudzinski Jr., friends of the
groom; andKyle Zapko, nephewof the
groom. The ringbearer was RyanZap-
ko, nephewof the groom.
Readings were givenby Kate War-
hurst andMarie Jasnoski. Offertory
gifts were presentedby Jennifer, Kyle
andRyanZapko.
Followingthe ceremony, a cocktail
hour andreceptionwere heldat Fiorel-
lis CateringinPeckville.
The bride was honoredat a bridal
shower hostedby her mother andsister
at the RadissonHotel, Scranton. The
parents of the groomhosteda rehearsal
dinner at Johns Place, OldForge.
The bride is a graduate of Pittston
Area HighSchool. She earneda bache-
lors degree inEnglishfromElizabeth-
townCollege anda masters degree in
curriculumandinstructionfrom
BloomsburgUniversity. She is currently
anEnglishteacher inthe Scranton
School District.
The groomis a graduate of Pittston
Area HighSchool. He is currently em-
ployedat FoxHill Country Clubin
Exeter.
Followinga honeymoontoKey West,
Fla., the couple resides inDupont.
Jasnoski, McArdle
M
r. and Mrs. Harold Green,
West Pittston, celebrated their
50th wedding anniversary on Oct
6. They were married Oct. 6, 1962,
at St. Anthonys Church in Exeter.
Mrs. Green is the daughter of
the late David and Nancy Pantuc-
ci.
Mr. Green is the son of the late
Ernest and Edith Green.
They are the proud parents of
son Harry and wife Lisa Green.
They have three grandchildren,
Holly, Nadine and Matthew Green.
They celebrated with a family
dinner.
The Greens
S
arina Ryan Shock and James Pa-
trick Drevenak were united in
marriage on June 16, 2012, at Ben-
tleys by Magistrate Rick Cronauer.
The bride is the daughter of James
and Elizabeth Shock, Sugar Notch.
She is the granddaughter of James
Shock and the late Sylvia Shock;
Mary Brink and the late Leo Brink,
both of Nanticoke.
The groom is the son of Mary Dre-
venak and the late Andrew Drevenak,
Wilkes-Barre. He is the grandson of
the late Andrew and Anna Drevenak
and the late Robert and Veronica
Dalton.
The bride was escorted down the
aisle and given in marriage by her
father. She chose her best friends
Gina Nardone, as maid of honor, and
Sarah DeFrancesco, as matron of
honor. Bridesmaids were Gina Shock,
sister-in-law of the bride; Carissa
Nardone, Cryatal Wah, Marcia Pa-
sone, Megan Lewis, and Nancy Carlo,
all friends of the bride and groom.
Flower girls were Ashley and Jenna
Sewald, cousins of the bride.
The groom chose his nephew, Rob-
ert Drevenak, as best man. Groom-
smen were James Shock, brother of
the bride; Dominic Pasone, Jesse
Griffiths, Mart Shershen, Bernie
Nealon, all friends of the groom and
bride. Ring bearers were Michael
Defrancesco, godson of the bride, and
Tristian Drevenak great-nephew of
the groom.
An evening cocktail hour and recep-
tion were held at Via Appia, Taylor.
The bride was honored with a bridal
shower by her mother and brides-
maids at Genetti Hotel and Confer-
ence Center, Wilkes-Barre. A rehears-
al dinner was hosted by the parents of
the bride at her childhood home.
The bride is a graduate of Hanover
Area Jr.-Sr. High School. She gradu-
ated from Wilkes University in 2006
with a bachelors degree in elemen-
tary education and a minor in history.
She is employed by Volunteers of
America as a learning works coach.
The groom is a graduate of Meyers
High School. He is employed by Trion
Industries.
The happy couple honeymooned in
Punta Cana, Dominican Republic.
They reside in Pittston Township.
Shock, Drevenak
M
r. and Mrs. Paul and Loretta Kazi-
netz, Dupont, celebrated their
65th wedding anniversary on Sept. 27.
They were married in1947 at Holy
Mother of Sorrows Polish National
Catholic Church, Dupont.
Mr. and Mrs. Kazinetz are the par-
ents of daughter Sandra Kazinetz,
East Pikeland Township, Pa., along
with her partner, Phil Maywalt; son
Paul Jr. and wife, Rose, Dickson City,
Pa.; and daughter Lynne Kazinetz,
Syracuse, N.Y.
They also enjoy the company of
their grandchildren, Nick and Paul
(P.K.) Kazinetz and Natalie Kazinetz
Soltysiak and husband, Jason, as well
as Naomi, Nathan and Kathryn He-
drick.
Mrs. Kazinetz is the daughter of the
late Antoinette and Thomas Ruck,
Dupont. She worked for many years as
a seamstress; contributed countless
hours as a volunteer at Holy Mother of
Sorrows; and is an avid gardener.
Mr. Kazinetz is the son of the late
Lena and Simon Kazinetz, Dupont.
His entire working career was spent at
the Lion Inc., which produced Gib-
bons and Stegmeier beers and where
he was the business manager before
he retired. Mr. Kazinetz was one of the
founding members of the YMSofR at
Holy Mother of Sorrows.
To celebrate this milestone, Mr. and
Mrs. Kazinetz were feted with a family
dinner at their home.
The Kazinetzes
K
elli Elizabeth OLeary and Mat-
thew James Merrifield, together
with their families, announce their
engagement and upcoming wedding.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of
M. Joseph and Elizabeth OLeary,
Clifton Heights, Pa.
Kelli is a 2005 graduate of Arch-
bishop Prendergast High School. She
earned a Bachelor of Science degree
in medical imaging from Misericordia
University in 2009. She is a registered
radiologic technologist for Main Line
Health.
The prospective groom is the son
of Mark and Robyn Merrifield, Dal-
ton, Pa.
Matthew is a 2004 graduate of
Tunkhannock Area High School. He
earned a Bachelor of Science degree
in medical imaging from Misericordia
University in 2008. He is a registered
radiologic technologist for Philadel-
phia Orthopedic Group.
The couple will exchange vows
July 6, 2013, at Holy Cross Church,
Springfield, Pa.
OLeary, Merrifield
M
arcy Broden and Nathaniel
Schuster, together with their
families, announce their engagement
and approaching marriage.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of
David and Frances Broden of Ply-
mouth Township. The prospective
groom is the son of Mary and Charles
Schuster of Warminster.
Marcy is 2000 graduate of Bishop
OReilly High School and received a
bachelors degree in psychology from
Lock Haven University in 2004. She
also received a masters degree in
clinical psychology from West Ches-
ter University in 2007. She is current-
ly pursuing a doctoral degree in clin-
ical psychology at Immaculata Uni-
versity. She is employed by Holcomb
Behavioral Health Systems as a ther-
apist in Exton and Allentown.
Nathaniel is a 1999 graduate of
William Tennent High School. He
received a bachelors degree in chem-
istry from Drexel University in 2004.
He is currently pursuing a masters
degree in applied statistics from Penn
State University. He is employed by
GlaxoSmithKline as a chemist in
Collegeville.
The couple will exchange vows
April 14, 2013, at the Stroudsmoor
Country Inn in Stroudsburg with the
reception to follow.
Broden, Schuster
PAGE 6B SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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KITCHEN & BATH: Kitchen cabinet sets by Silver Creek
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sinks, faucets, showers, vessel, drop in & pedestal sinks,
tubs, top brand toilets & sinks. FLOORING: Carpet rems &
padding, ceramic, 2 to 5 hardwoods in oak, maple, cherry,
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view, leaded glass, 9 lts, sliding & patio. INTERIOR DOORS:
P/H, raised, 6 panel in oak & pine, fush, bifolds, french.
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oak, pine, & primed. NAME BRAND TOOLS: Frame, fnish,
brad, & foor nailers, air comps, drills & saw kits. SPECIAL
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TERMS: Drv licensetoregister. cash, check,c/c.
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Nesbitt Womens & Childrens
Center at Wilkes-Barre
General Hospital
Chiappini, Paloma and Derek
Lucarino, Wilkes-Barre, a son,
Sept. 22.
Casterline, Kayla and Tyrone
Featherstone, Wilkes-Barre, a
daughter, Sept. 24.
Thomas, Shannan and William
Yenalevitch, Kingston, a daugh-
ter, Sept. 24.
Corbett, Kara and Michael , Exeter,
a son, Sept. 24.
Skutnik, Kacie and David, Moun-
tain Top, a son, Sept. 24.
Wisneski, Deanna, Noxen, a son,
Sept. 24.
Buczynski, Marcy and Robert,
Plains Township, a daughter,
Sept. 25.
Lipinski, Janicemarie and Joseph
Michael, Swoyersville, a son,
Sept. 25.
Rost, Rachel and Wesley, Jenkins
Township, a son, Sept. 25.
Waitword, Angela and Karl, Hun-
lock Creek, a son, Sept. 25.
Daniele, Jayme and Matthew, Glen
Lyon, a son, Sept. 25.
Edley, Amanda and Bill, Ashley, a
son, Sept. 26.
Deliscart, Chrisna, Wilkes-Barre, a
son, Sept. 26.
Sprow, Jessica and Shawn Wright,
Hanover Township, a daughter,
Sept. 27.
Seiger, Jennifer and Charles ,
Warrior Run, a daughter, Sept.
27.
Wood, Amanda and John Thomp-
son, Plains Township, a son,
Sept. 27.
Goss, Renee and Richard Lamo-
reaux, Hunlock Creek, a son,
Sept. 27.
Slatky, Kristen and Chris, Edwards-
ville, a daughter, Sept. 28.
Saranchuk, Jamie and John,
Duryea, a daughter, Sept. 28.
Morreale, Rosemarie and Ray-
mond, Dupont, a daughter, Sept.
28.
Culp, Lauren and Kevin LeBron,
Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, Sept.
28.
Decker, Christie and William J. Fox
IV, Wilkes-Barre, a son, Sept. 28.
Riggs, Jamie and Matthew, Ed-
wardsville, a son, Sept. 28.
Evanofski, Krista and Charlie,
Kingston, a daughter, Sept. 29.
BIRTHS
Monday
PLYMOUTH: Plymouth High
School Class of 1964 will meet
at 6 p.m. at Happy Pizza, Ply-
mouth.
Tuesday
MOUNTAIN TOP: Mountain Top
Knights of Columbus Council
6440, 7:30 p.m., at the Knights
home. Grand Knight Frank
Wurst requests all Knights to
attend this meeting.
NANTICOKE: The Friends of the
Mill Memorial Library, 6 p.m., in
the Alta Harrington Room of
the library, 495 E. Main Street.
Hostesses are Carol Sukowaski
and Lorraine Stawasz. New
members welcome.
WILKES-BARRE: Tequila Rose
Chapter of The Red Hat Socie-
ty, 1 p.m., Momma Bs restau-
rant in Wilkes-Barre. Members
going to the Halloween party
on Oct. 29 should bring $15 to
this meeting.
Wednesday
WILKES-BARRE: St. Davids
Society of Wyoming Valley Inc.,
noon, Genetti Hotel & Confer-
ence Center. President Antho-
ny T.P. Brooks will preside. A
vote will be taken on the rec-
ommendation of the Executive
Committee that women be
admitted into membership. The
vote will be by secret ballot
and only members in good
standing will be allowed to
vote. Membership dues will be
collected at this session.
Oct. 14
DUPONT: The Polish American
Citizens Club of Elm Street,
Dupont, 2 p.m. at the club
home. PACC active members
are encouraged to attend,
refreshments will be served
after the meeting.
MEETINGS
WILKES-BARRE: The Regi-
nas of Kings College will host
the 2012 Meet the Reginas at
7 p.m. Wednesday at the Cam-
pus Ministry Building at the
corner of Jackson and North
Franklin streets.
Mothers of incoming students
are invited to attend and learn
about the club and meet present
members.
IN BRIEF
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 PAGE 7B
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The Meadows Nursing & Rehabilitation Center will hold a fall craft fair from10 a.m.- 3 p.m. Oct. 17 at 4
E. Center Hill Road, Dallas. Admission is free and all proceeds will benefit the 130 residents at the center.
There will be a flu shot clinic hosted by Walgreens, various vendors, an Auxiliary-sponsored bake sale,
Christmas Treasure table and lunch. The Meadows is asking for donations of small or gently-used Christ-
mas items, books, canned food, and raffle baskets. Limited vendor spaces are still available. For more
information, call 675-8600 ext. 195 or 1 15, or email vol@meadowsnrc.com. Kneeling, from left: Camille
Fioti, assistant director, Community Services; Betty Sorchik, director, Community Services. Standing:
Volunteers Mary Law, Kevin Reilly, Valeria Jenkins, Maryan Daily, Pete Klein, Heidi Marr, Lloyd Ryman,
and Cristina Tarbox, administrator.
Craft fair to be held at Meadows Nursing & Rehabilitation Center
PAGE 8B SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
C O M M U N I T Y N E W S
HAPPY BIRTHDAY!
Michael Victor DeFrancesco, son
of Michael and Sarah DeFrances-
co, Bear Creek, is celebrating his
second birthday today, Oct 7.
Mikey is a grandson of Michael
and Lorraine DeFrancesco,
Wyoming, and Victor and Diane
Kopko, Hanover Township.
Michael V. DeFrancesco
Ava Grace Coltrane, daughter of
Doug and Kristy Coltrane, Plains
Township, is celebrating her
second birthday today, Oct. 7.
Ava is a granddaughter of Bruce
and Paulette Reilly, Wilkes-Barre;
Steve and Debbie Shackelford,
Arkansas; and the late Ronald
Douglas Coltrane Sr. She is a
great-granddaughter of Roberta
Reilly, Mountain Top; Aaron and
Flora Stark, Arkansas; and the
late Irene Hando. Ava has twin
sisters, Alexis and Hailey, 7
months.
Ava G. Coltrane
Lauren Renee Youells, daughter
of James and Susan Youells,
Forty Fort, is celebrating her
ninth birthday today, Oct. 7.
Lauren is a granddaughter of
Harold and Rita Jenkins, Forty
Fort, and James and Helen
Youells, Plymouth. She is a great-
granddaughter of Helen Youells,
Plymouth. Lauren has two sis-
ters, Rachelle, 1 1, and Alexis, 3,
and a brother, James, 5.
Lauren R. Youells
The Indo American Association of North East PA (IAANEPA) will celebrate its annual Diwali Festival on
Nov. 16 at Genetti Hotel and Conference Center, Market Street, Wilkes-Barre. The evening will include
authentic Indian food, Bollywood and Bharat Natyam dance performances and a regional fashion show
highlighting traditional dress from different states of India. There will also be a disc jockey as well as live
music performances. For more information, contact Shallu at gargshallu@hotmail.com<mailto:gargshal-
lu@hotmail.com> or Neela at Ommapps@aol.com<mailto:Ommapps@aol.com>. Advanced reservations
only, tables of 10 can be reserved with full payment. Finalizing details for the event are IAANEPA commit-
tee members, from left: Neela Patel, treasurer; Sushma Patel; Razia Shroff, Snigdha Gupta, Cynthia Das,
president; Varada Veluswamy, assistant treasurer; Heena Pursnani, Shallu Garg, vice president; and Muni-
reh Syed, secretary.
Indo American Association announces annual Diwali Festival
Marymount High School Class of 1962 recently celebrated its 50th anniversary reunion with a social
hour and dinner at The Caf, Route 315, Plains Township. A Mass, concelebrated by classmates Brother
Gerald Voychek and the Rev. Frank Skitzki, was offered in honor of deceased classmates the Sunday after
the reunion at Our Lady of Hope Parish. The group is also planning a 70th birthday party for 2014. At the
reunion, from left, first row, are Voychek, Mary Ann Omashel, Skitzki, Helen Weiss Malina and Mary Ann
Adamczyk Shubilla. Second row: Rose Klepaski Seroka, Joan Starzynski Pisack, Eleanore Peck Andreoli,
Dorothy Burick Simon, Barbara Perkowski Kumiega and Ruth Zugarek Oravitz. Third row: Matthew Ba-
nashefski, Edward Goodford, George Zaledonis, Joseph Centak, Stanley Malina and James Koneski. Also
attending were Joseph Banesh and Paul Coyle.
Marymount High 62 reunites for 50th annivesary
Thirty-five Kings College students have begun their 14-week student teaching experience in neighboring elementary and high schools for
the fall semester. The supervised student teaching experience is necessary to fulfill Kings degree requirements and to obtain a Pennsylvania
Teacher Certificate. Student teachers, from left, first row: Carmen Flores, Wilkes-Barre, Coughlin; Sara Schmader, Pleasant Valley, N.Y., GAR;
Ellen Gorman, Forty Fort, WVW Middle School; Mallory Lewis, Forty Fort, WVW Middle School; Kayla Solomon, Wyoming, State Street Ele-
mentary; Jean Marie Bertram, Wilkes-Barre, Plains-Solomon Elementary; Amanda Knowles, Pittston, Pittston Area Intermediate Center; Jil-
lian Foster, Levittown, N.Y., Heights Elementary; Aimee Bono, Hanover Township, Fairview Elementary; Jennifer Cook, Edwardsville, State
Street School; Jillian Crackett, Wilkes-Barre, Heights Elementary; and Julie Blackmore, Burlington, N.J., Dana Street Elementary. Second row:
Dr. Denise Reboli, chairperson, education department; Samantha Ide, Tunkhannock, Tunkhannock Area; Tami Ambosie, Mountain Top, Hazle-
ton Area Valley Middle School; Lynn Shymanski, Forty Fort, WVW Middle School; Elizabeth Demko, Bethlehem, Kistler Elementary; Laura
LoBrutto, Pittston, Pittston Area Intermediate Center; Lindsay Walsh, Hazleton, Weatherly Area; Sarah Bolton, Wyoming, Plains-Solomon
Elementary; Katherine Slemmer, North Wales, Chester Street Elementary; Rosalind Bingman, Shickshinny, Hanover Area; Samantha Jones,
Bristol, Dodson Elementary; Jill Hall, Wilkes-Barre, Kistler Elementary; Candice Russ, Dover, Del., Heights Elementary; Bobbilynn Loomis,
Maple Shape, N.J., Dana Street; and Bob Richards, assistant professor of education. Third row: Justine Tone, Falls, Tunkhannock Area; Antho-
ny Dietrick, West Orange, N.J., Heights Elementary; Andrew Gowisnok, Swoyersville, WVW Middle School; Scott DeVincenzo, Parsippany, N.J.,
Meyers; Brian Bartnikiewicz, Scranton, Valley View Elementary; Ben Harris, Kingston, WVW High School; Matthew Ide, Harveys Lake, Lake-
Noxen Elementary; and Amy Shonk, Kunkletown, Pleasant Valley High School. Also participating are Bobby Buttafogo, Kennett Square,
Meyers, and Jenera Quinones, Wilkes-Barre, Kistler Elementary.
Kings College students on teaching assignments
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Our Lady of Victory
HARVEYS LAKE
Our Lady of Victory Harveys Lake continues to host the
Annual Six Month Devotion to Our Lady of Fatima
This months service will take place on
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13TH AT 7:00 PM.
This special devotion is the sixth and nal one of the year.
The Devotions to Our Lady of Fatima consist of
The Rosary, Beautiful Marian Hymns,
Procession and Benediction.
Refreshments will be served immediately after the service.
For Further Information Call 639-1535
Handicap Parking & Access is Available
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 PAGE 9B
601 Market St., Kingston, PA 288-9311
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around the kitchen garden. She
was responsible for the health
and maintenance of her family,
so you need to know what she
does all day to see the whole pic-
ture.
Clarissa is awesome, says
Pat Martin, Massey board presi-
dent, who, inperiodclothingher-
self, cooks colonial dinners for
guests twice a year at the house.
It was hard living back then,
she says. You think things just
grow out there in the garden,
but wow, then Clarissa shows
you that they had to do this, they
had to have a nice garden to have
enough food for the winter.
It gets you out of your centu-
ry, into another world, Martin
says, but look at todays world
and sometimes you think it
might be better to go back.
COLONIAL
Continued from Page 1B
C M Y K
PAGE 10B SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
REBENNACKS APPLIANCE
269 Wyoming Ave, Kingston (570) 287-1175
C M Y K
SPORTS S E C T I O N C
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012
timesleader.com
DETROIT Justin Verlander
allowed a home run to the first
batter of the game and quick-
ly shrugged it off.
This hard-throwing ace
doesnt usually hit his stride un-
til a bit later.
Verlander
shut down Oak-
land after that
early slip, and
Alex Avila
homered in the
fifth inning to
lift the Detroit
Tigers over the
Athletics 3-1
Saturday night
in the opener of
their best-of-five
AL playoff.
Verlander al-
lowed three hits
in seven innings
and matched
his career post-
season high with 11 strikeouts.
As usual, he seemed stronger in
the later innings, striking out
the side in the sixth and the first
two hitters of the seventh. That
made up for Coco Crisps home
run that quieted the Comerica
Park crowd just one batter into
the game.
I was a little out of synch but
was able to get some outs with
guys on base and keep the score
at one run, Verlander said. The
adrenaline got me a little bit
early.
Joaquin Benoit pitched the
eighth and Jose Valverde struck
out two in a perfect ninth for the
save.
Oaklands Jarrod Parker al-
AP PHOTO
Detroit Tigers Alex Avila
rounds second base after hit-
ting a home run against the
Oakland Athletics on Saturday.
B A S E B A L L
Detroit,
Verlander
capture
Game 1
Staff ace puts Tigers up in
best-of-five American League
Division Series by a game.
By NOAH TRISTER
AP Baseball Writer
3
TIGERS
1
ATHLETICS
See TIGERS, Page 3C
STATE COLLEGE -- Matt
McGloin called it a dive. Afewof
his teammates werent so kind in
their description.
A hop. A jump. A fall on his
face.
Terrible, cornerback Ste-
phon Morris said. A two (out of
10).
All that mat-
tered was what
the officials
called it. A
touchdown.
The senior
quarterback
scrambled to his
right and went
airborne into
the end zone for
the winning
score, complet-
ing yet another
second-half dis-
mantling of
Northwestern.
Onanother re-
cord-setting Sat-
urday, McGloin
helped rally the
Nittany Lions from 11 down in
the fourth quarter, storming past
the No. 24 Wildcats 39-28 at Bea-
ver Stadium.
McGloin broke the all-time
school record for completions in
a game with 35. He threwfor 282
yards and figured on three sec-
ond-half touchdowns to stun the
Wildcats in the fourth quarter.
The third and final score came
on a broken play, a 5-yard touch-
down run -- his fifth of the season
-- onthirddownwithjust 2:37 left
to play.
I dont understand, a smirk-
ingMcGloinsaidwhentoldof his
teammates critiques, how a
touchdown becomes bad now.
Thats what I told em! It doesnt
matter what it looks like. It still
counts.
Did it ever.
Still trailing28-25 andthe kick-
ing game as shaky as ever,
McGloin lined up in the shotgun
with four receivers on third-and-
goal from the 5.
PENN STATE FOOTBAL L
Matts done a really nice job of coming in at halftime and
staying relaxed and calm. He understands its a
60-minute game. ... I cant say enough about Matt
McGloin. Hes got the job done.
Bill OBrien
Penn State coach on quarterback Matt McGloin
TAKING FLIGHT
AP PHOTO
Penn State quarterback Matthew McGloin (11) leaps over the goal line to score a touchdown as Northwestern defensive
lineman Quentin Williams (88) defends during the fourth quarter Saturday in State College. Penn State won 39-28.
Lions beat
1st ranked
foe under
OBrien
See FLIGHT, Page 6C
39
NITTANY
LIONS
28
WILDCATS
By DEREK LEVARSE
dlevarse@timesleader.com
It may have startedas a prank.
But by now, everyone knows Glenn Carr
isnt joking around about his field hockey ca-
reer.
The Northwest senior has his sights on the
U.S. Olympic mens field hockey team, even
while honing his skills with his high school
girls team.
This is just for working, trying to get bet-
ter, Carr said recently after helping WVCDi-
vision II-leading Northwest to its eighth
straight victory. (Im) tryingtomake it tona-
tionals, maybe the Olympics, if possible.
Hes onthe right track.
Carrsalreadycompetedonthemensjunior
national indoor and outdoor teams; received
his certification to be a U.S. field hockey
coach; and teamed with former Wyoming
Seminary standout Ja Ja Kentwell on a mens
summer teaminCalifornia.
All because, his Northwest teammates say,
Carrsbuddiesdefiedhimtojointhegirlsfield
hockey teamback whenhe was a freshman.
It was kind of a joke at first. It was a dare,
Northwest senior captainKirstenWalshsaid.
We were all kind of shocked when he came
out.
Its no surprise by nowthat Carr is having a
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Northwests Glenn Carr, with ball, has 22
goals and 20 assists in his last season and
a half playing for the Rangers.
H I G H S C H O O L F I E L D H O C K E Y
Dare may be ticket to Olympics
Despite being a boy in a girls world,
Northwests Glen Carr is proving to be
among the best on the hockey pitch.
By PAUL SOKOLOSKI
psokoloski@timesleader.com
See DARE, Page 10C
WILKES-BARRE Lucas
Benton had one more trick un-
der his crown Saturday night.
The GAR football standout
and homecoming king return-
ed an interception 50 yards for a
touchdown with 9.5 seconds
left, sealing the Grenadiers 35-
26 victory over Lake-Lehman in
a Wyoming Valley Conference
Division 2A-A game.
The victory allowed GAR
(4-2) to tighten up a District 2
Class 2Aplayoff race where Leh-
man(4-2) sat atopthe standings
going into the weekend. The
Grenadiers were in fourth.
Benton scored via run, punt
return and pass before cutting
off a Lehman fourth-down pass
H I G H S C H O O L F O O T B A L L
Grenadiers king Benton
seals victory over Knights
35
GAR
26
LEHMAN
See BENTON, Page 8C
By JOHN ERZAR
jerzar@timesleader.com
PAGE 2C SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
S P O R T S
Jesse ViPono recorded a hole-
in-one at Glenmaura National
Golf Club on Friday on hole
nine at a distance of 130 yards.
Witness was Dave Lang.
H O L E - I N - O N E
S P ORT S I N B RI E F
Kingston Recreational Center is
accepting registrations for the
Tommy Federici Sunday and
Wednesday Adult Mens Basketball
Leagues. The leagues begin Sun-
day, Nov. 11 and Wednesday, Nov. 14.
All participants must be 17 years
old or over. The cost to register for
the Sunday league is $200. The
Wednesday league is $125 and it
costs $300 to register for both.
Call 407-0189 for further informa-
tion.
Kingston Recreational Center is
accepting registrations for the
Willie Obremski Youth Baskeball
League. The league begins Dec. 10
with games on Mondays and
Tuesdays. Team drafts will be held
on Nov. 16 for the 5-7 and 8-10 age
groups and Nov. 19 for the 11-13 and
14-18 age groups. Parents are asked
to attend drafts.
Kingston Recreational Center
Youth Indoor Soccer League is
accepting registrations for age
groups 4-6, 7-9 and 10-13 through
Nov. 4. The cost is $40 for mem-
bers and $50 for non-members.
Coaches are also needed and will
receive a four-month membership.
The league is scheduled to begin
Dec. 1. For more information, call
287-1106.
Kings College Aquatics Swimming
will offer lessons Wednesday
nights from Oct. 10 to Nov. 14. Each
session will run from 5:30-6:10 p.m.
The cost is $60 per child, which
includes six 40-minute lessons.
Families registering more than one
child will pay a discounted price of
$50 for each additional child. For
more information, call Mike La-
bagh at 208-5900, ext. 5758, or
email him at michaella-
bagh@kings.edu
WB Express AAU will hold tryouts
for its Spring 2013 AAU teams Nov.
7 and 8 at the Wyoming Seminary
Upper School, Maple Ave, King-
ston. Boys in grades 4-6 from
6-7:30 p.m. and grades 7-11 from
7:30-9 p.m. For info contact Back-
court Hoops, Director Bill Callahan
@ billc@backcourthoops.com or go
to our Facebook site for more
information.
Wyoming Valley Sports Dome is
now taking applications for the
following leagues: Boys Little
League Baseball for ages U10 and
U12, Girls Softball for U10, U12, U14,
U16 and High School., Soccer
Leagues for ages U8, U10, U12, U14,
U18, High School, Over 30 and
Mens Open, Field Hockey for ages
7th grade and under, 8th grade,
10th grade and 12th grade and an
Open League for Lacrosse, which
will have open play day and sign
ups Wednesday, Oct 17 from 7:00
p.m. to 9:00 p.m.. For applications,
waivers and more information, call
823-9873 or visit www.wyoming-
valleysportsdome.com.
UPCOMING EVENTS/OTHER
Hanover Area Soccer Alumni will
hold its first alumni game Monday
at the football stadium at 5:30
p.m., before the boys teams
senior night festivities. All alumni
are invited. There is no charge to
play but donations will be accepted
for the teams effort in supporting
breast cancer awareness. For more
information, call James Lukachin-
sky at 825-0429.
Northwest Area High School Cheer-
leaders will host Rangers Raising
Awareness Pink Out during North-
wests football game against Lake
Lehman Oct. 12 at Northwest Area
High School. The event will raise
money to benefit Maternal and
Family Health Services Breast
Screenings.
CAMPS/CLINICS
11th Annual Paul McGloin Holiday
Pitching Camp will be held at
Riverfront Sports Scranton on
December 26, 27 & 28, 2012 from
9:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Cost is $150
per camper or $135 if postmarked
by November 26, 2012. For more
information call 570-955-0471 or
visit www.electriccitybaseball.com.
Electric City Baseball & Softball
Academy will host its annual
Winter Skills Baseball Camp at
Riverfront Sports in Scranton on
Saturdays, December 1, 8, 15 & 22
from10:00 a.m. -12:00 p.m. Cost is
$150 per camper or $135 if post-
marked by November 1, 2012. For
more information call 570-955-
0471 or visit www.electriccitybase-
ball.com.
Misericordia University Baseball
will host a one-day fall exposure
camp for high school players
interested in playing college base-
ball. The camp will be held Sunday,
Oct. 14, at Tambur Field in Dallas.
For more information, visit athlet-
ics.misericordia.edu
Wyoming Valley Goju Ryu Karate
Academy offers classes at the
Kingston Recreational Center. For
more information, call 888-328-
3218 or visit www.valleygojuk-
arate.com.
MEETINGS
Crestwood Football Booster club will
meet Monday at Cavanaughs at 7
p.m.
Crestwood Boys Basketball Booster
Club will meet at 7 p.m. at Cava-
naughs Grille on Tuesday, Oct. 16.
The Night at the Races event will
be discussed.
Hanover Area Quarterback Club will
be holding a meeting Tuesday at 7
p.m. atthe football stadium. All
parents of players are encouraged
to attend.
Jenkins Township Little League will
hold a monthly meeting Tuesday
at 6:30 p.m. at the field house to
discuss election of new officers
and field closing. All managers and
interested parents are urged to
attend.
South Wilkes-Barre Mini Mohawks
will hold their monthly meeting
Wednesday at 7 p.m. at the River-
side Bar and Grill. All parents of
football players and cheerleaders
are welcome to attend.
REGISTRATIONS/TRYOUTS
Dallas Mountaineer Aquatic Club
will hold a free, two-week trial
period beginning Tuesday and
ending Oct. 19. Kids from ages 6-14
can participate in DMAC. Swim-
mers between ages 6-10 (age as of
Oct. 1) can swim from 6 p.m. to 7
p.m. Swimmers between ages 11-14
(age as of Oct. 1) can swim from 7
p.m. to 8 p.m. You do not have to
be a Dallas student or resident to
become a member of DMAC.
Registration will take place at the
Dallas Middle School Natatorium
starting Oct. 8. All returning swim-
mers will begin practice Oct 22.
Each child must bring a swimsuit,
goggles (if you have them) and a
towel. For more information and to
download the registration form,
please visit dmacswimming.org or
call Reo Cheshire at 357-8631. JCC
is now taking registrations for the
Northampton Street Basketball
League.Games will be played on
Sundays starting Nov. 4.There will
be two divisions for ages 8-10, and
11-13. The cost is $65 per player,
with each sibling at $50.Team
registrations will be $300.There
will also be a skills clinic for ages
5-7.The cost is $35 per child and
will run in two-six week sessions
starting on Nov. 4. For more in-
formation, please contact Sean
Miller at: 592-1232. Interested
people can also visit our websites
at: www.northamptonleague.com,
www.jccwm.com, and www.wbym-
ca.org.
Bulletin Board items will not be
accepted over the telephone. Items
may be faxed to 831-7319, emailed to
tlsports@timesleader.com or dropped
off at the Times Leader or mailed to
Times Leader, c/o Sports, 15 N, Main
St., Wilkes-Barre, PA18711-0250.
BUL L E T I N BOARD
868-GOLF
260 Country Club Drive, Mountaintop
www.blueridgetrail.com
Tuesday thru Friday
Play & Ride for Just
$
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Weekday Special
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tournaments or with any other promotion. ST
Monday Special $32
Senior Day Mon-Thurs $28
Ladies Day Thursday $28
Weekends After 1 p.m. $36
GPS CART INCLUDED
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1757 SANS SOUCI PKWY, HANOVER TWP. W-B 824-3050
Sporting Goods
THE STORE FOR ALL
Your Hunting Needs
W B 8824 33050
OVER 600
GUNS IN
STOCK
HUNTING SEASON HOURS
Mon-Fri 8:30-6:00 Sat 8-4
140 S. Wyoming Ave. Kingston, PA 18704 570.486.6676
Buying Guns
Glock Stocking Dealer
Hunting & Fishing Licenses
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We Also Do
Gunsmithing
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Expires 12/31/12
NO APPOINTMENT OIL CHANGE
308 Wilkes-Barre Twp. Blvd. (Just Below Wegmans)
OPENING MONDAY
Featuring Mobil Open 7 Days A Week
BASEBALL
Favorite Odds Underdog
American League Division Series
TIGERS 8.5 As
American League Division Series
Yankees 8.5 ORIOLES
National League Division Series
GIANTS 7.0 Reds
National League Division Series
CARDS 7.0 Nationals
NFL
Favorite Points Underdog
Falcons 3 REDSKINS
STEELERS 3.5 Eagles
Packers 7 COLTS
GIANTS 10 Browns
VIKINGS 6 Titans
BENGALS 3 Dolphins
Ravens 6 CHIEFS
PANTHERS 3 Seahawks
Bears 5.5 JAGUARS
PATRIOTS 7 Broncos
49ERS 9.5 Bills
SAINTS 3 Chargers
Monday
Texans 7 JETS
Bye week: Cowboys, Lions, Raiders, Bucs
AME RI C A S
L I NE
BY ROXY ROXBOROUGH
L O C A L
C A L E N D A R
TODAY'S EVENTS
MEN'S COLLEGE GOLF
PSUAC/USCAA Golf Championships, TBA
WOMEN'S COLLEGE TENNIS
Wilkes at MAC Individual Tournament, All Day
WOMEN'S COLLEGE VOLLEYBALL
PSU Brandywine/PSU Schuylkill at PSU Wilkes-
Barre, Noon
MONDAY, OCT. 8
H.S. FIELD HOCKEY
Berwick at Hanover Area
GAR at Elk Lake
Meyers at Pittston Area
Northwest at Tunkhannock
H.S. GOLF
District 2 Individual Championships at Fox Hill C.C.
H.S. BOYS SOCCER
Nanticoke at MMI Prep
GAR at Hanover Area
Coughlin at Hazleton Area
Wyoming Valley West at Holy Redeemer
Wyoming Seminary at Pittston Area
Meyers at Lake-Lehman
Berwick at Danville
H.S. GIRLS SOCCER
Wyoming Area at Dallas
Hanover Area at Crestwood
Nanticoke at Wyoming Valley West
H.S. GIRLS VOLLEYBALL
Hanover Area at Dallas
GAR at Delaware Valley
Holy Redeemer at Crestwood
North Pocono at Lake-Lehman
Nanticoke at Hazleton Area
COLLEGE FIELD HOCKEY
Misericordia at FDU-Florham, 4 p.m.
WOMEN'S COLLEGE VOLLEYBALL
LCCC at Lackawanna/Harcum, 6 p.m.
Keystone at Kings, 7 p.m.
Wilkes at University of Scranton, 7 p.m.
Cairn at Misericordia, 7 p.m.
TUESDAY, OCT. 9
H.S. FIELD HOCKEY
Crestwood at Lackawanna Trail
Dallas at Abington Heights
Delaware Valley at Hazleton Area
Holy Redeemer at Wallenpaupack
Lake-Lehman at Honesdale
Nanticoke at Coughlin, 7 p.m.
Wyoming Valley West at Wyoming Seminary
H.S. BOYS SOCCER
Dallas at Tunkhannock
H.S. GIRLS SOCCER
Tunkhannock at Wyoming Seminary
H.S. GIRLS VOLLEYBALL
Berwick at Wyoming Area
Tunkhannock at Meyers
MMI Prep at Wyoming Valley West
Pittston Area at Coughlin
COLLEGE FIELD HOCKEY
Susquehanna at Wilkes, 7 p.m.
MEN'S COLLEGE SOCCER
DeSales at Wilkes, 4 p.m.
Delaware Valley at Kings, 7 p.m.
Eastern at Misericordia, 7 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 10
H.S. CROSS COUNTRY
(All games 4:15 p.m. unless noted)
Hazleton Area/Holy Redeemer/Coughlin/Nanti-
coke/Hanover Area at Wyoming Seminary
Pittston Area/Wyoming Valley West/Wyoming Ar-
ea/GAR/Berwick at Northwest
Tunkhannock/Crestwood/MMI Prep/Lake-Leh-
man/Meyers at Dallas
H.S. FIELD HOCKEY
GAR at Northwest
Montrose at Hanover Area
Pittston Area at Berwick
H.S. BOYS SOCCER
MMI Prep at Berwick, 6:30 p.m.
Meyers at Nanticoke, 6 p.m.
Wyoming Valley West at Pittston Area
Coughlin at Lake-Lehman, 7 p.m.
Hanover Area at Tunkhannock
Holy Redeemer at Hazleton Area, 6 p.m.
H.S. GIRLS SOCCER
MMI Prep at Dallas
Hazleton Area at Meyers
Wyoming Valley West at Holy Redeemer
Nanticoke at Tunkhannock, 6 p.m.
Berwick at Crestwood
Coughlin at Lake-Lehman
H.S. GIRLS VOLLEYBALL
Dallas at GAR
Hanover Area at Holy Redeemer
Delaware Valley at North Pocono
Crestwood at Nanticoke
COLLEGE FIELD HOCKEY
Kings at Drew, 4:30 p.m.
Franklin and Marshall at Misericordia, 5:30 p.m.
WOMEN'S COLLEGE SOCCER
DeSales at Wilkes, 4 p.m.
Delaware Valley at Kings, 7 p.m.
Eastern at Misericordia, 7 p.m.
WOMEN'S COLLEGE TENNIS
East Stroudsburg at Wilkes, 3:30 p.m.
WOMEN'S COLLEGE VOLLEYBALL
Kings at Manhattanville, 7 p.m.
Delaware Valley at Wilkes, 7 p.m.
Eastern at Misericordia, 7 p.m.
PSU at PSU Hazleton, 7 p.m.
THURSDAY, OCT. 11
H.S. FIELD HOCKEY
Abington Heights at Delaware Valley
Coughlin at Wyoming Area
Hazleton Area at Crestwood
Honesdale at Wyoming Valley West
Lackawanna Trail at Lake-Lehman
Wallenpaupack at Dallas
Wyoming Seminary at Nanticoke
Elk Lake at Tunkhannock, 6:30 p.m.
H.S. BOYS SOCCER
Crestwood at Hazleton Area
GAR at Nanticoke
H.S. GIRLS VOLLEYBALL
Lake-Lehman at Berwick
Hazleton Area at Tunkhannock
Wyoming Area at MMI Prep
Meyers at Pittston Area
Wyoming Valley West at Coughlin
MEN'S COLLEGE TENNIS
Misericordia at Lycoming, 2:30 p.m.
WOMEN'S COLLEGE VOLLEYBALL
Harrisburg at LCCC, 7 p.m.
W H A T S O N T V
AUTO RACING
2 p.m.
ESPN NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Good Sam Road-
side Assistance 500, at Talladega, Ala.
7 p.m.
ESPN2 NHRA, Auto-Plus Nationals, at Reading,
Pa. (same-day tape)
11 p.m.
SPEED FIA World Rally, at Ajaccio, Corsica
(same-day tape)
CRICKET
1 p.m.
ESPN2 ICCWorld Twenty20, final, Sri Lanka vs.
West Indies, at Colombo, Sri Lanka (same-day
tape)
CYCLING
5 p.m.
NBCSN Paris-Tours, Chateauneuf-en-Thyme-
rais to Tours, France (same-day tape)
GOLF
7:30 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Alfred Dunhill Links
Championship, final round, at St. Andrews, Scot-
land
1:30 p.m.
TGCChampions Tour, SASChampionship, final
round, at Cary, N.C.
4 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Shriners Hospitals for Children
Open, final round, at Las Vegas
7:30 p.m.
TGC Web.com Tour, Neediest Kids Champion-
ship, final round, at Potomac, Md. (same-day tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
Noon
MLBPlayoffs, American League Division Series,
game 2, Oakland at Detroit
3 p.m.
TBS Playoffs, National League Division Series,
game 1, Washington at St. Louis
6 p.m.
TBS Playoffs, American League Division Series,
game 1, New York at Baltimore
9:30 p.m.
TBS Playoffs, National League Division Series,
game 2, Cincinnati at San Francisco
MOTORSPORTS
4 p.m.
SPEED FIMWorld Superbike, race 1, at Magny-
Cours, France (same-day tape)
6 p.m.
SPEEDFIMWorld Superbike, race 2, at Magny-
Cours, France (same-day tape)
12 Mid.
SPEEDAMAPro Racing, at NewOrleans (same-
day tape)
NFL FOOTBALL
1 p.m.
CBS Cleveland at N.Y. Giants
FOX Philadelphia at Pittsburgh
4:15 p.m.
CBS Denver at New England
8:20 p.m.
NBC San Diego at New Orleans
SAILING
4:30 p.m.
NBC Americas Cup World Series, at San Fran-
cisco
SOCCER
2 p.m.
FOX Premier League, Manchester United at
Newcastle (same-day tape)
Eds: airs at 4:30 p.m. in early NFL markets
9 p.m.
ESPN MLS, Portland at Seattle
WNBA BASKETBALL
3:30 p.m.
ABCPlayoffs, Western Conference finals, game
2, Minnesota at Los Angeles
Copyright 2012 World Features Syndicate, Inc.
T R A N S A C T I O N S
FOOTBALL
National Football League
GREEN BAY PACKERSActivated DE Mike Neal
from exempt status. Released DE Phillip Merling.
INDIANAPOLIS COLTSPromoted OT Tony Hills
from the practice squad. Waived WR Kris Adams.
HOCKEY
American Hockey League
GRAND RAPIDS GRIFFINSReassigned G Petr
Mrazek to Toledo (ECHL).
SPRINGFIELD FALCONSAssigned LW Oliver
Gabriel and D Anton Blomqvist to Evansville
(ECHL). Released C Dan Gendur and LW Patrick
Kennedy fromtheir tryout agreements andreturned
themtoEvansville. ReleasedRWDonMaloney and
G Daren Machesney from their tryout agreements.
S O C C E R
High School Soccer
WVC Boys Standings
Division I W L T
Coughlin (2A).................................. 9 0 1
Dallas (2A) ...................................... 10 1 1
Lake-Lehman (2A) ......................... 8 3 1
Crestwood (2A) .............................. 7 5 0
Valley West (3A)............................. 5 6 0
Hazleton Area (3A) ........................ 2 10 0
Division II W L T
Tunkhannock (2A)............................ 10 4 0
Wyoming Seminary (A) ................... 9 4 0
Holy Redeemer (2A) ........................ 7 5 1
Meyers (A)......................................... 4 8 0
Pittston Area (3A)............................. 3 6 1
Division III W L T
Berwick (2A) .................................... 8 3 1
Nanticoke (2A)................................. 7 4 0
Wyoming Area (2A) ........................ 5 8 1
GAR (2A).......................................... 3 8 0
MMI (A)............................................. 1 11 0
Hanover Area (2A) .......................... 0 10 1
WVC Boys Scoring Leaders
(through Friday, Oct. 5)
Note: Stats are complied on those reported to The
Times Leader. If any are incorrect, please e-mail
drosengrant@timesleader.com
INDIVIDUAL SCORING
(minimum 3 points)
DIVISION I G A Pt.
Danny Saba, Dallas ................................ 17 7 41
A.J. Nardone, Dallas............................... 16 8 40
Alex Machalick, Crestwood................... 13 5 31
Pat Malone, Coughlin ............................. 12 5 29
Chris Edkins, Lake-Lehman .................. 10 7 27
Justin Okun, Coughlin............................ 10 6 26
Nick Singer, WVW.................................. 8 4 20
Dante DeAngelo, Dallas......................... 6 8 20
Travis Keil, Coughlin .............................. 7 4 18
Matt Saba, Dallas .................................... 7 4 18
Austin Harry, Lake-Lehman................... 6 5 17
Nate Wood, Dallas .................................. 5 7 17
John Andrews, Crestwood .................... 7 1 15
Alex Buchholz, Crestwood .................... 3 7 13
Blake Pertl, Dallas .................................. 3 7 13
Tristan Williams, Hazleton Area............ 5 2 12
Brandon Scharff, Dallas ......................... 3 6 12
Kris Konicki, Lake-Lehman.................... 5 0 10
John Murray, Dallas................................ 3 3 9
Ryan Wisniewski, WVW......................... 3 3 9
Eddie Thomas, WVW............................. 2 5 9
Travis Keil, Coughlin .............................. 3 2 8
Marty Ryman, Crestwood ...................... 2 4 8
Tyler Bicking, Hazleton Area................. 3 1 7
Mike Bazadana, WVW............................ 3 1 7
Eric Whited, WVW.................................. 3 1 7
Derek Distasio, Crestwood.................... 3 0 6
Zach Goodwin, Dallas............................ 3 0 6
Dave Marriggi, Coughlin ........................ 2 2 6
Casey Ritsick, Crestwood...................... 2 2 6
Matt Wimpfheimer, Crestwood.............. 2 2 6
Vince Hornak, Hazleton Area................ 2 2 6
Aaron Wrobliewski, Crestwood............. 3 1 5
Eric Pincofski, Dallas.............................. 2 0 4
Paul Owens, WVW ................................. 2 0 4
Brian Goyne, Dallas................................ 1 2 4
Robert Caffray, Hazleton Area.............. 1 2 4
Mike Symeon, Lake-Lehman................. 1 2 4
Alex Orrson, Crestwood......................... 1 1 3
Angelo Greco, Hazleton Area ............... 1 1 3
Chris Herrick, Lake-Lehman.................. 1 1 3
Tanner MacDougal, Lake-Lehman....... 1 1 3
Matt Labashosky, WVW......................... 1 1 3
DIVISION II G A Pt.
Henry Cornell, Wyoming Seminary 22 2 46
Brendan Leahigh, Holy Redeemer 14 6 34
Jacob Hughes, Tunkhannock 11 8 30
Jordan Consagra, Pittston Area 10 6 26
Dean Mirabelli, Tunkhannock 10 4 24
Colton Brown, Tunkhannock 9 4 22
Kenny Rexer, Holy Redeemer 9 2 20
Cal Lisman, Meyers 8 2 18
Brian Ly, Tunkhannock 7 2 16
Ian Tracy, Pittston Area 6 3 15
Chris Pawlenok, Holy Redeemer 4 7 15
Aidan Cronin, Tunkhannock 4 6 14
Amdiry Molchanov, Wyo. Seminary 4 3 11
Eduardo Laguna, Wyo. Seminary 3 5 11
Denedikt Buerk, Wyo. Seminary 2 6 10
Malcolm Lumia, Wyo. Seminary 4 1 9
Kenny Rexer, Holy Redeemer 4 0 8
Jarek Hernandez, Meyers 3 2 8
Matt Tavaglione, Pittston Area 3 1 7
Rob Dougherty, Holy Redeemer 1 4 6
Tyler Kukosky, Holy Redeemer 1 4 6
Mike Kendra, Meyers 2 1 5
Jesse Macko, Meyers 2 1 5
Colin Tracy, Pittston Area 2 1 5
Jacob Cole, Tunkhannock 2 1 5
Joel Tlatenchi, Meyers 1 3 5
Benedikt Buerk, Wyoming Seminary 0 5 5
Ander Gonzalez, Wyo. Seminary 2 0 4
Pat Casey, Tunkhannock 1 2 4
Robbie Mericle, Wyo. Seminary 1 2 4
Alex Kotch, Holy Redeemer 1 1 3
Tom Lovecchio, Meyers 1 1 3
Ashavan Monroe, Meyers 1 1 3
Fernando Ramirez, Meyers 1 1 3
Mauricio Rey, Meyers 1 1 3
Nick Allardyce, Pittston Area 1 1 3
Brandon Shamnoski, Pittston Area 1 1 3
Daniel Shurtleff, Tunkhannock 1 1 3
DIVISION III G A Pt.
Richard Umana, Berwick 25 11 61
Anthony Ramos, Berwick 13 4 30
Ed Lukowski, Nanticoke 12 5 29
Zack Sypniewski, Wyoming Area 6 4 16
Wiston Godoy, Nanticoke 5 6 16
Arlinson Reyes, Berwick 2 11 15
Noah Beltrami, MMI 6 1 13
Tyler Robaczewski, Nanticoke 5 3 13
Mike Mihneski, Nanticoke 5 2 12
Josh Moran, Berwick 3 5 11
James Lukachinsky, Hanover Area 4 2 10
Rees Roberts, Nanticoke 4 2 10
Brian Waisowaty, Wyoming Area 3 2 8
Luke Henger, Berwick 3 1 7
Junior Ramos, Berwick 3 1 7
Tristan Gibbons, MMI 3 1 7
Charlie Johnson, Wyoming Area 3 1 7
Luke Height, GAR 2 3 7
Andrew Woznock, Berwick 2 2 6
Mark OMalley, Wyoming Area 2 2 6
Zach Klinger, Berwick 1 4 6
Eli Dove, MMI 2 1 5
Brian Buckman, Wyoming Area 1 3 5
Paige Elmy, GAR 2 0 4
Bre Mosier, GAR 2 0 4
Madisen Nichol, GAR 1 2 4
David Klaproth, Wyoming Area 1 2 4
Casey Olszewski, MMI 1 1 3
Steve Kreitzer, Nanticoke 1 1 3
Mike Harding, Wyoming Area 1 1 3
Jared Zaboski, Wyoming Area 1 1 3
Ben Sersen, Nanticoke 0 3 3
TEAM SCORING
DIVISION I G GF GA
Coughlin................................................ 10 32 5
Crestwood ............................................ 11 38 22
Dallas .................................................... 11 67 10
Hazleton Area...................................... 12 12 54
Lake-Lehman ....................................... 12 26 13
Wyoming Valley West......................... 11 24 34
DIVISION II G GF GA
Holy Redeemer.................................... 13 34 25
Meyers .................................................. 12 20 35
Pittston Area......................................... 10 24 35
Tunkhannock........................................ 13 46 17
Wyoming Seminary............................. 12 42 18
DIVISION III G GF GA
Berwick ................................................. 12 54 25
GAR....................................................... 9 17 42
Hanover Area....................................... 9 9 41
MMI........................................................ 12 15 72
Nanticoke.............................................. 11 34 24
Wyoming Area ..................................... 13 22 37
A U T O R A C I N G
NASCAR
Sprint Cup-Good Sam
Roadside Assistance 500
Lineup
After Saturday qualifying;race Sunday
At Talladega Superspeedway
Talladega, Ala.
Lap length: 2.66 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 191.455.
2. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 191.145.
3. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 191.119.
4. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 190.993.
5. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 190.955.
6. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 190.848.
7. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 190.784.
8. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 190.727.
9. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 190.662.
10. (22) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 190.628.
11. (55) Michael Waltrip, Toyota, 190.465.
12. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 190.427.
13. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 190.419.
14. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 190.393.
15. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 190.37.
16. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 190.332.
17. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 190.298.
18. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 190.298.
19. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 190.177.
20. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 190.17.
21. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 190.113.
22. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 189.778.
23. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 189.748.
24. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 189.74.
25. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 189.616.
26. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 189.552.
27. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 189.38.
28. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 189.316.
29. (51) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 189.025.
30. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 188.947.
31. (32) Terry Labonte, Ford, 188.794.
32. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 188.727.
33. (26) Josh Wise, Ford, 188.649.
34. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 188.638.
35. (97) Timmy Hill, Toyota, 188.326.
36. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 188.296.
37. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 188.001.
38. (83) Landon Cassill, Toyota, 187.986.
39. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 187.46.
40. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 186.991.
41. (10) David Reutimann, Chevrolet, 186.783.
42. (33) Cole Whitt, Chevrolet, 186.289.
43. (23) Robert Richardson Jr., Toyota, 185.942.
F O O T B A L L
National Football League
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
N.Y. Jets ................................. 2 2 0 .500 81 109
New England .......................... 2 2 0 .500 134 92
Buffalo..................................... 2 2 0 .500 115 131
Miami ....................................... 1 3 0 .250 86 90
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Houston ................................ 4 0 0 1.000 126 56
Indianapolis .......................... 1 2 0 .333 61 83
Jacksonville.......................... 1 3 0 .250 62 97
Tennessee............................ 1 3 0 .250 81 151
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Baltimore................................. 3 1 0 .750 121 83
Cincinnati ................................ 3 1 0 .750 112 112
Pittsburgh................................ 1 2 0 .333 77 75
Cleveland................................ 0 4 0 .000 73 98
West
W L T Pct PF PA
San Diego ............................... 3 1 0 .750 100 71
Denver..................................... 2 2 0 .500 114 83
Kansas City............................. 1 3 0 .250 88 136
Oakland................................... 1 3 0 .250 67 125
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Philadelphia............................ 3 1 0 .750 66 83
Dallas ...................................... 2 2 0 .500 65 88
Washington ............................ 2 2 0 .500 123 123
N.Y. Giants.............................. 2 2 0 .500 111 84
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Atlanta ................................... 4 0 0 1.000 124 76
Tampa Bay............................ 1 3 0 .250 82 91
Carolina ................................ 1 3 0 .250 80 109
New Orleans......................... 0 4 0 .000 110 130
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Minnesota............................... 3 1 0 .750 90 72
Chicago................................... 3 1 0 .750 108 68
Green Bay ............................... 2 2 0 .500 85 81
Detroit...................................... 1 3 0 .250 100 114
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Arizona ..................................... 4 1 0 .800 94 78
San Francisco.......................... 3 1 0 .750 104 65
St. Louis.................................... 3 2 0 .600 96 94
Seattle....................................... 2 2 0 .500 70 58
Thursday's Game
St. Louis 17, Arizona 3
Today's Games
Baltimore at Kansas City, 1 p.m.
Atlanta at Washington, 1 p.m.
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
Green Bay at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at N.Y. Giants, 1 p.m.
Miami at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.
Seattle at Carolina, 4:05 p.m.
Chicago at Jacksonville, 4:05 p.m.
Buffalo at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.
Tennessee at Minnesota, 4:25 p.m.
Denver at New England, 4:25 p.m.
San Diego at New Orleans, 8:20 p.m.
Open: Dallas, Detroit, Oakland, Tampa Bay
Monday's Game
Houston at N.Y. Jets, 8:30 p.m.

MLB BASEBALL
Detroit 3, Oakland 1
Oakland Athletics Detroit Tigers
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Crisp lf 4 1 1 1 Jackson cf 4 1 1 0
Drew ss 4 0 1 0 Berry lf 3 0 2 0
Cespedes lf 3 0 1 0 Garcia ph 1 0 0 0
Moss 1b 4 0 0 0 Cabrera 3b 3 0 0 0
Reddick rf 3 0 0 0 Fielder 1b 4 0 0 0
Donaldson 3b 4 0 0 0 Young dh 2 0 0 0
Smith dh 3 0 0 0 Dirks lf 3 0 1 0
Norris c 3 0 0 0 Peralta ss 3 0 0 0
Kottaras ph 1 0 0 0 Avila c 3 1 2 1
Pennington
2b 2 0 1 0 Infante 2b 3 1 1 1
Totals 31 1 4 1 Totals 29 3 7 1
Athletics ............................... 100 000 000 1
Tigers ................................... 101 010 00x 3
E Parker (1), LOB Athletics 7,
Tigers 4 2B Drew (1), Jackson
(1), Infante (1) HR Crisp (1), Avila
(1)
IP H R ER BB SO
Athletics
Parker (L, 0-1).......... 6.1 7 3 2 1 5
Neshak...................... 0.2 0 0 0 1 0
Blevins ....................... 1 0 0 0 0 0
Tigers
Verlander (W, 1-0)... 7 3 1 1 4 11
Benoit (H, 1) ............. 1 1 0 0 0 1
Valverde (S, 1) .........
College Football Scores
EAST
Albany (NY) 31, Bryant 14
Army 34, Boston College 31
Bloomsburg 38, Millersville 14
Brockport 35, William Paterson 14
Brown 17, Rhode Island 7
California (Pa.) 41, Clarion 22
Castleton St. 35, Norwich 27
Cortland St. 42, College of NJ 28
Dartmouth 34, Yale 14
East Stroudsburg 35, West Chester 28
Edinboro 44, Gannon 24
Fordham 38, Georgetown 31
Harvard 45, Cornell 13
Hobart 28, Springfield 7
Holy Cross 13, Bucknell 6
Lehigh 35, Columbia 14
Lycoming 42, FDU-Florham 7
Maine 26, Delaware 3
Penn St. 39, Northwestern 28
Princeton 35, Lafayette 14
RPI 46, St. Lawrence 27
Richmond 28, Villanova 17
Rochester 44, Merchant Marine 26
Rowan 33, Montclair St. 7
Rutgers 19, UConn 3
S. Connecticut 47, Pace 26
St. Francis (Pa.) 10, Robert Morris 3
Stony Brook 49, Charleston Southern 7
Temple 37, South Florida 28
Trinity (Conn.) 53, Hamilton 14
Utica 51, Buffalo St. 44
Wagner 12, Sacred Heart 3
Widener 56, Stevenson 20
Wilkes 45, Misericordia 13
William & Mary 34, Penn 28
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 PAGE 3C
M A J O R L E A G U E B A S E B A L L
ALDS
GAME 2
Oakland (Milone 13-10)
at Detroit (Fister 10-10)
12:07 p.m. (MLB)
ALDS
GAME1
New York (Sabathia 15-6)
at Baltimore (Hammel 8-6)
6:15 p.m. (TBS)
NLDS
GAME 2
Cincinnati (Arroyo 12-10)
at San Francisco (Bumgarner 16-11)
9:37 p.m. (TBS)
NLDS
GAME 2
Washington (Gonzalez 21-8)
at St. Louis (Wainwright 14-13)
3:07 p.m. (TBS)
TODAY S SCHEDUL E
BALTIMORE Orioles roo-
kie thirdbasemanManny Macha-
do was a 4-year-old when Balti-
more and the New York Yankees
last met in the postseason.
In case the kid needs a quick
history lesson, left-hander David
Wells won a game for Baltimore,
Cecil Fielder and Darryl Straw-
berry homered for the Yankees,
and a youngster named Jeffrey
Maier stuck his glove in the mid-
dle of the whole thing.
The 1996 AL Championship
Series was a lifetime ago for
many Orioles fans and a rather
meaningless event in the devel-
opment of Machado, now 20 and
a key player in Baltimores im-
probable, magnificent 2012 sea-
son.
Sixteen years after the Yankees
ousted the Orioles from the play-
offs and advanced to the World
Series, the teams resume their ri-
valry tonight in Game1of the AL
Division Series. It will be Balti-
mores first home postseason
game since 1997.
The Orioles spent much of the
season chasing New York in the
AL East, and now they have an
opportunity to get the better of
the Yankees in a far more signif-
icant scenario. After New York
swept a three-game set in Balti-
more in April, the Orioles re-
bounded to forge a split of the18-
game season series.
Weve played those guys a lot
this year. We know what theyve
got, they know what weve got,
Orioles first baseman Mark Rey-
nolds said. Itll come down to a
big pitch or a big at-bat.
Or, the outcome could be influ-
enced by a fan in pursuit of a sou-
venir. In the eighth inning of
Game 1 of the 1996 ALCS, Maier
stuck his glove over the right-
field wall and appeared to rob To-
ny Tarasco of the chance to catch
a deep fly hit by Derek Jeter. Um-
pire Rich Garcia called it a home
run, andthe Yankees woninextra
innings en route to capturing the
series 4-1.
Jeter and Yankees left-hander
Andy Pettitte, who won the deci-
sive fifth game of that series and
is expected to start in Game 2 on
Monday night, have been to
many playoff series since. In this
one, they enter as part of a team
that went 14-4 down the stretch
tofinishwiththeALs best record.
And yet, the Yankees open the
series on the road.
Thats the topic of discussion
right nowbut, you know, this is a
one year thing and were going to
have to win some games on the
road most likely anyway if we
make it to the promised land,
Yankees first basemanMarkTeix-
eira said. Were not going to
complain about starting the first
two on the road.
And the Orioles? Well, theyre
delighted to be playing in front of
their home fans, but really,
theyre just happy tobe playingat
this time of year period.
After their abrupt exit fromthe
postseason in 1996, the Orioles
returned in 1997. Fourteen
straight losing seasons followed
before they put together an un-
imaginable 93-69 record this year
under former Yankees manager
Buck Showalter. For an encore,
Baltimore beat the Texas Rang-
ers and their best pitcher Yu Dar-
vish 5-1 on Friday night in the
one-game, win-or-go-home wild-
card round.
AP PHOTO
New York Yankees manager Joe Girardi, right, and third baseman
Alex Rodriguez take part in a practice session Saturday in Balti-
more. The Yankees and the Baltimore Orioles are scheduled to
play Game 1 in the American League Division Series today.
Orioles, Yankees
rekindle playoff
memories of 96
By DAVID GINSBURG
AP Sports Writer
There was
something a bit
artificial about
it to begin with,
and not just
because the
worst teamin
the National
League playoffs became the first
beneficiary of the expanded wild
card.
The St. Louis Cardinals cer-
tainly celebrated as if it was real,
even if they had to wait until
they were off the field to go wild
about their wild-card win. No
sense antagonizing the fans in
Atlanta any more, in case they
still had a fewmore beer bottles
in reserve.
Baseball is not supposed to be
decided in one game. Never was,
no matter howmuch extra mon-
ey it brings Bud Selig and his
owners.
That a 94-win season can end
because of a fewill-timed errors
is hard enough to digest for
Atlanta fans who kept the faith
through a long season. That a
call an umpire had no business
making thwarted a possible
comeback will make the offsea-
son seemeven longer.
Actually, left field umpire Sam
Holbrook may have done every-
body but Braves fans a favor by
raising his armand calling an
infield fly in the eighth inning
Friday. His call highlighted the
absurdity of a sudden-death
playoff systemthrown together
quickly and without a great deal
of careful thought.
The idea was sound, much like
the original plan to add a wild-
card teamback in1994. More
teams in contention in August
and September means more fans
in the stands, which means more
money to the owners.
The original wild card
instituted when baseball went to
three divisions fromtwo has
worked well, even if purists
grumble that the best-of-five
opening series should be best-of-
seven. It has added excitement
to baseball races, and given
teams that might never beat a
juggernaut in their division
something to play for.
The expanded wild card is
more of a gimmick that punishes
the wild-card entry with the best
record and makes the162-game
regular season even less mea-
ningful.
Theres too much emphasis
put on one game, too many
chances that something weird
like a bizarre infield fly rule call
causes an entire season to
suddenly go bad.
And let there be no mistake
about it. The infield rule call was
bizarre, beginning with the fact
it was made in the outfield.
It might not have cost the
Braves the game, but it surely
cost thema chance to get back in
the game. And while it may have
been the technically correct call
to make under the broad in-
terpretation of the rule, it was
the wrong call to make under the
rule of common sense.
The best tweak would be to
expand the wild-card elimination
to a best-of-three series, and play
all games on the home field of
the teamwith the best record.
That would provide an incentive
for having the best regular-sea-
son record of the two wild-card
teams and eliminate a travel day
that would push the postseason
further into November.
That doesnt guarantee the
best teamwill win, but playing a
minimumof two games takes
some of the randomness out of
it. Teams will play looser, manag-
ers will be able to set up their
pitching staffs better, and um-
pires will have a fewmore games
to get used to making calls down
the outfield lines.
More importantly, fans wont
have to live with the idea of an
entire season being wiped out by
a fluke play or a bad call.
One-game playoff
should be ruled out
Tim Dahlberg is a national sports
columnist for The Associated Press.
Write to him at tdahlberg@ap.org or
http://twitter.com/timdahlberg
OPINION
T I M D A H L B E R G
ST. LOUIS Adam Wainw-
right was a spectator last fall,
cheering on the St. Louis Cardi-
nals from the bench as they rose
from wild card to World Series
champions.
Its a lot more fun being part of
the action.
Looking back on it, it really
hits me when autograph seekers
hand me a ball and its a 2011
World Series ball, and then they
take it back and say No, No, sign
this one instead, Wainwright
said Saturday. Thats when it
hits that I really didnt get to do a
whole lot. This game I get to play
is very special to me, and missing
that time last year, I really
learned how much I love the
game.
Fans in Washington, D.C., an-
ticipating the first baseball post-
season appearance for the na-
tions capital since 1933, has to
feel that way, too.
Wainwright, a 14-game winner
in his first year back from elbow
reconstruction surgery, success-
fully fought against restricting
his innings andstarts today inthe
NL division series opener. The
Nationals, who led the league
with 97 wins, will go with 21-
game winner Gio Gonzalez after
sitting down Stephen Strasburg
in early September with 159 1-3
innings pitched.
Theres so many things that
factor into this that you take it
with a smile, Gonzalez said. Its
the first time ever experiencing
this, to represent such a great or-
ganization, such a great rotation,
great lineup. Its unbelievable.
The Nationals have one of the
youngest rosters in the majors
and won 98 games as they over-
came injuries to Jayson Werth,
Ryan Zimmerman, Michael
Morse and Ian Desmond. Davey
Johnson is a seasoned hand,
though, joining Billy Martin as
the lone managers to win divi-
sion titles with four franchises.
During spring training, Cardi-
nals general manager JohnMoze-
liak said there would be serious
consideration to ending Wainw-
rights season after perhaps 180
innings. About a month into the
season, the former 20-game win-
ner convinced the team such re-
strictions would be unnecessary,
and he finished second on the
Cardinals with 198 2-3 innings.
During the first half of the sea-
son, Wainwright was unhappy
with his fastball, slider and
changeup and pleased with just
his curveball.
I totally get now why Tommy
Johnrecovery is sohard, Wainw-
right said. Your arm just takes a
while to get back, it really does,
and its hard for me to say that be-
cause I thought I was going to be
the exception to the rule.
Strasburg, who had elbow sur-
gery in September 2010, was un-
successful in persuading the Na-
tionals to allow him to finish out
the season, the first for the fran-
chise to reach the playoffs since
the 1981 Montreal Expos.
Very little time has passed
sincetheNationals andCardinals
met inSt. Louis onthe final week-
end of the regular season, with
Washington on the verge of
clinching the leagues best record
and St. Louis closing in on the fi-
nal playoff spot.
St. Louis reached the division
series by winning the wild-card
playoff 6-3 in Atlanta on Friday, a
game marredbyaninfieldflyrule
call thatll live on forever in the
minds of disgruntledBraves fans,
but with botched umpiring that
affected both sides.
Ive never seen anything like
it, Carlos Beltran said. Its part
of baseball. Were happy.
Wainwright set to oppose Gonzalez in opener
By R.B. FALLSTROM
AP Sports Writer
lowed two earned runs in 6 1-3 innings
and took the loss.
Game 2 in Sunday, with Doug Fister
taking the mound for Detroit and left-
hander Tommy Milone for Oakland.
It was only the second victory for De-
troit in its last seven series openers. The
Tigers lost Game 1 to the Yankees in the
division series last year before winning
in five. Detroit then lost the opener of
the AL championship series to Texas.
After winning their final six games to
take the AL West in shocking fashion,
the As made their presence felt right
away in Detroit.
The home crowd greeted Verlander
with a roar and a sea of twirling white
towels when he popped out of the du-
gout and headed to the mound to start
the game, but Crisp was unfazed. He
pulled Verlanders two-strike fastball
just inside the pole in right field to put
Oakland on top.
The AL Central-champion Tigers tied
it immediately. Austin Jacksons hard-
hit ball deflected off diving shortstop
Stephen Drew and into short left field.
The Detroit leadoff man ended up with
a double and went to third when Quin-
tin Berry slapped a single to third off
Donaldson, who also could only get a
piece of the ball while diving for it.
Triple Crown winner Miguel Cabrera,
who went hitless, grounded into a dou-
ble play, but Jackson came home to
make it 1-all.
Drewfinally made a diving play in the
second, sprawling to his right on Del-
mon Youngs grounder and then throw-
ing to first for the out. At the plate, the
As made Verlander work, forcing himto
throw 61 pitches in the first three in-
nings. The Detroit ace struck out Bran-
don Moss to end the Oakland third with
a 99 mph fastball but Verlander was
having to reach back for extra speed
early.
The Athletics tied a postseason re-
cord by starting four rookies Parker,
Josh Donaldson, Yoenis Cespedes and
Derek Norris.
Parker looked sharp early but allowed
another run in the third because of a
fielding mishap. With two out and a man
on second, Berry chopped a soft groun-
der to the right side. Parker came off the
mound to field it, but with the speedy
Berry hustling to first, Parker lost con-
trol of the ball with his glove hand for an
error that allowed Omar Infante to
score.
TIGERS
Continued from Page 1C
AP PHOTO
Detroit Tigers designated hitter Delmon Young (21) is hit by a pitch during the
fourth inning against the Oakland Athletics on Saturday in Detroit.
EDITORS NOTE
At press time, the game between the
Cincinnati Reds and the San Francisco
Giants was still in progress.
CLEVELAND (AP) Terry
Francona has been fired as man-
ager of the Cleveland Indians.
Francona, who won two
WorldSeries titles withthe Bos-
ton Red Sox, accepted the Indi-
ans offer on Saturday and will
take over a team that collapsed
in the second half this season af-
ter a promising first four
months.
The 53-year-old will be intro-
duced as Clevelands 42nd man-
ager during a Monday news
conference at Progressive Field,
the Indians said in a statement
Saturday.
Cleveland chose Francona
over Sandy Alomar Jr., who
served as the clubs interim
manager for the final six games
after Manny Acta was fired on
Sept. 27. Francona and Alomar
were the only candidates to in-
terview for the Indians open-
ing.
Francona has worked as an
analyst for ESPN this season.
His father, Tito, played for the
Indians from1959-64.
Francona hired as Cleveland manager
C M Y K
PAGE 4C SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 PAGE 5C
S P O R T S
WILKES-BARRETWP. With
one booming shot from the blue-
line, Alex Grant firmly establish-
ed himself as a serious contender
for ice time among the Wilkes-
Barre/Scranton Penguins deep
defensive corps.
During Saturdays 3-2 loss to
the Hershey Bears, there were a
fewbright spots for thePenguins.
Most notably the power play,
which connected twice in the
first period.
And just like last season, Grant
was a main contributor.
With the Penguins on the sec-
ond power play of the night,
Grant gained the puck at the
point and skated along the blue-
line looking for a shooting lane.
Everything leading toward the
net was blocked, but Grant spot-
ted the stick of rookie Jayson
Megna off to the side and blasted
a slapshot right on his tape.
Megna deflected the shot past
Hershey goaltender Braden Holt
by for the goal, but it was Grants
patience along the blueline that
made it happen.
Guys were in the shooting
lane so I hadto shoot to the side,
hesaid. I couldnt hit thenet, but
Jayson did a great job putting his
stick out there for me.
The goal was important to
Grant, who needs to impress in
an area that has become the key
to his game. Of the 37 points
Grant scored last season, 27 of
them came on the power play.
He kind of set the bar for him-
self last year as far as his ability to
be a factor on the power play,
head coach John Hynes said. It
was nice to see him be able to do
that again tonight.
With 11 defensemen in camp
vying for the top-six spots on the
blueline, Grant knows he cant re-
ly on last seasons success to get
him ice time. Instead, he has to
continue to build on it, and that
means producing on the power
play.
With all the competition on de-
fense, Grant knows he must re-
establish himself once again.
There is some pressure there
and I definitely have to prove my-
self, he said. Its the same situa-
tion I was in at the start of last
year when there were no injuries
and I felt the pressure and nerves
when I did get out there.
Now, I have to prove myself
again and showI do belong in the
lineup every single night.
Notes
Rookie defensemanJoe Mor-
rowopened the scoring on Satur-
day with a blistering one-timer
from the right faceoff circle for a
power play goal. The shot im-
pressed Hynes. Its a shot, he
said. He got it off tonight more
thanhe has inthe other game. He
likes to use it and its a weapon.
Megna now has two goals in
two preseason games and has
been impressive with his offen-
sive awareness on the ice. He
has an idea of where to be, his an-
ticipation is good and he knows
what hes going to do before he
gets the puck, Hynes said. Meg-
na thrived on the power play in
college last season, as 10 of his 31
points came with the man advan-
tage.
The Penguins were 2-for-6on
the power play andwere a perfect
7-for-7 in the penalty kill depart-
ment. Despite losing the game,
Hynes said the special teams
work was beneficial to his team.
The intensity level also pickedup
as there were two fights in the
contest with Benn Ferriero and
Philip Samuelsson dropping the
gloves for the Penguins for the
teams first fights of the presea-
son. This game was great be-
cause you had different special
teams situations, a couple of
fights and you could see the regu-
lar season is starting to get clos-
er, Hynes said. It was a great
preparation game.
Defenseman Robert Bortuz-
zo, wholeft Fridays game against
Rochester early, is day-to-day
with a lower body injury, Hynes
said.
With the 3-2 loss, the Pen-
guins are now 1-1-0-1 in the pre-
season. They wrap up the exhibi-
tion schedule with a tilt in Her-
shey today at 5 p.m.
Hershey.................................................. 1 1 1 3
Penguins ................................................ 2 0 0 2
First Period
Scoring 1. WBS, Joseph Morrow(Ferriero, Smith)
power play 9:05. 2. WBS, Jayson Megna (Grant)
power play 10:37. 3. HER, Julien Brouillette unas-
sisted17:08. Penalties WBS, Holzapfel (elbowing)
5:57; HER, Galiev (slashing) 6:51; HER, Marshall
(slashing) 8:48; HER, Berry (cross-checking) 9:35;
WBS, Peters(hooking) 11:12; WBS, Ferriero(cross-
checking) 15:41.
Second Period
Scoring 4. HER, Stanislav Galiev (Berry, Marshall)
5:41. Penalties WBS, Ferriero (fighting) 12:48;
HER, Olesky (fighting) 12:48; HER, Carman (trip-
ping) 18:38.
hird Period
Scoring 5. HER, Alex Berry (Carman, McNeill)
3:31. Penalties WBS, Thompson (slashing) 1:36;
HER, Champagne (tripping) 6:24; HER, Hamill
(holding) 9:01; WBS, Peters double minor (hook-
ing, unsportsmanlike) 12:23; WBS, Samuelsson
(fighting) 13:54; HER, Pope (fighting) 13:54; WBS,
bench (too many men served by Neal) 18:49
Shots on goal: Hershey 10-4-4-18, Penguins
7-3-5-15
Power-play Opportunities: Hershey 0 of 7, Pen-
guins 2 of 6
Goaltenders: Hershey BradenHoltby (5saves 7
shots); Dany Sabourin 10:56 of the second period
(8-8). Penguins Jeff Zatkoff (15-18)
W B S P E N G U I N S
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
Penguins Joseph Morrow, center, celebrates with his teammates
after scoring in the first period of a preseason game with Hershey.
Grant makes case in Pens loss
By TOMVENESKY
tvenesky@timesleader.com
CHICAGO Cierre Wood
and George Atkinson III gave
Notre Dame its first 100-yard
rushing duo in a decade, and
Everett Golson came off the
bench to lead the No. 9 Irish to
a 41-3 victory over Miami on
Saturday night in what was a
very tame sequel to the famed
Catholics vs. Convicts rivalry.
Wood rushed for 118 yards
and two touchdowns, and At-
kinson added 123 yards and
another score. Golson, who sat
the first series as punishment
for violating team rules, com-
pleted his first six passes and
finished 17 of 22 as Notre Dame
improved to 5-0 for the first
time since 2002.
The loss snapped a three-
game win streak for Miami,
which was held to just 285 yards
after piling up 1,260 yards and
86 points in its previous two
games. The Hurricanes (4-2)
were hurt by at least a half-
dozen drops by their receivers.
West Virginia 48, Texas 45
AUSTIN, Texas Geno
Smith passed for four touch-
downs, leading No. 8 West Vir-
ginia to another wild shootout
win in the Big 12, this time
taking out No. 11 Texas.
Smith, who has 24 touchdown
passes this season without an
interception, hit Tavon Austin
with a 6-yard score with 10:50
left to play. Andrew Buie ran for
207 yards and two touchdowns,
the second coming giving the
Mountaineers a critical 10-point
lead late.
West Virginia (5-0, 2-0) didnt
seal the win until recovering an
onside kick with 14 seconds left
after Texas scored a touchdown
on a pass from David Ash to
Marquise Goodwin.
Joe Bergeron scored four
touchdowns, all on short runs,
for Texas (4-1, 1-1), which is 2-7
at home in conference games
the since 2010.
Wisconsin 31, Illinois 14
MADISON, Wis. Joel Stave
threw two touchdown passes
and Wisconsins running game
showed signs of life as the Badg-
ers defeated Illinois 31-14 on
Saturday.
Stave threw for 254 yards for
the Badgers (4-2, 1-1 Big Ten),
who rushed for 173 yards 96
in the fourth quarter.
The offensive struggles of the
Illini (2-4, 0-2) continued, with
quarterback Nathan Scheel-
haase the only positive. He
finished with 178 yards passing
and 84 rushing as Illinois gained
287 yards overall.
Scheelhaase ran for a 5-yard
touchdown in the first quarter
and threw for an 8-yard touch-
down to Ryan Lankford to make
it 24-14 late in the game.
Michigan 44, Purdue 13
WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind.
Denard Robinson rushed for 235
yards and Fitzgerald Toussaint
scored twice to help Michigan
rout Purdue.
The Wolverines (3-2, 1-0 Big
Ten) have won three straight
over Purdue.
The Boilermakers (3-2, 0-1
Big Ten) lost at home for only
the second time since Oct. 1,
2011.
It was a banner day for Rob-
inson in his first game back
from a dismal performance at
Notre Dame. He had three runs
of 35 or more yards, finished 8
of 15 for 105 yards, moved into
fifth place on Michigans career
rushing list, fourth on the
schools career passing list and
broke the Big Tens career rush-
ing record among quarterbacks.
Michigan St. 31, Indiana 27
BLOOMINGTON, Ind.
Andrew Maxwell passed for 290
yards and two touchdowns, and
Michigan State rallied from a
17-point deficit to defeat Indi-
ana.
Aaron Burbridge caught eight
passes for 134 yards and LeVeon
Bell ran for 121 yards and two
touchdowns on 37 carries for
the Spartans (4-2, 1-1 Big Ten),
who were coming off a 17-16 loss
to No. 12 Ohio State.
Cameron Coffman passed for
282 yards and three touchdowns
and Shane Wynn had 12 catches
for 70 yards for the Hoosiers
(2-3, 0-2), who led 27-17 at the
end of the third quarter. Indiana
could have given second-year
coach Kevin Wilson his first
conference win, but the Hoo-
siers went three-and-out on
critical back-to-back possessions
in the fourth quarter.
Florida 14, LSU 6
GAINESVILLE, Fla. Mike
Gillislee ran for a career-high
146 yards and two touchdowns,
bringing Florida to life in the
second half to beat LSU.
Led by Gillislee and a dom-
inant defense, Floridas grind-it-
out victory provided a signature
win for coach Will Muschamp in
his second season in Gaines-
ville. It was the programs first
win against a ranked team since
beating rival Georgia in 2010.
The Gators (5-0, 4-0 South-
eastern Conference) wore down
the Tigers (5-1, 1-1) in the sec-
ond half no surprise because
Florida has been doing that all
season. Florida, which trailed
6-0 at halftime, also came from
behind to beat Texas A&M and
Tennessee on the road last
month.
The Gators harassed quarter-
back Zach Mettenberger, who
completed 11 of 25 passes for
161 yards, with an interception.
It was Gillislees third 100-
yard game of the season.
Kansas State 56, Kansas 16
MANHATTAN, Kan. John
Hubert ran for 101 yards and
four touchdowns on just 10
carries, and Collin Klein had
two touchdowns running and
throwing as Kansas State routed
Kansas.
Klein finished with 129 yards
passing and 116 yards rushing to
help the Wildcats (5-0, 2-0 Big
12) pile up more than 50 points
for the third straight year
against their biggest rival.
Theyve won four straight
against the Jayhawks (1-4, 0-2)
since Bill Snyder returned as
coach.
The longtime Kansas State
coach probably had some choice
words for his team at halftime,
when a slew of mistakes result-
ed in a modest 21-14 lead. But
the Wildcats scored four touch-
downs in the third quarter, three
in a span of about 5 minutes, to
put the game away.
Kansas Dayne Crist threw for
189 yards and a touchdown, but
he also threw three intercep-
tions and lost a fumble. James
Sims had 115 yards rushing and
a touchdown for the Jayhawks.
Clemson 47, Georgia Tech 31
CLEMSON, S.C. Tajh Boyd
threw for a career high 397
yards and DeAndre Hopkins had
173 yards receiving to lead
Clemson over Georgia Tech.
The Tigers (5-1, 2-1 Atlantic
Coast Conference) gained 601
yards, while the Yellow Jackets
(2-4, 1-3) gained 483.
Boyd threw for two touch-
downs, including a 35-yard
touchdown to Hopkins that put
Clemson up 38-31 with 10:29 left
in the game.
Georgia Tech bobbled the
kickoff and started its next
possession at the 2 yard line.
Tigers linebacker Spencer
Shuey sniffed out an option
pitch two plays later for a safety
that crushed the Yellow Jackets
chances. It was the first time
either team led by more than a
touchdown.
Orin Smith gained 117 yards
on seven carries for Georgia
Tech.
Along with completing 26 of
41 passes, Boyd also ran for a
touchdown and caught one pass
a 2-point conversion.
Iowa St. 37, TCU 23
FORT WORTH, Texas
Jared Barnett threw three touch-
downs to Josh Lenz, who later
had a scoring toss of his own on
a trick play, as Iowa State ended
TCUs FBS-best 12-game win
streak.
It was the first Big 12 home
game for conference newcomer
TCU (4-1, 1-1), which played
without suspended quarterback
Casey Pachall.
Barnett was 12-of-21 passing
for 183 yards and ran nine times
for 30 yards in his first start this
season for the Cyclones (4-1,
1-1).
The Frogs had won a nation-
best 25 conference games in a
row, the first 24 while winning
the Mountain West champion-
ship each of the last three sea-
sons.
Lenz had TD catches of 51
and 74 yards in the first quarter.
Trevone Boykin started for
TCU and was 23-of-40 passing
for 270 yards with a touchdown
and three interceptions.
Oklahoma 41, Texas Tech 20
LUBBOCK, Texas Landry
Jones passed for two touch-
downs, Blake Bell ran for two
more and Oklahoma beat Texas
Tech to avenge a home loss to
the Red Raiders last season.
The win was crucial for Okla-
homa to remain in the conversa-
tion for the Big 12 title.
Both of Jones touchdown
passes went for 13 yards one
each to Justin Brown and Kenny
Stills. Bell, in at quarterback,
scored his touchdowns from a
yard out.
Javon Harris put the game out
of reach midway through the
third quarter when he returned
an interception 46 yards for a
TD to put the Sooners (3-1, 1-1)
up 38-13.
The Red Raiders had their
worst defensive performance
this year, giving up 380 total
yards after coming in ranked
No. 1 in the nation.
Seth Doege was 22 of 36 for
203 yards and had three in-
terceptions for Texas Tech (4-1,
1-1).
Stanford 54, Arizona 48
STANFORD, Calif. Chase
Thomas intercepted a tipped
pass by Matt Scott in overtime,
Stepfan Taylor ran for a 21-yard
score two plays later and Stan-
ford rallied from a two-touch-
down deficit to stun Arizona.
Josh Nunes threw for a career-
high 360 yards and two touch-
downs and ran for three more
scores for Stanford (4-1, 2-1
Pac-12) to offset Scotts record-
setting performance.
Scott completed 45 of 69
passes both school records
for 491 yards and three
touchdowns until Henry An-
derson tipped his final pass in
overtime that Thomas intercept-
ed. Arizona (3-3, 0-3) amassed
617 total yards but lost for the
third straight game and is still
winless in conference play.
Temple 37, South Florida 28
PHILADELPHIA Marcus
Greens blocked a late field goal
attempt and Montel Harris
scored two touchdowns to lead
Temple to a victory over South
Florida in a Big East Conference
matchup.
The game marked Temples
re-entry into the Big East since
the Owls were kicked out of the
conference in 2004.
Mississippi St. 27,
Kentucky 14
LEXINGTON, Ky. Tyler
Russell passed for two touch-
downs and Mississippi State
held Kentucky to just 228 yards
on offense in the victory.
LaDarius Perkins carried 25
times for 110 yards, including a
31-yard score, and Devon Bell
kicked field goals of 20 and 37
yards as Mississippi State
moved to 5-0 for the first time
since 1999. The Bulldogs are 2-0
in Southeastern Conference
play.
Russell was 23 of 39 for 269
yards, hitting Adrian Marcus
and Chad Bumphis for touch-
downs of 10 and 27 yards, re-
spectively.
Rutgers 19, Connecticut 3
PISCATAWAY, N.J. Jawan
Jamison ran for 110 yards and
Wayne Warren returned an
interception 25 yards for a
scores as Rutgers suffocated
UConn to remain undefeated.
The Scarlet Knights (5-0, 2-0
Big East) are off to their best
start since 2007, and they
avenged a bitter loss to the
Huskies that ended last regular
season and kept Rutgers from
sharing the conference title.
Oregon State 19,
Washington State 6
CORVALLIS, Ore. Jordan
Poyer had three interceptions,
Sean Mannion passed for 270
yards and No. 14 Oregon State
survived a shaky start with a
over Washington State.
Markus Wheaton had 95
yards receiving and a touch-
down but it was the Beavers
defense which kept the Cougars
at arms length on the day when
Mannion, who threw three in-
terceptions, was more down
than up.
South Carolina 35, Georgia 7
COLUMBIA, S.C. Connor
Shaw threw two touchdown
passes and ran for another, Ace
Sanders had a dazzling 70-yard
punt return touchdown and No.
6 South Carolinas defense dom-
inated fifth-ranked Georgia in a
victory.
The Gamecocks (6-0, 4-0
Southeastern Conference) won
their school-record 10th straight
game with a performance that
marked certainly marked them
an Eastern Division front-runner
and maybe showed theyre
capable of even more.
Those tests come soon as
South Carolina travels to once-
beaten LSU next week and then
to Florida on Oct. 20. Itd be
hard to pick against the Game-
cocks after this one. South Car-
olina grounded Gurshall,
holding Georgias stellar fresh-
men Todd Gurley and Keith
Marshall to 76 yards combined.
The Bulldogs (5-1, 3-1) finished
with 224 yards, less than half
their seasons average coming
in.
MAJOR COL L EGE FOOTBAL L
Notre Dame runs all over outmanned Hurricanes
AP PHOTO
Miami tight end Clive Walford, center, is tackled by Notre Dame cornerback Bennett Jackson (2),
Manti Teo, behind, and Zeke Motta (17), during the first half Saturday at Soldier Field in Chicago. At
press time, Notre Dame was leading Miami, 34-3.
The Associated Press
PAGE 6C SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
P E N N S T A T E F O O T B A L L
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Pressure from the defensive
end flushed him out to the right.
He threw a slight pump fake be-
fore crossing the 10, found open
grass in front of him and
launched off of his right foot at
the 2, just clearing the pylon for
the score.
Well, McGloin said, failing to
get out the first word of his de-
scription without a laugh, I was
unsure of what to do there if I
had to dive or not. So I just decid-
ed to dive. But my knee brace un-
fortunately got caught in the
ground. So I just looked like a
complete fool.
But I stuck the landing.
He added a flourish, too. The
senior, who in the past was
known to compare his style to
Brett Favre -- and not always fa-
vorably -- has apparently evolved
to emulate another Packers quar-
terback.
When McGloin landed from
his, whatever it was, he proceed-
ed to make like Aaron Rodgers af-
ter a big run and flash the cham-
pionship belt around his waist.
I was thinking about doing it
for a few days now, if I got anoth-
er rushing touchdown. So before
I did it, I was kind of looking to
see where the refs were (so I
wouldnt get flagged).
I kind of did a leg kick. He just
kindof does it (normal). I do a bit
of a little leg kick after mine.
After leading the Lions to 22
fourth-quarter points, McGloin
could probably have gotten away
withmost any kindof celebration
in Happy Valley. Especially now
that the Lions (4-2, 2-0 Big Ten)
head into their off week on a four-
game winning streak, delivering
Bill OBrien his first win over a
ranked team.
It didnt look likely after North-
westerns Venric Mark ran a punt
back 75 yards for a touchdown
with just 50 seconds left in the
third quarter. Penn State trailed
28-17 and the stadiumwas silent.
The offense answered with an
18-play, 82-yard drive, with
McGloin connecting with Allen
Robinson for their second touch-
down of the half. A 2-point con-
version pulled the Lions within
28-25, and the Wildcats (5-1, 1-1)
never recovered.
Matts done a really nice job of
coming inat halftime andstaying
relaxed and calm, OBrien said.
He understands its a 60-minute
game. Hes grown up a lot.
When youre a senior and
youre playing your last few
games here at Penn State, that
means a lot to him. I cant say
enough about Matt McGloin.
Hes got the job done.
As did the Penn State defense.
Just a weekafter Northwestern
set a school recordwith704yards
of total offense, the Lions held
the Wildcats to just 247. North-
western finished with season
lows in total yards, first downs
(14) and rushing yards (112).
And the Lions beat them at
their owngame. PennState tieda
school record by running 99 of-
fensive plays to just 61 for North-
western. Typically, its the Wild-
cats playinganup-tempogameto
pack in as many snaps as possi-
ble.
They couldnt get enough on
Saturday. After McGloins go-
ahead score, the defense got a
stop on an ensuing fourth down
and Michael Zordich iced the
game with a 3-yard touchdown
run.
You guys sawwhat we did out
there today, McGloin said.
Were going to fight for 60 min-
utes. Were not going to give up
on one another. Were going to
keep doing our jobs.
Northwestern..................... 0 14 14 0 28
Penn State.......................... 3 7 7 22 39
FIRST QUARTER
PSU -- Sam Ficken 21-yard field goal, 3:41.
Drive: 13 plays, 33 yards, 5:56. Analysis: The
Nittany Lions open their second series with
excellent field position after punter Alex Butter-
worth pins Northwestern at its 1 and the defense
forces a three-and-out. But the yards dont come
easily for the offense, which is forced into a pair of
fourth-down situations because of the teams
kicking woes. McGloin completes a fourth-and-4
pass to Allen Robinson on the first and Zach
Zwinak converts a fourth-and-inches up the middle
on the second. On third-and-goal, tight end Kyle
Carter comes open in the front of the end zone, but
Matt McGloins pass clangs off of his hands,
bringing on the field goal team. Its the third
successful kick of the season in nine tries for
Ficken. PENN STATE 3, NORTHWESTERN 0.
SECOND QUARTER
PSU -- Zach Zwinak 1-yard run (Ficken kick),
9:34. Drive: 8 plays, 40 yards, 2:16. Analysis: Penn
States defensive dominance is finally paid off,
forcing a fourth straight three-and-out to open the
game, delivering the ball to the offense at the
Northwestern 40. Again it takes a fourth-down
conversion to make it happen, as Penn State
improves to 3-for-3 on the game, getting another
successful QB sneak by McGloin to keep the drive
alive. Zwinak is turning into the Lions most reliable
runner and gets his number called in the red zone
to drive the ball to the 1. From there, he launches
not-so-gracefully through the air, but he meets little
resistance before landing in the end zone for his
third score of the season. PSU 10, NU 0.
NU -- Venric Mark 2-yard run (Jeff Budzien
kick), 6:23. Drive: 3 plays, 17 yards, 1:05. Analysis:
A critical special teams error gets the Wildcats into
the game. The defense finally surrenders a first
down at the 9:19 mark of the second quarter as
Northwestern moves into Lions territory for the first
time. But a stop near midfield brings on the punt
team. Return man Jesse Della Valle, sure-handed
to start the season, signals fair catch before having
the ball bounce off his fingertips. Northwestern
scoops it up immediately at the Lions 17, and is
prevented from scoring only because of a rule that
prevents a team advancing a muffed punt. That
only delays the inevitable as Kain Colter gets his
first big gain of the day down to the Penn State 2
on an option keeper. Two plays later, its Mark
going off right tackle and into the end zone for the
score. Its the first touchdown allowed by Penn
State in the first half all season. PSU 10, NU 7.
NU -- Tony Jones 11-yard pass from Trevor
Siemian (Budzien kick), 0:30. Drive: 8 plays, 66
yards, 1:50. Analysis: Siemian delivers the games
best throw, finding Tony Jones near two defenders
deep in the end zone to give the Wildcats a
surprising halftime lead. The scoring drive was
kept alive by a controversial pass interference call
against Lions corner Stephon Morris. The senior
went up and tipped the ball away from his man, but
a flag came almost immediately afterward. A play
later, when Morris was shaken up, Lions coach Bill
OBrien comes across the field to check on him --
and also to tear into the back judge who made the
call, yelling in his face. Penn State trails at halftime
for the first time this season. NU 14, PSU 10.
THIRD QUARTER
PSU -- Allen Robinson 8-yard pass from Matt
McGloin (Ficken kick), 7:17. Drive: 12 plays, 80
yards, 5:23. Analysis: After throwing it 28 times in
the first half, Penn States offense gets back in
balance, using the run to set up the pass and take
the lead back. Zwinak picks up 37 yards on six
carries to fuel a critical scoring drive. And this time,
its Penn State benefitting from a pass interference
call, as Robinson draws the flag in the end zone.
He then uses his 6-foot-3 to shield off a defender at
the goal line for the touchdown catch, his sixth of
the season. PSU 17, NU 14.
NU -- Kain Colter 10-yard run (Budzien kick),
3:12. Drive: 11 plays, 71 yards, 4:05. Analysis:
Northwestern punches right back by getting its
ground game on track as Mark starts chewing up
yards himself. Quickly reaching the red zone,
Colter executes a perfect zone-read fake, breaking
away with the ball at the last second to scamper 10
yards off left tackle for the go-ahead score. Its the
first time Northwestern has scored in the second
half against Penn State since 2005. Its the first
time the Wildcats scored a second-half touchdown
against the Lions since 2004. NU 21, PSU 17.
NU -- Mark 75-yard punt return (Budzien kick),
0:50. Analysis: As bad as Penn States special
teams had been all season, the Lions could still
point to their coverage units as a bright spot. Not
anymore. Butterworth blasts a 54-yard punt only to
give too much room to Mark, who expertly weaves
through traffic before hitting the left sideline and
leaving the rest of the Lions in his dust. Its the first
punt return for a score allowed by Penn State since
Florida States Willie Reid took one the distance in
the Orange Bowl at the end of the 2005 season.
NU 28, PSU 17.
FOURTH QUARTER
PSU -- Robinson 6-yard pass from McGloin
(Michael Zordich run), 9:49. Drive: 18 plays, 82
yards, 6:01. Analysis: The Lions dont lay down,
slowly marching downfield against a Northwestern
defense content to not give up the big play. Once
again, it comes down to a fourth-down play as Bill
OBrien goes for it on fourth-and-4 from the
Wildcats 6-yard line. McGloin has plenty of time
before delivering a strike to Robinson in the back
of the end zone. Zordich then takes the handoff on
a draw out of the shotgun for the conversion. NU
28, PSU 25.
PSU -- McGloin 5-yard run (Ficken kick), 2:37.
Drive: 15 plays, 85 yards, 5:38. Analysis: And
McGloin burns the Wildcats again. For a third
straight season, the Scranton native buries
Northwestern after halftime. He helps the Lions
convert a fifth fourth down, scrambling right and
finding Brandon Moseby-Felder on fourth-and-2.
That sets up a third-and-goal call from the Cats 5.
Its a pass all the way, but McGloin is again flushed
from the pocket. He takes off, throws a quick pump
fake and then does an awkward hopping sort of
thing over the pylon for the winning score. It counts
for six points just the same. PSU 32, NU 28.
PSU -- Zordich 3-yard run (Ficken kick), 1:30.
Drive: 3 plays, 28 yards, 0:18. Comment: The
Lions defense polishes off a strong afternoon by
stopping the Cats deep in their own territory on
fourth down. Northwestern still has two timeouts in
its pocket, but Penn State makes sure it doesnt
matter as two big runs by Zordich complete a
stunning fourth-quarter. PSU 39, NU 28.
A95,769.
NU PSU
First downs ............................. 14 30
Rushes-yards......................... 25-112 48-161
Passing.................................... 135 282
Comp-Att-Int ........................... 21-36-0 35-51-0
Return Yards .......................... 75 9
Punts-Avg................................ 8-38.4 5-36.8
Fumbles-Lost.......................... 1-1 2-1
Penalties-Yards ..................... 3-40 3-30
Time of Possession............... 20:43 39:17
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHINGNorthwestern, Mark 13-72, Colter
5-24, Siemian 4-14, Trumpy 3-2. Penn St., Zwinak
28-121, Zordich 7-32, Belton 4-12, Team 2-(minus
2), McGloin 7-(minus 2).
PASSINGNorthwestern, Siemian 21-36-0-
135. Penn St., McGloin 35-51-0-282.
RECEIVINGNorthwestern, To.Jones 4-27,
Trumpy 3-28, Fields 3-21, Colter 3-17, C.Jones
3-16, Lawrence 2-18, Mark 2-6, K.Prater 1-2. Penn
St., Robinson 9-85, Zwinak 6-52, Moseby-Felder
5-34, Carter 4-44, Zordich 4-31, Lehman 3-15,
Gilliam 1-15, Williams 1-7, James 1-0, Belton
1-(minus 1).
FLIGHT
Continued from Page 1C
AP PHOTOS
Penn State linebacker Michael Mauti (42), center, celebrates with teammates after winning 39-28 against Northwestern on Saturday in State College.
Penn State running back Michael Zordich (9)
celebrates as he leaves the field at Beaver Stadi-
um followed by Penn State wide receiver Allen
Robinson (8) on Saturday in State College.
Penn State running back Bill Belton (1) runs
during the second quarter Saturday against
Northwestern in State College. Penn State won
39-28.
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 PAGE 7C
P E N N S T A T E F O O T B A L L
STATE COLLEGE The Penn State
offense looked on top of its game, and
the defense continually flustered North-
westerns volatile running attack.
Alas, the Nittany Lions special teams
play opened doors for the Wildcats.
Two costly Penn State errors a
botched punt return and a failed punt
coverage pushed momentum in the
other direction during a 39-28 victory
over No. 24 Northwestern.
We put (the defense) in a tough job
with the punt return and some of the
things that went on there, coach Bill
OBrien said. That wasnt on them.
Following a second quarter defensive
stop of Northwesterns first possession
with a first down, returner Jesse Della
Valle flubbed a return at the17-yard line.
Northwestern assumed possession and
scored a Venric Mark rushing touch-
down three plays later to cut Penn
States lead to three points.
He was fair catchingit, OBriensaid.
He looked up and he looked up with the
fair-catch signal and then looked down.
He didnt concentrate on the ball. Hes
doneagreat job. I havealot of respect for
Jesse and what hes done here. He made
a mistake; hed be the first person to tell
you that. Obviously, we recovered from
it but right there, it hurt us a little bit.
Della Valle reluctantly admitted the
12-mph wind gusts played a factor in the
flub.
Both teams traded leads and stayed
relatively within an ear shot of each oth-
er before another special teams miscue
broke open an11-point Wildcat lead that
Nittany Lions managed to erase.
Fielding a 54-yard Alex Butterworth
punt, Markevadedthe first wave of Penn
State players and jetted to a 75-yard re-
turn down the sideline.
Butterworth said he punted the ball
too far, allowing Mark ample room to
eye the coverage and plan his first cut to
the left.
I knew it was a good punt, Butter-
worth said. I boomed it out of our cov-
erage zone. I started trailing as soon as
he caught it. I was all infront of that kick.
I mean usually I focus on getting it to
the left so our guys have a little more
time to get down there. They have a
good returner. Its scary.
Michael Mauti, who was on the field,
skirted the blame away from Butter-
worth and toward his fellow coverage
mates.
Nosuchthingas kickingit toofar, he
countered. Our guys gotta cover bet-
ter.
Mark said he expected Penn State to
study his return habits and thus he
changed course.
You could tell they did a lot of film
study, the Northwest halfback said.
They knewwe were going to go right. I
knew that they knew we were going to
go right, so I went left. There was no one
there but a kicker and (Mauti).
Yielding a return only briefly damp-
ened the mood on the sidelines. Thank-
fully for the special teams corps, the Nit-
tany Lions recovered to rattle off 22 con-
secutive points in the fourth quarter.
Any time there has been a special
teams touchdowntheres always a big
momentum change when the other
teammakes a big play onspecial teams,
OBrien said. Theres a little bit of a
quietness on the sidelines.
For all of the special teams woes,
none revolved around kicker Sam Fick-
en. Ficken moved to 3-for-9 on the sea-
son with a 21-yard field goal to supply an
early 3-0 lead. He also, shockingly, boot-
ed a kickoff between the uprights in
what assistant coach John Butler coined
an 80-yard field goal.
The Nittany Lions opened the game
with outstanding performances in the
punt game. Butterworth pinned the
Wildcats onthe1-, 8-, and15-yardline be-
fore Northwestern picked up a first
down.
On those type of punts, Im trying to
get it as deepas possible intheir ownter-
ritory, Butterworth said. Its a great
feeling knowing the defense is able to
hold them over and over again.
Each of Butterworths three punts in-
side the 20 impeded Northwesterns ef-
forts to run its high-powered offense. As
a result, the Wildcats failed to use its
highly-successful option attack until the
second quarter.
Football is complimentary, Butler
said. The special teams puts the offense
on a short field. It limits what they can
do. Thats a good offense right there.
They cant throw. They cant run their
option play. I think we had the ball on
our side of the field for the whole first
quarter. Thepuntinggamecompliments
our defense.
AP PHOTO
Northwestern head coach Pat Fitz-
gerald, right, celebrates with North-
western running back Venric Mark (5)
after his 75-yard kickoff return for a
touchdown during the fourth quarter
Saturday against Penn State in State
College.
Hardly a special delivery for Penn State
By JAY MONAHAN
For The Times Leader
STATE COLLEGE -- Bill
OBrien had bristled at the
label before the season.
A gambler? What did that
mean?
The Penn State coach shook
off the suggestion that he was a
risk-taker in the days before the
season opener.
But whether by nature or
necessity because of putrid
special teams play, thats exact-
ly what OBrien has been
through six games leading the
Nittany Lions.
It was never more evident
than on Saturday. Six times
Penn State went for it on
fourth down against North-
western and the Lions convert-
ed on five.
They needed every one of
them to rally past the Wildcats
for a 39-28 win.
On the sideline, you feel
like youre gonna have a heart
attack, linebacker Michael
Mauti said of the close calls.
Some of it is because of the
extreme uncertainty at kicker --
Sam Ficken is just 3-of-9 on
field goals this season. But
OBrien said its just as much
about getting a feel for the
game when deciding to go for
it.
A lot of times its worked
out this year where its been
about field position, OBrien
said. I dont think you see me
going for it on fourth down
backed up inside our own 20 --
or really ever on our side of the
50. I might have done it a few
times, but not too often.
Its not that hard on a play-
caller, because your third-down
call is like a second-down call
when you know youre going to
go for it. Its not like all of a
sudden you say, Were going to
go for it. Its a thought-out
deal.
Quarterback Matt McGloin
picked up four of the conver-
sions himself, going 3-for-4 on
fourth down for 31 yards and a
touchdown to Allen Robinson
that pulled Penn State within
three points in the fourth quar-
ter.
McGloin and tailback Zach
Zwinak each converted a
fourth-and-1 on the ground.
Im a firm believer,
McGloin said, that you get
four downs for a reason. And
coach OBrien, I dont have to
tell you (what he thinks).
Thats how we won the
game today. Going for it on
fourth downs. I wont be sur-
prised if we continue to do it
for the rest of the year.
Infirmary report
The Lions came into the
game as healthy as they had
been all season. Only one play-
er who contributed this season
-- Valley Views Nyeem Wart-
man -- did not suit up as he
recovers from a knee injury.
Defensive end Pete Massaro
returned after missing three
games with a shoulder injury
and some lingering soreness in
his surgically repaired knee.
The senior was welcomed
back to the field by being
named a game captain, joining
Evan Lewis and Brian Irvin at
midfield for the coin toss.
Redshirt freshman Deion
Barnes, however, made his
fourth straight start in Massa-
ros place, getting the nod for
the fifth time in six games.
Left tackle Donovan Smith
got his first start since the
Virginia game. He missed two
games with a lower leg injury
before returning last week
against Illinois, though he sat
out the opening series.
Smiths foot and ankle ap-
peared to be fine, but the red-
shirt freshman was sporting an
impossible-to-miss white cast
on his right hand.
Streak snapped
Penn State kept one season-
long streak alive but lost anoth-
er that had dated back to 2005.
The Lions have still not
allowed a point in the first
quarter through six games.
Northwestern did, however,
become the first team to score
a touchdown in the first half
against the Lions when Venric
Mark scored on a 2-yard run in
the second quarter.
On a more historic note,
when the Wildcats Trevor
Siemian threw a scoring strike
to Tony Jones in the third
quarter, it was the first points
the Wildcats scored after half-
time against Penn State since
Pat Fitzgerald took over as
head coach in 2006, a span of
four games.
Northwesterns most recent
second-half touchdown against
the Lions had come back in
2004 under the late Randy
Walker. That was also the last
time the Wildcats had beaten
Penn State.
Gambler OBrien
knows when to run
AP PHOTO
Penn State head coach Bill OBrien yells from the sidelines
during the first quarter against Northwestern on Saturday in
State College.
By DEREK LEVARSE
dlevarse@timesleader.com
"Zach, we felt, was running the ball
downhill," Penn State coach Bill OBrien
said. "We felt his physical presence in this
type of game was something we wanted to
go with."
So the Lions went with Zwinak again
and again.
The red-shirt sophomore running back
took six handoffs for 37 yards and added a
six-yard catch to cover more than half the
yardage on an 80-yard touchdown drive
that lifted the Lions into a 17-14 lead mid-
way through the third quarter.
Zwinak also gained 15 yards on the
ground and added 26 more yards on three
catches during a touchdown drive that
pulled Penn State within three points mid-
way through the final quarter, and added a
16-yard rush on the Lions go-ahead touch-
down march.
"Its a confidence-builder," Zwinak said.
"The coach trusts you enough to go in and
make the plays. I go into each game hoping
Ill get a play or two. Whoevers making
the plays, hes going to keep calling your
number. We have a lot of great running
backs. Im happy they allow me to do it."
Said OBrien, "We always try to achieve
some type of balance."
After working double-duty to provide
balance between Penn States running and
passing games, its a wonder Zwinak
didnt start wobbling.
With his 34 touches Saturday, Zwinak
handled the ball almost as much as
McGloin and center Matt Stankiewitch --
who exchange every offensive snap.
"Im hurting, too, a little bit right now,"
Zwinak said with a grin. "Just sore."
But its the kind of pain he worked to
achieve during a summer of sweat he en-
dured with hopes of playing a bigger part
in Penn States offense.
"It feels great," Zwinak said, "but I cant
do it alone."
Maybe he can, if Saturday was any in-
dication of how his game is starting to
grow.
STATE COLLEGE -- Hes already proven
to be viable threat while running with the
football.
But who knewZach Zwinak was so capa-
ble catching it?
Certainly not him.
You see, Zwinak came to Penn State as a
fullback who was more accustomed to hav-
ing the football placed against his belly
than thrown against his chest. And since
he wasnt naturally gifted with the art of
grabbing passes, he feared his body would
be a repellent to balls thrown his way.
"At my high school, we didnt really
throw the ball much," Zwinak said. "I
didnt have any confidence in my hands.
They were like brick walls."
Somehow, they softened, and not a min-
ute too soon for the Nittany Lions.
Zwinak pulled in six passes for 52 yards
-- second on the team Saturday -- while
helping Penn State come back for a 39-28
victory over previously-unbeaten North-
western.
Most importantly, he didnt drop one.
Mainly because he spent one long sum-
mer snaring hurtling objects.
"Tennis balls, footballs from jugs ma-
chines, (from) quarterbacks, seven-on-
sevens," Zwinak said, rattling off all the
drills he endured this past summer. "I
needed it. I was really bad."
Now, hes really good.
The six catches Zwinak made against
Northwestern came in handy and comple-
mented his 121-yard rushing day.
"Zachs one of the hardest-working guys
on the team, and one of the strongest,"
said Penn State quarterback Matt
McGloin, a West Scranton High School
grad. "I was proud of Zach, what he did
today. He really focused on his (pass) pro-
tection and got out in the passing game.
He had five or six catches, which was great
to see."
It was even better when the Nittany Li-
ons were watching Zwinak run with the
ball.
He ran four times for 32 yards on Penn
States 40-yard scoring march in the sec-
ond quarter, including an 11-yard burst
and a drive-culminating 1-yard plunge
over the goal line for the games first
touchdown.
Zwinak didnt start the game -- its al-
ways a competition during the week of
practice for playing time and starting roles
in Penn States backfield -- but he sure fin-
ished it with a flourish. Penn State shied
away from Saturdays starting tailback Bill
Belton through the second half, and relied
on Zwinak to help overcome a deficit that
reached 11 points.
Zach Zwinak worked on his skills until he became
AP PHOTOS
Penn State running back Zach Zwinak (28) gets past Northwestern linebacker Collin Ellis (45) during the fourth quarter Saturday in
State College.
A really good catch
Penn State running back Zach Zwinak (28)
runs against Northwestern during the
second quarter Saturday in State College.
Penn State won 39-28, with Zwinak gain-
ing 122 yards.
By PAUL SOKOLOSKI
psokoloski@timesleader.com
PAGE 8C SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
S P O R T S
EDWARDSVILLE No
team wants to be on the other
end of a programs first victo-
ry.
Wilkes was in jeopardy of be-
ing the first casualty for Miser-
icordia on Saturday at
Schmidt Stadium.
Then a strong second half by
the Colonels erased the scare,
as they outscored the Cougars
by 28 points in the final 30
minutes of a 45-13 victory.
We started to string a few
series together on both sides
of the ball. We just couldnt do
it in the second half, Miser-
icordia coach Mark Ross said.
Thats a good football team
and depth-wise, were not
quite where we need to be to
hang for 60 minutes yet. I hate
to say that but thats the real-
ity of the situation.
Misericordia (0-6, 0-5 MAC)
got off to a great start as Juwan
Petties-Jackson returned the
opening kickoff 90 yards to
give the Cougars the first lead
in program history, going up
6-0. They continued to stifle
Wilkes (3-2, 2-2) on its first
drive, forcing a three-and-out.
Its the first time we had
something positive, Ross
said. It was so exciting for the
kids, we couldnt get the per-
sonnel out to kick the extra
point right.
After Wilkes Aux Wogou
scored a pair of rushing touch-
downs later in the first quarter
and Jordan Fredo knocked
through a 20-yard field goal for
a 17-6 Colonels lead, the Cou-
gars sustained a long drive,
ending with a 5-yard TD from
quarterback Jeff Puckett to
Dean Lucchesi to trimthe lead
to 17-13 heading into halftime.
We came in (at halftime)
yelling and screaming saying
that we need to turn things
around. Theres no way they
should be in this game, said
Wilkes linebacker Tate Moore-
Jacobs, who had a game-high
14 tackles, including four for a
loss.
Then the Colonels looked
like the team that has been a
force in the MAC over the last
several years. They regrouped
and came out on fire, holding
the Cougars to 79 total yards
in the second half while piling
up nearly 300 of their own and
scoring on all four of their pos-
sessions.
Definitely intensity,
Wilkes coach Frank Sheptock
said about the difference in his
team in the second half. We
need to start finding our burst
earlier in the game to play
with some of the upper eche-
lon teams in the MAC.
Entering the game with the
top rushing offense in the
MAC, Wilkes used its run of-
fense to its advantage with
four rushing touchdowns in
the second half and 179 yards
on the ground, including all
119 yards Pat Inguilli racked
up in the game-high perform-
ance.
The freshman from Wallen-
paupack didnt get a carry un-
til the third quarter, but fin-
ished with a pair of touch-
downs on 20 carries. Inguilli
got those carries after Wogou
left the game in the second
quarter with an injury that ap-
peared to be a severe knee ail-
ment.
Calvin Garvin and P.J. Incre-
mona also had short touch-
down runs in the second half
for the Colonels. Wogou
rushed for 77 yards on 15 tou-
ches before falling with injury.
Eight backs had carries for
positive yardage for Wilkes.
I think thats one of our
deepest groups, Sheptock
added. Aux is our most expe-
rienced player and with what
were doing right now it will
be difficult to lose his services.
But were deep and Im real
pleased with how were run-
ning the football.
Puckett, who led the Cou-
gars in rushing with 46 yards,
was also very efficient with his
passing, completing nine of
his 11attempts for 63 yards and
one interception. Kurt Kowal-
ski led the Cougars with 34
yards receiving on five recep-
tions.
Ross said that hes trying to
get Petties-Jackson more in-
volved in the teams plans. He
was used on offense, defense
and special teams after start-
ing the season just at corner-
back. The freshman totaled
164 kick return yards, eight re-
ceiving yards and even had
one rush and one tackle.
I think hes very talented,
Sheptock lauded about the
Cougars all-around athlete.
Hes a person thats definitely
going to put some fear in the
MAC over the next four
years.
Wilkes 45, Misericordia 13
Misericordia ............... 6 7 0 0 13
Wilkes......................... 14 3 14 14 45
First Quarter
M Juwan Petties-Jackson 90 kick off return
(kick blocked) 14:46
W Auxence Wogou 2 run (Jordan Fredo kick)
10:29
W Wogou 1 run (Fredo kick) 6:09
Second Quarter
W Fredo 20 field goal 5:29
M Dean Lucchesi 5 pass from Jeff Puckett
(Steve Clemson kick) :54
Third Quarter
W Calvin Garvin 1 run (Fredo kick) 12:07
W Pat Inguilli 3 run (Fredo kick) 7:30
Fourth Quarter
W P.J. Incremona 2 run (Fredo kick) 14:55
W Inguilli 1 run (Frank Bobo kick) 4:35
Team Statistics M W
First downs....................... 12 25
Rushes-yards................... 40-117 58-276
Passing............................. 63 156
Total Yards....................... 180 432
Comp-Att-Int..................... 9-11-1 13-19-0
Sacks by-Yards Lost ....... 2-9 2-10
Punts-Avg. ........................ 7-27.7 2-47.0
Fumbles-Lost ................... 0-0 1-1
Penalties-Yards ............... 6-51 4-54
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING MI-
SERICORDIA, Jeff Puckett 16-46, Frank San-
tarsiero 8-37, Cody Lamoreaux 14-33, Robin
Custodio 1-4, Juwan Petties-Jackson 1-(mi-
nus-3). WILKES, Pat Inguilli 20-119, Auxence
Wogou 15-77, Andrew Regan 4-21, Calvin Gar-
vin 7-20, Justin Pellowski 1-14, P.J. Incremona
5-13, Joey Spies 2-8, Alex George 4-4.
PASSING MISERICORDIA, Puckett 9-11-1-
63. WILKES, George 12-17-0-145, Tyler Bernt-
sen 1-1-0-11, TEAM 0-1-0-0
RECEIVING MISERICORDIA, Kurt Kowalski
5-34, Dean Lucchesi 3-21, Petties-Jackson 1-8.
WILKES, Drew Devitt 3-56, Pellowski 3-23,
Payton Bachman 2-31, Ryan Casey 2-16, Dan
Curry 1-16, Incremona 1-8, Jonathon Conklin
1-6.
INTERCEPTIONS WILKES, Marcus Leaf
MISSED FIELD GOALS None
C O L L E G E F O O T B A L L
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Wilkes running back Andrew Regan dives short of the goal line
as Misericordia safety Brandon Salazar makes the tackle.
Wilkes takes over
with 2nd-half surge
Misericordia held its first
lead and was still in game
as teams went to halftime.
Conference Overall
W L W L
Widener ...................... 5 0 6 0
Lycoming.................... 5 0 5 1
Delaware Valley ........ 3 1 3 2
Wilkes......................... 2 2 3 2
Albright ....................... 2 2 3 2
Lebanon Valley.......... 2 2 3 2
FDU-Florham............. 1 3 1 4
Kings.......................... 1 3 1 4
Stevenson.................. 1 4 1 5
Misericordia ............... 0 5 0 6
Saturdays results
Lycoming 42, FDU-Florham 7
Widener 56, Stevenson 20
Wilkes 45, Misericordia 13
Saturday, Oct. 13
Wilkes at Lebanon Valley
FDU-Florham at Albright
Delaware Valley at Kings
Byes: Lycoming, Misericordia,
Stevenson, Widener
M A C S TA N D I N G S
By DAVE ROSENGRANT
drosengrant@timesleader.com
DALLAS Just when it
couldnt possibly get worse for
Pittston Area in the first half,
somehow it did.
Dallas quarterback Ryan Za-
poticky dropped a shotgun snap.
Then he picked up the ball,
stepped up in the pocket and
threw a 43-yard dart to Ryan Ko-
zloski.
Touchdown, Mountaineers.
It was that kind of Saturday af-
ternoon for Pittston Area and
that kind of Saturday afternoon
for Dallas.
Dallas dominated every aspect
of the game, handing the Patriots
a 35-0 loss in a Wyoming Valley
Conference Division 3A contest.
Dallas (3-3) won for the third
consecutive time. Pittston Area
(2-4) has its winning streak stop-
ped at two. The Patriots were
shut out for a third time this sea-
son.
Zapotickys touchdown pass,
one of four he threw, came with
47 seconds left in the second
quarter. It came two plays after a
Pittston Area fumble near mid-
field.
Its much better going into
halftime down 14-0 than 21-0,
Pittston Area coach Mike Barrett
said. It was a blown coverage.
That kind of took the wind out of
our sails.
The touchdown actually made
the score 20-0at halftime. But the
one-point discrepancy mattered
little. The Patriots couldnt mus-
ter much offense in the first half
and that carried over to the final
two quarters.
Pittston Area had just 64 yards
of offense at halftime. The run-
ning game produced just 11on12
carries. And the Patriots never
crossed midfield on their own.
The only time they were on Dal-
las half was when the Mountain-
eers failed to convert a fake punt.
Pittston Area had the ball only
twice in the second half and its
deepest penetration was the Dal-
las 27-yard line. The Patriots fin-
ished with 4 yards rushing on 19
carries. Quarterback James Em-
mett was11of 19for121yards, but
many of those completions came
with the game well in hand.
Our defense the last three
weeks has done an outstanding
job, Dallas coach Bob Zaruta
said. Williamsport (last week)
gained just over 100 yards. (Pitt-
ston Area) was probably around
that or a little less, perhaps. Were
just playing tough defensive foot-
ball.
Dallas punctuated its strong
defensive effort on Pittston Ar-
eas final play from scrimmage.
Defensive lineman Ryan Monk
sacked Emmett, forcing a fumble
that fellow lineman Buddy Shut-
lock caught in the air.
Emmett was sackedfour times.
Pittston Area had four turnovers
after totaling five in its last three
games.
It was a tough week, Barrett
said. I thought we had thempre-
pared, and they were more phys-
ical than us today.
We had a few key injuries. I
think about four or five of our
guys went down and we could
never get into a rhythm.
Dallas 35, Pittston Area 0
Pittston Area ........................ 0 0 0 0 0
Dallas .................................... 14 6 15 0 35
First Quarter
DAL Jason Simonovich 19 pass from Ryan
Zapoticky (Ryan Kozloski kick), 8:13
DAL Kris Roccograndi 10 run (Kozloski kick),
1:04
Second Quarter
DAL Kozloski 43 pass from Zapoticky (kick
failed), 0:43
Third Quarter
DAL Darik Johnson 25 pass from Zapoticky
(Kozloski run), 8:00
DAL Simonovich 58 pass from Zapoticky
(Kozloski kick), 3:44
TeamStatistics Pitt Area Dallas
First downs ............................ 6 20
Rushes-yards........................ 19-4 45-210
Passing .................................. 121 189
Total Yards ............................ 125 399
Comp-Att-Int .......................... 11-19-2 9-18-0
Sacked-Yards Lost............... 4-25 1-15
Punts-Avg. ............................. 3-26 0-0
Fumbles-Lost ........................ 2-2 1-0
Penalties-Yards .................... 4-30 5-53
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING Pittston Area, Justin Wilk 5-11,
Mark Romanczuk 4-7, Kyle Gattuso 1-(minus-5),
James Emmett 5-(minus-21), Jordan Houseman
3-7, Hassan Maxwell 1-5. Dallas, Roccograndi 17-
86, Zapoticky 8-27, Logan Brace 6-25, Zach Macos-
ky 2-2, Bill Gately 3-23, Justin Mucha 5-43, Ryan
Cheskiewicz 1-2, Mike Olenginski 2-2.
PASSING Pittston Area, Emmett 10-19-2-125.
Dallas, Zapoticky 9-18-0-189.
RECEIVING Pittston Area, Houseman 1-13,
Romanczuk 3-22, Joe Starinsky 2-34, Joah John 3-
32, Rich Weinstock 1-13, Gattuso 1-7. Dallas, Roc-
cograndi 1-(minus-1), Simonovich 2-77, Kozloski 3-
71, Gately 1-11, Johnson 2-31.
INTS Dallas, Macosky 2.
MISSED FGS Dallas 39WR.
H I G H S C H O O L F O O T B A L L
Defense powers Dallas to shutout
Mountaineers force four
turnovers, get four sacks
against Pittston Area.
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Pittston Areas Joe Starinsky takes off after making a catch as
head coach Mike Barrett watches on the sideline against Dallas.
By JOHN ERZAR
jerzar@timesleader.com
WILKES-BARREFour young
Wyoming Area children ran onto
the turf of Wilkes-Barre Memo-
rial Stadium, small footballs and
pen in hand.
They quickly searched out
Nick OBrien and asked for his
autograph.
You cant blame the young-
sters. They just wanted their op-
portunity to catch a piece of War-
rior history.
OBrien became the schools
all-time leading rusher on a 32-
yard touchdown run on the first
play of the second quarter, and
Wyoming Area reached the end
zone early and often in a 69-28
victory over Holy Redeemer Sat-
urday afternoon.
OBrien needed 69 yards to
break the record held by former
standout Jim Pizano, which
stood at 4,086. The senior now
has 4,118 yards with four games
remaining in the regular season.
Its a great feeling, he said. It
stands inthe recordbookas anin-
dividual accomplishment, but re-
ally, I feel that it is an entire team
effort. Every kid, every lineman
that has ever blocked for me, the
entire team and the coaching
staff all deserve the honor as
well.
The senior record-holder wast-
ed little time making his impact
felt.
He scored on a short, 1-run
yard on the Warriors opening
drive, and on the next series,
foundCody Schmitz for a 33-yard
score.
His record-breaker, a 32-yard
jaunt down the sideline, gave the
Warriors a 27-6 lead 10 seconds
into the second quarter.
I couldnt be more proud of
him, Wyoming Area head coach
Randy Spencer said. As much as
he does athletically, hes a great
character guy. He wants to make
that unselfish play, whether it is a
block or make sure to point out
how well someone else is doing.
Hes amazing from a leadership
standpoint.
OBriens day was done after
one half. He rushed for 101yards,
completed1of 3for atouchdown,
and also caught one ball for 21
yards.
Hes an explosive athlete, Re-
deemer head coach Pat Reece
said. We created a bubble and
we wanted to keep him in that
bubble. We needed the kids to do
their assignments, but if he got
outside that containment, he
would be dangerous. And he
was.
Wyoming Area (4-2) was ex-
plosive.
The Warriors had six touch-
downs more than 30 yards in
length. Jordan Zezza threw for
three touchdowns, completing
all five of his passes for 182 yards.
He had TD throws of 40, 32 and
76 yards the latter to Zack La-
nunziata that pushed the game
into the mercy rule.
In total, Wyoming Area out-
gainedHolyRedeemer (1-5), 575-
298, in total yardage.
Vince Villani provided the first
spark for the Royals, using a
quickburst of speeddowntheleft
sideline for an 80-yard touch-
down on a kickoff return.
The problemwas Wyoming Ar-
ea already had a 19-0 lead. The
Warriors scored on seven of its
eight first-half possessions, and
nine of 11 for the game.
Redeemer quarterback Jimmy
Strickland had another solid out-
ing, completing 15 of 29 for 216
yards and two touchdowns.
Wyoming Area................. 19 29 14 7 69
Holy Redeemer ............... 6 6 8 8 28
First Quarter
WA Nick OBrien 1 run (AJ Lenkaitis kick), 8:48
WA Cody Schmitz 33 pass from OBrien (kick
failed), 5:11
WA Schmitz 40 pass from Jordan Zezza (pass
failed), 2:13
HR Vincent Villani 80 kick return (kick failed),
2:01
Second Quarter
WA OBrien 32 run (OBrien run), 11:50
WA Trent Grove 32 pass from Zezza (Lenkaitis
kick), 6:32
WA Zack Lanunziata 76 pass from Zezza
(Lenkaitis kick), 2:34
HR Villani 21 pass from Jimmy Strickland (pass
failed), 0:47
WA Lanunziata 3 run (Lenkaitis kick), 0:24
Third Quarter
WA Schmitz 82 kick return (Lenkaitis kick), 11:46
WA Evan Skene 9 pass from Kyle Bortn (Lenkai-
tis kick), 3:02
HR Villani 36 pass from Strickland (Strickland
pass to Pat Villani, 0:00
Fourth Quarter
WA Isaiah Peoples 1 run (Lenkaitis kick), 8:50
HR Tyler Kastendieck 1 run (Chad Fahey run),
2:02
TeamStatistics WA HR
First downs............................... 17 12
Rushes-yards .......................... 43-351 21-82
Passing..................................... 224 216
Total Yards............................... 575 298
Comp-Att-Int ............................ 7-9-0 15-29-1
Sacks-Yards Lost.................... 1-6 0-0
Punts-Avg. ................................ 0-0 4-32.8
Fumbles-Lost ........................... 2-1 2-1
Penalties-Yards....................... 9-70 0-0
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING WA: Nick OBrien 9-101, Cody Schmitz
5-60, Jordan Zezza 3-51, Marty Michaels 5-39, Jeff
Skursky 5-38, Robert Wargo 3-36, Zack Lanunziata
4-19, Kye Higgins 4-18, Shawn Fernandes 1-2,
Isaiah Peoples 1-1, Team 3-(-14); HR: Pat Villani 6-
37, Tyler Kastendieck 3-21, Eric Kerr 3-17, Charles
Ross 1-9, ChadFahey 1-3, JustinRenfer 1-(-1), Jim-
my Strickland 5-(-4)
PASSING WA: Zezza 5-5-0-182, OBrien 1-3-0-
33, Kyle Bortn 1-1-0-9; HR: Strickland 15-29-1-216
RECEIVING WA: Schmitz 3-86, Lanunziata 1-76,
Trent Grove 1-32, OBrien 1-21, Evan Skene 1-9;
HR: Kerr 4-38, P. Villani 3-9, V.Villani2-57, Jason
Hoggarth 2-12, Matt Crofchick 1-45, Eric Ligotski 1-
23
INTERCEPTIONS WA: Ryan Murray
MISSED FGS -- None
QB OBrien sets Warriors mark in win
By TOMFOX
For The Times Leader
for his interception touchdown.
It was the Grenadiers second in-
terceptionof theseasonafter hav-
ing 15 in 2011. Korey Welkey had
one earlier in the game.
I was so happy it came to me
and I took advantage of it, Ben-
ton said.
As for wearing the homecom-
ing crownprior to the game, Ben-
ton preferred strapping on his
helmet.
Football, Benton said. The
crownis just a littlesidething. Its
just a bonus.
Benton finished with nine
catches for 108 yards, including
an11-yard TDreception with 7:11
left in the third quarter that
boosted GARs lead to 28-14. The
Grenadiers entered the game
with100 pass attempts, but quar-
terback Corey Moore nearly
threw half that many Saturday
night.
Moore finished 23 of 47 for 293
yards as the Grenadiers found lit-
tle running room. Although Ben-
ton had a 33-yard TD run in the
second quarter, GAR ended up
with a net of 29 yards on the
ground on 23 carries.
Our offense is like an air raid
attack, GAR coach Paul Wie-
dlich Jr. said. We use the pass as
a run. Most of our routes are any-
where between 3 and 10 yards.
Given credit to Lehman. They
shut our run down. We did what
we are getting better at.
Of course, the caveat of throw-
ing so much is the possibility of
interceptions. Lehman got two in
unique fashion to rally from the
28-14 deficit to 28-26 late in the
third quarter.
The first was by 6-foot-6 defen-
sive lineman Pete Borum, who
tipped and intercepted a pass
that led to a 3-yard TD run by
Dustin Jones. The second was by
Josh Winters, who intercepted a
pass, took a vicious hit and fum-
bled the ball into the arms of
teammate Brady Butler. Winters
followed with a 38-yard touch-
down reception, but the two-
point pass failed and Lehman
trailed 28-26.
They dida hell of job knowing
when to throwthe ball, Lehman
coach Jerry Gilsky said. We
made our adjustments at half and
limited them in the second half.
But we came uptwo points short,
technically. I dont count that last
score, but it is a score though.
GAR 35, Lake-Lehman 26
Lake-Lehman..................... 14 0 12 0 26
GAR.................................... 6 15 7 7 35
First Quarter
LL Dustin Jones 6 run (Kenny Kocher kick),
9:07
GAR Lucas Benton 33 run (kick failed), 6:46
LL Jones 32 run (Kocher kick), 2:26
Second Quarter
GAR Rich Sickler 6 pass from Corey Moore
(Rashaun Mathis from Moore), 7:02
GAR Benton 69 punt return (Luke Height
kick), 4:30
Third Quarter
GAR Benton 11 pass from Moore (Height
kick), 7:11
LL Jones 3 run (kick blocked), 3:41
LL Josh Winters 38 pass from Bill Hillman
(pass failed), 1:40
Fourth Quarter
GAR Benton 50 interception return (Height
kick), 0:09
TeamStatistics Lehman GAR
First downs............................ 10 18
Rushes-yards ....................... 35-120 23-29
Passing.................................. 136 293
Total Yards............................ 256 322
Comp-Att-Int ......................... 5-21-2 23-47-2
Sacked-Yards Lost .............. 1-1 1-10
Punts-Avg. ............................. 5-29.4 4-26.0
Fumbles-Lost ........................ 3-1 1-1
Penalties-Yards.................... 10-57 8-66
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING Lehman, Jones 16-89, Tom Dono-
van 11-21, Brady Butler 5-10, Hillman 2-(minus-1),
team 1-(minus-1). GAR, Sickler 5-0, Benton 10-38,
Moore 5-(minus-11), A.J. Mouzone 3-2.
PASSING Lehman, Hillman 5-21-2-136. GAR,
Moore 23-47-2-293.
RECEIVING Lehman, Winters 2-88, Donovan
1-21, Jones 1-12, Butler 1-15. GAR, Benton 9-108,
Jamaar Taylor 6-92, Mathis3-25, Sickler 3-27, Rash-
aun Jackson 2-41.
INTS Lehman, Pete Borum, Winters. GAR
Korey Welkey, Benton.
MISSED FGS none.
BENTON
Continued from Page 1C
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Lake-Lehmans Brian Derhammer (54), with the help of two team-
mates, stops GAR running back Rich Sickler at the 6-yard line in
the first quarter Saturday.
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 PAGE 9C
NFL SUNDAY
WWW. T I ME S L E ADE R. C OM/ S P ORT S
WHEN I WAS about
6-years-old, I set out to
discover gold. Really.
I had one of those kids
encyclopedias that had
little pictures of what
each state in the U.S.
produced Pennsylvania
had a little mining pick
and some coal, Wisconsin a cow and a bottle
of milk you get the idea.
But it was glorious Alaska that caught my
eye. It had the little mining pick, but with a
nugget of gold next to it. Gold, I knew, was
valuable, and I had only to go to Alaska and
start digging and I would be fabulously
wealthy I might even make $20.
So, I packed some peanut butter sand-
wiches, bananas and
chocolate milk in
some boxes, stored
them under my bed
and waited for the
excursion to begin.
A week later, my
mom discovered an
interesting smell in my
room and found the
green-covered remains
of what was to be my
stores for the journey.
It was at this time I
was introduced to the
concept of distance,
mining expertise and
the limitations parents
could put on a 6-year-
old.
Sometimes reality is
just one big old kick in
the head.
And a kick in the
head is exactly what I
need right now. Not a
literal one, of course.
After four weeks of trying to figure out the
fantasy landscape, its time for a king-sized
reality check. Its time to rethink what I
already thinked I thunk. Like
Ryan Tannehill and the Dolphins offense
isnt a fantasy wasteland. Silly me. I thought
the Cardinals defense would have its way
with run-oriented Miami. But 431 yards
passing for Tannehill and 253 receiving yards
for Brian Hartline say otherwise. Now, dont
expect those kinds of numbers every week,
but Tannehill has entered the conversation
as a good fantasy option. And Hartline has
become a great spot starter at WR.
The Vikings defense is one you should
get. They held the 49ers running attack
down in a Week 3 upset and bottled up the
Lions in Week 4. Toss in a couple of special
teams touchdowns and youve got yourself a
valuable squad.
Maybe this wasnt the year to get a QB
early. Oh you cant go wrong with Drew
Brees. Hes just darn good. But fellow first
round choices Aaron Rodgers, Tom Brady
and Cam Newton have been up and down,
and Matthew Staffords just been down.
Meanwhile, mid-round pick-ups Matt Ryan,
Joe Flacco and Robert Griffin III have been
racking up the fantasy points.
Darren McFadden was overvalued. If he
only stays healthy, my brain said. Hell be
the best back in the NFL. My brain has
trust issues. McFaddens stats are padded by
one 64-yard TD run. Take that away, and his
top rushing output of the year is 49 yards.
Jamal Charles was undervalued. Charles,
was coming back from an ACL tear and had
goal-line vulture Peyton Hillis to deal with.
Hows that working out? Charles has dealt
with those issues to the tune of 513 total
yards and 3 TDs. Charles is the better back.
START THESE GUYS
Reggie Wayne, WR, Colts. The Packers
will put up points, which means the Colts
will be throwing early and often to keep up.
And Wayne is Andrew Lucks favorite target.
Ryan Matthews, RB, Chargers. So, he was
supposed to be a top-three RB this year?
That aint happening. But he will have the
chance to play like one against the wet
napkin that is the Saints defense.
Matt Cassel, QB, Chiefs. Teams have been
able to throw on the Ravens defense. They
just cant stop the Ravens offense. If that
trend holds, Baltimore will rack up the
points and Kansas City will be forced to pass
a whole lot. Thems good stats for Cassel.
NOT THESE
Stevan Ridley, RB, Patriots. New England
is funny with its running backs. Ridley has
shown he can be a good one, but the Pats
only rely on him in certain game plans. This
game smells like an up-tempo affair, and the
last time they had one of those -- New En-
gland vs. Baltimore -- Ridley was an after-
thought.
Ben Roethlisberger, QB, Steelers. Two
things work against Ben this week. The
Eagles have been good at pressuring oppos-
ing QBs and the Steelers have been lousy at
pass protection. Doesnt sound like a recipe
for 300 yards and three TDs, does it?
Maurice Jones-Drew, RB, Jaguars. The
Bears defense knows how to scheme against
an opponent. And when you play Jackson-
ville, your game plan is, Dont let Jones-
Drew beat you.
RICH SHEPOSH
F A N T A S Y F O O T B A L L
Ever need
a good kick
in the head?
If your fantasy
defense is strug-
gling, take a look
at the Rams.
Theyve shut down
the Seahawks and
Cardinals the last
two weeks, and
after two brutal
matchups Green
Bay and New
England six of
their next seven
opponents have
so-so offenses.
ONE FACT
TO KNOW
WHATS ON TELEVISION
EAGLES at STEELERS
1 p.m., FOX-56, WOLF
BROWNS at GIANTS
1 p.m., CBS, WYOU-22
BRONCOS at PATRIOTS
4:25 p.m., CBS, WYOU-22
CHARGERS at SAINTS
8:20 p.m., NBC, WBRE-28
PHILADELPHIA at
PITTSBURGH
OPENING LINE: Steelers by 4
SERIES RECORD: Eagles lead
47-27-3
LAST MEETING: Eagles beat
Steelers 15-6, Sept. 21, 2008
LAST WEEK: Eagles beat
Giants 19-17; Steelers had bye
DID YOU KNOW? Steelers
havent lost back-to-back games
since 2009, coming off 34-31
loss to Oakland two weeks ago
... Steelers have started season
6-2 in each of coach Mike Tom-
lins first five seasons ... Pitts-
burgh leads NFL in time of
possession, averaging more
than 35 minutes a game ...
Steelers QB Ben Roethlisberger
second in NFL in quarterback
rating at 109.2 ... Pittsburgh is
26-6 in last 32 games against
NFC opponents and 4-1 coming
off bye week under Tomlin.
Pittsburgh has won seven
straight home games against
NFC teams, last loss 21-14 to
Giants in 2008
Philadelphia is 9-3-1 against AFC
North under coach Andy Reid,
including 2-0 this season ...
Philadelphia holding opposing
quarterbacks to passer rating of
65.8, third-best in NFL Phila-
delphia QB Michael Vick first
quarterback in 12 years to lead
team to three fourth-quarter
comebacks in first four games
of season ... Eagles lead NFL in
yards per game differential,
averaging 417.8 yards while
giving up 298.3. .. Eagles
havent allowed punt or kickoff
return for touchdown since
2008, longest active streak in
league.
CLEVELAND at
N.Y. GIANTS
OPENING LINE: Giants by 10
1
2
SERIES RECORD: Browns lead
26-19-2
LAST MEETING: Browns beat
Giants 35-14, Oct. 13, 2008
LAST WEEK: Browns lost to
Ravens 23-16; Giants lost to
Eagles 19-17
DID YOU KNOW? Browns have
lost 10 straight games dating to
last season. Last win was
against Jacksonville Nov. 20. ...
Rookie quarterback Brandon
Weeden has thrown for at least
300 yards in two of last three
games. ... Rookie running back
Trent Richardson has run for a
touchdown in three straight
games. ... Browns have played
defending Super Bowl cham-
pions in four of last five sea-
sons.
Quarterback Eli Manning has
won seven straight vs. AFC foes,
and has at least 200 yards
passing in 23 consecutive
games, second longest
streak in NFL history. His
1,320 yards passing is 30
yards shy of league-
leader Drew Brees.
......RB Ahmad Bradshaw
has 981 yards from
scrimmage (722 rushing,
259 receiving) and nine
TDs in last 10 games vs. AFC
opponents. ... Rookie David
Wilson third in NFL, averaging
30.2 yards on kickoff returns. ...
WR Victor Cruz leads NFL with
32 receptions. ... Domenik Hixon
had six receptions for 114 yards
last week, starting for injured
Hakeem Nicks. Fullback Henry
Hynoskis father, Henry Sr.,
played for Browns in 1975.
DENVER at NEW
ENGLAND
OPENING LINE: Patriots by 7
SERIES RECORD: Broncos
lead 27-18
LAST MEETING: Patriots
beat Broncos 45-10, Jan. 14,
2012
LAST WEEK: Broncos beat
Raiders 37-6; Patriots beat Bills
52-28
DID YOU KNOW? Patriots
have scored at least 41 points in
each of last three wins against
Broncos and are 3-1 in last four
matchups. ... Denver has out-
scored opponents in fourth
quarter by league-high 45
points. New England scored 31
against Buffalo in fourth quar-
ter last Sunday. ... Tom Brady
and Peyton Manning meet for
13th time and first since Man-
ning joined Broncos. Brady has
won eight of 12 meet-
ings. Brady tied
with Brett Favre
for third place
with 36 consec-
utive games
with at least one touchdown
pass. Only players ahead are
Drew Brees and Johnny Unitas,
with 47 each.
In last Sundays win over Oak-
land, Manning completed 30 of
38 passes for 338 yards, three
touchdowns and no intercep-
tions: and wasnt sacked. ...
Denver 5-2 in last seven games
at New England. ... Dan Koppen
expected to start at center for
Broncos after eight seasons as
Patriots starting center. ... Willis
McGahee leads active NFL
players with 32 games of at
least 100 yards rushing. He ran
for 112 against Raiders. ... Den-
vers Eric Decker has 24 catches
and Demaryius Thomas 21, tying
for second in receptions by
teammates this season. The
Patriots are first with Wes
Welker and Brandon Lloyd
catching 25 passes each.
SAN DIEGO at NEW
ORLEANS
OPENING LINE: Saints by 3
SERIES RECORD: Chargers
lead 7-3
LAST MEETING: Saints beat
Chargers 37-32, Oct. 26, 2008
LAST WEEK: Chargers beat
Chiefs 37-20; Saints lost to
Packers 28-27
DID YOU KNOW? Teams last
meeting came in Wembley
Stadium in London. ... Chargers
are 2-0 on road. ... Chargers QB
Philip Rivers replaced Saints
Drew Brees as starter in San
Diego in 2006. ... . Rivers
passed for 341 yards, three TDs
and one INT with a 104.3 rating
in only start vs. New Orleans,
marking one of only eight ca-
reer losses when rating 100 or
better. ... TE Antonio Gates has
7,907 career yards receiving,
and with 74 more yards will
surpass Hall of Famers Jackie
Smith (7,918) and Ozzie News-
ome (7,980) for fourth-most
career yards receiving by TE.
Saints seek to avoid first 0-5
start since 1996, when they
finished 3-13. ... Brees seeks NFL
record 48th straight regular
season game with TD pass. Hes
tied with Hall of Fame QB John-
ny Unitas, who had a TD pass in
47 straight from1956-60. ...
Last time Brees did not throw
TD pass was Oct. 4, 2009, a
24-10 win over N.Y. Jets. ... Since
joining the Saints in 2006,
Brees has passed for 29,744
yards. ... Brees has faced Char-
gers once, passing for 339
yards with three TDs in 37-32
win in 2008.
A STATE OF WAR
AP FILE PHOTO
If the Steelers want to win today, they need to avoid scenes
like this. When the teams play, QB Ben Roethlisberger tends
to get sacked a lot by the Eagles.
Tom Brady, meet Peyton Man-
ning. Peyton. Tom. Oh, you
two have met before? Yeah,
like 13 times before. And
usually, its Bradys Patri-
ots coming out on top.
Hes won eight of those
meetings. This will be the
first time Manning is wearing
Bronco orange, however. Not
that color schemes have
anything to do with winning
or anything.
>> EAGLES VS. STEELERS: Did you know
that the Eagles used to be the Steelers and
the Steelers the Eagles? Its true. Way back
in 1940, Steelers owner Art Rooney actually
sold the team and bought a share of the
Eagles franchise. With World War II looming
and player shortages inevitable, his goal
was to have an all-Pa. team called the
Pennsylvania Keystoners. But NFL politics
intervened and the idea was nixed. Since
Rooney wanted to stay in Pittsburgh, he
and the new Pittsburgh owner agreed to a
swap. The Pittsburgh team moved east and
Philadelphias team moved west. Somehow,
it must be no comfort to Eagles fans that
their team has won six Super Bowls.
>> FALCONS VS. REDSKINS: The Wash-
ington Redskins are a very balanced team.
And not in a good way. The team ranks
fourth in the NFL in points scored with 123.
Problem is, theyve also given up 123 points.
Not surprisingly the team is 2-2. The Atlan-
ta Falcons can also score a few points.
Theyre good for third in the NFL with one
more point than Washington. Toss in the
random fact that the last NFL game that
ended in a tie involved the Falcons, and you
can go to Vegas and bet the house on a tie.
Just make sure its your neighbors house.
>> TEXANS VS. JETS: When the NFL
returned to Houston in the early 2000s,
team big wigs were bandying about poten-
tial nicknames and, obviously, they chose
the Texans. But that wasnt
the first time the name
was used. In 1974,
the Houston
Texans played in
the short-lived
World Football
League one of
several leagues
back in the 70s
and 80s that tried
and failed to compete
with the NFL. The
original Texans
didnt even
finish their
first season
in Houston
before
moving to Shreveport, La.,
and becoming the Shreve-
port Steamer.
>> BRONCOS VS. PATRIOTS: You might
have heard of Tom Brady and Peyton Man-
ning. Each has won the Super Bowl, multiple
league MVP awards and have nice side jobs
as TV pitchmen. And they are also in a small
group of NFL players to have hosted Sat-
urday Night Live. So who gets the hosting
edge? Hard to say. Manning cursed at chil-
dren when he was on and Brady was walking
around in his underwear. Cursing at children
seems meaner, so advantage Manning.
>> BILLS VS. 49ERS: People probably
think the San Francisco 49ers did nothing
as a franchise before Joe Montana arrived
in 1979. But the 49ers had a number of
good years before Joe. What they didnt
have was a logo that stayed out of trou-
ble until 1968. From the teams inception
in 1946, this old coot was the face of
the franchise. He looks like a
guy named Pappy who
got all liquored up, fired
off a few rounds
and spent the night
in the drunk tank.
And someone
should work on him
with his firing tech-
nique. From that
position, he could
shoot out more
than his eye.
-- Rich Sheposh
THINGS
YOU
NEED TO
KNOW
WEEK 5
S T A N D I N G S
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
N.Y. Jets ................................. 2 2 0 .500 81 109
New England .......................... 2 2 0 .500 134 92
Buffalo..................................... 2 2 0 .500 115 131
Miami ....................................... 1 3 0 .250 86 90
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Houston ................................ 4 0 0 1.000 126 56
Indianapolis .......................... 1 2 0 .333 61 83
Jacksonville.......................... 1 3 0 .250 62 97
Tennessee............................ 1 3 0 .250 81 151
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Baltimore................................. 3 1 0 .750 121 83
Cincinnati ................................ 3 1 0 .750 112 112
Pittsburgh................................ 1 2 0 .333 77 75
Cleveland................................ 0 4 0 .000 73 98
West
W L T Pct PF PA
San Diego ............................... 3 1 0 .750 100 71
Denver..................................... 2 2 0 .500 114 83
Kansas City............................. 1 3 0 .250 88 136
Oakland................................... 1 3 0 .250 67 125
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Philadelphia............................ 3 1 0 .750 66 83
Dallas ...................................... 2 2 0 .500 65 88
Washington ............................ 2 2 0 .500 123 123
N.Y. Giants.............................. 2 2 0 .500 111 84
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Atlanta ................................... 4 0 0 1.000 124 76
Tampa Bay............................ 1 3 0 .250 82 91
Carolina ................................ 1 3 0 .250 80 109
New Orleans......................... 0 4 0 .000 110 130
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Minnesota............................... 3 1 0 .750 90 72
Chicago................................... 3 1 0 .750 108 68
Green Bay ............................... 2 2 0 .500 85 81
Detroit...................................... 1 3 0 .250 100 114
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Arizona ..................................... 4 1 0 .800 94 78
San Francisco.......................... 3 1 0 .750 104 65
St. Louis.................................... 3 2 0 .600 96 94
Seattle....................................... 2 2 0 .500 70 58
Thursday's Game
St. Louis 17, Arizona 3
Sunday's Games
Baltimore at Kansas City, 1 p.m.
Atlanta at Washington, 1 p.m.
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
Green Bay at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at N.Y. Giants, 1 p.m.
Miami at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.
Seattle at Carolina, 4:05 p.m.
Chicago at Jacksonville, 4:05 p.m.
Buffalo at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.
Tennessee at Minnesota, 4:25 p.m.
Denver at New England, 4:25 p.m.
San Diego at New Orleans, 8:20 p.m.
Open: Dallas, Detroit, Oakland, Tampa Bay
Monday's Game
Houston at N.Y. Jets, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 11
Pittsburgh at Tennessee, 8:20 p.m.
A F C L E A D E R S
Quarterbacks
Att Com Yds TD Int
Roethlisberger, PIT.. 120 82 904 8 1
Schaub, HOU............ 124 83 953 7 1
Dalton, CIN................ 126 85 1111 8 4
Brady, NWE.............. 154 101 1227 7 1
P. Manning, DEN...... 153 99 1162 8 3
Flacco, BAL............... 156 99 1269 7 3
P. Rivers, SND ......... 126 87 897 6 4
Locker, TEN.............. 106 67 781 4 2
Fitzpatrick, BUF ........ 125 72 931 12 7
C. Palmer, OAK........ 162 99 1081 5 2
Rushers
Att Yds Avg LG TD
J. Charles, KAN.......... 72 415 5.76 91t 2
A. Foster, HOU........... 103 380 3.69 22 4
Re. Bush, MIA ............ 67 369 5.51 65t 2
Jones-Drew, JAC....... 72 352 4.89 59t 1
Spiller, BUF................. 41 341 8.32 56t 3
Ridley, NWE ............... 74 339 4.58 20 3
McGahee, DEN.......... 69 325 4.71 31 3
R. Rice, BAL................ 64 317 4.95 43 3
Green-Ellis, CIN......... 82 286 3.49 19 2
T. Richardson, CLE ... 64 222 3.47 32t 3
Receivers
No Yds Avg LG TD
A.. Green, CIN ............. 27 428 15.9 73t 3
Hartline, MIA ................ 25 455 18.2 80t 1
Welker, NWE................ 25 380 15.2 59 0
Bowe, KAN................... 25 342 13.7 33t 3
Lloyd, NWE .................. 25 287 11.5 27 1
Decker, DEN................ 24 322 13.4 35 1
Wayne, IND.................. 23 294 12.8 30t 1
R. Rice, BAL................. 22 174 7.9 37 0
De. Thomas, DEN....... 21 325 15.5 71t 2
Bess, MIA..................... 20 297 14.9 23 0
Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush Rec Ret Pts
A. Foster, HOU........ 5 4 1 0 30
Battle, SND ............... 4 3 1 0 24
Chandler, BUF.......... 4 0 4 0 24
H. Miller, PIT............. 4 0 4 0 24
T. Richardson, CLE. 4 3 1 0 24
Spiller, BUF .............. 4 3 1 0 24
McGahee, DEN........ 3 3 0 0 20
Bowe, KAN............... 3 0 3 0 18
J. Charles, KAN....... 3 2 1 0 18
A.. Green, CIN ......... 3 0 3 0 18
Kicking
PAT FG LG Pts
Gostkowski, NWE.......... 14-14 10-13 53 44
Tucker, BAL .................... 13-13 8-9 56 37
S. Graham, HOU............ 15-15 7-8 41 36
Nugent, CIN.................... 13-13 7-7 47 34
M. Prater, DEN ............... 11-11 7-7 53 32
Succop, KAN.................. 8-8 8-9 45 32
P. Dawson, CLE............. 7-7 8-8 52 31
Janikowski, OAK............ 5-5 8-8 51 29
Bironas, TEN.................. 9-9 6-8 38 27
N F C L E A D E R S
Quarterbacks
Att Com Yds TD Int
M. Ryan, ATL............ 147 102 1162 11 2
Griffin III, WAS.......... 124 86 1070 4 1
Ale. Smith, SNF........ 113 76 784 5 1
Ponder, MIN.............. 123 84 824 4 0
Kolb, ARI ................... 107 67 752 7 2
A. Rodgers, GBY...... 156 109 1064 7 3
E. Manning, NYG ..... 160 103 1320 7 4
C. Newton, CAR....... 107 68 1013 4 5
Brees, NOR............... 191 110 1350 10 5
Stafford, DET............ 173 114 1182 3 4
Rushers
Att Yds Avg LG TD
M. Lynch, SEA............. 92 423 4.60 36 2
L. McCoy, PHL ............ 81 384 4.74 34 1
Morris, WAS................. 82 376 4.59 39t 4
A. Peterson, MIN......... 79 332 4.20 20 2
Gore, SNF.................... 66 326 4.94 23t 3
M. Turner, ATL ............ 55 257 4.67 27 2
Griffin III, WAS............. 39 252 6.46 19 4
D. Martin, TAM............. 71 247 3.48 17 1
Murray, DAL................. 61 237 3.89 48 1
Benson, GBY............... 64 228 3.56 11 1
Receivers
No Yds Avg LG TD
Cruz, NYG.................... 32 388 12.1 80t 2
Amendola, STL ............ 31 351 11.3 56 2
Harvin, MIN .................. 30 299 10.0 24 0
Ca. Johnson, DET....... 29 423 14.6 51 1
R. White, ATL............... 27 413 15.3 59 3
Gonzalez, ATL............. 26 265 10.2 25 3
J. Graham, NOR.......... 24 248 10.3 24 3
B. Marshall, CHI........... 23 352 15.3 34 2
Pettigrew, DET............. 23 223 9.7 24 1
Sproles, NOR............... 23 207 9.0 25 2
Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush Rec Ret Pts
Ve. Davis, SNF ........ 4 0 4 0 24
Griffin III, WAS......... 4 4 0 0 24
Morris, WAS............. 4 4 0 0 24
Roberts, ARI ............ 4 0 4 0 24
And. Brown, NYG.... 3 3 0 0 20
Mi. Austin, DAL ........ 3 0 3 0 18
Ma. Bennett, NYG... 3 0 3 0 18
M. Bush, CHI ............ 3 3 0 0 18
Gonzalez, ATL......... 3 0 3 0 18
Gore, SNF ................ 3 3 0 0 18
Kicking
PAT FG LG Pts
Ja. Hanson, DET............ 8-8 12-13 53 44
Tynes, NYG.................... 10-10 11-12 49 43
Zuerlein, STL.................. 5-5 12-12 60 41
M. Bryant, ATL................ 13-13 9-9 42 40
Akers, SNF ..................... 11-11 9-12 63 38
Gould, CHI ...................... 12-12 8-8 54 36
Walsh, MIN..................... 9-9 9-10 55 36
Barth, TAM....................... 7-7 9-9 57 34
Cundiff, WAS.................. 15-15 6-10 45 33
PAGE 10C SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
S P O R T S
412 Autos for Sale
TOYOTA 11 COROLLA
S 8500k Excel-
lent condition.
Extended 5 year
warranty. Daugh-
ter joined airforce.
570-401-1062
Berwick
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
FORD `00 ECONOLINE
E350 SUPER DUTY VAN
V8 Turbo Diesel,
Good tires, good
body, RUNS GREAT.
132,942 Miles.
$3800. 862-7155.
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
Cashier/Teller
Full & Part time
positions available
$9/hour to start,
must apply in per-
son, no phone calls.
United Check
Cashing
34 Gateway
Shopping Center
Edwardsville, PA
522 Education/
Training
WOMENS LACROSSE
HEAD COACH
Primary responsibil-
ities include: recruit-
ing, scheduling and
related administra-
tive duties involved
in coaching an
NCAA Division III
womens program.
Minimum of a bach-
elors degree and
three years experi-
ence as a lacrosse
coach, preferably at
the Division III col-
lege/university level,
general knowledge
of intercollegiate
athletics, NCAA
policies required.
For additional
information see
www.marywood.ed
u/athletics.
A Marywood appli-
cation, cover letter,
resume and names
and contact infor-
mation of three cur-
rent professional
references should
be submitted to:
Head Womens
Lacrosse Coach
Search Committee
Marywood University
2300 Adams Avenue
Scranton, PA 18509
jobs@marywood.edu
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/
AFFIRMATIVE ACTION
EMPLOYER
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
Commercial
Flooring
Estimator
CAD experience
a must, good
salary, good bene-
fits, please mail
resume to:
Hi-tech
flooring,Inc.
166 West Union St.
Kingston, Pa 18704
542 Logistics/
Transportation
Drivers:
Tractor Trailer.
Owner Operators in
Bethlehem.
Excellent money
per mile plus fuel.
Paid tolls using
EZPASS,
Home Daily.
Sign on Bonus.. up
to $5000.00 paid
in 10 weeks.
Lease Purchase
Available. CDL
Class A Req.
877-611-0797
548 Medical/Health
CERTIFIED NURSE
PRACTITIONER
Certified Nurse
Practitioner (CRNP)
needed for busy
Internal Medicine
practice in Duryea,
PA. Experience
required, along with
excellent communi-
cation and comput-
er skills.
Please fax
resume to
(570) 283-6924
or e-mail to
hr@ihgltd.com
551 Other
Pricing & Analytics
Leader
Develop & improve
algorithms to price
products. Develop
processes for SKU
based pricing
approach. Drive
revenue growth,
improve margins/
minimizing margin
loss, & calculate
analytical measur-
ing processes to
demonstrate bene-
fits of pricing man-
agement.
REQUIREMENTS:
MBA or foreign
equivalency; knowl-
edge of pricing
strategies & B2B
marketing, MS
Access, macros, &
VB coding, profit,
game theory.
Send resumes to
mrusso@
key-stone.com.
100 SLOCUM AVE.
EXETER, PA 18643
E.O.E. M/F/D/V
554 Production/
Operations
AEP Industries,
Inc., a leading
supplier of flexible
packaging has
immediate
openings for
MACHINE
OPERATORS
Starting at $ 9/hour
PLUS .50/hour
night shift differen-
tial; Working Full-
time 12 hours shifts
alternating 3 & 4
day work weeks.
Every other week-
end a must.
As a Machine Oper-
ator you will
remove, inspect,
and pack finish
product to specifi-
cations. You must
be able to do some
heavy lifting, know
how to use a tape
measure and scale,
and be a TEAM
PLAYER. Previous
manufacturing
experience pre-
ferred. Benefit
Package includes:
Medical, Dental,
Vision, Life Insur-
ance, Vacation, Hol-
iday pay,
Applications
accepted daily @
AEP INDUSTRIES,
INC.
8 a.m. until 4 p.m.
20 Elmwood Ave
Crestwood
Industrial Park
Mountaintop, PA
18707
Email: grullony@
aepinc.com
EOE * A drug free
workplace
Press Break
Set-up Operator
2nd and 3rd shifts.
Set up experience
a must. Able to
read blueprints,
great math and
measurement skills.
www.onesource
staffing.com
570-825-2105
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
MERCHANDISER
PART-TIME
AMERICAN GREETINGS
has exciting oppor-
tunities for a part-
time merchandiser
n Nanticoke, PA. As
a merchandiser, you
would be responsi-
ble for going into
retailers in your
area and setting up
seasonal cards,
straightening up the
cards, and taking
nventory. We offer
full training and a lot
of flexibility, as well
as competitive pay.
Interested
applicants should
apply online at
http://www.amgreet
ings-careers.com
WAREHOUSE
WORK FOR
THE BEST !!!
Thursday (10/11)
11 am until 1 pm.
We are a National
Convenience Store
Distribution Compa-
ny Seeking a 3rd
SHIFT STOCKER.
Previous Forklift
experience pre-
ferred. All positions
are Full time 40
hours per week,
with a generous
benefit package,
and various bonus
programs! Work for
the Best! Apply @
100 West End Rd.
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18706
NO PHONE CALLS
PLEASE
SHOW UP AND BE
INTERVIEWED!!
All applicants sub-
ject to pre-employ-
ment drug and
background check.
E O E
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
446. N. Main Street
Beautifully
Restored House
with Storefront in
Great, Safe
Neighborhood.
Near General Hos-
pital & Kings Col-
lege. Great Invest-
ment Property. 2
bedrooms & 2.5
baths. Upstairs
laundry room, office
with deck. New
kitchen, roof, heat-
ing & electric.
Huge insulated attic
with fan, for addi-
tional space. Hard-
wood floors. Off
street parking &
garage. Lots of
closet space.
$132,500. Call
570-466-1307
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
FORTY FORTY
3 bedrooms,
1 1/2 baths, brand
new kitchen and
bath, carpeting
and heat. $845/per
month, Call
(570) 220-6533
KINGSTON AREA
Large 3 bedroom.
One floor, stove,
washer/dryer hook
up, off street park-
ing. Gas heat. Wall
to wall carpet.
$595/month, Refer-
ences, lease &
security deposit.
Call 570-301-3401
MOOSIC
5 rooms 1st floor
heat and water fur-
nished. $745
Security and
references
570-457-7854
PLAINS
3 bedroom, no pets
1/2 double. $725
plus security
570-899-5455
field day during his final high
school season. Hes among the
Wyoming Valley Conferences
leaders in goals with 10, assists
with seven and points with 27.
Its like having another coach
on the field with the team,
Northwest coach Pete Malischak
said of Carr. Hes Mr. Every-
thing.
Hes also Mr. Nice guy.
Rather than try to dominate
the girls game, which Carr cer-
tainly can, he prefers to play a
more subduedgame almost like
a boxer pulling some punches.
Thats intentional.
I dont try to show off or any-
thing. I always trytoturnit down,
take it easy, not go crazy, Carr
said.
Maybe a little too much.
Hes morewillingtopass off to
girls he thinks can score, Malis-
chak said, rather than take the
shot himself. I have to get on him
sometimes to shoot.
But to Carr, stick-work at this
level is much more important
than scoring goals.
A perfect example came on
Northwests final goal of a 3-0 vic-
tory over Meyers on Wednesday.
Carr didnt get credit for an assist
on the play, but he started the
rush with a mesmerizing flick
pass over an opponents stick and
onto a teammates.
Hes out here practicingall the
time, Malischak said. And hes
doing stuff Ive never seena hock-
ey player do. The goal we scored
down low, I think he passed it be-
tween his legs.
One blast ona free hit off Carrs
stick caught a Meyers player in
the leg, knocking her from the
game. Carr was the first one to
come to her aid.
Hes very upset if he hits a ball
andaccidentallyhurts agirl, Ma-
lischak said. He doesnt like to
hurt anybody.
Mostly, I try to be nice to ev-
erybody on the opposing team,
Carr said. I date girls fromother
teams. I get along with all of
them. My team, they all like me
as far as I know.
He knows opportunities for
mens field hockey players are dif-
ficult to find in the United States.
Thats why the son of Heather
andGlennCarr Sr. of Shickshinny
considered going to Canada to
play collegiately before deciding,
Its far away and its a lot more
money.
Instead, hesaid, hes leaningto-
ward attending college locally
and helping other field hockey
players while keeping his game
sharp at practices.
Its fun, Carr said.
For him, its turning into the
challenge of a lifetime.
DARE
Continued fromPage 1C
professional cyclist in history
whose biography could make
50 Shades of Gray look like
a childrens book.
Lets just say Anquetil led a
colorful life and Howard lays
it all out in his biography of
the French cycling legend.
At times, Anquetil is a diffi-
cult person to like, but thats
one of the things that makes
this one so hard to put down.
Rough day for Valentine
Former Red Sox manager
Bobby Valentine certainly had
a rough season this year.
Being fired last Thursday
certainly couldnt have been a
highlight for Valentine.
But neither was last Tues-
day when Valentine an avid
cyclist crashed his bike
during a ride through New
Yorks Central Park.
Rest assured, according to
the New York Post, he had
only himself to blame. Valen-
tine crashed when he became
distracted while reading a
text.
Maybe, Bobby should just
stick to those Lifecycles we
all will be riding this winter.
Author: Geoff Drake
Price: List: $18.94, Digital:
$27.95, Kindle: $13.50
American cycling has
grown in leaps and bounds
since Greg Lemond won three
Tour de Frances back in the
80s.
Its beginnings were beyond
humble, however.
Drake traces those orgins
back to the dreams of two
men and a conveinence store
company with cash to spare.
Along the way he follows the
careers of star riders such as
Andy Hampsten, Davis Phin-
ney and Bob Roll.
If you like to follow the pro
peloton, you will enjoy this
book.
Sex, Lies and Handlebar
Tape
Author: Paul Howard
Price: List: $16.95, Digital:
$14.47, Kindle: $10.10
Jacques Anquetil was the
first man to win the Tour de
France five times, the first to
win all three grand tours and
the first to win the Tour de
France and Vuelta in the same
year.
Hes probably also the only
Now that
fall has offi-
cially arrived,
I have to re-
luctantly ad-
mit that the
days of my
2012 cycling
season are numbered.
There was once a time
when I would continue to ride
right up until snow forced me
off the road.
But once the temperatures
start dipping into the 50s I
seriously start considering
heading indoors to the Life-
cycle.
So knowing that there are
probably more than a few
riders out there like me that
will soon be hitting the gym
rather than the open roads, I
offer up few interesting reads
to keep your cycling fires
burning through the long cold
winter.
And fortunately, all the
books Im recommending are
available as ebooks, which
should make dragging them
to the gym all that much
easier.
Bike Snob: Systematically
and Mercilessly Realigning
the World of Cycling
Author: BikeSnobNYC
Price: List: $16.95; Digital:
$13.99, Kindle: $8.53.
The author of the popular
bikesnobnyc blog weighs in
on everything from the histo-
ry of cycling to todays bike
culture and beyond.
Amazon describes the book
as a laugh-out-loud rant and
rave about the world of bikes
and their riders. The descrip-
tion couldnt be more accu-
rate.
BikeSnobNYC, or whatever
his real name is, brings a wit
and sense of humor rarely
seen in a book about cycling.
This is truly a book every
cyclist should own.
Team 7-Eleven: How an Un-
sung Band of American
Cyclists Took on the World
-- and Won
Books can warm indoor rides
Joe Soprano writes about cycling
for The Times Leader. His Cycling
Scene column appears every other
Sunday. Reach him at 829-7164 or
jsoprano@timesleader.com.
AP PHOTO
Former Boston Red Sox manager Bobby Valentine goes for a
bike ride on Bostons Huntington Avenue on Thursday. Fortu-
nately for Valentine, he wasnt using his cell phone at the time.
JOE SOPRANO
C Y C L I N G S C E N E
DOYLESTOWN -- Sam
Helmstetters hat trick led the
Misericordia womens soccer
team to a 5-0 win at Delaware
Valley on Saturday.
Caitlin Boyle and Meghan
Antrim added goals, while
Nicolette Hensel and Laura
Roney combined for five as-
sists.
WOMENS SOCCER
Wilkes 2,
FDU-Florham 1
Alicia Roberts scored two
goals for Wilkes in a victory
over FDU-Florham.
Katie Mahoney had five
stops in net before giving way
to Hayley Kay, who picked up
one save of her own.
DeSales 2,
Kings 1
Jamie Barna scored twice as
the DeSales posted a victory
over Kings in Center Valley.
Lindsey Humanik scored off
an assist by Erin Laird for
Kings.
WOMENS VOLLEYBALL
Kings 3,
Alvernia 1
Kings defeated Alvernia
17-25, 25-19, 25-19, 25-23.
Elen ODonnel had 10 kills,
four digs, and two aces, Alexa
Nelson had 10 kills, two
blocks and Molly Dahl had
seven kills and three digs.
Arcadia 3,
Kings 0
The Monarchs lost to Arca-
dia 25-23, 25-14, 25-22.
Alexa Nelson posted 10 kills
and two digs, while Mary
Loughran had 20 assists with
five digs and three kills.
Alvernia 3,
Wilkes 1
Casey Bohan had 19 kills,
Paige Trusty added six kills and
Erin Nothstein recorded a
team-high 26 digs while Megan
Powers posted 27 assists for
Wilkes.
Wilkes 3,
Arcadia 1
Casey Bohan recorded a
team-high 21 kills while Paige
Trusty added 13 and Megan
Powers posted 44 assists for
Wilkes.
Misericordia 3,
Albright 2
Misericordia defeated Al-
bright 25-15, 17-25, 18-25, 25-22,
15-6.
Cailin McCullion had 18 kills
on the day to move into first
place in school history with 933
kills. Kat LaBrie had a team-
high 14 kills and two aces, and
Meghan Stack had 40 assists,
six kills and two aces.
Elizabethtown 3,
Misericordia 0
Misericordia lost to Eliza-
bethtown 25-11, 25-19, 25-22.
Shelby Brochetti led the
Cougars with eight kills while
Cailin McCullion added seven.
FIELD HOCKEY
Manhattanville 4,
Wilkes 3, OT
Wilkes dropped a decision in
overtime to host Manhattan-
ville.
Alexis Reed had 12 saves in
goal for the Colonels.
Delaware Valley 3,
Kings 2
Taylor Princhett scored the
game-winning goal as Delaware
Valley defeated Kings in Doyl-
estown.
Calli Berryman scored her
13th goal of the season off an
assist from Kim Howanitz,
and Megan Withrow made
seven saves in the net.
MENS SOCCER
Kings 2,
DeSales 1
Kings picked up the victory
over DeSales.
Kevin Buchanan and David
Stroh each scored a goal for
the Monarchs.
FDU-Florham 4,
Wilkes 2
Joe Brennan scored two
goals in Wilkes loss to FDU-
Florham.
Dave Marr made 10 stops in
goal for the Colonels.
WOMENS TENNIS
MAC championships
Four Kings players and one
doubles team reached the
quarterfinal round of the Mid-
dle Atlantic Conference Indi-
vidual Championships before
being eliminated at Kirby
Park.
Sarah Lynn, Maddie Griffin,
Nicole Molino and Vanessa
Wagner all reached the quar-
terfinals in singles matches.
The doubles team of Lynn
and Wagner lost to Katie
Lynn and Melanie Nolt of
Wilkes 8-3.
Misericordia advanced three
singles players and two dou-
bles teams to the semifinals.
Players were Michelle Cam-
eron, Breanne Phillips and
Cassie Foy all reached the
semifinals, as did the doubles
team of Cameron and Phillips
Nolt, Alexis Donner, Ally
Kristofco and Katie Lynn all
reached the singles semifinals
for Wilkes.
L O C A L C O L L E G E R O U N D U P
Cougars use a hat trick
to spark romp at Del. Val.
The Times Leader staff
KINGSTON Alexis Pileggi
scored two unassisted goals to
lead Wyoming Valley West to
a hard-fought victory over
Wyoming Area, 2-1, on Sat-
urday in high school girls
soccer.
Samantha Acacio scored the
only goal for Wyoming Area
on a penalty kick.
Wyoming Area............................................ 0 1 1
Wyoming Valley West............................... 0 2 2
Second half: 1. WA, Samantha Acacio
(penalty kick), 28:23; 2. WVW, Alexis Pileggi,
25:03; 3. WVW, Pileggi, 6:32.
Shots: WA 9, WVW 14; Saves: WA 7
(Jordan Chiavacci), WVW 6 (Paige Heckman);
Corners: WA 0, WVW 6.
Lake-Lehman 12, Meyers 0
Julia Hutsko had two goals
and two assists in Lake-Leh-
mans shutout victory over
Meyers.
Aleaha Blaizick contributed
with one goal and two assists,
while Shoshana Mahoney had
two goals and two assists.
Meyers ..................................................... 0 0 0 0 0
Lake-Lehman.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0
First half: 1. LEH, Brinley Williams (Shoshana
Mahoney), 7:01; 2. LEH, Mahoney (Julia Hutsko),
10:34; 3. LEH, Morgan Goodrich (Aleaha Blazick),
17:21; 4. LEH, Goodrich, 24:33; 5. LEH, Mahoney
(Goodrich), 30:29; 6. LEH, Blaizick (Mahoney),
31:06; Second half: 7. LEH, Emily Sutton (Blaiz-
ick), 00:30; 8. LEH, Hutsko (Mahoney), 2:05; 9.
LEH, Hutsko (Goodrich), 16:42; 10. LEH, Cayle
Spencer (Kendyl Maclean), 25:00; 11. LEH, Sutton
(Hutsko), 4:00; 12. LEH, MaClean (Karen Yam-
rick), 2:00.
Shots: LEH 3, MEY 39; Saves: LEH 10 (Em-
mallie Langen), MEY 3 (Kaylee Kishbaugh); Cor-
ners: LEH 0, MEY 8.
H.S. BOYS SOCCER
Dallas 7,
Wyoming Seminary 1
Matt Saba had two goals
and an assist in Dallas win
over Wyoming Seminary.
Nate Wood contributed for
the Mountaineer with a goal
and an assist.
Wyoming Seminary got its
lone score from Henry Cornell.
Wyoming Seminary ................................... 1 0 1
Dallas ............................................................ 4 3 7
First half: 1. DAL, Matt Saba (Eric Pincosski),
37:25; DAL, Nate Wood (Brian Goyne), 30:10; 3.
DAL, Saba (AJ Nardone), 26:47; 4. DAL, Zach
Goodwin, 22:00; 5. SEM, Henry Cornell, 7:24;
Second half: 6. DAL, Nardone (Saba), 16:24; 7.
DAL, John Murray (Wood), 13:29; 8. DAL, Brandon
Scharff, 7:06.
Shots: SEM 6, DAL 17; Saves: SEM 6 (Rick
Kaizaki), DAL 5 (Corey Metz, Casey Barretts,
Blake Williams); Corners: SEM 0, DAL 1.
GAR 6, Hanover Area 3
Luke Height accounted for
three goals and one assist in
the GAR victory.
Dylan Luzny led Hanover
Area with two goals and one
assist.
Hanover ........................................................ 2 1 3
GAR............................................................... 3 3 6
First half: 1. GAR, Joharky Santos (Luke
Height); 2. HAN, Dylan Luzny; 3. HAN, Luzny, 4.
GAR, Height (Jesus Tlatenchi); 5. GAR, Height
(Tlatenchi); Second half: 6. GAR, Height; 7. HAN,
John Morgan (Dylan Luzny); 8. GAR, Bre Moiser;
9. GAR, Katie Oldziejewski (Edwin Sosa)
Shots: HAN 12, GAR 23; Saves: HAN 12 (Jo-
seph Gagliardi), GAR 7 (Tony Tlatenchi); Corners:
HAN 3, GAR 2.
Wyoming Valley West 2,
Crestwood 0
Eddie Thomas scored both
goals in the Wyoming Valley
West victory over Crestwood.
Crestwood.................................................... 0 0 0
Wyoming Valley West............................... 0 2 2
Second half: 1. WVW, Eddie Thomas
(Dylan Reynolds), 32:50; 2. WVW, Thomas
(Nick Singer), 18:53.
Shots: CRE 20, WVW 14; Saves: CRE 9
(Steven Rerrick), WVW 18 (Derek Denman,
Logan Zavada); Corners: CRE 4, WVW 2.
H I G H S C H O O L R O U N D U P
Pileggis two goals propel Spartans, 2-1
The Times Leader staff
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 PAGE 11C
*Read the owners manual before operating Honda Power Equipment.
VALLEY POWER EQUIPMENT & RENTAL
710 Wilkes-Barre Twp. Blvd. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
570-823-2017
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EU3000is
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EU3000i Handi
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The lightest 3000-watt inverter
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Wheels and folding handle for true
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Compact Design Super Quiet
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EB3000c
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EU6500is EM6500s
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Powerful Honda iGX commercial engine
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EB6500
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EM4000s
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Powers fridge, furnace, lights, TV, and
much more
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Powerful Honda commercial OHV
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28 clearing width, 20 clearing
height
Clears up to 50 tons per hour
Self-propelled, innitely variable
hydrostatic drive
Track drive - best traction available
Easy starting Honda OHV
commercial grade engine
32 clearing width, 20 clearing
height
Clears up to 65 tons/hour
Work light standard
Pedal-adjustable auger height
PAGE 12C SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
S P O R T S
OUTDOORS
PGC open house
State Rep. Gerald Mullery
will host an open house
with the Pennsylvania
Game Commission on
Tuesday, Oct. 23, at
Luzerne County Com-
munity College. A pre-
sentation will be given
by the agencys black
bear biologist, Mark
Ternent, and PGC offi-
cials will be on hand to
answer questions. For
more information, call
740-7031.
Mountain Springs
Lake to be drained
The Pennsylvania Fish and
Boat Commission
(PFBC) announced that
deficiencies at Luzerne
Countys Mountain
Springs Lake have
prompted the agency to
completely drain the
reservoir and proceed
with plans to breach the
dam.
Commission engineers
and the state Depart-
ment of Environmental
Protection routinely
inspect the dam and,
during a recent in-
spection, we found large
cracks in the concrete,
said Jack Rokavec, PFBC
chief of engineering.
Excessive seepage has
also been observed
through the embank-
ment. The dam is more
than 100 years old, and
was designed and built
prior to current dam
safety regulations and
engineering standards
of practice.
The drawdown is expected
to begin in mid-October
and may take more than
a month to complete.
The lake can be drained
at a rate of about one
foot per day, depending
on weather. The actual
breaching of the dam is
not expected to take
place until late 2013 or
early 2014.
At this point, the PFBC has
no plans to rebuild the
dam. Agency waterways
conservation officers
say the lake receives
minimal use, in part
because of the difficulty
in reaching it. The lake is
accessible only by a
five-mile, unpaved road
through State Game
Land 57. Also, agency
biologists report that
the lake is a poor fishery
because of the acidic
water. Biologists do not
plan to conduct a fish
salvage prior to the
drawdown because of
the poor condition of
the fishery and because
the condition of the
access road prohibits
them from getting the
necessary equipment to
the lake.
The lake will remain open
to public use until the
water level reaches a
point where it may be
unsafe for anglers. At
that point the lake will
be closed and signs will
be posting alerting
anglers of the closing.
The 40-acre lake borders
Ricketts Glen State Park
and State Game Land
57. It was previously
lowered in 1999 by
approximately two feet
due to structural con-
cerns with the dam.
River access
reopened
The PFBC announced that
the Whites Ferry access
area in Wyoming County
is open again for public
use.
The access area was closed
in late July due to low
water conditions, which
made the launch ramp
unusable. PFBC staff
extended the ramp by
pouring stone at the end
and then placing con-
crete planks over the
stone.
Whites Ferry provides boat
access to the North
Branch of the Susque-
hanna River, six miles
south of Tunkhannock
on state Route 2007.
Outdoors Notes items will
not be accepted over the
telephone. Items may be
faxed to 831-7319, dropped
off at the Times Leader or
mailed to Times Leader, c/o
Sports, 15 N, Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA18711-
0250.
OUT DOORS
NOT ES
F
ishing on the opening day of
trout season can be tough for a
kid.
Along most stocked waterways,
competition for real estate is fierce
when it comes to find a place to cast
from and a spot in the water to cast to.
Anglers get bumped, lines get tan-
gled and tempers sometimes flare. And
unfortunately, respect gets thrown to
the wayside.
The entire experience can be an
intimidating one for a child, and it
shouldnt be that way.
Last week, the Pennsylvania Fish and
Boat Commission took a step to help
children enjoy the opening day of trout
without enduring the throngs of adults
that crowd favorite fishing spots. The
PFBC found the ultimate solution to
the problem one that hopefully sits
well with everyone.
They gave kids their own opening
day.
The concept is long overdue, yet still
a very proactive approach by the board
as it unanimously approved its first
mentored youth program that essen-
tially gives kids -- those 16 and under --
their own opening day of trout season.
The concept is the same as the Penn-
sylvania Game Commissions mentor
program, and it makes perfect sense.
Beginning in the spring of 2013, kids
will be able to fish the Saturday before
the season opener in the southeast on
select waters within the 18-county
region.
The waterways will be stocked with
trout ahead of time, and those partici-
pating must register for the program
and be accompanied by a mentor who
has a valid fishing license and trout
permit. The youth and the adult men-
tor can both fish, and they can each
keep two trout, insuring there will be
enough left over when the opening day
for the rest of us comes around a week
later.
Kingston resident Norm Gavlick,
who is one of 10 commissioners on the
PFBC board, said he expects the men-
tor program to be well-received by the
angling public.
If any adult anglers do take excep-
tion to letting a child have the first shot
at catching a couple trout, shame on
them.
Its going to be a great opportunity
for kids to have some space out there
and get first crack at catching a couple
trout, he said.
That first crack could pay dividends
for years to come. If children have an
enjoyable experience on opening day,
chances are theyll want to do it again
and eventually become license buyers.
Gavlick also said the board will re-
examine the mentor program and will
likely discuss expanding it to other
areas, if not the entire state.
Lets hope that happens.
Nothing captures a childs attention
like fishing for trout on opening day. It
has all the elements needed to make
for a memorable experience.
A kids-only opening day will make
sure those memories are positive.
In fact, I wish it was around when I
was a kid. Growing up, there was noth-
ing I loved more that trout fishing.
Nothing could keep me away from the
banks of my favorite stocked stream on
opening day -- not weather, illness,
homework, nothing at all.
Almost.
There were a few opening days in my
childhood when crowds made it diffi-
cult simply to have an opportunity to
fish. Those crowds filled with adults
-- were so focused on catching stocked
trout that sometimes I got bumped out
of the way.
It was a disheartening experience,
and its one that Ive seen other kids
endure today.
Kids are the future of our sport, and
theres only one thing thats going to
keep them involved -- make fishing fun.
On March 23, its going to be a blast.
TOM VENESKY
O U T D O O R S
Youth trout day
a long overdue
positive event
Tom Venesky covers the outdoors for The
Times Leader. Reach him at tvenesky@time-
sleader.com
When a pair of bills were introduced in
the state legislature last week that
would drastically change the way the
Pennsylvania Game Commission does
business, it caught board president
Ralph Martone by surprise.
A few days later, however, Martone be-
lieved he had a good idea why the bills
were introduced and what could be done
to address the issue.
On Oct. 1, state Senator Richard Al-
loway (R-Chambersburg) introduced SB
1603, which would cut the fees for hunt-
ing licenses in half. The bill was dis-
cussed during the Senate Game and
Fisheries Committee hearing on Oct. 3,
but no vote was taken.
Also last week, a House bill (HB
2073), introduced by state Rep. David
Maloney (R-Berks) that would remove
the Game Commissions exemption from
the Independent Regulatory Review
Commission (IRRC) was scheduled for a
vote by the House State Committee on
Oct. 2, but the meeting was canceled.
Alloway could not be reached for com-
ment last week, but Martone said SB
1603 wouldve cut the agencys revenues
in half, forcing it to use funds realized
from Marcellus Shale leases and royal-
ties to make ends meet.
By including the Game Commission
under the IRRC, it wouldve added
months or even a year or two to the time
it would take for board actions to be ap-
proved, Martone said.
Wed have to set seasons and bag lim-
its two to three years in advance, and
wed be very limited in how we handle
population and habitat changes, Mar-
tone said. It would absolutely create
some serious issues for some species.
Maloney said even under IRRC review,
some actions can be handled in an emer-
gency manner, speeding up the process.
He said one of his
main reasons for the bill
was to improve the agen-
cys accountability to
hunters.
I have an honest con-
cern, Maloney said, cit-
ing deer management
and the decline of hunt-
ing license sales. When
you have extreme cir-
cumstances, sometimes
it requires extreme mea-
sures.
Since no action was
taken on the bills, for
now, Martone said he be-
lieves they were a result
of legislators becoming frustrated with
communication issues with the PGC.
I talked to some commissioners and
we all feel we can do a better job commu-
nicating with legislators, and we intend
to, he said. I would like to see a better
relationship between not just the agency
and legislators, but the board and legis-
lators also.
Maloney agreed, but added the biggest
communication issue is with hunters,
not legislators.
Sure they can do a better job commu-
nicating, but the real problem is the lack
of communication or just listening to the
sportsmen, he said.
One root of the communication issue
stems from a move by the agency to seek
public comments on the possibility of
listing three species of bats Northern
long-eared bat, tri-colored bar and the
little brown bat on the states endan-
gered species list. The agency recently
announced in the Pennsylvania Bulletin
that it was considering the action and
collected public comments for more
than 30 days.
Game Commission spokesman Jerry
Feaser said the agency used the bulletin
to solicit public comments on the bat is-
sue prior to any action or recommenda-
tions in an effort to be more transparent.
He acknowledged that the agency
couldve done a better job communicat-
ing that the bulletin listing was solely
seeking public comments and not adver-
tising any proposed or adopted rulemak-
ing.
"We had some feedback from several
legislators and industry representatives
that it may be a very basic situation
where communication may have been
better as to what was going on," Feaser
said. "I believe we couldve done a better
job communicating through a news re-
lease that we were doing this."
The move generated great concern
from the timber industry and on Thurs-
day the PGC announced it will not move
forward to list the bats.
Martone said the move is related to
the recent actions by the state legisla-
tors.
(The timber industry) went to their
legislators like theyre supposed to do
and the legislators listened, Martone
said. We needed to do a better job com-
municating our intentions.
He said the idea of listing the three bat
species on the endangered species list
isnt a habitat issue but a disease issue,
relating to white-nose syndrome. As a re-
sult, restricting timber harvests
wouldnt be considered as a possible so-
lution.
We didnt communicate that, Mar-
tone said.
Now that action on the two bills has
been delayed, Martone hopes the agency
and board can resolve its communica-
tion issues with legislators to avoid fu-
ture conflicts.
He also didnt shy away from taking
responsibility for the problem.
Well take a great deal of the blame for
the confusion over the bat issue and lack
of communication with legislators,
Martone said. We intend to improve on
that in the near future.
Even though improved communica-
tion would be a positive step, Maloney
said, he still intends to pursue passage of
his bill.
As long as I have a breath I will pursue
the best interests of the sportsmen in
this state. If that means the passage of
this bill then yes, I will continue to work
for that, he said.
PGC challenged to communicate better
State legislature makes its point with
bills introduced in House, Senate,
prompting improved outdoors dialogue.
By TOMVENESKY
tvenesky@timesleader.com
Maloney
Matrone
Grouse, squirrel andearly deer seasons on
the horizon:
The Pennsylvania Game Commission
says hunters can expect slightly below-aver-
age grouse numbers for the upcoming sea-
son, while the states squirrel population is
abundant heading into the fall.
The first segment of the states three-part
grouse season opens Saturday, Oct. 13, and
runs through Nov. 24. The season reopens
Dec. 10-24, and then again from Dec. 26 to
Jan. 26.
Squirrel season opens Oct. 13, and runs
through Nov. 24. The season reopens Dec.
10-24, andagainDec. 26toFeb. 23. The daily
limit is six.
The states early firearms antlerless deer
seasons early muzzleloader season, Oct.
13-20, and special firearms season for junior,
senior, active duty military and certain dis-
abled hunters, Oct. 18-20, offer hunters a
chance to enjoy deer hunting while the
weather is still mild.
To participate in the special firearms an-
tlerless season (Oct. 18-20), hunters must
havea general huntinglicenseanda validan-
tlerless deer license, andqualifyinone of the
following license categories: resident junior
or senior license holders; nonresident junior
license holder; nonresident adult license
holders age 65 or older; hold a disabled per-
sonpermit to use a vehicle as a blind; be resi-
dents who are serving on active duty in the
U.S. Armed Forces; or qualify for license and
fee exceptions under Section 2706. Sporting
arms permitted include: manually-operated
center-fire rifles, handguns and shotguns;
44-caliber or larger muzzleloading long
guns; 50-caliber or larger muzzleloading
handguns; long, recurve or compoundbows;
and crossbows.
Based on a recent change in state law and
Game Commission regulations, these two
antlerless deer seasons noware open to par-
ticipants of the Mentored Youth Hunting
Program, which was created for those under
the age of 12. Mentored youth must obtain a
MYHP permit ($2.70) for the current year,
and they may receive only one antlerless
deer licensebytransfer duringalicenseyear.
Adult mentors may transfer more than one
antlerless deer license, but they must be to
different mentored youth. The transfer is
valid only if done in the WMUfor which the
antlerless deer license was issued. A pro-
posed change in regulations to allow for the
transfer of one DMAPantlerless deer permit
to a mentored youth wont take effect until
the 2013-14 seasons, as the proposal still re-
quires final adoption by the Board.
Prepping for open seasons
Grouse, squirrel and early deer seasons
will all be opening soon, with a plentiful
squirrel population available this fall.
The Times Leader staff
PGC PHOTO
Early muzzleloader season and special firearms season offer hunters a chance to enjoy
deer hunting while the weather is still mild.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 PAGE 13C
7
8
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2
4
The Pennsylvania Fish and
Boat Commission has found
what it hopes is the answer to
stopping the high turnover rate
of license buyers.
During its meeting last week
in Pittsburgh, the PFBC board
approved final implementation
of multi-year fishing licenses and
trout stamps. The new concept,
which became an option after a
new law giving the PFBC such
authority took effect this sum-
mer, begins on Dec. 1, and allows
anglers the option of buying a
three- or five-year license.
The move offers anglers con-
venience and a savings of $3.40
for a three-year license and $6.80
for a five-year license. It also al-
lows the agency to realize grea-
ter consistency with its license
sales, possibly leading to more
reimbursement from the federal
government.
Norm Gavlick, who represents
the Northeast Region on the
board, said there is also a possi-
bility of offering a five-year boat
registration as well.
Right now, our revenues fluc-
tuate drastically every year with
license sales, he said. With this
program, we know we have
those anglers for at least three
years, and that will help with the
reimbursement from the federal
government, which is based on
license sales.
Money from the second
through fifth years of a multi-
year license purchase will be de-
posited into a separate bank ac-
count to cover costs over the
course of those years, Gavlick
said.
Under the new law, the PFBC
has the authority to alter its li-
cense structure but it cant raise
license fees. Gavlick said the
board will consider other licens-
ing options next year, such as
family and vacation packages.
There is a whole range of
things we can do within the cur-
rent license fee structure to en-
courage people to buy fishing li-
censes, Gavlick said.
The board also approved a mo-
tion to eliminate the Early Sea-
son Trout-Stocked Waters Pro-
gram, which stocked certain wa-
terways and opened them to
trout fishing from March 1-31.
Those waters that were in the
program will now be regulated
as Approved Trout Waters Open
to Year-Round Fishing.
Local waterways affected by
the change include Lily Lake,
Moon Lake, Lake Took-a-While
and Lake Irena. Gavlick said the
move was made to allow anglers
to fish for other species, such as
bass and panfish, prior to the
start of trout season.
Multi-year licenses now on sale
PFBC approved sales of
permits and trout stamps
good for three or five years.
By TOMVENESKY
tvenesky@timesleader.com
O U T D O O R S
1. Anthony Glazenski 7.37 pounds
2. John Centak 7.18 pounds
3. Chuck Saypack 7.10 pounds
4. John Nealon 6.95 pounds
5. Ray Jones 6.77 pounds
6. Dave Searfoss 6.43 pounds
7. Dan Byorick Jr. 6.23 pounds
8. Chris Ostrowski 6.18 pounds
9. Joe Halesey 6.08 pounds
10. Ed Mrochko -- 6.07 pounds
Sept. 16 Susquehanna River Bass Tournament
1. John Centak and John Halesey -- 6 fish, 11.30
pounds
2. Rob Rosencrans and Lynda Morris -- 6
fish,10.50 pounds
3. Christopher Jones and Vincent Sabatini -- 6
fish, 7.63 pounds
Lunker winner -- Rob Rosencrans and Lynda
Morris -- 2.80 pounds
Next tournament Sunday, Oct. 21. For more
information, email bigbuck326@aol.com.
SUBMITTED PHOTO
From the left, Chuck Saypak, Anthony Glazenski and John Centak.
S U S K I E B A S S M A S T E R S
S E P T. 3 0 C H A M P I O N S H I P
Two Pennsylvania Game
Commission Food and Cover
Corps employees were injured
on Monday, Oct. 1, while re-
sponding to a burning target
backstop at a shooting range on
State Game Land 183 in Palmy-
ra Township, Pike County. Ac-
cording to Game Commission
Northeast Region director Da-
niel Figured, the accident is be-
ing attributed to the illegal use
of exploding rifle targets.
Game Lands maintenance su-
pervisor Leonard Boyer and
Game Lands maintenance work-
er Charles Campfield arrived at
the range, along state Route 6,
at around 3:15 p.m., and observ-
ed a target backstop and frame
on fire. While attempting to ex-
tinguish the fire, an illegal ex-
ploding target on the ground
detonated, injuring the two.
Both men sustained burned
skin, temporary blindness and
hearing damage as a result of
the blast, and were treated at an
emergency room of a local hos-
pital.
Game Commission shooting
ranges are intended for use by
sportsmen to sight in their fire-
arms and hone their shooting
skills, Figured said. The use of
exploding targets on SGL ranges
is prohibited by agency regula-
tions and clearly poses a threat
to the safety of our employees
and others using the range. The
only targets authorized on SGL
ranges are paper targets placed
on a permanent backboard.
Several brands of exploding
targets are legal to purchase and
available commercially. They of-
ten consist of two inert chem-
icals that, when combined and
loaded into a hollow target,
cause an explosive reaction
when impacted by a high veloc-
ity bullet.
Anyone with information on
this incident is asked to contact
the agencys Northeast Region
office at 675-1143.
Exploding target injures pair of SGL workers
The Times Leader staff
WalktoEndAlzheimers. SnoMountainSki Area,
Montage Mountain, Moosic. 10 a.m. Saturday.
822-9915 or alz.org.
Close Encounters with Birds of Prey. Ice House
Pavilion, Parking Lot #1, Tobyhanna State Park,
Coolbaugh Township. 12:30 p.m. Saturday. $5.
350-8798.
Do the Ten, a 10-mile team relay run to benefit
cancer wellness. Kirby Park, Wilkes-Barre. Sun-
day withregistrationat 7:30a.m. and event at 9
a.m. 714-8800.
McDade Trail Hike, five moderate-to-steep miles
along the Delaware River in Bushkill. Meet at
the Greater Scranton YMCA, 706 N. Blakely St.,
Dunmore. 9:15 a.m. Sunday. $8. 343-5144.
Y Cycle Sundays, a 12-mile group bicycle ride
along the Greater Hazleton Rail Trail. Helmets
mandatory. Meet in the parking lot at Laurel
and Juniper streets in Hazleton. 9:30 a.m. Sun-
day. 455-2046.
Devils Pulpit Hike, 6.5 difficult miles with the
Susquehanna Trailers. Meet at the Sears Auto-
motive Center, Wyoming Valley Mall, Wilkes-
Barre Township. 9:45 a.m. Sunday. 655-4979.
Tips and Tricks from Master Gardeners on pre-
paring your garden for the winter. Luzerne
County West Side Annex, 2009 Wyoming Ave.,
Forty Fort. 1 p.m. Wednesday. 825-1701.
Senior Citizen Outing, three moderate miles
along the Delaware in Martins Creek. Meet at
the Greater Scranton YMCA, 706 N. Blakely St.,
Dunmore. 9 a.m. Thursday. $8. 343-5144.
Wild Edible and Medicinal Plants, with wild-food
forager Nathaniel Whitmore. Endless Moun-
tains Nature Center, 280 Vosburg Road, Tunk-
hannock. 9 a.m. Thursday. $10. 836-3835.
Getting Jazzed About Juncos. Wild Birds Unlim-
ited, Dallas Shopping Center, Route 309. 6 p.m.
Thursday. Free. 675-9900.
OUTDOOR EVENS
PAGE 14C SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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ALMANAC
REGIONAL FORECAST
NATIONAL FORECAST
For more weather
information go to:
www.timesleader.com
National Weather Service
607-729-1597
Forecasts, graphs
and data 2012
Weather Central, LP
Yesterday 66/53
Average 64/44
Record High 87 in 1922
Record Low 26 in 1958
Yesterday 5
Month to date 20
Year to date 137
Last year to date 170
Normal year to date 211
*Index of fuel consumption, how far the days
mean temperature was below 65 degrees.
Precipitation
Yesterday 0.05
Month to date 0.97
Normal month to date 0.69
Year to date 28.32
Normal year to date 29.79
Susquehanna Stage Chg. Fld. Stg
Wilkes-Barre 1.09 -0.07 22.0
Towanda 0.58 NA 21.0
Lehigh
Bethlehem 3.07 0.75 16.0
Delaware
Port Jervis 3.36 0.06 18.0
Todays high/
Tonights low
TODAYS SUMMARY
Highs: 48-54. Lows: 35-37. Showers will
overspread the area today, then expect
partial clearing tonight.
The Poconos
Highs: 53-57. Lows: 40-46. Showers will
become likely today, before ending
tonight.
The Jersey Shore
Highs: 49-52. Lows: 32-40. Cloudy today
with a good chance of showers. Partly
cloudy and frosty tonight.
The Finger Lakes
Highs: 50-52. Lows: 36-41. Showers will be
likely today, then expect them to dimin-
ish overnight.
Brandywine Valley
Highs: 54-59. Lows: 40-48. Expect occa-
sional showers today, but they will end
early tonight.
Delmarva/Ocean City
Anchorage 50/46/.98 54/42/r 51/41/r
Atlanta 82/62/.00 67/49/pc 67/49/c
Baltimore 79/61/.00 52/40/sh 57/38/pc
Boston 78/59/.00 56/42/sh 57/44/pc
Buffalo 54/46/.66 50/40/sh 55/42/pc
Charlotte 82/56/.00 61/46/sh 62/42/sh
Chicago 49/34/.00 52/38/s 61/46/s
Cleveland 53/41/.40 50/37/sh 55/42/s
Dallas 57/51/.00 58/47/c 69/56/pc
Denver 36/31/.00 54/33/s 70/39/s
Detroit 50/39/.00 52/38/c 57/45/s
Honolulu 81/71/.00 84/72/s 84/71/pc
Houston 85/63/.00 69/55/c 77/59/c
Indianapolis 52/35/.00 52/32/pc 58/41/s
Las Vegas 87/69/.00 88/64/pc 89/64/pc
Los Angeles 75/63/.00 70/62/pc 66/60/pc
Miami 88/79/.00 88/77/t 88/78/t
Milwaukee 47/38/.00 52/37/s 61/47/s
Minneapolis 43/36/.00 55/38/s 65/43/pc
Myrtle Beach 81/63/.14 82/56/t 64/53/sh
Nashville 61/45/.71 58/40/pc 64/40/s
New Orleans 86/65/.00 75/58/pc 75/62/pc
Norfolk 84/61/.00 60/48/sh 58/51/sh
Oklahoma City 50/44/.00 56/35/c 68/52/s
Omaha 48/26/.00 58/34/s 70/43/s
Orlando 89/73/.00 89/71/t 89/71/t
Phoenix 92/71/.00 92/69/pc 93/70/pc
Pittsburgh 57/46/.11 49/35/sh 54/34/pc
Portland, Ore. 74/41/.00 75/44/s 72/47/s
St. Louis 51/38/.00 56/36/s 64/45/s
Salt Lake City 62/37/.00 64/40/s 70/46/s
San Antonio 77/66/.00 65/52/c 72/61/pc
San Diego 77/64/.00 71/63/pc 70/62/pc
San Francisco 69/56/.00 66/53/c 63/53/c
Seattle 73/46/.00 71/47/s 68/47/s
Tampa 86/73/.00 89/73/t 90/73/t
Tucson 90/63/.00 91/62/pc 90/61/pc
Washington, DC 80/63/.00 51/41/sh 57/39/c
City Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Yesterday Today Tomorrow
Amsterdam 59/45/.00 55/48/c 56/46/pc
Baghdad 102/73/.00 105/69/c 106/69/c
Beijing 77/48/.00 73/52/pc 77/52/pc
Berlin 64/43/.00 55/41/sh 55/43/pc
Buenos Aires 72/61/.00 64/56/sh 62/56/sh
Dublin 57/39/.00 51/46/c 56/48/c
Frankfurt 68/52/.00 56/43/pc 56/43/pc
Hong Kong 88/79/.00 84/72/pc 86/75/pc
Jerusalem 78/62/.01 77/60/s 75/61/s
London 59/46/.00 57/47/pc 53/46/sh
Mexico City 75/50/.00 72/46/t 71/49/pc
Montreal 61/48/.00 47/35/c 53/42/pc
Moscow 50/45/.00 54/42/sh 48/41/sh
Paris 66/55/.00 59/47/pc 60/53/sh
Rio de Janeiro 88/75/.00 88/67/s 88/68/pc
Riyadh 100/66/.00 97/72/s 95/71/s
Rome 77/54/.00 72/59/pc 78/60/pc
San Juan 88/77/.00 88/80/t 90/79/t
Tokyo 79/70/.00 73/59/pc 68/61/pc
Warsaw 70/54/.00 55/43/c 51/40/pc
City Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Yesterday Today Tomorrow
WORLD CITIES
River Levels, from 12 p.m. yesterday.
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sn-snow, sf-snowurries, i-ice.
Philadelphia
52/41
Reading
51/38
Scranton
Wilkes-Barre
54/37
53/37
Harrisburg
50/37
Atlantic City
56/46
New York City
57/45
Syracuse
52/39
Pottsville
51/34
Albany
54/39
Binghamton
Towanda
49/37
50/35
State College
51/34
Poughkeepsie
53/38
58/47
52/38
54/33
74/50
55/38
70/62
61/53
57/40
64/38
71/47
57/45
52/38
67/49
88/77
69/55
84/72
52/42
54/42
51/41
Sun and Moon
Sunrise Sunset
Today 7:07a 6:35p
Tomorrow 7:08a 6:33p
Moonrise Moonset
Today 11:42p 1:45p
Tomorrow none 2:24p
Last New First Full
Oct. 8 Oct. 15 Oct. 21 Oct. 29
Today's weather
may seem more
like a a day in
November since
the high temper-
ature forecast is
for what is nor-
mal on
November 7. Oh,
and that reminds
me, we don't
turn our clock
back one hour
until November
4. A patch of
light rain will
pass over our
area today, mak-
ing for measura-
ble rain on nine
of the past 12
days. When skies
turn clear after
midnight tonight,
frost will form in
the normally
colder spots out-
side of town.
Expect a good
deal of sunshine
on both Monday
and Tuesday
when many loca-
tions will be at
their peak of fall
color. This sure is
a beautiful time
of the year.
- Tom Clark
NATIONAL FORECAST: Showers will overspread the Mid-Atlantic states and Northeast today as low
pressure develops over the western Atlantic. Snow will likely mix in atop the higher elevations of the
Appalachians. Look for a few thunderstorms across central and southern Florida, with showers
affecting parts of southern Texas, as well.
Recorded at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Intl Airport
Temperatures
Heating Degree Days*
Precipitation
TODAY
Cloudy, cold with
light rain
MONDAY
Frost,
partly
sunny
57
37
WEDNESDAY
Some
sun, rain,
warmer
64
45
THURSDAY
Colder,
mostly
sunny
57
40
FRIDAY
Partly
sunny, a
shower
60
40
SATURDAY
Mostly
sunny
55
35
TUESDAY
Sunny
skies
63
36
52

40

C M Y K
BUSINESS S E C T I O N D
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012
timesleader.com
T
ony Liuzzo doesnt mind going
out on a limb, although he ac-
knowledges this years holiday
retail sales forecast is not a big risk. As
usual, the economics professor and
director of the MBA program at Wilkes
University was one of the first prognos-
ticators to make an educated guess at
how much more (its always more)
well spend in the season that can make
or break a retailers year. But at 3 per-
cent, the growth he sees is modest and
at the low end of the batch of predic-
tions released so far.
Naturally optimistic, Liuzzo cites
some good reasons to be upbeat, in-
cluding a calendar that allows the most
possible shopping days between the
traditional kickoff of Black Friday and
Christmas. While the holiday season
includes all of November and Decem-
ber, People dont get into a real buying
mood until after Thanksgiving, he
said.
Having 32 days between then and
Christmas, including five weekends,
gives shoppers more opportunity to
spend. Thats great for newspapers,
too, by the way, as they get five Sun-
days worth of advertising.
Retailers and publishers had better
make the most of it; next year the cal-
endar rolls over to make the season the
shortest possible 26 shopping days
and four weekends.
Liuzzos forecast for this year is
slightly less than in 2011, when he
predicted a 3.5 percent gain. In reality,
shoppers threw caution to the winds
and boosted their spending more than
4 percent. Still, that was a pretty good
guess after two recession years that
flummoxed nearly all forecasters.
In past years, Liuzzo has kept faith
with American consumers, but the
notes to this years forecast are larded
with cautions:
Consumer confidence is low be-
cause unemployment remains stub-
bornly high
The stock market, while perform-
ing well, still frightens many investors
Home prices continue to be de-
pressed
While interest rates are low, con-
sumer debt is still relatively high
Liuzzo and others see the conclusion
of a long and contentious election
campaign as positive. No matter who
wins, they say, at least the question of
who will be in the White House and
Congress will be settled and both busi-
nesses and consumers tend to pull in
the horns when faced with uncertainty.
Im not as confident well feel that
much better when we wake up on Nov.
7. The campaign and its distractions
have shifted the national conversation
away from serious financial challenges
at every level of government and a
financial services sector that continues
to pile on risk. If we Americans dont
face up to reality its certain that for-
eign buyers of our debt will send us a
sharp reminder that its time to get our
house in order.
But until then nearly everyone ex-
pects us to go on our merry, consum-
ing way, scouring the shelves for the
hot gift of the season. Liuzzo hasnt
tried to make that prediction in the
past, but a grad assistants research led
him to list a reinvented, high-tech
Furby and the iPad Mini, a version that
could be a hit with kids, as the must-
have gifts this season.
Only time will tell how madly we
rush to the mall for them, or instead
hold tightly to our wallets in the face of
conflicting and at best mediocre
economic news. Some restraint would
be a sign the public senses its time to
move away from consumption as an
economic model. That would conflict
with the desperate attempts by big
business and government to go back to
the future, a direction that seems like a
wrong turn.
RON BARTIZEK
B U S I N E S S L O C A L
Will shoppers
signal change
in direction?
Ron Bartizek, Times Leader business editor,
may be reached at rbartizek@timeslead-
er.com or 570-970-7157.
IM A HUGE fan of
Annies Homegrown
products. From the
tasty cheddar bunnies
to bunny-shaped maca-
roni and cheese, I cant
say that Ive ever had a
product from Annies that I didnt
enjoy. And now I cant wait to enjoy
the companys newest food line: Rising
Crust Frozen Pizza made with organic
ingredients.
Available in three flavors Uncured
Pepperoni, Four Cheese and BBQ
Recipe Chicken the pizza is sold in
family size and has entered the local
market where its sold in Shop Rite
grocery stores. The closest ones to
Luzerne County are in Daleville, Lack-
awanna County and in Mount Pocono,
Monroe County.
If Annies other products are any
indication, it might be worth the drive.
And a coupon for a free one would
certainly make it worth the trek.
So if youre the first person to send
me an email to aseder@timeslead-
er.com with Annies in the subject
line and your name, address and the
correct answer to this trivia question,
you will have a free pizza coupon
mailed to you. The question is: What
is Annies Inc.s four-letter stock sym-
bol on the New York Stock Exchange?
The winner will be announced in this
column next Sunday.
Head to Subway for breakfast this
month and buy a 6-inch sub and a
drink before 9 a.m. and get another
6-inch sub of equal or lesser value for
free.
Price Chopper has two coupon dou-
blers on the front of its circular inside
todays Times Leader. There are plen-
ty of coupons in todays coupon sec-
tions that can be used. Among them is
the $1 off two Aussie hair products,
which are on sale for $2.50 each. So
grab two for $3 when you use the
coupon and doubler.
Another deal is to use the $1 off two
Betty Crocker 17.5 ounce cookie mix
pouches, which are on sale for $2 each.
Get two packs for $2 when you use the
doubler. Betty Crocker frosting also is
on sale for $1.99 and the coupon can
be used for two of them as well.
Not to be outdone, Weis has a $5 off
a $50 purchase coupon on the front of
its circular. Make sure you use it and
also use the $1.50 off two Tyson
bagged chicken strips coupon since
the product is on a buy-one, get-one-
free sale this week.
Shur Save markets has Mrs. Ts
pierogies on sale for $1.88 a box. Use
the $1 off two Whole Grain types cou-
pon to get two boxes for $2.76. Just
make sure you get the whole grain
kind.
No coupon needed for this deal at
Rite Aid. Arizona iced tea 23-ounce
cans are buy-one, get-one-free. So, too,
are tons of other products throughout
the store; check out the circular to see
all the BOGO offers.
Pierogies and BBQ chicken: These deals are making me hungry
Andrew M. Seder, a Times Leader staff
writer, may be reached at 829-7269. Follow
him on Twitter @TLAndrewSeder If you
know of any local steals or deals, send them
to aseder@timesleader.com
ANDREW M. SEDER
S T E A L S & D E A L S
BADE, Taiwan On a November
afternoon two years ago, a taxi
pulled up to the gate of Ta Liang
Technology, one of countless nonde-
script companies that make up the
global gadget supply chain.
Sitting in the back seat was an
American wearing a T-shirt, shorts,
sandals and carrying a backpack,
looking like a tourist who took a
wrong turn in this town south of Tai-
pei that has few English speakers.
But the passengers business card
needed no translation: Supply Base
Engineer,
Asia Procure-
ment Oper-
ations Ap-
ple.
The un-
scheduled vis-
it, a glimpse of
Apples global
supply chain
in motion, set
off a scramble.
Within min-
utes, the Ap-
ple rep was
sipping coffee
with Ta
Liangs chair-
man and oth-
er executives,
who were pre-
sented with a
technological challenge that could
lead to a sizable contract.
Apples massive supply chain is
what enabled the record-breaking
rollout of the iPhone 5 in Septem-
ber; more than 5 million units were
sold by the end of its first weekend.
While the Cupertino, Calif.-based
company outsources component
production to numerous corners of
the globe, Taiwan is at the center of
the Apple manufacturing ecosys-
tem.
The island is packed with aggres-
sive and nimble companies vying to
provide under-the-cover but critical
technology that ensures that Apples
latest gadgets arrive on the global
stage by the millions at Apples com-
mand. And Taiwans importance is
apt to grow if Apple shifts the pro-
duction of its iPhone chips from
MCT PHOTO
At center, the horizontal blue
strip is an example of an ani-
sotropic conductive film manu-
factured by TeamChem used to
link two printed circuits, at the
TeamChem facility in Bade,
Taiwan.
See APPLE, Page 2D
The island is
packed with ag-
gressive and
nimble companies
vying to provide
under-the-cover
but critical tech-
nology that en-
sures that Ap-
ples latest gad-
gets arrive on
the global stage
by the millions at
Apples command.
Secrets
behind
Apple
By JOHN BOUDREAU
San Jose Mercury News
F
inding it difficult to locate skilled workers, a
local high-tech company has turned to its Ger-
manheritage andstartedanapprenticeship pi-
lot program at its local facility in Duryea.
Schott North America Inc. a maker of special-
ized glass products used in scientific and industrial appli-
cations, has hiredninepeopletoparticipateinamulti-year
apprenticeship program at its plant along York Avenue.
The program, which has been
used in Schotts home country of
Germany for decades, seeks to find
candidates with certain skill sets
that can be brought in, receive on-
the-job, hands-on training and be
hired full-time once the apprentice-
ship is complete.
Anne Marie Martin, a human re-
sources specialist with Schott, came
to Duryea from the companys oper-
ations in Germany to organize and
establish the apprenticeship pro-
gram in the United States.
She saidPennsylvania CareerLink
and the Office of Veterans Affairs
helped find candidates. More than
250people applied, many fromas far
away as Hawaii and New Mexico.
But Martin said the goal was to
hire local people and to make sure
military veterans were among the
apprentices.
We really wanted to invest in
the local community, Martin
said. The interest in veterans
comes from experience that
shows oftentimes veterans,
through their military training,
have a head start on some of the
skills that are needed to work as a
glass operator generalist, a ma-
son-metalsmithor a maintenance-
machinist, the three apprentice-
SCHOTT apprentice Christopher Coaty of
Kingston examines a glass corner cube for
laser rangefinding at the plant in Duryea.
BILL TARUTIS PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Supervisor Kevin McAndrew, center, gives a tour to apprentices during orientation at the Schott North America Re-
search & Development Center in Duryea on Thursday afternoon.
SCHOTT NORTH AMERICA,
INC. GIVES AREA RESIDENTS
THE OPPRTUNITY OF
A LIFETIME THROUGH
APPRENTICESHIP
By ANDREW M. SEDER aseder@timesleader.com
THE LUCKY NINE
See SCHOTT, Page 2D
D
URYEA -- John Steckman IV was
working at Kmart in Edwardsville.
JeremiaNgolowas employedat Sal-
lieMaeinHanover Township. AndLandon
Montewasself-employed. All sawtheirjobs
as just the latest stoponthe jobcarousel.
Thencamewordthat Schott GlassinDu-
ryea, oneof theregions high-techmanufac-
turingcompaniesthathasahistoryofhiring
people that wind up staying for decades,
was launching a new apprenticeship pro-
gram.
The three men, and about 250 others,
jumped at the opportunity and applied for
consideration. This week, Steckman, Ngo-
lo, Monteandsixotherswill report fortheir
shift at the plant alongYorkAvenue.
The company gave preferences in the se-
lection process to veterans, which includes
MonteandNgolo, andsons or daughters of
current employees, of whom Steckman is
one. The rest have no military background
or relationship with a current Schott em-
ployee.
ITS LIKE HITTING
THE LOTTERY
By ANDREW M. SEDER
aseder@timesleader.com
See APPRENTICE, Page 2D
PAGE 2D SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
B U S I N E S S
WOMEN IN BUSINESS LUN-
CHEON: Tuesday,noon-1 p.m.,
Genettis, 77 W. Market St.,
Wilkes-Barre. Topic: The Cre-
ative Process at Work. $15 for
Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber
members and guests. Reserve by
email at dsedor@wilkes-
barre.org or call 823-2101, ext.
125.
COMMUNICATION EXCELLENCE
TRAINING: Wednesday, 9 a.m.-4
p.m., Top of the 80s, Sugarloaf
Township. Topics include com-
munication challenges in todays
workplace, characteristics of
effective business messages,
practicing ethical communi-
cations, designing and delivering
oral presentations, negotiation
skills and having the "hard to
have" discussions. Course com-
pletion will earn six General
HRCI recertification credits. The
cost is $145 for Northeast Penn-
sylvania Manufacturers and
Employers Association members
and $290 for nonmembers. For
information or to register, call
622-0992 or email crob-
bins@maea.biz.
HOLIDAY SALES OPPORTUNI-
TIES: Wednesday, 1 1:45 a.m.-1
p.m., Stone Hedge Golf Course in
Tunkhannock. Executives from
Condron and Company advertis-
ing agency will address holiday
sales opportunities. To reserve
seats, call 875-8325 or by email
Deborah@wyccc.com. Seating
limited to one representative per
business.
DRESS FOR SUCCESS FUN-
DRAISER: Thursday, 5:30 p.m.,
Rodanos on Public Square,
Wilkes-Barre. Wine and appetizer
reception jewelry and prizes
donated by local merchants.
Continues with a clothing sale
through Sunday. For more in-
formation, call 270-4949.
NETWORKING MIXER: Oct. 17,
5:30-7:30 p.m., Community
Regional Credit Union, 548
Wyoming Ave., Kingston. Free for
Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber
members and guests; others $10.
Reserve by email at dse-
dor@wilkes-barre.org or call
823-2101, ext. 125.
DISCOVERY BREAKFAST: Oct. 18,
8-9 a.m., Top of the 80s, Sugar-
loaf Township. Participants will
receive an overview of the ser-
vices available to Northeast
Pennsylvania Manufacturers and
Employers Association member
companies. Free, but registration
required; call 570-622-0992 or
email gwhalen@maea.biz.
BUILDING INDUSTRY ASSN.
AWARDS DINNER: Oct. 20, 5
p.m., Mohegan Sun at Pocono
Downs. The Keystone Awards
recognize local building industry
professionals and associates.
$75 per person. For information
and reservations, call Donna
Moscatelli at 287-3331.
BUSINESS AGENDA
Send announcements of upcoming
events by email to tlbusiness@time-
sleader.com; by mail to Business
Agenda, Times Leader, 15 N. Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA1871 1 or by fax to
829-5537. Include a contact phone
number and email address. The
submission deadline is Wednesday
for publication on Sunday.
Fidelity Bank has earned a four-
star Excellent rating from
Bauer Financial, an independent
rating company analyzing and
reporting on the performance of
U.S. banks and credit unions
since 1983. Financial institutions
that earn a four-star rating from
Bauer Financial are placed on
the Bauer Financial Recom-
mended Report.
Anthony C. Dougalas, R.Ph, has
been presented with the Cardi-
nal Health Generation Rx Cham-
pions Award
by the Penn-
sylvania
Pharmacists
Association.
This award
was spon-
sored by the
Cardinal
Health Foun-
dation. Dou-
galas, of Mountain Top, is the
owner of The Medicine Shoppe
in Nanticoke.
Adam C. Welch, PharmD, MBA,
BCACP, Mountain Top, has been
awarded the
2012 Pharma-
cist of the
Year Award by
the Penn-
sylvania
Pharmacists
Association.
Welch is
currently
serving as an
associate
professor at the Wilkes Uni-
versity Nesbitt College of Phar-
macy.
The Rev. Patrick Sullivan, C.S.C.,
has been named to the 2012
Labor 50 List published by The
Irish Echo
newspaper.
The list is an
annual effort
to honor 50
leading Irish
American
men and
women active
in the labor
movement
and reflecting on the work of
those who paved the way to
labors central role in contempo-
rary American life.
HONORS
AND AWARDS
Welch
Sullivan Dougalas
UPSTATE SHREDDING-BEN
WEITSMAN
John Silva, 20-year marine scrap
metal veteran, has joined the
company as vice president of
port operations. Upstate Shred-
ding Ben Weitsman, with a
facility in Scranton, was recently
ranked one of the largest scrap
companies in North America by
Recycling Today and was an
AMM finalist for scrap company
of the year (both public and
private).
MEDICO INDUSTRIES, INC.
Phil Medico, Wilkes-Barre, has
been named Associate of the
Year by NUCA of Pennsylvania.
Medico received a Bachelor of
Science degree from the Uni-
versity of Scranton and then was
awarded a graduate fellowship
toward his masters in biochem-
istry, also at the University of
Scranton.
FNCB
Attorney Mary Griffin Cummings,
Swoyersville, has been named
senior vice
president and
general coun-
sel, as well as
a member of
the companys
senior man-
agement
team.
CORPORATE LADDER
Griffin Cummings
Q: One of my employees fre-
quently wears clothing that is
too small and too tight. Al-
though we have a written dress
code, Rachel has apparently
decided to ignore it. Both cus-
tomers and co-workers have
commented on the amount of
skin and cleavage she displays.
I asked Rachel if she would
like some assistance in selecting
suitable outfits for the office, but
she said no. Now I cant decide
whether I should make the dress
code more specific, send her
home tochange, or just write her
up. What would you suggest?
A: As Rachels boss, you have
every right to clearly define ap-
propriate office attire and see
that she complies. But this par-
ticular option seems to be mis-
sing fromyour list of possible ac-
tions. Somewhere between ask-
ing if she would like assistance
and writing her up is a more
logical strategy: Firmly describe
your expectations, then follow
up with ongoing feedback.
For example: Rachel, we
need to talk about appropriate
dress for the office. Any outfit
that exposes a lot of skin be-
tween your shoulders and knees
is not acceptablebecauseit looks
unprofessional. For instance, the
shirt youarewearingtodayis too
low-cut for work, but the dress
you wore yesterday was fine. To
be sure these expectations are
clear, lets discuss some other ex-
amples.
From then on, if Rachel dress-
es inappropriately, immediately
send her home to change. But
whenshe makes correct clothing
choices, acknowledge her good
judgment. When attempting to
change an employees behavior,
managers need to not only cor-
rect missteps, but also praise
progress.
Q: My co-worker, Ted, some-
times leaves the office for two or
three hours in the middle of the
day. When I refused to cover for
him, he became angry and retal-
iated by telling the owner that I
didnt have enough work to do.
Since the owner believes every
word Ted says, she decided to in-
crease my workload. Now Im
overwhelmed, but I dont know
what to do about it. By the way,
Ted is the owners nephew.
A: Your last sentence contains
the most pertinent fact about
this situation, because family
businesses have some unique
characteristics. For one thing,
relatives almost always have
greater influence and flexibility
than other employees. There-
fore, even though it may not
seemfair, the odds are good that
Teds aunt will continue to favor
him in the future.
This does not mean that you
must suffer insilence, but it does
meanthat youshouldavoidcom-
plaining about Ted. So instead of
trying to settle the score with
your vindictive colleague, calm-
ly explain to the owner howyour
unmanageableworkloadis creat-
ing business problems. Provide
meaningful examples, then pro-
pose a reasonable solution.
If these family dynamics be-
come too frustrating, you can al-
ways start looking for a more
conventional place to work. But
if you choose to stay with this
company, just remember that
getting along with Ted will be an
ongoing job requirement.
OFFICE COACH
Provide clear guidance on dress code
Marie G. McIntyre is a workplace
coach and the author of Secrets to
Winning at Office Politics. Send in
questions and get free coaching tips
at www.yourofficecoach.com.
By MARIE G. MCINTYRE
McClatchy-Tribune News Service
NEWYORKGlenn Bridges
can tell that the market for home
remodeling is picking up
when hes hanging cabinets or
laying a floor in a customers
house, a next-door neighbor is
bound to knock on the door and
ask if hes available for another
project.
Theyll look at his handiwork
and then say, we have some-
thing were interested in doing,
Bridges says. Its quite uplift-
ing.
The collapse of the housing
market decimated contractors
like Bridges, most of whom are
small businesses with just a
handful of employees. But many
are seeing business improve as
home sales slowly recover and
homeowners who had put off
projects during the recession are
feeling better about the econo-
my. Still, the improvement is
gradual and projects arent typi-
cally as lucrative as they were
back when homeowners were
able to borrow against a large
amount of equity intheir houses.
Bridges was so optimistic
about the remodeling market
that in February that he restart-
ed the contracting business he
was forced to shut down in 2007.
When he closed, he had to lay off
his three full-time workers. But
at the start of 2012, things began
to change.
I had people that needed
work done and all in one week-
end they said to me, why dont
you help me ... why dont you get
active again? says Bridges,
owner of Eagle Ridge Contractor
Services in Naples, Fla. He had
spent the intervening years
working on projects with other
business owners.
Hes worked steadily since
February, installing new kitch-
ens and bathrooms that range
from $10,000 to $25,000. He
hired one full-time worker when
he started his business again and
says he may take on as many as
three more if business is good
enough. And hes optimistic that
it will be, because hes getting
more requests for bids on pro-
jects.
Bridges isnt alone. Sales of
previously occupied homes are
up more than 9 percent this year,
and spending on residential con-
struction has risen 16 percent.
People who track housing trends
see signs that remodeling is on
the rise and that the improve-
ment will continue. HarvardUni-
versitys LeadingIndicator of Re-
modeling Activity suggests that
annual homeowner improve-
ment spending could rise 12.2
percent in the first quarter of
2013, up from levels reached in
the first three months of 2012.
SMALL TALK
Remodeling resurgence boosts sales for contractors
By JOYCE M. ROSENBERG
AP Business Writer
AP PHOTO
Carpenter Nick Rossi, of New-
ton, Mass., a contractor who
does home remodeling and
renovations, works at a home
in Watertown, Mass.
For thosechosenfor theapprentice-
ship, whichincludespay, benefits, paid
college courses and almost guaran-
teed placement in a full-time position
at Schott, the opportunity is still sink-
ingin.
Its like hitting the lottery for me,
said Ngolo, 37, an Army veteran and
resident of Nanticoke.
Steckman, whoat19istheyoungest
of the apprentices, realizes that he
could be one of the few Americans in
his generation with the potential to
workhisentireadult lifeat onecompa-
ny thanks to the program. He said too
often people his age have trouble find-
ing jobs and head to college, accumu-
late student loans and then still might
not be able tofindworkintheir field.
The Edwardsville resident, whose
father has worked at Schott for seven
months, knows hes lucky to be in the
situation he is and said hes honored
tohavebeenchosentobepartof what
he calledThe AmericanDream.
While the initiative is a plum to
those involved, the company initiated
to anticipate looming retirements
from its staff of 260. That progressive
thinking demonstrated to Monte that
thecompanyhesnowaffiliatedwithis
onthe ball.
Theyhadverygoodforesight tobe
able to see that theyre going to have
difficulties soonandits toour bene-
fit perfectly, Monte, 29, of Dallas,
said. The fact the companys willing
tointertwine its future withmine says
a lot.
The apprentices will focus most of
their time onone of three disciplines --
glass operator generalist, mason-met-
alsmith or maintenance-machinist
but will also be cross-trained so they
will be able tobe assignedtowhichev-
erdepartmentismostinneedinthefu-
ture.
For Ngolo, whowas doingfinancial-
related work at Sallie Mae when the
Schott opportunity arose, the chance
at a career he could see himself in for
the rest of his life left himat a loss for
adequatewordstoexpresshisfeelings.
In this valley, there are not many
jobs like this or opportunities. You
cantbeatthis,hesaid. Hecreditedhis
militarybackgroundandthevaluesys-
tem it taught him for giving him an
edge.
So too did Monte who said hes
banking the rest of my life on this
program. Its an absolutely amazing
opportunity.
APPRENTICE
Continued from Page 1D
ship paths Schott offers.
Schott accomplished both goals. Of the
nine apprentices brought on, all are from
Luzerne County and three are veterans.
Martin said the company will use what
it learns in Duryea to establish programs
at its four other Schott facilities in the
U.S., including a plant in Lebanon early
next year.
Securing the future success of Schotts
U.S. businesses played a big role in bring-
ing the program stateside.
Sandra Herman, Schotts assistant
manager for human resources at its Du-
ryea site, said a pending tidal wave of like-
ly retirements is what really started the
company down this path at this time
stateside.
Of the Duryea complexs approximate-
ly 260 employees who have an average
of 30 years of service Herman estimated
30 percent will retire inthe next five years
and 60 percent will be gone in a decade.
Somebody whos workedhere 20 years
is really a junior employee, Herman
joked.
Of the nine apprentices selected, Her-
man admitted that none would have been
hired had they applied to a job posting.
But thats not a knock on the nine, its
more anindicationof the lackof high-tech
job skills being taught in the region.
A lot of the schools, a lot of the pro-
grams have been eliminated, Herman
said. Theres not many people going into
manufacturing training.
Withinthe past twoyears 30 employees
have been hired, though only a third are
from this area.
Most local people dont even apply be-
cause they dont have the knowledge or
skills were looking for, Herman said.
Christine Jensen, director of the Ca-
reerLink office in Wilkes-Barre, had high
praise for the programandsaidshe hoped
other local companies would follow
Schotts lead.
Its really forward thinking and proac-
tive and companies should be doing more
of this, although we should also be edu-
cating our students at a very young age
about the need to learn some of these
skills, Jensen said.
The Schott site in Duryea is a union
shop and Herman said the UFCW Local
1776 agreed to the apprenticeship pro-
gram, though the apprentices will not be
unionized. Herman said the union realiz-
es their ranks will be depleted soon and
they need to start thinking about their fu-
ture, too.
Many high school and college gradu-
ates are struggling to find a good job with
a living wage, said Martin. Too many
are caught in the Catch-22 that is often
thehiringprocess; tofindwork, theyneed
experience, but they can only gain experi-
ence from working. Schotts apprentice-
ship program slices through this contra-
diction and offers nine trainees an oppor-
tunity to learn a valuable trade while
working full time with benefits. At the
same time, Schott gains a newgeneration
of skilled workers to build on our 125
years of producing the worlds top glasses
and materials, and advanced technolo-
gies.
SCHOTT
Continued from Page 1D
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Glassmaker John Orluk, right, describes
a quality control examination of corner
cubes used in laser rangefinding to
apprentices during their first week of
orientation.
Samsung, with whom Apple is
engaged in a patent war, to Tai-
wan Semiconductor Manufac-
turing, which industry insiders
here believe will happen soon.
Apples supply networkis per-
haps the most sophisticated in
the world, said Creative Strate-
gies President Tim Bajarin.
Many people have heard of
Taiwan-based Foxconn, whose
factories across China employ
more than a million workers to
assemble everything from Mac-
Books to iPads. But it is off-the-
radar-screen companies like Ta
Liang that Apple consistently re-
lies onto figure out hard-to-solve
production problems on tight
deadlines. Acontract with Apple
can send a suppliers stock share
soaring or even represent
most of its revenue.
But working with Apple is not
easy. Its engineers are uncom-
promising, and it imposes a code
of silence enforcedwithfinancial
penalties for product leaks. And
its history of cutting suppliers in
a heartbeat helps create a love-
hate relationship between Ap-
ple and the companies that build
its products, said Stephen Su,
general director of Taiwans In-
dustrial Technology Research
Institute, who used to work for a
company that supplies camera
modules for iPhones, iPads and
MacBooks.
Apple does not co-invest in a
newtechnology with a supplier,
he said. And they are not pa-
tient. Can you do it? If not, I will
go to another supplier.
Accordingtoa report Apple re-
leased earlier this year, the com-
pany relies on 156 official prod-
uct and components suppliers,
about a third of which are based
in Taiwan. But the report doesnt
include companies like Ta Liang
Technology, whichsays about 20
percent of its business is derived
from building sophisticated fac-
tory machines that produce Ap-
ple products. Nor does it include
TeamChem, a 17-employee star-
tup also in Bade that makes
chemical coatings for circuit
boards for Foxconn.
We are just a tiny screwin the
machine, said Todd Yeh, Team-
Chem chairman.
But the small screw remains
on Apples radar screen. An Ap-
ple engineer called to inquire
about TeamChems new conduc-
tive adhesive technology that,
amongother things, wouldallow
chips to be mounted directly on
an iPhone circuit board, elimi-
nating the need for tiny sockets.
This would lower manufactur-
ing costs, increase the speed at
which the devices roll off as-
sembly lines and allow them to
be even thinner. The adhesive,
which has yet to be mass-pro-
duced, could also be used on
flexible circuit boards for future
devices with flexible panels.
As long as Apple remains on
top, companies will dojust about
anythingtoworkwithit, Susaid.
He recalled traveling to Cali-
fornia a few years ago to make a
product proposal. He arrived at
San Francisco International Air-
port from Taipei in the after-
noon, drove to Apples campus
for a one-hour meeting, then re-
turned to the airport for a mid-
night flight back to Taiwan a
common practice among suppli-
ers.
Apples willingness to cut sup-
pliers looseonamoments notice
could ultimately damage the
companys global supply chain
should it lose its competitive
edge, Su said. If that were to hap-
pen, many suppliers might first
line up behind other companies
with whom they have enjoyed
long-term relationships, poten-
tially making it more difficult for
Apple to find partners, he said.
For now, though, Apple calls
the shots. And suppliers willing-
ly follow.
APPLE
Continued from Page 1D
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 PAGE 3D
B U S I N E S S
MarketPulse
COMEBACK
A ghost of Christmas past is trying for a comeback: Hasbro (HAS) is
once again selling the Furby toy this holiday season. The bird-like
gizmo was one of the original must-have toys in 1998, and financial
analysts say it will likely be
a hit again.
But that wont be
enough for Hasbro to be
this seasons winner, says
Sterne Agee analyst
Margaret Whitfield. She
says Mattel (MAT) has
more potential winners,
including a new line of
Barbie construction toys.
Revenue for both
companies was weaker in
the first six months of 2012
than in the first half of
2011.
TIS THE SEASON
Its the most wonderful time of the year for investors. The fourth
quarter has traditionally been the best for stocks not only in the
U.S. but emerging markets as well, according to S&P Capital IQ.
The S&P 500 has had an
average monthly return of
0.8 percent in the fourth
quarter, going back to
1900. That compares with
an average of 0.5 percent
in the other three quar-
ters. Emerging market
stocks dont have as long
a track record, but the
MSCI Emerging Markets
index has been even bet-
ter. It has had a 1.9 per-
cent monthly average re-
turn during the fourth
quarter since 1988.
AP
SPOOKY
October has historically been a decent month for stocks, with
an average gain of 0.4 percent over the last 84 years. But
when the market has a
bad day during October,
it can be really bad.
Five of the 10 worst
days in the history of
the Standard & Poors
500 index have come
during October. The
headliner is Black Mon-
day, when the index
plunged 20.5 percent
on Oct. 19, 1987. More
recently, the index fell 9
percent four years ago
during the depths of the
recession amid the fi-
nancial crisis. Source: S&P Capital IQ Source: S&P Dow Jones Indices
Top 4Q emerging markets
Average monthly return, 4Q
10 worst days for the S&P 500
One day change
Mexico
Taiwan
Brazil
Russia
Turkey 4.7%
3.5
2.6
2.3
2.0
Nov. 15, 1908
Oct. 18, 1937
Sept 3, 1946
Nov. 6, 1929
April 16, 1935
March 18, 1935
Nov 16, 1935
Oct. 29, 1929
Oct. 28, 1929
Oct.19, 1987 -20.5%
-12.3
-10.2
-10.1
-10.1
-10.0
-9.9
-9.9
-9.3
-9.0
Title: President of Causeway
Capital Management
What he suggests: Stocks are
better buys than bonds
Answers edited for content and
clarity.
Harry Hartford
Surging stock prices can make
value investors nervous. They
like to buy stocks when theyre
cheap, and an ebullient market
makes good buys tougher to find.
But Harry Hartford says they still
exist, even though markets around
the world have jumped 20 percent
over the last 12 months. His firm
manages $16 billion in assets,
and its flagship mutual fund is the
Causeway International Value fund
(CIVVX), which has Morningstars
gold rating. Its biggest holding is
British American Tobacco.
Are you surprised stocks have
done so well given the long list
of worries, from the U.S. fiscal
cliff to Europes debt crisis to
Chinas slowing growth?
All of these things are out there,
yet the S&P 500 on a total-return
basis is at an all-time high. To
me, the primary reason why that
is the case is that equities arent
expensive.
Still, even after the run up?
Still. In aggregate, U.S. stocks
are trading at 12 or 13 times their
earnings. Non-U.S. developed
market stocks are on 10 or 11
times earnings. Thats not an
overly demanding valuation.
Even if you dont believe
earnings will keep growing?
Even if you dont believe the
earnings. In the case of non-U.S.
stocks, lets assume earnings fall
by 30 percent. That would put
them at 13 or 14 times earnings.
That would still only be at the
average over the last 20 years.
In addition to that, as an inves-
tor, the thing that worries me most
is when investors are complacent.
When investors are complacent,
theyre going to misprice risk.
Its the mispricing of that risk
that creates the problem. Today,
investors are nervous. If investors
are pricing risk correctly, then the
risk of a bubble is much reduced.
Some say a bubble is forming
in dividend stocks, because
investors are scrambling for
yield amid low interest rates.
Stocks in the United States that
investors have gravitated toward
as a substitute for bonds, they are
expensive relative to their history.
But its less so overseas, nowhere
near the shift that has occurred
here.
Why is that?
If you take the Anglo Saxon world
out of the equation, stock as an
asset class is actually quite small.
Germany is less than 5 percent
of the world developed markets
by market capitalization. France
is about 5 percent in market cap.
Together, theyre about half the
size of the U.S. population, yet
the U.S. is about 45 percent of
the worlds market value.
So theres a less developed
equity culture outside the U.S. So
when a U.S. investor sees that
their yield on the 10-year Treasury
is fading below 2 percent, theyre
willing to buy an asset that is
deemed to be higher risk in the
form of an equity. That is less
developed overseas.
Global
values
InsiderQ&A
AP
Stan Choe; J. Paschke AP Source: Morningstar Data through Oct. 3 *Annualized
Big value funds
small
In a quest to find the next Apple, many investors
are drawn to the stocks of young and small, but
fast-growing, companies.
But theres another group of small-cap
stocks to consider: value stocks.
Theyre not as sexy but have
provided the best long-term returns.
Noted finance professors
Eugene Fama and Kenneth French
define value stocks as those with
low stock prices relative to their
book value, which is how much
accountants estimate the company is
worth. Their research shows that
smaller stocks have historically offered
better long-term returns than bigger stocks,
and value stocks have outperformed growth
stocks. From 1927 through 2011, small-cap
value stocks had an annualized return of
13.5 percent, versus 9 percent for large-cap
growth stocks.
That phenomenon is echoed in mutual fund
returns. Small-cap value stock funds have posted an
average annual return of 10 percent over the last
decade. Thats better than any large-cap, mid-cap or
other category of value-stock fund.
One possible reason for the outperfor-
mance points to risk. Small companies
can be riskier than large ones
because they have less access to
financing and less diverse customer
bases. So when problems arise,
they may struggle more.
Value stocks, meanwhile, are
often inexpensive because they
are out of favor with investors. That
could be because they have
substantial debt or are trying to turn
around their operations.
That means investors are rewarded
with higher long-term returns in
exchange for taking on more risk. So
its key to think long-term. Last year, for
example, small-cap value stock funds lost an
average 4.5 percent, compared with a return of 2.1
percent for the Standard & Poors 500 index.
Target Small Capitalization Value (TASVX) 31.4% 3.1% 12.3% 0.71%
Consulting Group Small Cap Value (TSVUX) 39.4 5.4 12.2 0.95
American Beacon Small Cap Value (AASVX) 39.6 2.5 11.7 0.56
Berwyn (BERWX) 42.9 4.7 11.6 1.21
Queens Road Small Cap Value (QRSVX) 14.9 2.5 10.7 1.24
Average small-cap value fund 36.1 1.7 10.4 1.47
1-YR FUND 5-YR* 10-YR*
EXPENSE
RATIO
TOTAL RETURN
For the long haul:
These small-cap
value stock funds
have at least a
four-star rating from
Morningstar and
lower expenses than
the category average.
12.3%
12.2
11.7
11.6
10.7
10.4
Air Products APD 72.26 6 92.79 83.90 1.20 1.5 s s -1.5 +9.19 4 -0.6 15 3.1
Amer Water Works AWK 28.34 9 39.38 37.24 0.18 0.5 t s 16.9+30.66 227.1a 19 2.7
Amerigas Part LP APU 37.00 8 46.47 43.75 0.09 0.2 s s -4.7 +5.83 4 9.6 ... 7.3
Aqua America Inc WTR 20.16 8 26.93 24.96 0.20 0.8 t t 13.2+21.71 3 3.1 22 2.8
Arch Dan Mid ADM 23.69 5 33.98 28.21 1.03 3.8 s t -1.4+14.86 3 -1.2 15 2.5
AutoZone Inc AZO 307.16 9399.10 381.29 11.62 3.1 s s 17.3+20.12 3 25.1 17 ...
Bank of America BAC 4.92 9 10.10 9.32 0.49 5.5 s s 67.6+62.22 1-25.2 10 0.4
Bk of NY Mellon BK 17.10 9 24.95 23.42 0.80 3.5 s s 17.6+30.96 2-10.1 13 2.2
Bon Ton Store BONT 2.23 7 14.99 10.96 1.46 15.4 t s 225.2+125.45 1-13.4 ... 1.8
CVS Caremark Corp CVS 32.28 0 49.16 48.86 0.44 0.9 s s 19.8+48.70 1 5.5 17 1.3
Cigna Corp CI 38.79 0 49.89 48.85 1.68 3.6 s s 16.3+17.52 3 -1.5 11 0.1
CocaCola Co KO 31.67 8 41.25 38.58 0.65 1.7 s t 10.3+20.80 3 8.1 20 2.6
Comcast Corp A CMCSA 19.72 0 36.90 36.54 0.96 2.7 s s 54.1+71.71 1 9.7 21 1.8
Community Bk Sys CBU 21.86 9 29.50 28.41 0.22 0.8 t s 2.2+24.30 3 9.7 14 3.8
Community Hlth Sys CYH 14.61 0 30.00 28.96 -0.18 -0.6 s s 66.0+83.99 1 -1.9 10 ...
Energy Transfer Eqty ETE 30.78 0 46.07 45.75 0.55 1.2 s s 12.7+46.26 1 10.6 28 5.5
Entercom Comm ETM 4.61 7 8.64 7.37 0.51 7.4 s s 19.8+30.67 2-17.3 10 ...
Fairchild Semicond FCS 10.25 5 15.90 12.97 -0.15 -1.1 t t 7.7+12.20 3 -6.9 22 ...
Frontier Comm FTR 3.06 5 7.15 4.77 -0.14 -3.0 s s -7.410.43 4 -8.9 30 8.4
Genpact Ltd G 11.76 0 17.70 17.42 0.74 4.4 s s 32.5+33.74 2 3.1 23 1.0
Harte Hanks Inc HHS 6.16 2 10.24 6.70 -0.23 -3.3 t t -26.319.78 5-15.8 ... 5.1
Heinz HNZ 48.54 9 58.31 57.09 1.14 2.0 s s 5.6+18.90 3 7.4 19 3.6
Hershey Company HSY 55.32 9 73.42 71.49 0.63 0.9 t t 15.7+24.45 3 11.4 24 2.1
Lowes Cos LOW 18.55 0 32.29 31.77 1.53 5.1 s s 25.2+63.88 1 3.0 21 2.0
M&T Bank MTB 66.40 0 98.14 98.51 3.35 3.5 s s 29.0+44.58 2 0.9 18 2.8
McDonalds Corp MCD 83.74 4102.22 91.00 -0.75 -0.8 r s -9.3 +9.29 4 12.8 17 3.4
Mondelez Intl MDLZ 20.86 0 28.48 27.81 1.16 4.4 s s 13.8+32.69 2 7.1 ... 1.9
NBT Bncp NBTB 17.47 8 24.10 22.15 0.08 0.4 s s 0.1+18.48 3 2.0 13 3.6
Nexstar Bdcstg Grp NXST 6.00 0 12.00 11.90 1.28 12.1 s s 51.8+79.22 1 2.9 43 ...
PNC Financial PNC 44.74 9 67.89 64.80 1.70 2.7 s s 12.4+40.44 2 -0.0 13 2.5
PPL Corp PPL 26.68 7 30.27 29.12 0.07 0.2 t s -1.0 +11.29 3 -5.9 10 4.9
Penna REIT PEI 6.50 0 17.44 16.79 0.93 5.9 s s 60.8+137.52 1 -11.5 ... 3.8
PepsiCo PEP 58.50 9 73.66 71.10 0.33 0.5 t s 7.2+21.42 3 1.8 19 3.0
Philip Morris Intl PM 60.45 0 94.00 93.74 3.80 4.2 s s 19.4+53.10 127.6a 19 3.6
Procter & Gamble PG 59.07 0 69.97 69.63 0.27 0.4 s s 4.4+13.36 3 2.2 18 3.2
Prudential Fncl PRU 42.45 7 65.17 56.70 2.19 4.0 t s 13.1+24.09 3 -9.1 7 2.6
SLM Corp SLM 10.91 0 16.94 16.67 0.95 6.0 s s 24.4+40.53 2-18.9 10 3.0
SLM Corp flt pfB SLMBP 39.00 9 51.25 49.37 -0.13 -0.3 s s 26.6 ... 0.0 ... 4.6
TJX Cos TJX 26.44 0 46.67 45.40 0.61 1.4 t s 40.7+62.85 1 26.5 20 1.0
UGI Corp UGI 24.07 0 32.04 31.91 0.16 0.5 s s 8.5+27.69 2 6.7 19 3.4
Verizon Comm VZ 35.17 9 48.77 47.05 2.00 4.4 s s 17.3+37.17 2 6.0 47 4.4
WalMart Strs WMT 51.63 0 75.24 75.13 1.33 1.8 s s 25.7+45.66 2 12.4 16 2.1
Weis Mkts WMK 36.52 6 45.96 41.91 -0.42 -1.0 t t 4.9+15.41 3 2.5 14 2.9
52-WK RANGE FRIDAY $CHG%CHG %CHG%RTN RANK %RTN
COMPANY TICKER LOW HIGH CLOSE 1WK 1WK 1MO 1QTR YTD 1YR 1YR 5YRS* PE YLD
Notes on data: Total returns, shown for periods 1-year or greater, include dividend income and change in market price. Three-year and five-year returns
annualized. Ellipses indicate data not available. Price-earnings ratio unavailable for closed-end funds and companies with net losses over prior four quar-
ters. Rank classifies a stocks performance relative to all U.S.-listed shares, from top 20 percent (far-left box) to bottom 20 percent (far-right box).
LocalStocks
Past the peak
Stock
Screener
Source: FactSet
Priceline.com (PCLN) 571.0% $622.82 $17 $775 0.0% 26
Alexion Pharma. (ALXN) 563.8 117.82 60 119 0.0 118
Perrigo (PRGO) 437.8 119.18 87 120 0.3 29
Ross Stores (ROST) 392.1 66.69 37 71 0.9 20
Edwards Lifesci. (EW) 329.2 109.37 62 111 0.0 53
Apple (AAPL) 300.0 671.45 354 705 1.6 16
Dollar Tree (DLTR) 240.7 47.02 36 57 0.0 21
TJX (TJX) 204.9 45.21 26 47 1.0 20
AutoZone (AZO) 202.6 372.14 307 399 0.0 16
CF Industries (CF) 200.0 219.98 115 228 0.7 9
Estee Lauder (EL) 191.6 63.30 41 66 0.8 29
MasterCard (MA) 191.2 473.76 293 475 0.3 28
Salesforce.com (CRM) 178.8 157.04 94 165 0.0 n/a
Teradata (TDC) 178.1 76.06 44 81 0.0 33
Netflix (NFLX) 174.6 62.58 53 133 0.0 36
Watson Pharma. (WPI) 174.4 86.43 55 88 0.0 71
LOW HIGH
PRICE-
EARNING
RATIO*
DIV.
YIELD CLOSE
CHANGE
SINCE 2007
PEAK COMPANY
52-WEEK
Its been a tough five years
for the Standard & Poors 500.
On Oct. 9, 2007, the index
closed at a record high amid
hopes that the economic
expansion that began in 2001
would keep going. It fell the
next day and proceeded to
plunge 57 percent through the
financial crisis before
bottoming in March 2009. The
index has recovered since
then, although it is still 7
percent below its record high.
But that masks a dichotomy
within the index: Nearly half of
the stocks in the S&P 500,
237 of them, are already
above where they were on
Oct. 9, 2007.
This screen shows the
stocks that have climbed the
most in the last five years.
Priceline.com is No. 1, and its
stock is up more than sixfold
from $92.82. Its revenue has
grown by at least 24 percent
each year since 2007.
Several of the other stocks
help customers find bargains
such as Ross Stores, TJX and
Dollar Tree. AutoZone has
benefited as drivers keep their
cars longer.
*based on last 12 months results **Data through Oct. 3
American Funds BalA m ABALX 20.50 +.27 +3.4 +22.2/A +3.2/A
American Funds BondA m ABNDX 12.95 -.02 +.3 +7.1/C +4.0/E
American Funds CapIncBuA m CAIBX 53.66 +.79 +3.0 +19.4/A +.7/C
American Funds CpWldGrIA m CWGIX 36.81 +.79 +5.4 +24.7/B -1.3/B
American Funds EurPacGrA m AEPGX 40.46 +.76 +6.4 +20.7/B -2.2/A
American Funds FnInvA m ANCFX 40.84 +.72 +4.7 +28.3/C +.4/C
American Funds GrthAmA m AGTHX 34.37 +.51 +5.1 +28.4/B +.1/D
American Funds IncAmerA m AMECX 18.21 +.23 +3.3 +21.4/B +2.2/C
American Funds InvCoAmA m AIVSX 31.13 +.48 +3.9 +26.8/D -.1/C
American Funds NewPerspA m ANWPX 30.96 +.62 +4.9 +25.3/B +.8/A
American Funds WAMutInvA m AWSHX 31.89 +.58 +4.0 +26.9/D +.5/B
BlackRock GlobAlcA m MDLOX 19.72 +.15 +3.1 +14.4/D +2.6/B
BlackRock GlobAlcI MALOX 19.82 +.15 +3.2 +14.7/C +2.9/B
Dodge & Cox Income DODIX 13.83 +.6 +9.0/B +7.1/B
Dodge & Cox IntlStk DODFX 33.26 +.81 +6.8 +19.0/C -3.6/B
Dodge & Cox Stock DODGX 120.72 +1.78 +4.6 +31.9/A -1.9/D
Fidelity Contra FCNTX 80.64 +.96 +4.3 +28.6/B +2.6/A
Fidelity GrowCo FDGRX 99.31 +1.07 +3.1 +30.9/A +4.0/A
Fidelity LowPriStk d FLPSX 39.54 +.35 +2.7 +26.3/C +3.1/A
Fidelity Spartan 500IdxAdvtg x FUSVX 51.79 +.49 +4.3 +30.5/A +.9/B
FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m FKINX 2.24 +.01 +3.3 +24.0/A +3.5/C
FrankTemp-Franklin Income C m FCISX 2.26 +.01 +3.2 +23.1/A +3.0/D
FrankTemp-Mutual Euro Z MEURX 21.11 +.51 +4.1 +21.2/E -1.6/A
FrankTemp-Templeton GlBond A mTPINX 13.43 +.04 +2.8 +13.6/A +9.5/A
FrankTemp-Templeton GlBondAdv TGBAX 13.39 +.04 +2.9 +13.9/A +9.8/A
Harbor IntlInstl d HAINX 60.02 +1.21 +5.5 +22.5/A -2.3/A
Oakmark EqIncI OAKBX 29.41 +.32 +3.0 +17.8/D +3.9/A
PIMCO AllAssetI PAAIX 12.73 +.06 +2.8 +18.4/B +6.7/A
PIMCO LowDrIs PTLDX 10.65 -.01 +.6 +6.9/A +5.3/A
PIMCO TotRetA m PTTAX 11.59 +.01 +1.0 +11.7/A +8.5/A
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PIMCO TotRetIs PTTRX 11.59 +.01 +1.0 +12.1/A +9.0/A
PIMCO TotRetrnD b PTTDX 11.59 +.01 +1.0 +11.8/A +8.7/A
Permanent Portfolio PRPFX 49.64 +.11 +2.6 +9.7/E +7.9/A
T Rowe Price EqtyInc PRFDX 26.58 +.47 +4.9 +29.5/B +.5/B
T Rowe Price GrowStk PRGFX 38.59 +.34 +3.6 +31.6/A +2.3/B
T Rowe Price HiYield d PRHYX 6.91 +.03 +1.9 +23.0/A +8.0/B
T Rowe Price MidCpGr RPMGX 59.26 +.17 +1.9 +22.8/C +3.7/A
T Rowe Price NewIncome PRCIX 9.94 -.02 +.3 +7.1/C +7.0/B
Vanguard 500Adml VFIAX 134.78 +1.95 +4.3 +30.5/A +1.0/B
Vanguard 500Inv VFINX 134.78 +1.95 +4.3 +30.4/B +.8/B
Vanguard GNMAAdml VFIJX 11.07 -.04 +3.7/B +6.7/A
Vanguard InstIdxI VINIX 133.89 +1.94 +4.3 +30.6/A +1.0/B
Vanguard InstPlus VIIIX 133.90 +1.95 +4.3 +30.6/A +1.0/B
Vanguard InstTStPl VITPX 32.90 +.46 +4.0 +30.6/A +1.4/A
Vanguard MuIntAdml VWIUX 14.43 +.01 +.8 +8.5/B +5.7/B
Vanguard STGradeAd VFSUX 10.87 +.5 +4.8/B +4.4/B
Vanguard TgtRe2015 VTXVX 13.63 +.09 +2.6 +17.2/B +2.7/A
Vanguard Tgtet2025 VTTVX 13.83 +.13 +3.3 +20.6/B +1.5/B
Vanguard TotBdAdml VBTLX 11.17 -.03 +4.9/E +6.5/C
Vanguard TotBdInst VBTIX 11.17 -.03 +5.0/E +6.5/C
Vanguard TotIntl VGTSX 14.45 +.22 +6.1 +18.0/C -4.7/C
Vanguard TotStIAdm VTSAX 36.34 +.49 +4.0 +30.4/B +1.4/A
Vanguard TotStIIns VITSX 36.35 +.50 +4.0 +30.5/B +1.4/A
Vanguard TotStIdx VTSMX 36.33 +.49 +4.0 +30.3/B +1.3/A
Vanguard WellsIAdm VWIAX 59.64 +.36 +1.8 +16.9/B +6.9/A
Vanguard Welltn VWELX 34.62 +.39 +3.4 +21.3/B +3.9/A
Vanguard WelltnAdm VWENX 59.80 +.69 +3.4 +21.4/B +4.0/A
Vanguard WndsIIAdm VWNAX 53.25 +1.06 +4.9 +31.8/A -.2/B
Vanguard WndsrII VWNFX 30.00 +.60 +4.9 +31.7/A -.3/B
MutualFunds
FRIDAY WK RETURN/RANK
GROUP, FUND TICKER NAV CHG 4WK 1YR 5YR
Dow industrials
+1.3%
+2.3%
Nasdaq
+0.6%
-0.0%
S&P 500
+1.4%
+1.6%
Russell 2000
+0.7%
+0.1%
LARGE-CAP
SMALL-CAP
p
p
p
p
q
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
+11.4%
+20.4%
+16.2%
+13.8%
Mortgage rates fall again
The average rate on a 30-year fixed mortgage fell
to a record low for the second straight week,
down to 3.36 percent from 3.4 percent. Mortgage
rates, though, may tick up again. They tend to fol-
low the direction of the yield on the 10-year Trea-
sury note, and an encouraging jobs report on Fri-
day sent it back above 1.7 percent for the first
time in nearly two weeks.
InterestRates
MIN
Money market mutual funds YIELD INVEST PHONE
3.25
3.25
3.25
.13
.13
.13
PRIME
RATE
FED
FUNDS
Taxablenational avg 0.01
Direxion US Govt MMF/Cl A 0.11 $ 25,000 min (800) 851-0511
Tax-exemptnational avg 0.01
Invesco Tax-Exempt Cash Fund/Cl A0.09$ 1,000 min (800) 659-1005
Broad market Lehman 1.66 0.06 t t -0.75 2.55 1.56
Triple-A corporate Moodys 3.47 0.10 s t -0.45 4.18 3.22
Corp. Inv. Grade Lehman 2.76 -0.05 t t -1.21 4.03 2.75
FRIDAY
6 MO AGO
1 YR AGO
FRIDAY CHANGE 52-WK
U.S. BOND INDEXES YIELD 1WK 1MO 3MO 1YR HIGH LOW
Municipal Bond Buyer 4.18 0.00 t t -0.78 5.05 4.17
U.S. high yield Barclays 6.43 -0.12 t t -3.68 10.15 6.15
Treasury Barclays 0.96 0.05 s s -0.18 1.34 0.80
FRIDAY CHANGE 52-WK
TREASURYS YIELD 1WK 1MO 3MO 1YR HIGH LOW
3-month T-Bill 0.10 0.01 r s 0.09 0.12
1-year T-Bill 0.20 0.01 r t 0.05 0.25 0.10
6-month T-Bill 0.14 0.01 s r 0.12 0.15 0.01
2-year T-Note 0.26 0.03 s t -0.01 0.40 0.21
5-year T-Note 0.68 0.05 s s -0.32 1.20 0.54
10-year T-Note 1.74 0.11 s s -0.25 2.40 1.39
30-year T-Bond 2.97 0.15 s s 0.01 3.48 2.45
Money fund data provided by iMoneyNet Inc.
Rank: Funds letter grade compared with others in the same performance group;
an A indicates fund performed in the top 20 percent; an E, in the bottom 20 percent.
PAGE 4D SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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C M Y K
VIEWS S E C T I O N E
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012
timesleader.com
W
hen you vote for Democrat Barack
Obama or Republican Mitt Romney in
November, youll be voting for more
than a president. Youll be casting a
ballot for and against a checklist of
policies that touch your life and shape the country you
live in.
It can be hard to see, through the fog of negative ads,
sound bite zingers and assorted other campaign nas-
ties, that the election is a contest of actual ideas. But it
is always so. A candidates words connect to deeds in
office.
Roll back to 2008. Obama was the presidential candi-
date who promised to get the country on a path to
health insurance for all. He delivered. If you havent
noticed one way or another, soon you will.
And back to 2000. George W. Bush ran on a platform
of big tax cuts. Thats precisely what the country got. A
decade later, taxes are lower than they otherwise
would have been.
Thats not to say you can count on Romneys check-
list or Obamas to come into full being. You sure cant.
By nature and necessity, the presidency is in large
part a creature of compromise and improvisation. The
unforeseen happens (the terrorist attacks), or circum-
stances change (the December 2007-June 2009 reces-
sion), or things that the candidate sets out to do run
into a buzz saw in Congress (way too many examples
to mention). Thats why promises are broken, prior-
ities shift and intentions get swept away by the fistful.
Even so, you get what you vote for, probably about as
often as not. And a lot of what you get, you will feel in
a personal way, for better or worse, no matter how
distant Washington seems from your world.
The wars called away people in your orbit, if not in
your family. The spending that each candidate wants
to do Romney vows military expansion, Obama
would put more into education, for starters is
bound to benefit many livelihoods in some fashion, at
the risk of even deeper national debt. And read their
fine print: Medicare wont be the same in the years
ahead. Perhaps not Social Security, either. (Theres
that national debt, after all.)
Across the spectrum of issues, Obama and Romney
have drawn contrasts and telegraphed divergent ways
for the nation to go.
You cant believe everything you hear. But you can
believe enough to know that Tuesday, Nov. 6, is a true
day of decision.
In this series, Associated Press writers who cover
subjects at stake in the election look at the positions of
the candidates, the underlying issues and why it
matters.
By CALVIN WOODWARD Associated Press
EDITORS NOTE
The Associated
Press Why It
Matters series,
which explores top
issues confronting
the nation in this
presidential cam-
paign season and
their impact on
Americans.
20 1 2
ELECTION
ELECTION 2012:
WHY IT MATTERS
INSIDE: More issues, 2E
T
he stakes now are similar to
what caused the U.S. to
invade almost 11 years ago:
the threat of more al-Qaida attacks.
President Barack Obama says U.S.
forces must not leave until Afghan
forces can defend the country on
their own. Otherwise the Taliban
would regain power and al-Qaida
might again launch attacks from
there. Republican rival Romney
appears to share that view.
Whats often overlooked in the
al-Qaida returns scenario is an
answer to this question: Why, after
so many years of foreign help, are
the Afghans still not capable of
self-defense? And when will they be?
The official answer is by the end
of 2014, when the U.S. and its allies
plan to end their combat role. The
Afghans will be fully in charge, or so
it is hoped, and the war will be over,
at least for Americans.
AFGHANISTAN
T
he job market is brutal and the
economy weak. Nearly 13 mil-
lion Americans cant find work;
the unemployment rate has been
higher than 8 percent for more than
40 months. A divided Washington has
done little to ease the misery.
The economy didnt take off when
the recession ended in June 2009.
Growth has never been slower in the
three years after a downturn. The
human toll is staggering. Forty per-
cent of the jobless, 5 million people,
have been out of work six months or
more a national crisis, according
to Federal Reserve Chairman Ben
Bernanke. Wages arent keeping up
with inflation.
Obama wants to create jobs by
keeping taxes low for everybody but
the wealthiest and with public-works
spending, clean energy projects and
targeted tax breaks to businesses.
Romney proposes further cuts in tax
rates for all income levels; hed also
slash corporate rates, reduce regu-
lations and encourage oil production.
ECONOMY
T
he U.S. accuses China of flouting
trade rules and undervaluing its
currency to helps its exporters,
hurting American competitors and jobs.
But imposing tariffs could set off a
trade war and drive up prices for Amer-
ican consumers.
Tensions now have spread to the
automotive sector: The U.S. is seeking
international rulings against Chinese
subsidies for its auto and auto-parts
exports and against Chinese duties on
U.S. autos. Romney says hell get tough-
er on Chinas trade violations. Obama
has taken a variety of trade actions
against China, but on the currency
issue, he has opted to wait for econom-
ic forces to encourage Beijing to raise
values.
Cheap Chinese goods have benefited
American consumers and restrained
inflation. But those imports have hurt
American manufacturers. And many U.S.
companies outsource production to
China. One study estimated that be-
tween 2001 and 2010, 2.8 million U.S. jobs
were lost or displaced to China.
CHINA
G
un violence has been splayed
across front pages with alarm-
ing frequency lately: the
movie theater killings in Colorado, the
Sikh temple shootings in Wisconsin,
the gunfire outside the Empire State
Building and more. Guns are used in
two-thirds of homicides, according to
the FBI. But the murder rate is less
than half what it was two decades
ago.
Neither Obama nor Romney has had
much to say about guns during the
campaign. Obama hasnt pushed gun
control measures as president; Rom-
ney says new gun laws arent needed.
Its getting harder to argue that
stricter gun laws are needed when
violent crime has been decreasing
without them.
But the next president may well fill
at least one Supreme Court seat, and
the court is narrowly divided on gun
control. An Obama appointee could be
expected to be friendlier to gun
controls than would a Romney nomi-
nee.
GUNS
A
mericas health care system is
unsustainable. Its not one
problem, but three: cost,
quality and coverage. The U.S. has
world-class hospitals and doctors. But
it spends far more than other ad-
vanced countries and people arent
much healthier. And in an aging socie-
ty, theres no reliable system for
long-term care. Obamas expansion of
coverage for the uninsured hits high
gear in 2014. Obama keeps todays
Medicare while trying to slow costs.
He also extends Medicaid. Romney
would repeal Obamas health care law
but hasnt spelled out what hed do
instead. On Medicare, he favors the
option of a government payment to
help future retirees get private cov-
erage. The risk of expanding coverage:
Health costs consume a growing share
of the stressed economy. The risk of
not: Millions continue uninsured or
saddled with heavy coverage costs as
the population grows older.
HEALTH CARE
S
yrias conflict is the most vio-
lent to emerge from last years
Arab Spring. Activists say at
least 23,000 people have died over
the last 18 months. Obama wants
Syrian President Bashar Assad to
leave power. But he wont use U.S.
military force to make that happen.
Romney says "more assertive" U.S.
tactics are needed, without fully
spelling them out. The future of Arab
democracy could hinge on the crisis.
After dictatorships fell in Tunisia,
Egypt, Libya and Yemen, critics say
Assads government has resorted to
torture and mass killings to stay in
power. Its success would deny the U.S.
a major strategic victory. Assad long
has helped Iran aid Hamas and Hez-
bollah, destabilizing Lebanon while
threatening Israels security and U.S.
interests in the Middle East. But extre-
mists among the opposition, Assads
weapons of mass destruction and
worries about Israels border security
have policymakers wary about deeper
involvement.
SYRIA
T
he debate over banking rules
is, at its core, a dispute about
how to prevent another eco-
nomic cataclysm. The financial crisis
that peaked in 2008 touched off a
global economic slowdown. Four years
later, the recovery remains painfully
slow. After the crisis, Congress passed
a sprawling overhaul of banking rules
and oversight. The law gives regu-
lators new tools to shutter banks
without resorting to emergency bai-
louts. It restricts risky lending and
establishes a new agency to protect
consumers from misleading marketing
and other traps. The new rules also
boost companies costs, according to
Romney and many in the business
community. Romney believes the law
is prolonging the nations economic
agony by making it harder for compa-
nies to invest and grow. He has
pledged to repeal it. Obama fought for
and supports the law.
WALL ST. REGULATION
E
ducation ranks second only to
the economy in issues impor-
tant to Americans. Yet the U.S.
lags globally in educating its children.
And higher education costs are leav-
ing students saddled with debt or
unable to afford college at all. State
budget cuts have meant teacher
layoffs and larger class sizes. Colleges
have had to make do with less. It all
trickles down to the kids in the class-
room. Although Washington contrib-
utes a small fraction of education
money, it influences teacher quality,
accessibility and more. For example,
to be freed from provisions of the No
Child Left Behind law, states had to
develop federally approved reforms.
Romney wants more state and local
control over education. But he sup-
ports some of Obamas proposals,
notably charter schools and teacher
evaluations. So, look for them to be
there whoever wins the White House.
EDUCATION
LADYLIKE?
It is a telling choice
of word. Hearing it
used unironically, as
would-be Missouri
senator Todd Akin
did last month, one
almost feels as if
Amelia Earhart never flew a plane and
Sally Ride never rode a space shuttle.
As if Madame C.J. Walker never made
millions and Meg Whitman never
made CEO. As if Lisa Leslie never
dunked, Pat Benatar never rocked,
Oprah Winfrey never reigned, Hillary
Clinton never ran.
But that is, indeed, what the man
said. In a recent interview, he com-
plained that his opponent, U.S. Sen.
Claire McCaskill, was very aggressive
in debating him, unlike her 2006 race,
when she was much more ladylike.
Akin, last heard revealing the exist-
ence of a previously unknown mecha-
nism in the female body that shuts
down contraception in the event of
legitimate rape, might want to pen
himself a reminder to not talk about
women again, ever.
This latest gaffe is somewhat remi-
niscent of when Senate Majority Lead-
er Harry Reid was quoted as saying
candidate Barack Obama had the abil-
ity to switch off and on his Negro
dialect. While the observation was
true enough, we were still left to grap-
ple that bizarre choice of word. There
has not been a Negro in this country
since 1969, the year Reid turned 30.
How is it he failed, for 40 years, to get
the memo?
One wonders the same about Akin.
The issue is not dated terminology, per
se, but rather, the suspicion that it
reflects a dated worldview particular-
ly with Akin, given his belief in a rape-
resistant uterus.
But though he is the latest, he is
hardly the only man who has sought
recently to police the decorum of fe-
male lawmakers. Consider the 2011
email U.S. Rep. Allen West sent U.S.
Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz telling
her, you are not a lady and shall not
be accorded due respect from me.
And then theres then-Sen. Arlen Spec-
ters 2010 shot at Rep. Michele Bach-
mann during a radio interview: Ill
treat you like a lady. So act like one.
One struggles to imagine a male
lawmaker being chided to behave in a
gentlemanly fashion. The person doing
the chiding would be laughed into
oblivion and deservedly so the com-
plaint belongs to the era of handlebar
moustaches and high-wheeled bikes.
This is not to say that a man or
woman ought not strive to behave in
ways that reflect class, refinement and
manners.
But this is not about that. It is, rath-
er, about an arrogant, condescending
and paternalistic mindset that says a
woman cannot be tough, aggressive,
competitive, smart or feisty, that if she
embodies those traits, so prized in
men, she does so at the cost of her own
femininity.
In this construction, being a lady
has nothing to do with good home
training, and everything to do with
being properly deferential and submis-
sive in the presence of testosterone.
And yes, you might just want to chalk
all this up to a difference of values, to
say that Akin, West and Specter are
just old-fashioned guys having trouble
finding their way in a newfangled
world. But to do that is to give them a
pass they do not deserve. It is to tell a
little girl she must truncate the sprawl
and adventure of her personality, prune
it back until it fits into a small, dainty
box marked ladylike.
That would be a tragedy. And a
betrayal.
There is, frankly, a point at which
being old-fashioned becomes being
stubborn, denying unwelcome, un-
settling and self-evident change. These
fellows are well past that point and our
message to them ought to be simply
this:
If you want to govern in this century,
try living in it first.
COMMENTARY
L E O N A R D P I T T S J R .
Memo to Akin:
Try living in
this century
Leonard Pitts Jr., winner of the 2004
Pulitzer Prize for commentary, is a colum-
nist for the Miami Herald, 1 Herald Plaza,
Miami, FL 33132. Readers may write to him
via email at lpitts@miamiherald.com.
PAGE 2E SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
V I E W S
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D
efense spending: At its
core, the debate over
how much the U.S.
spends on defense gets down
to this: What is it that America
should be defending against?
There are plenty of potential
security threats on the horizon,
not to mention an unfinished
war in Afghanistan. The size
and shape of the defense bud-
get go a long way toward de-
termining whether the U.S. can
influence events abroad, pre-
vent new wars and be ready for
those it cant avoid. It also fuels
the domestic defense industry
in ways that affect the vitality
of communities large and small
across the country. Obama
wants more restraint in military
spending while Romney favors
expansion. Obama also wants
more focus on Asia-Pacific
security, reflecting Chinas
military modernization. But that
and other elements of military
strategy could come apart if
Washington doesnt find a way
to avoid automatic budget cuts
starting in January.
DEFENSE SPENDING
A
sea of red ink is con-
fronting the nation and
presidents to come.
The budget deficit - the short-
fall created when the govern-
ment spends more in a given
year than it collects - is on
track to top $1 trillion for the
fourth straight year. The gov-
ernment borrows about 40
cents for every dollar it spends.
The national debt is the total
amount the federal government
owes. Its risen to a shade over
$16 trillion. Obama has proposed
bringing deficits down by slow-
ing spending gradually, to avoid
suddenly tipping the economy
back into recession. Hed raise
taxes on households earning
more than $250,000 and im-
pose a surcharge of 30 percent
on those making more than $1
million. Romney would lower
deficits mostly through deep
spending cuts. But many of the
cuts hes pushing would be
partially negated by his propos-
als to lower top tax rates on
corporations and individuals.
DEBT
B
oth sides of the gay
marriage debate agree
on this much: The issue
defines what sort of nation
America will be. Half a dozen
states and the District of Co-
lumbia have made history by
legalizing it, but its prohibited
elsewhere, and 30 states have
placed bans in their constitu-
tions. Obama supports legal
recognition of same-sex mar-
riage, as a matter decided by
states. Romney says same-sex
marriage should be banned
with a constitutional amend-
ment. The debate divides the
public down the middle and
stirs up passion on both sides.
In November, four states have
gay-marriage measures on their
ballots. In Minnesota, the vote
is whether to ban gay marriage
in the state constitution. Voters
in Maine, Maryland and Wash-
ington state are voting on
whether to legalize gay mar-
riage. Thus far, foes of gay
marriage have prevailed in all
32 states where the issue reac-
hed the ballot.
GAY MARRIAGE
A
lmost every U.S. tax-
payer faces a signif-
icant tax increase next
year, unless Congress and the
White House agree on a plan to
extend a huge collection of tax
cuts expiring at the end of the
year. And theres a huge debate
over how to overhaul the tax
code to make it simpler, with
lower rates balanced by fewer
deductions. Obama wants to
extend Bush-era tax cuts again,
but only for individuals making
less than $200,000 and married
couples making less than
$250,000. Romney wants to
extend all those tax cuts and
enact new ones, dropping all
income tax rates by 20 percent.
Romney says he would pay for
that by eliminating or reducing
tax credits, deductions and
exemptions. But he wont say
which ones would go. Most
lawmakers want a simpler tax
code.
TAXES
EDITORSNOTE: Tuesday, Nov. 6, is a true day of decision. In this series, Associated Press writers who cover subjects at stake in the election look at the
positions of the candidates, the underlying issues and why it matters.
THE ELECTION: WHY IT MATTERS
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 PAGE 3E
S E RV I NG T HE P UB L I C T RUS T S I NC E 1 8 81
Editorial
I think each process needs to be
clearly stated in advance. There
cant be secret hiring
procedures.
Linda McClosky Houck
The Luzerne County councilwoman and her colleagues are mulling the
possibility of allowing managers and department heads to customize
hiring processes as certain job openings arise. If so, council must first
vote to amend the countys personnel code.
YEARS AGO, when email
became the rage, I went to
my mother and encouraged
her to use it. It would cut
down on phone bills, I
pointed out.
No, she said.
But, Mom, its not hard.
No.
I sighed. Why not?
Because I want to hear your voice. I
want you to make the effort.
Needless to say, she never learned email.
She never even got a computer. Of the bil-
lion electronic messages I have received in
the last decade, not one, in the subject field,
has ever read, From Mother.
I bring this up in light of a recent Time
magazine piece that claims Americans ages
18-29 now send and receive around 88 text
messages a day, as opposed to 17 phone
calls in that same period of time.
Eighty-eight a day? Nearly 2,750 a
month?
This should surprise no one. The pre-
ferred form of communication is now a fast
type on a small device. Even email is con-
sidered archaic. And calling on the phone?
Well. Just try reaching a teenager these
days. You can call a cellphone 10 consec-
utive times. You can leave 10 consecutive
voice mails. No response.
But send a text to the same number ask-
ing, Where R U? and youll get a reply:
Right here. Why?
No one wants to talk anymore. I used to
fret about cellphones and flying. I figured by
the time we reached 2012, the inside of a
plane would sound like the inside of a high
school cafeteria. When I read that they were
developing cellphone use for international
travel, I had visions of flying from Detroit to
London in one long echo of YOULL NEV-
ER GUESS WHERE IM CALLING FROM!
I dont worry anymore. They can develop
whatever they want. Walk onto an airplane
now, and all you will see are people with
their heads down, fingers flying. They dont
make a peep. I cant scientifically prove this,
but I believe airplanes are actually quieter
than they were. No one talks to the person
next to him. No one bothers to ask, Busi-
ness or pleasure? People just put their
heads down and text, text, text.
So whats wrong with this, you ask? Was
it really so much better when teenagers sat
on the phone all day? Arent we being more
efficient? Isnt one form of communication
as good as the next?
No.
And I will tell you why.
Forget the fact that we are raising a na-
tion of short-cutters who think 143 is the
same as I love you and LOL is a substitute
for real laughter. (By the way, how do you
know the person is really LOL? Maybe they
are lying. Maybe they are stone-faced.)
Forget all that. Here is the real reason this
trend of 88 texts versus 17 phone calls and
rising is so disturbing: We are losing con-
tact. Losing human connections. And in
doing so, we are losing something precious.
I sat with my mother all this past week,
my mother who refused to learn how to
email. She is in a wheelchair now, unable to
speak due to a stroke. She half-smiles when
I make a joke, and every now and then she
tries to form a word when I ask her a ques-
tion.
Its hard. I miss the old days. But you
know what I miss the most?
Her voice.
Not her letters. Not a text. When some-
one is gone, honestly, will you ever mourn
their texts? She was so right on insisting I
call her all those years; we could tell by our
tones how we really felt, what was OK and
what was not. I am forever grateful for all
those hours of shared laughs, of impas-
sioned arguments and of a mothers most
encouraging phrase, Dont worry, every-
thing will be all right.
Her voice was distinct, melodic, full of
my earliest memories of life. It wasnt a
series of electronic letters. When we spoke,
only she could be on the other end of the
line. When you get a text, in theory, anyone
could be sending it. How would you even
know?
I feel sorry for the 18- to 29-year-olds, and
even sorrier for younger teens who almost
exclusively text their parents and siblings.
Too late, they are going to learn this simple
truth of life: The only thing worse than
missing a loved ones voice is to have barely
heard it at all.
Fast type on a tiny device: The end of human connection
Mitch Albom is a columnist for the Detroit Free
Press. Readers may write to him at: Detroit Free
Press, 600 W. Fort St., Detroit, MI 48226, or via
email at malbom@freepress.com.
COMMENTARY
M I T C H A L B O M
THOMAS Dartmouth
Rice was an acclaimed
actor in his day. A white
entertainer in the 1830s he
performed in several trav-
eling minstrel shows that
toured many of the 26
American states.
Rice developed his most popular charac-
ter in blackface to belittle black Amer-
icans and pander to the prejudice of his
audiences in pre-Civil War America. His
blackface buffoon was named Jim Crow.
So widely known and distasteful was
the Rice portrayal of his theatrical clown
that Jim Crow would come to describe a
carefully choreographed system of state
laws to, among other things, obstruct the
right of freed Americans to vote. Jim
Crow laws sprung up throughout the
Southern reconstructed states from
1870 to 1964 when the Civil Rights Act
and the Voting Rights Act of 1965 finally
were adopted.
The 15th Amendment to the Constitu-
tion, ratified in 1870, states, The right of
U.S. citizens to vote shall not be denied or
abridged by the United States or by any
State on account of race, color or previous
condition of servitude.
The 15th proved inconvenient for South-
ern whites hoping to recoup through Jim
Crow laws much of what was undone by
the 13th and 14th amendments abolishing
slavery and guaranteeing equal protection
under the law to every American.
They considered the right to vote estab-
lished by the 15th Amendment a minor
setback to be neutered by poll taxes, liter-
acy requirements and grandfather laws,
cleverly designed to disenfranchise black
Americans and many poor whites of non-
English descent.
A poll tax to vote in Georgia, equal to
$25 today, was upheld by the U.S. Su-
preme Court as late as 1937, which stated,
it was unrelated to any attempt to dis-
enfranchise.
Literacy tests were made impossible for
poor, uneducated Americans to navigate.
And all were enacted, in straight face, to
combat voter fraud.
These laws disenfranchised tens of
thousands of Americans while grandfather
statutes permitted some illiterate whites
to evade these obstructions if their father
or grandfather had voted prior to 1868
ratification of the 14th Amendment.
Legislation to disenfranchise voters is
the ultimate voter fraud and it is as old as
Jim Crow.
Following the incredibly close presi-
dential election of 2000 and anticipating
equally tight results in 2004, 08 and be-
yond, states seeming to have Republican
legislatures and Republican governors
with a pen began enacting restrictive state
voter laws and some, such as Pennsylva-
nia, even required voters to present a
photo ID to be allowed to vote.
Pennsylvania accomplished this feat in
May of this presidential-election year,
making it almost impossible for tens of
thousands of Pennsylvania voters espe-
cially the poor, elderly, students, the dis-
abled and others to clear that hurdle by
Nov. 6.
Supporters of the law (Act 18 of 2012)
that would disenfranchise so many Penn-
sylvania voters justified their actions, in
straight face, as necessary to combat voter
fraud.
As we know, however, of all the imagi-
native ways to perpetrate voter fraud,
showing up at the polls in person, pre-
tending you are someone youre not, isnt
one of them.
Stating the reason for erecting this vot-
er ID obstruction in the path of honest
Pennsylvanians, state House Majority
Leader Michael Turzai, R-Allegheny Coun-
ty, while touting his accomplishments
before a group of admirers in July, told us
on tape what we already knew: Voter ID,
which is going to allow Governor Romney
to win the state of Pennsylvania done.
The despicable intent of Act 18 is a stain
upon the commonwealth, and a state
judge last week appropriately issued an
injunction blocking its most onerous pro-
visions from taking effect this year.
Republican Gov. Rick Snyder this year
opposed such attempts to disenfranchise
voters in his state. He vetoed legislation
that would have altered the states flexible
Voter ID law. Standing tall, Snyder issued
his veto on the Fourth of July.
Rick Snyder is the governor of Michi-
gan, home of Ferris State University and
the universitys Jim Crow Museum.
Intent behind voter photo ID law as old as Jim Crow
Kevin Blaums column on government, life and
politics appears every Sunday. Contact him at
kblaum@timesleader.com.
KEVIN BLAUM
I N T H E A R E N A
W
ITHOUT leaving
their riverside
town in rural Lu-
zerne County, res-
idents of Shickshinny can
again shop for cereal, tailgat-
ing snacks and everyday sta-
ples at a grocery store some-
thing they had been unable to
do for 13 months.
Dont dismiss this news as
trivial, something
having only to do
with foodstuffs for a
few people in the
boonies.
This is about peo-
ples resilience and
the power of com-
munity.
It reflects an on-
going story occur-
ring in West Pitt-
ston, Bloomsburg
and other Pennsyl-
vania places hard hit by the
flooding of September 2011,
where residents continue to
worktoreclaimsomethingthe
rushing water threatened to
take away: a sense of place.
Any strong community in
which people take pride and
want to live even those
small, unofficial communities
nestled inside dauntingly big
cities typically contains
many of the same elements: a
park, a place to pray, a post of-
fice, a bank, somewhere safe
for kids to play, a gathering
spot toswapgossipandunbur-
den souls, a school, some
shops, eateries and a place to
purchase food for stocking the
kitchen cabinet and refrigera-
tor.
Last year, Shickshinny prac-
tically lost it all.
The Five Mountain Market
on the boroughs main drag
its only market got
swamped, as did more than 25
other businesses. Residents,
many coping with damaged
houses, wondered whether
they could muster the energy
to recover and if those retail-
ers uponwhichthey depended
would come back.
Most businesses did. They
plunged in, betting that cus-
tomers would
return and re-
ward their risk-
taking.
As of Satur-
day morning
with the
planned open-
ing of a new
Thomas Mar-
ket in the refur-
bished Five
Mountain Plaza
another piece
of the puzzle snapped into
place.
Thomas Market co-owner
Chris Evans told a Times
Leader reporter last week:
Ive been in this business for
29 years now and Ive never
had a municipality or a group
of people so excited to have a
business come totheir townas
the people of Shickshinny.
The narrative emerging
from this and other Susque-
hanna River-bordering com-
munities is not unique.
Bloomsburg sopped up the
mess and again orchestrated
its fabulous fair. West Pittston
continues to power through,
too. Its an American tale, the
comeback story.
And the basic formula is
this: We become strongest
when we support one another,
when we think and act as
community.
OUR OPINION: SHICKSHINNY
The comeback
of a community
Residents, many
coping with damaged
houses, wondered
whether they could
muster the energy
to recover and if
those retailers upon
which they depended
would come back.
PRASHANT SHITUT
President and CEO/Impressions Media
JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ
Vice President/Executive Editor
MARK E. JONES
Editorial Page Editor
Editorial Board
QUOTE OF THE DAY
T
HE MITT ROMNEY
who shone in
Wednesday nights
debate was the mod-
erate Massachusetts gover-
nor, not the condescending
presidential candidate who
spent the past year pandering
to the far right. The Barack
Obama who phoned in a lack-
luster performance was the
policy wonk president steep-
ed in detail, not the fiery, elo-
quent campaigner who so in-
spired voters four years ago.
And to complete the bi-
zarre pastiche, the once-inci-
sive PBS newsman Jim Lehr-
er was a hapless bystander to
a debate he was supposed to
focus and control.
As a consequence, Romney
got a virtual pass on trying to
occupy every position at
once, from the Everyman
who feels the pain of the poor
to the Ayn Rand free marke-
teer bent on again deregulat-
ing the financial industry and
moving Medicare toward
vouchers.
Meanwhile, Obama paint-
ed himself into a defensive
corner. He let pass Romneys
claimthat he didnt workwith
Republicans, when in fact he
has bent too far to try to com-
promise with a party whose
publicly stated goal from day
one was to make him fail. He
flounderedinthe weeds of his
policies instead of driving
home his successful rescue of
the auto industry, the need to
educate the future workforce
and the urgency of investing
in America. No business ever
thrived by only cutting costs.
The president approached
this debate as if the audience
knew all about the issues.
Romney came in fresh, with
an eye toward captivating in-
dependents who are just now
tuning in. His was the smart
strategy. Now the president
has to play catch-up.
San Jose Mercury News
OTHER OPINION: DEBATE
Moderate Mitt
goes unchallenged
An company
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Cartoon unfair
to prothonotary
F
ormer Luzerne County
Prothonotary Carolee
Medico Olenginski has
been a friend for many years.
She has been publicly embar-
rassed by a cruel, senseless
editorial cartoon in The Times
Leader (Sept. 23).
She has had her position
eliminated, lost her court
appeal and for all practical
purposes been fired from an
elected position possibly a
first in the state. The cartoon
appears as a lets kick her one
more time.
I have been active in politi-
cal issues for more than 30
years and a member of the
taxpayers association in Lu-
zerne County. Her friendship
extends to professional admi-
ration for her outstanding
work in the prothonotary
office. She indeed has saved
the taxpayers many dollars.
She exhibited tireless efforts
regarding the storage of coun-
ty records and identified the
mismanagement of taxpayers
dollars in the case of the Little
Red Wagon payments. Her
efforts to modernize the proth-
onotarys office are just anoth-
er example of her skill and
dedication.
The decision has been cast
by the voters to eliminate the
prothonotarys office. I will
not contest the majority. The
home rule charter allowed for
the prothonotary to finish the
remainder of her term, which
expires December 2013. It
does not state that the protho-
notary shall be paid salary and
benefits to December 2013; it
states the office continues to
that date. What is the prob-
lem?
Is The Times Leader willing
to humiliate a person to save
less than $50,000? Embarrass
her into quitting, surrendering
salary and benefits?
Perhaps the problem lies
with county leadership. You
know, having the capability of
managing, and not only those
who agree with your every
whim. No question, Carolee is
outspoken and sometimes
demanding. You see, a posi-
tive leader recognizes the
strengths and assists the
weaknesses. Carolees educa-
tion and vast successful expe-
rience in the county should
have been utilized, not crit-
icized.
Bottom line: the extent of
humiliation over an issue
already decided by the electo-
rate and courts, would, in my
opinion, call for a public apol-
ogy by The Times Leader.
There are much bigger fish to
fry in this county and city.
Audrey Biscontini
Wilkes-Barre
Top taxpayers
beat it to Britain
W
hy are more than
200,000 rich, former U.S.
residents living in Lon-
don? Why do they make the
United Kingdom one of the
largest American communities
outside the United States?
The simple answer is be-
cause they can. Millions of
American expatriates have
created homes abroad to es-
cape America. We always
have been fortunate in the
United States that the high
wage earners pay so much of
our tax burden. Few of us take
the time to thank the rich for
taking the wrath of the IRS on
a continuing basis. Maybe it is
time we start.
Even our president regularly
insults rather than thanks
them. Many articles have been
written showing that the top 1
percent pay about 40 percent
of the taxes, and there are 46
percent of Americans who pay
no income taxes at all. So,
from my point of view, a lot of
people should be thanking a
lot of other people, rather
than complaining.
If you add the 75,000 pages
in the IRS tax code, plus the
Patriot Act and a few other
anti-privacy laws, there is a
new built-in disincentive for
big-money taxpayers in Amer-
ica to stick around and pay the
tax toll. Many high rollers in
the IRS books have had
enough of the IRS and the
oppressive America they en-
counter every day.
Personal taxes are paid
mostly by the successful. So,
because they can, the success-
ful are now snubbing their
noses, packing up and getting
out of the United States. The
same phenomenon that has
rich Californians leaving that
state in droves and heading
for Texas is occurring nation-
ally with our best taxpayers
off-shoring their lives and the
lives of their families to for-
eign countries.
It is not necessarily that
things are that bad right now
in the United States, as much
as what the successful see
coming in the future. The
government continues to
amass greater amounts of
power to do just about any-
thing it wants, even if its acts
are unconstitutional. So, the
rich fear they might become
big targets of a government
gone bad.
With Obamas class warfare
rhetoric, the most successful
Americans must fear more for
their safety as the president
agitates the people to look
upon the rich as a big prob-
lem.
If you and I were in such
circumstances, you and I also
would see the U.S. govern-
ment as the most dangerous
force on Earth. It would be
time to find a ticket on the
next outbound flight. Or ...
perhaps we can vote for peo-
ple who will end the hateful
rhetoric.
Brian Kelly
Wilkes-Barre
Obama moving us
on healthy path
A
re you voting again for
President Obama? If so,
you already know the
man. Smart. Compassionate.
Dead-on serious, focused,
positive and forward-looking.
Gracious and kind. He is one
of us, and understands our
needs. This president de-
serves a second term.
Are you undecided? Please
review some of the things
Barack Obama has accom-
plished. He passed credit-card
reform, the Hate Crimes Pre-
vention Act, student-loan
reform, Wall Street reform and
middle-class tax cuts, repealed
dont ask, dont tell, helped
create millions of jobs, passed
equal pay for equal work,
ended the war in Iraq, raised
fuel efficiency standards, gave
new life to the U.S. auto indus-
try (and death to Osama bin
Laden) and fought for benefits
for veterans and their families.
And lets not forget Obama-
care, officially titled the Affor-
dable Care Act.
On May 3, The Wayne Inde-
pendent reported that through
the Affordable Care Act,
Wayne Memorial Hospital had
been awarded grants for ex-
pansion and improvement.
Other eligible medical facil-
ities across our nation also
will enjoy these grants.
Visit www.healthcare.gov/
law/timeline/index.html, and
see for yourself the many good
things that are proceeding, in
a timely order, for all Amer-
icans. You then will remember
this historic and important
decision by its rightful name
Affordable Care Act and you
wont want it taken away.
I hope this information is
helpful. And I hope you love
our president as much as I do.
Mary E. Hawran
Honesdale
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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 PAGE 5E
V I E W S
IT WAS the
biggest rout
since Agin-
court. If you
insist, since
the Carter-
Reagan de-
bate. With a
remarkable display of confi-
dence, knowledge and nerve,
Mitt Romney won the first 2012
presidential debate going away.
Romney didnt just demon-
strate authoritative command of
a myriad of domestic issues. He
was nervy about it, taking the
president on frontally, not just
relentlessly attacking, but an-
swering every charge leveled
against him with a three-point
rebuttal.
And he pulled off a tactical
coup by coming right out of the
box to undo millions of dollars
worth of negative ads that paint-
ed him, personally, as Gordon
Gekko rapacious vulture cap-
italist who doesnt just lay off
steelworkers but kills their
wives and, politically, as intent
on raising taxes on the middle
class while lowering them for
the rich.
The Romney campaign had
let these ads go largely unan-
swered. But a kill Romney
strategy can work only until
people get to see Romney them-
selves. On Wednesday night,
they did. Regarding the charac-
ter assassination, all Romney
really had to do was walk out
with no horns on his head.
Confident, smiling and non-
threatening, he didnt look like a
man who enjoys killing the
wives of laid-off steelworkers.
Not a very high bar, I admit.
But remember: Its President
Obama who set the bar. And
succeeded. Romney suffers from
unprecedentedly high negatives
(50 percent), the highest unfa-
vorability rating at this late date
for any challenger in the last
three decades.
As to the policy, Romney
finally got to explain to the 60
million Americans watching
that he intends to lower taxes
across the board, particularly for
the middle class. As for the rich,
he got to explain the difference
between lowering tax rates and
reducing tax payments. He
repeated at least twice that the
rich would continue to pay the
same percentage of the tax
burden, while lower rates would
spur economic growth.
His success in doing this
against a flummoxed Obama
does more than rally the conser-
vative base. It might affect wa-
verers disappointed 2008
Obama supporters waiting for a
reason to jump. They watch
Romney in this debate and ask:
Is this the clueless, selfish, out-
of-touch guy weve been hearing
about from the ads and from the
mainstream media?
And then they see Obama
detached, meandering, unsure.
Can this be the hip, cool guy his
acolytes and media have been
telling us about?
Obama was undone on
Wednesday in part by his dis-
missive arrogance. You could
see him thinking annoyedly:
Why do I have to be onstage
with this clod, when Ive gone
toe-to-toe with Putin?" (And lost
every round, Id say. But thats
not how Obama sees it.)
Obama never even pulled out
his best weapon, the 47 percent.
Not once. Thats called sitting
on a lead, lazily and smugly. I
wager he mentions it in the next
debate, more than once and
likely in his kickoff.
On the other hand, Obama
just isnt that good. Not without
a teleprompter.
By the end of the debate,
Obama looked small, uncertain.
It was Romney who had the
presidential look.
Re-election campaigns after a
failed presidential term so
failed that Obama barely even
bothers to make the case, prefer-
ring to blame everything on his
predecessor hinge almost
entirely on whether the chal-
lenger can meet the threshold of
acceptability. Romney crossed
the threshold Wednesday night.
Reagan won his election
(Carter was actually ahead at
the time) when he defused his
caricature as some wild, ex-
treme, warmongering cowboy.
In his debate with Carter, he
was affable, avuncular and rea-
sonable.
Romney had to show some-
thing a little different: That he is
not the clumsy, out-of-touch
plutocrat that the paid Obama
ads and the unpaid media have
portrayed him to be. He did,
decisively.
Thats why the polls show
that, by a margin of at least
two-to-one, voters overwhelm-
ingly gave the debate to Rom-
ney.
And he won big in an unusual
way. This could be the only
presidential debate ever won so
definitively in the absence of
some obvious and ruinous gaffe,
such as Gerald Fords there is
no Soviet domination of Eastern
Europe.
Romney by two touchdowns.
Its a Romney win
by two touchdowns
COMMENTARY
C H A R L E S
K R A U T H A M M E R
Charles Krauthammers email
address is letters@charleskrauth-
ammer.com.
W
ith beauty and grace, the wary heron leaves us alone on shore flatfoot-
ed, a tad forlorn and fully aware that we envy, still, the innate gift of
flight. Rise up, friend. Rise.
ANOTHER VIEW
A photograph by Aimee Dilger
and words by Mark E. Jones
MITT Romney
appeared on
stage Wednes-
day night not
as the awk-
ward, gaffe-
prone neo-
conservative
that he was in the Republican
primary elections, but as the
articulate, Harvard moderate
and former Massachusetts
governor that he really is.
The Etch A Sketch trans-
formation that his campaign
manager had predicted came
to full bloom during the first
presidential debate, with Rom-
ney ditching the conservative
dogma that he had embraced
while courting the Teavangel-
ical right wing.
I thought I was watching a
show on evolution on the Sci-
ence Channel.
Well, maybe not evolution.
Teavangelicals dont believe
in evolution, right? They are
the zealots changing textbooks
in Texas and Louisiana that
dispute evolution and claim
that dinosaurs lived in co-
existence with humans. They
believe that the Earth is 5,000
years old instead of the age
claimed by scientists of 4.5
billion years.
Maybe Romneys transfor-
mation was more of a meta-
morphosis.
Right before our eyes, the
Mittster morphed from a con-
servative caterpillar who had
attacked 47 percent of us for
not taking responsibility for
our lives into a magnanimous,
moderate butterfly who cares
deeply about all the people
President Obama has put out
of work with his terrible econ-
omy.
Yes, Romney did make a
strong shift to the Mittle on
Wednesday. At this rate he will
be the reincarnation of Bobby
Kennedy by Election Day.
The makeover of Romney
was so dramatic that President
Obama looked liked he just
saw Freddy Krueger.
Gone from the new Romney
was all the rhetoric about be-
ing a very conservative gover-
nor and instead this new guy
showed up: a lover of teachers
who also endorsed the regu-
lation of business, a kind man
promising to give health care
to people with pre-existing
conditions, a frugal steward of
finance promising that he
would not cut taxes if it would
increase the deficit, a consum-
er advocate painting President
Obama as the protector of big
banks.
Claiming that Obama has
taken $716 billion from the
Medicare program, this new
Romney said with a stern jaw
and presidential bearing that
I will put the $716 billion
back in Medicare.
Romney denied that he ever
said that he would reduce
taxes 20 percent across the
board even though he had
been saying exactly that at
campaign stops for the past six
months.
Independent observers con-
clude that a 20 percent across-
the-board tax cut would cost
the Treasury $5 trillion over
the next 10 years, but Romney,
in true Ayn Rand fashion,
shrugged off that claim of
simple arithmetic like Atlas
with the world on his broad
shoulders.
It was quite a television
performance, resulting in
Romney being named the win-
ner of this weeks American
Idol.
By the next morning, liber-
als heads were exploding they
were so mad at President Oba-
ma for not litigating on his
own behalf. Obama didnt
mention that the economy has
had more than 30 consecutive
months of job creation since
the calamitous crash of the
world economy in 2009, that
the auto industry is booming
and that Romney was totally
misleading on most of his
claims.
And Republicans were glee-
ful because they were back in
the running after a few dismal
weeks maybe too gleeful. On
Thursday morning John Sunu-
nu, Romney surrogate and
former chief of staff for Presi-
dent George H.W. Bush, cross-
ed the line of dog whistledom
saying that Obama was lazy
and disengaged.
Republicans everywhere last
week renewed their ghastly
chant to take our country
back, as if people are too
stupid to know exactly what
they are saying.
A torrent of criticism faced
Obama on Thursday, especial-
ly for not challenging Romney
on a number of provable false-
hoods, such as the one that
Obama doubled the deficit.
The deficit in 2009 was $1.4
trillion. For fiscal year 2012,
which ended last week, the
deficit is expected to be $1.1
trillion just under the level in
the year he was inaugurated.
As an admirer of Obama, I
thought his performance was
lackluster, but Ill give him the
benefit of the doubt.
Perhaps Obama was allow-
ing the new Romney to emerge
from this new, general election
cocoon so he could see with
whom he is now dealing.
Before our eyes, the metamorphosis of Mitt
JOHN WATSON
C O M M E N T A R Y
John Watson is the former publisher
of the Sunday Dispatch in Pittston.
He lives in Seattle. Contact him via
email at jwatson@timesleader.com.
Yes, Romney did make a strong
shift to the Mittle on
Wednesday. At this rate he will
be the reincarnation of Bobby
Kennedy by Election Day.
AS THE presidential
campaign moves into
high gear, the quality
of our public schools
will be a topic of de-
bate. Some people
will point to interna-
tional comparisons to
argue that we need to eliminate teach-
ers unions and tenure, while privatiz-
ing our educational system with vouch-
ers, charter schools, cyber schools,
for-profit colleges and the like.
Comparisons of scores on the most
recent Program for International Stu-
dent Assessment do suggest that U.S.
students are in the middle of the pack
in reading and science, and below
average in math. However, because
many countries scores are so close, the
rankings are misleading. When analysis
techniques are applied, the United
States actually was tied for fifth place
worldwide. Scores on the National
Assessment of Educational Progress
show that U.S. students scores have
been increasing steadily.
If we compare apples to apples, our
schools are doing well. For example, in
schools with little poverty, Americas
students are number two in the world.
In schools where the majority of chil-
dren qualify for free or reduced lunches
like many school districts in North-
eastern Pennsylvania scores decline.
Countless studies demonstrate a link
between parents income and students
test scores. Since President Reagan
began the war on the poor, poverty in
America has increased. We have more
children in poverty (23.1 percent) than
all but one of the worlds 35 developed
nations, according to a recent UNICEF
study. Only Romania is in worse shape
(25.5 percent).
What have other countries done to
improve student outcomes? How did
Finlands students, for example, get to
the top of the international student
assessment rankings?
Finland began its turnaround after
the fall of the former Soviet Union. It
created an economic recovery plan
centered on school improvement. To
compete globally, the Finns thought
every child would need a very good
public school. To attract the best to
classrooms, its reforms required teach-
ers to earn a fifth-year masters degree
at one of eight state universities at
state expense. Those admitted are
selected from the top 10 percent of
college graduates, thus Finlands teach-
ers are seen as having status equal with
doctors and lawyers. With the changes,
top applicants flooded teaching pro-
grams.
The plan increased salaries teach-
ers with 15 years of experience make
more than college graduates in other
professions. In the United States,
teachers with similar experience make
only 62 percent of what other college
graduates earn. Finland also does not
offer merit pay.
Finlands plan worked, but even it
was surprised when its schools were
touted in last years Waiting for Super-
man movie, which panned public
education in the United States.
In Finland a socialized country
the educational system is nationalized
and the heads of the government agen-
cies that run it are educators, not busi-
ness people, military leaders, lawyers
or career politicians. With a national-
ized curriculum, every school focuses
on the same goals. Its curriculum con-
tains only guidelines, not trivia. Its
math goals take up only 10 pages.
Starting at age 9, all students study
another language (English is their
favorite). Finland has no government-
mandated standardized tests, except
for the one that is administered when
students turn 16. It has no district
rankings, comparisons or competition.
The government trusts its teachers and
principals.
Compulsory schooling does not
begin until age 7 and grouping by abil-
ity is not done. Since all schools draw
from the same pool of university-
trained educators, all children have an
equal opportunity at getting the same
quality education no matter where they
live. Finlands schools are publicly
funded, but it spends about 30 percent
less per student than our country. Its
educational resources are distributed
equally across districts and its saves
money by focusing only on what is
important. For example, it sponsors no
inter-scholastic athletics.
It does not retain kids. Homework is
minimal. The differences between its
weakest and strongest students are the
smallest in the world, according to
Resources for Life. Compulsory school-
ing ends at ninth grade when students
opt into academic high schools or trade
and technical schools. Both are highly
respected. College is free.
Finland has a powerful national
teachers union, and there has been no
move to bust it. Its teachers spend four
hours a day in their classrooms. They
use the time saved to cooperatively
build curricula, plan and assess stu-
dents. Its teachers monitor and support
each other.
There is almost no poverty in Fin-
land (less than 5 percent). Its children
do not show up to school hungry. It
provides three years of maternity leave,
and subsidized day care and preschool
for all 5-year-olds (97 percent attend),
which emphasize play and socializing
not academics. It subsidizes parents,
paying them a sum each month for
every child until he or she turns 17. Its
schools provide free food, medical care,
counseling and taxi service, if needed.
Health care for students is free.
Finlands children spend far more
time playing outside, even in the frigid
winter. Unlike students in the United
States, they watch hardly any televi-
sion.
Surely we can improve our own
schools, but probably not by doing the
opposite of what our competitors are
doing. For sure, we cannot improve by
disrespecting our teachers or degrad-
ing science and social studies curricu-
lum while ignoring the arts. We cannot
improve by slashing budgets and bene-
fits, disrespecting unions, eliminating
teachers (300,000 so far for the 2012-13
school year in the United States), and
replacing quality control with tests.
If our students, teachers and educa-
tional system are going to be compared
to Finlands system, maybe we should
follow its lead and implement some of
the Finns ideas.
If we want to see our schools fare better, we should look to Finland
COMMENTARY
J O S E P H R O G A N
Joseph Rogan is professor of teacher educa-
tion at Misericordia University in Dallas
Township.
We cannot improve by slashing
budgets and benefits, disrespecting
unions, eliminating teachers (300,000
so far for the 2012-13 school year in
the United States), and replacing
quality control with tests.
PAGE 6E SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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CAFE rules could
cost consumers
T
he article New fuel econo-
my rules to double effi-
ciency to 54.5 mpg by
2025, which refers to the gov-
ernments boosting of CAFE
standards, suggests motorists
might save money at the pump;
but these standards might cost
us more than we anticipated.
The manufacturers cost to
comply: roughly $3,000. This
could prevent millions of po-
tential customers from qualify-
ing for car loans. No car no
gas no environmental benefit
no business for the auto in-
dustry.
Hybrids and electric vehicles
will show up on dealer lots
despite little interest from
consumers. Manufacturers, in a
push to sell, will likely offer
higher rebates on the hybrids
and EVs. The result: The cur-
rent lower-priced, best-selling,
fuel-efficient, 40-mpg, gas-
powered vehicle will end up
costing consumers more. Like
it or not!
Completely electric? Im not
the only one not sold on this.
GM closed its plant for five
weeks due to lack of sales of its
Chevy Volt. No consumer de-
mand, yet hundreds of thou-
sands invested.
And the worst part of it:
Manufacturers will need to
make cars thinner, lighter and
more compact, with more
plastic and less steel, trading
safety for lower mpg. The cost
of repairs will undoubtedly lead
to increased insurance rates.
Governments goal of getting
gas guzzlers off the road could
end up forcing people to keep
what they have. I predict no
sales and/or less gas buying,
generating billions less in fed-
eral gas-tax revenue through
2025. This we cant afford.
Michele Piccolini
Old Forge
LETTERS FROM READERS
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012
timesleader.com
etc.Entertainment Travel Culture S E C T I O N F
DEATH SPIRAL
Author: James Boedeker, 49,
lives in Meshoppen with his wife,
Sunee, and stepdaughter Natty.
He enlisted in the U.S. Navy
shortly after high school and, af-
ter serving honorably, has
workedas anindustrial mechanic
and technician for Procter and
Gamble.
Publisher: Penumbra Publish-
ing
Available: Through Amazon-
.comas ane-bookandpaperback,
through Barnes
and Noble, and
various sites
online.
Suitable for:
Mature readers
due to language
and adult con-
tent
Plot: When U.S. Navy SEAL
Robert OLeary is kicked out of
the service, he vacations in Thai-
land and finds himself declaring
war on some of the natives. He
falls in love with a disfigured
woman named Mina, whom he
sees as his last shot at redemp-
tion in a horribly broken life.
Additional books: The second
in this three-part series, Jai
Dee, will come out this month.

Q: You have no prior experi-


ence as a writer. What made you
want to write a book?
A: I have a Kindle, and when I
readstories onit that I like I leave
a positive comment on the book.
One of the authors replied to my
post, and we got to know each
other. He eventually told me he
wanted to write a sequel to his
book but didnt know where to
start, so for laughs I wrote two
paragraphs and sent it to himand
he said to me, You need to write
a book of your own, so I did.
Q: What was the writing proc-
ess like for you?
A: Well, a title actually popped
into my head and I started to
thinkabout a storytofit that title.
Its backwards, I know.
Q: This book takes place in
Thailand. How are you so famil-
iar with the culture?
A: Ive been there seven times,
and my wife and stepdaughter
are Thai. Theyre a very humble
people. Their motto is land of
the smiles, and it fits because
they smile all the time. One thing
I learned, though, is that the
smile is also a damn good poker
face. Theyll grin at you but be
thinking the worst thoughts be-
cause you just committed a taboo
act or put your nose where it
didnt belong. Thats one thing
about Thailand: Youve got to
mind your own business, espe-
cially if youre a foreigner.
Q: Youwereinthemilitary, and
so is your lead character
A: My years in the U.S. Navy
were the most valuable of my life.
Thats the first time I ever felt
proud to be me, when I was at
boot camp. One thing Imgood at
is history, and I can run like a
deer; when you get chased every
day you learn how to run.
Q: Is the character Robert like
you in any way besides a military
background?
A: His childhood is mine, for
the most part.
BOOKSHELF
Adventure series inspired by real-life experiences
By SARA POKORNY
spokorny@timesleader.com
See BOOKSHELF, Page 5F
Ben Affleck was so hellbent on direct-
ing Argo he was willing to do just about
anything to get the job. Even tell a fib or
two.
The movie, based on a true story, un-
reels the story of six Americans in 1970s
Tehran who escaped an assault on the
American embassy by fleeing to the
home of the Canadian ambassador.
The Americans spent three long, scary
months waitingfor someonetofigureout
howtorescuethem. Enter TonyMendez,
a CIA exfiltration expert who master-
minded a plan to pose as the Canadian
producer of a B-movie
called Argo. After us-
ing the movie to get
himself inside Iran,
Mendez attempted to
sneak out the Ameri-
cans bypretendingthey
were part of his crew.
When Affleck was
handed Chris Terrios
script about the little-
known incident, he
flippedfor it. He not on-
ly wanted to direct but
alsowantedtocast him-
self as Mendez.
But first he had to
convince producers
Grant Heslov and Ge-
orge Clooney as well as
the suits at Warner
Bros. that he was the
man for the job.
In college, Affleck
majoredinMiddleEast-
ern studies. He never
graduated, but he de-
cided to use his back-
ground as leverage.
IvealwaysbeeninterestedintheMiddle
East, andIvealways followedit, Affleck,
40, says. So when this came along, I was
instantly saying, I have a Ph.D. inMiddle
Eastern Studies.
Affleck laughs.
I made up all kinds of bulls--t.
Thanks to his smooth talking, Affleck
got the job. And if the reviews are any in-
dication, he aced the assignment. When
Argo premieredat therecentlyconclud-
ed Toronto Film Festival, it netted rave
notices from critics, including Roger Eb-
ert who predicted it would be the movie
to beat for this years Best Picture Oscar.
Affleck is just happy he got the chance
to direct a film that combines suspense
andHollywoodsatireinoneuniquepack-
age. The truth is that Warner Brothers
tookachanceonmetomakeamoviethat
was veryunconventional, that hadalot of
elements that could trip you up, that
would be a challenge to sell.
Indeed, after a speedy trip to the top of
the Hollywood mountain courtesy of his
Oscar-winning screenplay for Good Will
Hunting (which he wrote with best pal
Matt Damon), Affleck spent a few years
anchoring popcorn fare such as Pearl
Harbor and The Sumof All Fears.
Then came a period in the early 2000s
when he seemingly made one bad career
Ben Affleck
lands his
dream job
with Argo
Film, based on a true story from the
1970s, is actors third directing gig.
By AMY LONGSDORF
For The Times Leader
See AFFLECK, Page 4F
The truth is
that Warner
Brothers took
a chance on
me to make a
movie that
was very
unconvention-
al, that had a
lot of ele-
ments that
could trip you
up, that would
be a challenge
to sell.
L
ots of little girls like to hold an
imaginary microphone while they
sing and dance around the house.
Candice Nicole went a step fur-
ther when she was about 7 and
crafted a creative costume.
I probably wrapped a towel around my
legs and pretended it was a fin,
said the singer, who was a great
admirer of Ariel, the fairy-tale
swimmer who longed to walk
on land.
Twenty years later, Nicole is
living her dream, singing lyrics
from Disneys The Little Mer-
maid as well as Beauty and
the Beast and other songs in
conjunction with three other
singers and backed by orches-
tras from Melbourne to Dublin
to Northeastern Pennsylvania.
On Saturday evening in
Wilkes-Barre and on the after-
noon of Oct. 15 in Scranton, she
and her fellow vocalists Whit-
ney Claire Kaufman, Andrew
Johnson and Aaron Phillips will be guest per-
formers with the Northeastern Pennsylvania
Philharmonic for Disney in Concert: Mag-
ical Music from the Movies.
Images fromthe movies will be shown on a
screen while the singers and orchestra pre-
sent music from such shows as Mary Pop-
pins, The LionKing, Aladdin, Pirates of
the Caribbean, and Hunchback of Notre
Dame.
My biggest hope is for the audience to
leave with a big smile on their face and go
home to watch their favorite Disney movies
again, saidKaufman, who sings the words of
Pocahontas and Simba at dif-
ferent points in the show.
It doesnt matter how old
you are, Kaufman and Nicole
said, predicting Disney tunes
will evoke happy nostalgia for
parents and grandparents and
be a good introduction to sym-
phony music for the youngest
generation.
I think theres something
about it that renews a child-
like spirit in the grown-ups,
Kaufman said, and if they
bring young children, they can
share in their feeling of won-
der.
Adding to the enchantment,
Philharmonic spokesman
Steve Parulski said, the orchestra encourages
patrons andtheir childrentodress upas their
favorite Disney characters and take part in a
parade across the stage during the Scranton
performance.
Audience sing-alongs are planned for both
concerts.
By MARY THERESE BIEBEL mbiebel@timesleader.com
What: Disney in Con-
cert: Magical Music from
the Movies
Wilkes-Barre perform-
ance: 7 p.m. Saturday at
the F.M. Kirby Center,
Public Square
Scranton performance:
2 p.m. Sunday at Scran-
ton Cultural Center,
North Washington Ave-
nue, Scranton
Tickets: $29 to $60;
students $15
More info: 270-4444
IF YOU GO
Nicole
Kaufman
Phillips
Johnson
PAGE 2F SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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HOROSCOPE
HOROSCOPE
ARIES (March 21-April 19).
You are the one who
places a value on your
thoughts, deciding which
ones deserve credence
and action. Because you
place a low value on nega-
tive and scary thoughts,
you easily rise above
them.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20).
Sometimes you want
something, but you forget
to follow up with the ask.
Make a conscious effort
to ask today, because you
are as powerful as you
are direct. Your specific
requests will quickly be
answered.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21).
Theres a bit of fun brew-
ing in your imagination.
You will weave together
your many interests into
a single project. You will
need to pull from your
wide variety of skills to
make a project work.
CANCER (June 22-July 22).
You are sincere and hon-
est and real. Remembering
your excellent qualities
will help you gain the
confidence you need to
be stronger. Youll get
an insight about some-
thing that has been
bothering you.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). If
you seek to expand your
circle, it will be as though
the barriers between you
and those you dont know
melt away. Youll feel as
relaxed and easy-going
around strangers as you
do around your nearest
and dearest.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22).
Maybe you still dont feel
entirely secure about your
future, but you know that
whatever happens, youre
just the type of person to
find happiness while mak-
ing the most of what you
have.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23).
You are powerful because
you accept yourself fully
and feel good about your
weaknesses as well as
your strengths. You can be
happy about who you are
even as you work toward
improvement.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
21). You respect yourself
and others, and you take
responsibility for your
actions. With these prin-
ciples guiding your day,
youll live honorably and
enjoy much.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec.
21). You may not dare to
speak of gigantic goals,
afraid that theyll ring
ridiculous in your ears. But
keep thinking about them.
Mull over your dreams
long enough, and they will
start to enter the realm of
possibility.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19). Change is positive, as
long as your values stay
the same. Like a child
growing into an adult, you
wont change into some-
one youre not. You will
fulfill the potential of who
you always were.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18). Youll be in a creative
mood, and youll want
to explore new ways of
putting things together.
Make notes as you go.
Later, youll pass them on.
Always share knowledge;
your immortality depends
on it.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20).
Because you are so glori-
ously empathetic, you
assume its easy for any-
one to put themselves in
the shoes of another. Not
so. Your gift is rare. Set an
example for others, and
eventually they may
follow.
TODAYS BIRTHDAY (Oct.
7). Your playful attitude
invites good fortune and
affection this month.
A financial transaction
makes your life easier in
November. In December,
youll frequently be a
host. 2013 opens with a
pervasive sense of calm.
You become powerful as
things slow down, and you
enjoy life for what it is
while plotting what could
be. Aquarius and Taurus
people adore you. Your
lucky numbers are: 7, 3, 19,
35 and 29.
HIGH JINKS
Amy Johnson
10/7/12
1. Each row and each column must contain the numbers 1 through 4. 2. The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes, called
cages, must combine using the given operation (in any order) to produce the target numbers in the top-left corners. 3. Freebies:
Fill in single-box cages with the number in the top-left corner.
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 PAGE 3F
D I V E R S I O N S
For information about WonderWord volumes and Treasuries, call Universal Press Syndicate at 1-800-255-6734.
WONDERWORD
By David Ouellet
Cryptograms New York Times
Bonus Puzzle Diagramless
GOREN BRIDGE
LAST WEEKS PUZZLE ANSWERS
WITH OMAR SHARIF
& TANNAH HIRSCH
1995 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
UNIVERSAL SUDOKU
UNIVERSAL SUDOKU KIDS
MINUTE MAZE
PREVIOUS DAYS SOLUTION
PREVIOUS SUNDAYS SOLUTION
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O N T H E W E B
HOW TO CONTACT:
Dear Abby: PO Box 69440, Los Angeles,
CA 90069
10/7
DEAR ABBY
Addiction to prescribed
pills is still an addiction
Dear Abby:
My Aunt
Betty, with
whom I have
always been
close, is 68
and retired.
She is abusing prescription
drugs and spends several
days a week passed out or
confused sometimes hal-
lucinating. I rarely call her
anymore because all she
does is mumble and make
odd comments. Sometimes
she passes out on the phone.
My uncle is in denial. He
comes from a generation
where family problems are
kept within the family. He
refuses to seek professional
treatment for her or get her
into detox. Caring for Aunt
Betty is affecting his health,
but he refuses to budge.
Please dont tell me to
notify her doctor I already
tried. Aunt Betty is an ac-
complished manipulator and
doctor-shops until she finds
new doctors who load her
up when the old ones wont
cooperate. She does have
genuine health issues that re-
quire meds, but her doctors
have said she would never
be stoned if she used them
properly.
Confronting my aunt
when shes coherent only
makes her angry. She denies
shes abusing drugs because
they are all prescription.
My mom is dead and Im
worried about my aunt and
uncles health. Help!
Desperate Niece in Florida
Dear Desperate: Start call-
ing your aunt more often,
because addiction is an ill-
ness and denial is one of the
symptoms. Older people do
react differently to medica-
tions than younger ones do,
and a dose that might be
tolerated when someone is
middle-aged can be too great
for a senior.
Because your uncle isnt
able to insist that your aunt
get professional help, allow
me to offer a suggestion.
The next time she passes out
during one of your phone
conversations, do what youd
normally do if someone else
lost consciousness while
talking to you. Call 911.
When she winds up in the
emergency room, her doc-
tor will be alerted about the
overdose. It would be a first
step in seeing her get the
help she needs.
P.S. Theres a common
misconception among older
people that because a drug is
prescription its somehow
not addictive. And your aunt
isnt the first person to fall
into this trap.
Dear Abby: Our wedding
plans have taken a sudden
turn. My fiancee, Carolyn,
has a wealthy father with a
reputation for being an ex-
treme tightwad. Carolyn was
profoundly touched when he
offered to pay for most of the
wedding expenses.
Last night, Carolyns
mother confessed to us
that Carolyns father is not
paying for the wedding. He
is deducting the expenses
from Carolyns inheritance
from her grandmother. (The
father is executor of her
grandmothers estate.) He
has no idea that his wife told
Carolyn, and were sworn to
secrecy because she will get
into deep, deep trouble if
he finds out she told.
To make matters worse,
he has the gall to make de-
mands about the wedding
as if he was paying for it
himself.
Carolyn is so deeply hurt
by this deception that she
doesnt even want her par-
ents to attend the wedding.
All of the joy has gone out of
the wedding for her and
therefore, for me as well.
Abby, how do you think
we should handle this?
Flummoxed Fiance in
New York
Dear Flummoxed Fiance: I
think you should elope.
For everything you need
to know about wedding plan-
ning, order How to Have a
Lovely Wedding. Send your
name and mailing address,
plus check or money order
for $7 (U.S. funds) to: Dear
Abby, Wedding Booklet, P.O.
Box 447, Mount Morris, IL
61054-0447. (Shipping and
handling are included in the
price.)
To receive a collection of Abbys most memorable and most
frequently requested poems and essays, send a business-
sized, self-addressed envelope, plus check or money order for
$3.95 ($4.50 in Canada) to: Dear Abbys Keepers, P.O. Box
447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage is included.)
A D V I C E
KenKen
10/7
New York Times
10/7
Bonus Puzzle
10/7
PAGE 4F SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
E T C .
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DOES NOT PLAY ON SUNDAY, 10/7)
RESIDENT EVIL: RETRIBUTION (3D) (R)
7:45PM
RESIDENT EVIL: RETRIBUTION
(DIGITAL) (R)
2:40PM
TAKEN 2 (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
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(1:20PM 4:30PM 7:25PM 10:05PM DO
NOT PLAY ON WEDNESDAY, 10/10)
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move after another. See bombs
such as Gigli, Man About
Town and Surviving Christ-
mas. And his increasingly color-
ful personal life included starring
in videos for gal pal Jennifer Lo-
pez. Affleck became, in the words
of Vanity Fair, a national punch-
ing bag.
But he had a comeback strate-
gy. Around the same time he mar-
riedactress Jennifer Garner (with
whom he has three children), he
pulled himself out of his career
slump by putting himself behind
the camera.
First came Gone Baby Gone,
which he co-wrote and directed.
Affleck cast his brother Casey in
the starring role and shot the mo-
vie for a mere $19 million in his
home turf of Boston. The filmgot
solid reviews and did well enough
at the box office so he was able to
direct The Town, his second
Boston-set feature.
Argoisarguablythebest of Af-
flecks directorial efforts, but he
refuses totake muchcredit, point-
ing to supporting players such as
Breaking Bads Bryan Cranston,
John Goodman, Alan Arkin and
Rory Cochrane.
While crafting the film, Affleck
is the first to admit he took some
liberties with the facts. He com-
pressedeventsandmadethemain
action a footnote tothe Iranhos-
tage crisis, which lasted 444 days
much easier to follow.
Theres a clear divide between
documentaries, where youexpect
a stricter adherence to facts and
truth and history, and to our mo-
vie where we say, Based on a true
story.
In fact, because we say, Based
on and I learned this from the
lawyers rather than This is a
true story, its understood that
were allowed to take some dra-
matic license. But we got really
lucky because most of what really
happened is extremely compell-
ing, andthecharacters wereall ve-
ry interesting.
In at least one department, Af-
fleck was determined that not a
hair, so to speak, would be out of
place. While figuring out how as-
sortedmembersof thecast should
look, Affleck went for full-on 70s-
era shag haircuts and bushy mus-
taches.
I had to grow out this kind of
like Davy Jones/Barry Gibb thing
that I hadonmyheadformonths,
Affleck says with a laugh. But ev-
erybody really went for it. There
was no vanity among the actors.
There was no, like, I have to look
good in the movie. Everybody
said, How much can I look like
the real people?
Afflecks attention to detail
didnt just win over the critics.
The real-life Tony Mendez en-
joyed the movie so much he turn-
ed up for its Toronto premiere.
We were going to the screen-
ing, and its the big, red-carpet
thing, Affleck says. I said, Tony,
all these people are here to watch
thestoryof your lifeandseeall the
things that you did. Whats that
like? He goes, Its good.
I was, like, All right. I guess
once a spy always a spy.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Bryan Cranston, as Jack ODonnell, and Ben Affleck, as Tony Men-
dez, in Argo, a rescue thriller about the 1979 Iranian hostage crisis.
AFFLECK
Continued from Page 1F
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 PAGE 5F
BOOKS
timesleader.com
Q: He has a rough childhood, so Imassum-
ing yours was, too.
A: Growing up was embarrassing; my life
wasnt easy. I had a cleft palate so I was a tar-
get to begin with. Then add that my parents
were really hard on me It wasnt a good
childhood at all.
Q: The character of Mina very much shows
signs of someone whos been ridiculed for her
appearance. Did you use any of your experi-
ence for that character?
A: When I talk about howevery time some-
one looked at her, her shoulders slumped like
shed been slapped, thats how it feels. I defi-
nitely imparted some of how I felt into Mina.
To this day, everyone tells me I look fine, but
thats not what I see whenI look inthe mirror.
This is also true for Robert.
Q: You have a strong opinion about bully-
ing, then?
A: One of the things Imstrongly in support
of is the anti-bullying laws because Im a vic-
tim. I love when people say fight back. How
does a kid that weighs 119 pounds fight half
the football team? You just swallow it day af-
ter day, and you either turn into a bully your-
self or you take my route and decide youre
going to stick up for the underdog.
BOOKSHELF
Continued from Page 1F
HARDCOVER FICTION
1. The Casual Vacancy. J.K. Rowling. Little,
Brown ($35)
2. Winter of the World. Ken Follett. Dutton ($36)
3. Gone Girl. Gillian Flynn. Crown ($25)
4. The Time Keeper. Mitch Albom. Hyperion
($24.99)
5. A Wanted Man. Lee Child. Delacorte ($28)
6. Low Pressure. Sandra Brown. Grand Central
($26.99)
7. Zoo. Patterson/Ledwidge. Little, Brown
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8. Severe Clear. Stuart Woods. Putnam ($26.95)
9. Delusion in Death. J.D. Robb. Putnam
($27.95)
10. Founders. James Wesley Rawles. Atria
($25.99)
HARDCOVER NONFICTION
1. No Easy Day. Mark Owen. Dutton ($26.95)
2. Waging Heavy Peace. Neil Young. Blue Rider
Press ($30)
3. I Declare. Joel Osteen. FaithWords ($21.99)
4. One Last Strike. Tony La Russa. William
Morrow ($27.99)
5. Guinness World Records. ($28.95)
6. The Financial Crisis ... John A. Allison.
McGraw-Hill ($28)
7. Mugged. Ann Coulter. Sentinel ($26.95)
8. The Price of Politics. Bob Woodward. Simon
& Schuster ($30)
9. Joseph Anton. Salman Rushdie. Random
House ($30)
10. Killing Lincoln. Bill OReilly. Henry Holt ($28)
BEST BETS
David Wong
wakes up with a
horrific spiderlike
creature biting his
leg that only he can
see. In This Book
Is Full of Spiders:
Seriously Dude, Dont Touch It, the
nightmare is just beginningfor Wong.
The story is told primarily from his
point of view, and its not clear right
away if what hes seeingis real or if its
inhis twistedimagination.
Wong is also listed as the author of
the book, and that adds an extra level
of madness to the proceedings. The
author is Jason Pargin, senior editor
and columnist for Cracked.com, a hu-
mor website. The comedic and crack-
ling dialogue also brings a whimsical
flairtothestory, makingitseemlikean
episodeofAMCsTheWalkingDead
written by Douglas Adams of The
Hitchhikers GuidetotheGalaxy.
ThenovelisasequeltoJohnDiesat
theEnd,butWongtellsreadersonthe
first page not to bother with the first
bookbecausea freshstart is better.
The spider that bites Wong contin-
uestoattackhim, andhesluckynot to
betakenoverbythisparasiticlikecrea-
ture. Acopshows upandends upcon-
sumed by the monster. Soon other
people in the town begin showing
signs of being controlled, and Wong
can see millions of the spiders every-
where. He asks his friend, John, and
his girlfriend, Amy, for help in stop-
pingthe madness. Mysterious portals
to the womens underwear section of
Wal-Mart, soy sauce and a strange
therapist addtothemix.
Imagine a mentally ill narrator de-
scribing the zombie apocalypse while
drunk, andtheendresult is unlikeany
other bookof thegenre.
Seriously, dude, touchit andreadit.
Spiders
is worth
the danger
This Book Is Full of Spiders: Seriously
Dude, Dont Touch It (Thomas Dunne
Books), by David Wong
By JEFF AYERS
For The Associated Press
A
ndwethought weowed
Julia Child a word of
thanks for bringing
cremebruleeandchampagneto
American palates.
According to author Thomas J.
Craughwell and his meticulously
researched book, Thomas Jeffer-
sons Creme Brulee: How a Found-
ing Father and His Slave James
Hemings Introduced French Cui-
sine to America, it was Thomas
Jefferson in the 1780s who was re-
sponsible for such then-exotic de-
lights.
Craughwell weaves the surpris-
ing and little-known story of how
Jefferson promised and later grant-
ed freedom albeit belatedly
to Hemings inexchange for his cul-
inary training in France and chef
services at home inMonticello, Jef-
fersons plantation in Virginia. But
it also teaches us about 18th-centu-
ry American eating habits, an
equally fascinating subject to even
the most casual of foodies.
Despite the ocean, lakes and riv-
ers crowded with cod and bass,
clams and mussels, even lobster
none of this was deemed palatable
to the early colonial settlers. In-
stead, they boiled their meat and
game, overcooked their vegetables
and heavily sweetened their des-
serts.
Craughwell also illuminates Jef-
ferson, the farmer. He developed
more efficient ways to raise crops,
increase harvests and limit pests.
He tried endless varieties of fruits,
nuts and wines, and experimented
with European crops that he
thought might thrive in the U.S.,
including rice, which he smuggled
illegally out of Italy.
He also shares everything he
learned about Hemings, a slave 20
years Jeffersons junior, whoserved
as his chef for more than a decade
and whose sister, Sally, may have
been the mother of several of their
owners children.
And, remarkably, the book in-
cludes several of Hemings recipes
eight written in his own hand
have survived and nearly 150 oth-
ers were passed down by Jefferson
or his granddaughters. They in-
clude ice cream, macaroni and
cheese and, of course, creme bru-
lee.
THANKS JEFFERSON
Thomas Jeffersons Creme Brulee: How a Founding Father and His Slave James Hemings Introduced French Cuisine
to America (Quirk Books), by Thomas J. Craughwell
By KIM CURTIS
For The Associated Press
Founding father brought crme brulee to America
PAGE 6F SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
T R A V E L
BEL L ES
C O N S TRUC TIO N C O . IN C .
PA012959
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Call or visit us online for details on many other tours.
821-3855 or 1-800-432-8069 www.martztours.com
SALEM & BOSTON
HALLOWEEN 3-DAY
Oct. 19-21 ($474) Two for the
Boo! Salem for its Haunted
Happenings and 17th Century
witch lore, and Boston for a spirit-
raising Ghost Walk. Lizzie Borden
House, free time in Newport.
KING OF
PRUSSIA MALL
Oct. 27 ($35) Over 400 stores!
Grand names in brand names, and
many mall merchant discounts for
early Christmas shoppers.
PHILADELPHIA
GHOST TOUR
Oct. 13, 20 ($75) Whats
in store? Spooks galore!
Independence National
Park and Eastern State
Penitentiary.
COMING SATURDAY OCTOBER 20 & SUNDAY OCTOBER 21
ADVERTISING
DEADLINE:
TUES., OCTOBER 16
TO PLACE AN AD CALL:
JOYCE LANGAN
970-7424
TRIXIE JACKSON
829-7104
jlangan@timesleader.com
bjackson@timesleader.com
CALL NOWTO PLACE YOUR AD!
OPEN HOUSE
WEEKEND
A SPECIAL REAL ESTATE CLASSIFIED EDITION
FOR LUZERNE/LACKAWANNA COUNTY HOME BUYERS
SANFRANCISCOThe spot
where Jimmy Stewart saved Kim
Novak in Vertigo is at Fort
Point, just under the base of the
Golden Gate Bridge.
Afewmiles down the bay is Al-
catraz, where Nicolas Cage and
SeanConnerypreventedmissiles
from launching and Clint East-
woodmay or may not have escap-
ed. Up onshore, theres Coit Tow-
er, City Hall, the Transamerica
Pyramid, all those hills that have
been the setting for so many
chase scenes.
Filled with iconic landmarks,
breathtaking scenery and a wide
range of locations, San Francisco
has a long history as a favorite
site for filmmakers and the
movie buffs who want to see the
places where their favorite
scenes were filmed.
So many people are so famil-
iar with the icons, with the land-
marks of San Francisco, said
BryanRice, owner of SanFrancis-
co Movie Tours. You can show
the Golden Gate Bridge, you can
show the Transamerica Pyramid
in the background, show these
different places where people are
familiar with and it draws people
in.
The Bay Areas moviemaking
history goes back to the begin-
ning of film, to Eadweard Muy-
bridges study of a horse gallop-
ing in Palo Alto, widely regarded
as the first motion picture ever
made.
Charlie Chaplins movies and
many of the first silent films were
shot near San Francisco, along
with parts of The Jazz Singer,
the first talkie released in1927.
Alfred Hitchcock loved shoot-
inginthe Bay Area, as didGeorge
Lucas and Clint Eastwood.
Its easy to see why: The bay,
the bridge, the landmarks, and a
variety of elevations for interest-
ing angles to shoot from. Loca-
tions are diverse: downtown, the
waterfront, the Painted Ladies
Victorian homes, Chinatown, the
gritty Tenderloin. Film noir can
be shot in the fog; a screwball
comedy can bounce along hilly
streets. Many films shot in San
Francisco are written for the city,
so it, in a sense, becomes a char-
acter in the movie.
San Francisco still attracts mo-
vie-makers, with more than 100
films shot here in the past decade
and 16 last year, but more are in-
dependent or from small local
companies than in the past. Still
the citys long history of film of-
fers plenty of iconic spots to visit.
Here are just a few.
ALCATRAZ: In Birdman of
Alcatraz, Escape from Alca-
traz, Murder in the First, The
Rock, The Enforcer.
A federal penitentiary from
1934-63, The Rock housed no-
torious criminals including Al
Capone, George Machine Gun
Kelly and James Whitey Bul-
ger. Now a national park, Alca-
traz offers visitors a chance to
tour the prison.
Round-trip ferry to Alcatraz,
$28-$32 including audio tour, ev-
ery half-hour starting about 9
a.m.: http://www.alcatrazcruis-
es.com
FORT POINT, GOLDEN
GATE BRIDGE: In Foul Play,
Dopamine, High Anxiety,
Petulia, Point Blank, Verti-
go, The Presidio.
Built to protect the San Fran-
cisco Bay from Confederate and
foreign attack during the Civil
War, Fort Point is where Stewart
savedNovak inVertigo, right at
the base. The bridge also has
been blown up countless times
on film, including in X-Men 3
and Monsters vs. Aliens.
COIT TOWER: In Boys &
Girls, After the Thin Man, Dr.
Dolittle, Sister Act 2, The En-
forcer, The Presidio, The
Rock, Innerspace.
The narrow, white concrete co-
lumn atop Telegraph Hill has
beena part of SanFranciscos sky-
line since1933andoffers spectac-
ular views of the bay and the city.
Observation deck, $7 for non-res-
idents, $5 seniors and youth (12-
17), $2 kids (5-11), http://sfrec-
park.org/CoitTower.aspx.
CITY HALL: In A View to a
Kill, Bedazzled, Bicentennial
Man, Class Action, Final
Analysis, Foul Play, Invasion
of the Body Snatchers, Jagged
Edge, Magnum Force, Milk,
The Rock, The Wedding Plan-
ner.
City Hall has one of the largest
domes in the world and replaced
a structure destroyed in the 1906
earthquake. It was used exten-
sively at the end of Invasion of
the Body Snatchers and Sean
Penn, inhis AcademyAward-win-
ning portrayal of gay rights activ-
ist Harvey Milk, gave an impas-
sioned speech on its steps. ALA-
MO SQUARE: In Murder in the
First, Nine Months, The Con-
versation, Mrs. Doubtfire.
The neighborhood and park
are among the most photo-
graphed spots in San Francisco
because of the Painted Ladies, a
row of Victorian houses facing
the park on Steiner Street. The
Ladies have been a favorite of
filmandtelevisionproducers and
were used in the opening shot for
the sitcom Full House. The
house where Robin Williams
dressedup as Mrs. Doubtfire pos-
ing as his ex-wifes nanny is north
of the park at Steiner and Broad-
way.
WHERE TO EAT: One of the
citys oldest restaurants, Johns
Grill, 63 Ellis St., was a setting in
author Dashiell Hammetts The
Maltese Falcon. The interior
looks just as you would picture it
from the book, filled with origi-
nal period furnishings. A great
place to get steaks or a few cock-
tails while taking in the atmo-
sphere.
WHERE TO STAY: A quaint
boutique hotel, the Bijou, 111Ma-
son near Union Square, offers the
full Hollywood-in-San Francisco
experience. The hotel is de-
signedinthe theme of classic mo-
vie palace and portraits frommo-
vies decorate the walls. Each
roomis named after a movie shot
in San Francisco and theres a
mini movie theater off the lobby
that shows nightly double fea-
tures of San Francisco-based mo-
vies. Rates starting at low $100s;
http://www.hotelbijou.com.
SAN FRANCISCO MOVIE
TOURS: http://www.sanfrancis-
comovietours.com/ . Daily, 10:30
a.m., $47, three hours.
San Franciscos movie landmarks
AP PHOTOS
A sailboat makes its way past Alcatraz Island in San Francisco.
Rock, bridge, bay all hot tourist spots
By JOHN MARSHALL The Associated Press
People pose for pictures, and a car makes its way down Lombard
Street with Coit Tower on Telegraph Hill in the background.
The old neon sign hanging
above Johns Grill.
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 PAGE 1G
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PAGE 2G SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
150 Special Notices 150 Special Notices
230 Real Estate
Auction
250 General Auction
230 Real Estate
Auction
250 General Auction
230 Real Estate
Auction
250 General Auction 250 General Auction
Octagon Family
Restaurant
375 W Main St, Plymouth, PA 18651
570-779-2288
W Weekend S eekend Special pecial
$13.95 $13.95 for a Large Plain
Pie & a Dozen Wings
Dine in only. Valid Saturday & Sunday.
One coupon per party/table.
Cannot be combined with any other offers.
Home of the Original O-Bar Pizza
7
8
1
0
4
4
AUCTION
Location: 130 Marvin Rd, Shickshinny, PA.
(Muhlenberg Corners Area) From Huntington
Mills turn onto Shickshinny Lake Rd. & go
approx. 4 miles to stop sign and turn right. Trav-
el 1 mile and turn right onto Benscoter Rd. Go 1
mile to stop sign and turn left onto Marvin Rd. If
traveling Rt. 11, turn onto Main Rd at the old
Hunlock Creek Post Office Building & go
approx. 6 miles to 4 way stop sign. Go straight
through approx. 200 yards and turn left onto
Benscoter Rd.
Sat., October 13, @9 A.M.
Antiques, Firearms & Equipment
Oak C Roll Top Desk from Shamokin Railroad
Station, excellent condition; Oak Hall Tree; Oak
Dressers; Stoneware Crocks & Jugs; Dome Top
Trunks; Oak Parlor Stand; Oak Drop Front Desk;
Small Hoosier Style Cupboard; E.R. Heller
Milling Co. Flour Sacks; Students Lamp; RCA
Floor Model Victrola, working condition; Singer
Treadle Sewing Machine; Butcher Kettle; Ox
Yoke; Wicker Fishing Creel; Snow Shoes;
Wooden Wagon Seat and Springs; Mizuho
Brand Slot Machine; 1 & 2 Man Cross Cut
Saws; Rug Beaters; Early Map of PA; Wehrle
Co. Brand Parlor Stove; Kodak Model B Folding
Brownie; Wicker Rockers; Kenmore Auto Wash-
er & Speed Queen Dryer; Small Chest Freezer;
Sharp TV; Custom TV Cabinet; Air Conditioner;
Carved Wooden Bear; Wooden Settee; Heavy
Pine Coffee Table; Steel Fire Pit; Bar Stools;
Small Cedar Chest; Bear Lamp; Cherry Hutch;
Computer Center; Remington M760 BDL 30-06;
Browning BPS 12 Gauge with 2 bbls; Reming-
ton M522 Semi 22 cal. Rifle; Meriden 12 Ga.
Double Bbl; Flobert 22 cal. Rifle; Modern Ken-
tucky Flintlock 50 Cal. Rifle; Air Rifle; Spinning
Rods & Reels; Knives & Bayonets; Fish
Mounts; Canadian Black Bear Rug; Boar Head;
Fiberglass Canoe; 2 Wheel Car Dolly; Sears
Radial Arm Saw; Chain Saws; New Bench
Vices; Sears 5 Hp. Air Compressor; Lincoln AC
DC Stick Welder; Battery Charger; Acet/Oxy.
Tanks & Gauges; Floor Jack; Appliance Cart;
4000 Watt Generator with electric start; Car-
pentry & Mechanical Hand Tools; John Deere
210 Lawn Tractor; Sears 12 hp. Lawn Tractor;
Noma 18hp. Lawn Tractor; 2 Wheel Dump Cart;
High Wheel Push Lawn Mower; Troy-Bilt
Junior Model Rear Tine Tiller, like new; Alum.
Ext. Ladders; Lawn & Garden Tools; Terms:
Cash or PA Check. Lunch Available. Bring
Chairs Auctioneers Note: Jim & Jean have sold
their home and makes auction necessary. This
will be an all day auction. Owners: James & Jean
Merrion
7
8
0
9
8
6
AUTO
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
460
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
472 Auto Services
$ WANTED JUNK $
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310 Attorney
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135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
DEADLINES
Saturday
12:30 on Friday
Sunday
4:00 pm on
Friday
Monday
4:30 pm on
Friday
Tuesday
4:00 pm on
Monday
Wednesday
4:00 pm on
Tuesday
Thursday
4:00 pm on
Wednesday
Friday
4:00 pm on
Thursday
Holidays
call for deadlines
You may email
your notices to
mpeznowski@
timesleader.com
or fax to
570-831-7312
or mail to
The Times Leader
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711
For additional
information or
questions regard-
ing legal notices
you may call
Marti Peznowski
at 570-970-7371
or 570-829-7130
LEGAL NOTICE
Middle Smithfield
Township, Monroe
County,
Pennsylvania
SEEKS MUNICIPAL
CERTIFIED PUBLIC
ACCOUNTANT /
AUDITOR
REQUEST FOR
PROPOSAL Due By:
October 26,
4:00pm
NOTICE TO
RESPONDENTS
See www.Middle-
SmithfieldTown-
ship.com for pack-
age or email
MiddleSmithfield-
Township@
gmail.com with
REQUEST RFP FOR
CPA in the subject
line, or call 570-
223-8920, x10
135 Legals/
Public Notices
NON_PROFESSION-
AL BRIDGE INSPEC-
TION SERVICES
Prime Engineering,
Inc. (PRIME) has
been contracted by
the Pennsylvania
Department of
Transportation to
perform bridge
safety inspections
in Susquehanna and
Wyoming Counties.
PennDOT approved
Contractors will be
required to provide
hands-on access to
PennDOT certified
bridge safety
inspectors as
directed. PRIME
will accept bid
package requests
for the following
services: Mainte-
nance and Protec-
tion of Traffic, Lift
Vehicle with 45
minimum reach.
Contractors can
present bids for
one or multiple
services. Multiple
bridge safety
inspections are to
be conducted from
October 2012
through June 2017.
PRIME will accept
separate, sealed
bids from qualified
Contractors until
2:00 PM, Monday,
October 8, 2012 in
the PRIME office
located at 224 St.
Charles Way, Suite
290, York, PA,
17402. Bid pack-
age requests or
other inquiries can
be obtained from
John Branyan at the
same address or at
717.881.4696.
PRIME will award
the contract to the
lowest responsible
bidder. PRIME
reserves the right
to reject any or all
bids deemed not in
in conformance
with the bid require-
ments. All pro-
ceedings are sub-
ject to PennDOT
approval.
PUBLIC NOTICE
Pursuant to 53 Pa.
C.S. Section 2952
of the Home Rule
Charter and Option-
al Plans Law,
NOTICE is hereby
given that the City
of Pittston shall
conduct a referen-
dum at the 2012
General Election on
November 6, 2012
between the hours
of 7:00a.m. and
8:00p.m.
In the City of
Pittston, the ques-
tion shall appear as
follows:
Shall the Home
Rule Charter con-
tained in the report,
dated August 27,
2012, of the Gov-
ernment Study
Commission, pre-
pared in accor-
dance with the
Home Rule Charter
and Optional Plans
Law, be adopted by
Pittston City?
YES _____ NO _____
Joseph Moskovitz
City Clerk/Manager
145 Prayers
O Holy St. Jude,
Apostle and Martyr,
great in virtue and
rich in Miracles,
near kinsman of
Jesus Christ, faithful
intercessor of all
who invoke your
special patronage in
time of need, to you
I have recourse
from the depth of
my heart and
humbly beg to
whom God has
given such great
power to come to
my assistance. Help
me in my present
and urgent petition.
In return, I promise
to make your name
known and cause
you to be invoked.
St. Jude pray for us
and all who invoke
your aid Amen. Say
three Our Fathers,
Hail Marys and Glo-
rias. Publication
must be prompt.
The Novena has
never been known
to fail. I have had my
request granted.
N R
To place your
ad call...829-7130
150 Special Notices
ADOPTING
YOUR NEWBORN
is our dream.
Endless love, joy,
security awaits.
Maryann and Matt
888-225-7173
Expenses Paid
< < < < < <
150 Special Notices
Need a fun and
sweet wedding
favor? Try a
candy buffet
with candies
matching the
color of your
wedding.
Everyones
sweet tooth will
be satisfied.
bridezella.net
FOSTER PARENT(S)
NEEDED
IMMEDIATELY
for teens or sibling
groups.
Compensation,
training, and 24
hour on-call sup-
port provided.
Please call
FRIENDSHIP
HOUSE (570) 342-
8305 x 2058.
Compensation up
to $1200.00 per
month per child.
W WANTED ANTED
MALE SINGERS MALE SINGERS
570-285-4810
200
AUCTIONS
230 Real Estate
Auction
HOME CARE
Reliable, Pleasant,
Experienced
Woman seeks posi-
tion as companion.
Appts, errands, etc.
570-823-8636.
310 Attorney
Services
BANKRUPTCY
FREE CONSULT
Guaranteed
Low Fees
Payment Plan!
Colleen Metroka
570-592-4796
Mention this ad
when you call!
DIVORCE No Fault
$295 divorce295.com
Atty. Kurlancheek
800-324-9748 W-B
Free Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty. Sherry
Dalessandro
570-823-9006
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
360 Instruction &
Training
ATTEND COLLEGE
ONLINE from Home.
*Medical, *Business,
*Criminal Justice,
*Hospitality. Job
placement assis-
tance. Computer
available. Financial
Aid if qualified.
SCHEV authorized.
Call 888-220-3984.
www.Centura
Online.com
380 Travel
NYC/RADIO CITY
Christmas Show
Veterans Day, 11/12
$85 bus/ticket. $32
bus only. 574-6375
380 Travel
BROADWAY
SHOW
BUS TRIPS
A CHRISTMAS
STORY
WED. DEC. 12th
$150 Orch seats
RADIO CITY
XMAS SHOW
Mon. Nov. 26
$90.
Wed. Dec. 12
$95.
Sat. Dec 15th
$130.
ALL SHOWS
INCLUDE BUS
& SHOW
CALL ROSEANN
@ 655-4247
To Reserve
Your Seats
CALL US ABOUT
9/14 to 9/22, 2013
All inclusive Cruise
from $1399.00 per
person.
Inside Cabin
******************
NCL Gem
6/15 to 6/22/2013
to Bahamas from
$939.00 per per-
son. Inside Cabin
******************
Royal Carribbean
12/13 to 12/23/2012
Explorer of the
Seas to Caribbean
10 nights. From
$855.00 per person
Inside Cabin
******************
Tenenbaums
Travel
288-8747
CAMEO
HOUSE
BUS TOURS
NOV. 10 NYC
CHOCOLATE SHOW
9/11 MEMORIAL
CENTURY 21
DISCOUNT
STORE
NOV. 17 PHILA
Lunch at LeBec
Fin, Exhibit &
Barnes Museum
LIMITED
SPACE
FOR BOTH
call 570-655-3420
or email
Anne.Cameo
@verizon.net
www.cameohouse
bustours.com
LIKE US
FUN GETAWAYS!
Mountain of
Vermont & New
Hampshire
5 day Oct 8-12
includes: 8
meals, train ride,
cruise & more!
Englishtown
Flea Market
Oct 6
Jersey Boys
Oct 13
Salem & Boston
Halloween
Happenings
Oct. 19-21
Philadelphia
Ghost Tour &
Eastern &
State
Penitentiary
Oct. 20
Giants/Redskins
10/21
1-800-432-8069
380 Travel
RAINBOW
TOURS
570-489-4761
NYC Wed/Sat $34
JERSEY BOYS
10/13 OR 10/17
WICKED 10/17
$141 ORCHESTRA
SUN NYC TRIP
10/14
MARY POPPINS
Bus Only $34
A DELICIOUS
EVENT NYC
CHOCOLATE
SHOW
SUN TRIP 11/11
$85 (child $40)
RADIO CITY
SHOWS
Nov - Dec Dates
A CHRISTMAS
STORY
Broadway Musical
11/11
Please Call on
Prices
Depart Park/Ride
R 309 or R 315
SPORTING EVENTS
Oct. 6th
NASCAR at Dover
$144 includes
breakfast & buffet
after race.
OVERNIGHT TRIPS
Salem
Oct 26th, 27th &
28th
$209. Includes Bus
transportation &
hotel.
COOKIES
TRAVELERS
570-815-8330
570-558-6889
cookiestravelers.com
406 ATVs/Dune
Buggies
HAMMERHEAD 09
DUNE BUGGY
SIDE BY SIDE 250
SS AUTOMATIC
HIGH LOW RANGE
HEADLIGHTS
TURN SIGNALS
ELECTRIC START
500 MILES GREAT
CONDITION 2500.
CALL ANYTIME
570-394-6446
HAWK 2011 UTILITY ATV
NEW!! Full size
adult ATV. Strong 4
stroke motor. CVT
fully automatic
transmission with
reverse. Electric
start. Front & rear
luggage racks.
Long travel suspen-
sion. Disc brakes.
Dual stage head
lights. Perfect for
hunters & trail rid-
ers alike. BRAND NEW
& READY TO RIDE.
$1,995 takes it
away.
570-817-2952
Wilkes-Barre
409 Autos under
$5000
MERCURY `79 ZEPHYR
6 cylinder
automatic.
52k original miles.
$1500. OBO
570-899-1896
409 Autos under
$5000
CADILLAC `94
DEVILLE SEDAN
94,000 miles,
automatic, front
wheel drive, 4
door, air condi-
tioning, air bags,
all power, cruise
control, leather
interior, $3,300.
570-394-9004
CADILLAC `99
DEVILLE
White, beige leather
interior, fully
equipped.
Inspected. $1,750.
(570)299-0772
DODGE 98 NEON
Moving must sell.
Excellent condition.
109,000 mi. 4 cylin-
der great on gas.
$1995 Neg.
570-436-3779
570-459-1913
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
FORD 95 F150
4x4. 1 Owner. 91K.
4.8 engine, auto.
Runs great. New
paint, stake body
with metal floor.
570-675-5046.
Leave message,
will return call.
$4495.
LEOS AUTO SALES
93 Butler St
Wilkes-Barre, PA
570-825-8253
Ford 01 Explorer
4 door, 6 cylinder,
auto, 4WD
$2,650
Ford 95 Ranger
PickUp with cap
6 cylinder, auto,
2WD
$1,950
Current Inspection
On All Vehicles
DEALER
409 Autos under
$5000
SUBARU `01 OUTBACK
151,000 miles, all-
wheel drive, runs
well, green. $1,995.
(570) 693-4080
after 5:00 p.m.
412 Autos for Sale
AUDI `01 A6
4.2 Engine, V8
good condition.
Quatro awd, abs 4
wheel, navigation
system, integrated
phone, plus all stan-
dard Audi options.
Super clean,
garage kept,
recently inspected.
If you ever wanted
an Audi, heres
your opportunity!
Per Kelly Blue Book
$5500.
Asking $4,900.
570-678-5618
570-574-3441
BMW `95 325I
Convertible, power
roof, manual trans-
mission, black/tan
leather, 1 owner,
garage kept. Com-
plete service
record. Very good
condition. 206K.
KBB value $4,000,
asking $3,000.
(570)655-4465
BUICK 04
LESABRE
Silver.
32K miles. Very
nice condition.
$9,950.
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
CADILLAC `01 DEVILLE
Black, gold pack-
age, heated seats,
exquisite grill, vogue
tires & wheels, car-
riage top, back up
sensors. You name
it, this car has it!
$7495
570-457-7854
412 Autos for Sale
CADILLAC 05
DEVILLE
One owner, low
miles, Pearl White,
new tires.
Warranty. $12,500.
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
CADILLAC 06 DTS
Grey, low miles,
local trade.
Performance pack-
age with navigation.
sunroof. $17,900.
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
Selling your
Camper?
Place an ad and
find a new owner.
570-829-7130
CHEVY 04
MONTE CARLO SS
Extra Sharp.
Warranty. $6,995
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
FORD 02 MUSTANG
GT CONVERTIBLE
Red with black
top. 6,500 miles.
One Owner.
Excellent Condi-
tion. $17,500
570-760-5833
HYUNDAI 05
ELANTRA GT
84,000 miles,
leather, excellent
condition, includes
power train
warranty. $7,000
(570) 262-0919
412 Autos for Sale
01 LINCOLN TOWN
CAR Executive
74K $5,399
06 Dodge
Caravan 57k
$7,299
06 Chrysler
Sebring Conv.
Touring 60K
$7,499
06 Dodge
Stratus SXT
6 cyl, AT-AC 62K
$7,599
05 Chrysler
T & C 63k
$7,699
06 FORD FREESTAR
62k, Rear air A/C
$7,799
05 CHEVY
MALIBU Only 36k,
Private Owner
$9,299
07 Ford Escape
4X4 XLT 83K
$10,399
12 Ford Fusion
25k factory
warranty $15,399
09 Subaru
Forester
4x4 11k red
$15,799
11 Nissan Rogue
AWD, 27k
Factory warranty
$17,199
11 Mitsubishi
Endeavor
4x4 26k
Factory warranty
$17,999
11 Ford Escape
XLT, 4x4, 26k,
Factory Warranty,
6 Cylinder
$18,999
CROSSROAD
MOTORS
570-825-7988
700 Sans Souci
Highway
W WE E S S E L L E L L
F O R F O R L L E S S E S S ! ! ! !
TITLE TAGS
FULL NOTARY
SERVICE
6 MONTH WARRANTY
WE WILL ENTERTAIN
OFFERS!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
412 Autos for Sale
DODGE 02
VIPER GTS
10,000 MILES V10
6speed, collec-
tors, this baby is
1 of only 750 GTS
coupes built in
2002 and only 1 of
83 painted Race
Yellow it still wears
its original tires
showing how it
was babied. This
car is spotless
throughout and is
ready for its new
home. This vehicle
is shown by
appointment only.
$39,999 or trade.
570-760-2365
Let the Community
Know!
Place your Classified
Ad TODAY!
570-829-7130
HONDA `12
ACCORD LX
Grey. 6K miles.
Factory Warranty.
Was 20,900, sale
price $19,995.
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
HONDA 08
CIVIC LX
4 door, automatic,
22,000 miles. Extra
Sharp. Warranty.
$12,495.
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
Travel
Purebred Animals?
Sell them here with a
classified ad!
570-829-7130
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 PAGE 3G
SA VE $2000O FF M SR P !
K E N P OL L OCK N IS S A N
www.ke n polloc kn is s a n .c om
229M UN DY S TRE E T
W IL K E S -BA RRE , P A .
1-8 66-70 4-0 672 K E N P OL L OCK
N IS S A N
Th e #1 N is s a n De a le rin N .E. PA
*Ta x a nd Ta g a d d itio na l. Prio rSa les Ex c lu d ed . N o tR es po ns ib le fo rTypo gra phic a l Erro rs . All reb a tes & inc entives a pplied . **0 % APR in lieu o f reb a tes .
As k fo rd eta ils . **B a s ed o n N is s a n M o nth End Sa les R epo rtfo rSept. 2 0 12 . All o ffers ex pire 10 /3 1/12 .

2013N IS S A N
A L TIM A 2.5
S E DA N
4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, PW , PDL ,
T ilt, Zero Gra vity S ea ts ,
F lo o rM a ts & M u ch M o re!
2 A T TH IS 2 A T TH IS
P R IC E! P R IC E!
B U Y FOR
$
20 ,410
*
+ T/T
OR
L EAS E
FOR
$
259
*
P ER
M O.
2012N IS S A N
A L TIM A 2.5S
COUP E
4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, L ea ther, Prem iu m
Pa cka ge, F o g L ights , M o o n ro o f, Bo s e
S o u n d , Cn v. Pkg, & M u ch M o re!
STK# N22155
M O DEL# 15112
V IN# 260196
M SRP $31,530
2 A T TH IS 2 A T TH IS
P R IC E! P R IC E!
B U Y FOR
$
26,530
*
+ T/T
$
299
*
P ER
M O.
W / $150 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE, $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
SA VE $5000O FF M SR P !
L OW
FIN A N CE
R
A
T
E
S
DON T BUY
A N YW HE RE
E L S E !
2012N IS S A N
S E N TRA 2.0S S E DA N
4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, PW ,
PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, F lo o r
M a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s !
*$189 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $10,292.60;
m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $2000 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+) p lu s
regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2202.50.
STK# N22431
M O DEL# 12112
V IN# 757810
M SRP $19,420
2 A T TH IS 2 A T TH IS
P R IC E! P R IC E! SA VE $3000O FF M SR P !
B U Y FOR
$
16,420
*
+ T/T
OR
$
18 9
*
L EAS E FOR
P ER
M O.
W / $20 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE & $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
SA VE $7000O FF M SR P !
2012N IS S A N M A XIM A
3.5S L IM ITE D E DITION
V-6, CVT , A/ C, S u n ro o f,
Bla ck W heels , F lo o r
M a ts , AM / F M / CD,
M u ch, M u ch M o re!
*$289 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $19,627.95;
m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $2000 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+) p lu s
regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2,202.50. $1000 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te in clu d ed .
STK# N22368
M O DEL# 16112
V IN# 861635
M SRP $34,435
5 A T TH IS 5 A T TH IS
P R IC E! P R IC E!
B U Y FOR
$
27,435
*
+ T/T
OR
$
28 9
*
L EAS E FOR
P ER
M O.
W / $350 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE & $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
H U R R Y ! H U R R Y !
A N D THA TS
S TIL L THE
BOTTOM
L IN E !
*$259 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l=
$11,837.80; m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $2000 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e
eq u ity. (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2202.50.
*$299 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $16,710.90; m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru
NM AC @ T ier1; $2000 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2202.50.
L EAS E
FOR
OR
300
VEHICLES
IN STOCK!
300
VEHICLES
IN STOCK!
HIGH
TRA DE
V
A
L
U
E
S
THA N K S TO OUR CUS TOM E RS
THA N K S TO OUR CUS TOM E RS THA N K S TO OUR CUS TOM E RS
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S
T
A TE OFP E N N
S
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F
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A
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W
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! W
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L
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A
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A
I
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!
2012N IS S A N ROGUE S FW D
B U Y FOR
$
17,995
*
+ T/T
W / $150 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE & $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt,
F lo o rM a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s
$
18 9
*
P ER
M O.
L EAS E
FOR
OR
O NLY 5 O NLY 5
L EFT! L EFT!
*$189 p erm o n th p lu s ta x. 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $12,908;
m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $1995 Ca s h d o w n o rT ra d e E q u ity (+) p lu s
regis tra tio n fees ; T o ta l @ d elivery= $2202.50. $1000 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te in clu d ed .
SA VE O VER $5000 O FF SA VE O VER $5000 O FF
M SR P O N S M O DEL FW D M SR P O N S M O DEL FW D
R O G U ES IN STO C K O NLY ! R O G U ES IN STO C K O NLY !
STK# N21727
M O DEL# 23212
V IN# 218668
M SRP $32,850
2012N IS S A N M URA N O S A W D
B U Y FOR
$
26,8 50
*
+ T/T
W / $20 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE & $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
V6, CVT , Blu eto o th, AM / F M / CD, PW , PDL ,
Cru is e, T ilt, F lo o rM a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s
$
269
*
P ER
M O.
L EAS E
FOR
OR
O NLY 8 O NLY 8
M U R A NO S M U R A NO S
L EFT A T L EFT A T
TH IS TH IS
P R IC E!! P R IC E!!
H U R R Y H U R R Y
*$269 p erm o n th p lu s ta x. 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $17,739;
m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $1995 Ca s h d o w n o rT ra d e E q u ity (+) p lu s
regis tra tio n fees ; T o ta l @ d elivery= $2202.50. $1500 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te in clu d ed .
SA VE O VER $6000 O R M O R E SA VE O VER $6000 O R M O R E
O FF M SR P O N A L L 2012 O FF M SR P O N A L L 2012
M U R A NO S IN STO C K O NLY M U R A NO S IN STO C K O NLY
2012
N IS S A N
A RM A DA
P L A TIN UM
4X4
STK# N22344
M O DEL# 26612
V IN# 618651
M SRP $57,045
SA VE
$9000
O FF M SR P !
H U R R Y O NLY 10 H U R R Y O NLY 10
2012 A R M A DA S 2012 A R M A DA S
R EM A IN! R EM A IN!
B U Y FOR
$
47,745
*
+ T/T
V8, Au to , Na vi, Pw rL iftga te, Hea ted S ea ts & S teerin g W heel, Blu eto o th,
M o o n ro o f, Chro m e W heels , 2n d Ro w Ca p ta in Cha irs & M u ch, M u ch M o re!
*S a le Price p lu s ta x a n d ta gs .
2 A T TH IS 2 A T TH IS
P R IC E! P R IC E!
STK# N22468
M O DEL# 13013
V IN# 125432
M SRP $22,410
STK# N21750
M O DEL# 22112
V IN# 282868
M SRP $23,050
2 A T TH IS 2 A T TH IS
P R IC E! P R IC E!
**
PAGE 4G SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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Some restrictions apply. See dealer for details.
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Must Present Coupon Prior To Service. Expires 10/31/12.
$.99
Lube Oil Filter
Must Present Coupon Prior To Service. Expires 10/31/12.
$24.95
Rotate & Balance
Must Present Coupon Prior To Service. Expires 10/31/12.
$24.95
Emissions Inspection
Must Present Coupon Prior To Service. Expires 10/31/12.
Coolant System Services
Must Present Coupon Prior To Service. Expires 10/31/12.
Automatic Transmission Service
Must Present Coupon Prior To Service. Expires 10/31/12.
$24.95
$89.95
$124.95
NEW CARS
USED CARS
*All lease payments based on 39 mos with 10,000 miles per year, $3,000 cash or trade down plus tax,
tags and rst payment due at signing. All factory rebates applied. See Dealer for details. Lease pro-
gram subject to change by lender. Residual Values: A=$14,379 B=$23,172.25 C= $20,812 D=$21,609.50
STK#2115,
PREFERRED EQUIPMENT PKG.,
BLACK BEAUTY
LEASE FOR $183
.09
PER MO.
A
NEW 2012 BUICK VERANO
1-888-307-7077
WE ARE OPEN
Please Pardon Our Dust
As We Remodel To Serve You Better!
STK#2001,
8 PASSENGER SEATING,
LOADED W/ LUXURY
NEW 2012 BUICK ENCLAVE AWD
STK#2065
SLE PACKAGE, POWER
TECH PACKAGE
NEW 2013 GMC SIERRA 1500 EXT. CAB 4X4
STK#2113
SLE PACKAGE, POWER
TECH PACKAGE
NEW 2013 GMC SIERRA 1500 CREW CAB 4X4
05 FORD F-150 X-CAB 4X4
Just Traded, XLT 5.4 Package As Traded.......................
$
10,995
04 MERCEDES BENZ C240
4-Matic, Leather, Moonroof, 89K Miles,
Local Trade As Traded ..................................................
$
11,995
08 PONTIAC TORRENT AWD...........................................
$
12,995
10 CHEVY HHR LT
Silver Beauty, Power Galore ............................................
$
13,995
11 HYUNDAI ACCENTS (4 AVAILABLE) .........................
$
13,995
11 TOYOTA YARIS SEDANS.............................................
$
14,900
10 DODGE CALIBERS (2 AVAILABLE)...........................
$
14,995
10 CHRYSLER SEBRING (2 AVAILABLE) ............From
$
14,995
11 CHEVY IMPALA LT
Power Equipped, Tons of Warranty ........................
$
15,995
11 DODGE AVENGER SXT ...............................................
$
16,900
12 FORD FOCUS SDNS ....................................... From
$
16,900
11 TOYOTA COROLLA 27K Miles .....................................
$
16,995
11 NISSAN ALTIMA 23K Miles..........................................
$
17,995
09 LINCOLN MKZ ALL WHEEL DRIVE
One Owner, Local Trade, Only 45K Miles....................
$
18,995
12 FORD E-150 CARGO VAN..........................................
$
19,900
11 NISSAN ROGUE AWD.................................................
$
19,900
11 HYUNDAI SANTA FE AWD.........................................
$
20,900
11 DODGE CHALLENGER..................................................
$
22,900
11 CHEVY CAMARO LT..................................................
$
22,900
11 MAZDA CX-7 AWD...................................................
$
23,900
10 TOYOTA TACOMA DOUBLE CAB 4X4 PICK UP
24K Miles, SR5 V6, TRD Pkg. ......................................
$
24,995
12 NISSAN MAXIMA 16K Miles ....................................
$
25,995
11 CHEVY TRAVERSE LT AWD.......................................
$
26,995
12 RAM 1500 QUAD CAB 4X4
13K Miles, Red Beauty, SLT Equipment.. .....................
$
26,995
LEASE FOR $366
.11
PER MO.
B
LEASE FOR $366
.90
PER MO.
C
LEASE FOR $393
.56
PER MO.
D
HOURS: Monday Thru Thursday
8:00am - 8:00pm
Friday & Saturday 8:00am - 5:00pm
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
PETILLO MOTORS
910 Moosic Rd. Old Forge, PA
(570)457-5441
OUR OCTOBER SHOWCASE
FULL INVENTORY AT
PETILLOMOTORS.COM
2010 CHEVY COBALT SPORT
50K, Remainder of Factory Warranty 5yr/100K ............$10,995
2008 CHEVY IMPALA LS
Like New, A Must See, 50K ............................$10,995
2004 CADILLAC CTS
Black on Black, Nav, 83K, A Must See, 6 Month Warranty ...$10,495
2003 DODGE CARAVAN SXT
68 Miles, Like New .................................... $4,995
2004 DODGE STRATUS
61K, Like New ..................................... $5,995
2006 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER LT
NewTransmission, A Must See and 4x4 ................... $6,995
2003 DODGE RAM 1500 4X4 4DR
Pickup, SLT, 6 Month Warranty .......................... $5,995
2006 CHEVY MONTE CARLO LT
Like New, 6 Month Warranty, Sale ....................... $6,495
2003 MERCEDES BENZ S600
V12, The Big Boy Toy, Nav .............................$14,995
BLOWOUT BUYS!
101 Lonesome Rd.
Old Forge, PA
ALL VEHICLES
UP TO $2,000
OFF RETAIL!
02 JEEP LIBERTY
4X4
Serviced, Inspected,
6 Mo. C.A.R.S. Warranty
$
5,990
02 FORD ESCAPE
4X4
Serviced, Inspected,
6 Mo. C.A.R.S. Warranty
$
5,990
04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
4X4
Serviced, Inspected,
6 Mo. C.A.R.S. Warranty
$
6,990
04 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER
4X4
Serviced, Inspected,
6 Mo. C.A.R.S. Warranty
$
5,990
05 FORD ESCAPE
4X4
Serviced, Inspected,
6 Mo. C.A.R.S. Warranty
$
6,990
05 CHEVY EQUINOX
LT AWD
Serviced, Inspected,
6 Mo. C.A.R.S. Warranty
$
7,990
05 CHEVY EQUINOX
FWD
Serviced, Inspected,
6 Mos. C.A.R.S. Warranty
$
5,990
1339N. River Street,
Plains, PA. 18702
829-2043
www.jo-danmotors.com
J
O
-
DAN
MOTORS
J
O
-
DAN
MOTORS
TAX AND TAGS ADDITIONAL We Now Offer Buy Here-Pay Here!
LOWDOWN PAYMENT CLEAN, INSPECTED VEHICLES
6 MO. WARRANTY ON ALL VEHICLES FULL SERVICE DEPARTMENT
We Service ALL Makes & Models
Family Owned & Operated for over 40 years
10 DODGE CHALLENGER R/T
Fuchsia, 40th Anniv, Sunroof, Only 7K Miles!. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$
32,995
09 CHEVY IMPALA LS
Blue, Nicely Equipped, 35K . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$
13,995
09 FORD FOCUS SE
White, 4 Door, Nicely Equipped . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . .
$
12,495
05 BUICK LACROSSE CXL
Gold, Leather, Sunroof, 54K Miles! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$
12,495
09 CHEVY AVEO LT
White, Sedan, Auto, CD . . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . ..
$
10,995
07 NISSAN ALTIMA S
Grey, Sdn, 4 Cyl, Nicely Equipped. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$
9,995
06 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SE
Charcoal, 7-Pass, Good Miles, Rear A/C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$
9,995
05 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SE
Green, 7 Passenger, Only 46K Miles! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$
9,995
04 HYUNDAI SONATA
Silver, 50K Miles, Nicely Equipped. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$
8,995
2003 Ford F150 88,031 Miles ......................$11,500
2007 Ford Mustang 32,569 Miles.................$19,900
2006 Toyota Corolla 53,236 Miles ................$10,900
2010 Volkswagen Tiguan 21,500 Miles.........$21,900
2005 Audi A8.......................................$15,800
2006 Chevy Cobalt 78,925 Miles....................$8,500
2008 Chevy TrailBlazer 19,670 Miles............$18,999
2011 Ford Econoline 11,100 Miles ...............$18,500
2007 Ford Econoline 56,256 Miles ...............$13,999
2008 Ford Mustang 59,632 Miles.................$17,999
2008 Jeep Wrangler 36,600 Miles................$23,900
2009 Jeep Wrangler 35,760 Miles................$20,999
2007 Mercedes-Benz CLK-Class 45K Miles ...$27,888
2007 Nissan Murano............................$17,490
2009 Nissan Sentra 34K Miles ...................$12,699
2011 Ford F150 18K Miles .........................$28,699
2008 Mazda 3 49K Miles ...........................$14,299
2010 Mazda 6 30K Miles ...........................$15,699
2007 Mercury Grand Marquis 49K Miles .....$12,299
2004 Dodge Ram 1500 87,500 Miles ...........$14,999
2008 Honda CRV 59,100 Miles.....................$18,499
2010 Mazda 3 Speed GT Turbo 33,352 Miles ...$19,999
2009 Pontiac Vibe 58,525 Miles ...................$12,709
2003 BMW 3 Series.............................$12,500
2011 Hyundai Elantra ..........................$14,999
2011 Nissan Frontier ...........................$22,499
2002 Ford Thunderbird ........................$21,900
2010 Suzuki Kizashi SLS AWD..............$18,995
2003 Audi A4.......................................$10,890
2009 Suzuki SX4 Crossover .......................$13,890
2005 Dodge Ram 1500 Quad Cab 4x4 ..$15,999
2006 Cadillac DTS...............................$16,490
2003 BMW 5 Series ..................................$11,990
1553 Main Street, Peckville, PA 18452
PRESTIGE
ONE AUTO
WEBUY
VEHICLES!
Call Dan Lane @ 570-489-0000
*Tax, tags & license fees not included.
412 Autos for Sale
468 Auto Parts
412 Autos for Sale
468 Auto Parts
7
7
7
3
1
9
MOTORTWINS
2010 Wyoming Ave., Wyoming
718-4050
CALL STEVE MORENKO
*All Prices Plus Tax & Tags. **See dealer for details.
$
6,995
*
2004 Saturn Ion
$
5,590
*
2000 Dodge
Stratus
$
3,695
*
2001 Subaru
Legacy Wagon
2005 Pontiac
G6
$
5,995
*
5 Speed, Sharp!
Loaded, Leather, Sunroof
2003 Ford Taurus
SE
$
5,595
* $
3,990
*
1999 Ford
Escort 2dr
Loaded, Remote Start, 6 Disc
CD, Moonroof, Low Miles
AS ALWAYS ***HIGHEST PRICES***
PAID FOR YOUR UNWANTED
VEHICLES!!!
DRIVE IN PRICES
Call for Details (570) 459-9901
Vehicles must be COMPLETE!!
PLUS ENTER TO WIN $500 CASH!!
DRAWINGTO BE HELD LAST DAY
OF EACH MONTH
www.wegotused.com
Home Of The Lifetime Labor Free Warranty
344-8558
3905 Birney Ave, Moosic, PA
www.gronskis.com
GRONSKIS
Since 1951
Family Owned & Operated Since 1951
CELEBRATING 61 YEARS!
2006 FORD ESCAPE
XLT 4WD
6 Cyl, Auto, A/C, PW, PDL, CD
$8,495
2010 CHEVROLET
MALIBU LS
4 Cyl, Auto, A/C, PW,
PDL, P. Seat, CD
$11,495 ONLY
2011 CHEVROLET
IMPALA
6 Cyl, Auto,
A/C, PW, PDL,
P. Seat, CD
$14,995 ONLY
2010 FORD
FUSION SE
4 Cyl, Auto, A/C,
PW, PDL, CD
$13,695 ONLY
2010 FORD
FUSION SE
4 Cyl, Auto, A/C,
PW, PDL, CD,
2 To Choose From
$14,495 ONLY
2010 DODGE
JOURNEY SE
4 Cyl, Auto, Rear A/C, 3rd
Row Seating, PW, PL, CD
$14,995 ONLY
2010 CHEVY IMPALA
LS
6 Cyl, Auto, A/C, PW,
PDL, P. Seat, CD,
2 To Choose From
$12,695 STARTING AT
2009 FORD ESCAPE
XLT 4WD
6 Cyl, Auto, A/C, PW,
PDL, P. Seat, CD
$11,995 ONLY
2011 FORD
FUSION SE
4 Cyl, Auto, A/C,
PW, PDL, CD,
3 To Choose From
EXTRA
CLEAN!
PRICED
RIGHT!
RATES AS
LOW AS
2.49%*
$15,995 STARTING AT
*Ask for details.
412 Autos for Sale
ACME AUTO SALES
343-1959
1009 Penn Ave
Scranton 18509
Across from Scranton Prep
GOOD CREDIT, BAD
CREDIT, NO CREDIT
Call Our Auto Credit
Hot Line to get
Pre-approved for a
Car Loan!
800-825-1609
www.acmecarsales.net
11 AUDI S5 CONV.
Sprint blue, black
/ brown leather
int., navigation,
7 spd auto turbo,
AWD
09 CHEVY IMPALA LS
Silver, V6
07 BUICK LACROSSE
CXL, black, V6
07 BUICK LUCERNE
CXL, silver, grey
leather
06 LINCOLN ZEPHYR
grey, tan leather,
sun roof
05 HYUNDAI SONATA
GLS, blue, sun-
roof, 87k miles
05 CHEVY IMPALA
silver, alloys, V6
04 DODGE NEON SXT
black, 4 door,
4 cylinder
04 MERCURY GRAND
MARQUIS GS mint
green, grey int.
04 NISSAN MAXIMA LS
silver, auto,
sunroof
03 CHEVY CAVALIER
Blue, 4 cyl., auto
(R-title)
03 CHEVY MONTE
CARLO LS blue
V6 auto
03 AUDI S8 QUATTRO,
mid blue/light grey
leather, naviga-
tion, AWD
00 BMW 323i
silver auto
98 NISSAN ALTIMA
Gold, auto, 4 dr
4 cyl.
73 PORSCHE 914
green & black, 5
speed, 62k miles.
SUVS, VANS,
TRUCKS, 4 X4s
08 JEEP PATRIOT
grey, auto, 4 cyl.,
4x4
08 FORD ESCAPE XLT
SILVER, V6, 4X4
07 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
GLS, black, V6,
4x4
07 DODGE CARAVAN
SXT green,
4 door, 7 pass
mini van
06 DODGE DAKOTA
QUAD CAB SLT
black, 4 door, V8,
4x4 truck
06 INFINITY QX56
Pearl white, tan
leather, Naviga
tion, 3rd seat, 4x4
06 DODGE RAM 1500
QUAD CAB, Black,
V8, 4x4 truck
06 CHEVY TRAILBLZAER
LS, SILVER, 4X4
05 MERCURY
MOUNTAINEER
premier black, grey
leather, 3rd seat,
4x4.
05 FORD ESCAPE XLT
blue, auto, V6 4x4
05 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT
green, V6, 4x4
05 FORD FREESTAR SE,
white, 7 pax mini
van
05 CADILLAC SRX
black, leather, V6,
AWD
05 HYUNDAI TUSCON LX
green auto, AWD
05 JEEP LIBERTY
RENEGADE Blue,
5 speed, V6, 4x4
04 DODGE DAKOTA
QUAD CAB SLT navy
blue, 4 door, 4x4
truck
04 FORD ESCAPE XLT
red, V6, 4x4
04 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER
lt green V6 4x4
04 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO
Se patriot blue, V6,
4x4
04 FORD SUZUKI XlS LX
blue V6 4x4
04 KIA SORENTO EX
blue, auto, V6 AWD
04 NISSAN XTERRA XE
blue, auto, 4x4
04 CHEVY TAHOE LT
4x4 Pewter, grey
leather, 3rd seat
04 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE OVERLAND
graphite grey,
2 tone leather,
sunroof, 4x4
02 FORD F150 LARIAT
Super Crew gold,
tan leather 4x4
truck
02 CHRYSLER TOWN &
COUNTRY EL
4 door,
7 pass mini van
01 DODGE SLT
Durango 5.9l,
peweter silver,
3rd seat, 4x4
01 FORD EXPLORER
Sport teal blue,
2 door, auto, 4x4
01 FORD F150 XLT
white, super cab,
4x4 truck
01 FORD F150 XLT
Blue/tan, 4 door,
4x4 truck
99 NISSAN PATHINDER
gold, V6, 4x4
98 FORD EXPLORER XLT
red, auto, 4x4
HONDA 09 ACCORD
CD, keyless, extra
clean 39k $15,999
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
HONDA 09
CIVIC EX
Grey. 42K miles.
Moon roof, alloys.
Reduced Price
$14,495.
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
JEEP 04 LIBERTY
Limited Edition.
Black, good condi-
tion. 97,000 miles.
Tires and battery 2
years old. New
Alpine radio CD
player. $8500 neg.
570-693-4549
412 Autos for Sale
HONDA 09 CRV-EX
Sunroof,
well equipped, 30k
miles.
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H
PAID
570-301-3602
MAZDA 3 08
Extra clean. 5
speed. 41K miles
$12,999
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
MERCEDES 06 BENZ
S-CLASS S500
90,000 miles, full
options, silver, very
good condition.
$18,500.
570-814-9286
MERCEDES-BENZ `07
C280
4 matic, 73K miles.
Full options, 1
owner, dealer serv-
iced. Black exterior/
cream interior. Very
good condition.
$16,000
(570)262-0313
PONTIAC `00
SUNFIRE
Silver, 2.2 liter, auto
30 mpg. Like new,
garage kept, non
smoker with sun-
roof & rear spoiler.
Air. AM/FM CD.
Flawless interior.
Rides & handles
perfect. New tires.
Regular oil
changes. Always
maintained, 89,900
miles. $3,995.
(570)592-0997
SATURN 04 ION
Quad Coupe
67k miles
$6,999.
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
Subaru `04 Out-
back
5 speed. 88,000
miles. Serviced &
inspected. $8,500.
Chrysler 05
Town & Country
Mini-Van. 108,000
miles. All options.
$5,950.
Corvette 00
Convertible. Auto,
63,000 miles, yel-
low/black. $17,500
.
Mercedes Benz
00 S430. Luxury
sedan, 120,000.
$9,900.
Corvette 90
Convertible. Auto,
85,000 miles, new
tires, white/black.
$7,900
Buick 98 Park
Avenue. 75,000
original miles, serv-
iced & inspected.
$2,950.
Ford 96 Bronco.
4 x 4 all custom,
one of a kind.
$3,950.
Kingston Corners
Auto Sales
570-299-9370
SUBARU 11 OUTBACK
SW keyless, well
equipped, AWD
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
TOYOTA `03
HIGHLANDER
White.
Original Owner.
Garage kept.
Excellent condition.
$9,750. Neg.
570-677-3892
TOYOTA 03 COROLLA LE
5 speed
$3,999
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
412 Autos for Sale
TOYOTA 04 CELICA GT
112K miles. Blue,
5 speed. Air,
power
windows/locks,
CD/cassette, Key-
less entry, sun-
roof, new battery.
Car drives and
has current PA
inspection. Slight
rust on corner of
passenger door.
Clutch slips on
hard acceleration.
This is why its
thousands less
than Blue Book
value. $6,500
OBO. Make an
offer! Call
570-592-1629
TOYOTA 09
CAMRY
18,000 Miles,
1 owner,
4 cylinder.
$15,995.
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
TOYOTA 11 COROLLA
S 8500k Excel-
lent condition.
Extended 5 year
warranty. Daugh-
ter joined airforce.
570-401-1062
Berwick
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
VITOS
&
GINOS
949 Wyoming
Ave, Forty Fort
288-8995
96 Ford Taurus,
30 V6, 4 door,
power window &
door locks, A/C
$1,800
96 Buick Skylark
Auto, 4 door, 81K
$2,300
00 Chevy S10
Blazer. 4 door.
4wd. Red.
$2,500
96 Pontiac Grand
Prix. White, Air,
power windows
& brakes, 4
door, runs good.
106K.
$2,995
02 Ford Windstar
44K, auto, 6 cyl-
inder, air, all
power options,
runs good.
$4,600
95 Buick Park Ave
54k. $3,995
03 Ford Windstar
LX, 6 cylinder,
A/C, 94K, all
power options,
$4,300
94Cadillac Fleet-
wood Limo, ex -
cellent condition,
40K $6,000
93 UD Tow Truck
with wheel lift.
64k. $10,000
04 Nissan
Armada, 7 pas-
senger. 4wd.
Excellent condi-
tion. $11,900
09 Mercedes
GL450, 7 pas-
senger. Too many
options to list. 30K
miles. Garage
kept. Cream puff.
$47,000
Junk
Cars,
Used Cars
& Trucks
wanted.
Cash paid.
574 -1275
VOLKSWAGEN 04
JETTA GL
Black. 75K miles.
5 speed stick.
Warranty.
$7495.
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CHEVROLET `76
PICKUP
4 Cylinder
Very Good
Condition!
NEW PRICE
$2,500.
570-362-3626
Ask for Lee
FORD `90 MUS-
TANG
Convertible, 5.0
auto. Red with new
black top, black
interior, good look-
ing car, good run-
ner, good tires.
$5300. Other Mus-
tangs available
570-283-8235
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $7,995.
Call 570-237-5119
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
MERCEDES-BENZ `73
450SL
Convertible with
removable hard top,
power windows, AM
/FM radio with cas-
sette player, CD
player, automatic, 4
new tires. Cham-
pagne exterior; Ital-
ian red leather inte-
rior inside. Garage
kept, excellent con-
dition. Priced to Sell!
$23,000.
Call 570-825-6272
MERCURY `55 MONT-
CLAIR
99.9% original. 4
door sedan, black &
yellow. Motor re-
built, 250 miles on
it. Youve got to
see it to believe it!
call for more infor-
mation after 1:00pm
540-3220. $19,500
or best offer.
421 Boats &
Marinas
SEA NYMPH
BT165 96
16 boat with 25hp
motor, electric lift,
12 lb. thrust trolling
motor, batteries,
extra seat, fish find-
er, canopy, includes
trailer. $1,995.
570-574-9243
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
427 Commercial
Trucks &
Equipment
CHEVY 08 3500
HD DUMP TRUCK
2WD, automatic.
Only 12,000 miles.
Vehicle in like
new condition.
$19,000.
570-288-4322
UTILITY TRAILER 13
7x20, 7,000 GVW,
Can be purchased
with or without 3
wheel chocks. 5
10,000lb tie downs
Pricing @ $2,799,
570-690-8588
439 Motorcycles
12 BRAND NEW
SCOOTER
All ready to ride,
electric start, auto-
matic transmission,
disk brakes, rear
luggage trunk,
under seat storage,
around 100 mpg,
fully street legal, all
ready to go! only
$1,595. Call
570-817-2952
HARLEY 10 DAVIDSON
SPORTSTER CUSTOM
Loud pipes.
Near Mint
174 miles - yes,
One hundred and
seventy four
miles on the
clock, original
owner. $8000.
570-876-2816
SUZUKI 01 VS 800
GL INTRUDER
Garage kept, no
rust, lots of
chrome, black with
teal green flake.
Includes storage
jack & 2 helmets.
$3600
570-410-1026
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
YAMAHA 97
ROYALSTAR 1300
12,000 miles. With
windshield. Runs
excellent. Many
extras including
gunfighter seat,
leather bags, extra
pipes. New tires &
battery. Asking
$4,000 firm.
(570) 814-1548
442 RVs & Campers
FOREST RIVER`08
5TH WHEEL
Model 8526RLS
Mountain Top,PA
$18,500
570-760-6341
442 RVs & Campers
SANDPIPER 00
TRAVEL TRAILER,
38 foot with 2 slide
outs, front kitchen,
living room with
queen convert-a-
bed, bath with tub &
shower, bedroom
with queen bed, lots
of closets. On per-
manent site but can
be moved. 40X14
deck & screen
house. Asking
$7,000.
570-655-1699
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
CHEVROLET `04
BLAZER
2 door, 4 wheel
drive, air, all power,
89K. Excellent
condition. $5,995.
570-814-0633
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
ACURA `04 MDX
MUST MUST SELL! SELL!
BEAUTIFUL. White,
all wheel drive,
compact SUV. 3rd
row seat, remote
starter, sun roof,
heated seats, tan
leather interior.
Absolutely like new!
99k miles. NADA
book price $13,550
asking $11,550.
MUST SELL!
570-332-6012
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
CHEVROLET `04 SIL-
VERADO 2500 HD
4wd, inspected
until 05/13.
Ready to Go.
570-822-6520
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 PAGE 5G
PAGE 6G SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 PAGE 7G
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
of Wilkes-Barre
1060 Highway 315,
Wilkes-Barre, PA
570-822-9900
PREOWNED VALUES!
*Tax and tags additional.
Not responsible for
typographical errors.
Ofer thru 10/31/12 only. 2 At This Price!
6 Cyl, 297HP, 7 Speed Automatic, Leather, Moonroof, H. Seats, Dual Zone
Temperature Control, Dual Power Seats, Backup Camera, Intelligent Key,
XMRadio, Bluetooth, Power Telescopic Steering Wheel
$
399
Lease
For:
PER
MONTH
+Tax
39 Month Lease, Tax Additional. All Incentives applied. Initial Payment $4399 plus tax. At Lease End Purchase for $21,988.80 + $300 Purchase Options
Fee. 10,000 Allowable Miles Per Year, No Security Deposit required. Lease thru Nissan-Inniti LT. Subject to credit approval within program guidelines.
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
HDI Metals
Cash Paid for Gold Silver Jewelry Coins
any type or condition
We will beat any competitors advertised
price by up to 20% Guaranteed
Licensed & Insured
(11AM - 6PM | M-Sat)
Condential & Secure
570-735-1487
39 S. Prospect St.
Nanticoke
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
CADILLAC 08 SRX
AWD. Beige
metallic. 60K miles,
sunroof,
heated seats.
$19,995.
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
CHEVROLET `99 S-10
64,000 miles, 4
cylinder, auto, great
on gas. $4,500.
570-947-0032
Line up a place to live
in classified!
CHEVY 99 BLAZER
Sport utility, 4
door, four wheel
drive, ABS, new
inspection. $4200.
570-709-1467
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHEVY 03 IMPALA
auto, V6. very
clean car! $3,995.
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHEVY 03
SILVERADO 4X4
REG CAB
AUTO, V8. LOOKS
& RUNS GREAT
$6995.
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHEVY 04
COLORADO SPORT
5 speed, 2WD,
Like New, 1 Owner
Truck $4,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
FORD `00 ECONOLINE
E350 SUPER DUTY VAN
V8 Turbo Diesel,
Good tires, good
body, RUNS GREAT.
132,942 Miles.
$3800. 862-7155.
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
DODGE 07
GRAND CARAVAN XE
54,000 miles 1
owner, brand new
tires, loaded, sto-n-
go seats, Power
windows, power
locks, remote
starter & sliding
doors. Must see
asking $9,800
570-655-1699
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
DODGE 03 CARAVAN
Auto, V6. Nice
clean car $4495
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
FORD `08 EXPEDITION
Black, 32,500
miles, leather
upholstery, 3rd seat
pkg., optional tow
pkg. with 910lb,
tongue/9,100lb tow
- all the goodies.
Excellent condition
$22,900
(570)690-8588
FORD 02 EXPLORER
Red, XLT, Original
non-smoking owner,
garaged, synthetic
oil since new, excel-
lent in and out. New
tires and battery.
90,000 miles.
$7,500
(570) 403-3016
FORD 04 F150
4x2. Nice Truck!
$10,999
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD 00
EXPLORER XLT
EXTRA CLEAN!
4X4.
$3,495.
570-696-4377
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD 03
EXPLORER XLT
4X4, leather,
sunroof, like new!
$5,495
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD 03 F150 XL
4x4, 6 cyl., auto, 1
owner, great work
truck $4495.
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD 99 F150
4X4. Super Cab.
Extra Clean!
1 owner truck!
$5,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
HONDA `05
ELEMENT LX
4 wd, auto, 58k
miles, excellent
condition. $12,000
(570)472-9091
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
HYUNDAI 01
SANTA FE
4WD, AUTO, V6
EXTRA CLEAN!
$4,995.
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
JEEP 02 Wrangler
X LOW MILES
53,000. 5 speed
manual transmis-
sion, soft top,
garage kept, asking
$11,500. Call
570-655-1699
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
JEEP `12
LIBERTY SPORT
4 x 4. Silver. 14K
miles. Factory War-
ranty . Sale Price -
$20,900.
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
JEEP 04 WRANGLER
6 cylinder. 5 speed
4x4
$9,999
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
JEEP 04 GRAND
CHEROKEE LOREDO
4x4, 6 cyl, 1
Owner, Extra
Clean SUV!
$5,495
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
SATURN 04 VUE
Front wheel drive,
4 cyl, 5 speed,
sunroof, clean,
clean SUV! $4,495
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
TOYOTA `04 SIENNA
LE
Clean & well main-
tained, auto car
starter, gold, low
mileage, 65K, Kelly
blue book value of
$11,300.
Asking $9,900
(570)283-3086
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
All
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
600
FINANCIAL
610 Business
Opportunities
NEPA FLORAL &
GIFT SHOP
Full-service floral &
gift shop for sale.
Turn key operation
in prime retail loca-
tion. Stable revenue
growth & flexible
operating hours.
Includes delivery
van, all inventory,
walk in cooler, sup-
plies, website &
customer list. Must
sell, Owner re-
locating. $63,000
570-592-3327
630 Money To Loan
We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED. Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say theyve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
Its a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
700
MERCHANDISE
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
Allegro razor blade
sharpener, Swiss
made, exc cond,
$30.00 or b/o
Gillette hand
razors,1 gold tone,
3 silver tone, 3 diff
styles,$20.00 or
b/o
Cigarette tin, circa
1900, The Rich-
mond straight cut,
American tobacco
Co$30.00 or b/o
ANTIQUE OAK
BED
(late 1800s) with
matching dresser
and mirror.
Additional night-
stand included. All
refinished. Excellent
condition.
$965. 466-6499.
ANTIQUE OAK
HIGHBOY
refinished with new
vintage hardware
Excellent condition
$320.
570-466-6499
BOOKS. War History
collection on all
wars of the United
States. 12 books.
$50 Call Jim at
570-655-9474
Too many baby
toys?
Pass them on, sell
them with an ad!
570-829-7130
COFFEE BIN.
Antique. From
Dilsworths Prime
Grade Coffee Co.
Original Condition.
$525. 823-5648.
COLLECTOR
PLATES 6 of chil-
dren, good condi-
tion $15. each.
Roseback antique
rocker, cane back &
seat with natural
cane $65. 819-2174
CRYSTAL Chande-
lier 1930s. $350
570-825-8141
DOLL HOUSE Vin-
tage 1950s style 3
rooms down, stair-
case, 2 rooms up
plus furniture. Make
offer. 570-675-
0460/574-1724
PUNCH BOWLS (2)
1 silver plated, 12
cups included $75.
1 with 25th Anniver-
sary plates, 3. $7
each. 288-0864
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
WASHINGTON
coins, quarters
1932-P, 1935-P,
1936-P, 1937-P,
1938-P, 1939-D,
1940-S. $72.
570-287-4135
YEARBOOKS.
COUGHLIN (25)
1928-1980, GAR,
(22) 1928-2006,
MEYERS, (9) 1957-
1981, WYOMING
VALLEY WEST, (11)
1970-1992. $20-$40
each. Call for further
details and addition-
al school editions.
570-825-4721
arthurh302@
aol.com
710 Appliances
Why Spend
Hundreds on
New or Used
Appliances?
Most problems
with your appli-
ances are usually
simple and
inexpensive to fix!
Save your hard
earned money,
Let us take a look
at it first!
30 years in
the business.
East Main
Appliances
570-735-8271
Nanticoke
COUCH leather
couch & love seat,
white, excellent
condition Paid
$3200 sell $200.
570-457-7854
DRYER. Lightly used
prior to moving.
Needs to go fast.
$75. 570-407-0874
FOOD DEHYDRA-
TOR. Ronco 5 tray.
Plus 3 herb screens
set. Still in box. $25
570-735-1225
MEAT SLICER. $20.
570-288-0864
STOVE GAS, black
excellent condition,
barely used. $300.
570-328-2444.
WAFFLE MAKER/
Grill in perfect con-
dition, chrome. $20.
Capucchino maker
$10. CANISTER, set
of 4 in cream color
trimmed in navy
blue, beautiful, like
new. $50. 570-457-
5843/570-780-3159
WASHER, 11
Maytag. $200.
570-474-5277
WASHER, Hotpoint,
heavy duty, extra
large capacity, 7
cycle. Very good
condition. $200.
570-825-4031
WASHER, Kenmore
Elite, Excellent con-
dition. $175. DRYER,
Kenmore Elite, elec-
tric, excellent condi-
tion. $160. DISH-
WASHER, Hotpoint.
$100. COOKTOP,
Kitchenaid, electric.
$100. 678-7544.
WATER COOLER,
GE, hot & cold.
570-287-1908
712 Baby Items
BABY CL OT HE S
starting at infant/
newborn to 12
months. Great con-
dition. Asking $200
for all. 570-328-5511
CAR SEATS 2 (1)
Graco (1) Evenflo
$25. each. Excellent
condition. 819-2174
CRIB complete
Slumber time Elite
by Simmons from
Target, 3 piece,
changing table,
matching glider,
ottoman, with baby
pink cushions. Dark
expresso wood.
bumper guards. 3
years old, great
condition from
smoke & peT free
home. paid $750.
sell for $200. FIRM
570-709-9863
SHOES. Baby girl.
Name brands, gen-
tly worn, $30 for all.
BOOTS, Gently worn
$15, CLOTHES,
Beautiful condition.
60 pieces $30 ALL
Call for details
570-709-9863
716 Building
Materials
BRICK. House.
Brown mix color.
Over 1000 brick
available. Asking
$300. 570-991-0221
IRON Supports, 4
pieces, 8 feet high
for porch. Black. $15
each. 883-7007
VINYL FENCING.
New Unused.
Fence, rails, slats,
top/bottom rails,
posts, beams, caps,
crowns. Approxi-
mately 450 assort-
ed pieces. $350
OBO. Hanover Twp.
Area.
570-650-3450
722 Christmas
Trees
CHRISTMAS TREE,
6 1/2 foot Regency,
slim, evergreen, life
like, prelit with white
lights and accented
with sugar globe
white lights, Tree
bag included. Used
2 years, purchased
at www.treeclas-
sics.com for $350.,
will sell for $100.
570-301-8515
WHOLESALE
CHRISTMAS TREES
Frazier Fir
Frank at
570-752-3315 or
570-764-2153
726 Clothing
JACKET black
leather mens Adler
large worn once
excellent condition
$75. 570-819-2174
726 Clothing
BOOTS UGG Short
chestnut girls size 2
$30. Chocolate
triple Bailey Button
girls size 3 $75. Pink
classic tall womens
size 5 $65. All great
condition. 474-0753
BOOTS, womens,
black, $30 Firm.
Shirts and tops, $25
per box. Youth hik-
ing boots, $20 Firm.
Call for details
570-709-9863
HALLOWEEN COS-
TUME, adult size,
velour black hooded
cape, sequin devil
hat. $30 for both. 30
pieces of calligraphy
items $20.
570-267-6100
JACKET. Mens
Pittsburgh Steelers
faux leather team
apparel jacket.
Large, never worn,
has tags. Paid $70-
sell $50
570-301-8515
JACKETS, MENS 3
large & 1 medium.
Name brand, excel-
lent condition. $15
for all. 655-1808
730 Computer
Equipment &
Software
DESKTOPS/systems
Windows xp=$25 to
$75. Windows 7
towers $100-$125.
Windows xp laptops
with wifi, bag, new
battery $125. Win-
dows 7 laptops with
wifi, bag, new bat-
tery $150-$200
(dual cores). All
refurbished & re-
stored /upgraded.
All are legal & acti-
vated, have office
10 + antivirus + more
& cdrw/dvd combos
OR dvdrw, warranty.
570-862-2236!!
LAPTOP, HP Pavil-
ion. All in one print-
er, scanner, fax.
Few years old,
excellent condition.
$150. 654-2907
LAPTOP. GATEWAY
P4 XP Wide-screen.
80Gig HD and DVD
Burner. $175. 570-
283-2552 or
rick@wyoming val-
ley.net
WORK STATION HP
DC7100 new main-
board, new memory
modules. 3ghz cpu.
1 gb ram. Windows
xp. Delivery. Best
offers accepted.
$90. 570-654-0574.
732 Exercise
Equipment
B O D Y G L I D E ,
Denise Austin. Good
condition. $60.
E X E RCI S E BI KE
#385, Denise Austin
magnetic. Good
condition. $60.
570-825-4031
NORDIC TRAC, walk
fit. $75.
570-288-0864
TREADMILL. Pro-
form electronic
Crosswalk GT. User
manual. Excellent
condition. $150 OBO
570-301-8515
734 Fireplace
Accessories
HEATER/FURNACE
Coal/Wood
24x24x48 Mont-
gomery Ward
Mo# SDL56202A
610-534-7655
736 Firewood
FIREWOOD. Sea-
soned cherry, oak
and black walnut.
Free local delivery.
Pick up truck load
$99, Full cord, $175
570-241-3455
742 Furnaces &
Heaters
COAL/wood stove
Kodiak combination
with glass door
insert. Has all brick
lining & baffle plates
for coal conversion.
Asking $500. call
after 5pm 574-7123.
STOVE PIPE, 8
elbows, 4 lengths
plus more. $50
570-956-9401
744 Furniture &
Accessories
BEDROOM
SUITE. 5 piece
Bassett. Walnut
wood. Double
bookcase bed,
triple dresser (9
drawers), chest
of drawers (5
drawers) 2 night
stands (2 draw-
ers in each).
$250
570-675-5046
CHAIRS, (2)
Genuine
leather, cus-
tom made
recliners.
Taupe color,
like new. $550
each.
570-675-5046
CONSOLE lovely
cherry finish con-
sole for TV & acces-
sories $50. Floral
sofa & matching
Queen Anne chair
$150. excellent con-
dition. Beautiful,
decorative walnut
finish dining room
hutch by Pilliod Fur-
niture $375.
570-472-0285
COUCH, Leather
Love seat, Chair,
excellent condition.
$250. 817-8981
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER.
Solid oak with lead-
ed glass doors. Will
fit a 35 TV. Room
for stereo, game
system, DVD player,
etc. Large storage
drawer. Excellent
condition. $150
After 3pm 779-3281
744 Furniture &
Accessories
DEN
FURNITURE
Wood/cloth. Reg-
ular size sofa,
chair and
ottoman. Coffee
table, 2 end
tables. Excellent
condition. $325
for all.
570-675-5046
ENTERTAINMENT
center 5 drawer
side to side file
$300. 5 drawer
roller bearing $50. 2
entertainment cen-
ters $100 for all. 33
1/2 LP records $3
each. 30 pieces of
classical 100
authentic movie
posters $15 each.
Call 570-280-2472
FURNI SH FURNI SH
FOR LESS FOR LESS
* NELSON *
* FURNITURE *
* WAREHOUSE *
Recliners from $299
Lift Chairs from $699
New and Used
Living Room
Dinettes, Bedroom
210 Division St
Kingston
Call 570-288-3607
HEADBOARD brass
for double bed, cus-
tom made. Make
offer 570-675-0460
or 574-1724
KITCHEN/DINING
SET, 4 leather
maroon swivel
chairs. Table is light
oak finish. $100.
570-362-4322.
MATTRESS SALE
We Beat All
Competitors Prices!
Mattress Guy
Twin sets: $139
Full sets: $159
Queen sets: $199
All New
American Made
570-288-1898
MATTRESS: queen
size P-Top set. New
in plastic. Must sell
asap. $150
Call 570-280-9628
PAPASAN CHAIR
base & teal cushion
$125 cash only.
Almost new with
tags still on. Daugh-
ter moved to NYC.
May have been
used twice.
570-829-2382
after 6 pm.
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
SLEEPER SOFA, 2
recliners, like new, 1
year old. new
$1,750 sell for $875.
46 TV stand $50.
570-237-5216
SOFA
Lazy-Boy with
Queen size sleeper,
love seat & chair.
Excellent condition.
$600.
570-655-4256
SOFA maroon
Berkline reclining
sofa with fold down
center console &
reclining love seat .
Good Shape. Asking
$300. 762-7495
SOFA, 3 cushion in
navy blue print, in
very good condition.
$150. DESK, maple
with 2 drawers on
each side, middle
drawer. $75. END
TABLES, various.
$50 each. COFFEE
TABLE, beautiful
marble round. $100.
BASE LAMPS. $25
each. LAMPS, 2
cream color ginger
jar $25 each.
CHAIRS, 4 uphol-
stered in very good
condition $75 each.
CARPET gold, 100%
wool, 15x15. $100.
TABLE, maple
pecan color, dining
with 6 chairs $100.
BUFFET to match
table, 60. $50. T.V.
26 screen, 2 RCA.
$50 each. T.V. 32
screen. $75. Please
call 570-457-5843/
570-780-3159
SOFA, burgundy
leather, loveseat,
glass end tables,
was $1,900 asking
$795. 831-5510
TABLE wood round
dual drop leaf
table,pedestal base,
oak, 30h x 42w x
42d, $100.
570-654-1368
TABLE, round
38x48 with glass
top for dining room -
cabinet 58 long -
32 height, 3 draw-
ers, 4 cabinet doors
$300 for both.
TABLE, 2 Italian
Provincial, slab mar-
ble on top $200.
HUTCH, yellow 2
top shelves + cabi-
net doors below -
small table with 2
chairs. $100.
570-288-0864
TABLE. Oak kitchen.
$100. (4) High back
chairs with much
detail, $95 each.
570-287-2760
EXETER
Dog kennel 17 sq.
ft.. 5ft high,
5 gates, 3 coops,
$1000.
8ft truck cap, 29
high,
w/ 42 inch door,
you can sleep in
this, $100.
Freezer, like new
$100. Table 7 ft
square
with lazy susan,
seats 20 persons,
great for large
gatherings, $100.
Lots of fishing,
hunting & golf
equipment.
459 Wilson Street.
570-693-2423
EXETER
Some items free,
only 3 per family.
FREEZER $100.
Special tables
$100. Loads of
sporting equipment,
hunting, fishing &
golf gear. Some
new, some used.
Over 100 other
items. 459 Wilson
St., Exeter. Call -
570-693-2423
PITTSTON TWP.
633 Suscon Rd
Sat, Sun, 10-6 10-7
9am - 5pm
RAIN OR SHINE
Household, holiday,
sports cards and
Nascar, watches,
knives, Precious
Moments, and
more!!!
SHAVERTOWN
1195 Sutton Road
BARN SALE BARN SALE
10/6-10/7
Sat 8-4 and
Sun 9-3
Antiques, house-
hold, furniture,
clothing, new items,
and good things.
SHAVERTOWN
134 Manor Drive
10/6 & 10/7:
8:00 to 2:00.
Contents of house:
furniture, kitchen
items, wall decor,
holiday decorations,
& much more!
SWOYERSVILLE
Saint Elizabeth and
Seton Parish
Hughes Street
Mon., Oct 8,
9-3 & 6-8 pm.
Tues., Wed.,
Oct. 9 & 10, 9-3pm.
Wednesday-
BAG DAY.
LUNCH/BAKE
SALE DAILY.
TRUCKSVILLE
51 Harris Hill Road
Sat., Oct 6, 8-4
Sun. Oct. 7, 8-1
Furniture, dishes,
odds & ends.
WEST PITTSTON
116 Linden Street
OCT., 6 & 7, 9-1
Household items,
small
furniture, Tiffany
lamps and ceiling
fixtures.
and much more!!
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
WEST
WYOMING
102 Florida Ave.
Sun Oct 7
9am-4pm
Multi Family!
Large Variety of
Items!
WEST WEST WYOMING WYOMING
6th Street
OPEN YEAR ROUND
SP SPACE ACE
A AV VAILABLE AILABLE
INSIDE & OUT INSIDE & OUT
Acres of Acres of
parking parking
OUTSIDE
SPACES
- $10
Saturday
10am-2pm
Sunday
8am-4pm
WILKES-BARRE
183 Park Avenue
Fri., 8:30-3:30
Sat., 8:30-2
Sun., 9-3
Clothing, house-
hold items, baseball
cards, snowblower,
Christmas, old &
new decorations &
jewelry.
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
PAGE 8G SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
SHOP 24/7 WWW.VALLEYCHEVROLET.COM
*All prices plus tax & tags. Prices include all applicable rebates - trade-in bonus cash (if applicable); Business Choice rebates (if applicable); VYU Snowplow bonus cash (if applicable); All Star Edition LowAPR in lieu of
certain rebates - see dealer for details; Must take delivery by October 31, 2012. Leases are $99 per month plus tax, tags & $1999; 24 month lease, 12K miles per year; plus cash or trade equity of $2799 due at lease signing;
Tax & tags additional. To well qualifed buyers. Must take delivery by Oct. 31, 2012. Not responsible for typographical errors. Artwork may be for illustration purposes only. See dealer for details.
EXIT 170B OFF 1-81 TO EXIT 1 - BEAR RIGHT ON BUSINESS ROUTE 309 TO SIXTH LIGHT. JUST BELOW WYOMING VALLEY MALL
Chevy Runs Deep
570-821-2778
VALLEY CHEVROLET
601 Kidder Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA
821-2772 1-800-444-7172
www.valleychevrolet.com
$
23,599
*
2012 CHEVROLET SILVERADO
1500 REGULAR CAB 4X4
SALE PRICE
#12506, 4.3L V6, 4 Speed
Automatic, Air, Locking Rear
Differential, Rubberized Vinyl
Floor, Stabilitrak, 17 Steel
Wheels, Cruise
MSRP $27,400
SAVE OVER
$
3,800
For 60
Mos. 0%
APR
2012 CHEVROLET SILVERADO
1500 EXTENDED CAB 4WD W/T
#12257, VORTEC 4.8L V8 AT,
Cruise, AM/FM Stereo, Deep
Tinted Glass, Stabilitrak, 17
Steel Wheels, Folding Rear Seat
$
24,995
*
MSRP $31,565
For 60
Mos. 0%
APR
SAVE OVER
$
6,500
SALE PRICE
#12584, 5.3L V8, AT, AC, PW,
PDL, EZ Lift Tailgate,
Locking Rear Differential,
Alum. Wheels,
OnStar Turn-By-Turn
Navigation, XM Satellite
2012 CHEVROLET SILVERADO
1500 CREW CAB 4X4
$
28,999
*
MSRP $36,560
For 60
Mos. 0%
APR
SAVE OVER
$
7,500
SALE PRICE
#12357, 6.0L V8 AT, AC,
Cruise, Snowplow Prep Pkg.,
HD Trailering Equipment,
Stabilitrak, Locking Rear
Differential
$
28,999
*
2012 CHEVROLET SILVERADO
2500 REGULAR CAB 4X4
MSRP $34,240
For 60
Mos. 0%
APR
SAVE OVER
$
5,200
SALE PRICE
#12384, 6.0L V8 AT, AC, PW,
PDL, Locking Rear
Differential, 18 Steel Wheels,
Snowplow Prep Pkg., Cruise
$
29,999
*
2012 CHEVROLET SILVERADO
3500 REGULAR CAB 4X4 W/T
MSRP $34,743
For 60
Mos. 0%
APR
SAVE OVER
$
4,700
SALE PRICE #12363, 6.0L V8, 6 Spd. AT,
Locking Rear Differential,
Snowplow Prep Pkg., AC,
17 Steel Wheels
2012 CHEVROLET SILVERADO
3500HD 4WD DUMP TRUCK
$
39,999
*
MSRP $45,639
SALE PRICE
SAVE OVER
$
5,600
#13130, ALL STAR EDT., 5.3L V8, AT,
AC, P/Opts., Remote Start, FABTEC 6 Lift Kit,
4 Wheel To Wheel SS Nerf Bars,
Stripe Paint w/Fender Flares,
Leather, OnStar, XM,
Locking Rear Diff.,
Rear Park Assist., Much More!
$
45,999
*
MSRP $55,402
SALE PRICE
2013 CHEVROLET 1500
CREW CAB 4X4 SOUTHERN
COMFORT EDITION
O
c
t
o
b
e
r
L
E
A
S
E
S
p
e
c
i
a
l
s
$
99
Per
Month
YOUR
CHOICE!
#13055, 2.4L DOHC 4 Cyl.,
6 Speed Automatic, PW, PDL,
P. Mirrors, Remote Keyless
Entry, Onstar w/ Turn-By-Turn
Navigation, Cruise, Bluetooth,
AM/FM/CD, 17 Aluminum
Wheels, Steering Wheel Controls
$
23,799
*
SALE PRICE
MSRP $24,580
2012 CHEVROLETTRAVERSE
LS FWD 8 PASSENGER
#12780, 3.6L SIDI V6, 6 Speed Automatic,
Traction Control, Remote Keyless
Entry, 3rd Row 60/40 Bench Split
Seat, PW, PDL, P. Mirrors,
Bluetooth, Rear Spoiler, Onstar
w/ Turn-By-Turn Navigation,
XM Satellite Radio
$
27,899
*
SALE PRICE
MSRP $30,925
APR
For 72
Mos. 0%
2013 CHEVY CAMARO
LS COUPE
$
99
PER MO.
24 MOS
+$1999
Stk. #13020, 3.6L SIDI 6 Speed Manual
Transmission, PW, PDL, Air, Rear Spoiler,
Limited Slip Dierential, 18 Heritage Steel
Wheels, Onstar w/ Turn-By-Turn Navigation,
XM Satellite Radio, Bluetooth, AM/FM/CD
2013 CHEVY CRUZE
LS
$
99
PER MO.
24 MOS
+$1999
Stk. #KCW01, 1.8L ECOTEC VVT 4-Cyl,
Automatic Trans., PW, PDL, Bluetooth,
USB Audio Interface, Front Bucket Seats,
Air, OnStar w/ Turn-By-Turn Navigation,
XM Radio, AM/FM/CD
2013 CHEVY MALIBU
LS
$
99
PER MO.
24 MOS
+$1999
Stk. #13071, ECOTEC 2.5L DOHC 6 Speed
Automatic, PW, PDL, Air, P. Mirrors, Tinted
Glass, Stabilitrak, XM Satellite Radio, Onstar
w/ Turn-By-Turn Navigation, Compass
Display, 16 Aluminum Wheels, Tilt &
Telescopic Steering Column
2013 CHEVY EQUINOX
LS FWD
$
99
PER MO.
24 MOS
+$1999
Stk. #13055, 2.4L DOHC 4 Cyl., 6 Speed
Automatic, PW, PDL, P. Mirrors, Remote Keyless
Entry, Onstar w/ Turn-By-Turn Navigation,
Cruise, Bluetooth, AM/FM/CD, 17 Aluminum
Wheels, Steering Wheel Controls
2013 CHEVROLET EQUINOX
LS FWD
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 PAGE 9G
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I
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AMERICAS NEW
CAR ALTERNATIVE
COME
SEE FOR
YOURSELF...
290MUNDYSTREET, WILKES-BARRE, PA
301-
CARS
2277
WWW.NATIONWIDECARSALES.NET
MONDAY - FRIDAY
8:30AM- 8:00PM
SATURDAY
8:30AM- 5:00PM
*TAX & TAGS ADDITIONAL. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. ASK SALESPERSON FOR DETAILS OF PROGRAMS. FINANCE RATE SUBJECT TO APPROVAL.
OVER
200
VEHICLES
AVAILABLE
WE
WILL BUY
YOUR CAR!
1
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7
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%
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SUVS IN ALL
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FOR
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IN CROSS
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BAD CREDIT
NO PROBLEM
WE WILL GET YOU
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Check
Out These
And
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12 YEARS
OF
EXCELLENCE
2003 JEEP
LIBERTY
SPORT 4X4
#18861, Moonroof,
Alloys, Low Miles $8,980
SPECIAL PURCHASE
2012 FIAT 500
#18983, Auto, P. Windows, P. Locks, CD
$13,999
2011 NISSAN VERSA
Auto, P. Windows, P. Locks, Keyless Entry, 5 To Choose From
$12,950
2011 KIA SPORTAGE LX AWD
Alloys, P. Windows, 6 Left To Choose From
$18,939
2011 HYUNDAI
SANTA FE
GLS
AWD, Alloys, Low Miles,
5 To Choose From $18,796
195More
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- Or More -
WHY
GO
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PAGE 10G SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 PAGE 11G
INTERSTATE
ROUTE 315
KEN
POLLOCK
SUZUKI
81
ROUTE 315
EXIT 175
CLOSE TOEVERYWHERE!
WERE EASY TOFIND!
JUST OFF EXIT 175
RTE I-81 PITTSTON
A TOP 10 IN THE NATION SUZUKI SALES VOLUME DEALER 2 YEARS RUNNING***
$
20,999*
BUY NOW FOR:
4 Wheel Drive, Voice Activated Navigation w/ Blue Tooth,
Automatic Transmission, Power Windows, Power Locks,
PowerMirrors, Electronic Stability Control
2012 SUZUKI GRAND VITARA
4WD
MSRP
$
24,789*
Ken Pollock Sale Price
$
22,999*
Manufacturer Rebate -
$
1,500*
Owner Loyalty Rebate -
$
500*
Stk#S2240
$
15,999*
BUY NOW FOR:
8 Standard Airbags, Dual Digital Climate Control,
Power Windows, Power Locks, Power Mirrors,
AM/FM/CD, 6 Speed Manual Transmission
2012 SUZUKI KIZASHI
S FWD
MSRP w/ Accessories
$
20,493*
Ken Pollock Sale Price
$
18,499*
Manufacturer Rebate -
$
1,500*
Owner Loyalty Rebate -
$
1,000*
Stk#S2207TT
Advanced Intelligent All-Wheel Drive, 8 Standard Air-
bags, Dual Zone Digital Climate Control, Automatic
CVT Transmission, TouchFree Smart Key, Power
Windows, Power Locks, Molded Mud ap package
MSRP
$
23,294*
Ken Pollock Sale Price
$
21,999*
Manufacturer Rebate -
$
1,500*
Owner Loyalty Rebate -
$
1,000*
2012 SUZUKI KIZASHI
S AWD
NEW
Stk# S2339
$
19,499*
BUY NOW FOR:
2012 SUZUKI SX4 LE
POPULAR SEDAN
MSRP
$
18,439*
Ken Pollock Sale Price
$
16,999*
Manufacturer Rebate -
$
1,000*
Owner Loyalty Rebate -
$
500*
Stk#S2148
LE Popular Package, 8 Standard Airbags,
Automatic Transmission, Power Windows, Power Locks,
Power Mirrors, Alloy Wheels
NEW
$
15,499*
BUY NOW FOR:
NEW
NEW
*Tax and tags additional. Buy now for sale price includes Suzuki Manufacturer Rebates of $1,000 on 2012 Suzuki SX4 AWD, and SX4 Sedan; $1,500 Suzuki Manufacturer Rebates on Suzuki Grand Vitara and Kizashi. Buy now for sale prices includes $500 Suzuki Owner Loyalty on 2012
Suzuki SX4 Sedan, Equator and Grand Vitara. Buy now for ale price includes $1,000 Suzuki Owner Loyalty on 2012 Suzuki SX4 Crossover and Kizashi. All Ken Pollock Suzuki discounts applied. Artwork for illustration purposes only. Dealer not responsible for typographical errors. Prices
ar VALID ON IN STOCK VEHICLES ONLY **0% Financing up to 72 Months with approved credit for S Tier Customers. $13.89 for every $1,000 Financed. 0% Financing in lieu of Manufacturer Rebate. Offer Ends 10/31/2012. ***Based on 2010 and 2011 Presidents Club Standings.
HOWABOUT YOU!!!
$
15,999*
BUY NOW FOR:
MSRP
$
19,895*
Ken Pollock Sale Price
$
17,999*
Manufacturer Rebate -
$
1,000*
Owner Loyalty Rebate -
$
1,000*
3-Mode Intelligent All-Wheel Drive,
8 Standard Airbags, Power Windows,
Power Locks, Power Mirrors, Automatic
OVER 15 AVAILABLE @ THIS PRICE!
NEW
2012 SUZUKI SX4
CROSSOVER AUTO AWD
Stk#S2269
4 Wheel Drive, Automatic Transmission,
Power Windows, Power Locks, Power Mirrors,
4.0L V6, Factory Spray In Bed Liner
MSRP
$
29,824*
Ken Pollock Sale Price
$
27,499*
Manufacturer Rebate -
$
2,000*
Owner Loyalty Rebate -
$
500*
Stk#S2373
2012 SUZUKI EQUATOR CREW
CAB SPORT 4X4
NEW
$
24,999*
BUY NOW FOR:
Margo & Tom from West Pittston Arlinda from Wilkes-Barre Hal from Wilkes-Barre Eric from Hanover Twp.
Discover
the Deals
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PAGE 12G SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
www.MattBurneHonda.com
2012 HONDA
ACCORD LX
4 dr, Auto Trans, AC, PW, PL, Cruise, ABS, 6 Air Bags, Tilt,
Keyless Entry, AM/FM/CD, Model #CP2F3CEW
*
MPG
34 HWY
$219 Lease Per Mo. For 36 Months through AHFC. $0 Down Payment. 1st Payment and tags due at delivery. Residual $12,457.80.
$0 DOWN
PAYMENT
Open Monday - Thursday 9-9
Friday & Saturday 9-5
Thank You To Our Customers
0
.9%
APR FINANCING
NOWAVAILABLE!
*On select models to qualied
buyers for limited term.
2012 HONDA CIVIC LX SEDAN
MPG
28 City
39 HWY
***Lease 36 Months through ahfc. $0 Down Payment.
1st payment and tags due at delivery. Residual $11,757.00
Per Mo.
Lease
ease 36 Months through ahfc $0 Down Payment
Per Mo Per Mo.
LLease
* **
Model #FB2F5CEW 140-hp
16-Valve SOHC i-VTEC 5-Speed
Automatic Transmission Air Con-
ditioning with Air-Filtration System
Power Windows/Locks/Mirrors
Cruise Control Remote Entry
160-Watt AM/FM/CD Audio System
with 4 Speakers ABS
Dual-Stage, Multiple-Threshold
Front Airbags (SRS) Front Side
Airbags with Passenger-Side Oc-
cupant Position Detection System
(OPDS) Side Curtain Airbags
$0 DOWN
PAYMENT
2012 HONDA ODYSSEY EX
MPG
18 City
27 HWY
****Lease 36 Months through ahfc. $0 Down Payment.
1st payment and tags due at delivery. Residual $18,174.80
Per Mo.
Lease
Model #RL5H4CEW
248-hp, 3.5-Liter, 24-Valve, SOHC i-VTEC
V-6 Engine 5-Speed Automatic Transmission
Vehicle Stability Assist (VSA) with Trac-
tion Control Anti-Lock Braking System (ABS)
Drivers Seat with 10-Way Power Adjustment,
including Power Lumbar Support Power Slid-
ing Doors 17 Alloy Wheels 229-Watt AM/
FM/CD Audio System with 7 Speakers includ-
ing Subwoofer 2GB CD-Library Bluetooth
HandsFreeLink USB Audio Interface
Exterior Temperature Indicator Multi-Function
2nd-Row Center Seat Three-Row Side Curtain
Airbags with Rollover Sensor Front Side
Airbags with Passenger-Side Occupant Position
Detection System (OPDS) Tri-Zone Automatic
Climate Control System with Humidity Control
and Air Filtration One-Motion 60/40 Split
3rd-Row Magic Seat
2012 HONDA CR-V EX
MPG
22 City
30 HWY
Model RM4H5CJW 185-hp
2.4-Liter, 16-Valve SOHC i-VTEC 4-Cylinder
Engine Real Time AWD with Intelligent Control
System Vehicle Stability Assist (VSA) with
Traction Control Automatic Transmission
Cruise Control A/C One-Touch Power
Moonroof with Tilt Feature Remote Entry
System Bluetooth HandsFreeLink
Multi-angle rearview camera with guidelines
160-Watt AM/FM/CD Audio System with 6
Speakers Bluetooth Streaming Audio
Pandora Internet Radio compatibility
SMS Text Message Function
USB Audio Interface
Anti-Lock Braking System (ABS)
Dual-Stage, Multiple-Threshold Front Airbags
(SRS) Front Side Airbags with Passenger-Side
Occupant Position Detection System (OPDS)
Side Curtain Airbags with Rollover Sensor
VTEC
mission
h Trac-
m (ABS)
ustment,
wer Slid-
att AM/
includ-
etooth
LEASES BASED ON APPROVED CREDIT TIER 1 THRU AHFC. MILEAGE BASED ON 2012 EPA MILEAGE ESTIMATES. USE FOR COMPARISON PURPOSES ONLY.
DO NOT COMPARE TO MODELS BEFORE 2008. YOUR ACTUAL MILEAGE WILL VARY DEPENDING ON HOW YOU DRIVE AND MAINTAIN YOUR VEHICLE. OFFERS EXPIRE 10/31/2012
MATT BURNE HONDA PRE-OWNED CENTER
Call: 1-800-NEXTHONDA View Prices at www.mattburnehonda.com
*2.9% on Certifed Accords thru Am Honda Finance W.A.C. up to 60 mos. Certifed Hondas have 1 yr - 12k
Basic Warranty & 7yr - 100k Powertrain from orig. inservice date.
S
1110 Wyoming Ave,
Scranton, PA
1-800-NEXT-HONDA
570-341-1400
ODYSSEY
11 ODYSSEY LX Gray, 31K......................NOW $22,950
10 ODYSSEY EX Slate, 24K.....................NOW $23,750
10 ODYSSEY EX White, 33K....................NOW $23,750
10 ODYSSEY EXL-DVD Slate, 33K ...NOW $24,950
10 ODYSSEY EXL-DVD Slate, 24K ...NOW $25,950
ACCORDS
09 ACCORD LX SDN Gray, 36K..........................NOW $14,950
09 ACCORD LXP SDN Silver, 37K......................NOW $15,500
10 ACCORD LX SDN Silver, 31K.........................NOW $15,950
10 ACCORD LXP SDN Silver, 29K......................NOW $16,500
09 ACCORD EX SDN Gold, 31K..........................NOW $16,750
08 ACCORD EXL NAVI SDN Red, 46K ..........NOW $16,950
08 ACCORD EXL V6 SDN Green, 52K .............NOW $17,500
09 ACCORD EXL V6 SDN Silver, 37K ..............NOW $17,950
10 ACCORD EX SDN Burgandy, 19K ....................NOW $18,500
10 ACCORD EXL SDN Burgandy, 30K .................NOW $18,950
10 ACCORD EXL V6 SDN Gray, 39K ...............NOW $18,950
11 ACCORD SE SDN Gray, 16K ..........................NOW $19,950
11 ACCORD EXL V-6 SDN Amber, 21K............NOW $22,950
ELEMENT 4WD
09 ELEMENT EX Red, 53K ...................................NOW $16,950
$0 DOWN
PAYMENT
Lease 36 Months through ahfc $0 Down Payment
Per Mo. Per Mo.
LLease
* ***
2.9% on
Certied
Accords
2.9%
APR
2.9%
APR
CIVICS
10 CIVIC VP SDN Gray, 47K.................................NOW $13,950
09 CIVIC HYBRID SDN Black, 37K....................NOW $14,500
10 CIVIC LX CPE Gray, 19K..................................NOW $14,950
10 CIVIC EX SDN Blue, 26K.................................NOW $16,500
10 CIVIC EX SDN Black, 25K................................NOW $16,500
12 CIVIC EXL SDN Gray, 11K ..............................NOW $19,999
PILOT 4WD
09 PILOT EX Silver, 58K ..........................................NOW $22,500
11 PILOT LX Gray, 37K............................................NOW $23,500
11 PILOT LX Silver, 17K...........................................NOW $24,750
11 PILOT EXL-DVD Cherry, 36K...........................NOW $28,500
11 PILOT EXL White, 17K .......................................NOW $28,950
10 PILOT EXL Black, 45K .......................................NOW $25,950
11 PILOT EXL Silver, 25K .......................................NOW $28,950
CRV 4WD
08 CRV LX Silver, 60K...............................................NOW $16,750
08 CRV LX Green, 57K..............................................NOW $16,750
08 CRV EX White, 46K ..............................................NOW $17,750
10 CRV LX Gray, 53K................................................NOW $17,950
10 CRV EXL Titanium, 37K ........................................NOW $22,500
10 CRV EXL Black, 26K............................................NOW $23,500
10 CRV EXL Blue, 26K.............................................NOW $23,500
WE KEEP THE BEST...
& WHOLESALE THE REST!
RIDGELINE 4WD
09 RIDGELINE RTL Cherry, 33K ..........................NOW $26,950
Navy, 71K, Was $9,850
Now $8,750
07 CHRYSLER
SEBRING TOURING
Silver, 37K, Was $11,950
Now $10,500
06 MERCURY GRAND
MARQUIS SDN
Silver, 68K, Was $12,500
Now $11,500
07 CHEVY
TRAILBLAZER LS 4WD
Black, 73K, Was $13,950
Now $12,500
07 FORD FUSION
SEL SDN
Navy, 69K, Was $17,950
Now $14,950
07 TOYOTA
HIGHLANDER 4WD
Gold, 76K
Now $8,950
04 BUICK RENDEZVOUS
CL AWD
Black, 25K
Now $19,500
10 TOYOTA CAMRY
XLE SDN
Green, 65K
Now $13,750
08 NISSAN ALTIMA
SL SDN
Gray, 23K, Was $18,950
Now $16,950
10 TOYOTA MATRIX
S AWD
White, 19K, Was $14,950
Now $14,950
06 HONDA ACCORD
EX SDN
Silver, 37K
Now $9,950
03 TOYOTA COROLLA
LE SEDAN
HONDA
RIDGELINE 4WD
08 RTS, White, 87K
$17,500
09 RTL, Silver, 93K
$16,950
Silver, 37K
Now $13,950
06 HONDA ACCORD
LX SEDAN
Club Cab, Black, 26K
07 DODGE DAKOTA
SXT 4X4
Now $19,950
YOURE
NICE
TRADE
HERE
Red, 35K
Now $15,750
10 TOYOTA COROLLA
S SEDAN
Gray, 56K
Now $13,950
06 HONDA ACCORD
EX SEDAN
White, 56K
Now $15,950
06 HONDA PILOT
EXL 4WD
Gold, 57K
Now $8,500
06 CHEVY COBALT
SEDAN
Silver, 103K
Now $7,950
01 HONDA CRV
EX 4WD
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 PAGE 13G
CALL AN EXPERT
CALL AN EXPERT
Professional Services Directory
1000
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
1015 Appliance
Service
ECO-FRIENDLY
APPLIANCE TECH.
25 Years Experi-
ence fixing major
appliances: Washer,
Dryer, Refrigerator,
Dishwasher, Com-
pactors. Most
brands. Free phone
advice & all work
guaranteed. No
service charge for
visit. 570-706-6577
1024 Building &
Remodeling
1st. Quality
Construction Co.
Roofing, siding,
gutters, insulation,
decks, additions,
windows, doors,
masonry &
concrete.
Insured & Bonded.
Senior Citizens Discount!
State Lic. # PA057320
570-606-8438
ALL OLDERHOMES
SPECIALIST
825-4268.
Remodel / Repair
Kitchen
& Baths
DAVE JOHNSON
Expert Bathroom &
Room Remodeling,
Carpentry & Whole
House Renovations.
Licensed &Insured
570-819-0681
GENERAL CONTRACTING
Roofing & siding.
Kitchens, bath-
rooms. Additions.
painting & drywall.
Free Estimates
570-831-5510
Looking for
answers
to the
changes in
the Building
Trades ?
Join the BIA
and get
all the
answers &
many
benefits.
call 287-3331
or go to
www.bianepa.com
NICHOLS CONSTRUCTION
All Types Of Work
New or Remodeling
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
570-406-6044
NORTHEAST
CONTRACTING
GROUP
Decks, Sunrooms,
Additions, Windows,
Kitchens & Baths.
Concrete
Driveways,
Walkways & Patios
570-338-2269
1024 Building &
Remodeling
PR BUILDERS
Any and all types of
remodeling from
windows to design
build renovations.
Handyman
Services also,
Electric, Plumbing,
Building.
PA license 048740
accepts Visa &
MasterCard
call 570-826-0919
ROOFING, SIDING,
DECKS, WINDOWS
For All of Your
Remodeling Needs.
Will Beat Any Price
25 Yrs. Experience
Ref. Ins. Free Est.
570-332-7023
Or 570-855-2506
1039 Chimney
Service
A-1 ABLE
CHIMNEY
Rebuild & Repair
Chimneys. All
types of Masonry.
Liners Installed,
Brick & Block,
Roofs & Gutters.
Licensed &
Insured
570-735-2257
CHIMNEY REPAIRS
Parging. Stucco.
Stainless Liners.
Cleanings. Custom
Sheet Metal Shop.
570-383-0644
1-800-943-1515
Call Now!
CHRIS MOLESKY
CHIMNEY SPECIALIST
New, repair, rebuild,
liners installed.
Inspections. Con-
crete & metal caps.
Licensed & Insured
570-328-6257
COZY HEARTH CHIMNEY
ALL CHIMNEY
REPAIR
Chimney Cleaning,
Rebuilding, Repair,
Stainless Steel
Lining, Parging,
Stucco, Caps, Etc.
Free Estimates
Senior Discounts
Licensed-Insured
1-888-680-7990
570-840-0873
1042 Cleaning &
Maintainence
A+ VERAS CLEANING
Homes,
Apartments,
Offices.
(570)817-3750
Connies Cleaning
15 years experience
Bonded & Insured
Residential Cleaning
Connie Mastruzzo
Brutski - Owner
570-430-3743 570-430-3743
Connie does the
cleaning!
Friendly, Reason-
able & Reliable.
Weekly Cleaning &
Household Organiz-
ing. Errands, Lite
Meal Prep & Shop-
ping.
570-288-4273
1054 Concrete &
Masonry
A. CHAIRGE CONCRETE
25 Years Exp.
Concrete/Masonry
Quality Work
Affordable Prices
Free Estimates
Licensed/Insured
W. Pittston
570-760-6720
1054 Concrete &
Masonry
D. PUGH
CONCRETE
All phases of
masonry &
concrete. Small
jobs welcome.
Senior discount.
Free estimates.
Licensed & Insured
288-1701/655-3505
Wi l l i ams & Franks I nc
CHIMNEYS,
Masonry, Con-
crete, Brick,
Stonework, Stucco
Damage repair
specialist
570-466-2916
1057Construction &
Building
GARAGE
DOOR
Sales, service,
installation &
repair.
FULLY
INSURED
HIC# 065008
CALL JOE
570-735-8551
Cell 606-7489
MICHAEL
GENERAL
CONTRACTOR
& HOME BUILDER
30 Years Exp.
SPECIAL SALE
25% off our normal
low prices. Have
your home beautiful
for the holidays.
Interior / Exterior
WE DO IT ALL!
Why pay more.
Pay when youre
pleased. All work
guaranteed.
Free Estimates.
570-899-3123
1078 Dry Wall
MIRRA
DRYWALL
Hanging & Finishing
Textured Ceilings
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
570-675-3378
1084 Electrical
GRULA ELECTRIC LLC
Licensed, Insured,
No job too small.
570-829-4077
SLEBODA ELECTRIC
Master electrician
Licensed & Insured
Service Changes &
Replacements.
Generator Installs.
8 6 8 - 4 4 6 9
1099 Fencing &
Decks
ACTION FENCE
INVENTORY
CLEARANCE SALE
Specials on new &
used fencing.
All Types & Styles
Sales & Installation
Call today for a
FREE estimate!
570-602-0432
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
1099 Fencing &
Decks
PISANOS FENCE &
MANUFACTURING
COMPANY
1399 Susquehanna
Ave, Exeter, PA
40 years in
business, free esti-
mates, fully insured.
Sales and installa-
tion of chainlink,
custom built wood,
PVC, and all types
of fencing. Call
570-654-2257 or
570-654-2286
1105 Floor Covering
Installation
HARDWOOD FLOOR
REFINISHING &
INSTALLATION
Recoat your hard-
wood floors starting
at $1.25/SQ FT
Free Estimates
570-793-4994
1129 Gutter
Repair & Cleaning
GUTTER CLEANING
Window Cleaning
Pressure washing
Insured
570-288-6794
1132 Handyman
Services
A TO Z
HANDYMAN
SERVICES
Masonry, Carpentry,
Painting &
Electrical
Interior/Exterior
Carpet &
Upholstery Cleaning
570-332-5290
DO IT ALL HANDYMAN
Painting, drywall,
plumbing & all types
of interior & exterior
home repairs.
570-829-5318
Home
Winterization
Roof Repairs,
Chimney Rebuilds.
You Name It. 30
Years Experience.
Licensed & Insured.
570-704-8759
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
A A C L E A N I N G
A1 Always hauling,
cleaning attics, cellar,
garage, one piece or
whole Estate, also
available 10 &20 yard
dumpsters.655-0695
592-1813or287-8302
AAA CLEANING
A1 GENERAL HAULING
Cleaning attics,
cellars, garages.
Demolitions, Roofing
&Tree Removal.
FreeEst. 779-0918or
542-5821; 814-8299
A.S.A.P Hauling
Estate Cleanouts,
Attics, Cellars,
Garages, were
cheaper than
dumpsters!.
Free Estimates,
Same Day!
570-822-4582
ALWAYS READY
HAULING
Property & Estate
Cleanups, Attics,
Cellars, Yards,
Garages,
Construction
Sites, Flood
Damage & More.
CHEAPER THAN
A DUMPSTER!!
SAME DAY
SERVICE
Free Estimates
570-301-3754
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
ALL KINDS OF
HAULING & JUNK
REMOVAL
FALL CLEAN UP!
TREE/SHRUB TREE/SHRUB
REMOV REMOVAL AL
DEMOLITION DEMOLITION
Estate Cleanout Estate Cleanout
Free Estimates
24 HOUR
SERVICE
SMALL AND
LARGE JOBS!
570-823-1811
570-239-0484
Mikes $5-Up
Hauling Junk &
Trash from Houses,
Garages, Yards, Etc
826-1883 472-4321
1162 Landscaping/
Garden
ARE YOU TIRED
OF BEING
RAKED?
Specializing In
Trimming and
Shaping of Bush-
es, Shrubs, Trees.
Also, Bed
Cleanup, Edging,
Mulch and Stone.
Call Joe.
570-823-8465 570-823-8465
Meticulous and
Affordable.
F Free ree E Estimates stimates
Brizzys
Arbor Care &
Landscaping
Tree trimming,
pruning & removal.
Stump grinding,
Cabling. Shrub and
hedge sculpting
and trimming.
Spring cleanup,
retaining walls
and repair.
Free Estimates
Fully Insured
570-542-7265
JAYS LAWN SERVICE
Summer clean-ups,
mowing, mulching
and more!
Free Estimates
570-574-3406
KELLERS LAWN CARE
Gutter cleaning, Fall
cleanup & trimming,
snow removal
Landscaping,
planting. Affordable.
Free Estimates.
Fully Insured.
Commercial
& Residential.
570-332-7016
LANDSCAPE TREES
Farm Fresh
9 White Pine $95
9-10 Norway
Spruce $105
Great for natural
fences. Other
sizes & types.
Delivery & Installa-
tion Available
helenandedstree
farm.com
570-498-6209
TOUGH BRUSH
& TALL GRASS
Mowing, edging,
mulching, shrubs &
hedge shaping.
Tree pruning. Gar-
den tilling. Fall
Clean Ups. Leaf
removal. Weekly &
bi-weekly lawn
care. Fully Insured.
Free Estimates
570-829-3261
1183 Masonry
OLD TIME MASONRY
Voted #1
MasonryContractor
Let A Real
Mason Bid Your
Project!
Brick, Block,
Concrete, Stone,
Chimney &
Stucco Repair,
Retaining Walls,
Patio & Pavers,
Stamped &
Colored
Concrete, etc.
Fully Insured.
570-466-0879
oldtimemasonry.com
STESNEY
CONCRETE & MASONRY
Brick, block, walks,
drives, stucco, stone,
steps, chimneys .
Lic. & insured.
570-283-5254
STEVE WARNER
Masonry/Concrete
Custom Work
Small Jobs &
Repairs. Free esti-
mates. Lic. & Ins.
570-561-5245
1195 Movers
BestDarnMovers
Moving Helpers
Call for Free Quote.
We make moving easy.
BestDarnMovers.com
570-852-9243
1204 Painting &
Wallpaper
JACOBOSKY JACOBOSKY
P PAINTING AINTING
Get your home
painted today, We
have an eye for
detail!
Power Washing,
Quality Painting,
Affordable prices,
$50.00 off with
this ad.
Free Estimates.
570-328-5083
M. PARALI S PAI NTI NG
Int/ Ext. painting,
Power washing.
Professional work
at affordable rates.
Free estimates.
570-288-0733
MARTYS PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Top Quality Work
570-468-9079
1213 Paving &
Excavating
DRIVEWAYS
PARKING LOTS
ROADWAYS
HOT TAR & CHIP
SEALCOATING
Licensed and
Insured. Call
Today For Your
Free Estimate
570-474-6329
Lic.# PA021520
L&M BLACKTOPPING
Driveways, exca-
vating & resurfac-
ing. Concrete &
pavers. Major Cred-
it Cards Accepted
Licensed &
Insured. Call Ron
570-290-2296
Wanna make your
car go fast? Place
an ad in Classified!
570-829-7130.
1249 Remodeling &
Repairs
RE-CON RE-CON
Reconstruction
Specialists
For all your home
improvement needs
Heating, plumbing
& remodeling.
One Phone Call
Does It All!
570-406-4738
1252 Roofing &
Siding
EVERHART
CONSTRUCTION
Roofing, siding,
gutters, chimney
repairs & more.
Free Estimates,
Lowest Prices
570-855-5738
FALL ROOFING
McManus
Construction
Licensed, Insured.
Everyday Low
Prices. 3,000
satisfied customers.
570-735-0846
GILROY
Construction
Your Roofing
Specialist
Free Estimates
No Payment
til Job is
100% Complete
570-829-0239
J & F
CONSTRUCTION
All types of roofing.
Repairs & Installation
25 Years Experience
Licensed/Insured
Free Estimates
Reliable Service
570-855-4259
J.R.V. ROOFING
570-824-6381
Roof Repairs & New
Roofs. Shingle, Slate,
Hot Built Up, Rubber,
Gutters & Chimney
Repairs. Year Round.
Licensed/Insured
FREE Estimates
*24 Hour
Emergency Calls*
Jim Harden
570-288-6709
New Roofs &
Repairs, Shingles,
Rubber, Slate,
Gutters, Chimney
Repairs. Credit
Cards Accepted
FREE ESTIMATES!
Licensed-Insured
EMERGENCIES
1276 Snow
Removal
SNOW SNOW
PLOWING PLOWING
VITOS & GINOS
570-574-1275
Commercial
Industrial
Residential
Driveways
Sidewalks
Salting
1339 Window
Service
PJS WINDOW
CLEANING &
JANITORIAL
SERVICES
Windows, Gutters,
Carpets, Power
washing and more.
INSURED/BONDED.
570-283-9840
Sell your own home!
Place an ad HERE
570-829-7130
YATESVILLE
40 PITTSTON AVE
Oct 6-7th 9am-3pm
Kitchen table and
chairs, infant chil-
drens and adult
clothes all sizes,
holiday decor,
christmas tree, a lot
of baby and chil-
dren items! And
much more.
750 Jewelry
DIAMOND RING
Ladys 14 carat yel-
low gold ring, 3/4
carat, I to J quality,
2 baguettes, .20
carats, H to I.
Appraised at
$4,450, will
sell for $2,000.
570-592-5661
752 Landscaping &
Gardening
LAWN MOWER.
Toro. $40
570-288-4852
LAWNMOWER, runs
great $65.
570-825-3371
754 Machinery &
Equipment
SAWMILLS: From
only $3,997.00-
MAKE/ SAVE
MONEY with your
own bandmill- Cut
lumber any dimen-
sion. In stock ready
to ship. FREE
Info/DVD: www.Nor-
woodSawmills.com
1-800-578-1363
Ext.300N
SNOW
BLOWER.
Craftsman. 12
HP, 32 dual
stage. Electric
start. Track
Drive. $525.
570-675-5046
SNOW THROWER.
Simplicity. 10 HP,
auger control head-
light, electric start,
manual, used very
little. Like new, built
to handle the tough-
est winters. Asking
$850.
570-288-8689
756 Medical
Equipment
POTTY CHAIR
(adult),TUB BENCH,
handicapped. Both
brand new. never
used/ $120 for both.
570-829-3172
SCOOTER Go-Go
Ultra X 4-wheeler
with basket and bat-
tery. Good condition
$400. 592-8856
758 Miscellaneous
FREE AD POLICY
The Times Leader
will accept ads for
used private
party merchan-
dise only for items
totaling $1,000 or
less. All items must
be priced and state
how many of each
item. Your name
address, email and
phone number must
be included. No
ads for ticket
sales accepted.
Pet ads accept-
ed if FREE ad
must state FREE.
You may place your
ad online at
timesleader.com,
or email to
classifieds@
timesleader.com or
fax to 570-831-7312
or mail to Classified
Free Ads: 15 N.
Main Street, Wilkes-
Barre, PA.
SORRY NO
PHONE CALLS.
All
Junk
Cars
&
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
BAND SAW. For
stained glass
includes pattern
books. 7 sheets of
stained glass all
sizes. Lots of
accessories, too
much to mention.
Call for details. All
for $160. Very good
condition.
570-696-2169
To place your
ad call...829-7130
CAR CARRIER.
Sears X. $30. AIR
CONDITIONER,
Amana, 5000 btu,
$50. 570-826-9049
CHINA 12 piece
place setting with
serving pieces, Star
Light pattern, fine
china by Harmony
House, great condi-
tion $295.
570-472-0285
CHRISTMAS TREE. 1
year old. 7.5 ft. Pre-
lit from Sears. Paid
$150, Ask $75.
570-388-6770
758 Miscellaneous
CANES & walking
sticks. 30 available.
Many different
sizes, heights,
shapes, made from
slippery maple trees
$5. each. Christmas
& household over
200 items available
includes trees,
ornaments, lights,
vases, knick-
knacks, figurines,
lamps, baskets,
flowers, Samsonite
belt massager,
all for $60 Electric
sewing machine
with cabinet, excel-
lent condition $45.
Stove, old fash-
ioned coal. White
Dickson with warm-
ing closet and 6
lids. Excellent con-
dition. $500
570-735-2081
CHINA SET 40 piece
75-100 years old
Austrian, hand
painted blue rose
design with scal-
loped gold fringe
edge, includes plat-
ter, 2 tureens with
cover, butter dish
with cover, gravy
boat with attached
dish, relish dish. $40
570-819-2174
CHRISTMAS TREE.
7.5, in original box.
Excellent condition.
Was $400 sell for
$50 OBO
570-829-3443
CHURCH PEWS
Beautiful used 8-ft
church pews for
sale @ $45/ft or 8
pews @ $2,400 OBO
Unity of NEPA: A
Spiritual Center 140
S Grant Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18702 For more info,
call Marilynn 570-
824-7722 or 570-
269-2914.
CLOTHING RACKS
4 steel approxi-
mately 6 $75. each.
570-883-4443
DISHES service for
8 also includes
sugar bowl, cream-
er, platter, serving
bowl. Excellent con-
dition asking $75.
570-655-3032
DISPENSER, Bowl-
ing Ball whiskey.
Complete with 6
glasses - chrome.
$100. 489-2675
DISPLAY UNITS. (2)
chrome with 6 glass
shelves in each unit.
$75 for both.
570-283-1774
DRAPERY. Custom
made, fully lined
with matching
valance. Light pat-
tern mauve, aqua,
white. Like new. Fits
window 116wx78l.
Beautiful workman-
ship. $350.
570-655-4736
FABRIC Sewers
Delight, large box of
material, includes
cotton denim,
crepe, etc. Large
pieces included. $15
for box. 655-1808
FLATWARE, Oneida
silverplated serv-
ings for twelve plus
serving pieces $49.
BOWL, Oneida sil-
verplated Paul
Revere with glass
liner 8 inches in
diameter $15. Sugar
bowl, Oneida silver-
plated Paul Revere
& creamer $15.
Sugar bowl, modern
style silverplated
and creamer with
walnut handle $15.
CUPS, 8 Noritake
Demitasse with
saucers and free
spoons $25.
(570) 474-6094
HEATER Quartz
infrared 1200W, 20.
Great for work-
shop/garage, like
new, $30. 696-1267
HOOD 1967
Corvette Big Black
427, Good condition
in primer $695. Will
sell fast! 883-7007
HORSE. Radio FLyer
Liberty Spring with
sound option, $100,
VIDEOS, Childrens
(16) $2 each, COF-
FEE MAKER, $10,
LIGHT, stained glass
ceiling, $15, ENTER-
TAINMENT CENTER,
cherry, lots of
space, bottom stor-
age, $35.
570-288-8689
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
LITE BALLAST new
3-T8-8 $75. 3T12-
8 $55. New spare
tire with 4 lugs T-115
70 D/14 $20. 3 26
oz spray foam
adhesive sealant
$3.49 each. 3 piece
15 amp type S fuses
$2 each, quantity 2.
Three 4 piece 30
amp type S fuses $2
each, quantity.
570-902-5273
MASSAGE CHAIR
good condition-
(black) good for Tat-
too shop or for mas-
sage. $25.
570-740-1188
MOVIE, Gong Show,
$10, WINDOWS,
storm (5) $10 each,
TIRES, various types
and sizes, (5) $20-
$65. PARTS, auto,
(2) $40-$100. PIPE,
PVC, over 8 $10,
SHOES, Flame
mens, $50, SEC-
TIONAL with bed
and table, large,
$200. 740-1246
OIL Home heating
oil; approximately
500 gallon; located
in Pittston; $2. per
gallon; buyer must
remove; call
570-262-0530.
758 Miscellaneous
MERCHANTS
VILLAGE
MERCHANTSVILLAGE.COM
(Former Walmart
Building)
Oak St., Pittston
Come Shop
With Us!
NOW
ACCEPTING
EBT
CARDS
3 Acres Inside
Air Conditioned
Huge, Huge
Inventory
FOOD ITEMS
Huge Selection
1/2 Price!
BABY ITEMS
diapers by the
case
BEAUTY ITEMS
Make-Up
CLEANING ITEMS
ELECTRONICS
HOUSEHOLD ITEMS
HEALTHCARE
TOOLS
Food Court
570-891-1972
RAMPS. steel car,
$40. DIGGER, post
hole, $15, CHAIR,
light gold accent.
Basket weave size,
$40. 570-288-4852
To place your
ad Call Toll Free
1-800-427-8649
ROTORS. (2) New
front. For 2009 Jeep
Liberty. Must take
pair, $40. TIRE, on
Jeep Liberty Rim.
New,. $40. TOOL
BOX, (2) black plas-
tic for full size truck,
$50 , black plastic
for Small size truck
$50. 570-430-4647
SCRUBS, X-large,
womens worn, $5
each. New scrubs,
$8. 5 pairs ladys
slacks size 18, $8
each. 5 ladys extra
long sleeve tops,
$10 each. 5 ladys
skirts, size 18, $10
each. Mon-Fri, 10 to
4. 570-655-0103
SEWI NG Machi ne,
with chair, like new.
$50. 288-0864
SOUP TUREEN with
lid, platter, spoon,
salt and pepper
shaker. Garden Har-
vest by Arnart. New,
excellent condition,
never used. 45
years old, received
for wedding pres-
ent. $30
570-696-2169
STEAM BLASTER,
$40, Sears X.
Cargo, $25, Shelf,
$25, Lamp, floor,
$35, Corner shelf,
$20, Desk, comput-
er $20, Table, small,
$15, Bar Stools, (3)
$40 all, Dog Bed,
Orthopedic, $25,
Gazelle, $20, Christ-
mas figures, (3) $25
each, All excellent
condition. 735-0812
TEMPURPEDIC
MATTRESS & FOUN-
DATION. New in
original wrapper
with original price
tags. Tempur Cloud
model. Double bed.
Must Sell. Paid
$1849, SELL $999
OBO. Will deliver
within 100 miles.
570-696-1410. car-
olsab2@gmail.com
TREADMILL, manu-
al, $10. EXERCISE
MACHINE, rower/
ski, $10, TV TEDDY
with 6 videos, $15,
TOY SET, Melanies
Mall, $10, NIGHT-
STAND, $12, RICE
COOKER, $4.
570-696-3368
TREK MOUNTAI N
BIKE, like new! $150
570-287-1908
762 Musical
Instruments
CLARINET Artley,
solid wood, black
with case & 4 new
reeds. $175.
Call 570-675-0460
or 574-1724
GUITAR. FENDER
Squier Stratocaster
electric guitar with
gig bag. $125.
FENDER Chorus
effect pedal $25,
Proco RoadKill Rat
effect pedal $49,
VOX Clyde-style
Wah, $89, AMPEG
4x12 Slant speaker
cab, $250. 570-
283-2552 or rick
@wyoming valley.net
SAXOPHONE,
Yamaha. $225.
484-221-0648
772 Pools & Spas
HOT TUB. Jacuzzi, 6
person, green with
cover, 19 jets, 1 hp
motor, 230 VAC.
Kept indoors, very
good condition.
$1,200. Avoca.
570-457-1979
776 Sporting Goods
BOW. PSE Game
Sport Strato-Flite.
Includes 18 arrows,
very good condition.
$60. JACKET, Wool-
rich Hunting and
Pants, size 48, $15.
Call for details
570-696-2169
HELMET, Official
New York Giants full
size, signed by
Tikk Barber. $225.
570-489-2675
776 Sporting Goods
CROSSBOW. New,
never fired. Barnett
Wildcat C5 Camo
pkg. 150lb draw,
320 fps, weighs only
6lb. Includes 4x
Multi Reticle Scope,
Quad Crank Cock-
ing Device, Quick
Detach Quiver, 4 ea.
20 bolts. Paid $495
Sell $380.
570-881-7113
IRONS. Callaway.
Complete set from
3 iron through
lob.sand attack
wedge. $65. Great
set of irons. Must
sell. 570-655-3512
TENNIS RACKET
girls Wilson, pink &
brown breast
awareness. Comes
with case. Only
used once. Mint
condition. $20.
570-704-6185
778 Stereos/
Accessories
RECEIVER, Technics
dolby sound speak-
er system $75. MCS
series, 3040 stereo
graphic equalizer
$25. Technics 5 cd
player $65.
570-287-2760
780 Televisions/
Accessories
T.V. 47
not HD Sony $250.
883-7007
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
782 Tickets
PENN STATE
TICKETS
4 seats, last 3
games on the 20
Yard Line, Section
EGU, cushioned
seats.
570-954-5237
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
PAGE 14G SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
R.J. BURNE
1205-1209 Wyoming Avenue, Scranton
(570) 342-0107 1-888-880-6537 www.rjburne.com
Mon-Thurs 9-8 Fri 9-5 Sat 9-4
*TAX & TAGS EXTRA NC + Non-Certied
1205 Wyoming Ave. RJ Burne Cadillac
From Wilkes-Barre to Scranton
Expressway 8 Blocks on
Wyoming Avenue
E
X
P
W
A
Y
WYOMING AVE.
8
1
Please excuse our dust while we remodel to help serve you better!
2013 ATS
by Cadillac
2013 XTS
by Cadillac
Cue, Power Lumbar, Keyless Entry,
19 Wheels, stabilitrak, 3.6 SIDIHFV6
MSRP
$
45,345
NOW IN STOCK
2012 SRX
Luxury by Cadillac
Lease price based on a 2012 SRX FWD Luxury $41,890 MSRP $399 per month plus 9% sales tax total
$435 per month. 39 month lease 10,000 miles per year. 39 Monthly payments total $16,965 $.25/
mile penalty over 32,500 miles. $0 down payment plus $399 rst payment plus tax and tags due at
delivery, Total due at delivery $435 plus tag fees. MUST BE A CURRENT LESSEE OF A 1999 OR
NEWER NON-GM LUXURY LEASE. MODELS TO QUALIFY INCLUDE: AUDI, LEXUS, BMW,
ACURA, MERCEDES, LINCOLN, INFINITI, VOLVO, JAGUAR, LAND ROVER, PORSCHE Leasee
responsible for excessive wear and tear. Must take delivery by 10/30/12. Requires ALLY Bank Tier S
or A credit approval. Please see sales person for complete details.
Lease price based on a 2013 ATS Sdn 2.5L $37,585 MSRP. $349 per month plus 9% sales tax total
$381 per month. 36 month lease 10,000 miles per year. 36 Monthly payments total $13,716 $.25/mile
penalty over 30,000 miles. $1999 down payment plus $349 rst payment plus tax and tags, Total due
at delivery $2550 plus tag fees. MUST BE A CURRENT LESSEE OF A 1999 OR NEWER NON-GM
LUXURY LEASE. MODELS TO QUALIFY INCLUDE: AUDI, LEXUS, BMW, ACURA, MERCEDES,
LINCOLN, INFITY, VOLVO, JAGUAR, LAND ROVER, PORSCHE Lessee responsible for excessive
wear and tear. Must take delivery by 10/31/12. Requires US Bank Tier 1 credit approval. Please see
sales person for complete details.
Ultraview roof, Memory Settings,
Heated Seats, OnStar, XM,
Keyless Access, Remote Start
PER
Mo. $
399
MSRP
$
41,890
39MO
security
deposit
DOWN PAYMENT
$
0
$
0
PER
Mo. $
349
36MO
security
deposit
DOWN PAYMENT
$
1,999
$
0
Black Diamond Tricoat, Standard Collection,
2.0T, Drivers & Front Passenger Heated
Seats, 17 Polished Wheels, RVN Flat Tires,
Cadillac User Experience CUE, Bose,
Rear Vision Camera
MSRP
$
37,585
of Scranton - NEPA
Must be a current Lessee of a 1999 or newer Non-GM Luxury Lease.
Models to qualify include: Audi, Lexus, BMW, Acura, Mercedes,
Lincoln, Inniti, Volvo, Jaguar, Land Rover, Porshe.
Must be a current Lessee of a 1999 or newer Non-GM Luxury Lease.
Models to qualify include: Audi, Lexus, BMW, Acura, Mercedes,
Lincoln, Inniti, Volvo, Jaguar, Land Rover, Porshe.
2006 DTS
by Cadillac
2007 SRXAWD
by Cadillac
2011 SRX Luxury
AWD by Cadillac
2011 CTS Luxury
by Cadillac
2008 STSAWD
by Cadillac
2008 CTS Luxury
AWD by Cadillac
Black/Black Sunroof,
OnStar, Chrome Wheels
$
13,996
White Diamond/Shale Leather
Ultraview Sunroof, Heated &
Memory Seats, Navigation,
OnStar, XM
$
17,997
Gold Mist/Cashmere
Ultraview, XM , Onstar,
Memory Seats,
Only 10,426 miles
$
35,991
Radiant Silver, Leather,
Heated & Memory Seats,
XM, OnStar, 6,601 miles
$
32,991
Black/ Cashmere leather
Sunroof, XM, Onstar,
Heated & Memory Seats
$
22,998
#9004A Platinum/Leather,
Sunroof, Heated & Memory
Seats ONLY 28,973 MILES!
$
25,998
207-8149
VIEW OUR INVENTORY 24/7 AT WWW.SANTOCARS.COM
Montage Auto Mile, 3514 Birney Ave., Moosic
2005 BMW X3 3.0i AWD 2005 Toyota Highlander AWD
V6 Third Row
2010 Honda Odyssey EX-L 2008 Lincoln MKZ AWD
Highland Green
w/Sand Leather,
Moonroof,
Only 68,000
miles
Silver w/ Gray Leather,
Moonroof,
Only 59,000 Miles
1-Owner
Silver w/off
Black Leather,
Moonroof, DVD,
1-Owner,
Only
26,000 miles
Red Candy,
Metallic w/
Sand Leather,
Moonroof,
Heated Seats,
1-Owner
$
15,490
$
15,990
$
26,990 $16,990
LUCKYS GEMS
All Prices plus tax and tag.
Lucky Santo
OFF BRAND PRE-OWNED DEALS PRICED TO SELL
784 Tools
LADDER 24 alu-
minum extension
ladder $100.
570-829-5542
786 Toys & Games
SCOOTER. Amigo 3
wheel. New batter-
ies, excellent condi-
tion. $300
570-287-6289
786 Toys & Games
FOOSBALL TABLE.
Regulation size in
medium wood stain.
Converts to 9 differ-
ent games, includ-
ing pool. bowling,
shuffleboard, etc.
Great condition.
Asking $200.
570-991-0221
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
788 Stereo/TV/
Electronics
T.V. 55 Ultravision
Digital. Works very
well. $75. 570-709-
9863. after 5pm.
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
TV 19 color
Symphonic with
remote. $25 cash.
Call 570-829-2392
after 6 pm.
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
BUYING SPORT CARDS
Pay Cash for
baseball, football,
basketball, hockey
& non-sports.
Sets, singles &
wax. Also buying
comics.
570-212-0398
Line up a place to live
in classified!
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
$ ANTIQUES BUYING $
Old Toys, model kits,
Bikes, dolls, guns,
Mining Items, trains
&Musical Instruments,
Hess. 474-9544
To place your
ad call...829-7130
WANTED
JEWELRY
WILKES BARREGOLD
( 570) 48GOLD8
( 570) 484- 6538
Highest Cash Pay-
Outs Guaranteed
Open 6 Days
a Week
10am- 6pm
Cl osed Thursdays
1092 Highway 315 Blvd.
( Pl aza 315)
315N . 3 mi l es af t er
Mot orworl d
We Pay At Least
80% of the London
Fixed Market Price
for All Gold Jewelry
Visit us at
WilkesBarreGold.com
Or email us at
wilkesbarregold@
yahoo.com
London PM
Gold Price
Oct . 4 - $1,791.75
800
PETS & ANIMALS
810 Cats
CAT. Male. Indoor
white and orange
striped. Declawed
and neutered. Good
with kids and dogs.
Need to find new
home due to aller-
gies. Megan @
570-477-6677
FREE KITTENS to
good home. All litter
trained, 6 weeks
old. 3 females & 3
males 208-3938/
cell 570-299-1486
810 Cats
CATS & KI TTENS
12 weeks & up.
All shots, neutered,
tested,microchipped
VALLEY CAT RESCUE
824-4172, 9-9 only
KITTENS 2 FREE
to good home.
Call 570-288-9478
815 Dogs
PAWS
TO CONSIDER....
ENHANCE
YOUR PET
CLASSIFIED
AD ONLINE
Call 829-7130
Place your pet ad
and provide us your
email address
This will create a
seller account
online and login
information will be
emailed to you from
gadzoo.com
The World of Pets
Unleashed
You can then use
your account to
enhance your online
ad. Post up to 6
captioned photos
of your pet
Expand your text to
include more
information, include
your contact
information such
as e-mail, address
phone number and
or website.
Poms, Husky, Labs,
Yorkies, Puggles,
Chihuahuas, Pugs
Dachshund, Goldens,
Shepherds, Dober-
mans, Shih-Tzus
570-453-6900
570-389-7877
Let the Community
Know!
Place your Classified
Ad TODAY!
570-829-7130
GOLDEN RETRIEVER
/LAB PUPS
1 black female
& 1 black male.
$250, each.
570-836-1090
POODLE/SHIH-TZU
MIX dog. 3 years
old, friendly. Comes
with carrier, all
toys,food, bowls,
etc. FREE to good
home only
570-338-2415
815 Dogs
PUPPIES FOR SALE
Golden Doodles,
$475. Jugs, $250.
All shots and
wormed.
570-274-5099
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
GET IT
TOGO.
Search the app store
and install The Times Leader
mobile app now for when
you need your news to go.
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 PAGE 15G TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MARCH 4, 2012 PAGE 15G TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012 PAGE 15G
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com PAGE 15G
www.lewith-freeman.com
Top Seller In
Luzerne County
Exposure
on Over 600
Web Sites
Source: Actual member statistics for LeadingRE and estimates for other networks using average sales units per agent
and average sales price for frms in each respective network frompublished sources for 2011 production.
L
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$235
$157
$106
$101
$85
$46
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$21 $17
$9
$166

Leading Real Estate


Companies of the World

Coldwell Banker
RE/MAX
Prudential
Keller Williams
Century 21
Sothebys
Real Living
ERA
Realty Executives
Better Homes & Gardens
LEADING RE IS LEWITH & FREEMANS
WORLD WIDE NETWORK
Lewith&Freeman
Real Estate, Inc.
NATIONAL STRENGTH
LOCAL COMMITMENT
2
6
3
4
9
0
Se Habla
Espanol
~
870 LAKE STREET
DALLAS 12-3353
Matchless Colonial in
tranquil setting on
22 beautiful wooded
acres. Immaculate
condition, spacious
floor plan, comfortable
master bedroom with
2 person jacuzzi.
Finished walk-out
basement connecting
to stone patio. A fantastic home with lots of privacy!
CALL CARY 240-3552 $497,000
DIR: From Dallas, take Memorial Hwy toward Harveys Lake. Turn
right on Lake St and follow to end of street. Home is on left.
Open House!
12:00
- 2:30
PM
271 CHARLES ST.
LUZERNE 12-2583
A distinctive discovery! This
warm and inviting 3-bedroom
home includes the comforts
of newer carpeting and freshly
painted interior, mud room,
modern kitchen, and main-
level laundry. An excellent
buy!
CALL FLO 371-2881
NEW PRICE: $90,000
DIR: Wyoming Avenue to
Bennett. Right on Ryman, left
on Charles. Property on right.
Open House- Oct 7th -Price Reduced!!
1:00
-
2:30
PM
33-35 OAK ST.
WILKES-BARRE 11-3031
Attractive, solid double
with many upgrades!
3 bedrooms each side,
n e w e r roof, and
replacement windows.
Owner side features
new bathroom, new
kitchen floor, and
laundry room with
bath. Vacant side is
freshly painted with new interior doors and n e w e r gas furnace.
A nice, large, well-built property in a nice residential neighborhood!
CALL RON 817-1362 $89,900
DIR: South on Carey Ave. Right onto Oak St. Property on right.
Open House- Oct 7th -Absolutely Awesome!
1
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p
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ONE
SOURCE
REALTY
ERA1.com
Mountaintop Ofce
12 N Mountain Blvd.
(570) 403-3000
WE WILL SELL YOUR HOUSE
OR ERA WILL BUY IT!*
Watch this Community come to life by
becoming a Bell Weather Resident. Tere
has never been a better time to join us
Prices Starting in the $140s
Find us in our convenient Location:
Wyoming Avenue to Union Street. Turn
onto Mill Hollow in Luzerne.
Two-story
New Construction
Townhomes
1st oor master
Formal Dining Room
Eat-in Kitchen
Loft
Valuted Ceilings
Front Porch
Garage
Garden Area
Pure Indulgence...
Luxury
Condominiums
nestled in a quiet
corner of Northeast
Pennsylvania
OR ERA WILL BUY IT!
Waypoint
In Luzerne
Contact one of our
Luzerne County
Real Estate
Professionals at
570.403.3000
7
8
2
2
7
7
837 Wyoming Ave., Kingston
288-1401
LOWER DEMUNDS RD.,
DALLAS
Like new! This 2,500 sq.ft. home
features 4 bedrooms; newkitchen;
2 1/2 new baths; new hardwood
fooring; new heating system; new
plumbing; newly fnished lower
level. MLS#11-4504
JOE MOORE $169,000
138 ORCHARD EAST,
DALLAS
MOTIVATED SELLER! 2 bedroom
- 2 bath condo in very nice con-
dition. Tiled baths. 2 balconies.
Nearby 1-car garage. New vinyl
exterior... Assessment paid by
seller/owner. New roof 2005. New
electrical system.
MLS#11-4031
JOE MOORE $99,500
N
E
W
P
R
IC
E
66 GOODWIN AVE N,
KINGSTON
2-story in good condition with fex-
ible foor plan. First foor living room;
dining room; kitchen; TV room; of-
fce; 3/4 bath-laundry. Second foor:
3 bedrooms,full bath. Lower level:
1/2 bath and rec room. Ductless
air-conditioning on frst foor. Private
driveway. MLS#12-2024
JOE MOORE $112,500
Atlas Realty, Inc.
829-6200 www.atlasrealtyinc.com
We Sell Happiness!
Charles A. Adonizio, III
Broker, GRI, SRES
315 BALTIMORE AVE.,
WEST PITTSTON
Beautifully maintained 3
bedroom home with ex-
tra large family room, gas
heat, nice yard, low traf-
fc location. Not fooded
in 1972 or 2011.
MLS #12-3677.
Call Charlie.
$119,900
Dir: Wyoming Ave. turn
West onto Baltimore,
home on left.
2
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OPEN HOUSE TODAY
Wilkes-Barre 570-825-2468 Shavertown 570-696-2010
info@mksre.com
Darren G. Snyder
Broker/President
1 PAIGE DR.,
YATESVILLE
Better than new end unit
townhouse with 3 bedroom, 2.5
baths, 1 car garage, modern kitchen
with breakfast bar, dining area and
all appliances included. Master
bedroom with beautiful master
bath. Fenced yard with patio.
Call Darren Snyder 570-825-2468
Directions: From Rt. 315, turn at
St. Joes Oblates to stop sign, turn
right at Yatesville Road, townhomes
on right just past the Boro building.
$219,900
Open House Today Sunday, October 7th 1:00-3:00PM
THE REAL ESTATE MARKET IS VERY BUSY!
WE NEED HOMES TO SELL!
CALL US FOR A FREE MARKET ANALYSIS!
Low Commision Rates to Save You Money
Print and Internet Advertising
Data Base of Buyers Ready to Buy
Jerry & Pats Award Winning Experience
Jerry Busch, Jr.
709-7798
Pat Busch
885-4165
GERALD L. BUSCH
REAL ESTATE, INC.
288-2514
601 Union Street (Luzerne Dallas Hwy), Luzerne, PA
Call Jerry & Pat Today
Cell 709-7798 or Cell 885-4165
Story and photos
by Marianne Tucker Puhalla
Advertising Projects Writer
You start with a 7.73-acre organic
farm, add a three-bedroom ranch
home, and top it off with a pavilion, log
cabin, pond, greenhouse, sawmill, barn
and heated Quonset. The result is this
unique country property at 218 Ridge
Rd., Wapwallopen.
Listed by Gene Kahley of Trade-
Mark Realty Group for $389,900, this
exceptional retreat offers numerous
opportunities. With unfertilized soil,
this land is available for organic farm-
ing or a landscaping business. The
location is less than four miles from
the Dorrance exit of Interstate 81, and
offers easy access to points north and
south.
You can see all this property has to
offer at an Open House this coming
Saturday, Oct. 13 from 10 a.m. to
12 p.m.
The vinyl-sided home offers 1,604
square feet of space, beautiful hard-
wood ooring and great windows
which make it easy to enjoy the
country setting. A covered front porch
leads into tiled entry and the vaulted
18-by-15 living room, where the hard-
wood oors shine and all eyes are on
the replace with gray marble trim and
carved oak mantle. Windows ank
the replace and a set of atrium doors
opens to a side porch.
The adjacent open dining room
shares a vaulted ceiling, measures 12-
by-12 and has more of the hardwood
ooring and four side windows.
Sure to be a prime selling point,
the kitchen is simply beautiful with
off-white tile ooring, and gray and
tan speckled laminate countertops of
a large number of oak cabinets. The
sink is set on an angle in a corner
of windows to maximize the view. A
peninsula offers breakfast bar seating
and serves as a divider for a vaulted
breakfast room where a bay of three
windows faces front.
The master bedroom measures
15-by-13 and features wine carpeting,
off-white walls and atrium doors that
open rear to a patio.
The nearby master bath offers
plenty to talk about with a skylight
overhead and two octagon accent win-
dows. Cream tile ooring accents an
oak vanity topped by a cream cultured
Organic farm available in Wapwallopen
Continued
SUNDAYREAL ESTATE
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012
OPEN HOUSE TODAY, 10AM-2PM
Smith Hourigan Group
SMARTER. BOLDER.
FASTER.
Century21SHGroup.com
Visit Our Website
Two Ofces To Serve You Better:
1149 Wyoming Avenue, Forty Fort 570.283.9100
28 Carverton Road, Shavertown 570.696.2600
Visit our website: www.poggi-jones.com
!
#12-2525 $109,900
Chris Jones 696-6558
Tis is a unique home with
cedar &stone exterior. Fabulous
2-story Great roomwithstone
replace, pool cabana, decks
for entertaining. Walk to the
marina. DIR: Rt. 309to Rt. 415
to Harveys Lake, Rat lake, Ron
Oak, followto Pine, home onR.
#12-2542 $347,000
Maribeth Jones 696-6565
Convenient locationwitha
beautiful yardmake this property
a rare nd! 4bedrooms, formal
dining room, large 2-car garage
andworkshop. Make this home
your investment! DIR: No.
Memorial Highway to LonW.
Center St. Home onR.
Beautifully restoredCape Cod
withquality throughout. Kitchen
withgranite counter tops, tiled
oors, newwindows &laundry
area. Large master suite w/walk-
inclosets &adjoining oce/den
or 4thbedroom. Dining room
has glass Frenchdoors.
#12-2753 $139,000
Karen Bernardi 283-9100
#12-2703 $265,000
Ted Poggi 283-9100 x25
Carefullyhiddenon0.82acre
woodedlot, freshlyrenovated
2800SF2-storyColonial, ready
tomove into! 4BRs, 2.5BAs.
DIR: Huntsville Roadfrom
Dallas Corners toElizabethSt.,
take L, followtoend, bear R
ontoColonial, home onR.
21Colonial DriveDallas
2012 BRERAfliates Inc. An independently owned and operated broker member of BRERAfliates Inc. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are registered service marks of Prudential
Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license with no other afliation with Prudential. Equal Housing Opportunity.
Entertain Friends & Family In Your NewHome!
W. Pittston-Cape Cod 51 W. Center St. Shavertown 30 Pine St. Harveys Lake
O
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COMING SATURDAY OCTOBER 20 & SUNDAY OCTOBER 21 ADVERTISING DEADLINE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 16
OPEN HOUSE
WEEKEND
A SPECIAL REAL ESTATE CLASSIFIED EDITION
FOR LUZERNE/LACKAWANNA COUNTY HOME BUYERS
TO PLACE YOUR AD CONTACT:
JOYCE LANGAN 970-7424 jlangan@timesleader.com
OR TRIXIE JACKSON 829-7104 bjackson@timesleader.com
PAGE 16G SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
marble sink. A jetted tub is set into a tiled surround
and there are sliding glass doors on a separate walk-
in shower. Storage is plentiful in a walk-in closet with
a linen closet nearby in the hall.
Bedrooms two and three each measure 11-by-10
with a double closet and carpeted oor.
The homes second full bath offers a pedestal sink
and one-piece tub and shower surround. It is all set
on a hunter green tiled oor.
A laundry room with white vinyl oor hosts a
washer and dryer, included in the sale. A nearby
door opens to the two-car garage.
A lower level has double doors that open to the
yard with both a coal/wood burning stove and pro-
pane gas heater to supplement propane forced air
heat. A second washer and dryer set and utility sink
are located on this level in a separate utility room.
For additional information, contact Gene Kahley
at TradeMark Realty Group, (570) 901-1020,
genekahley@yahoo.com.
SPECIFICATIONS:
Ranch
1,604 square feet
BEDROOMS: 3
BATHS: 2
PRICE: $389,900
LOCATION: 218 Ridge St., Wapwallopen
AGENT: Gene Kahley
REALTOR: TradeMark Realty Group,
(570) 901-1020; genekahley@yahoo.com
OPEN HOUSE: Saturday, Oct. 13,
10 a.m.12 p.m.
WapWallopen
Continued from front page
Real Estate Briefs
Prepared by The Times Leader Advertising Department
In recognition of
REALTORReach Out Month
GWBARwill be sponsoring a Mixer,
Thursday, October 11,
2012, 5:00-7:00PM
Uptown II, Courthouse
Square Towers, Wilkes-Barre
Please join us for a night of fun
including Drink Specials, 50/50Drawings and
GWBARs Very own CELEBRITY BARTENDERS!!
Jay Crossin, Eddie Heck, Kathy Murray and Dave Rubbbico, JR.
Will be mixing, shaking, stirring and pouring
Your favorite drinks for a good cause.
All proceeds will go to the Catherine McAuley Center
for displaced women and children.
Please be sure to bring your family and friends and help make
this event a huge success!! THANK YOU!!
The Attorney To Call
When Buying A Home
Complete Real Estate Legal
Services
Title Insurance
Rapid Title Search & Closing
Evening & Weekend
Appointments
Angelo C. Terrana Jr.
ATTORNEY AT LAW
Suite 117 Park Building,
400 Third Avenue, Kingston, PA
(570) 283-9500
7
7
2
0
1
9
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nations con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
AVOCA
PRICE REDUCED
$62,000
902 William St.
Cozy 2 story with 2
bedrooms, in great
location, move in
condition. Newer
hot water heater &
gas furnace, above
ground pool & play-
set included. MLS
#12-3318. For more
information and
photos visit
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com.
Call Tom
570-262-7716
BIG BASS LAKE
$135,000.
This is a large
Chalet has a full
kitchen on the
ground floor with full
bath. This would be
great for two fami-
lies to share or in
laws quarters. This
is in Big Bass Lake
community which
has indoor pool,
outdoor pool, club
house, gym, also
lake front beaches,
This is conveniently
locate near RT 380,
435, and 307.
ERA ONE SOURCE
REALTY
Call Tom
cell 515-507-9403
Office
570-842-2300
906 Homes for Sale
BACK
MOUNTAIN
2 or 3 bedroom 2-
story farmhouse
located in the Vil-
lage of Orange. 1st
floor bedroom, living
room with hard-
wood flooring, eat-
in kitchen. 1st floor
laundry. garage &
shed with loft. Rear
deck overlooking
cleared lot. NEWLY
DRILLED PRIVATE
WELL & ''PEX''
PLUMBING, Sept.
2012. New furnace,
new kitchen floor
(October, 2011)
$119,900
MLS-12-3255
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
BEAR CREEK
6650 Bear
Creek Blvd
Well maintained
custom built 2 story
nestled on 2 private
acres with circular
driveway - Large
kitchen with center
island, master bed-
room with 2 walk-in
closets, family room
with fireplace, cus-
tom built wine cellar.
A MUST SEE!
MLS#12-1751
PRICE REDUCED
$275,000
Call Geri
570-862-7432
Lewith & Freeman
696-0888
Line up a place to live
in classified!
DALLAS
FOR SALE BY OWNER
36 Hemlock Street
Brick Front Ranch
on quiet dead end
street 3 bed-
rooms, 1 1/2 baths,
new carpet, large
kitchen, finished
basement with
plenty of storage
on 125x125 lot.
$144,000.
call 675-0537
906 Homes for Sale
BEAR CREEK
Immaculate 2 story
Colonial on 3 acres
in Laurelbrook
Estates, finished
lower level &
access to a profes-
sionally landscaped
yard & in- ground
pool. 3 bedrooms, 3
1/2 baths & over-
sized 2 car garage.
Kitchen has stain-
less steel appli-
ances, a center is-
land, granite coun-
tertops & tiled back-
splash. Family room
with cathedral ceil-
ing & propane fire-
place.
MLS# 12-3600
$384,900
Darren G. Snyder,
Broker
825-2468
DALLAS
Gorgeous does not
begin to describe
this 3-4 bedroom
ranch home built in
2008. Every up-
grade you could
think of - hardwood
floors, 10 ceilings,
tile, granite. Ultra,
ultra kitchen. Tiled
baths. Beautiful
3.86 acre lot in a
cul-de-sac with
magnificent vistas.
Walk out lower level
easily finished.
Superior Wall
System.
MLS# 12-2423
$369,900
Call Tracy Zarola
696-0723
696-3801
DALLAS
Haddonfield Hills
Corner Lot
4 bedroom, 2
bath split level.
Hardwood floors.
Gas heat.
2 car garage.
MLS #12-1942
NEW PRICE
$178,000
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
ComeUpToQuailHill.
com
New Homes
From $275,000-
$595,000
570-474-5574
HANOVER TWP.
For Sale
by Owner
4 PARK STREET
Ranch, 3 bedroom,
1 bath. Corner lot.
Gas heat, 2 car
garage. $96,000.
570-823-8833
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
OPEN HOUSE
Sun., Sept. 23, 2-3
21 Colonial Drive
Carefully hidden on
a 0.82 acre wooded
lot, this freshly reno-
vated 2,800 sq. ft.,
2 story colonial
home is ready to
move in to! It offers
an attractive floor
plan with 9 rooms, 4
bedrooms & 2.5
baths. The private
development, High
Point Acres, boasts
a community swim-
ming pool with life-
guard. Additionally,
the home offers
central air, a
screened in porch,
fireplace, finished
basement & a 2 car
garage. Directions:
Huntsville Rd. from
Dallas Corners to
Elizabeth St., make
left, follow to end in
High Point Acres,
bear right onto
Colonial Dr., home
on right.
MLS #12-2703
$265,000
Ted Poggi
283-9100 x 25
570-696-2600
DALLAS
If you have seen it
before, TAKE
ANOTHER LOOK!
Freshly painted,
new tile. Open floor
plan & so much
room! Well main-
tained home on
wooded lot in desir-
able neighborhood.
4-6 bedrooms, 3.5
baths, tile kitchen,
hardwoods in family
room, new carpet.
Finished walk-out
lower level with two
additional bed-
rooms & 3/4 bath.
Two fireplaces. ONE
YEAR HOME TRUST
WARRANTY includ-
ed! Additional Lot
available.
Directions: Rt.309
to left on Irem Rd -
left on Fox Hollow
Dr. - Home on left
(corner lot).
MLS# 12-3348
$270,000
Call Tracy Zarola
696-0723
696-3801
To place your
ad call...829-7130
EDWARDSVILLE
25 Tobin Lane
Well maintained
2 bedrooms,
1.5 bath home on
a quiet street.
3 car garage.
Gas heat, nicely
landscaped fenced
in yard.
forsalebyowner.
com
$92,000
call 570-288-0590
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
Lovingly restored
farmhouse with
newer kitchen with
ceramic tile.
Approximately 500
of stream frontage
on Sutton Creek.
Bonus 30' x 60'
drive-through heat-
ed garage with over
20' clearance.
Natural wood
built-ins, archway &
under carpets.
Seller to credit
buyer $3,000
towards a water fil-
tration system.
MLS# 12-1624
$169,900
call Tracy
McDermott
570-696-2468
DALLAS
REDUCED!
NEWBERRY ESTATE
ORCHARD EAST
MOTIVATED SELLER!
2 bedroom - 2 bath
condo in very nice
condition. Tiled
baths. 2 balconies.
Nearby 1-car
garage. New vinyl
exterior. Assess-
ment paid by sell-
er/owner. New roof
2005. New electri-
cal system.
$99,500.
MLS#11-4031
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
Looking for Work?
Tell Employers with
a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
DURYEA
$239,900
705 Blueberry
Lane
Large 4 bed-
room Bi-level
Pwith large
master bedroom
with sliding
glass doors
leading to pri-
vate deck. Mod-
ern kitchen with
skylights, sky-
lights also in
master bath.
Dining room
with sliding
glass doors to
deck. Large
corner lot with
attached 2 car
garage ready to
move right
in.For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-2379
Call Fred
570-817-5792
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
906 Homes for Sale
DURYEA
REDUCED
$99,5000
226 Church St.
Four square home
with large rooms
and old world fea-
tures in the wood-
work and stained
glass. A must see
home. MLS #12-
2596. For more
information and
photos visit
atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Charlie
829-6200
VM 101
Find Something?
Lose Something?
Get it back where it
belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130
DURYEA
REDUCED PRICE
Enjoy sitting on the
front porch of this
well maintained 4
bedroom, 3 bath
home on nicely
landscaped lot in
desirable neighbor-
hood. Family room
with gas fireplace,
central air/gas heat,
covered & open
patios. Two car
garage. Tastefully
decorated. Above
ground pool.
MLS 12-2656
$255,00
Call Sandra Gorman
570-696-5408
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-696-1195
906 Homes for Sale
DURYEA
IS TWO BEDROOMS
ENOUGH FOR YOU?
Quaint & Quiet reno-
vated two bedroom
features new trendy
large tiled Kitchen,
hardwood floors in
living room, formal
dining room & bed-
rooms. New tiled
bath with jetted tub
to de-stress in. Two
porches, yard &
plenty of parking.
New furnace, hot
water heater (with
warranty) & new
100 amp box. Great
starter home or
someone looking to
down size. Solid
Buy! Taxes are not
accurate. Owner is
a Realtor. $79,900.
11-4472. Please call
Michele Hopkins
570-540-6046
EDWARDSVILLE
32 Atlantic Ave.
Remodeled home
with new electrical
and plumbing and
hot water heater.
Nice backyard with
off street parking.
Call Pat Doty
570-394-6901
MLS # 12-3612
570-696-2468
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 PAGE 17G
OPEN HOUSE SUN, 10/7
12:00 - 2:00PM
OPEN HOUSE SUN, 10/14
12:00 - 2:00PM
146 Lincoln Street
DALLAS 1st foor Master in this adorable 4BR, 2.5
bath home w/stone FP, security system, walk-out
basement. Almost new! MLS# 12-1653
JOAN 696-0887 $259,900
Dir: Center Street to L on Ondish Hills Road - L
on Lincoln.
175 Sutherland Drive
MOUNTAINTOP Move-in ready. 4BR w/ new kitch-
en w/ss appliances, offce & large FR w/cathedral
ceiling. Formal LR & DR. MLS#12-3692
EVELYN 715-9336 $285,750
Dir: 309N, L on Kirby, L on Sutherland
DALLAS This outstanding Federal brick &
stone home is situated on 7acres & overlooks
the Huntsville Reservoir. Inviting foyer w/lovely
curved staircase - spacious rms offer HW frs,
period moldings & cabinetry & wonderful arched
doorways. Stunning kitchen is classic yet ultra
modern w/Viking & Sub-Zero - 5BRs, 4 baths -
Beautifully landscaped property is complete with
a carriage house & Bocce court. MLS# 11-2533
RHEA 696-6677 $699,000
MOUNTAINTOP Quality built 6000SF
home on 3acres! Radiant heat on 1st
foor, 5 car garage, 10 ceilings on 1st
foor, 2-story FR w/FP, in-ground pool, cov-
ered patio, wet bar in LL! One of a kind!
MLS# 12-3153
JIM 715-9323 $797,500
SHAVERTOWN Attractive 2 Story - al-
most new const. Elegant kitchen w/bkfst
bar, FR w/gas FP, 3-4 BRs, hdwd frs, 3
car garage & much more!
MLS# 12-1433
JUDY 714-9230 $444,900
DALLAS Outstanding custom home on
27+acres w/spacious rooms, 1st foor
Master, great kitchen & windows to ex-
ceptional landscaping. MLS# 12-2312
RHEA 696-6677 $1,280,000
MOUNTAINTOP NEW LISTING Elegant 2-story
set on 3acres in a Golf Course Community.
Formal LR & DR, HW foors, 5BRs, screened
porch, heated pool & 3 car garage.
MLS# 12-3459
GERI 696-0888 $599,000
BEAR CREEK VILLAGE Bischwind - Elegant
English Tudor home currently operated as a
Bed & Breakfast. Covered terraces & patios
overlook serene, 7acres, lakefront setting,
expansive lawn, garden & pool. Grand rms,
fabulous staircase, decorative leaded glass
windows, 1st fr Master apt, 8 guestrooms &
suites w/FPs & private baths. MLS# 12-2756
MARGY 696-0891 $1,450,000
DALLAS NEW LISTING Lovely 2-story
home which has been very well-main-
tained. Fireplace in FR, gas heat, 2 car
garage. MLS# 12-3769
SALLY 714-9233 $239,900
SHICKSHINNY Enjoy privacy & comfort-
able living w/this beautifully maintained
3BR, 3 bath, 2-story set on 2acres. New
rear deck. MLS# 12-3210
CHRISTINA K. 714-9235 $230,000
DALLAS Pretty Ranch in quiet country
setting. Features hdwd foors, LR w/FP,
1st fr FR & offce, huge LL rec room.
MLS# 12-2918
ANN LEWIS 714-9245 $189,000
NORTH LAKE GREAT HOUSE w/ 90ft of lake-
front! 3BR, 2.5 bath Cape Cod w/ Open f plan
has extensive views, 1st foor Master opens
to screened porch & large deck.
MLS# 11-2958
RHEA 570-696-6677 $319,500
TRUCKSVILLE Beautifully maintained
3BR Ranch on large corner lot. Spa-
cious LR, DR, HW foors, C/A, 1 car ga-
rage, 2nd driveway - access to back of
property. MLS# 12-2724
CLYDETTE 696-0897 $154,900
MOUNTAIN TOP NEW LISTING Spacious
4BR, 2.5 bath, 2-story on cul-de-sac. 2nd
foor laundry, fnished lower level, spring fed
pond. Make offer! MLS# 12-3703
PATTY A. 715-9332 $299,900
MOUNTAINTOP Located on a cul-de-sac with
.9acres this home boasts 3500SF. 3 fre-
places, classic moldings, HW foors, granite,
2-5BRs. MLS# 12-1111
DAVID 970-1117 $279,900
MOUNTAINTOP Beautiful 2story located
in Fox Run Estates. 5BRs, 4 baths, gas
heat, C/A, above ground heated pool,
fnished basement. MLS# 12-1966
CORINE 715-9331 $259,999
MOUNTAINTOP 6yrs young! 3BR Town-
home w/walk-out fnished basement
which includes a workshop area. 1 car
garage & C/A. MLS# 12-2128
LISA 715-9335 $199,900
FAIRVIEW TWP. 2BR & offce on 1st foor
could be 3rd BR. Freshly painted, new
carpeting, 3 season porch, 2 car garage,
fenced yard. Move right in!
MLS# 12-2387
PAT S. 715-9337 $107,000
PLYMOUTH NEW LISTING Room ga-
lore! Spacious 4BR, 3 bath with large
LR, modern eat-in kitchen, beautiful HW
foors, fnished lower level, 2 car garage.
Spectacular view of valley. 4.3acres!
MLS# 12-3655
CLYDETTE 696-0897 $243,000
KINGSTON NEW LISTING Lovely brick Ranch
w/plenty of room to grow. Open foor plan
& easy fow kitchen, opens to patio. 3BR, 3
baths, formal DR, fnished LL, C/A, all on a
spacious lot in quiet neighborhood. Close to
paths! MLS# 12-3719 DEB R. 714-5802 or
TERRY NELSON 714-9248 $229,000
KINGSTON Classic 4BR 2.1 bath home. Ex-
cellent condition. HW, LR w/FP; formal DR;
modern granite-tile kitchen w/lovely cabinets;
Many features! MLS# 12-3361
RAE 714-9234 $187,500
LARKSVILLE Larkmount Manor Bi-level
w/4BRs, 2 baths, newly fnished base-
ment. Lg fenced yard. 2 car garage. Home
Warranty. MLS#12-1105
NANCY PALUMBO 714-9240 $174,900
BEAR CREEK TWP. REDUCED Custom
built 10yr old nestled on 2 private acres.
Circular drive, large kitchen, offce, cus-
tom built wine cellar. MLS# 12-1751
GERI 696-0888 $275,000
WILKES-BARRE Contractor Special - Turn
this 2-story, 3000SF home back into its
glory! This 4-5BR home has HW foors, high
ceilings, 3 baths & much more. Heating &
plumbing not functional. MLS# 12-1294
TERRY NELSON 714-9248 $80,000
EDWARDSVILLE NEW LISTING Clean
& move in ready! This 3BR Ranch has
2 baths, eat-in kitchen, 1 car garage &
deck. Priced to sell! MLS# 12-3701
JUDY 714-9230 $115,000
EDWARDSVILLE REDUCED 3BR, 2 bath
home in convenient location. Gas heat,
large eat-in kitchen, DR, freshly painted
offce. Dont miss this home! MLS# 12-
3113 DEB K. 696-0886 $49,900
OLD FORGE Modern open-foor plan 4BR, 3 bath
home w/1st fr MBR Ste; beautiful HW; formal
LR & DR; 1st fr FR w/full-wall stone FP; modern
eat-in granite-HW Kit w/lovely cabinets & Island;
lg 1st fr rec rm; heated FL rm; 2 garages; 1st
fr laundry; heated in-ground pool & much more!
MLS# 12-3423 RAE 714-9234 $249,900
BEAR CREEK NEW LISTING Stunning 9yr young
custom Cape-Cod in beautiful Penn Lake Park on
1+acre features modern Kitchen w/breakfast
room, Great room w/gas FP, 1st foor Master
Suite, DR w/custom wainscote. Only 30 minutes
to Wilkes-Barre or Mt Top. MLS# 12-3780
ANN LEWIS 714-9245 $269,000
PITTSTON Lovely 3BR, 1 bath 2-story
home with FR, formal DR & eat-in kitch-
en area. Large backyard & oversized 1
car garage. MLS# 12-2503
TERRY NELSON 714-9248 $78,500
PLAINS REDUCED Spacious home on
corner lot in convenient location. 3 BRs,
3 baths, DR, LR, eat-in kit, FR, detached 1
car gar. Must see! MLS# 12-2900
DEBORAH KROHN 696-0886 $68,000
V
I
R
T
U
A
L
T
O
U
R
BEAR CREEK TWP. NEW LISTING Best of both worlds! 1980s brick Ranch
features 2BRs, 2 bath. Modern home w/fnished lower level & 2 car garage
+ 1930s Log Cabin on 1+ country acres.
ANN LEWIS 714-9245 $172,500
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 PAGE 18G
Single Family Homes Patio Homes
Live Here For
$
695
*
Per Month!
Sand Springs
YOU CAN LIVE HERE FOR
$1,000 PER MONTH!
YOU CAN LIVE HERE FOR
$979 PER MONTH!
4 Homes ready for immediate move-in!
NewTwo Story Floor Plans
NewRanch Plans
Free Granite Countertops plus
Stainless Steel Appliances
Build at Eagle Viewin
Jenkins Twp... Every
Home Has this View!
Lets pick a lot and design a
house... Call 881-2144
OPENHOUSE
You can viewa Model of our
LUXURY RANCHat
15 River Shores Court,
West Pittston (corner of Erie
and Susquehanna)
from11amto 2pm
SUNDAY
or anytime by calling
881-2144
Lets Put This Patio!!
On Your House With This View!
And This Grilling Porch!!
CustomBeauties from$275,000 to $325,000... ALL INCLUDED
Pick your lot now&build when you are ready
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 PAGE 19G
158
157
32
30
29
28
31
33
34
35
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17,818.61 SF
17,818.61 SF 18,309.98 SF
24,445.03 SF
23,903.35 SF
35,644.32 SF
31,609.33 SF
20,855.99 SF
22,266.25 SF
16,657.29 SF
Development
PHASE IVB
JENKINS TWP.
HUMFORD REALTY INC.
HUMFORD.COM
(570)822-5126 ext.3
HUMFORD REALTY INC.
WillowViewDevelopment
NEWPhase IV-B in Pittston Area (Jenkins Twp.)
Build immediately. All utilities available.
5 lots available from$76,000!
Build
Immediately!
Close to
Everything!
Next to Pittston High School
Centerpoint Industrial Park: 4 minutes
Route 81 and Turnpike: 4 minutes
Mohegan Casino: 6 minutes
Avoca Airport: 10 minutes
Center City Wilkes-Barre: 16 minutes
Center City Scranton: 19 minutes
Travel time calculated by Mapquest
1
3
4
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0

Development
34 34 34 34 3
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S
O
L
D
Rob Finlay, Broker
(570)822-5126 ext. 3
humford.com
Patrick Deats Contractor
Integrity Quality Value
Custom Home Builder
with over 25 years
experience in Luzerne
and Lackawanna Counties
570-696-1041
www.patrickdeats.com
Lot/Home Packages or Custom Homes on Your Lot
New Construction in Fairway Estates
For Sale $399,500
ELEGANT HOMES, LLC.
51 Sterling Avenue, Dallas PA 18612
(570) 675 9880
www.eleganthomesinc.net
New Construction! $198,900
* Approx 2100 Sq. Ft.
* 2 Car Garage
with Storage Area
* 2 Story Great Room
* Cherry Kitchen
with Granite
* Fenced in Yard
with Patio
* Gas Heat/AC
Directions: From Wyo-
ming Ave. take Pringle
St. to the End, take left on
Grove St. Twins on left -
267 Grove St. Kingston
Luxurious Twins in Kingston
Open House Today 1:00-3:00PM
Open House Sunday 10/7 12-2PM
Smith Hourigan Group
SMARTER. BOLDER.
FASTER.
Century21SHGroup.com
(570) 696-1195
Donna Klug
(570) 696-5406
173 Cummings Road, Dallas
Charming home on 10 acres wooded lot in Dallas School District. Approximately
2,300 square feet, 4 bedrooms with master on rst oor. Heated tile oors,
including heated oors in basement and garage, whole house generator.
DIR: Rte. 309N to R on Carverton to L on 8th St. (3.8 mi) to L on Orange Rd,
1st R onto Brace Rd, 1st L onto Cummings Rd.
Price Drastically Reduced to $325,000!
Level Building Lots .40 1.50 Acres
All Underground / Public Utilities
Gas, Sewer, Water, Phone, Electric, Cable, Street Lighting, Sidewalks
Rental / Lease Options Available
Convenient Location / Hanover Township / Close to Hanover Industrial Park
NEPAs Leader in Energy Ecient Construction
Alternative Energy Solutions
Additional Warranty and Maintenance Services available
LOT PRICES STARTINGAT $40,000
LOTS READY FOR IMMEDIATE CONSTRUCTION
For Specics Call Connie Yanoshak 829-0184
LOT PRICES STARTINGAT $40 000
EVERY NEWHOME CONTRACT INCLUDES
HEATINGANDCOOLINGBILLS FOR
10YEARS
COUNTRYWOOD
ESTATES
EILEEN R. MELONE
Real Estate 821-7022
EILEEN MELONE, Broker 821-7022
Visit us on the web at: www.NEPAHOMESETC.com OR www.realtor.com/wilkes-barre
SUSQUEHANNA
MODULAR HOMES
BE HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS!
Less than half the time to complete project!
Call us for
your consultation.
Well work with you!
Proud builder
of affordable
handicapped
accessible
housing.
Rear 913 Wyoming Ave, Wyoming, PA
(Behind McDonalds) 1-866-823-8880
46 Farmhouse Road,
Mountaintop
HIGHLANDWOODS - Motivated Seller!
Lovely 10 room stone front vinyl ranch
featuring sunken LR, formal DR with HW
oor and French doors, modern eat-in kitchen
with cherry cabinets, maser bedroom with
walk in closet and master bath with whirlpool
tub and separate shower. Lower level consists
of 2 large recreation rooms, oce, powder
room and workshop.
Dir: Rt. 309, Mountaintop to Kirby Ave. R
on Farmhouse Rd. to home on L.
$279,900
CALL FLORENCE KEPLINGER
570-474-6307 / 570-715-7737
Smith Hourigan Group
Smarter. Bolder. Faster.
Mountaintop 570-474-6307
46 6 Far h mhouse Roadd
p
Open House Sunday, October 7
th
1:00-3:00PM
Florence Keplinger
Professional Ofce Rentals
Full Service Leases Custom Design
Renovations Various Size Suites Available
Medical, Legal, Commercial
Utilities Parking Janitorial
Full Time Maintenance Staff Available
For Rental Information Call:
1-570-287-1161
New Bridge Center
480 Pierce Street
Ofcenter250
250 Pierce Street
Ofcenter270
270 Pierce Street
Park Ofce Building
400 Third Ave.
Ofcenter220
220 Pierce Street
KINGSTON OFFICENTERS
www.lippiproperties.com
We Need Your Help!
Anonymous Tip Line
1-888-796-5519
Luzerne County Sheriffs Ofce
PAGE 20G SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Heritage Homes Promise:
Competitive Pricing No Hidden Costs No Hidden Upgrades
Heerriittaagggee HHooommmeeess PPrroommiisse:
titiv ivee Pr Pr Pric ic icin in in nggggggg NNo No No No HHHH Hid id id id id idddde de de dennnnn CCo Co Co Cost t st stsss No NNo No No HHHid d idde de d nn Up
Te Somerville - 2,210 sq. ft.
2808 Scranton/Carbondale Highway
Blakely, PA 18447
570-383-2981 www.heritagehomesltd.com
Featuring:
Youve Got Dreams. Weve Got Plans.
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MODEL HOURS
Weekdays 12-7
Sat & Sun 12-5
Closed Fridays
HERITAGE HOMES INCLUDE:
Gas Warm Air Heat
Site Work Package
Central Air Conditioning
Concrete Front Porch
Andersen Windows
1st Floor Laundry
Master Bedroom 1st Floor
Two Story Great Room
2 1/2 Tile Baths
Front Vinyl Shakes
Hardwood, Kitchen, Foyer
Poured Concrete Foundation
Parsons Section of Wilkes-Barre - Ready to Move In
$89,900
3 BR, 2 bath, LR, eat in kitchen, DR, two car garage, all
season heated breezeway between garage and home,
sunroom, nice yard completely fenced in for pets, shed
approx 12x12. Interior recently remodeled -- new solid oak
stairway, solid oak hardwood foors throughout
main bath has whirlpool tub and shower, kitchen is newly
remodeled/ new ceramic tile foor, new Wilsonart bevel edge
countertops and glass tile back splash, appliances included
DW, frig, g/d, natural gas range, combination space saver
microwave and hood over range, laundry in basement, 2 zone
high effciency hot water heat and hot water furnace, plenty
of storage areas
For more information or to see the home
call Bill, 570-885-0790
906 Homes for Sale
EXETER
ONE OF A KING
CONTRACTORS HOME!
3 bedrooms, 2 1/2
baths, huge family
room, stone fire-
place, stone bar,
granite kitchen,
dining room, office
exercise room.
BEAUTIFUL VIEW
2 ACRES
$425,000 neg.
shown by appt only
570 690-6245
EXETER
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday
12pm-5pm
362 Susquehanna
Avenue
Completely remod-
eled, spectacular,
2 story Victorian
home, with 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
new rear deck, full
front porch, tiled
baths & kitchen,
granite counter-
tops. All cherry
hardwood floors
throughout, all new
stainless steel
appliances & light-
ing. New oil fur-
nace, washer/dryer
in first floor bath.
Great neighbor-
hood, nice yard.
$174,900 (30 year
loan, $8,750 down,
$887/month, 30
years @ 4.5%)
NOT IN FLOOD
100% OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Call Bob at
570-899-8877
570-654-1490
EXETER
Beautifully remod-
eled 3 bedroom
home in mint metic-
ulous condition, with
2 full baths, and a 2
car garage, hard-
wood floors, tile
floors, exterior com-
posite wood deck,
fully finished lower
level family room,
large closets, up-
graded kitchen with
stainless steel appli-
ances, granite
countertops, gas
heat, excellent
neighborhood.
$174,900
Bob Stackhouse
654-1490
EXETER TWP.
311 Lockville Road
Stately brick 2 story,
with in ground pool,
covered patio, fin-
ished basement,
fireplace & wood
stove, 3 car
attached garage
5 car detached
garage with
apartment above.
MLS# 11-1242 NEW
PRICE
$599,000
Please call Donna
570-613-9080
FORTY FORT
1426 Wyoming Ave
You will fall in love
with this grand Vic-
torian with magnifi-
cent entry foyer,
modern kitchen
with new counter-
tops, enclosed 3
season side and
rear porch, reno-
vated large front
porch. Off street
parking and so
much more.Proper-
ty could also be
used as profession-
al office in home
use. MUST SEE!
MLS 12-3604
$199,900
Jay A. Crossin
Extention 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
906 Homes for Sale
FALLS
REDUCED
$189,900
This home was built
with energy efficien-
cy in mind. Nestled
in a wooded setting
and close to Wilkes
-Barre and Clarks
Summit. Floor to
ceiling windows in
the 3-season sun
room, hardwood
and tile throughout,
spacious room
sizes, wood/coal
stove for those win-
ter evenings. 3 bed-
rooms, with 16x20
master and adja-
cent sitting room or
den. Call for an
appointment today.
Maribeth Jones
570-696-6565 or
Chris Jones
570-696-6558.
#12-3048
696-2600
FORTY FORT
77 Wesley St.
$84,900
Classic 4 square
home in desirable
neighborhood. Four
bedrooms, nice old
woodwork, stained
glass and built ins
plus 3 car garage
on extra deep lot.
MLS #12-2612. For
more information
and photos, visit
atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Charlie
829-6200
VM 101
FORTY FORT
77 Wesley St.
$84,900
Classic 4 square
home in desirable
neighborhood. Four
bedrooms, nice old
woodwork, stained
glass and built ins
plus 3 car garage
on extra deep lot.
MLS #12-2612. For
more information
and photos, visit
atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Charlie
829-6200
VM 101
FORTY FORT
PRICE REDUCED
1908 Wyoming Ave
Plenty of TLC is
reflected in this
attractive 3 bed-
room, 1 bath home
in a convenient
location. Offers for-
mal living room/din-
ing room & family
room with sliding
doors to large rear
deck & a great level
lot. MLS# 11-2083
Only $95,000
Call Barbara Metcalf
570-696-0883
HANOVER TWP.
Tastefully remod-
eled rancher on 87
x 100 lot with in-
ground pool. Home
boasts brand new
kitchen & bath. Full
basement is ready
for finishing. Home
is move-in-ready
for a new buyer.
Total electric @
$177/month for all
utilities. 40 year
roof, central air.
MLS# 12-3399
$140,000
Call Lynda Rowinski
570-696-5418
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-696-1195
906 Homes for Sale
FORTY FORT
REDUCED
$119,900
OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY
OCT., 7TH
12:00 1:30
23 CENTER ST.
Charming cape cod
in move-in condi-
tion! 3 bedrooms, 1
baths, 1st floor
laundry, formal din-
ing room, neutral
dcor. Bonus room
on the 2nd floor, full
unfinished base-
ment, large
screened-in front
porch, 2 car
detached garage
with storage loft on
nicely landscaped
lot. MLS 12-2520
Call Mary Donovan
(570) 696-0729
FORTY FORT
OPEN HOUSE
Oct. 7, 14, 21, 28
2:00 to 4:00
84 Wesley St.
DIR: Wyoming Ave.,
North, left on Wes-
ley, house on left.
Price reduced to
$169,000.
Newly renovated
interior and exterior.
Home features 3
bedrooms with
large closets, 2
large bathrooms,
one with a double
vanity, the other
with laundry hook-
up, ultra modern
kitchen with honey
oak cabinets, gran-
ite countertops and
stainless steel appli-
ances, oversized 2-
car garage, walk-up
attic, full basement,
large yard, very
desirable location!
MLS #12-3227
Eric Feifer
570-283-9100 x 29
570-696-2600
GLEN SUMMIT/
MOUNTAIN TOP
PRICE REDUCED!
Beautifully appoint-
ed home on 2
acres. Community
amenities include
private lake with
sandy beach, tennis
courts, trails for
hiking & biking.
This home boasts
perennial gardens
& mature landscap-
ing, fenced rear
yard enclosing
20x40 heated in-
ground pool, raised
garden, custom
dog house & run.
Entertain & dine on
the wrap-around
porch with
mahogany flooring
& electric hurricane
shutters. The
residence features
hardwood flooring,
French doors,
cherry kitchen, 3-4
bedrooms, updated
heating/air.
Emergency genera-
tor for inclement
weather. Call me,
Maribeth Jones at
my direct number
696-6565 or the
office number 696-
2600 ext. 210.
#12-1647 $450,000
NANTICOKE
Updated brick
Ranch with open
floor plan. Modern
kitchen with island
opens to dining area
and living room with
pellet stove. 3 bed-
rooms, 2 full baths.
Lower level family
room. Hardwood
floors, central air, 2
car garage, level lot.
Home warranty.
MLS# 12-3236
$189,900
Call Linda
(570) 956-0584
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP.
LIBERTY HILLS
CONSTITUTION AVE
Spacious traditional
5 year old, 8 room,
4 bedroom home on
generous lot.
Featuring a formal
dining roon, first
floor family room,
hardwood floors, 2
car garage, gas
heat, central air and
a deck with a fan-
tastic view. A must
see home!
MLS# 11-2429
$279,900
Call Florence
570-715-7737
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
HANOVER TWP.
NEW PRICE!
2 Betsy Ross Drive
Warmly inviting 3
bedroom, 2.5 bath
Tudor. Striking high-
lights in this beauti-
ful home include
custom blinds, man-
icured lawn, deck,
patio and 3-season
porch. Entertain in
the finished walk-
out basement with
wet bar or relax by
the pool! Outstand-
ing quality!
$329,900
Call Pat Guesto
570-793-4055
CENTURY 21
SIGNATURE
PROPERTIES
570-675-5100
HANOVER TWP.
PRICE
REDUCED
$114,900
22 Allenberry Drive
Move right in! Cen-
tral air, hardwood
floors, central
stereo system. Gas
heat under $700
yearly expenses. 2
bedrooms, 1 car
garage. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 12-2739
Call Tom
570-262-7716
HANOVER TWP.
Lyndwood Gardens
Newer 2 story.
kitchen with island &
breakfast area open
to family room with
fireplace. Formal
dining room, living
room, master suite
& 3 additional bed-
rooms with main
bath on second
floor. 2 car garage.
Fenced yard. Deck.
Central air. Home
warranty included.
MLS# 12-3070
$274,900
Call Linda
(570) 956-0584
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
LAFLIN
3 Bedroom
Log Cabin
home on 2 acres.
Country Living
in Town! $190,000
570-829-2022
906 Homes for Sale
HARDING
$249,900
1385 Mt. Zion Rd.
Great country set-
ting on 3.05 acres.
Move in condition
Ranch with 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths,
inground swimming
pool, hardwood
floors. Finished
basement with wet
bar. 2 car garage,
wrap around drive-
way. For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com
MLS 12-2270
Call Tom
570-262-7716
HARDING
''Country Charm''
at its best
describes this 3
bedroom, 1.5 bath 2
story situated on
1.87 scenic acres
with many updates.
Knotty pine kitchen,
breakfast room, liv-
ing room with gas
propane stove,
dining room, hard-
wood, office with
electric stove,
deck, gazebo &
detached
garage.
MLS# 12-2813
$204,900
Call Marie Montante
570-881-0103
HARDING
PRICE REDUCED
$69,900
2032 ROUTE 92
RIVER VIEWS PLUS
EXTRA LOT ON
RIVER. Just 1/4
miles from boat
launch, this great
ranch home is
perched high
enough to keep you
dry, but close
enough to watch
the river roll by.
Surrounded by
nature, this home
features large living
room and eat in
kitchen, 3 bed-
rooms, full unfin-
ished basement.
Ready to move
right in and enjoy
country living just
minutes from down-
town. For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-79
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
HUGHESTOWN
REDUCED
$84,500
154 Rock St.
Very nice 2 story
with 3 bedrooms
and 2 full baths.
Replacement win-
dow with great
screened porch for
outdoor living with-
out the bugs. Very
neat and clean.
MLS 12-3029
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
906 Homes for Sale
HARVEYS LAKE
PRICE REDUCED
$347,000
View this beauty
cedar and stone
sided contemporary
home on partially
wooded lot. Great
Room with floor
to ceiling fireplace,
built-in bookcases
adjoining the dining
room and entry to
the four season
porch. 2 year new
stainless steel appli-
ances and a break-
fast area with
beamed ceiling and
a wall of glass. First
floor den or bed-
room, tile and mar-
ble bath with walk-in
master bath with
lounge area and
a massive closet.
Pool surrounded by
decking warrants
great entertain-
ingcabana with
bath. Separate
building to pot your
plants. Walk to the
marina and slip into
your boat.
MLS# 12-2542
Call Maribeth Jones
directly at
696-6565, office
696-2600 ext. 210
HUDSON
ADD YOUR
TOUCHES!!
Genuine hardwood
floors, doors & trim
will catch your
attention as you
arrive through the
entry foyer into the
sunny living room,
formal dining room
& eat-in kitchen.
You will be pleased
with the spacious
bedroom sizes &
closets. Terrific
walk-up attic for
your imagination.
Whole house fan will
keep you cool.
Attached garage
with large, full
B-Dry Basement.
Great Yard! Virtual
Tour. MLS#12-2785
$112,000
Michele Hopkins
570-540-6046
570-696-2468
LivingInQuailHill.com
New Homes
From $275,000-
$595,000
570-474-5574
906 Homes for Sale
HUGHESTOWN
184 Rock St.
Spacious brick
Ranch with 3 bed-
rooms, large living
room with fireplace.
3 baths, large Flori-
da room with AC.
Full finished base-
ment with 4th bed-
room, 3/4 bath,
large rec room with
wet bar. Also a
cedar closet and
walk up attic. www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 12-3626
$209,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
HUNLOCK CREEK
1594 MAIN ROAD
REDUCED
$104,500
Owner Will
Entertain Offers
Large 2 story home
in very good condi-
tion, features 3 bed-
rooms, 1 1/2 modern
bath rooms, large
eat in kitchen with
appliances. Dining
room with French
doors, large family
room has fireplace
large foyer, with
opened stairway
and stained glass
window. Home has
natural woodwork
thru-out, with plast-
er walls, CENTRAL
AIR thru out. Many
extras must see.
Level lot with a 3
bay garage in back.
Shown by appoint-
ment to qualified
buyers only. Home
has a "HOME WAR-
RANTY" paid by sell-
ers. Additional pho-
tos can be seen at
CAPITOL REAL
ESTATE WEB SITE,
www.capitol-real
estate.com
Call John Vacendak
823-4290
735-1810
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
SHAVERTOWN
124 School Street
3 bedrooms,
1 1/2 baths
1566 sq ft
$134,900
(570) 313-5571
906 Homes for Sale
HUNLOCK CREEK
Lovely Ranch home
on 1.42 acres.
Features 3 bed-
rooms, full bath, 1/2
bath, kitchen, living
room with fireplace,
dining room, den &
laundry room on
Main floor. Kitchen,
family room with
fireplace, 3/4 bath &
storage room on
Lower Level. Newer
roof, siding, sofit &
gutters plus some
newer carpeting,
pergo flooring, cen-
tral air & whole
house fan, 2 car
garage & paved
driveway. 12-1010
$176,900
Ken Williams
570-542-8800
Five Mountains
Realty
HUNLOCK CREEK
Sorbertown Hill Rd.
Nice ranch style
home. 3 bed-
rooms, modern
kitchen & bath.
Move in condition.
Country living
at its best.
Affordable @
$119,500
Towne & Country
Real Estate Co
570-735-8932
570-542-5708
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
INKERMAN
$79,900
45 Main St.
Large two story
home with 3/4 Bed-
rooms and newly
remodeled bath
with double sinks
and whirlpool tub,
eat-in kitchen, din-
ing room, living
room and family
room. Large back-
yard, Off street
parking.
For more info and
photos, go to
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com.
MLS# 12-3708
Call Terry
570-885-3041
Angie
570-885-4896
906 Homes for Sale
JENKINS TWP.
$94,900
216 Saylor Ave.
Neat 3 bedroom
ranch on over half
an acre. Endless
possibilities for
expansion and use
of oversized lot.
MLS #12-3679. For
more information
and photos visit
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com.
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
JENKINS TWP.
151 E. Saylor Ave.
Calling all handy-
men! This one is for
you! Fixer upper
with great potential
in quiet neighbor-
hood. 3 bedrooms,
1 bath with off
street parking and
nice yard.
Directions: Rt 315,
at light turn onto
Laflin Rd to bottom
of hill. Turn right
onto E. Saylor.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 12-3672
$34,900
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
Let the Community
Know!
Place your Classified
Ad TODAY!
570-829-7130
JENKINS TWP.
MOTIVATED SELLER
MAKE AN OFFER $59,500
1717 River Road
Great investment or
a perfect Home for
the Holidays.
Completely remod-
eled home with new
siding, windows
and modern kitchen
& bath. New floor-
ing, walls, heat and
electric. Move right
in. Off street park-
ing in rear. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-2232
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
906 Homes for Sale
JENKINS TWP.
Highland Hills
8 Patrick Road
Magnificent custom
built tudor home
with quality
throughout. Spa-
cious 4 bedrooms,
3.5 baths, 2 story
living room with
fireplace and library
loft. Dining room,
family room and 3
season sunroom
which overlooks
professionally land-
scaped grounds
with gazebo and
tennis/basketball
court. Lower level
includes recreation
room, exercise
room and 3/4 bath.
Enjoy this serene
acre in a beautiful
setting in Highland
Hills Development.
Too many amenities
to mention.
Taxes appealed
and lowered con-
siderably for year
2013. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-723
OWNER SAYS
SELL. PRICED
REDUCED TO
$369,900
Call Terry
570-885-3041
Angie
570-885-4896
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
KINGSTON
$139,900
129 S. Dawes Ave.
Three bedroom, 2
bath cape cod with
central air, new
windows, doors,
carpets and tile
floor. Full concrete
basement with 9'
ceilings. Walking
distance to Wilkes
Barre. Electric and
Oil heat. MLS #12-
3283. For more
information and
photos visit
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com.
Call Tom
570-262-7716
SWEET VALLEY
Grassy Pond Road
6.69 wooded acres.
Great building site
and/or ideal hunting
property. No utili-
ties. REDUCED
$65,000
Call Pat Doty
570-394-6901
McDermott Real
Estate
570-696-2468
PAGE 21G SUNDAY,OCTOBER 7, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
906 Homes for Sale
KINGSTON
177 Third Avenue
COMPARE WHAT
YOU GET FOR YOUR
MONEY! Modern 3
bedroom end unit
townhouse, with 2
1/2 baths (master
bath). Central air.
Family room, foyer,
deck with canopy,
patio, fenced yard,
garage. Extras!
$123,000.
MLS # 12-3012
Ask for Bob Kopec
Humford Realty Inc
570-822-5126
KINGSTON
NEW LISTING!
Cozy Cape Cod
Newly painted, well
maintained, 3 bed-
rooms, new heat
system with
driveway.
$89,900
Call Ann Marie
Chopick at
760-6769
288-6654
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
KINGSTON
A quality home in a
superior location!
Features: large liv-
ing room; formal
dining room with
parquet flooring;
oak kitchen with
breakfast area; 1st
floor master bed-
room suite; knotty
pine den; half-bath.
2nd floor: 2 bed-
rooms and bath.
Finished room with
newer carpeting &
wet bar in lower
level. Central air. 2-
car garage. In-
ground concrete
pool with jacuzzi.
$299,000
MLS-12-1203
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
KINGSTON
Spacious 4 bed-
room, 2 1/2 bath
home in popular
'Green Acres'.
Good floor plan. Liv-
ing room with bay
window; formal din-
ing room;kitchen
with breakfast
room. 2nd floor
laundry. Great clos-
ets. Covered rear
patio. 2 separate
heating/air condi-
tioning systems.
$259,000
MLS-12-2969
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
LAFLIN
$129,900
111 Laflin Road
Nice 3 bedroom,
1.5 bath Split Level
home with hard-
wood floors, 1 car
garage, large yard
and covered patio
in very convenient
location. Great curb
appeal and plenty
of off street park-
ing. Rt. 315 to light
@ Laflin Rd. Turn
west onto Laflin Rd.
Home is on left.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-2852
Keri Best
570-885-5082
LAKE SILKWORTH
Brand new Ranch
approximately 50
yards from lake. 3
bedrooms, 2 baths,
laundry room and
full basement.
Deeded lake
access available.
MLS 11-2346
$135,000
Call Barb Strong
570-762-7561
ANTONIK AND
ASSOCIATES
570-735-7494
906 Homes for Sale
LAFLIN
13 Fordham Road
Totally remodeled
custom brick ranch
in Oakwood Park.
This home features
an open floor plan
with hardwood
floors, 2 fireplaces,
kitchen, formal living
& dining rooms,
family room, 4 bed-
rooms, 4 baths,
office with private
entrance, laundry
room on first floor,
tons of closets and
storage areas,
walk-up attic, great
finished basement
with fireplace, built-
in grill, in-ground
pool, cabana with
half bath, an over-
sized 2-car garage
& a security system.
Renovations include
new: windows, gas
furnace, central air,
electrical service,
hardwood floors,
Berber carpeting,
freshly painted,
updated bathrooms
& much, much,
more. Laflin Road to
Fordham Road, on
right. $423,700
Call Donna
570-613-9080
LAKE SILKWORTH
Completely remod-
eled year round
lake house. Brand
new kitchen and
bath. All new appli-
ances, heating and
central AC systems.
2 bedrooms, 1 bath,
laundry room and
carport. Deeded
lake access and
shared dock.
MLS 11-2345
$91,000
Call Barb Strong
570-762-7561
ANTONIK AND
ASSOCIATES
570-735-7494
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
LAKE TOWNSHIP
LAKE TOWNSHIP
Sweet Valley Area
Updated & remod-
eled classic Colonial
PA farmhouse with
3 bedrooms, family
room, dining room,
office, wrap-around
concrete covered
porch with views
towards Bear Creek
and your private
pond. Newer in-
ground heated pool,
3-story barn, cus-
tom stainless steel
kitchen counter,
built-in book cases.
Family room with
views of the Endless
Mountain range.
Easy access to all
major roads. Land is
cleared and gently
slopes. Fenced area
for an animal.
Perennials on all
6.45 acres. Corner
property with 1000
SF+/- road frontage.
A real find! Offered
at $250,000
#12-3662
Bob Cook
570-696-6555
570-696-2600
LAUREL RUN
Great home in a
great location.
Looking for a private
rural feeling home
but still close to
everything.. This is
your place. 3 bed-
room, hardwood
floor, carport, above
ground pool, quiet
setting and so much
more. Too many
reasons to see the
inside?? Call Today!
MLS 12-2384
$81,900
Call / text Donna
Cain 570-947-3824
or Tony
570-855-2424
PLAINS
MILL CREEK
ACRES - NEW
LISTING
A Rare Find !!
Outstanding 2-story
features 9 rooms, 4
bedrooms, 2.5
baths, full finished
basement, rear
deck & patio. 2-
story Family Room
with stone Fire-
place. Move-in
condition.
Call Donna
570-613-9080
P
E
N
D
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906 Homes for Sale
MOOSIC
$99,900
602 Gravity/Kane
Road
Nice 3 bedroom, 1
bath ranch home
with hardwood
floors, 2 car car-
port, new 30 year
roof, cedar siding.
MLS #12-3770. For
more information
and photos visit
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com.
Call Tom
570-262-7716.
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
MOUNTAIN TOP
OPEN
HOUSE
Sunday
October 7th
1 pm to 3 pm
46 Farmhouse Rd.
Lovely 10 room vinyl
sided ranch home,
with 2.5 modern
baths, formal dining
room, gas heat,
central air, 2 car
garage & large
deck. Lower level
consists of 2 large
recreation rooms.
Office, half bath and
workshop. Lower
level all ceramic
tiled floors.
MLS# 12-1359
$279,900
Call Florence
570-715-7737
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
MOUNTAINTOP
Colonial home loc-
ated on 3.77 acres.
This home offers
formal living & dining
rooms & 4 bed-
rooms with plenty of
closet space. Fam-
ily room, hardwood
floors throughout,
fenced rear yard,
fireplace, 3 season
room, full & 1/2
bath, recently re-
modeled. 2 car gar-
age + storage shed.
Come & take a look!
MLS# 12-3596
$174,900
Jill Jones
696-6550
MOUNTAINTOP
Move in & stretch
out! Plenty of room
in this outstanding 2
story home. Open
kitchen & family
room leads to large
deck & fenced
yard. Above
ground heated pool
with gated multi-
level deck. Finished
basement with 2
car garage with
shelving &
workbench.
MLS# 12-3328
$199,900
Jeff Cook
Bank Capital
Realty World
235-1183
NANTICOKE
$29,900
715 Maple St.
Handymans
dream. NOT a
nightmare. A lit-
tle paint, car-
peting and
water lines and
this house is
good to go.
Large yard. 2
bedrooms. For
more info and
photos visit:
www. atlasreal-
tyinc.com.
MLS 12-2332
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
P
E
N
D
I
N
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NANTICOKE
192 Middle Road
Large two story. 4
bedrooms, 1.5
baths, attached two
car garage. Call
Jim for Details
Offered @ $95,000
Towne & Country
Real Estate Co
570-735-8932
570-542-5708
906 Homes for Sale
NANTICOKE
136 East Ridge St.
Owner Will
Entertain Offers
A great home fea-
tures 3 bedrooms,
plenty of closet
space, modern eat
in kitchen with
great appliances,
living room with
wood pellet stove,
large family room, 1
1/2 modern bath-
rooms, washer/
dryer hook-up, sec-
ond floor has all new
replacement
windows, exterior
has aluminum sid-
ing, stain glass win-
dow on new front
porch, new above
ground pool, fenced
in level yard, Plenty
of off street parking,
A+ today. Never
worry about park-
ing, its always there.
Great location, best
price home in
today's market,
Shown by appoint-
ment only, to quali-
fied buyers.
REDUCED
$45,000
Call John Vacendak
570-735-1810
www.capitol-
realestate.com
for additional
photos
NANTICOKE
1472 S. Hanover St.
Well maintained bi-
level. This home
features 2 bed-
rooms, 1 3/4 baths,
recreation room
with propane stove.
Walk out to a 3 sea-
son porch. Profes-
sionally landscaped
yard. 1 car garage,
storage shed, new
appliances, ceiling
fans. Close to
LCCC. $163,900.
Call 570-735-7594
NANTICOKE
25 W. Washington
Move right into this
very nice 3 bed-
room, 1 bath home.
Lots of natural
woodwork and a
beautiful stained
glass window.
Newer kitchen
appliances and w/w
carpeting. Supple-
ment your heating
with a recently
installed wood pel-
let stove. This home
also has a one car
detached garage.
MLS 12-2171
$76,000
John Polifka
570-704-6846
FIVE MOUNTAINS
REALTY
570-542-2141
NANTICOKE
A Must See!
This ranch home
features 4 bed-
rooms, 2 baths,
central air, three
zoned heating, new
windows, a large
lot, and a possible
mother in law
suite in basement!
$185,000
570-762-4157
NANTICOKE
418 Front Street
Large 4 bedroom
house with formal
dining room, family
room & living room.
Across from multi
use recreation park.
Near I81 & Hanover
Industrial Park.
Zoned for neighbor-
hood commercial
district.
MLS# 12-3268
$45,000
Dana Distasio
715-9333
Lewith &
Freeman
95 S. Main Road
Mountain Top, PA
474-9801
To place your
ad Call Toll Free
1-800-427-8649
SHAVERTOWN
Midway Manor
Ranch
3 bedrooms, 2
baths, family room,
3 season porch,
gas heat, central
air, 2 car garage.
MLS #12-1935
$177,000
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
906 Homes for Sale
NANTICOKE
Stately 2 story
home has exquisite
woodwork through-
out, stained glass
windows, hardwood
floors. Living, dining
& Family rooms.
2nd floor den or
nursery, private
drive, nice fenced
yard, 2 car garage.
MLS #12-3670
$115,000
Lynda Rowinski
696-5418
Smith Hourigan
Group
696-1195
NANTICOKE
REDUCED
1457 S. Hanover St.
Beautiful Tudor
style split level
home. This home
features 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
recreation room
with a bar, wood
burning stove, 2 tier
patio, storage shed,
fenced yard and 1
car garage. Securi-
ty system and
more.
MLS 12-3292
$184,900
John Polifka
570-704-6846
Five Mountains
Realty
570-542-2141
NANTICOKE
REDUCED!
143 W. Broad St.
Nice 2 story home
with 3 bedrooms
1.5 baths, fenced
yard, newer furnace
with 3 zones and
newer 200 amp
electrical service,
whole house water
filter and beautiful
hard wood floors.
This home has an
attached Mother in
Law suite with a
separate entrance.
This can easily be
converted to a 1st
floor master bed-
room with a
master bath.
MLS 12-1401
$64,900
John W. Polifka
Five Mountains
Realty
570-542-2141
570-704-6846
NANTICOKE
A PLACE TO
HANG YOUR
HEART
Large three bed-
room brick ranch
located on the out
skirts of Nanticoke.
You'll fall in love with
the spacious open
floor plan! Large
sunken Living room,
tiled kitchen with
black appliances
included, formal
Dining room, bath
with tiled garden tub
& shower, lots of
closet space, fin-
ished basement
with fireplace, three
quarter bath / laun-
dry room. On a quiet
dead end street.
Back yard is cur-
rently under going
beautiful landscape
redesign. $129,000
MLS# 12-2629
Michele Hopkins
570-540-6046
NEWPORT TWP
REDUCED
Unique ''Deck
House'' contempo-
rary-styled home
with brick & red-
wood exterior. 5
bedrooms & 3
baths. Features: liv-
ing room with fire-
place & vaulted ceil-
ing with exposed
beans. Modern
cherry kitchen.
Lower level family
room with kitch-
enette. Hardwood
floors. All on 1 acre
in Wanamie section.
$239,000
MLS-12-3588
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
WEST PITTSTON
Split level, stone
exterior, multi-tiered
deck, bluestone
patio, flood dam-
aged, being sold as
is condition.
$73,500
CALL DONNA
570-613-9080
906 Homes for Sale
NEWPORT TWP
INVESTMENT
PROPERTY
Nice fully rented 2
family investment in
quiet conveniently
located neighbor-
hood. Separate
heat, electric and
water. Large wide
double lot with off
street parking on
each side. Fenced
rear yard.
$49,900
MLS 12-2311
Call Steve Shemo
570-718-4959
CLASSIC
PROPERTIES
570-793-9449
NEWPORT TWP
MULTI FAMILY
Nice fully rented
2 family investment
in quiet convenient-
ly located neighbor-
hood. Separate
heat, electric and
water. Large wide
double lot with off
street parking on
each side. Fenced
rear yard.
$49,000
MLS 12-2008
Call Steve Shemo
570-718-4959
CLASSIC
PROPERTIES
570-793-9449
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
NEWPORT TWP.
OPEN HOUSE
SAT. OCTOBER 6
3PM - 5PM
4 Overlook Drive
Great split level
home in Whitney
Point development,
formerly Ridgeview.
This home has 3
bedrooms, 1.5
baths, 2 car
garage, large deck,
and lower level
family room with a
bar and coal stove.
Heat your house all
winter long with
about $150 worth
of coal!
MLS# 12-2548
$169,900
Call John Polifka
570-704-6846
Five Mountains
Realty
570-542-2141
PITTSTON
$49,900
42 E. Oak St.
Cozy 2 bedroom, 2
story home with
modern kitchen and
bath. New vinyl win-
dows, nice yard.
Storage shed and 1
car detached
garage. www.
atlasrealtyinc.com.
MLS 12-3016
Terry
570-885-4896
Angie
570-885-4896
PITTSTON
$49,900
514 Main St.
Grand older home
being sold as-is.
Four bedrooms,
large kitchen, hard-
wood floors on first
floor, vinyl sided,
some newer win-
dows. Needs work
but makes a great
winter project. MLS
#12-2873. For
more information
and photos visit
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com.
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PITTSTON
$78,900
8 Tunnell St.
3 bedroom, 1 bath
2 story with extra
large kitchen in very
private location with
newer vinyl win-
dows. For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-2944
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
906 Homes for Sale
PITTSTON
$79,900
121A Broad St.
Duplex. fully rented
with 2 bedrooms
each unit. Owner
pays heat. Tenants
pay electric and hot
water. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-2973
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
PITTSTON
HOUSE FOR
SALE BY OWNER
Modern 2 story
home. 3 bedrooms,
1.5 baths. Large
living room, small
Florida room with
French doors, large
eat-in kitchen, gran-
ite countertops &
hardwood floor.
Laundry room on
1st floor, all appli-
ances included.
Gas heat, central
air, garage with
attached custom
shed. Concrete
patio, paved drive-
way, blue stone
walkway from front
to rear. Low
maintenance, vinyl
fencing & new roof.
$129,000
570-417-3781
PITTSTON
REDUCED
$189,900
251 Broad St.
Much bigger that it
looks, this modular
constructed Cape
Cod has 3 bed-
rooms, 2 full baths,
heated sunroom
and beautiful
kitchen with granite
counters and stain-
less appliances. Full
finished basement.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-2973
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
PITTSTON
REDUCED
$29,900
110 Union St.
Fixer upper with 3
bedrooms, new
roof, gas heat.
Great lot 50 x 173.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-1513
Call Tom
570-262-7716
PITTSTON
REDUCED
$99,500
Own a Historical
Gem!!! This home
was built in 1907
and is STILL in
near original condi-
tion. All the wood-
work, glass and
light fixtures are
there. Never ruined
by a cheap remodel
and the woodwork
was never painted
over. Dont take my
word for it, go on
line and check out
the photos at
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com. If you like
classic features
youll love this
home!
MLS 12-2781
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
906 Homes for Sale
PITTSTON
REDUCED!!!
Roomy 4 bed-
rooms, 2 bath with
eat in kitchen, din-
ing room, 1st floor
bedroom and bath,
plus drive in rear.
Motivated seller
Asking $29,300
MLS 12-3152
Ann Marie Chopick
760-6769
570-288-6654
PITTSTON TWP.
$144,900
10 Norman St.
Very nice, classic
two story brick
home with large
rooms, 4 bed-
rooms, plenty of
baths, large base-
ment, open deck
and covered deck.
Large eat in
kitchen, plenty of
off street parking.
MLS #11-2887. For
more information
and photos visit
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com.
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PITTSTON TWP.
23 Ridge Street
4 Bedroom
Colonial Home in
Pocono Ridge
Estates. Large
2 Car Garage,
Paved Driveway,
Electric Heat &
Central Air, 1.5
Baths, Large Eat in
Kitchen & Dining
Room. Double
Deck with Hot Tub.
Low Taxes.
$219,000
Call
570-212-1404
SALE
PENDING
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
PITTSTON
PRICE REDUCED!
$339,000 is the
new price on this
gorgeous home.
3,200 sq. ft. on two
floors plus a finished
basement. Large
entry foyer office on
first level, custom
kitchen with ash
cabinetry and gran-
ite island. Sunken
first floor family
room with blonde
hardwood floors,
gas fireplace and
vaulted ceiling.
Master suite with
sitting room & three
walk-in closets,
large master bath
featuring custom
cabinetry, Jacuzzi
tub, walk-in shower.
Two guest bed-
rooms with family
bath, second floor
laundry room. Fin-
ished lower level
and separate stor-
age room. Central
air, gas heat, roofed
rear porch, low
maintenance yard,
2-car garage with
storage. Convenient
location!
Call Maribeth Jones
696-6565
#12-2606
696-2600
PLAINS
5 Odonnell St.
New Price
$85,000
This home wont
be available for
too long. Call
me to see this 3
bedroom, 1 and
3/4 bathroom Bi
level with NEW
roof, finished
lower level with
4th bedroom or
office. 1 car
garage. Located
in a very con-
venient location.
atlasrealtyinc.co
m
MLS # 12-2622
Directions: Trav-
eling South on
RT 315; Left on
Mundy St; Left
on Bear Creek
Blvd; Left on
ODonnell St.
Home is on
the right.
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
P
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D
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906 Homes for Sale
PLAINS
NEW LISTING
58 WARNER ST.
$129,500
Move in condition!
Well maintained two
story with 3 bed-
rooms, 1 baths,
formal dining room,
large eat-in kitchen
and bonus sun-
room. Exterior sid-
ing recently paint-
ed, replacement
windows, new exte-
rior doors, newer
electrical service,
carpeting, and tile
floors. Two car
oversized garage,
all nestled on a
double lot.
MLS 12-3521
Call Mary Donovan
696-0729
PLAINS
14 Pine Road
Lovely brick home in
great development.
Hardwood floors, 2
car garage, newer
roof, large laundry
room with office
space, covered
back porch, large
Family room on first
floor with fireplace,
possible 3rd Bed-
room over garage.
12-2688.
$198,000
Call Nancy Answini
Gilroy Real Estate
570-288-1444
PLAINS
16 Birch Street
Great home in
Hudson Gardens.
4 bedrooms, 2 1/2
baths, central a/c,
new roof &
windows, newly
painted, screened
porch, family room
with fireplace & bar.
MLS #12-2688
$167,000
Call Nancy Answini
Gilroy Real
Estate
570-288-1444
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
PLAINS
NEW LISTING!
This charming brick
2 story with semi-
modern kitchen, 3
bedrooms & 1 bath
is well maintained.
Newer roof, 1st
floor replacement
windows, off street
parking & more.
Priced to Sell!
$54,900
Call Ann Marie
Chopick
570-760-6769
570-288-6654
PLYMOUTH
You will love this
cozy rancher locat-
ed in the ''garden
spot'' of Plymouth
Boro. Home fea-
tures fantastic loca-
tion, modern eat in
kitchen, remodeled
bathroom, addition-
al 4 season room
leading to deck,
newer carpeting
with hardwood
floors underneath.
New roof in 2008,
full basement, 1 car
garage & a positive-
ly wonderful back-
yard. Home is in
''move-in'' condi-
tion. Must see.
MLS 12-3490
$85,000
Call Lynda Rowinski
696-5418
Smith Hourigan
Group
696-1195
PLYMOUTH TWP.
Well kept 2 story
home, located in
Plymouth Township
sits high & dry in a
quiet location.
Large eat-in
kitchen, living & din-
ing rooms, oil hot-
water baseboard
heat. Nice yard,
wrap around porch.
MLS #12-2256
$45,000 Call
Lynda Rowinski
Smith Hourigan
Group
696-1195
906 Homes for Sale
PRINGLE
24 Flanagan St.
$99,900
This one of a kind
original home will
help you pay for
itself. 2 ready to
move in 1 bedroom
units. 1st floor has
themed porch with
a great view of the
valley, 2nd floor is
uniquely custom
designed & built
with new every-
thing. House fea-
tures garden area,
berries, fruits,
16x40 workshop,
large back yard
carport, 10x10
shed, basement
storage & sink
area. New copper
plumbing, central
a/c, gas & electric
heat, new metal
roof, 2 electric pan-
els, gas filled win-
dows, whole house
woodburner backup
and good Karma.
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
Call Tom
570-262-7716
SHAVERTOWN
Extraordinary, cedar
& stone, multi-level
Contemporary with
open-floor plan.
A p p r o x i m a t e l y
5,000 sq.ft. of living
features 10 rooms;
4 bedrooms; 3 1/2
baths; porcelain/tile
flooring; sunken
Family Room with
vaulted ceiling &
gas fireplace, ultra
Kitchen with granite
counters; 800 sq.ft.
Rec Room with
granite wet bar &
fireplace; In-home
theater; lower level
gym. Decks with
pond view. 2 sepa-
rate heating /air
conditioning sys
tems.
$475,000.
MLS-12-2816
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
SHICKSHINNY
524 Hunlock
Harveyville Rd
3 Bedroom, 1 bath 2
story home in good
condition with
detached garage on
approximately 6 1/4
acres. $165,000.
MLS# 12-2749
Call Ken Williams
Five Mountain
Realty
570-542-8800
SHICKSHINNY LAKE
Lake Front Property
at Shickshinny
Lake!!! 4
Bedrooms, 2.75
baths, 2 kitchens,
living room, large
family room. 2 sun-
rooms, office &
laundry room. Plus
2 car attached gar-
age with paved
driveway, AG pool,
dock & 100' lake
frontage. $382,500.
MLS #12-860
Call Kenneth
Williams
570-542-2141
Five Mountains
Realty
SWEET VALLEY
Split Level in good
condition with 3
bedrooms, 2 baths,
Owens Corning
walls in basement,
walk-in cedar clos-
et, whirlpool tub,
Granite counter
tops, 4 Season
Sunroom, open floor
plan, quality ceiling
fans, french doors in
Master bedroom,
plus 2 car detached
garage all sitting on
3 Acres of land.
$179,900.
MLS 12-1293
Ken Williams
570-542-8800
Five Mountains
Realty
SWOYERSVILLE
689 Main Street
2 bedroom home on
large lot with bonus
efficiency apart-
ment. Large living
room, eat in kitchen,
screened porch.
Freshly painted and
new flooring. See
www.craiglslist.org
$59,900. Call
570-696-3368
Motorcycle for sale?
Let them see it here
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
Motorcycle for sale?
Let them see it here
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
Find homes for
your kittens!
Place an ad here!
570-829-7130
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
T I M E S L E A D E R PAGE 22G SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7 , 2012 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 PAGE 23G
Call Stan Pearlman (570) 474-2340 Stanley.Pearlman@ColdwellBanker.com
100 Years of Exceptional
Real Estate Services
Coldwellbankerrundlerealestate.com
e-mail: rundlerealestate@coldwellbanker.com
Hablamos Espanol
Visit
COLDWELL BANKER
RUNDLE REAL ESTATE
40 N. Mountain Blvd., Mountaintop
OPEN SUNDAY, OCT. 7
TH
1:00-3:00PM
10 FREDERICK ST., ASHLEY
Low taxes & quiet street make
this move-in ready home a must
see for frst time homebuyers or
downsizers. New carpet, paint,
updated electrical. Spacious eat-
in kitchen,HW, fenced yard. 1 yr
Home Warranty. MLS#11-3191
Directions: Ashley St to L on Car-
ey, L on Richard, R on Culvert,L
on Preston, R on Frederick
$56,500
Were building nowfor late-summer/fall occupancy
&offering great incentives on current inventory
GREAT LOCATION! Minutes to NE ext. and I-81.
CALL: 877-442-8439 Susan Parrick, Director, Sales/Marketing
Four Great Styles...
3 with rst oor master
Starting at $219,000
Model Home Now For Sale!
2000 sq. ft. + open foor plan
formal dining room - 3BR/2.5 Bath
Priced to Sell $247,000
LIKE US ON
OPEN
HOUSE
TODAY
1-3
www.staufferpointe.com
Construction Lending is Available! Use the equity of your home
while you sell, to enjoy hassle-free nancing at todays low interest.
DIRECTIONS: From William St., Pittston, turn onto Fulton St. At 4-way, cross Butler St. and go straight to Grandview Dr.
SHAVERTOWN WILKES-BARRE
DALLAS GLENMAURA
10 DAKOTA DRIVE
DALLAS DAKOTA WOODS - Carefree Condo -Bright & spacious
w/3 BRs, 1st fr master, study/library, kit w/granite & upscale
appls, 2 car gar. MLS#11-3208
RHEA 696-6677 $379,000
DIR: Rt 309N to R into Dakota Woods
LAFLIN LAKE NUANGOLA
FORTY FORT
KINGSTON
TRUCKSVILLE
LARKSVILLE
OPEN HOUSE TODAY 1:00-3:00 PM
Lot 1 Woodberry Dr., Mountaintop
Preview this 4BR, 3bath 2 story
model w/ lots of HW & tile. Gran-
ite counters in kit, MSTR Suite
w/2 walk-in closets & tiled bath
w/ dbl vanities, shower & whirl-
pool. Home/lot packages avail-
able. TERRY D. 715-9317
Dir: 309S. to Right on S Main, Right on
Nuangola, RIght on Fairwood Blvd. to
end. Straight into Woodberry Manor. 1st
house on left.
OPEN HOUSE TODAY 1:00-2:30 PM OPEN HOUSE TODAY 12:00-1:30 PM KINGSTON OPEN HOUSE TODAY 1:00-2:30 PM
300 W. CENTER HILL ROAD
SHAVERTOWN Tastefully remodeled & spacious home situated
on 1acre w/Master Suite on 1st foor, in-ground pool, hot tub &
more! MLS# 12-3539
REBECCA D. 696-0879 $299,995
DIR: RT.309N TO RT.415 TO L ON CENTER HILL ROAD.
1130 MARCY ROAD
EXETER TWP. WYOMING SCHOOL DISTRICT - A welcoming
3-4BR home on 1acre. Kitchen w/granite counters, FR w/FP &
bright sunroom. Attached 2 car garage plus a 2 car detached
garage. MLS# 12-2181
BARBARA M. 696-0883 $279,000
DIR: 8th Street to Bodle Rd - Cross Sutton Creek Rd - R on
Marcy.
LAKE NUANGOLA Lakefront! Beautiful totally remodeled from
top to bottom-inside & out Multi-level. Decks & new dock mo-
torboat are allowed! 3BRs, 1 3/4 bath, great sunroom. Less
than 1 minute to I81. MLS# 12-2775
PAT S. 715-9337 $399,900
WILKES-BARRE Beautifully remodeled Bi-level with Owens
Corning LL & renovated kitchen & baths, 2FPs, C/A & extra
lot. MLS# 12-3710
DEANNA 696-0894 $221,500
SHAVERTOWN Lovely 2 story home with charm throughout.
HW foors in LR & DR, built-in bookcases, gas FP, screened sun
porch, detached garage. MLS# 12-2144
SALLY 714-9233 $229,900
WILKES-BARRE Private serene setting! Two ranches! Main
house w/pool & gazebo, 60x40 pole barn, storage for cars,
boats. Located near Geisinger! MLS# 11-2259
TERRY D. 715-9317 $329,000
LARKSVILLE Larkmount Manor Bi-level w/4BRs, 2
baths, newly fnished basement. Lg fenced yard. 2
car garage. Home Warranty. MLS#12-1105
NANCY PALUMBO 714-9240 $174,900
KINGSTON 4BR & 1.5 bath, 3-story with large LR,
modern kitchen with appliances & dining area. 1st
foor laundry, gas forced air heat with C/A, yard & pa-
tio. MLS# 12-3743 ANDY 714-9225 $119,900
TRUCKSVILLE 2BR, 1 bath Ranch w/2 car garage,
new kitchen, new roof, low taxes on quiet street.
Move-in condition! MLS# 12-3705
MARK 696-0724 $124,000
FORTY FORT Cape Cod in move-in condition! 3BR,
1.5 bath w/1st foor laundry, bonus 3 season room
on 2nd foor, large screened porch, 2 car detached
garage w/loft. MLS# 12-2520
MARY D. 696-0729 $119,900
KINGSTON Character & charm throughout this 3story beauty!
6BRs, 3 baths, HW foors, beveled glass windows, modern
kitchen, 2 car garage. MLS# 12-3121
TRACY Z. 696-6674 $299,000
GLENMAURA BEAUTIFUL home w/everything you could ask for
& more! Modern kitchen, HW foors, 5+BRs, Florida room, MBR
on 1st foor - All of this PLUS a wonderful lot with a view of the
Glenmaura Golf Course. MLS# 12-2473
PEG 714-9247 $1,100,000
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ONLY 6 LOTS LEFT
Custom Homes by
Romanowski Homes
Spec Home offered at $525,000
Or
Have Romanowski Homes build your
Dream Home on any of these
6 remaining lots
Call Geri for details
ERA1.com
ONE
SOURCE
REALTY
Mountaintop (570) 403-3000
*Conditions and limitations apply; including but not limited to: seller and house must meet specic qualications, and purchase price will be determined solely by ERA Franchise Systems LLC, based upon a discount of the homes appraised value.
Additionally, a second home must be purchased through a broker designated by ERA Franchise Systems LLC.
2008 ERA Franchise Systems LLC. All Rights Reserved. ERA and Always There For You are registered trademarks licensed to ERA Franchise Systems LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Ofce is Independently Owned and Operated.
Clarks Summit (570) 587-9999
Peckville (570) 489-8080
Moscow (570) 842-2300
Lake Ariel (570) 698-0700
Mt Top (570) 403-3000
Scranton (570) 343-9999
Stroudsburg (570) 424-0404
Lehighton (610) 377-6066
Toll Free 877-587-SELL
appraised value
Sunita Arora
Broker/Owner
Accredited Buyer Representative
Certied Residential Broker, E-Pro
Graduate Realtors Institute
Seniors Real Estate Specialist
C bbased upon a ddisc dd asedd upo
PLAINS
Income Potential! double block,
2BR and 3BR units, large garage
$94,000 MLS#12-3749
WILKESBARRE
LOCATION! Near General Hospital,
fenced yard, three 3- season porches
$55,000 MLS#11-1779
HANOVER TWP.
Spacious! 2 story home, modern
oak, eat-in kitchen, family room
$45,000 MLS#12-3270
WILKESBARRE
JUST LISTED! Clean 2-story,
fenced yard, nice street. $$$ to Sell
$26,900 MLS#12-3767
HAZLETON
Te Price is RIGHT! 3BR, 1/2
double, yard, nished attic, dont wait!
$24,600 MLS#12-3765
WILKESBARRE
NEW PRICE! 2-story, 3BR on large
lot, eat-in kitchen, SS appliances
$85,900 MLS#12-2543
PITTSTON
Charming! 2-story home, eat-in
kitchen, 3 BR, 3-season porch, garage
$67,500 MLS#11-4229
DURYEA
Incredible Cape Cod! 4BR, totally
renovated, lovely level corner lot
$205,000 MLS#12-2623
PITTSTON
Park-like setting! 12 acre estate,
sprawling ranch, private setting
$569,000 MLS#12-1707
DRUMS
Edgewood Terrace! 4BR, replace
in living room, garage, nice lot
$188,000 MLS#12-3103
NANTICOKE
Rich Ranch! close to schools and
LCCC. Huge private backyard
$129,900 MLS#12-2927
WILKESBARRE
Why Rent?! Lots of potential, 1/2
double, Rolling Mill Hill section
$28,000 MLS#12-2495
HARVEYS LAKE
Luxury Lakefront! 6,250 sq ft
main house, boat house and dock
$1,475,000 MLS#12-2045
MOUNTAINTOP
Beautiful Chalet! 1 acre parcel,
luxury master suite w/ garden tub
$289,700 MLS#12-3441
SWOYERSVILLE
Beautiful Bi-Level! Bi-Level! 2
kitchens, 2 replaces, in-ground
$130,000 MLS#12-3269
FREELAND
Better than NEW! New roof,
windows, electrical, siding, deck
$103,900 MLS#12-2415
SHAVERTOWN
Single-Level Living! 3BR, new SS
appliances, OSP, Dallas Schools
$89,900 MLS#12-3750
EDWARDSVILLE
Multi-Family! Duplex, original
woodwork, two 3BR 1BA, ample OSP
$74,000 MLS#11-1607
MULTIFAMILY MULTIFAMILY
Visit NBCAM.org...
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OCTOBER IS NATIONAL BREAST CANCER
AWARENESS MONTH
SERVING THE NEPA REAL ESTATE
COMMUNITY FOR OVER A DECADE
61 MARKET ST., LAFLIN
NEW! 4BR ranch, modern baths
nished LL, wood, large deck
$134,900 MLS#12-3752
DIR: River St from W-B R on Maett St to R on E
Saylor Ave., ( becomes Market Street), Home at the
end of street across from stream
Jennifer Winn 570.760.1622
620 HOOVEN ST., DURYEA
NEW! Charming home, total renovation,
Walk to Abington Middle School
$79,500 MLS#12-3751
DIR: From Pittston, N Main St to R on Parsonage
St, bear L on Foote Ave L on Hooven home on L
Jennifer Winn 570.760.1622
OPEN HOUSE TODAY 2:003:30PM OPEN HOUSE TODAY 12:001:30PM
(570) 474-9801
If you are buying or selling anywhere
in the county, I can help you!
Only if you call!
Direct Line - Jim (570) 715-9323 Jim Graham
Associate Broker
DRUMS
Excellent - better than new patio home! 1st fr living w/3 BR, 2
baths, DR, FR w/FP & cathedral ceiling, all in golf community.
MLS#12-2241 $224,900
(570) 288-9371
Rae Dziak
714-9234
rae@lewith-freeman.com
With Rae, Service = Sales
OPEN HOUSES TODAY
Modern (2005) 4BR, 2.1 bath home. Beautiful HW
oors; eat-in tile/granite kitchen w/Island, vaulted
ceiling & sliders to deck; 1st oor FR w/FP; LR
& DR w/FP; MBR Suite; 2nd oor laundry; 3 car
garage; A/C; Terric home!
DIR: Rt 309 N, R on Harris Hill, L on Ondish,
L on Roosevelt, home on R.
$279,900
Well kept 3BR, 1 bath home in nice neighborhood.
LR & DR; large eat-in kitchen w/nice cabinets; 2
heated rooms in attic need updating; Peerless fur-
nace; new sewer line; 3 porches; excellent location!
DIR: Rutter Avenue to E. Bennett (Turkey Hill)
home on R (E. Bennett is one-way from Rutter to
Wyoming Avenue)
$59,900
16 Roosevelt Street
Dallas
86 E. Bennett Street
Kingston
1:00-2:30PM
3:00-4:00PM
Im Sue Barre and I sell houses.
I can SELL YOURS! (570) 696-5417
d III llll hh
$225,000
5 Aster Road,
Dallas
Dallas Schools
Open House Today 1:00-3:00PM
MotivatedSeller readytosell!! Move
right into this 3BR 3BA 2story w/lg
family room, in Applewood Manor
in Dallas schools. Large mod kit,
DR, LR, LL w/waterproong
system, 2 car garage. NO HOAfees.
MLS#12-2244
Directions: From 309, turn as if
going to Dallas H.S., then bear left
on upper Demunds Road.
Go approx 2 miles look
for Aster on R. House
on R.
Smith Hourigan Group
SMARTER. BOLDER.
FASTER.
Century21SHGroup.com
(570) 696-1195
Were moving lots and this exclusive development
will sell out soon to a fortunate few!
Convenient to Wilkes-Barre with spectacular views
and 1 to 4.5 acre parcels.
16 - Estate sized sites on a private rolling hillside
between Hillside Road and Huntsville Reservoir,
Shavertown.
Public Sewer - Natural Gas
Another Quality Halbing Amato Development
Expert Construction with attention to every detail
by Summit Pointe Builders Your plan or ours!
Contact: Kevin Smith (570) 696-1195
Kevin.Smith@Century21.com Kevin.Smith@
Smith Hourigan Group
W W ii ll t dd h thii ll ii dd ll t
Exclusive Jackson Township Location Just Off Hillside Road
Homesites From $155,900
Ready for custom build by
Summit Pointe Builders
www.gordonlong.com
3138 Memorial Hwy., Dallas
Across From Agway
(570) 675-4400
DALLAS BOROUGH
Great Location for Family
living- Great Condition,
3 Bedroom 2 & 1/2
Bath, Heated Garage,
LG Corner Lot Across
from Park, 18 x 36 Pool.
Asking $209,900
Call Richard Today
for Showing
570-406-2438
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OPEN HOUSES - SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7TH, 2012
BACK MOUNTAIN & SURROUNDS
Dallas 16 Roosevelt St. 1-2:30PM Lewith & Freeman
Dallas 146 Lincoln St. 12-2PM Lewith & Freeman
Shavertown 300 W. Center Hill Rd.12-1:30PM Lewith & Freeman
Dallas 27 Susquehanna Dr. 1-2:30PM Lewith & Freeman
Dallas 11 Jackson St. 2-3:30PM Lewith & Freeman
Harveys Lake Pole 205 1-2:30PM Lewith & Freeman
Dallas 10 Dakota Dr. 1-2:30PM Lewith & Freeman
Franklin Twp. 799 Coon Rd. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group
Dallas 173 Cummings Rd. 12-2PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group
Back Mountain 5 Aster Rd. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group
Kingston Twp. 499 Lakeview Dr. 12-2PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group
Dallas 12 Woodcliff Dr. 12:30-2:30PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group
Shavertown 51 W. Center St. 12-1:30PM Prudential Poggi & Jones
Harveys Lake 30 Pine St. 1-3PM Prudential Poggi & Jones
Dallas 21 Colonial Dr. 1-3PM Prudential Poggi & Jones
Dallas 870 Lake St. 12-2:30PM Century 21 Signature Properties
Dallas Twp. 691 Carpenter Rd. 12-2PM Realty World Rubbico Real Estate
KINGSTON/WEST SIDE & SURROUNDS
Swoyersville 120 Hemlock St. 12-1:30PM Lewith & Freeman
Forty Fort 367 River St. 12:30-2PM Lewith & Freeman
Forty Fort 23 Center St. 12-1:30PM Lewith & Freeman
Kingston 86 E. Bennett St. 3-4PM Lewith & Freeman
Swoyersville 82 Grandville Dr. 1-2:30PM Lewith & Freeman
Forty Fort 30 Walnut St. 12-2PM Classic Properties
Luzerne 271 Charles St. 1-2:30PM Century 21 Signature Properties
Luzerne 73 Parry St. 12-1:30PM Century 21 Signature Properties
Larksville Morgan Terrace 12-1:30PM Gilroy Real Estate
Edwardsville Green St. 2-3:30PM Gilroy Real Estate
PITTSTON/NORTH & SURROUNDS
Harding 310 Lockville Rd. 12-1:30PM Atlas Realty
Lain 142 Maplewood Dr. 12-2PM Atlas Realty
Old Forge 213 Bridge St. 2:30-4PM Atlas Realty
West Pittston 315 Baltimore Ave. 2:30-4PM Atlas Realty
Exeter Twp. 1130 Marcy Rd. 1-2:30PM Lewith & Freeman
West Wyoming 688 W. 8th St. 2-3:30PM Lewith & Freeman
Lain 198 Haverford Dr. 2-4PM Lewith & Freeman
Jenkins Twp. Insignia Point Courtyards 1-3PM Lewith & Freeman
Pittston 238 S. Main St. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group
Exeter Twp. 713 Jean St. 12-1:30PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group
Pittston 4 Depew St. 1-3PMColdwell Banker Rundle Real Estate
Yatesville 1 Paige Dr. 1-3PM Marilyn K. Snyder Real Estate
Lain 61 Market St. 2-3:30PM ERA One Source Realty
Duryea 620 Hooven St. 12-1:30PM ERA One Source Realty
West Pittston 15 River Shores Court11AM-2PM River Shores Developement
WILKES-BARRE & SURROUNDS
Laurel Run 2030 Pine Run Rd. 12-1:30PM Lewith & Freeman
Wilkes-Barre 652 N. Main St. 2-3:30PM Lewith & Freeman
Wilkes-Barre 38 Westminster St. 1-3PMColdwell Banker Rundle Real Estate
Wilkes-Barre 68 Jones St. 1-2:30PMColdwell Banker Rundle Real Estate
Wilkes-Barre 33-35 Oak St. 1:30-3PM Century 21 Signature Properties
Plains 29 W. Stanton St. 1-3PM Realty World Rubbico Real Estate
MOUNTAINTOP & SURROUNDS
Mountaintop 60 Ice Lake Dr. 1-3PM Lewith & Freeman
Mountaintop Lot 1 Woodberry Dr. 1-3PM Lewith & Freeman
Mountaintop 46 Farmhouse Rd. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group
Mountaintop 2108 Slocum Rd. 1-2:30PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group
Mountaintop 24 Walden Dr. 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group
Mountaintop 32 Patriot Circle 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group
Mountaintop 16 Patriot Way 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group
HANOVER/ASHLEY/NANTICOKE & SURROUNDS
Shickshinny 67 Main Rd. 12-1:30PM Lewith & Freeman
Hanover Twp. 204 Independence Blvd.12:30-2:30PM Eileen R. Melone Real Estate
Ashley 10 Frederick St. 1-3PMColdwell Banker Rundle Real Estate
HAZLETON & SURROUNDS
Drums 9 Benn Acres Circle 1-3PM Benjamin Real Estate
Wilkes-Barre keesssssssssss-BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBaaarrrrrrrrrrrrrreeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
Loft @ Elevations
Te latest look...sweeping loft condo w/ultra modern
kitchen opens to huge great room w/FP. Large MBR
w/master bath & walk-in closet. Corner unit w/high
windows stream in light. Close to everything + covered
garage for parking & a 6x10 storage unit located in
garage. MLS#12-2001 Only $279,900
Barbara F. Metcalf
Associate Broker
Lewith &Freeman Real Estate
(570) 696-3801 (570) 696-0883 Direct
metcalf@epix.net
Stunning craftsman-style home cradled on 11+ acres complete w/
pond, stream & rolling meadows in pristine condition. Great room
w/stone FP & warm wood walls is one of the focal points of this
home. Oers modern kitchen, formal DR & FR. Wrap-around
porch overlooks property, recently built 3-car garage w/guest
quarters above, invisible dog fence, and HOMEWARRANTY on
property. MLS#11-1741 $499,000
Dallas
52-acre pristine equestrian estate. Settle in @ this stunning 4,120
SF ranch home w/spacious oor plan + 1,800 SF guest/caretaker
home. Te 2,600 SF stable has 7 stalls, wash stall, heated tack room,
plus indoor riding arena (130x65.4), owner previously had outdoor
arena + 10 paddocks which could easily be put back in place. Entire
property is level, 75% cleared bordering PA state forest lands.
MLS#12-2161 $749,000
prop prop p p p p p erty. M
Dallas
69 N. MEMORIAL HIGHWAY, SHAVERTOWN, PA18708
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 PAGE 24G
906 Homes for Sale
SWOYERSVILLE
187 Shoemaker St.
Adorable 3 bed-
room 1 bath Cape
Cod. Completely
remodeled inside
and out with new
granite counter-
tops, ceramic tile
back splash and
flooring in the
kitchen. New hard-
wood floors
throughout. New
furnace, roof, vinyl
siding, windows,
concrete deck in
the back and so
much more! Duct
work in place for
central AC. This is
not a drive by.
MLS 12-1595
REDUCED
$125,000
Jay A. Crossin
Extension 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
SWOYERSVILLE
Wonderful 4 bed-
room single family
home in quiet neigh-
borhood. Featuring
in-ground pool,
stamped concrete
patio, ceramic tile
baths, finished
basement, garage,
vinyl. Fenced yard
and an additional
room for extra living
space or possible
business.
MLS# 12-833
$189,900
Jolyn Bartoli
696-5425
Smith Hourigan
Group
696-1195
TRUCKSVILLE
OPEN HOUSE
Sun., Oct. 7th, 1-3
157 Carverton Rd.
Enjoy country living
with scenic views
just minutes from
309. This 2,030 sq
ft Colonial offers an
oak kitchen with
new Jennaire gas
range, family room
with fireplace lead-
ing to a spacious
rear deck, Formal
dining room, 4 bed-
rooms and 2/1/2
baths plus a 2 car
garage. The base-
ment has a work
shop area and can
easily be turned into
additional living
area. REDUCED!
$189,000
Ann Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
(570) 288-6654
WAPWALLOPEN
359 Pond Hill
Mountain Road
4 bedroom home
features a great
yard with over 2
acres of property.
Situated across
from a playground.
Needs some TLC
but come take a
look, you wouldnt
want to miss out.
There is a pond at
the far end of the
property that is
used by all sur-
rounding neighbors.
This is an estate
and is being sold as
is. No sellers prop-
erty disclosure. Will
entertain offers in
order to settle
estate. MLS 11-962
$64,900
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
WEST NANTICOKE
TILBURY TERRACE
Tilbury Avenue
Superb 3 bedroom
single. Hardwood
floors, fireplace,
garage. Well main-
tained. Great
Neighborhood.
REDUCED TO
$179,900
Towne & Country
Real Estate Co.
570-735-8932
570-542-5708
WEST PITTSTON
$189,900
DOUBLE
VICTORIAN HOME
621 WYOMING AVE
Not In Flood Zone
Good income
property. 3 car
detached garage.
In ground pool.
Large fenced yard.
570-760-0049
906 Homes for Sale
WEST NANTICOKE
Tilbury Terrace
69 Tilbury Ave
All brick, 3 bedroom
ranch, large
wooded lot, large
rooms with
beautiful
Parquet hardwood
floors, plaster
walls/ceilings, full
walk-up floored
attic, full
basement with
concrete walls &
floor, wine cellar,
washer/dryer,
workshop areas,
2 car attached
garage.
Quiet, friendly
neighborhood,
$165,000.
ROTHSTEIN
REALTORS
1-888-244-2714
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
WEST PITTSTON
$109,000
812 Luzerne Ave.
Excellent starter
home with 2 bed-
rooms, knotty pine
ceiling and walls.
Modern kitchen,
hardwood floors,
oak trim through-
out. 3 season
porch, 6 vinyl pri-
vacy fence around
back yard. Move in
condition.
MLS 12-3123
Fred Mecadon
570-817-5792
WEST PITTSTON
725 Second St.
$259,900
Four bedroom brick
ranch home with
large rooms, 4
baths, finished
lower level with wet
bar, central air, walk
out basement,
garage & new roof.
MLS 12-2608 For
more information
and photos visit
www. at l asr eal t y
inc.com.
Call Tom
570-262-7716
WEST PITTSTON
REDUCED TO
$64,500
318 Chase St.
3 bedroom, one
bath home with
extra large kitchen.
Has newer gas fur-
nace. Was not
flooded in Sept.
2011. Why rent
when you can own
your own home?
Interest rates will
probably never be
lower. If youre
employed and have
good credit dont
wait, buy now! For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-2837
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
WEST PITTSTON,
$119,900
315 Baltimore Ave.
Beautifully main-
tained 3 bedroom
home with extra
large family room,
gas heat, nice yard,
low traffic location.
Not flooded in 72
or 2011. MLS #12-
3677. For more
information and
photos visit
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com.
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
906 Homes for Sale
WEST PITTSTON
NEW LISTING
Ledgeview
Estates
Townhouse
Updates, Updates,
Updates New
hardwood floors,
granite counter tops
in kitchen, new
granite vanities, tile
floor, finished, walk-
out basement with-
gas fireplace. Call
Donna Mantione,
613-9080
WHITE HAVEN
Nice home with
double lot in Hickory
Hill community.
Great bi-level with
open floor plan and
plenty of space for
all your needs.
Serene wooded lot
and a stream that
run trough it. Make
this your seasons
home or your per-
manent place to call
home. House sold
as is,Inspections for
buyers information
only. MLS 12-2385
$107,900
Call / text Donna
Cain 570-947-3824
or Tony
570-855-2424
WHITE-HAVEN
501 Birch Lane
Beautiful 4 bed-
room, 3 bath. Enjoy
the amenities of a
private lake, boat-
ing, basketball
courts, etc. The
home has wood
floors and carpeting
throughout. French
doors in the kitchen
that lead you out to
the large rear deck
for entertaining. The
backyard has 2 utili-
ty sheds for storage
MLS 12-1695
$179,900
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
WILKES BARRE
$49,900
61 Puritan Lane
Very well main-
tained home fea-
tures large rooms,
first floor bath &
laundry, large
fenced in yard,
potential for drive-
way for off street
parking. MLS #12-
1823. For more
information and
photos visit
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com.
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
WILKES BARRE
$69,900
253 Parrish St.
Spacious home,
ready to move into.
Large open floor
plan offers a great
layout for all your
needs. Three bed-
rooms, plus lower
level family room.
Modern bath and
open kitchen.
Shared driveway
gives you off street
parking for a couple
of cars,detached
garage. MLS #12-
3628. For more
information and
photos visit
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com.
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
WILKES-BARRE
68 Jones Street
This 2 story home
features 3 bed-
rooms, 1 & 1.5
baths, an attached
sunroom, private
back yard, large liv-
ing room all great
for entertaining.
Close to schools &
shopping.
$44,900.
MLS 12-3211
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
$132,000
153 New
Mallery Place
Great split level
home features 5
levels of living
space. Much larger
than it appears. 4
bedrooms, 1.5
baths, 1 car garage,
extra lot.www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-3259
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
WILKES-BARRE
$73,500
35 Hillard St.
Hardwood floors,
fenced in yard,
large deck. Off
street parking. 3
bedroom home with
1st floor laundry.
Move in condition.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-1655
Colleen Turant
570-237-0415
WILKES-BARRE
Beautiful large
ranch in a great
area of Wilkes-
Barre, Lovely River-
side park. This brick
ranch offers a 2 car
garage, serene
backyard with in-
ground pool, large
rooms, finished
lower level with
kitchen and bar,
screened in porch,
family room and on
just about a half
acre. Come take a
look at your new
home! House sold
as is, inspection for
buyer information
only. MLS 12-2451
$220,000
Call / text Donna
Cain 570-947-3824
or Tony
570-855-2424
WILKES-BARRE
13 Darling St.
$99,900
Beautifully main-
tained 2-story
home with 3
bedrooms and 1
and 3/4 bath-
rooms. Oak
floors through-
out with chest-
nut woodwork.
Cherry kitchen,
stained glass
windows, french
doors, fireplace
and a 3-season
porch all situat-
ed in a country-
like setting in
the heart of the
city. Huge attic
can be convert-
ed into master
suite or 4th or
5th bedroom.
Off street park-
ing. Convenient
location. Noth-
ing to do but
move in! Must
s e e .
atlasrealtyinc.co
m
MLS #12-2620
$99,900
Directions: Trav-
eling south on
North River Rd;
Left at light at
Courthouse onto
West North St,
Left onto Darling
St. Home is in
the right. atlas
r eal t yi nc. com
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
WILKES-BARRE
70 McLean Street
$99,900
Very nicely updated
& maintained 2
story home, 3 bed-
rooms, 1 bath, 4-
season sunroom
with huge backyard
& deck. Newer car-
peting, off street
parking & security
system. ONE YEAR
HOME WARRANTY.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-2886
Keri Best
570-885-5082
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
446. N. Main Street
Beautifully
Restored House
with Storefront in
Great, Safe
Neighborhood.
Near General Hos-
pital & Kings Col-
lege. Great Invest-
ment Property. 2
bedrooms & 2.5
baths. Upstairs
laundry room, office
with deck. New
kitchen, roof, heat-
ing & electric.
Huge insulated attic
with fan, for addi-
tional space. Hard-
wood floors. Off
street parking &
garage. Lots of
closet space.
$132,500. Call
570-466-1307
WILKES-BARRE
74 Frederick St
This very nice 2
story, 3 bedroom, 1
bath home has a
large eat in kitchen
for family gather-
ings. A great walk
up attic for storage
and the home is in
move-in condition.
MLS 11-1612
$63,900
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real
Estate
570-474-2340
WILKES-BARRE
MOTIVATED SELLER
$26,500
37 Lynch Lane
Add some TLC and
this large 2 story
home could be the
gem it once was.
Off street parking, 3
bedrooms, 1.5
baths. Priced to sell
in quiet neighbor-
hood. Being sold in
as is condition.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 12-2634
Call Michele
570-905-2336
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
WILKES-BARRE
Nice two-story, 3
bedroom with mod-
ern bath, modern
kitchen, ceramic tile
floor. Screened in
rear porch, hard-
wood flooring, gas
heat, off-street
parking for 2 cars.
Move in condition
home! DIR: So.
Main St. to South
St., go to the top of
the hill to So.
Meade St., 1st
house on right
behind the church.
#12-2098 $69,500
Call Mike Holland at
696-6565
WILKES-BARRE
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday., Oct 7th
1pm to 3 pm
38 Westminster St.
Very good condition
one story home
with off street
parking & nice yard.
2 year old roof, new
stove & fridge
included along with
clothes washer &
dryer. Large living
room, dining room
& eat-in kitchen.
Full, dry concrete
basement, could be
finished. Gas heat.
$64,400.
MLS# 12-2605.
Directions: Carey
Ave. or S. Main to
either Wood or
Hanover to
Westminster.
Call Jim Banos
570-991-1883
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real
Estate
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
Classy, Sassy &
Spacious, this four
square, 4 bedroom,
2 bath updated
home is ready to
move into! Theres a
first floor tiled laun-
dry & mudroom,
tiled eat-in kitchen,
formal dining room,
large
living room, entry
foyer with closet,
replacement
windows, amazing
walk up attic,
screened porch,
large fenced yard &
garage.
MLS# 12-3499
$135,900
Call Pat today @
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-287-1196
WILKES-BARRE
Why Rent???
This move in
ready, afford-
able, adorable
3 bedroom with
wrap around front
porch, screened
rear porch, fenced
yard, large eat-in
kitchen, 1.5 baths,
closets galore,
newer carpeting
throughout & walk
up attic can be
yours for less
than renting!!!
MLS # 12-2300
Only $57,0-00
Call PAT today @
Smith Hourigan
Group
287-1196
WILKES-BARRE
PRICE REDUCED
$114,900
Parsons Manor
Beautiful Town-
house in great
condition. Very
spacious with
large rooms,
one car garage
and basement
storage. 3 bed-
rooms.
For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-2292
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
WILKES-BARRE
NEW ON THE
MARKET!
Affordability For
You! This spacious
home features
formal dining room,
three bedrooms,
convenience of a
bath on each floor,
an extra benefit
of a walk-up attic,
newer windows,
door, screen doors,
deck to relax on
and fenced-in yard
for children & pets.
Within Your Means-
Lock The Door On
High Rent!!!! View
The Virtual Tour.
MLS# 12-2990
$39,900
Michele Hopkins
570-540-6046.
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
WILKES BARRE
MOTIVATED
SELLER!
Looking for an offer!
Move-in ready
home with 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
kitchen is newly
remodeled with
Brazilian cherry
hardwood floors.
New 1/2 bath on 1st
floor. Features off
street parking with
2 car garage.
Just reduced to
$119,900.
#12-2545
Call Christine
Pieczynski
696-6569
696-2600
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
Looking for a home
with 5 bedrooms
or mother in-law
apartment, this is
the home for you!
This property has
many amenities, a
privacy rear fence
with a concrete
rear patio (23
x23), large stor-
age building (23 x
18). Off-street
parking for 2 vehi-
cles, rear porches
on 2nd and 3rd
floor. Home has 9
rooms, 2 modern
baths, 2 modern
kitchens with plenty
of cabinets.
Replacement win-
dows, newer roof,
natural woodwork
in living room and
dining room. Prop-
erty is close to all
amenities including
playground across
the street, Dan
Flood School,
Coughlin High
School, General
Hospital, Kings
College, churches
and shopping.
#12-1763 $69,900
Louise Laine
283-9100 x20
570-283-9100
WILKES-BARRE
Nice, clean 3 bed-
room, 6 room home
in very good condi-
tion, parking at rear
for 3+ vehicles,
newer rear porch
with trees shading
porch. Side lot is
nicely landscaped,
2nd floor has rear
porch off bedroom.
Large storage area
on 2nd floor which
can be converted to
a 2nd bathroom.
Replacement win-
dows throughout,
natural woodwork
on 1st floor and
stairs. Kitchen
remodeled with new
stove and dish-
washer.
#12-2213 $59,000
Louise Laine
283-9100 x20
696-2600
WYOMING
$89,900
4 Sharpe St.
Well kept 3 bed-
room Cape Cod.
Excellent location.
Ready to move in.
New replacement
windows, wall to
wall carpeting,
hardwood, cherry
wood trim through
out the house.
Security system
This house is a
must see.
MLS 12-3214
Fred Mecadon
WYOMING
20 Sharpe Street
A well-built, well
kept brick front
ranch on a level
corner lot with
screened patio, big
fully applianced
kitchen with many
cabinets, tiled bath,
hardwood floors,
roomy closets,
ductless air & spa-
cious semi-finished
2 room basement -
at this price, this
charming property
should definitely
make your
short list.
MLS# 12-2081
$144,900
Call PAT today!
Smith Hourigan
Group
287-1196
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
WYOMING
OPEN HOUSE
SUN. 9/30 & 10/7
2PM - 4PM
575 Susquehanna
Avenue
FOR SALE BY OWNER
NEVER FLOODED
4 bedroom, 2 full
bath in a great
neighborhood. New
windows entire
home, finished
lower level,
detached garage, 4
season sunroom.
Master suite has
new full bath and
large walk in closet.
New above ground
pool with deck.
Must see!
$189,000 neg.
570-885-6848
906 Homes for Sale
WYOMING
3 bedroom bi-level
features many up-
grades to kitchen,
living & dining
rooms & 1/2 bath.
Move right in to this
lovely home on .36
acres. Ultra
modern kitchen.
Dining room with
sliders to rear deck.
Lower level family
room with fireplace,
playroom, office &
great storage.
Attached 2 car
garage.
MLS# 12-3199
$205,000
Call Lynda Rowinski
570-696-5418
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-696-1195
YATESVILLE
Better than new,
end unit townhouse
with 3 bedrooms,
2.5 baths & 1 car
garage. Modern
kitchen with break-
fast bar, dining area
& all appliances
included. Master
bedroom with
beautiful master
bath. Fenced yard
with patio.
MLS #12-2965
$229,900
Call Darren Snyder
(570)825-2468
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
AVOCA
REDUCED
$69,900
129 Lampman St.
Side by side double
block home with 3
bedrooms each
side, separate utili-
ties. Includes 2
extra lots. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-2253
Call Tom
570-262-7716
AVOCA
REDUCED TO
$89,000
25 St. Marys St.
3,443 sq. ft.
masonry commer-
cial building with
warehouse/office
and 2 apartments
with separate elec-
tric and heat. Per-
fect for contractors
or anyone with stor-
age needs. For
more information
and photos log onto
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS #10-3872
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
VM 101
BEAR CREEK
$149,900
1255 Laurel Run Rd.
Bear Creek Twp.,
large commercial
garage/warehouse
on 1.214 acres with
additional 2 acre
parcel. 2 water
wells. 2 newer
underground fuel
tanks. May require
zoning approval.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-208
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
HANOVER
Repossessed
Income Property
& Duplex Home.
Out of flood area
On same lot.
7 apartments, 5 in
excellent condition.
Hardwood floors.
$119,000
570-822-9697
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
DUPONT
$79,900
100 Lncoln St.
MULTI FAMILY
3 bedroom
home with
attached apart-
ment and beau-
ty shop. Apart-
ment is rented.
For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-941
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
S
O
L
D
DUPONT
REDUCED
$82,900
238 Main St.
Multi Family
Investment
Property
Great opportuni-
ty for the expe-
rienced
investor. Prop-
erty is large
with parking for
at least 9 cars.
Extra lot, one
office and 2
apartments.
For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-2315
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
DURYEA
$39,900
93 Main St.
Four units. 3 resi-
dential and one
storefront.Great
corner location,
flood damaged
home being sold as
is. For more info
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-1948
Call Tom
570-262-7716
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
EDWARDSVILLE
Lawrence St.
Nice 3 unit property.
Lots of off street
parking and bonus 2
car garage. All units
are rented. Great
income with low
maintenance.
$139,900
MLS# 10-2675
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
JENKINS TWP.
$149,900
55 1/2 Main St.
Newer side by side
double with sepa-