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WILKES-BARRE, PA $1.

00 Sunday, November 11, 2012


Local woman to tell
her story Monday
on TODAY show.
>> PAGE 9
Apartments at
former Hitchner
Bakery dedicated.
>> PAGE 12
Old Forge also
moves on in
football playoffs.
>> PAGE 40
Lucky to
be alive
Rooms
with a view
Warriors
advance
COUPON SAVINGS INSIDE WORTH $416.10
A salute to veterans
TONY CALLAIO/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
The Wyoming Area Chorus, under the direction of Narda Sperazza, sings a patriotic choral medley during a Veterans Day ceremony in the
high school gymnasiumon Thursday. Veterans Day coverage begins on PAGE 3.
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Brandy Wright showed up for
our meeting with a chocolate
cupcake for me. Not only did it
look delectable but the present-
ation, in a clear plastic cube,
was quite professional.
In was Friday morning, Nov.
2. My birthday. But this is
something she could not have
known.
Brandy is a student of mine
at the community college. This
semester she is in a class called
Feature Writing and Fridays
meeting was to discuss her
work, one-on-one. Examining
the cupcake, with mouth water-
ing, I asked her if there were a
special reason for bringing it.
No, she said, but her eyes
betrayed her.
You know its my birthday,
dont you?
She nodded, looking at the
floor, as though confessing to a
crime. I was touched.
It came up at the scholarship
dinner last year, she said. It
was on November second. I
recalled the conversation as we
sat with the donors of a scholar-
ship she had received. Dave and
Charlene Outt provide the grant
in memory of their son Jon,
also one of my writing students,
who was killed in a car crash
nearly 20 years ago.
And you remembered, I
said.
Brandy, as you might have
guessed, is shy. Thats why I
like having one-on-one meet-
ings. I can learn things that
would never come out in a
classroom full of students.
She said she baked the cup-
cakes with her niece and put
one aside for me. When writ-
ing, Brandy has two favorite
topics: her niece and her dad,
who passed away last summer.
When it comes to her niece,
her sisters daughter, I always
tell Brandy she is what every
child should have: a single aunt.
My sisters and I grew up with
one of these, Aunt Dorothy. She
provided all the special things
my mom could not afford.
I told Brandy I saw an oppor-
tunity for her as a writer.
Theres not much out there on
the role of a single aunt, I said.
Funny thing is, she added,
there are mostly men in our
family, so when she first started
to talk, my niece always called
me Uncle Brandy.
Thats the title of your first
book, I said. Uncle Brandy,
The Joy of Being a Single Aunt.
What I really wanted to dis-
cuss that morning, though, was
a piece Brandy had written
about her dad, more specifical-
ly, about his funeral. Its the
first thing she wrote this semes-
ter and, while it needed work,
the first draft was beautifully
done, heart-wrenching and
heart-warming at the same
time. When she told me she
wrote it sitting at her fathers
grave, I knew Brandy was not
only a special student, but also
a special daughter.
The things I teach my stu-
dents about writing are quite
simple, actually, but not all
embrace them. Brandy does.
They are mostly about pruning,
as with a rose bush. The more
words you can trim away the
stronger the writing becomes, I
teach. And fall in love with the
short sentence, I add. A short
sentence is powerful.
Friday, Nov. 2, we brought up
on the computer screen Bran-
dys article on her dad and, as is
my method, I began to read it
aloud, Brandy looking over my
shoulder. I was already some-
what emotional because as
Brandy and I chatted something
about her reminded me of my
sister Barbara, who would have
turned 64 on Nov. 1. We were
born a year and a day apart.
Barbara died nine years ago. I
told Brandy about her.
A few weeks ago Brandy and
I saw a flyer about a writing
contest for Veterans Day and
since there was a category for
college students, I encouraged
her to enter her story. Shes one
of three finalists, she told me.
Tonight shell find out if she
won.
Before I started to read, Bran-
dy said she had done more
editing. I liked hearing that.
The writing, I always tell my
students, begins after youve
written. Brandy understands
this.
Three-quarters of the way
through her piece, I started a
sentence I couldnt finish. The
lump in my throat wouldnt
allow it. I started again and
someone how managed to get
the words out but by then my
eyes were filled with tears. So
were Brandys. It wasnt just
what Brandy had written but
how she had written it that had
me so moved. Seeing the
growth in her as a writer, seeing
my influence on the screen
before me, knowing she had
grasped something about this
craft that is now hers, never to
be lost, and appreciating that
her ability to write had helped
her deal with the undeniable
grief of losing her father, was
almost more than I could bear.
Brandy, I said, this is the
most perfect birthday present I
could ever receive. Today,
Veterans Day, I share that pre-
sent with you. Brandys story
appears on page 14.
Ed Ackerman, optimist
eackerman@psdispatch.com
Uncle Brandy and the perfect present
Iwo Jima hero...................................................3
Home Rule for City ..........................................5
Elvis on the way ...............................................6
Local Chatter ....................................................8
The brink of death ...........................................9
New apartments..............................................12
Editorial /Cartoon ...........................................14
Maria Heck........................................................15
Nutrition............................................................15
Free clinic anniversary..................................28
Town News ......................................................34
Sports..............................................................40
Obituaries........................................................52
Birthdays.........................................................B3
Faith .............................................................B5, 7
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For WWII combat veteran Art
Sparky Faltyn everyday is Vet-
erans Day. Though the Exeter
born and bread 92-year-old likes
to say things like joining the Ma-
rines was the worst thing I ever
did and the Marines put me
through holy hell from day one,
he often wears a Marines sweat-
shirt and hat and is proud of his
service.
Well, he should be.
Faltyn was a foot solider who
fought in some of the most icon-
ic battles on the Pacific with the
Marines at Guadalcanal, Bou-
gainville, Guam and Iwo Jima.
Faltyn was 5-5 and115 pounds
when he graduated from Exeter
High School in 1941 where he
played left field for the schools
baseball team and earned the
nickname Sparky, after a cartoon
strip horse named Sparkplug,
because he did every thing on
and off the field at a frenetic
pace.
He got a job at Sickermans, a
feed store in Exeter, then moved
to NewJersey with his buddy El-
liot Pellegrini where they
worked for a defense contractor.
When he got his draft notice for
the Army in 1942, he joined the
Marines, against the advice of
his Marine brother Bert.
He was already in. He begged
me not to do it, but I didnt listen.
I thought I was a tough guy, but I
found out I wasnt so tough.
Faltyn trained at Paris Island
and New River, North Carolina,
where he joined the newly-
formed Marine Third Division.
He also was sent to Texas and
Catalina Island, California.
In typical military fashion Fal-
tyn was given 14 days leave in
California. He spent 12 of the
days traveling back and forth
across the country by train and
two days home in Exeter.
At Catalina the division was
outfitted with winter gear, ex-
pecting to be shipped to Kiska in
the Aleutian Islands of Alaska
which the Japanese had invaded.
But when Faltyns troop carri-
er cleared the Golden Gate it
turned south and headed to New
Zealand, a staging area for the
Pacific campaign. From there
Faltyn was shipped to Guadalca-
nal with the Third Division, K
VETERAN S DAY
Sparky Faltyn: Iwo Jima hero
JACK SMILES/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Joe DaSilva, left, considers Sparky Faltyn his surrogate grandfather and was inspired by himto join the Marines. In the background is
Faltyn's painting of his wife, Anna Mae.
At age 92,
Exeter man
looks back
on WW II
By JACK SMILES
jsmiles@psdispatch.com
See IWO JIMA, Page 10
U.S. Marine Sgt. Major Pa-
trick Tracy was set to lead a
group of men through a treach-
erous section of Iraq in 2005.
Before he left, his command-
ing officer told him hed be tak-
ing a photojournalist along for
the ride.
I thought: Great, one more
person I have to take care of, one
more person I have to look after,
Tracy said. I cant let anything
bad happen to a photographer.
Tracy, a PittstonArea graduate
and author of Street Fight in
Iraq: A Private Journal of a U.S.
Marine Warrior, was the fea-
tured speaker at Wyoming Area
High Schools 11th annual Veter-
Veterans honored at 11th
annual fete at Wyoming Area
The Dupont VFW4909 Honor Guard presents colors.
By JOE HEALEY
jhealey@psdispatch.com
See HONORED, Page 4
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ans Recognition Program on
Wednesday. He served two tours,
one in 2004 in Operation Iraqi
Freedom and one in 2011 in Op-
eration Enduring Freedom. He
has received numerous awards
and medals.
As Tracys vehicle neared the
destination, it hit a roadside
bomb and a tire got blown off.
There was gunfire hitting our
vehicle. It was just a very bad
place to be, he said.
He decided his team, which
consisted of his driver, his wing-
man and the photographer, need-
ed to get into a nearby building,
get to the roof and return fire.
After a series of defensive
moves, they made it to the roof
and spent the rest of the day in a
fire fight. As night approached
and his vehicle was hitched to
another, the menhadtoevacuate.
We finally got out of there in
one piece, he said.
Later that night, Ray, the pho-
tographer, came into Tracys
quarters to thank him, but also to
apologize.
I said why would you owe me
an apology?
The photographer fessed up.
I need to tell you one thing,
the reason I have to apologize to
you, the photographer told Tra-
cy. You just saved the life of a
Wyoming Area Warrior.
Tracy, a Pittston Area Patriot
just several years earlier, said
that showed him how small the
world really is.
It really doesnt matter what
side of the river you live on.
Before the ceremony, about 75
veterans were treated to a turkey
dinner that included mashed po-
tatoes, stuffing, corn, cranberry
sauce, rolls and coffee and iced
tea. Surrounding the dining
room were essays that Wyoming
Area students wrote, many entit-
led, What Veterans Day Means
to Me.
Principal Vito Qualia started
off the ceremony on a lighter
note.
Today is truly a special day,
Quaglia told the crowd. Not on-
ly are we honoring these veter-
ans, but its also the only day that
we will display our arch rival,
Pittston Areas colors, so promi-
nently in our building.
Pittston Areas colors are red,
white and blue.
TONY CALLAIO/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Frank Napkora, dressed in one of his uniforms, is seated with fellow Vets during the programheld at Wyoming Area in their honor.
Left, Marine Sgt. Major Patrick Tracy, a Pittston Area graduate, was the
featured speaker at the annual Veterans Day programat Wyoming Area.
Above, Charlie Sciandra, right, a school board member at Pittston Area,
was a special guest of Wyoming Area Superintendent Raymond J. Ber-
nardi. Sciandra brought along his father Charlie, Sr. a Veteran himself.
Honored
Continued fromPage 3
See HONORED, Page 31 S
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Pittston Citys Home Rule
Referendum was approved by
voters bya 3to2marginonTues-
day.
Highlights include consolidat-
ing the power of the mayor and
city manager, raising the earned
income tax by a
half percent
and adding a
homestead ex-
emption to
property taxes
which would
benefit home-
owners that live
in the city.
My reaction
is were happy,
but its only the
first step, said
former mayor
Michael Lom-
bardo, a mem-
ber of the study
commission.
The ultimate
goal, according
tocityofficials,
is to improve
the neighbor-
hoods.
Sixty-four
percent of the
voters ap-
proved the measure with 1,659
votes, and 36 percent of voters
rejected the measure with 1,021,
according to unofficial returns
from Luzerne County. Joe Mos-
kovitz, the city manager, said the
goals of the Home Rule Study
Commission were clear.
The issue has always been,
howdo we provide real estate tax
relief for seniors and strengthen
and revitalize our neighbor-
hoods, Moskovitz said.
Last November, Pittston City
voters approved the formation of
a commission to study home rule
for the city. Voters approved the
results of that commission on
Tuesday.
Enacting the Home Rule
Charter basically allows elected
city officials flexibility in gov-
erning not allowed by the current
Third Class City Code, especial-
ly when it comes to taxation,
Moskovitz said.
Taxation
One of the primary compo-
nents of the Home Rule is the
city will soon be able to add and
additional half percent to its cur-
rent 1 percent Earned Income
Tax.
The half percent will dramat-
ically help the city, Lombardo
said.
Of that original 1 percent, half
goes to the Pittston Area School
District. The new tariff could
mean an additional $550,000 for
the city.
But some of that extra cash
will offset a planned Homestead
Exemption, included in the char-
ter. Officials, when discussing
the charter with residents, had
been using a 20-percent figure.
But state law will only allow a
specific dollar amount, not a per-
centage.
What the administration is at-
tempting to do is comply with
the spirit of the general study
committees 20 percent recom-
mendation, Moskovitz said.
After the exemption is fac-
tored into the budget, the city
should net about $150,000 to
$200,000 more a year because of
the switch, he said.
Luzerne County has a similar
$10,000 homestead tax break
given to roughly 84,000 residen-
tial property owners. The home-
stead exemption, which was
wrapped in with the county reas-
sessment, knocked $10,000 off
an assessment for county taxes
only, not school or municipal
ones.
The administration needs to
make home ownership more pal-
atable, Lombardo said. Less than
50 percent of the people that own
property live in the city.
If you let property taxes go
through the roof and the earned
income tax through the roof,
why would you want to live
here? Lombardo said. We
need to bring people into the city,
not drive them out.
For city residents, the tax shift
should be manageable.
It amounts to$5a weekfor an
average city worker, Moskov-
Home rule comes to Pittston
See HOME RULE, Page 7
Voters approve charter in Tuesday election
By JOE HEALEY
jhealey@psdispatch.com
Pittston Home Rule
*Yes: 1,659
No: 1,021
U.S. Senator
*Bob Casey, D: 2,921,798
Tom Smith, R: 2,430,995
U.S. Representative (17th Dis-
trict)
* Matt Cartwright, D: 158,422
Laureen Cummings, R: 103,319
State General Assembly (118th
District)
*Mike Carroll, D: 16,462
Terrence OConnor, R: 8,563
State General Assembly (120th
District)
*Phyllis Mundy, D: 14,051
Aaron Kaufer, R: 11,002
* denotes winner
GREATER PI TTSTON
EL ECTI ON RESULTS
Home
rule will
give us
more flex-
ibility in
helping
bring the
city back.
Mike Lombardo
Member of
Pittstons Home
Rule Study
Commission
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BUY SELL REPAIR
The Pittston Memorial Li-
brary Board and Capital Cam-
paign Committee have an-
nounced that tickets are now on
sale for Shawn Klush, the
Worlds Greatest Elvis.
The showwill be presented on
Nov. 24, at 8 p.m. at the F.M. Kir-
by Center. Tickets can be pur-
chased at the Pittston Memorial
Library, Kirby Box Office or
through Ticketmaster.
Born and raised in Pittston,
Klush has been designated the
First Ever Ultimate Elvis Trib-
ute Artist by Elvis Presley En-
terprises. He has also been
named The Worlds Greatest
Elvis following a vote of 6.5
million international viewers on
BBC1 Television in the United
Kingdom.
Also appearing at his perform-
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guests, The Sweet Inspirations,
who performed as backup sing-
ers for Elvis Presley his entire
career.
Those purchasing VIP tickets
will be provided with choice
seating and access to a pre-show
Meet and Greet that will in-
clude appetizers, complimentary
drink and photo/autograph op-
portunity with Klush. The Meet
and Greet will begin at 6:30
p.m. and go to 7:3 p.m.
To purchase tickets from the
Pittston Memorial Library, call
654-9565 X 25. The F.M. Kirby
Center Box Office can be reac-
hed by calling 823-4599 or e-
mail Ticketmaster at www.tick-
etmaster.com. Payment can be
made by check, money order, or
credit card.
Library Board Member Marla
Pupa is serving as event chair.
For a preview of the concert,
visit http://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=s1LWfIWabV8
All proceeds of the event will
go to benefit the Cosgrove Cap-
ital Campaign for library expan-
sion. The library plans to add a
5,175 square foot addition to the
current facility at 47 Broad St. in
downtown Pittston.
The new addition will include
a community/conference room
large enough for 100 people and
furnished with Smartboard, Wi-
Fi and teleconferencing capabil-
ities.
The new community/confer-
ence room will also serve as a
home to the Intergenerational
Family Center, an all-inclusive
program designed to provide
support and services to grand-
parents who are raising their
grandchildren. The programwill
be open to all residents of Lu-
zerne County.
The library addition will also
provide a larger childrens sec-
tion, arts and crafts room; teen,
senior and veterans space; en-
trance, vestibule and other
amenities.
Sponsorships for Shawn
Klush, the Worlds Greatest El-
vis are available as well as space
for ads in the shows program
book. For additional information
on sponsorships, ads and ticket
specials, call Carol Crane at 654-
9565 X 25.
L I BRARY BENEF I T
Klush brings Elvis tribute to Kirby
Shawn Klush as Elvis
WHAT Shawn Klush, Worlds
Greatest Elvis
WHERE FM Kirby Center,
Wilkes-Barre
WHEN Nov. 24, 8 p.m.
TIX Pittston Library, Kirby Box
Office, Ticketmaster
I F YOU GO S
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Frozen by the dozen.........................$5.00
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Meat or Cheese
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Pittston, PA
ick.said. We feel those workers
are in a better position than the
seniors, living on a fixed in-
come.
When discussing earned in-
come taxes for 2011 and 2012,
city officials dont have concrete
numbers because Centax-Don
Wilkinson Agency, the agency
that had been collecting the tax,
is now defunct.
Municipalities in Luzerne
County and throughout the state
have been struggling to pay bills
due to significant delays in re-
ceiving taxes that were collected
by Centax in 2012 and reports on
the 2011 collection.
City administration
The city is moving from a 3rd
Class City Code, with a weak
mayor, strong council form of
governing, to the Home Rule
Code, with a strong mayor/man-
ager structure.
Currently, the mayor has one
vote on council and each council
member are titular heads of de-
partments of accounts and fi-
nance, public works, public safe-
ty and fire, buildings and
grounds, and the mayor oversees
the police department.
Home rule brings those de-
partments under the mayor and
city manager.
Despite it being a weak mayor
form of government, the past
several mayors have typically ex-
ercised a considerable amount of
control.
Dating back to Mayor Bob
Loftus and including Mayors
Tom Walsh, Mike Lombardo
and Joe Keating, all have all been
strong forces in the city.
Home rule is just making it
official, Moskovitz said.
The day-to-day operations of
the city will now fall under the
city manager, including person-
nel, purchasing and general ad-
ministration. And the city man-
ager will report directly to the
mayor.
What we have is the mayor is
the chief executive officer of the
organization and the manager is
the chief administrator, Mosko-
vitz said.
But there is a significant
checks-and-balances measure.
Council has the power of the
purse, Moskovitz said.
The city controller, one of the
two city row offices, will be
eliminated when the next term
expires, which is Dec. 31, 2018.
The next municipal election,
the office will be on the ballot,
Moskowitz said. This is not a
power grab by any means.
The position will be replaced
by an independent auditor, but
the city treasurer will remain.
Whats next?
The Home Rule Study Com-
mission will have its final meet-
ing at 6 p.m. Monday night.
Members of the commission
include Lombardo, current May-
or Jason Klush, Ginger Murphy,
Art Bobbouine, Joe Chernous-
kas, Fred Stuccio and Ben Tielle
Jr.
After Monday, they will be-
come the Home Rule Transition
Committee and are charged with
drafting an administrative code,
which includes a code of ethics,
conflict of interest policy, per-
sonnel policy, procurement pol-
icy, competitive bidding process
and a long range comprehensive
plan.
Their work must be complete
by Dec. 31, 2013.
Lombardo said the ultimate
goal of Home Rule is toallowthe
city neighborhoods to flourish.
We need to attract younger
people to the city, Lombardo
said.
Lombardo said Main Street
and the downtown is moving in
the right direction.
Now we have to focus on the
neighborhoods, he said. Side-
walks are in deplorable condi-
tion and houses are in disrepair.
He said Pittston has a low
crime rate and said that will con-
tinue under Home Rule. Were
not going to sacrifice police or
emergency services.
Moving forward, Lombardo
sees a bright future for Pittston.
What happened yesterday
was a vote of confidence and
trust in the administration, he
said.
Home rule will give us more
flexibility in helping bring the
city back.
Home rule
Continued from Page 5
Members of the Wyoming Ar-
ea Kiwanis Club and its spon-
sored youth leadership programs
are planning the annual Break-
fast with Santa to be held Dec. 2
from 8:30 a.m. to noon at the
Wyoming Area Secondary Cen-
ter Cafeteria. The event has
grown into one of the most child
friendly and enjoyable events of
the Christmas season.
After entering through Santas
Wonderland, guests will enjoy a
breakfast of pancake, scrambled
eggs, sausage and pancakes,
with chocolate chips if desired,
along with juice, milk, coffee
and tea. Cost of the meal is $6 for
adults and $3 for children.
Tickets are available from any
Kiwanis member and at the door.
Activities will include the jolly
old elf himself, Santa, who will
be available for all children in a
family-friendly environment.
Professional pictures by PSP
will also be available.
Children will have the oppor-
tunity to participate in age ap-
propriate Christmas crafts from
Christmas card making to face
painting. There will be several
Chinese auctions for toy baskets,
and several holiday theme bas-
kets and live Christmas trees.
WyomingArea Kiwanis Presi-
dent Carl Worthingtonstatedthis
has become a premier event for
children and parents to start off
the holiday season. It also pro-
vides the Kiwanis Club with in-
come to run its program of com-
munity service. Worthington
asks that the community consid-
er support the Kiwanis club pro-
grams and if any community
minded persons are interested in
joining, the club to meets on the
2nd and 4th Wednesday of each
month at Gobers Deco Lounge.
WYOMI NG AREA KI WANI S
Breakfast with Santa
listed at WA cafeteria
Miracle on the Hudson US
Airways Flight 1549 survivor
Fred Berretta will share his life-
changing story when he serves
as the principal speaker at JMJ
Catholic Radio 750 AMs inau-
gural fall banquet today.
The event will begin with
Mass at 4 p.m. at St. Anthony of
Padua Church, 28 Memorial St.,
Exeter, followed by the banquet
at 5 p.m. in the parish center lo-
cated adjacent to the church.
Berretta, one of the survivors
of the ill-fated US Airways
Flight 1549, which had to make
an emergency landing in the
Hudson River shortly after de-
parture from New Yorks La
Guardia Airport on Jan. 15,
2009, will recount the harrowing
experience and how it became a
life-changing event.
Attendees will also have the
opportunity to meet fellow lis-
teners and supporters of JMJ Ca-
tholic Radio, and also to discuss
programming and share ideas.
Catholic Radio banquet today
LOCALCHATTER
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What are you chattin about? Call 602-0177 or email sd@psdispatch.com and let us know.
Pittston Area School District
10th Grade Student Kristen Ri-
chards is the 2012AMVETSDe-
partment of Pennsylvania Na-
tional Essay contest winner for
her essay Why Im Proud to be
an American.
She was the recipient of a
weekend visit to the Valley Forge
Freedom Foundation Youth
Leadership Conference. Photo is
Wins competition
Alena Carabetta, 10, daughter
of Jason and Franceen Carabetta
was crowned Miss Magical Mo-
ments Mini National at the Mini
National Magical Moments
Olympic Dreams competition in
Budd Lake, New Jersey.
Alena competed in the10 to12
age category in the modeling
competition in the gown, sports-
wear andOlympic divisionof the
competition. She won a crown,
banner and medal.
Alena is a member of the All
Star Cheerleading Academy,
Jessup. Her competitive team
will be traveling to Nashville,
Tennessee in April. Alena loves
gymnastics, dance, cheerleading
and skiing. Alena has an older
sister Luchia and a younger
brother Matteo. She is the grand-
daughter of Frank and Mary Lou
Pisano, Wyoming and Carol and
Ed Carabetta, Hopatcong, New
Jersey.
Earns doctorate
In August, 2012, Jonathan
Kotula defended his doctoral
thesis at Duke University, earn-
ing a Ph.D. in molecular genetics
and microbiology.
Jonathan performed his thesis
research titled, Achieving Cell-
Specific Delivery of Multiple
Oligonucleotide Therapeutics
with Aptamer Chimeras under
the mentorship of Dr. Bruce A.
Sullenger, Director of the Duke
Translational Research Institute.
Over the course of his re-
search, he published multiple
journal articles and was invited
to present his research at confer-
ences in Japan, Washington
D.C., and Philadelphia.
While at Duke, Jonathan was
involved in many leadership and
entrepreneurial activities includ-
ing the patenting of his research,
and the formation of a small
company.
He andthree friends co-found-
ed an annual charity event called
The Doughman (www.dough-
man.org), which is a 4-person
teamrace that takes place onMe-
morial Day weekend, and was
featured on the Travel Channel
show, Man vs. Food.
The Doughman has raised
over $100,000 to date, and sup-
ports educational programs for
at-risk youth such as SEEDS, an
educational community garden
in Durham, NC. He also led the
graduate and professional stu-
dent mens basketball committee
where he had an opportunity to
meet Coach Krzyzewski, and
Coach Knight.
Jonathan, the son of Deborah
Stevens, Dupont and Walter Kot-
ula, Dupont is a 2005graduate of
Penn State University with de-
grees in biochemistry and mo-
lecular biology, andbioengineer-
ing.
He is also a 2001 graduate of
Pittston Area High School. He is
the grandson of Elizabeth Taru-
tis, Barnesville, PA and the late
Leonard Tarutis and Laura Kot-
ula, Dupont and the late Edward
Kotula.
Roast beef today
St. Michael the Archangel
Byzantine Catholic Church will
hold its annual Patron Saint Din-
ner today, Sunday, Nov. 11, in the
Church Hall, 205 North Main
Street, Pittston from1 to 3 p.m.
Take outs anytime during the
dinner.
Menu includes roast beef, gra-
vy, Italian beans and red beets,
cake for dessert andcoffee, tea or
soft drink.
Araffle witha varietyof prizes
will be held.
The public is invited to attend.
St. Michaels is served by Fa-
ther Joseph Bertha, PhD.
PA10th grader wins AMVETS essay contest
SPC Patrick McCabe, Armament/Electrical/Avionic Systems Repairman, son of Linda and Ted
McCabe, West Pittston, received the Wings of Lightning Hero of the Week in October.
SPC McCabes extensive knowledge on the OH-58 Kiowa Warrior helicopter enabled him to
cross train on UH-60 Black Hawks where he assembled and installed six, 12-point communication
systems while maintaining a 46 work order a month average allowing TFLightning Horse to stay in
the fight.
SPC McCabe is serving in Kandahar, Afghanistan.
Named Hero of the Week
Kristen Richards at the Valley
Forge State Park
Alena Carabetta
Jonathan Kotula S
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Social Security
Disability
Claimants represented by
attorneys are more successful
in obtaining benets. Call me
for a FREE CONSULTATION.
I can help.
Janet A. Conser
Attorney At Law
1575 Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort
283-1200
Get The Benets
You Deserve!
Member of the National
Organization of Social Security
Claimants Representatives
Over 25 Years Experience
The most affirming moment of
my entire life and to be able to
say this withabsolute certainty is
just another example of how this
disease has changed my per-
spective in positive ways was
when a man named Bill Gavigan
called me in spring 2010.
Is this Susannah Cahalan?
he asked breathlessly.
Yes, I stated, taken aback.
People usually did not say my
name as if it carried such weight.
He went on to tell me the story of
his teenage daughter, Emily.
Thats an excerpt from the
book Brain on Fire, My Month of
Madness, by New York Post re-
porter Susannah Cahalan.
The Bill Gavigan mentioned is
our Bill Gavigan, Bill Gavigan
of Laflin.
The Emilyis his daughter, now
23.
The disease is NMDA Recep-
tor Antibody Disease.
Emily contracted it in 2009
while a sophomore at the Uni-
versity of Scranton and to hear
her father talkabout it, it is one of
the most horrible things that can
happen to a person. And one of
the most difficult to diagnose.
So difficult, in fact, that had
Cahalan not written about her
own experiences with it, which
resulted in an appearance on the
TODAY show on NBC, Emily
Gavigan may not be alive today.
The night before Emily was
flown in a comatose state after
degenerating to a point where
she, a former deans list student,
was unable to walk or talk by
helicopter to University of Penn-
sylvania Hospital, Bill Gavigan
told her doctor at Geisinger
Wyoming Valley that if they
waited 24 hours to take her by
TOMORROW ON TODAY
Back from the brink of death
Emily Callahans battle with
rare disease to be featured
on TODAY show Monday
By ED ACKERMAN
eackerman@psdispatch.com
Emily Gavigan,
left, with Susan-
nah Cahalan,
New York Post
reporter and
author of Brain
on Fire, My
Month of Mad-
ness, during a
visit to the Gavi-
gan home. The
two, along with
Emily's father,
Bill Gavigan, will
appear on the
TODAY show
Monday to talk
about the rare
disease both
were forced to
battle.
See EMILY, Page 11
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Company, 21st Regiment.
When he got to Guadalcanal it
was already secured and he saw
limited action but won a battle
star for protecting Henderson
Airfield.
At the Bougainville invasion
he saw a lone Japanese plane
bomb and destroy a ship wiping
out a division of Marines.
Bougainville was an island of
mud and jungle so dense the men
were issued machetes to hack
their way in. Faltyn also experi-
enced an earthquake and dis-
ease. We had dysentery, he
said. We had to cut our pants,
we didnt even have time to get
them down.
On Guam he sur-
vived an earthquake
and a desperate Ban-
zai attack by Japa-
nese infantrymen
who charged with no
concern for casual-
ties.
Youshot themlike
clay pigeons, he
said. But there were
casualties on both
sides. Thats where I
lost two buddies, who
are buried in Hawaii.
His buddies were from Long Is-
land and Brooklyn.
Also on Guam Faltyn wit-
nessed Japanese women jump-
ing to their deaths from100-foot
cliffs with their children in their
arms, rather than face the Amer-
icans, who, the womenwere told,
would rape and torture them and
eat their babies.
From Guam, Faltyn was sent
to Iwo Jima where he landed on
day three of the invasion and
went right into the thick of com-
bat. The fighting was so fierce
by nightfall of the first day only
30 of 700 men in his company
rallied. The rest were dead,
wounded or missing.
On Iwo, Faltyn was an acting
sergeant leading a squad with
tanks behind them. He led them
under heavy fire to an airfield on
highground, where he andone of
his men, a soldier from Texas,
got pinned down in a bomb shell
crater for most of a day.
Fromthe crater Faltyn took re-
con on Japanese gun placements
which paid off later when an of-
ficer asked himto lead a brigade
of tanks loaded with much need-
ed ammo up to the airfield.
With knowledge of how earli-
er tanks had avoided the mine-
field and of the Japanese gun
placements, Faltyn rode in the
back of a tank under heavy fire
and by phone directed return
fire. Faltyn received a commen-
dation for meritorious action on
Iwo Jima.
At least three times Faltyn
came within seconds of being
killed on Iwo. I was in a hole
and I dont know why, but I
jumped out of that hole and
scrambled to another one and the
hole I left took a direct hit. got
shrapnel in my back. It was like
rabbit pellets.
Faltyncouldhave gone backto
the fieldhospital, but insteadhad
the corpsman pull out the shrap-
nel with a scalpel and stayed at
the front to be a
mother hen to ar-
riving green re-
placements.
In another close
call Faltyn and an-
other man were in a
fox hole on guard
duty in a perimeter
around a camp,
when a Japanese
soldier came by and
stood over them.
Faltyn was wearing
a rain poncho which
would make a rus-
tling sound if he
moved. He froze and whispered
under his breath to his buddy, a
man named Frommer, who shot
and killed the enemy soldier.
In a third instance Faltyn and
his platoon were patrolling a riv-
er bank which he described by
saying Imagine you were on the
river bank in West Pittston.
Two of his men, including An-
gelo Bertelli, the 1943 Heisman
Trophy winner from Notre
Dame, called Faltyn to a cave at
the rivers edge where they had
found and killed a Japanese sol-
ider, who had a cigarette, still
burning, in his hand.
Walking back up the bank,
Faltyn came within 10 feet of Ja-
panese solider who had grenade
in hand with the pin pulled. Fal-
tyn took two steps and leaped to
the ground. The grenade flew
over him and rolled away as his
men opened up on the enemy.
They made minced meat out
of him, Faltyn said.
Sparkys bother Hubert Bert
was at Iwo Jima at the same time
with the 5th Marines. Bert got a
battlefield commission on Iwo,
won a Navy Cross and has a Ma-
rine Corps League named after
him in Salem, Oregon, where he
settled after the war. Bert died in
1994.
FromIwo, where Marine loss-
es were second only to Okinawa,
Sparky was sent back to the
states, where he pulled guard du-
ty in Washington D. C. including
at the Lincoln Memorial before
being discharged in October of
1944.
Back home in Exeter, Faltyn
visited a young girl, Anna Mae
Hudak, who had been writing to
40 soldiers, including Faltyn.
I made a mistake, Faltyn
said with a chuckle. I told her I
loved her.
Soon they were married. He
was 25, she was 18 and still in
high school.
His young bride had survived
a severe infection and was told
she couldnt conceive.
One day Faltyn came home
from working construction and
Anna Mae said, Im pregnant.
Startled, Faltyn dropped his
lunch pail, shattering his ther-
mos. He would shatter six more
thermoses. He and Anna Mae
had seven children: Norie, Paula,
Artie, Mary, Toni, Joey and Pat-
ty.
In his post WWII life, after
taking an art course at LCCC,
Faltyn took up painting. His cre-
ations hang on the walls of his
home. One depicts a soldier at
Arlington cemetery. Another is
of his wife in her wedding gown.
Patty, Faltyns youngest, took
in and raised a boy who came
from a difficult family situation.
The boy, Joe DaSilva, a 2008
Wyoming Area graduate, con-
siders Faltyn his surrogate
grandfather and inspiration. Da-
Silva joined the Marines and will
ship out for basic soon.
Hes the reason. I joined be-
cause of Sparky, DaSilva said.
Iwo Jima
Continued from Page 3
PHOTOS SUBMITTED
Sparky Faltyn, front row center with hat, with his squad just before they shipped out to Iwo. Faltyn
tried but was never able to reconnect with any of his men.
Sparky's brother, Bert, who also fought on Iwo Jima, won the
Navy Cross.
You shot them
like clay pi-
geons. Thats
where I lost two
buddies, who
are buried in
Hawaii.
Sparky Faltyn
Talking about a
Japanese attack on
Guam S
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Personal Injury
Workers Compensation
Social Security Disability
Family Law
(Divorce/Custody/Support)
Bankruptcy
Real Estate Transactions
and Closings
Wills,Trusts, Living Wills,
Powers of Attorney
Estate Administration
Corporations/Business Law
Landlord-Tenant
Collections
Municipal Law
ATTY. GREGORY S. SKIBITSKY, JR.
GSkibitsky@skibitskyandmolino.com
ATTY. GENE M. MOLINO
GMolino@skibitskyandmolino.com
457 North Main Street, Suite 101 Pittston, PA
Call Us For A Free Consultation, 655-0300
655-0300
www.skibitskyandmolino.com
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champagne, wine and spirits, on-board
gratuities and on-board spending credit
Promotion ends November 30, 2012.
Call for details and booking on this
once in a lifetime promotion.
Northeast Windows of Pittston
donated $500 to the Pittston
Citys efforts to obtain a police
dog. Councilman Mike Lombar-
do said about half of the $20,000
goal has beenreached. Becauseof
difficult financial times, the city
is unable to afford a dog and offi-
cials are moving forward with a
plan to raise funds independent of
the citys budget. The dog would
be trained in narcotic detection
andpatrol operations. Shownpre-
sentingthecheckonFridayis first
row, fromleft Christie Rogo, Lau-
ra Rogo and Jason Gilroy, all of
Northeast Window, and Lombar-
do. Second row, Patrolman Dion
Fernandes, Patrolman Joseph Ga-
leski, Sgt. Neil Murphy and Pa-
trolman Justin Tokar. Donations
may be made payable to Pittston
City K-9 Fund, 35 Broad St.,
Pittston, PA18640.
$500 donation for police dog
JOE HEALEY/THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
ambulance his daughter would
not be alive.
Because of Cahalans story,
Gavigan insisted his daughter be
tested for the disease. This came
after more than a year of one
misdiagnosis after another as he
and his wife helplessly watched
their daughter disappearing,
both physically and mostly men-
tally, before their eyes.
At U of P, Emily was properly
diagnosed and began, through
chemotherapy, the long road
back to herself, but not before
she had been there for 25 days
during which she lost 30 pounds.
In all, Emily would spend 53
days at U of P. Her mom, Grace,
was with her every day.
It was after the diagnosis the
first relief the Gavigans had dur-
ing their daughters ordeal that
Bill Gavigan tracked down Su-
sannahCahalantosaythankyou.
It was Bills sister Mary, who
lives inWayne, whofirst sawCa-
halan on the TODAY show and
told Bill about her.
Since Bills first phone call,
Susannahs become like a sec-
ond daughter to me, he said of
the 26-year-old writer.
She recently visited the Gavi-
gans at their home along with
Kerri Zimmer, a producer for
TODAY, to prepare for a seg-
ment which will air Monday
morning at 8 a.m. Bill and Emily
Gavigan and Susannah Cahalan
will be on the show live.
Emily is still undergoing treat-
ment, but she has managed to re-
turn to college and earn dual de-
grees in English and Business
Management.
And she finished in a normal
eight semesters.
She was very determined,
Bill said.
Emily has also returned to the
ice. She is an accomplished fig-
ure skater and teaches figure
skating.
On Mothers Day of 2010,
Bill Gavigan says, I pushed my
daughter in a wheelchair into a
store to buy a card for her moth-
er. Ayear later, she was skating.
During the TODAY interview
at the Gavigan home, when
asked by Zimmer if she feels
shes been given a second chance
at life, Emily Gavigan said, No,
actually a third chance, Bill Ga-
vigan related.
She said she was dead twice
and was able to come back, he
explained.
Emily
Continued from Page 9
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This isnt the way the cookie
usually crumbles.
The Hitchner Biscuit Compa-
ny Building, an eyesore along
Exeter Avenue in West Pittston
for decades, as been given a new
lease on life as 18 moderate-in-
come apartments were unveiled
on Friday morning.
The $6 million renova-
tion was paid for through
a mix of private and pub-
lic funding from United
Neighborhood Commu-
nity Development Cor-
poration of Scranton,
PNC Bank, Luzerne
County, the state Housing
Finance Agency. The last
piece of the funding puz-
zle was $500,000 in local
share gambling funds.
The 18 one-, two- and
three-bedroom apart-
ments are equipped with
kitchens and baths and there is a
community space and off street
parking for all residents. All but
two units are rented. The 4-story
fireproof concrete structure was
built in1905 and at its height, the
company employed 300 people,
including Agnes Lanzone.
Lanzone, 85, a lifelong West
Pittston resident, remembered
helping grease the massive coo-
kie pans used in production of
some of the companys famous
Coco Crisps, Scotch Lassies and
Bonnie Molasses and Nic Nacs.
There was a conveyor that
brought the pans down from the
cleaning room, she said. It was
a good job.
She said many family mem-
bers, including her then future
husband Louie, worked at the
factory.
I was also a
packer, packing
cookies and crack-
ers, she said. I
worked here for
about six years,
until I got mar-
ried.
The facility
baked 90 different
types of cake, bis-
cuit and cookie
products. Cresco
Crackers were
known as the Bis-
cuit that made
West Pittston Fa-
mous.
Bill Hastie, a lifelong West
Pittston resident, worked mak-
ing marshmallows in 1941 while
between his two hitches in the
army.
Each batch had 1,400 pounds
of sugar in it, he said. The sug-
ar came in 100 pound bags and I
was the one guy on the shift that
could handle those bags.
A ribbon cutting ceremony
was held before tours were of-
fered of the building. State Rep.
Phyllis Mundy said the property
is an asset to West Pittston.
Affordable housing is such a
need in our community, she
said. The people who live here
will be grateful to have such a
high-quality building in such a
beautiful community.
Boyd Hitcher, great-grandson
of one of the founders Joseph
Hitchner, provided memorabilia
from the bakerys heyday, in-
cluding photos, cookie crates
WEST PI TTSTON
Landmark has a sweet success story
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
The Hitchner Biscuit Co. Building on Exeter Avnue in West Pittston on Frdiay.
Jeff Saar inspects one of three appartments on the fourth floor
the Hitchner Biscuit Company Building.
Former Hitchner Bakery
now apartment building
JOE HEALEY
jhealey@psdispatch.com
The ovens
had to be on
day and night.
They couldnt
let them cool
down. They
were so big.
Boyd Hitchner
Great-grandson of
co-founder Joseph
Hitchner
See HITCHNER, Page 13 S
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Th e Villa Foglia
Restau ran tan d C aterin g
Fea tu ring Th e Bes tin Ita lia n/Am erica n Cu is ine
Prou dly Serving th e W yom ing Va lley For Over 40 Yea rs
H ou rs :M onda y-Sa tu rda y from 4:30 p.m .til ?
1 1 33W yo m in gAven u e,Exeter654-1 20 6
Ca ll for Berea vem entL u nch eon info.
FUL L D INNE R M E NU
Pa s ta Ch icken Vea l
Sea food Stea ks
& M ore!
Tu es da y D inner Specia l:
EGGPLA NT ROLLA NTINI
W ednes da y D inner Specia l:
BEEF & REEF
NY Strip A nd Sh rim p Scam pi
Th u rs da y D inner Specia l:
Risotto
E very Frida y Specia l:
12 Cu tsRed orW h itePizza
Eat-In orTak e-Ou t
Honored to
Salute our veterans
and cracker boxes.
He said many in West Pittston
remember the Broken Cookie
Room where damaged cookies
could be purchased for as little as
25cents a bag. He saidhis grand-
mother would give himmoney to
go to the movies across the
bridge in Pittston, she wouldnt
provide money for candy.
Go down to the bakery and
get some sweets out of the bro-
ken cookie bin, he said his
grandmother would tell him.
And dont put those sticky mo-
lasses and marshmallowcookies
in your pockets. Take the hard
cookies!
The massive two-story brick
coal and steam ovens were in-
cluded in the new design of the
building.
The ovens had to be on day
and night, Hitchner said. They
couldnt let them cool down.
They were so big.
One of the ovens nowserves as
a sitting roomand the other is set
up as a sitting/reading room.
Hitchner said the building was
often the hub of town.
It provided jobs for hundreds
of people of West Pittston for
many years, including the Great
Depression and into World War
II, he said. The bakery was
staffed for three shifts a day. He
said everyone in town called the
building simply, The Bakery.
Bill Goldsworthy, the Deputy
Director of Governor Tom Cor-
betts Northeast Regional Of-
fice, served as Mayor and coun-
cilman for 26 years. He said hes
glad to see all the hard work of so
many people come to fruition.
We all saw that this could be
something productive, he said.
This is a great example of howa
public/private partnership is sup-
posed to work.
State Sen. John Yudichak said
the building kept history alive in
the area.
The transformation of the
abandoned building from eye-
sore to community asset is dra-
matic, he said in a news release.
The new apartment building
was carefully constructed in a
way to reflect the history, charm
and character of a significant
part of West Pittstons past.
TONY CALLAIO PHOTOS/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
The second former oven now serves as a lounge, sitting or reading room for residents.
Agnes Lanzone, 85, of West Pittston, remembered helping grease
the massive cookie trays in the late 1940s.
Hitchner
Continued from Page 12
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Several years ago when the bill to create
casino gambling was being considered
then Governor Ed Rendell came to Pitt-
stontotout the bill. He visitedthe home of
a senior citizen widow and said the bill
was going to help the widow keep her
home by lowering her property taxes sub-
stantially.
Well, years have gone by. Casino and
gambling, originally slots-only, has been
expanded to table games. Last year alone,
revenue fromthe gaming was over $3 bil-
lion.
So wheres the property tax relief? Yes
property taxes have been reduced, but
hardly enough to keep up with rate in-
creases, and certainly not enough to make
the burden easier on fixed income proper-
ty owner.
We bring this up in reference to the
citys switch to home rule. One of the big-
gest advantages of home rule, according
to proponents, is that it will allowthe city,
unbound by state-imposed third class city
rules, to lower property taxes by increas-
ing wage taxes.
Sounds good for the senior home own-
ers such as the one Rendell visited, but
will it really happen?
Promises of tax reduction, however sin-
cere when they are made, are often not
kept.
Things happen, unexpected expenses
pop up. Officials get used to the extra
money.
Under one scenario regarding home
rule property taxes will not be reduced in
the first year that the wage tax is enacted
so the city can build a little kitty of cash
and then the property taxes will be re-
duced the second year.
Lets not let that first year turn into two
or three or more. Were not predicting this
will happen, in fact we believe the mea-
sure will work, but its something to
watch.
Lets not let that happen in Pittston. As
the voters approved home rule by 60 to 40
percent, they must believe it will have a
positive impact and that means at least
some workers voted to raise their own tax-
es in order to help out their fixed income
and elderly friends and neighbors.
Thats saying something these days of
economic turmoil.
Lets not disappoint the voters and the
folks in need of property tax relief.
Keep the
home rule
promise
ED. NOTE: Brandy Wright is ajournalismstudent of Dispatch
editor Ed Ackerman at Luzerne County Community College. She
wrote this for a class and Ed suggested she enter it into a contest.
He writes about it today on page 2.
I dont know their names; they dont know mine.
I dont know their history; they dont know ours.
I dont even know what branch of military they belonged to
and all they knew was that my father had
served.
What I do know is they were there.
A small group of veterans at my dads fu-
neral.
Of all his military stories, the best was his
version of how I came into his life. He had
transferred to an Air Force base in Wiesba-
den, Germany and upon arrival, his commanding officer offered
him this unique statement: You know, every soldier stationed
here leaves with either a BMWor a baby. Thats just the way it
is.
My father left with both.
I was born while our family was overseas and my name is
Brandy Melissa Wright. Thus, the BMW.
He spent eight years of his life serving in the United States
Army. He was told howto live, where to work, when to eat, who
to talk to, and even what to wear.
There was no calling in sick.
There were times my mother was, in a sense, raising us alone.
He was proud, however, to have served.
We all were.
When he passed away a fewweeks ago, my mother met with a
Veterans Affairs representative about any military benefits he
was entitled to.
He respectfully informed her that due to a loophole, he only
qualified for a $100 funeral benefit fromthe county. Because he
had served during peacetime only.
I was only three when he got out of the Army and moved back
home. I vaguely recall the friends we met along the way. Some
have kept in touch and have called from all over the world with
their sympathy.
Military life, in general, is still somewhat of a mystery to me.
So was the day of his funeral and the
whirlwind afterwards.
These amazing people showed up at a
time of sorrowto honor a fellowcomrade, a
man they had never met. Their professional-
ism, love of their country, and lack of politi-
cal agenda was refreshing.
And their respect for my mother was
something that I hadnt expected. It made this whole process a
little more bearable.
The reverent manor in which they handled the flag that hung
over the side of the casket was like watching someone with their
most prized possession. Gentle. Calculated.
Then, the hollow echo of the twelve bullets fired strategically
into the air, signifying his rank and branch of service during the
three volley shot. A simple sound that will forever mean so
much, a gesture from complete strangers that reached the deep-
est part of my heart.
Frommyfather, I thought I learnedwhat love was. Although, it
wasnt until his funeral that I truly knew.
The bond these veterans had with my father is one Ill never
fully understand. But I appreciate it.
It didnt matter to them whether he served during wartime or
peacetime. He was one of them.
Veterans were there when she needed them most
These amazing people showed up at
a time of sorrow to honor a fellow
comrade, a man they had never met.
OUROPINION
GUESTOPINION S
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In the beginning, we live our lives by following
the examples of our parents, and then we progress
to absorbing the patterns of our peer groups.
Thats a big, fat crap shoot; we emulate the be-
havior of our friends and they can be ANYONE.
I mean, Charles Manson had friends he influen-
ced, as did Jeffrey Dahmer, Hitler and George
Bush. Its all just a huge roll of the dice.
For example, when I was seven, my best friend
was Jimmy Hoffman. It was all fun and games until
he pulled-down his pants and peed in front of me in
the back of the convent. (True story). I thought I
saw Satan.
Thankfully, I had the wherewithal to dispose of
him as a friend (and potential future inmate) and
move onto a better set of cronies.
Along with being affected by the people and sti-
muli surrounding us, we also inhale the words of
advice we glean in our formative years and store
them in the filing cabinet in our brains forever.
FOR. EV.ER.
I wanted to know just how much the advice of
others helps to formour own personalities, and de-
cision making and life skills. Does the poor advice
of a parent make us fall into an abyss of bad choic-
es? Do the words of wisdomfroma sister guide us
through those painfully ugly mullet years? Does
my mother telling me never to wear green because
it makes me look sick and pasty totally ruin the col-
or for me for the rest of my days?
Yes.
And perhaps, when she also told me: Sh*t in
one hand and wish in the other and see which
comes first, it was just her maternal way of pro-
tecting me from fanciful thinking like wishing
for a prom date. Or a new pair of Jordache. Or
straight bangs. Or height.
Frommy dad, this consistent tidbit was a keeper:
Dont sweat the small stuff. Which he spouted
years before it became mainstream popular.
I abide by that advice, too stringently, and some-
times to catastrophic results. But! I will never have
a bleeding ulcer!
He also told me not to drink cheap whiskey be-
cause Id just be cleaning it off my shoes in 6 hours.
Words to live by, my friends, words to live by.
Throughout my childhood, I spent a lot of time
with my wise Polish grandma, Helen, who didnt
put-up with even a modicumof crap. Her pearls of
wisdom doled out to me, over so much deep-fried
dough products and full-fat milk, were endless.
She always said: When the going gets tough, the
tough toss-back a few highballs.
And: Everyone needs pin curls; Only emerge
pierogies in pure, hot lard nothing else matters;
and Make your own kielbasa in the shed. Dont
even ask.
My Italian grandmother, Bridget, made sublime
pepper cookies, but words of wisdom? Not so
much. She did inform me, cryptically: Theres a
pot for every lid, and I just pray you find your lid.
She didnt enjoy my sassiness in the least.
I asked my husband what the best words of ad-
vice he ever received were and he didnt even skip a
beat. Not one beat. He said: Best advice I ever
got? Dont marry her!
Thats hilarious. That little gem shouldve come
with a bumper sticker that read: Celebrate Celi-
bacy. Idiot.
My friend Denise had the most intriguing advice
to impart: Always wipe front to back. Also
weigh yourself every day. I blame her for most of
my neurosis.
My boss-friend, Anne, always shares excellent
advice with me, pretty much weekly. She is young-
er than I (BUTNOTBYMUCH), and wise beyond
her years. When I asked her to give me her most
useful words of counsel, she said: You cannot
control people. The only thing you can control is
your reaction.
See, I try to control everyone and everything and
I dont give a crap about my reaction. Note to self:
Listen to Anne more, react less.
My brother told me: Women are like buses; if
you miss one, another one will come by in15 min-
utes. Huh. Well. Hes single.
I so wanted my kids to examine their little, black
souls for any advice thats affected their lives. I was
praying it was something I mayve spewed, but no
such luck.
My son, Patrick, said the best advice he could
ever give was this: Always make sure theres toilet
paper before you poop. I asked him to dig a little
deeper and he said: That is deep for me.
Double sigh. I worry about his future.
I held out more hope for Madeline, who is now
21 and smarter than I by a country mile. She told
me that a quote by author Marianne Williamson
floats through her head daily and she has applied it
to her life in all respects: As we let our light shine,
we unconsciously give others permission to do the
same Where the hell did she come from???
And my blonde Nicholas, 17 years-old and not a
stinking care in the world, offered this jewel:
Dont eat yellow snow. Fabulous.
But wait redemption
Also, work hard. Through great adversity
comes great strength. And he knows what hes
talking about. Hes seen adversity and hes mined
great strength.
Theres hope!
Maybe my kids have truly decoded the recipe of
life: take a teaspoon of tried-and-true advice, add a
cup of good heartedness, mix with equal parts sar-
casmand love, and blend with a pinch of wariness.
Simmer and stir and youve got yourself a big, old
pot of Heck Stew.
And, if youre reading this Jimmy Hoffman, my
advice to you is this: Pull up your pants and dont
eat yellow snow. Youre welcome.
MOTHERS DAZE
Maria Jiunta Heck
Advice: 5
Advice to Dispatch readers: always read Maria
Hecks column which appears in this space every
other week.
The gourds and pumpkins are still decorating our homes. The
scarecrows and ghosts have been replaced by turkeys. Thanksgiving
and the holiday season are almost here!
For those who like trivia, Virginians claim to have celebrated the
first Thanksgiving on December 4, 1619, at Berkeley Plantation lo-
cated just southeast of Richmond on the James River. But most peo-
ple associate the holiday with the pilgrims who ate their famous har-
vest meal with the Indians in1621. They did not eat turkey. Examples
of what they did eat are wild duck, geese (otherwise known as fowl),
venison, cod, sea bass and some say even lobster!
Almost all of us will eat hen turkeys this Thanksgiving. Tom tur-
keys are four weeks older and weigh almost twice as much. And if
you are in the woods and see a turkey, remember; only male turkeys
gobble. Hens make a clicking sound.
Although the sweet potato was not introduced to the pilgrims, on
our table we usually fine them prepared in many different ways. To
settle the family discussion, The African word nyami refers to the
orange flesh sweet potatoes. Yams in the US are actually sweet pota-
toes with relatively moist texture and orange flesh. USDA requires
that the label yam always be accompanied by sweet potato.
Some of the more serious side of the holiday is ensuing that no one
gets sick! Keep in mind these food safety tips!
Turkey Tip #1
Find space for a #20 pound turkey before you buy it! Food safety
experts recommend only defrosting a turkey in the refrigerator. It
takes approximately one day to defrost 5 pounds of meat. So if you
have a 20poundturkey, it will take a minimumof four days todefrost.
That means it needs to be in the refrigerator by Sunday to be thawing
for roasting on Thursday. If you do not have room in the refrigerator
for that size turkey, maybe a 5# turkey breast would be a better selec-
tion.
Turkey Tip #2
Purchase a food grade chef thermometer. This type of thermome-
ter does not stay in the oven in the turkey. You can check the temper-
ature by pulling the pan out of the oven and inserting it into the meat-
iest part of the breast. Be careful not to touch the turkey bone with the
tip of the thermometer. A whole turkey is safe when cooked to a
minimuminternal temperature of 165 degree. For a brochure on how
to use one properly, email mre2@psu.edu<mailto:mre2@psu.edu>.
Turkey Tip #3
Check your oven temperature. Experts recommend roasting a tur-
key at 325, no lower. Use an oven thermometer to ensure that your
oven is working properly at least 3 days before Thanksgiving! Once it
reaches 165 degrees, take the turkey out of the oven and let the turkey
stand for 20 minutes before carving to allow the juices to set. This
will make carving easier.
Turkey Tip #4
Refrigerate any leftovers within two hours. Finish carving the tur-
key and if you plan to make turkey soup, refrigerate the carcass with-
in two hours also. Taking any leftover meat off the bones will reduce
the time it takes to cool the meat down to the recommended 40 de-
grees. Although this is tough to do with a house full of company, it is
important to cool down any leftovers quickly.
Turkey Tip #5
Bake stuffing separate fromthe turkey. Some folks place the stuff-
NUTRITION
CORNER
Mary R. Ehret, MS, RD, LDN
Penn State Cooperative Extension
Turkey tips for safety
Mary R. Ehret, M.S., R.D., L.D.N., is with Penn State Cooperative
Extension, Luzerne County, 16 Luzerne Ave., West Pittston, Pa., 18643.
(570) 825-1701/602-0600. Fax (570) 825-1709. mre2@psu.edu.
See NUTRITION, Page 16
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Its You Against Te Little Old Lady
Pennsylvanias Rules of Evidence
prohibit an injured party (plaintiff)
from informing the jury that the
defendant in a civil case has
insurance to pay the verdict. The
reasoning behind the Rule is to
keep the jury focused on the facts
of the case, instead of on the
issue of how much insurance the
defendant carries. Its also feared
that the jury will award a runaway
verdict if it thinks a large insurance
company is going to pay it on
behalf of the defendant.
The Rules practical effect,
however, is to make the jury think
that the little old lady, or young
college student, sitting in front of
it will have to personally pay the
plaintiff any verdict thats awarded.
This can lead to an unfair verdict,
since the jury will be reluctant to
award a large verdict if it thinks
it will nancially destroy the
defendants life.
Many facts in a case are
purposefully kept from juries for
fear that the jury will be prejudiced
or swayed by such knowledge.
Perhaps its time juries hear the
truth, the whole truth, and nothing
but the truth.
ing in the oven on 350 degrees
right after the turkey reaches 165
degrees and comes out of the ov-
en.
Call or email
mre2@psu.edu<mail-
to:mre2@psu.edu> for a fact
sheet on cooking a Thanksgiving
turkey and or a copy of Penn
State Extension Recipes for
Thanksgiving. Here is a favor-
ite muffin recipe fromour recipe
booklet.
Cranberry Pumpkin Muffins
2 cups flour (may substitute
white whole wheat flour)
3/4 cup sugar
3 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
3/4 teaspoon allspice
1/3 cup canola oil
2 large eggs or 4 egg whites
3/4 cup canned pumpkin
2 cups fresh or frozen chopped
cranberries
Preheat oven to 400 F. In a
large bowl, sift together dry in-
gredients (flour through all-
spice) and set aside. In a separate
bowl, beat oil, eggs, and pump-
kin together until well blended.
Add the pumpkin mixture to
the dry ingredients all at once.
Stir until moistened. Fold in
chopped cranberries. Spoon into
paper lined muffin cups. Bake
for 15 to 20 minutes. Makes 12
muffins
For more educational materi-
als please visit our web site at
www. http://luzerne.exten-
sion.psu.edu.
Nutrition
Continued from Page 15
We want your vote, the numbers and the polls
count to get your candidate in office.
But I am more than a Democrat or Republican,
Conservative or Liberal, I am more than just a
number.
I am me with thoughts, hopes, feelings and
dreams.
I amme withconscience inhowI feel about what
is right and what is wrong.
I will not judge, be critical or insult for the sake
of any agenda.
I will state my facts in the most humanly, honest
measure to the best of my abilities, and expect
nothing more but respect.
Words and actions when directed in a manner of
arrows and swords only defeat the real meaning of
our human existence, our real purpose that has
been bestowed on us by our Creator.
What hurts us, yes, hurts Him in ways the pro-
fundity of these feelings, words could never ex-
press.
So as we reflect on what these past eighteen
months have done to our country.
Are we more divided then ever? Is all this bicker-
ing worth the loss of civility?
Why can we not learn from one another without
fear of judgment or ridicule?
At least if we learn something from each others
culture or viewpoint, even if we do not agree with
it, be human enough to respect it.
I am me.
Do I dare to share that with you?
Mary Anne K Quick
11/08/2012
YOUR OPI NI ON
I am me
I wanted to take this opportu-
nity to acknowledge and thank
local police, fire, EMS, public
works and emergency manage-
ment personnel for their exem-
plary performance during the
Hurricane Sandy emergency.
Both career and volunteer per-
sonnel worked long, tiring hours
preparing for, responding to and
cleaning up after the storm. Fire,
rescue and EMS personnel pro-
vided many volunteer hours
serving their community.
In Wyoming, our volunteer
fire department staffed both sta-
tions and provided an additional
paramedic unit in addition to a
volunteer EMS crew. Our de-
partment of public works
worked throughout the weekend
clearing leaves from the road-
ways, keeping drains clear dur-
ing the storm emergency and
preparing for the cleanup after-
wards. Our police department
had extra personnel on duty to
assist during storm-related
emergencies.
Finally, I must acknowledge
and thank the residents of
Wyoming and surrounding com-
munities for their cooperation
and assistance during this emer-
gency. Residents helped their
neighbors in preparing for the
storm, cooperated with curfews
and other emergency instruc-
tions. Many people volunteered
their time and energy to assist
during this storm.
On behalf of Borough Council
and myself, we appreciate the ef-
fort shown by everyone. Clearly,
by working together as a com-
munity, we can overcome diffi-
cult circumstances together.
Mayor Robert Boyer
Wyoming
Wyoming mayor praises efforts during Sandy S
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Brought to you as a paid public service by
the Law Ofces of Dominick P. Pannunzio,
294 Main Street, Dupont, 655-5541
By
Dominick P.
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Colleges are still not allowed to count
competitive cheerleading as a sport when
trying to satisfy compliance standards of Title
IX, a federal appeals court in Connecticut has
ruled.
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The US appeals court for the District of
Columbia has overturned the EPAs Cross-
State Air Pollution Rule. The rule was
designed to protect people who live in states
that are downwind of pollutants emitted
by power plants in adjacent states so if
coal smoke from Texas, say, is in the air in
Louisiana, the EPA could force Texas to be a
better neighbor by cutting emissions.
***
New laws in New Hampshire and Vermont
require sports teams to get medical opinions
about when its safe for players with head
injuries to return to the game.
***
A federal appeals court has taken key civil
service protection away from government
employees involved in national security
work. In a 2-1 decision involving two Defense
Department employees, the U.S. Court of
Appeals for the Federal Circuit said the Merit
Systems Protection Board is prohibited from
reviewing dismissals and demotions of
such government employees, regardless of
whether those jobs require access to classifed
information.
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Frank A. Bucci Jr., MD of Bucci Laser Vision in Wilkes-
Barre, PA is conducting a clinical research trial to study
an investigational treatment to stop or slow the
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Approved by Alpha IRB April 30, 2012
John P. Cosgrove, whose do-
nation of his lifes library con-
sisting of more than1,000 books,
artifacts, and other memorabilia,
sparked a movement to expand
the Pittston Memorial Library,
will be on hand Thursday for the
groundbreaking of the expan-
sion which will bear his name,
the Cosgrove Annex.
Cosgrove, 94, resides in
Washington, D.C., where he has
spent more than 70 years in the
media. A Pittston native, he is a
former president of the National
Press Club. His donation of
$50,000 was the first in a ongo-
ing capital campaign to fund the
annex.
The librarys Board of Direc-
tors announced the ground-
breaking for the new 5,175
square foot addition will be held
Thursday, Nov. 15, at 3:30 p.m.
on the library grounds, 47 Broad
St., Pittston. The general public
is welcome to attend.
The groundbreaking ceremo-
ny will mark the start of a signif-
icant step in expanding the li-
brary so that we can better serve
the community and meet the
growing demand for services,
said Barbara Quinn, chairman of
the library board of directors.
This is a dreamcome true and
we are delighted that Mr. Cos-
grove will be able to join us, she
added.
Cosgrove has made several
trips to the library since his origi-
nal donation, much of which is
on display in a Cosgrove roomat
the library.
It has been an amazing proc-
ess so far and, now, the reality
will be here soon. The staff and I
cannot wait to be able to use the
new space to provide expanded
services. We are planning al-
ready. Thank you to everyone in-
volved in the project to date and
to those who have made finan-
cial contributions. We encourage
everyone to visit the library to
view the plans and to participate
in the groundbreaking, said
Anne Hogya, library director
The expansion project is ex-
pected to cost an estimated $1.2
million. The new addition will
be built onto the rear of the cur-
rent library facility.
Included in the new addition
will be a state-of-the-art commu-
nity/conference center equipped
with a Smartboard, WiFi and a
video-conferencing system. The
center will be large enough to
hold 100 people and will be
available for community use for
conferences, meetings, presenta-
tions, programs and seminars.
The new addition will also
contain a larger childrens sec-
tion with additional book stacks,
four computer stations anda play
area; arts and crafts room; teen
space with age-appropriate ma-
terials; kitchenette; coat room;
entrance with vestibule for after-
hours access; and bathroom fa-
cilities.
Funding for the project will
come from a low-interest loan
from Department of Agriculture
Rural Development, which was
secured with the help of Sen.
Robert Casey; various govern-
mental, corporate and private
foundation grants; and a capital
campaign currently underway
and co-chaired by retired PA
State Rep. Tom Tigue, of Hugh-
estown, and Pat Solano, of Pitt-
ston Township, who has served
as a senior advisor to numerous
Pennsylvania governors.
Tigue headed a group of li-
brary representatives who joined
Cosgrove in Washington to
make the initial presentation to
Sen. Casey.
Construction is expected to
take six to seven months, de-
pendent upon the weather.
The Capital Campaign Com-
mittee is still seeking donations
and pledges.
Arrangements can be made to
make donations or pledges in in-
stallments. Call Fundraising Di-
rector Carol Crane at 654-9565
Ext. 25 for additional informa-
tion.
PI TTSTON MEMORI AL L I BRARY
Groundbreaking set for Cosgrove Annex
FILE PHOTO
John Cosgrove, right, chats with Sunday Dispatch editor Ed Ack-
erman at the kick-off of the Pittston Memorial Library's capital
campaign to provide funding for expansion. Groundbreaking for
the new Cosgrove Annex is Thursday, Nov. 15. S
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Operating as a full service general practice Law Firm which
handles criminal & civil matters with an emphasis on:
Family Law
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Bankruptcy
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Social Security Disability
Atty. Michelle L. Guarneri
Michelle L. Guarneri
ATTORNEYAT LAW
49 S. Main Street, Suite 400
Pittston, PA
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1843 Hwy. 315 Pittston 570-602-7400 www.highwayfcu.org
On Monday, Nov. 12, a con-
tractor for PennDOTwill be pav-
ing SR11(Main Street) in Avoca
between McAlpine Street and
the Dupont/Avoca line. There
will be a single lane closure from
7 a.m. to 4 p.m. and major delays
are expected.
Roast beef today
St. Michael the Archangel
Byzantine Catholic Church will
hold its annual Patron Saint Din-
ner today, Sunday Nov. 11 in the
Church Hall, 205 North Main
Street, Pittston from 1 to 3 p.m.
Take outs anytime during the
dinner.
Menu includes roast beef, gra-
vy, Italian beans and red beets,
cake for dessert andcoffee, tea or
soft drink. Araffle with a variety
of prizes will be held.
The public is invited to attend.
St. Michaels is served by Fa-
ther Joseph Bertha, PhD.
Line dance lessons
AmericanLegionPittstonPost
477, 203 Vine St. Pittston is of-
fering Line Dance Lessons to-
day, Nov.11, 3 to 5 p.m. Public is
invited to attend (18 years and
up). Cost is $7. Instructed by
"Trish" (singer from Farmers
Daughter.)
Knights of Lithuania
This afternoon , Nov. 11, at
noon, members of The Knights
of Lithuania, C143, Pittston, will
hold a regular meeting at St.
John The Evangelist Church
Hall in Pittston. The hall is hand-
icapped accessible. The topics
will be the current Lithuanian,
traditional activities.
On the serving committee are
Robert andGina Warnagiris, and
HelenKarpovich. Newmembers
are welcome. Jean Mihalick will
preside
Veterans Day ceremony
American Legion Post 513 and
VFW Post 4954 will conduct a
Veterans Day Ceremony, today,
Sunday, Nov 11, at 11 a.m. in
front of the Old Forge Borough
Building. All are welcome to at-
tend.
A Veterans Mass will be held
at Prince of Peace Parish in Old
Forge on Sunday, November 11,
at 8 a.m. All are welcome and all
veterans are invited to attend.
Uniform is optional.
Veterans and family members
will assemble at front of church
in a reserved section. Light re-
freshments will be served in the
cafeteria after mass.
Dinner at St. Maria Goretti
A dinner will be held at the
Church of St. Maria Goretti, La-
flin Road, today, Sunday, No-
vember 11 from 12 to 5 p.m.
Take-outs are 12 to 4 p.m. con-
tainers will be provided. Tickets
can be purchased at the door for
$9.50. Children five years old
and under are free for eat-in only.
ILGWU Retirees
The ILGWU retirees and
union members will meet Mon-
day, Nov. 12, at 2 p.m. at Savos
Restaurant. The Christmas party
will be discussed.
PHS Class of 57
The PittstonHighSchool class
of 1957 will meet at Tonys Piz-
za, City Line Plaza on Monday,
Nov. 12, at 7:30 p.m. to finalize
plans for a Christmas Party to be
held Saturday, Dec. 1, at the Du-
pont VFW All classmates are
cordially invited to attend. Pay-
ment of $17.00 will be due at that
time.
For further details contact Ja-
nie at 654-0224.
Jenkins Twp. Seniors
The Jenkins Township Senior
Citizens organization will hold
their regular monthly meeting on
Tuesday, Nov. 13, at the Jenkins
Township Hose House at 6:30
p.m. President Jean Mudlock
will preside. Refreshments will
be served.
Hostesses for this month are
Marion Price and Joan Dian-
driole. Plans will be finalized for
the Christmas party. Following
the business meeting, bingo will
be played. New members are
welcome.
Jenkins Class of 51
The Jenkins Township Class
of 51Lunch Bunch will meet on
Thursday, Nov. 15, at Cafe Italia,
River Road, Port Blanchard at
noon.
All classmates are welcome.
St. Josephs Seniors
St Josephs Senior Social Club
will meet Nov. 15, at 1pm. in the
Our Ladyof Mount Carmel Cen-
ter on William St. in Pittston.
those attending are asked to be
prepared to pay for the Christ-
mas Party which will be held at
Valentis Restaurant in Exeter.
Plans are being finalized.
Members are also reminder to
bringcannedgoods for St. Johns
food pantry.
Yearly dues are being collect-
ed.
Bingo and card games will be
played. Refreshments will be
served.
Newmembers are always wel-
come.
Hosts for January are Wesley
Pedrick, James Piedmont, and
Mary and Dominick Policare.
For information call Theresa
at 654-2967.
NARFE luncheon
NARFE, Greater Pittston
Chapter 1723 will hold an annual
buffet luncheon on Thursday,
Nov. 15 at the VFW, Main Street
Dupont. President John Ryan
will present an update on all cur-
rent NARFE activities. John
Shutak, Vice President Dist. 3
will be the honored guest. Reser-
vations can be made by calling
Liz Tighe at 655-5153. Deadline
for reservations is Nov. 10.
Craft and Food Fair
St. Georges Altar Society will
hold a Craft and Food Fair at St.
Georges Center, 743 Keyser
Avenue, Taylor, on Saturday,
Nov. 17 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
There will be vendors, ethnic
food, homemade baked goods.
Admission is $1.
Self Defense Seminar
The Greater Pittston YMCA
will offer a Self Defense Semi-
nar for the public to educate ev-
eryone how to protect them-
selves in dangerous situations.
Eric Kovaleski, owner of Tang
Soo Do Karate U.S.A., along
with Danielle Maroni and Aron
Turner will teach defensive
moves that everyday people can
use to ward off assailants.
The YMCA has a focus on
Social Responsibility and hav-
ing this seminar promotes just
that, said Diane Butwin, Group
Exercise Coordinator. We [the
YMCA] want our members and
the public we serve to be well in-
EVENTS, MEETI NGS, BRI EFS
Main Street Avoca paving tomorrow, expect delays
Roast beef dinner today at St. Michaels; self-defense seminar at Y next Sunday
See BRIEFS, Page 21
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Find Us on
Announcing The Retirement Of
DR. JAMES & SYLVIA BUTCOFSKI
Dr. James Butcofski and I have been
employed through the Intermountain Medical
Group, Community Health Systems, for many
wonderful years. It has been our pleasure to belong
to such a dedicated medical corporation and work
daily with Ken and the phlebotomists at our lab, our
supervisors Charlene and Jennifer, co-workers at the
Center for Diagnostic Imaging, co-workers at 610
Wyoming Avenue and the couriers.
Our Heartfelt thanks and sentiment go out to our
three generations of patients who have entrusted
their medical care to us for forty-eight (48) years.
It has been an honor to care for each and every one of you and a wonderful journey we will
treasure forever. Also, thanking the thousands of patients, pharmacists and others who have
sent beautiful letters, cards, and gifts. We were so deeply touched.
In closing, once again, thanking our patients, our medical family, for giving us this milestone
in our lives. We wish all of you and Intermountain Medical Group, Community Health
Systems, good health and happiness always.
Very Sincerely,
The Pittston High School Class of 1947
held their 65th class reunion at Coopers
Seafood House in Pittston recently.
Pictured seated from left Marion Tighe
Posluszny, Dolores Kedlow Battean, Ma-
rie Ginochietti Venarucci, Mary Lou Sur-
age Langan, Jane Donahue Ryan, Lena
Sellani, Tina Sperrazza Cumbo, Matt Gil-
lis, Fran Holleran. Second row Joe Guar-
nari, Barrett Leonard, Eugene Hammill,
Chris Latona, Tony Aquilina, Charles
Maira, Mike Dardes, Ed Viola, Gladys
Morgan Shue, Sam DeSalvo, Anita Ado-
nizio Tassone, Jasper Reggie, Jim Jack-
son.
65TH ANNI VERSARY
Pittston High Class of 47 gathers S
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accompany all children under 17 to an R Rated feature
*No passes accepted to these features.
**No restricted discount tickets or passes accepted to these features.
***3D features are the regular admission price plus a surcharge of $2.50
D-Box Motion Seats are the admission price plus an $8.00 surcharge
First Matinee $5.25 for all features (plus surcharge for 3D features).
**Skyfall - PG13 - 150 min.
(1:00), (1:40), (2:20), (4:00), (4:40), (5:20),
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Wreck it Ralph 3D DBOX - PG -
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(1:15), (3:40), 7:10, 9:35
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The Man With the Iron Fists - R -
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Cloud Atlas - R - 180 min.
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Fun Size - PG13 - 100 min.
(2:30), (4:40), 7:05, 9:15 (no 2:30 or 4:40
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Paranormal Activity 4 - R - 95 min.
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Here Comes The Boom - PG -
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Sinister - R - 120 min.
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Hotel Transylvania -PG- 100 min.
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Argo - R - 130 min.
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Special Events:
November 15 Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn,
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FREE METAL REMOVAL
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570-677-6968
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formed and safe in the Greater
Pittston area.
Kovaleski has three studios in
NEPA; one in Dickson City,
West Scranton and Carbondale.
His first studio opened in 1994.
He is a six degree black belt giv-
ing him the classification of
Master. He started is karate ca-
reer at the age of three.
Maroni hails from Avoca. She
is a second degree black belt and
has been with Tang Soo Do Kar-
ate for 10 years.
Turner is also from Avoca. He
is a second third degree black
belt. Once he reaches fourth de-
gree black belt he will gain the
title of Master. He has been with
Tang Soo Do for 11 years.
The seminar will be held Sun-
day, Nov. 18, at the Greater Pitt-
stonYMCAfrom4to6p.m. The
cost of the seminar is $20 for ev-
eryone. For more information
please contact the YMCA at
570-655-2255.
Bingo in Centermoreland
Bingo will be held on Monday,
Nov. 19, at the Northmoreland
Township Fire Hall in Center-
moreland. Doors open at 5 p.m.
andearlybirds beginat 6:30p.m.
Food and beverage available. For
more information, call Jim at
333-4906.
Seton Class of 77
Seton Catholic class of 1977
will hold its 35th High School
reunion at Rooneys Irish Pub in
Pittston.
The reunion will start at 6 p.m.
on Friday Nov. 23. All class
members are invited to attend.
Classmates can visit St Johns
Seton Catholic Class of 1977 on
Facebook or emailsetonclas-
sof77@verizon.netfor details on
the reunion.
Price for the reunion is $40 a
person. Make checks payable to
Joe Dorbad 300 Heidi Lane Du-
pont, PA18640. Payment can al-
so be made at Rooneys Irish Pub
on Thursday, Nov. 15, at 7:30
p.m.
Interested classmates can con-
tact Pauline Albano 498-0180,
Marianne Devers 815-8380, Joe
Dorbad 704-8584, Al Fereck
655-9713,or John Walsh 407-
0654.
Roast beef dinner
A roast beef dinner will be
held Wednesday, Nov. 28, at the
Northmoreland Twp Fire Hall in
Centermoreland. Serving is
from 5 until 7 p.m. Adults $8.00
and children under 12 years of
age $4.00. Eat in or take out.
Tickets may be purchased at
door.
PA senior parents
The Pittston Area class of
2013Parents Groupwill meet for
the final time on Tuesday, Nov.
13 at 7 p.m. in the high school
lobby. Senior students and their
parents are invitedtoattend. This
will be the last opportunity to
discuss the all-night party.
St. Johns Class of 72
An Informal 40th anniversary
reunion Get Together for St.
John the Evangelist Class of
1972 will be held on Saturday,
Nov. 24, at 7 p.m. at Rooneys
Irish Pub, 67 South Main Street,
Pittston. All classmates are invit-
ed to attend.
There will also be a memorial
Mass on Sunday, Nov. 25 at 10
a.m. in St. John the Evangelist
Church, WilliamStreet, Pittston.
For more information, please
call Joe Aquilina 788-6240,
Grace Bufalino Bradshaw, 655-
3680, Anne Loughney Dolinsky
883-4554 or Winifred Smalley
Serfass at 655-1114 or e mail at
bttrmn@verizon.net.
IAAC dinner meeting
The November Dinner Meet-
ing of the Italian American As-
sociationof Luzerne Countywill
be held on Thursday, Nov. 15, at
Genettis Hotel and Convention
Center. Arrival time is 6 p.m.
with dinner served at 6:30. Price
is $25.00 per person. Music for
dancing by Gary Dee with danc-
ing to10:15. For reservations and
membership information, please
call Judy Deice at 654-7600 or
Louise Castellani 654-6454.
President, James Deice will pre-
side.
Irish history contest
The Ladies Ancient Order of
Hibernians, Division 1 St. John
Neumann, of Wilkes-Barre, is
inviting all Luzerne County stu-
dents to submit essays to the
LAOH 2011-2012 Irish History
Writing Contest. The LAOHis a
charitable organization of Irish-
American women founded in
1894, and aims to promote Irish
history and culture.
The contest is open to any stu-
dents (public, private, parochial,
or home-schooled) of grades 6
through12. This years topics are
Level 1(grades 6-8): The Story
of Annie Moore IrishImmigra-
tion to America, and Level 2
(grades 9-12): The Irish and the
Building of the American Infras-
tructure.
Cash prizes will be awarded to
winners at both the State and Na-
tional levels. For complete con-
test rules and list of prizes,
please contact Division Histori-
an, Mary Ellen Dooley, at (570)
735-1711, or visit the National
website at www.ladiesaoh.com.
Briefs
Continued from Page 19
See BRIEFS, Page 24
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Tis Weeks Dining Guide Feature:
To Advertise In Te Dining Guide Call:
Jill Andes 970-7188 Steve Morris 829-7290
ENTER TOWIN
THIS MONTHS
GIFT CERTIFICATE:
Fill out and deliver
or mail entry to:
Te Sunday Dispatch
Dining Guide
109 New Street
Pittston, PA 18640
Name:____________________
Address:___________________
__________________________
City:______________________
State:______________________
Zip:_______________________
Phone:____________________
COOPERS WATERFRONT
DENTES CATERING
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JUNIORS PASTA HOUSE
NARDONES RESTAURANT
SAVOS PIZZA & RESTAURANT
Look On Te Following Pages For
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OCTOBER
DINING GUIDE
WINNER
JIM FRANCIS
of Pittston S
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SUN., MON., TUES.
7 A.M.-3 P.M.
WED., THUR., FRI., SAT.
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Biagio A. Dente, CEC,AAC, HOF
Blaise Alan Dente, CCC, HAAC
655-0801 www.dentescatering.com
DENTES CATERING
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Since
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JUNIORS
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204 Broad Street, Pittston 299-7814
Check out Juniors Bar on Facebook
TOUR OF ITALY IS BACK!
3 Course Menu................$14.95
Tues. - Fri. 4:30 to 6:00pm
Plus... Enjoy our New Autumn Dinner Menu
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Receive 1 FREE Appetizer with
the purchase of 2 entrees.
(Appetizer not to exceed $10.00, with this ad only)
Rt. 11 Pittston By-Pass, Pittston Commons
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
Mon-Thurs 11-9
Fri & Sat 11-10 Sun 12-9 655-0001
IN GREATER PITTSTON
Price does not include sales tax, cannot be combined
with other specials. Expires 11/30/12
Get 12 Cuts of Pizza For
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Includes 1 Side Of Bleu
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Price does not include sales tax, cannot be combined with
other specials. Good for our red pizza only.
Expires 11/30/12
DELIVERY, PICK-UP OR EAT IN COUPONS
THRU SUPER SUNDAY FEB. 3RD
WHILE WATCHING THE GAME ON OUR
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12 CUTS OF PIZZA ONLY $9.99
CHICKEN WINGS ONLY 40 Each
Sold in 6 or 12 pieces only
Miller Lite & Coors Light Buckets
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16 oz. Drafts - only $2.00
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The best way to taste different kinds of honey is
to see how each one inspires you. There are many
varieties to choose from. For example, avocado honey
has a dark color and richness like molasses (use it
in barbeque sauce), or sage honey, which is much
lighter with a spicy zip. It can be used infused with
fresh rosemary sprigs as a base for lemonade. Honey
can be used in sauces, marinades, salad dressings,
and can be substituted for granulated sweeteners.
served with potato,
vegetable and
fresh baked bread
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St. Johns Class of 1962
The St. John the Evangelist
High School class of 1962 will
celebrate their 50-year class re-
union on Friday, Nov. 23. Mass
will be held at 5 p.m. at the St.
John the Evangelist Church,
William Street in Pittston and
will be a joint celebration with
the class of 1987 Seton Catholic
High School, which is celebrat-
ing their 25 year class reunion.
The class of 1962 will contin-
ue their festivities at the Quality
Inn and Suites Wilkes-Barre
with dinner and dancing from 6
to 11 p.m.
Addresses for the following
class members are requested:
Theresa Klocko, Matthew Smi-
kosky, Thomas Vasil and Sal Ia-
cona.
Anyone with information, is
asked to call Sheila 655-0858 or
Nancy 457-4092.
St. Johns Class of 72
An informal 40th Reunion
Get Together for St. John the
Evangelist Class of 1972 will be
held on Saturday, Nov. 24 at 7
p.m. at Rooneys Irish Pub, 67
South Main Street, Pittston. All
classmates are invited to attend.
There will also be a memorial
Mass on Sunday, Nov. 25, at 10
a.m. in St. John the Evangelist
Church, WilliamStreet, Pittston.
Flyers will be sent to all class-
mates.
For more information, please
call Joe Aquilina 788-6240,
Grace Bufalino Bradshaw, 655-
3680, Anne Loughney Dolinsky
883-4554 or Winifred Smalley
Serfass at 655-1114 or e mail at
bttrmn@verizon.net.
PA Class of 77
The Pittston Area Class of
1977 will hold a 35th class re-
union on Saturday, November 24
at Mount Carmel Hall on Wil-
liam St. in Pittston. The fun be-
gins at 6:00 p.m.
The committee has made ev-
ery attempt to contact every
classmate.
If you have not received an in-
vitation and would like to attend
please call Lew Sebia at 823-
1100 (ask for Karen), Donna
Boylan Ahearn at 212-2348, Jim
Collins at 654-8243 or Bob Lin-
skey at 212-0724 for more de-
tails.
Seton Class of 77
Members of Seton Catholic
Class of 1977 are planning a 35th
Reunion. The reunion will be
held on Friday, Nov. 24. The re-
union will be held at Rooneys
Irish Pub on Main Street Pittston
from 6 to 9 p.m.
Any classmates interested in
attending the reunion should
emailsetonclassof77@veri-
zon.netto find out details and in-
formation.
Dutch Apple trip
A bus trip is planned to Dutch
Apple Dinner Theater inLancas-
ter on Thursday, Nov. 29 to see
A Swingin Christmas.
The show provides beautiful
singing, breath-taking dancing,
gorgeous costumes, rib-tickling
fun and a commitment to the real
meaning of the holiday.
Price of the trip is $80 which
includes a buffet dinner, bus
seat, show ticket and bus driver
tip.
A $40 payment is required
with reservations and the bal-
ance is due by October 15.
For additional information or
to make a reservation call 654-
2310 or 654-8775.
The trip is being sponsored by
the Womens Group of the Unit-
ed Methodist Church Pittston.
Applause Theatre
The Applause Theatre in the
former St. Casmir Church, 65
Church St., Pittston presents
Raymond the Amish Comic at 8
p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 1.
Tickets for the adult-oriented
show are $15 and will be avail-
able at the door or bycalling430-
1149.
VFW Christmas party
The Dupont V.F.W. Post #4909
Home Association will hold
their annual Christmas Party on
Saturday, Dec. 8 at the post
home. Music provided by the
Home Town Boyz. Dinner buffer
served from 7:30 to 8:45 p.m.
Bar open from7:30 p.m. to12:30
a.m. Donation is $28.
For tickets and reservations
see Bob Lopata at the post home
or contact him at 654-9104.
Deadline for tickets is Friday,
Dec. 7.
Tickets will not be sold at the
door.
Briefs
Continued from Page 21
Falls Center
Anyone 60+ is invited to the
following activities at the Falls
Center.
Wed. Nov.14, 9:30 p.m. walk-
ing group;11:30 a.m. Sue Chapin
fromClarks Summit Senior Liv-
ing will speak on Veteran At-
tendant Benefits; 1p.m. the Gar-
den Club will put the gardens to
bed for the winter.
Thurs., Nov.15, Thanksgiving
celebration.
Fri. Nov.16, 11 a.m. complete
body stretch exercises using
weights and bands, 45 min.
Mon., Nov.19, Wii Bowling at
10 a.m. competing with Tunk-
hannock seniors; 11 a.m. body
stretch.
Tues., Nov 20, Beth Lutz from
9:30 a.m. to noon to give infor-
mation regarding Medicare En-
rollment. Appointment required.
The Center offers free unlimit-
ed coffee. Wii, schuffleboard
and card games are daily activ-
ities.
Anyone wishing to stop by for
a hot meal at noon for a suggest-
ed donation of $2 should RSVP
to Twila @ 388-2623 by 12:30
p.m. the day before.
The Center is openfrom9a.m.
2 p.m. M-F.
It is located on SR 92.
Pittston Center
The Pittston Senior Center an-
nounces the following:
The Center will be closed on
Monday, Nov. 12, in observance
of Veterans Day.
At noon on Thurs., Nov.15, a
Thanksgiving Day Special Din-
ner will be held. Reservations
must be made at least one day in
advance by calling the center at
655-5561 by 1 p.m.
A flea market and bake sale
will also be held from9 a.m. to 3
p.m.
Donations of baked good or
flea market items will be appre-
ciated.
On Friday, Nov. 16, November
birthdays will be celebrated. A
foodbasket will raffledoff toone
lucky birthday person. You must
be present to win.
At 1 p.m. on Mondays, the
newly formed Polka Group
meets.
Newmembers are welcome to
join this group. If you like to pol-
ka stop in and join us. This group
will be providing entertainment
at local personal care and nurs-
ing homes.
At 10 a.m. on Mondays, the
crochet club meets for those in-
terested in learning how to cro-
chet.
Zumba Gold class is held ev-
ery Tuesday afternoon at 2 pm.
Cost of the class is $2 for mem-
bers and $3 for non-members.
The Pittston Senior Center is
open Monday through Friday
from8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Newmem-
bers are welcome.
If you would like further infor-
mation about the center and its
activities and programs, please
feel free to contact Connie An-
drews, Center Director.
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The Applause Theatre Com-
panys production of the Wizard
of Oz, billed as the grand open-
ing of the Downtown Arts venue
in the former St. Casmirs
Church at 64 Church Street in
Pittston, has been postponed.
The show will go on eventual-
ly, but exact dates have not been
determined.
The original show dates were
Nov. 16-18 and Nov. 23-25.
In an email Applause Theatre
Board explained what happened.
The domino effect fromHur-
ricane Sandy has impacted our
progress. Many of the service
people needed are assisting
those who have greater needs
then our building. Even materi-
als to finish our project have
been delayed due to the demand
in NJ and NY. This situation is
beyond our control and must be
addressed.
Sadly it means we will not be
opening next weekend. Our cast,
crew, and supporters have much
invested into the production of
The Wizard of Oz.
These efforts will not be
wasted as the theatre will open
soonandthe showwill goon. We
are thankful that we have several
options to discuss. It was agreed
more time is needed to complete
our venue and establish a beauti-
ful show for everyone to be
proud of. We are looking at ten-
tative dates in January.
Tickets already sold will be
addressed once a date is chosen.
We hope you will join us to forge
ahead and count our blessings
that we have the ability to contin-
ue production and establish a
place we can all enjoy together
unlike so many others who lost
everything in the storm. We will
continue to up date as the details
and plans are finalized shortly.
Applause Theater Wizard
of OZ show is postponed
The second Annual West Side
Santa Parade is next Sunday,
Nov. 18, at 3 p.m. beginning on
First Street. The parade will pro-
ceed along Wyoming Avenue to
the Forty Fort Park.
The Tree Lighting and Holi-
day Festival in the Butler Street
Park are Saturday, Nov. 24. Santa
arrives by fire truck and lights
the tree at dusk.
The Childrens Holiday Party
is Sunday, Dec. 9, from1 p.m. to
3 p.m. in the Tenth Street School
cafeteria
The borough will also have a
Holiday House Contest. Deco-
rate your home for the holidays.
Judging will occur over the
weekend of Dec. 14 and 15.
The events are free andopento
the public and sponsored by
Wyoming Borough and the
Wyoming Recreation Board
Wyoming Borough
lists Holiday events
Santa parade next Sunday,
tree lighting slated Nov. 24
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The Local Guys With The National Buys
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Leadership Wilkes-Barre
hostedLeadershiponTap a so-
cial/mixer at the Susquehanna
Brewing Co on Friday evening.
The event included live enter-
tainment, brewery tours, beer,
wine and non-alcoholic beverag-
es and food donated by a local
restaurant.
Proceeds will benefit the LWB
Scholarship and program devel-
opment fund.
Leadership W-B on tap Friday
TONY CALLAIO/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Joleen Lazecki, Tony and Jeanie Bantell spend some time with Leadership Wilkes-Barre's Executive
Director Lori Nocito.
Gathering at Leadership Wilkes-Barre's "Leadership on Tap" was, left to right: Glen Lawless, Tom
McGinley, Brenda McGinley, John Zelena, Kate Eltringham, TJ Eltringham, Kristen Suma. Standing in
front: Alan Dente.
Billy Joyce, left, and Matt Carmody chat while at "Leadership on
Tap."
Mark Noble, a principal owner
of the Susquehanna Brewing
Company. S
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17,818.61 SF
17,818.61 SF 18,309.98 SF
24,445.03 SF
23,903.35 SF
35,644.32 SF
31,609.33 SF
20,855.99 SF
22,266.25 SF
16,657.29 SF
Development
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Gloria Blandina had done her
homework. Andshe was onlytoo
happy to share it. Speaking at a
reception marking the fifth anni-
versary of the Care and Concern
Free Health Clinic in Pittston,
Blandia, clinic director, began
with the number of patient visits
during that time: 5,663.
Using a figure of $200 as a
minimum charge for an emer-
gency room visit at a hospital,
Blandina calculated the clinic
has saved $1,132,600 in health
care costs.
Citing the all volunteer staff,
which includes doctors, nurse
practicioners, nurses, and social
service professionals, she esti-
mates weeklysalaries savedtobe
a minimum of $7,800, or
$394,000 a year. The five year
total? $1.97 million.
In his remarks, Msgr. John
Bendik, pastor of the Parish
Community of St. John the
Care and Concern Free Health Clinic in former Seton
Clinic volunteers. Row1, left to right, Cathy Rusnok; Gina Rushkowski; Gloria Blandina; Lil Dominici; Mary H
da Gretz; Dr. Lewis Druffner; Rachel Miller; Arianna Colella; Mary Ellen Hromisin; Mary Clare Leonard; Msgr.
han; Pat McCulloch; Keli Shanahan; Rosaleen Scatena and Dr. John Callahan. Absent fromthe photo: Grace
ty; Ann McNevin; Doreen Reese; Mary Ann Rome; Dr. Crescenso Calise; Dr Mohammed Saleem; Dr. Valerie W
ris; Mary Supey; Jennifer Caggiano; Kerry Denicola; Brian Mc Nulty and Joe Ranieli.
Concerned, carin
Msgr. John Bendik chats with volunteers at the five-year anni-
versary reception for the Care and Concern Free Health Clinic in
Pittston on Sunday afternoon.
Social worker Angelo Montante looks over photos and newspaper
clippings on display taken over the five-year history of the Care
and Concern Free Health Clinic.
Michael and Judy Fino, Gloria Blandina, Jack and Annette Peck fromFino's Pharmacy, which was
honored for its assistance to the clinic.
Pittston Area art teacher and Art Club m
fromleft, stands in front of a mural with
and Angelo Montante. The script was d S
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Evangelist, sponsors of the clin-
ic, recalled the opening night
five years ago as he waited with
Dr. John Callahan and just one,
single patient showed up.
The clinic operates totally on
donations andgrants andBlandi-
na listed several of those.
She also recognized the efforts
of the owners of Finos Pharma-
cy, Pittston; Pittston Area art
teacher Judy Greenwald and her
students; and the Sunday Dis-
patch, in providing a variety of
assistance.
The Free Health Clinic is open
at 5:30 p.m. every Wednesday in
the former Seton Catholic High
School. The Care and Concern
ministries also operate The
Greater Pittston Food Pantry
(anyone in need of food is asked
tocall 654-9923) andthe Greater
Pittston Kids Closet, noting its
third anniversary providing new
and gently used clothing.
n Catholic school notes 5th anniversary with reception
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Hughes; Pat Manganiello; row 2, Angelo Montante; Mary Lou Kowalczk; Florence Para; Brenda Pavill; Aman-
John J. Bendik; row 3, Kenny Musto; Theresa Skechus; James Hockenbury; Nancy Somers; Ellen Shana-
e Bradshaw; Mareen Brennan; Dolores Crowley; Maureen Hefferen; Mary Lever; Marian Giraldi; Kate McGin-
Weber; Laura Zdancewicz; Kristen Walker; Mary Beth Pascuka; Elaine Czarnecki; Mary Hanczyc; Fran Nor-
ng and proving it
Care and Concern Free Health Clinic director Gloria Blandina, left,
reacts to comments made by Sunday Dispatch editor Ed Acker-
man at the fifth anniversary ceremony last Sunday.
Care and Concern Free Health Clinic office manager Mary
Hughes, left, and volunteer Keli Shanahan at the reception.
Msgr. John Bendik offers remarks during the fifth anniversary reception of the Care and Concern
Free Health Clinic.
moderator Judy Greenwald, second
h Msgr. John Bendik, Gloria Blandina,
done by art club members.
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Pride Mobility Products Cor-
poration and QuantumRehab re-
cently offered 21 students with
disabilities an opportunity to be
mentored by career profession-
als during Disability Mentoring
Day (DMD) at Prides Exeter fa-
cility.
Attendees al-
so included Lu-
zerne Interme-
diate Unit
(LIU) 18 spe-
cialists, learn-
ing support
teachers, and
parents.
DMD is de-
signed to bring
students and
job seekers
with disabili-
ties into the workplace through
hands-on career exploration, on-
site job shadowing, and ongoing
mentoring leading to internship
and employment opportunities.
Through Pride and Quantums
DMD, participants were wel-
comedwithremarks fromChair-
man and CEO Scott Meuser and
had the opportunity to meet with
professionals in research and de-
velopment, marketing, govern-
ment affairs, sales, and technical
service to learn the typical job
responsibilities and the neces-
sary knowledge and skills need-
ed for a specific vocation.
Disability Mentoring Day is
such a vital program toward fos-
tering the educational and em-
Pride hosts Disability Mentoring Day
PHOTO SUBMITTED
Attendees at Disability Mentoring Day at Pride Mobility Products Corporation and QuantumRehab
in Exeter.
See PRIDE, Page 32
21 students
with disabilities
mentored by
professionals
Attendees
also included
Luzerne Inter-
mediate Unit
(LIU) 18 spe-
cialists, learn-
ing support
teachers, and
parents. S
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Were Americans today, he
said. And were here to honor
our veterans.
Wyoming Area Superintend-
ent Ray Bernardi urged students,
when home from school on
Monday because of the Veter-
ans Day holiday, to remember
those that serve. We cannot
rightfully celebrate the joy of our
freedom without remembering a
veterans unwavering service to
his or her country, Bernardi
said.
Bernardi said members of the
armed forces need to be recog-
nized. Today, at Wyoming Ar-
ea, we pause to honor all the men
and women before you who have
served honorably in the military
during times of war and peace,
he said. Many years ago the in-
dividuals in front of you made a
choice to serve their country. For
some it was the conflict of World
War II or the standoff of the Cold
War. Others found themselves in
the jungles of Vietnam, Korea or
Panama. Some have seen multi-
ple tours in Iraq or Afghanistan,
on active duty or as reservists.
Taps was played for the fallen
soldiers, which include former
Wyoming Area School Board
members Thomas Kearns, who
died Nov 2.
George Yurek, a World War II
vet from West Wyoming said he
is humbled by the program each
year. Its feels great to be honor-
ed, he said. These men here are
the bravest men I know.
Bob Jones, also of West
Wyoming, served aboard the
hospital ship USS Repose in the
Vietnam War.
Were so thankful for what
Wyoming Area does for us each
year, he said. And were
proud.
This was Tracys first time
back at the Wyoming Area gym
since he competed there in 1985
as part of Pittston Areas wres-
tling team.
As a Pittston Area Patriot, its
very weird feeling to be cheered
for in the Wyoming Area gym.
Tracy talked about U.S. Ma-
rines being Pennsylvania
Tough.
After joining the Marines, he
wound up being stationed in
Scotland and his old gunnery
sergeant served four tours in
Vietnam.
He was so grizzled, he said.
He still had shrapnel in his head
they were unable to remove.
Tracy called him a veterans
veteran.
That sergeant told him about
Pennsylvania marines.
A Pennsylvania Marine is
tougher than everybody else. A
Pennsylvania Marine works har-
der than everybody else. And a
Pennsylvania Marine never com-
plains, never whines, never quits
and always gets the job done.
The sergeant told him that on
his four tours in Vietnam, he had
a two drill sergeants, a squad
leader and a platoon commander
that were all from Pennsylvania.
He said, those four people
were the toughest, hardest work-
ing, non-complaining, toughest
most blue collar guys Ive en-
countered, he said.
Those words of wisdom have
stayed with Tracy.
When he was in Iraq in 2005,
he was able to pick his teamfor a
particular mission.
I first asked who was from
Pennsylvania. Five guys raised
their hands. They were my first
five picks.
TONY CALLAIO/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Members of the Exeter VFW833 pose for a photo with Wyoming Area Superintendent Raymond J.
Bernardi. Seated, left to right: Frank Onda, Joe Kleback, Dave Voda, Max Marcus. Standing: Sam
Ferrero, Joe Fedor, Bernardi, Len Benfanti, Jack Brogan. Before the ceremony, about 75 veterans
were treated to a turkey dinner.
Max Marcus, a VietnamVet, spoke on the VietnamVeterans' Wall
in Washington, D.C.
Wyoming Valley Ko-
rean War Vets. Seated,
left to right: Bob Alper,
Victor Habib, Anthony
Oliveri, Joe Petraser.
Standing: Jerry Guar-
nieri, Brian McHugh,
Joe Sincavage, George
Handzo, Lou Wierz-
nusz.
Honored
Continued from Page 4
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ployment goals of those with
physical and intellectual disabil-
ities, said Mark E. Smith, Pride
Consumer Research Manager.
As one with a disability myself
inthe workforce, I recall myhigh
school years being a large ques-
tion mark as to my future em-
ployment. I, therefore, know the
importance and inspiration that
students nowhave via DMD, and
its anhonor tohave Pride Mobil-
ity involved in supporting those
with disabilities in such an im-
pacting way.
The event included a tour of
Prides facility, as well as the test
lab, hands-on demonstrations of
mobility products such as a
manual and power wheelchair,
personal perspective presenta-
tions from mobility product us-
ers Mark E. Smith, Madonna
Long, Pride Consumer Advo-
cate, and Rodney Shemory,
Pride Receptionist with a visual
impairment, and a continental
breakfast and lunch.
James Ziobro, a participant
from Pittston Area High School,
was impressed by the extensive
testing facility at Pride and con-
siders going into a profession
that will allow him to be hands
on. Its cool how they test stuff
in the test lab so its dependable
and safe for the patients, Ziobro
said.
Other participants like Daniel
Stefanowicz, who has cerebral
palsy and attends Lake-Lehman
Junior/Senior High School, at-
tended Disability Mentoring
Day with a specific career in
mind.
I have an interest in business
and marketing and liked watch-
ing the sales team, Stefanowicz
said. It was fun to see them
place orders and interact with
people from all over the coun-
try.
Sarah Pryor, who is a teacher
at Lake-Lehman Junior/Senior
High School, noted how impor-
tant it was for students to realize
the wealth of opportunities avail-
able right in their backyard. I
appreciate Pride welcoming us
into their business and allowing
the students to learn more about
career opportunities within our
area, Pryor said.
Pride offers more than just
wheelchairs and scooters; there
are so many different facets to
meet a variety of interests. It was
wonderful of the employees to
share their stories and stress the
importance of hard work and
never giving up on your dreams.
Disability Mentoring is a na-
tionwide event hosted by the
American Association of People
with Disabilities. DMDbegan in
1999 with fewer than three-doz-
en student participants as part of
a White House effort to increase
the profile of National Disability
Employment Awareness Month,
celebrated every October.
DMD is the nations largest
job-shadowing program de-
signed for people with disabili-
ties, which allows career explo-
ration to take place outside of the
hiring context so job seekers can
meet and learn about employers
committed to hiring fromthis di-
verse and untapped workforce.
DMD also helps to dispel em-
ployers fears and promote dis-
ability as a central component of
diversity recruitment for a more
inclusive workforce.
Pride Mobility Products
Corporation is the worlds lead-
ing designer and manufacturer
of mobility products including
Jazzy Power Chairs, Pride
Scooters, Pride Lift Chairs,
and Pride Lifts and Ramps.
Quantum Rehab, a division
of Pride Mobility, manufactures
innovative, complex rehab solu-
tions. The company, headquar-
tered in Exeter, Pa., also has op-
erations in Australia, Canada,
Italy, the Netherlands, NewZeal-
and, and the United Kingdom.
Pride Mobility is dedicated to
providing expertly designed, en-
gineered, and tested products in-
corporating technologically in-
novative, intelligent features en-
abling end-users to achieve their
mobility goals.
Pride
Continued fromPage 30
Disability Mentoring Day is such a
vital program toward fostering the
educational and employment goals
of those with physical and intellec-
tual disabilities.
Mark E. Smith
Pride Consumer Research Manager S
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The following memorial
books have been placed on the
shelves at Pittston Memorial Li-
brary. Also listed are donations
to the library.
In memory of Rosine Bellan-
co Coming Home presented
by Cathy Turonis
In memory of Cassidy Sum-
mer Thomas Two For One
presented by Al & Ann Irvin
The Quintessential Quinoa
Cookbook presented by Lee
Bantell
In memory of Rosina Bellan-
co Weeknights with Giada
presented by Joann Polidori
"Coming Home" presented by
Cathy Turonis
In memory of Jospehine Shif-
flett Dinner, A Love Story
presented by Joe &Nancy Cron-
ick
In memory of Joseph Dennis
Service: A Navy Seal At War
presented by Brenda Lispi &
Linda Kohut
In memory of Richard Jo-
seph The Jefferson Lies pre-
sented by James Harowicz Bad
Animals presented by Joe and
Rosemary Dessoye
In memory of Angie Scian-
dra 10 Mindful Minutes pre-
sented by Shirley Trotta and
Elaine Centi
In memory of Justin Burns
The Challenge presented by
Patrick and Josephine Dowd and
Family
In memory of Mary I. Burns
Between The Lines presented
by Joan Pascolini and Alicia
Hintze
In memory of Brian Hoover
Son of Neptune presented by
Paul Zaffuto Sophomore Cam-
paign & The Legend of Mickey
Tussler presented by Teresa Lo-
Brutto
In memory of Clifford S.
Wachtel, DDS ABC Dentist
presented by Linda OBoyle
In memory of Msgr. Francis
Callahan A Blaze Of Glory
presented by Ellen &Jerry Mon-
dlak
Inmemoryof Charles Schifa-
no The Risk Agent presented
by Joe and Jean Sperrazza
In memory of Peggy Briggs
Spring Fever presented by An-
drew and Kristen Cole Sum-
merland & Back Fire presented
by Pat and Bob Cole
In memory of Evelyn Castel-
lino Beautiful Sacrifice pre-
sented by Bill and Josie Howley
In memory of Michael Kosar
The Bourn Imperative pre-
sented by Lili and Jeanie
In memory of Charles D.
Lemmond Jr. The Presidents
Club presented by Lili and Jea-
nie Villa Roma
In memory of Wanda Bracci-
ni Sweet Design presented by
Michael & Renee Mesaris and
Family
In memory of Mary Gunning
Guilty Wives presented by
Christopher & Sabrina
In memory of Helene Mangi-
nello Friends Forever present-
ed by The Hoban Family
In memory of John Dom-
broaky Campout & The Total
Outdoors Man Manual present-
ed by Barbara &Carmen Oliveri
In memory of Beatrice Mon-
tagna SandcastleGirls pre-
sented by Joe and Rosemary
Dessoye
In memory of Eugene Oscar
LaFratte Judgement Call pre-
sented by Michael and Renee
Mesaris and family
In memory of Lucy Pace
Where We Belong presented
by Stella Roman, Karen Chris-
tein and rose VanDemark
In memory of Mary Marcino
Soska The Judgement pre-
sented by Maria Capolarella
Montante
Adedicationtothe staff at Pitt-
ston City Early Intervention Unit
presented by Michael Jacob Fath
& Sophia Gronka
A dedication to Pat Solano
The Storm and The Third Gate
presented by James and Gloria
Blandina Prague Winter pre-
sented by Pat and Fred Gubitose
Adedication to Lighthouse A-
cademy Artemis Fowl present-
ed by Lori Ostrowski
Memorial donations placed at
the Pittston Library:
In memory of Irene Cerza by
Shirley Trotta
In memory of George Cameli
by Rose LoBrutto
In memory of Lucy Pace by
Antoinette Ardiere
Pittston Memorial Library is
located at 47 Broad Street Pitt-
ston. Phone: 570-654-9565.
L I BRARY NEWS
Memorial books placed at Pittston Library
The Pittston Memorial Li-
brary at 47 Broad St. in Pittston
announces the following:
A Holiday Gift Fair will be
from10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday,
Dec. 8., in the library. It will fea-
ture local hand crafters, a gigan-
tic book sale, a bake sale, a scav-
enger hunt for prizes and a rein-
deer food bar for the kids. Ad-
mission is free.
The Adult Baked Goods &
Book Club will be at 6 p.m. Dec.
3. Copies of the book, A Lion
Among Men by Gregory Ma-
guire are available at the circula-
tion desk.
Story Time signups are on-
going. Toddler Story Time, for
children 18 months to 3 years
old, will be at 10a.m. onTuesday.
Preschool Story Times, for chil-
dren Age 3 to Pre-Kindergarten,
will be at 1:30 p.m. Tuesday or 10
a.m. Wednesday. To sign up, call
the library at 654-9565 or email
pittstonlibrary@yahoo.com.
New this month is Family
Story Time for preschoolers and
toddlers at 1:30 p.m. Saturday.
Theres no need to sign up.
The library is starting a pro-
gram for grandparent raising
their grandchildren and is inter-
ested in what concerns and is-
sues there are. Call 654-9565 or
stop by the library. There is a
questionnaire to fill out to help
organize the program.
The Lego Club will meet at
between 3:45 and 4 p.m. on Nov.
11.
Christmas Cards for the
Troops are being collected again
this year. The cards can be hand-
made or store bought, signed
with encouraging messages and
decorated. Please dont seal the
envelopes and drop off complet-
ed cards at the front desk. The
deadline is Nov. 12, where there
will be a card-making party at 6
p.m. in the library. There is also a
basket of unsigned greeting
cards at the front desk. Used
Christmas cards are also being
collected to be re-used.
The Crochet Club meets at 10
a.m. Tuesdays and at 6 p.m.
Thursdays.
Kids Craft Club meets at 10
a.m. on the third Saturday of ev-
ery month and the Kids Science
Club meets the first Saturday of
each month. Both are open to
kids in grades 2-5. Please call,
visit, or email us to register.
The kids book club, Page
Turners, meets at 4 p.m. on the
first Thursday of each month. It
is open to kids in grades 3 to 5.
The Christmas book is available
at the front desk. Please call or
email us to register.
Elvis tribute artist Shawn
Klush will be at the Kirby Center
in Wilkes-Barre on November
24 for a library benefit. Please
call the library and speak with
Carol Crane for tickets.
Hangout Club, the book club
for teens in grade 6-12, will meet
at 6 p.m. Monday, Nov. 19 in the
library. The book of the month is
Divergent byVeronica Roth. If
you like The Hunger Games,
youll love this one. Copies avail-
able for check out at the front
desk.
Gamefest will be from 5 to 7
p.m. onThursday, Nov. 29. Enjoy
Wii with friends on a giant flat-
screen TV. More than 30 games
are available. Students in grades
6-12 are encouraged to attend.
Upcoming December Events
Dec. 1 Science Club at 11 a.m.
Dec. 3 Adult Book Club at 6
p.m.
Dec. 6 Kids Book Club at 4
p.m. and TAG at 6 p.m.
Dec. 8 Holiday Gift Fair and
Reading Dogs, both at 10 a.m.
Dec. 10 Lego Club at 4 p.m. &
Christmas Movie at 6 p.m.
Dec. 13 Family Storytime and
Craft Night December 17 Han-
gout Club at 6 p.m.
Activities listed at Pittston Memorial Library
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In the towns
Because of the communitys
efforts, the Avoca Crime Watchs
formation is off to a great start.
In order for this to continue, they
need more members. And on
Tuesday, you can become a part
of it.
The Avoca Crime Watch will
meet at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday,
Nov. 13 at the Avoca Municipal
Building, 752 Main St. All at-
tendees will receive a PIN num-
ber to anonymously report any
suspicious activity to 911.
If you have a PIN, but did not
register it, you can do it at this
meeting.
Fire fund drive
The Avoca Fire Department
asks anyone who has not made a
contribution to their fund drive
to please do so as soon as pos-
sible. Less than 40 percent of all
residents have contributed at this
point. As a result, the department
is financiallystressedandcannot
continue to operate.
The fire department plays a
crucial role in the community
and will go bankrupt unless it re-
ceives donations.
St. Michaels dinner
The Rev. Joseph Bertha, Ph.D.
and the parishioners of St. Mi-
chael the Archangel Byzantine
Catholic Church invite the com-
munity to their 16th annual feast
day dinner from1to 3 p.m. today,
Nov. 11 in the church hall, 205
North Main St., Pittston. Take
outs will be available too.
The menu includes roast beef,
mashed potatoes, gravy, Italian
green beans, red beets, cake and
your choice of coffee, tea or a
soft drink. Dinners are $10 for
adults and $7 for children.
There will also be a piggy sale
during the dinner hours. In addi-
tion to the great food, there will
also be a raffle with various
prizes.
Financial workshop today
George R. Siracuse, president
of Strategic Financial Planners,
Inc. will conduct a free senior
strategies workshop at noon to-
day, Nov. 11in St. Marys School
auditorium, 742 Spring St.
Queen of the Apostles
Queen of the Apostles Parish
youth group will meet from6:30
to 8:30 p.m. today, Nov. 11 in St.
Marys School auditorium, 742
Spring St. Call Lori Ostrowski,
director of youth ministry, at
457-8840 for details.
The youth group is collecting
winter hats and gloves for the
needy. Items may be dropped off
in the designated containers lo-
cated in the back of St. Marys
Church, 715 Hawthorne St.
The parishcouncil will meet at
7 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 12 in the
rectory.
The womens guild will meet
at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 13 in
St. Marys School auditorium.
The social concerns/respect
life committee will meet at 6
p.m. onFriday, Nov. 16inSt. Ma-
rys School auditorium. The
committee is accepting food do-
nations for the Thanksgiving
food baskets for the poor. Items
can be dropped in the church un-
til Nov. 16.
The worship committee will
meet at 7:30 p.m. on Monday,
Nov. 19 in the rectory.
The annual appeal committee
will meet at 7:30 p.m. on
Wednesday, Nov. 21 in the recto-
ry.
The building and grounds
committee will meet at 6:30 p.m.
on Monday, Nov. 26 in the recto-
ry.
The parish will host the Rev.
Michael Shea, C.M., as he con-
ducts a Marian Triduumat 8 a.m.
and 7 p.m. November 27-29 at
the church. The Triduumwill fo-
cus on the three apparitions of
Mary to St. Catherine Laboure.
It will precede the parishs nine
day Miraculous Medal Novena
which will conclude on the feast
of the Immaculate Conception,
Dec. 8. Father Shea is a Vincen-
tian priest currently assigned to
the Central Association of the
Miraculous Medal in German-
town.
The womens guild will have
its Christmas party on Sunday,
Dec. 2 at Colarussos LaPalazzo,
Moosic. To make a reservation,
call Debbie Callahan at 457-
8887, Anne Dillon at 881-5182
or the parish office at 457-3412.
All women are invited to attend.
Ash pick up
Avoca Borough will collect
ashes every Wednesday. Resi-
dents are asked to place them
curbside by 8 a.m. on the collec-
tion date.
Recycling reminder
The Moosic recycling truck
will be at the Avoca Municipal
Garage, 1106 Plane St., from 8
a.m. to 8 p.m. every Thursday,
instead of Wednesday.
Avoca residents are invited to
recycle newspaper and commin-
gled glass, plastic and metal bot-
tles, cans and jars.
All lids should be removed
and disposed of in home trash.
Containers should be rinsed,
plastics and metals should be
flattened and glass should not be
broken.
The new system allows paper
to be mixed with cardboard.
All recyclables should be
placed in the appropriate com-
partment of the truck.
Residents are urged to read
and follow the signs on the recy-
cling tuck.
The recycling area will be
monitored and violators can be
fined or banned from future re-
cycling privileges.
Recycling flyers are available
in the lobby of the Avoca Munic-
ipal Buildingandat the recycling
trailer.
Yard waste
Avoca Borough will have a
yard waste collection on Tues-
Seeking members, Crimewatch to meet Tuesday
AVOCA
JACKIE BORTHWICK-GALVIN
457-3351
avocahappenings@verizon.net
See AVOCA, Page 35
Today, Sunday, Nov. 11, the an-
nual Veterans Day Ceremony is
at the Dupont Municipal Memo-
rial Lawnbeginningat 11:00a.m.
This years event is sponsored by
AMVETS Post 189 with the
cooperation of the VFW Post
4909 and the American Legion
Post 657.
Ariana L. Pourmonir, LTJG, a
graduate of Pittston Area Class
of 2006, will offer remarks along
with local Veteran Organizations
Commander.
VFW Auxiliary
The Ladies Auxiliary to the
Pryzybytek Kundlas VFW post
4909 will meet on Tuesday, No-
vember 13 at the post home be-
ginning at 7 p.m.
Hostesses are: Ruth Heine and
Mary Janeski. Elaine Healey
Presidnet will preside.
Sermon, Soup, Sandwich
Sermon, Soup and Sandwich
will be held this Saturday, No-
vember 17 at Holy Mother of
Sorrows, Wyoming Ave. at
noon. Fr. Walter Placek Ph.D.
will make a presentation titled
God and Science in the
church.
Fr. Walter Placek is a graduate
of Wilkes College Class of 1961
with a B.S. in Physics and cur-
rently serves as a Professor of
Physics and Education Adjunct
Professor at Wilkes, Kings, and
Misericordia.
This causal gathering is open
to all members of the communi-
ty. Fellowship with soup and
sandwich will follow in the par-
ish hall at 12:30 p.m. sponsored
by Al & Donna Micka and Dr.
Jim and Elane Plaskonka.
All are invited for this event
free of charge. No reservations
are needed. All are welcome.
Food collection
Holy Mother of Sorrows and
Sacred Heart of Jesus Church in-
vite the community and parish-
ioners to take part in their annual
food collection for the Greater
Pittston Food Bank. Needed
items are any canned food that
would help make a Thanksgiv-
ing and Christmas Holiday din-
ner: stuffing mix, gravy, cran-
berry sauce, soup sweet pota-
toes, and canned vegetables.
Offerings can be brought to
the weekend Masses at both
churches November 10/11 and
17/18. They can also be left on
the rectorys back porches.
Prayer Service
Everyone is cordially invited
to the 4th annual community
Thanksgiving Prayer Service at
Sacred Heart of Jesus Church on
Sunday, November 18 at 7 p.m.
Sacred Heart and Holy Mother
of Sorrows parish choirs will
join forces and voices in praise
and thanksgiving.
Pourmonir to speak at Veterans Day Ceremony
DUPONT
ANN MARIE PADDOCK
407-0231
dupont.news@comcast.net
See DUPONT, Page 36 S
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DELI
201 Foote Avenue, Duryea
FREE DELIVERY! CALL 457-8881
OPEN DAILY: 6 a.m.-7 p.m. Saturday & Sunday til 5 p.m.
REHOSKIS MARKET
Turkey Breast ........................................ $5.99 lb.
Soft Salami............................................ $3.99 lb.
Baby Swiss Cheese ............................... $5.99 lb.
Center Cut Pork Chops Or Roast............ $1.99 lb.
Rump Roast .......................................... $3.79 lb.
Lean Stewing Beef ................................ $3.99 lb.
Seasoned Butt Porketta......................... $2.99 lb.
Butt Steaks ........................................... $2.29 lb.
Smoked Bacon...................................... $4.99 lb.
Fresh & Smoked Kielbasi
If youre an animal lover, there
is an event coming up on Satur-
day you will not want to miss. It
will not only be a good time for
you and your four-legged friend,
but it will also provide much
needed help for a non-profit ani-
mal group right here in Duryea
that is providing care for four
dogs who were rescued from se-
vere inhumane treatment.
BigLots andHolidayHair will
sponsor Pictures with Santa for
Pets from noon to 3:30 p.m. on
Saturday, Nov. 17 at Big Lots,
Birney Plaza, Moosic. The pho-
tos, which will be taken by Pixel
Perfect Photography, are $10
each.
There will also be a bake sale,
hot chocolate, raffles, prizes,
Christmas Carols performed live
by local country music singer
Dani-elle and dogs for adoption.
All proceeds will benefit Tra-
ceys Hope Hospice Care Pro-
gram and Rescue for Domestic
Animals, Inc., Duryea.
This non-profit is currently in
dire need of financial support as
they are funding veterinary and
nutritional care for four purebred
Weimaraners who were rescued
locally last week. These dogs
were severely malnourished, ve-
ry frail and fearful. However,
they are safe now at Traceys
Hope. Please keep their hope
alive! Donations can be sent to:
Traceys Hope 4 Weimaraners
c/o Pennstar Bank
801 South Main St.
Taylor, PA18517.
For more information, please
call Traceys Hope at 457-1625.
Little League sends thanks
The Duryea Little League
would like to thank all of the
boys and girls who participated
in the league this year. They
would also like to thank the
coaches and volunteers who
helped throughout the season. A
special thank you goes out to all
of the sponsors, individuals and
groups that contributed to the or-
ganization in any way to help
make the season a success. Sig-
nups for the 2013 baseball and
softball seasons will take place
in January.
Legion Sons fund raiser
The Sons of the American Le-
gion (S.A.L.), Squadron 585, are
having a holiday fundraiser. First
prize is a $500 gift certificate to
Quality Beverage, Laflin; sec-
ond prize a $100 gift certificate
to the Wine and Spirits store;
thirdprize is a $50gift certificate
to Komenskys Market, Duryea.
Chances are $3 each or two for
$5. They can be purchased from
any S.A.L. member or at the post
home. The drawing will take
place on Dec. 22.
Veterans Day ceremony
The American Legion Bren-
nan Reagan Post 585 will have
its annual Veterans Day ceremo-
ny at 11 a.m. today, Nov. 11 at the
V.F.W. Post 1227, 492 Stephen-
son St.
The members of the V.F.W.
Post 1227, the Sons of the Amer-
ican Legion, Squadron 585 and
the American Legion Auxiliary
to Post 585 will also participate.
St. Michaels dinner
The Rev. Joseph Bertha, Ph.D.
and the parishioners of St. Mi-
chael the Archangel Byzantine
Catholic Church invite the com-
munity to their 16th annual feast
day dinner from1to 3 p.m. today,
Nov. 11 in the church hall, 205
North Main St., Pittston. Take
outs will be available too. The
menu includes roast beef,
mashed potatoes, gravy, Italian
green beans, red beets, cake and
your choice of coffee, tea or a
soft drink. Dinners are $10 for
adults and $7 for children. There
will also be a piggy sale during
the dinner hours. In addition to
the great food, there will also be
a raffle with various prizes.
Street Dept. notes
The Duryea Borough Street
Department and borough offices
will be closed on Monday, Nov.
12 in observance of Veterans
Day. Garbage will be collected
one day late this week. Yard
waste and ashes will be collected
on Friday, Nov. 16.
The Duryea Borough Street
Department will also be closed
on Thursday, Nov. 22 in observ-
ance of Thanksgiving. All recy-
clables throughout the borough
will be collected on Wednesday,
Nov. 21. Ashes will be collected
on Friday, Nov. 23; however
there will not be a yard waste
collection on Nov. 23.
The final yard waste collec-
tion for 2012 will be on Friday,
Nov. 30.
Legion Auxiliary
The American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 585 will have its
monthly meeting at 6:30 p.m. on
Tuesday, Nov. 13 at the Brennan
Regan post home, 329 Main St.
All members, senior and ju-
nior, are encouraged to attend.
Any member that has not paid
their 2013 membership dues or
updated any necessary informa-
tion should as soon as possible.
Council meeting
The Duryea Borough Council
will meet at 6:30 p.m. on Tues-
day, Nov. 13 for their monthly
meeting and work session at the
Duryea Municipal Building, 315
Main St. The public is invited to
attend.
Rec board sends thanks
The Duryea Rec Board would
like to thank everyone who
helped make their recent Hallo-
ween Spooktacular a huge suc-
cess. Nearly 200 children and
their parents were treated to
complimentary food, music, hay
rides and a haunted house. They
also received treat bags courtesy
of state Rep. and Mrs. Mike Car-
roll.
The Rec Board will meet at
6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 14
at the Duryea Municipal Build-
ing, 315 Main St.
Holy Rosary race night
Holy Rosary School will
sponsor its third annual Night at
the Races on Friday, Nov. 16 at
the school, 125 Stephenson St.
The doors open at 5:30 p.m. and
the races start at 7 p.m.
Admission is $10 which in-
cludes food and beverage.
Contact Debbie Davis at 451-
1762 to purchase advance tick-
ets, horses or advertise as a race
sponsor. Adults 21 and older are
invited to attend.
All proceeds will benefit Holy
Rosary School.
Phillips fund raiser
There will be a fundraiser in
memory of Bernard Phillips Jr.
from2 to 4 p.m. on Sunday, Nov.
18 at Memorable Occasions (for-
merly Y.M.S. of R Hall), Main
Street. There will be basket and
50-50 raffles as well as other ac-
tivities. All proceeds will be used
to defray the cost of Phillips fu-
neral expenses.
Cub Pack Night
Duryea Cub Scout Pack 285
will have Pack Night at 7 p.m. on
Monday, Nov. 19 at Sacred Heart
Hall, Stephenson Street. The
Bear Scouts will host the meet-
ing and perform a skit about
Leave No Trace.
Aguest speaker will also be in
attendance to talk about nutri-
tion.
The Bobcat badge ceremony
will also take place for new
Scouts. New Scouts must wear
their full dress uniform and have
a parent present.
For more information, call
Ann Edwards at 457-8402.
Polish Falcons to meet
The Polish Falcons, Nest 128,
will have its monthly meeting at
7 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 24 at the
nest, 631 Main St. Nominations
for officers for 2013 will be held
along with discussions of up-
coming holiday plans.
Pictures with Santa for Pets event Saturday
DURYEA
JACKIE BORTHWICK-GALVIN
457-3351
duryeahappenings@verizon.net
day, Nov. 20, weather permitting.
In addition to collecting grass
clippings and leaves, borough
workers will also collect other
yard waste, including shrubs,
hedge clippings and tree limbs.
Grass clippings and leaves can
be placed in the same container;
however, the other collection
items must be placed in a sepa-
rate container.
The recycling center will not
accept grass and leaves that are
combined with the other forms
of yard waste.
Tree limbs should not exceed
three feet in length and one-half
inch in diameter. Rocks, stones,
dirt and animal waste are not ac-
ceptable forms of yard waste and
will not be collected.
A maximum of three open
containers, not exceeding 30
pounds, will be allowed per col-
lection.
Residents should not put col-
lection items in plastic bags.
They will not be collected.
Collection items should be
placed curbside by 8 a.m.
VFW Auxiliary Christmas
party
The Ladies AuxiliarytoV.F.W.
Post 8335 will have their annual
Christmas party at 6 p.m. on Sat-
urday, Dec. 1 in the post home,
915 Main St.
The chairperson of this event
is Betty Lewis, and co-chairper-
son is Wendy Radle. Members
may bring guests. Gifts will be
exchanged. The drawing for the
holiday food baskets will also
take place at this time.
Please call Mary Orluk at 457-
5999 or June Fitzgerald at 457-
9604 by Nov. 21to make a reser-
vation.
Avoca
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The homilist for the service
will be Father Dawid.
During the service a collection
will be taken which will benefit
the Pittston Food Bank. Follow-
ing the prayer service a social
will be held in Sacred Heart
church hall.
Sportsmens Club
ElmSt. Sportsmens Club will
meet today, Sunday, November
11, at 7 p.m. at the Polish Amer-
ican Citizens Club, Dupont.
John Lizak will preside.
The Polish American Citizens
Club of Elm Street Dupont, will
hold their regular monthly meet-
ing at 2 p.m., today, Sunday No-
vember 11th, at the Club home.
PACC Active members are en-
couraged to attend; refreshments
will be served after the meeting.
Lottery fund raiser
Dupont Lions annual fun-
draiser Match the Daily Lot-
tery tickets are now available
from any Lion member. Tickets
are also on sale at The Hub
One. Cost is $10 and all pro-
ceeds benefit community pro-
jects: Christmas lights, Chil-
drens Easter Egg Hunt, Hallo-
ween safety stations and the chil-
drens Christmas party. Dupont
Lions will meet on Monday, No-
vember 12th at 6:30pm at the
VFW Post Home 4909.
Eco-Tip
Here is Joey Jones Eco-Tip of
the week: Check that your radi-
ators are not blockedbyfurniture
or drapes. If they are blocked,
heat will not get to the rest of
your home.
Gas service applications
Applications for gas service
are available at the Dupont Mu-
nicipal offices during regular
business hours. UGI representa-
tive Mike Trussa stated that for
the company to have program
approval for placement of gas
lines residents applications
must be filed with UGI. For
more information you can con-
tact Mike at 829-8664.
Pictures with Santa
Pictures with Santa with pro-
ceeds to benefit Traceys Hope
of Duryea: Children and/or pets
can have their picture taken for
$10.00 by Pixel Perfect Photog-
raphy on Saturday, November 17
from noon to 3:30 p.m. at Big
Lots in the Birney Plaza in
Moosic.
In addition there will be a bake
sale, live entertainment with lo-
cal Nashville Singer Dani-elle
Hot Cocco served by the Junior
Volunteers, raffles, prizes and
most importantly there will be
pets available for adoption. Pet
Services by Denise and Traceys
Hope Hospice Care Programand
Rescue for Domestic Animals,
Inc. would like to thank the com-
munity for their ongoing support
for all their furry friends.
Council meeting
Dupont Borough Council will
meet on Tuesday, November 13.
Second reading of the 2013 bud-
get will top the agenda.
Weatherization Assistance
Some Dupont residents may
qualify for the Weatherization
Assistance Program which
makes single-family and mobile
homes more energy efficient,
saving money and keeping
homes warmer. Also some resi-
dents may also be eligible for the
Low Income Home Energy As-
sistance Program, or LIHEAP.
There are certain income guide-
lines and restrictions. Call Du-
pont Borough for more informa-
tion.
Public Works Job Opening
Dupont Borough is accepting
applications for an experienced
employee with a CDL license,
experienced in snow plowing
and heavy equipment operation.
Applications are available at
the borough office. Qualified
applicants are asked to please
contact the borough office as
soon as possible.
Last compost pick up
This is the last week for resi-
dents to pick up compost for use
at your properties and gardens
fromthe newoperations at Grea-
ter Pittston Compost Facility on
Garden Drive. The material is
available behindthe first redgate
to the facility. Truckloads are
available to residents and busi-
nesses during operation hours up
to November 15 on Tuesday and
Wednesday from 8 to 4. Cost for
truckloads is $10.00tobe loaded
by our operator.
Sacred Heart of Jesus
Choir will practice on Thurs-
day, November 15 at 6:30 to 7
p.m. for choir members and con-
tinue from7 to 8 p.m. with mem-
bers and Holy Mother of Sor-
rows members in the choir loft to
prepare for the Thanksgiving
Prayer Service.
Womens Society will meet at
6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, November
13 in the church hall. Holy Name
Society will meet at 7PM on
Wednesday, November 14 in the
church hall.
Leos Club clothing drop
The Pittston Area Leos Club
in partnership with Fibers of the
Earth has placed clothing drop
boxes at the Dupont Municipal
Bldg and at the Kindergarten
Center in Dupont.
They also have placed boxes at
all the Pittston Area Schools:
High School in Yatesville, the
Middle, Intermediate and Pri-
mary Center in Pittston.
The Leos Club will receive
much needed funds from this
program and will be keeping the
items out of our landfills. Please
tell your friends, family and
neighbors. Just place your items
in a tied plastic bag and drop
them off at any of the locations.
Look for the green box with the
Dragon Fly Logo.
Some of acceptable items:
Clean, wearable adult and chil-
drens clothing and sleepwear.,
sneakers and shoes, sheets and
linens, curtains, purses, belts,
bags, hats, paired socks and
stuffed animals and soft cloth
toys.
If you need a special pickup or
additional information contact
Annmarie Paddock at 654-2415,
ext 2250 or Clairellen Hopple at
654-2415 ext. 2101.
Balavage thanked
Last weekend, between Satur-
day and Sunday, the Sacred
Heart Statue in front of Sacred
Heart Church was desecrated
with vulgar drawings. Many
thanks to Tony Balavage who
went to work to fix the statue as
soon as he saw what had hap-
pened.
Wafer Dinner
The Womens Society of Sa-
cred Heart of Jesus Church will
hold their annual Wafer Dinner
on Sunday, January 13 at 2:00
p.m. in the church hall with
Coopers of Scranton catering
this years event.
Cost is $10 per person and res-
ervations can be made by con-
tacting Diane Skrzysowski at
654-6639 or Carolyn Klimek at
654-3713. Deadline for reserva-
tions will be December 28.
Payment can be deposited in
the collection basket or you can
drop off your reservation at the
rectory office during business
hours.
Christmas party
Reservations are now being
accepted for the Dupont Bor-
ough Annual Childrens Christ-
mas which will be held on Sat-
urday, December 15 at the VFW
Post Home 4909 from1to 3 p.m.
Make your reservations by call-
ing Borough Manager Patty
McDonald at 655-6216.
Bowling results
Elkos Bantam/Prep Mixed
High Scratch Series Score:
Boys Division: Ryan Kane,
118; Ryan Peck, 115; Aiden
Hindmarsh, 112; Alek Chilson,
109; Robert Davidson, 103; Jake
Grzech, 94; Jimmy Soroka, 92;
Bryan Bryk, 90; MatthewMesa-
ris, 85; Beau Widdick, 74.
Girls Division: Makenzie Ka-
minski, 155; Madison Mesaris,
121; Kacie Fisk, 102; Sophia
Gronka, 29.
Elkos Prep Boys
High Scratch Series Scores:
Tyler Cegelka, 322; Martin Ku-
na, 321; Zachary Elko, 311; An-
thony DePascale, 309; T J Con-
nors, 292; Tyler Granahan, 278;
Marc Piechota, 276; Jeremy La-
velle, 274; John Jr. Colarusso,
223.
Elkos Junior/Senior Friday
High Scratch Series Scores:
Boys Division: Peter Kulick,
709; Conrad Chapple, 661; Da-
vid Zydko, 637; Zachary McKit-
ish, 618; Stephen Yuhas, 593.
Girls Division: Irene Mag-
don, 541; Courtney Osiecki, 516;
Katie Wynn, 462; Jessica Weso-
lowski, 424; Jordan Cegelka,
366.
Magic Circle
High Scratch Series Scores:
Mens Division: Chris renfer,
692; Kyle Wagner, 667; Don
Whiting, 656; Rich Jr. Aston,
646; Paul Chmiel, 642; Rich
Wagner, 633; Joe Sr. Wruble,
627; Harry Nicholson, 618; Bill
Pupa, 609; Wally Ziemin-
ski,570.
Womens Division: Marythe-
resa Pupa, 487; denise Gordon,
411; Courtney McKitish, 330;
Mima Brunges, 305; Ashley
Fuller, 289.
Universal
High Scratch Series Scores:
David Titton, 692; Jerry Cog-
gins, 653; Ryan OMalley, 630;
Francis Pupa, 612; Ed Rutledge,
607; WilliamElko, 593; Billy Jr.
Elko, 592; George Gulla, 562;
Jim Lavelle, lll, 556; John Kon-
icki, 518; Richard Arditi, 518.
Warehouse Mixed League
High Scratch Series Scores:
Bill Casterline, 695; Ed Cologie,
660; Jim Golden, John Doran,
620; Scott Jablowski, 607.
National
High Scratch Series Scores:
Jerry Coggins, 772; Mark Kul-
ick, 744; Matt Felter, 710; Keith
Weinschenk, 680; Neal Elko, Li-
sa Menichini, 630; John Kulick,
627; Allyn Jr. Ferretti, 620; An-
thony Ferretti, 603; Robert Lus-
si, 576.
Pittston Township VFW
High Scratch Series Scores:
Wally Moore, 659; Joe Sr.
Walsh, 615; Rich Russian, 608;
Larry Jr. OBrien, 604; Russ Ste-
vens, 603; Gene Wasko, 583;
Jow Argenio, 571; Ed Wasko,
571; Frank Solano, 557; Joe Da-
lessandro, 536.
Elkos Mixed
High Scratch Series Scores:
Boys Division: Michael Elko,
668; Evan Elko, 452; Joey Jones,
406; JustinCoyne, 382; EvanEs-
posito, 374; Paul Greco, 362;
Dylan Kelly, 357; Anthony Zim-
merman, 330; Charles Kulick,
326; Dominic Falzone, 323.
Girls Division: Samanatha
Piechota, 383; Morgan, Mesaris,
381; Gina Kirkpatrick, 350;
Piper Kane, 317; Hannah Ma-
ruhnich, 312; Kiena Vest, 230;
Janelle Dudek, 217; Loren Gron-
ka, 210; Alyssa Bulford, 193;
Halle Gronka, 167.
American
High Scratch Series Scores:
Dave Kern, 780; John Grohow-
ski, 765; Neal elko, 738; Gary Jr.
Magdon, 694; Bruce Rydzy,
655; Pete Latona, 647; Gerry
Reilly, 631; Mark Kulick, 630;
Chris Kasa, 620; Scott Kowalc-
zyk, 617.
Sunday Night Mixed
High Scratch Series Scores:
Mens Division: Joe Umbra,
680; Joe Sr. Wruble, 616; Francis
Pupa, 611; Russ Stevens, 603;
Vito Buzzetta, 599.
Womens Division: Marianne
Argenio, 427; Marytheresa Pu-
pa, 420; MaryLou Fereck, 409;
Karen Umbra, 397; Gracelynn
Williamson, 368; Courtney
McKitish, 368.
Boys Division: Zachary
McKitish, 621.
Services schedule
Public Works Dept. service
schedule for the week of Nov. 11:
Monday, Nov. 12 - Refuse
Tuesday, Nov.13 -Yard waste
Wednesday, Nov.14 - Mixed
papers.
Dupont
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There will be a budget meet-
ing for Exeter Boro on Monday,
Nov. 12, at 7:00 p.m. at the bor-
ough building. The meeting is
open to the public. Joe Boyle
from the Pa Economy League
will be present.
Cosmopolitan Seniors
The Cosmopolitan Seniors,
will gather again at 1 p.m. on
Tuesday November 13, at St. An-
thony Center, in Exeter, and en-
joy a Halloween party including
a Hoagie luncheon. .
Fifty-six members and 3
guests attended the previous
meeting. After the call to order
by the President, VP Kleback,
led the group in prayer, pledge of
allegiance and a patriotic song.
Secretary Terri Mislan read the
minutes of the last meeting .
Treasurer Amy Alpaugh an-
nounced the bank balance.
Congratulations were extend-
ed to Terri and George Mislan
celebrating their 47th Wedding
Anniversary, and to Antoinette
Manganello on her 90th birth-
day.
Johanna reported on the plans
for the Christmas party sched-
uled for December 4.
After the meeting the group
enjoyed refreshments, bingo was
played, and Bill Kull entertained
at the organ. The club is seeking
speakers and entertainers. Please
contact Vic at 655-2720.
Frances Voveris won the spe-
cial game prize, and the bingo
jackpot was shared by Theresa
Blasavage and Florence Stan-
koski. 50/50winners were: Mary
Coleman, Virginia, Craig, Shari
Dailey, Joe Kleback, and Kathy
Loucks. AColumbus Daybasket
of Italian food items was won by
Sharon McAdarra
Travel coordinator Johanna is
accepting reservations for a trip
to Mount Airy Casino on
Wednesday November14. Pick-
ups in Exeter and Pittston. You
do not have to be a member to
come on these trips. Details can
be obtained from Johanna at
655-2720.
WA senior parents
Class of 2013 Pasta Dinner &
Craft Fair will be held Sunday,
December 9, 11 a.m. 5 p.m. at
Secondary Center Cafeteria.
Five tickets will be distributed to
each senior with report cards on
Nov. 13. Money and/or unsold
tickets need to be returned to
homeroom teachers by Tuesday,
Nov. 20 in the envelope provid-
ed.
Parent volunteers are needed
on Saturday, Dec. 8, 4-7 p.m. and
alsoSunday9a.m. 6p.m. inthe
high school cafeteria. Seniors
will be asked to volunteer on
Sunday; signup sheets will be
available in homerooms.
Along with craft vendors,
there will be a Chinese auction.
Any basket donations can be
dropped off that Sunday morn-
ing. Still looking for interested
vendors; contact Nancy 570-
417-4603 or 570-693-3568
Breakfast with Santa
Members of the Wyoming Ar-
ea Kiwanis Club and its spon-
sored youth leadership programs
are planning the annual Break-
fast with Santa to be held De-
cember 2 from8:30 a.m. to noon
at the Wyoming Area Secondary
Center Cafeteria.
After entering through Santas
Wonderland, guests will enjoy a
delicious breakfast of pancake,
scrambled eggs, sausage and
pancakes, withchocolate chips if
desired, along with juice, milk,
coffee and tea. Cost of the meal
is $6 for adults and $3 for chil-
dren. Tickets are available from
any Kiwanis member and at the
door.
Activities will include the gen-
tle old man himself, Santa, who
will be available for all children
ina familyfriendlyenvironment.
Professional pictures by PSP
will also be available. Children
will have the opportunity to par-
ticipate in age appropriate
Christmas crafts fromChristmas
card making to face painting.
There will be several Chinese
Auctions for toy baskets, and
several Holiday Theme Baskets
and live Christmas Trees!!
WyomingArea Kiwanis Presi-
dent Carl Worthingtonstatedthis
has become a premier event for
children and parents to start off
the holiday season. It also pro-
vides the Kiwanis Club with in-
come to run its program of com-
munity service. Worthington
asks that the community consid-
er support the Kiwanis club pro-
grams and if any community
minded person are interested in
joining the club to meet with us
on the 2nd and 4th Wednesday of
each month at Gobers Deco
Lounge.
Ziti dinner
Exeter Borough Hose Co #1
1405 Susquehanna Ave will hold
a ziti dinner on Saturday, No-
vember 17 from 1 to 6 p.m.
Adults are $7, children 12 and
under $4.
Tenth Street fundraiser
Those interested can register
or re-enroll their Price Chopper
grocery store card online to help
benefit Tenth Street Elementary
School. (http://www2.price-
chopper.com/toolsforschools/)
School Code is 17322. Residents
of Wyoming and West Wyoming
may also sign up to help the local
elementary school.
Borough notes
Residents are not to take recy-
clables to the recycling building.
They are to be placed curbside
for pick-up on Mondays. Yard
waste is to be placed curbside on
Thursdays.
Businesses that have not pur-
chased a recycling or refuse
sticker for 2012 will no longer
have recyclables picked up and
will be cited by the police and
subjected to a fine.
Anyone who has a private
dumpster must report their ton-
nage to Karen Szwast, recycling
Exeter Borough Council meeting Monday
EXETER
EILEEN CIPRIANI
287-3349
ecipriani@comcast.net
The Exeter Lions Club conducted their annual goblin watch on Wednesday October 31 at their gaze-
bo on Wyoming Ave. and Lincoln St. Pictured in the front row are Justin Cameli, Dustin Doria, Rocco
Pizano, Leo Haros, Sean Burke, ALEX Snook. Standing, Lion President Janet Serino, Lion Linda
Hyzinski, Lion Jean Marie Radle, Lion Jack Brogan and Brian Strazdus, third grade JFK Elementary
School.
Members of the Wyoming Area Kiwanis Club and its sponsored
youth leadership programs are planning the annual Breakfast
with Santa to be held December 2 from8:30 a.m. to noon at the
Wyoming Area Secondary Center Cafeteria. Pictured planning the
event are, front row Tiffany Calliao, Amy Casagrande, and Cathy
Coolbaugh. Standing are Builders Club President Morgan Cool-
baugh, Kiwanis President Carl Worthington and Kiwanis Presi-
dent Elect Jackie Kasa.
See EXETER, Page 38
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The West Pittston Rams have
begun selling their Year End Cel-
ebration Awards Ceremony tick-
ets. They are available at the sta-
dium clubhouse this Monday,
Tuesday and Wednesday, from 5
to 7 p.m. The event will be held
at the Secondary Center High
School Cafeteria on November
17 from 1 to 5 p.m. Cost is $15
per adult, $10 per child (ages 4 to
14). Menu available at ticket pur-
chase times.
Make checks payable to West
Pittston Rams. All registered
children are free but must obtain
a ticket for admittance. All tick-
ets are pre-sale. There will be no
tickets sales at the door.
For basket raffle donations,
please contact Amy Switzer. For
dessert table donations, please
contact Tiffany Clark or Donna
Giambra.
The Rams are accepting appli-
cations for Board positions for
2013. Send them via email to
President@westpittston-
rams.com.
Board positions will be voted
on at the December meeting.
Library book fair
The West Pittston Library will
be having a Book Fair at Barnes
& Noble at the Arena Hub Plaza
fromDecember 7 - 9. Gift-wrap-
ping will be provided on Decem-
ber 8 at no charge with proof of
your paid receipt.
Mention that you are shopping
for the West Pittston Library pri-
or to paying for your purchase.
People shopping online can
use the Bookfair ID #10884930
when checking out fromDecem-
ber 7 - 14.
For more information, please
call or email Sara at 570-883-
7079 or email: sarashanekel-
ly@gmail.com.
WA pasta dinner
The Class of 2013 Pasta Din-
ner and Craft Fair will be held on
Sunday, December 9, 11a.m. to 5
p.m. at Secondary Center Cafe-
teria.
Five tickets will be distributed
to each senior with report card
on November 13. Money and/or
unsold tickets need to be return-
ed to homeroom teachers by
Tuesday, Nov 20 in the envelope
provided.
Parent volunteers are needed
on Saturday, December 8, 4 -7
p.m. and Sunday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
in the high school cafeteria. Se-
niors will be asked to volunteer
on Sunday, signup sheets will be
available in homerooms.
Along with craft vendors,
there will be a Chinese auction.
Any basket donations are greatly
appreciated and can be dropped
off that Sunday morning.
Still looking for interested
vendors, please contact Nancy at
570-417-4603 or 570-693-3568.
WA cabaret night
The Wyoming Area Drama
Club and Thespian Society
#4295 is holding Cabaret Night
on Sunday, November 18 in the
Wyoming Area Secondary Cen-
ter Cafeteria from 6 to 9 p.m.
Tickets are $5 and available
through any Drama Club mem-
ber. They will also be available at
the door. Refreshments will be
available.
Library Autumn Programs
Adult Programs
Downloading Free E-books
From the Library - Nov. 26 at
6:30 p.m.
Beginner Yoga - Mondays -
10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.; Tues-
days and Thursdays 8:30 to 9:30
a.m.; Wednesdays, 9 a.m.; Fri-
days, 10:30 a.m.
Intermediate Yoga Wednes-
days - 6:30 p.m.
West Pittston Library Book
Club - First Tuesday of each
month, 6:45 p.m.
Basic Computer Classes: Ses-
sion 2, Thursday, Nov. 1to15 and
Nov. 29, 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. $50.
New York City Holiday Bus
Trip Fundraiser? - Dec. 8, all
day?, $25. Proceeds benefit the
West Pittston Library. The Li-
brary will provide the bus and
The City will provide the enter-
tainment. The Martz Bus will
pick up at the Atlas Building on
4th St. and Pacific Ave in West
Pittston at 6:30 a.m. and will
pick up to return at 6:30 p.m.
sharp on 8th Ave. between 50th
and 51st Streets. Sign up early to
reserve your seat.
Save the Date - The Barnes &
Noble Book Fair will be on Dec.
7, 8 and 9.
Childrens Programs
Introducing... Library Labora-
tory! (Lib Lab) - Gore and More;
Session 3, Nov. 19 at 6 p.m.,
Sweet Treats.
Weekly Story Time - Fridays
at 1 p.m.
For more information about
upcoming library programs, vis-
it the librarys website at
www.wplibrary.org.
Street Department
Residents are requested to
rake leaves to the tree lawn and
place in a pile or open contain-
ers. Please do not place leaves in
plastic bags and do not rake unto
the road.
Tax collector
George L. Miller, tax collec-
tor, announces the face value of
taxes is in affect until December
3.
The Borough tax penalty peri-
od will be honored through De-
cember.
Office hours during rebate are
from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday and
Wednesday.
It is the property owners re-
sponsibility to forward their tax
bills to their financial institution
for payment.
If a receipt is requested, please
include a self addressed stamped
envelope with payment.
For appointments, call 655-
3801 or 655-7782 ext. 232.
Birthday Notes
Celebrating this week: Barry
Finn, Mitch McCabe, Nov. 12;
Ann Sorick, Jill Orth, Nov. 13;
Denise Chiampi, Nov. 16; Court-
ney Sadowski, Nov. 17.
Special birthday wishes goes
out to one of the boroughs favor-
ite sons Joe Jumper who cele-
brates his birthday tomorrow,
November 12.
Thought for the Week
Death and taxes and child-
birth! Theres never any conve-
nient time for any of them!
Quote of the Week
I have long since come to be-
lieve that people never mean half
of what they say, and that it is
best to disregard their talk and
judge only their actions. Do-
rothy Day, American reformer,
journalist and founder of the Ca-
tholic Worker.
Bumper Sticker
The sea hath fish for every
man.
West Pittston Rams award ceremony Nov. 17
WESTPITTSTON
Tony Callaio
654-5358
tonyc150@verizon.net
Big Top Tent Rental is the main sponsor of the West Pittston 4
Mile Anthracite Run in West Pittston. The run benefits the two-
parks in the borough. This past year, the slide in the park on
Montgomery Ave. was damaged in the flood. The proceeds from
this year's run went to purchase a new slide for the park. Pictured
on the new slide are Olivia Allen and Sophia Farrell.
coordinator, at 654-0933.
Failure of businesses to pur-
chase a refuse sticker, recycling
sticker or report tonnage is a vio-
lation of the borough ordinance.
All refuse is to be placed in
garbage bags and put in a gar-
bage can and placed curbside by
6 a.m. on Wednesdays.
Loose garbage in garbage cans
will not be taken. It is the respon-
sibility of the resident to pur-
chase their own garbage cans.
Street sweeping is conducted
the first Friday of every month.
There will be a parking ban in ef-
fect on Wyoming Avenue.
St. Barbaras news
Our November Wedding An-
niversary Mass will be held on
Tuesday, November 20 at 7 p.m.
All couples celebrating their
wedding anniversary in the
month of November are invited
to come and receive a special
blessing.
The American Red Cross will
hold a Blood Drive on Monday,
November 12 from1 until 6 p.m.
at St. Anthonys Hall.
St. Barbara Christian Wom-
ens Organization will hold their
monthly meeting Tuesday, No-
vember 13 at 6:30 p.m. at the
church hall. All women of the
parishare invitedtoattend. Host-
esses for this meeting are Mari-
lyn Jacobs, Cynthia Liberski and
Geraldine Connolly.
The Christian Women will
serve a chicken dinner to Men of
Mother Theresas Haven on Nov.
14 at 5 p.m. in St. Josephs Hall,
Wyoming. Ladies who are do-
nating chicken and/or potatoes
are asked to bring them to the
hall by 12:30 p.m. that day. Vol-
unteers who are donating other
food and serving are asked to
come by 4 p.m. Call 654-0936 or
655-1776 for more info.
Exeter
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Class of 2013 Pasta Dinner &
Craft Fair will be held Sunday,
December 9, 11 a.m. 5 p.m. at
Secondary Center Cafeteria.
Five tickets will be distributed to
each senior with report card on
Nov 13. Money and/or unsold
tickets need to be returned to
homeroom teacher by Tuesday,
Nov 20 in the envelope provided.
Parent volunteers are needed
on Saturday, Dec 8, 4-7 p.m. and
alsoSunday9a.m. 6p.m. inthe
high school cafeteria. Seniors
will be asked to volunteer on
Sunday, signup sheets will be
available in your homeroom.
Along with craft vendors, there
will be a Chinese auction. Any
basket donations can be dropped
off that Sunday morning. Still
looking for interested vendors,
please contact Nancy 570-417-
4603 or 570-693-3568
Borough notes
Wyoming Borough reminds
residents that blowing, raking or
pushing leaves into the roadway
is strictly prohibited. In prepara-
tion for the potential heavy rain-
falls, residents are asked to assist
the DPW with clearing leaves
away from storm drains.
The West Side Santa Parade
will be Sunday November 18 at 3
p.m. The parade is a joint project
with Forty Fort Borough. The
parade lineup is at 2 p.m. on First
Street in Wyoming. Area fire de-
partments, EMS units, and orga-
nizations are invited to attend.
Parade participants are asked
to please contact the municipal
office at 693-0291extension1to
register. The parade will proceed
fromFirst Street alongWyoming
Avenue into Forty Fort Borough
concluding at the Forty Fort
Park.
Little League
The Wyoming/West Wyoming
Little League hold a board meet-
ing at 6:30 p.m. on Sunday, Nov.
11 at the West Wyoming Bor-
ough Building. Elections for the
board of directors for the 2013
season will be conducted.
Tenth Street fundraiser
Those who wish may register
or re-enroll their Price Chopper
grocery store card online to help
benefit Tenth Street Elementary
School. (http://www2.price-
chopper.com/toolsforschools/)
School Code is 17322. Residents
of Wyoming and West Wyoming
may also sign up to help the local
elementary school.
St. Monicas news
The Parish Office will be
closed through November 14.
A pasta dinner sponsored by
St. Monicas Mens Group will
be held from noon to 5 p.m. on
Sunday, Nov. 4 at Our Lady of
Sorrows Hall, West Wyoming.
Tickets are $8 for adults and $5
for children. Takeouts will be
available.
The first-ever Annual North-
east PACatholic Radio Banquet:
JMJ Radio, 750AM, Catholic
Radio Banquet will be held on
Nov. 11 at St. Anthony of Padua
Hall, Exeter. Aspecial Mass will
be followed by a dinner with the
featured speaker Fred Berretta, a
survivor of US Airways Flight
1549 which crashed in the Hud-
son River in 2009. Holy Mass is
at 4 p.m. and dinner is at 5 p.m.
Tickets are $25 per person and
include a buffet dinner catered
by Arcaro and Genells Restau-
rant of Old Forge.
Seating is limited. For infor-
mation and reservations, call
451-1903, 287-4670 or jmjbene-
fit@comcast.net.
The Music Ministry at St.
Monica is sponsoring a concert
by the Catholic Choral Society at
3 p.m. on Sunday, Dec. 2 in the
church. The group will perform
Advent and Christmas music un-
der the direction of Ann Manga-
niello. A social in the hall will
follow the performance.
ParishCalendar: Pre-KC.C.D.
- classes start today in the Parish
Center. Mary Smith is their
teacher and interested parents
should call the Parish Office to
register or for more information.
Senior Citizens meet the first
andthirdTuesdayof the monthat
1:30 p.m. in the Church Hall.
Mother Teresas Haven the
shelter for homeless men will be
staying at St. Monicas Parish in
St. Josephs Hall on 6th Street
until November 18th. Anyone in-
terested in helping (cooking a
meal or serving one) please con-
tact Joanne Austin at 288-6785.
Kings College Open House
ProgramKings College invites
students and their parents to at-
tend Fall Open House today on
Sunday, November 11. Registra-
tion begins at 8:30 a.m. or you
may register online at
www.kings.edu.
Wyoming Library news
Storyteller Daria Marie Walsh
and Poet Paul H. Tubb will visit
the Wyoming Free Library on
Saturday, November 24 at noon,
bringing a show of Storytelling
and Poetry from Ireland. The
couple, who have been married
eight years, reside in the seaside
village of Howth, County Du-
blin. Daria is a native of Wilkes-
Barre and a graduate of Bishop
Hoban High School and Kings
College.
Daria and Paul have perform-
ed their stories, poems and songs
all over Ireland at Events and
Festivals including The Chil-
drens Books Festival, Listowel
Writers Week and Poetry Now,
just to name a few.
Paul has three books in print
and one Kindle-only, his latest
book A Poets Nonsensical
Journey through England, Scot-
land and Wales was released
earlier this year. Daria is a regu-
lar Storyteller with Milk &Coo-
kie Stories in Temple Bar, Du-
blin and released her first Story-
telling CD, The Wonderful Ad-
ventures of Lorcanthe Lamband
His Woolly Coat Part 1 Meet
Lorcan the Lamb last month.
Duringthe couples last visit to
Wilkes-Barre, Paul performed
his Poetry and Songs at Barnes
& Noble and Daria told her Sto-
ries, in a one-woman show A
Story for my Supper, at The
ArtScene Gallery, Arts YOUni-
verse for Verve Vertu, and Ruths
Place. The pair will be present-
ing the Wyoming Free Library
with a Signed Collection of their
Books andCD. This showis suit-
able for all ages. Call the library
at 693-1364 to register.
The Junior Friends of the
Wyoming Free Library is an ex-
citing new program for children
entering 3rd through 6th grade.
The goal of the group is, with
adult guidance, to provide chil-
dren from Wyoming and West
Wyoming the opportunity to be-
come active volunteers at the li-
brary. Membership dues are
$1.00 per year. The first meeting
will be held on Saturday, No-
vember 17 at 1 p.m. Subsequent
meetings will be held the second
Saturday of each month at 12
p.m. Snacks will be served. Call
the Library to sign up at 693-
1364.
Starting November 12, the
Wyoming Free Library will offer
after school snacks to children
under the age of 18. Snacks and
meals will be offered from 3:30-
4:30 p.m. Hot meals will be
available on Mondays and Fri-
days. Please call the library at
693-1364 for more information.
On December 1, the Friends of
the Wyoming Free Library will
hold a holiday book sale. There
will also be an appearance by
Santa Claus and you can have
your picture taken with him!
There will be handmade crafts,
storytelling, carol singing and
crafts.
Please call the library at 693-
1364 for more information.
The Friends of the Wyoming
Free Library invite you to bring
your knitting, crocheting, nee-
dlepoint, embroidery, or sewing
to the library on the 1st & 4th
Wednesdays of the month from
10 to 11:30 a.m. You can create
your own projects or learn how
to do something newfromone of
the Friends or guest instruc-
tors. Call the library to register at
693-1364
WA Class of 13 parents plan pasta dinner, craft fair
WYOMING NEWS
EILEEN CIPRIANI
287-3349
ecipriani@comcast.net
Sanitation stickers are now on
sale at the Town Hall, weekdays
betweenthe hours of 8a.m. and4
p.m. All residences in West
Wyoming must purchase a stick-
er.
The cost remains the same as
last year, $200. If purchased be-
fore January31, 2013, senior citi-
zens (65 and older) will receive a
$25 rebate ($175), all others re-
ceive a $15 rebate ($185).
If purchased from February 1-
28, 2013, the full price will be
charged, $200. After February
28, 2013, the cost will be $300
for the year and citations will be
filed with the District Magistrate
for noncompliance with the Or-
dinance.
Stickers are also available
through the mail: West Wyom-
ing Borough Building, 464 West
8th Street, P.O. Box 4035, 464
West 8th Street, West Wyoming
PA 18644. For the added conve-
nience of residents, Visa, Mas-
terCard and Mac are accepted.
Stickers can also be purchased
through the borough website
www.westwyoming.org.
Website
Visit the West Wyoming Web-
site at www.westwyoming.org.
If any residents are interested in
receiving a monthly e-newsletter
from the borough, please visit
the website for more details.
Yard Waste
The final yard waste collec-
tion will be November 15. Leaf
pickups are scheduled for No-
vember 28 and December 12.
Leaves must be in an open con-
tainer or degradable paper leaf
bag. plastic bags will not be ac-
cepted. There will be no more
Saturday hours for the season.
Recycling reminder
West Wyoming recycling con-
tainers are located behind Hose
Company #1.
Recycling can be dropped off
any day of the week.
The following is the list of ac-
ceptable items for recycling:
commingled food and beverage
containers, plastic containers (all
number recyclables are accept-
ed), cardboard, newspaper and
office paper.
2013 Sanitation stickers on sale now in W. Wyoming
WESTWYOMING
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Sports
When half of your plays are
touchdowns, your offense is
clicking. The Wyoming Area
Warriors offense clicked that
way on its first three possessions
on Friday night in 49-14 over
Lake Lehman in a District 2 2A
tournament first round game.
On their first play from scrim-
mage quarterback Nick OBrien
ran a student body right play out
of the shotgun for a 52-yard Td
run and a 7-0 lead after the point
after by Lenkaitis. Joe Talyor
showed a nice burst of speed get-
ting a key block on the edge.
After Lehman answered with
an 80-yard Td drive with the
touchdown by Dustin Jones,
Zach LaNunziata returned a
tumbling kick off 54 yards to the
Lehman 22. After a 2-yard loss
on a run on first down, OBrien
threwa 24-yard Td pass to Cody
Schmitz who beat one-on-one
coverage down the right side.
The point was missed and it was
13-7 with 6:23 left in the first
quarter.
After a Lehman three-and-out
and a short punt, OBrien ran 36-
yards for a Td on second down,
then ran in for two and it was
21-7 with 3:36 left in the first.
Six plays, three for touchdowns.
The next drive took a little
longer, four plays. The big one
was a 50-yard OBrien to Jordan
Zezza completion. OBrien
rolled to his right and found Zez-
za behind the secondary for the
big gain. That play led to a 12-
yard Td run by Schmitz and it
was 28-7, after the point, with
1:17 left.
On the ensuing possession
Lehmans offense kept the ball
nearly eight minutes and moved
56 yards to Wyoming Areas 12,
where they were stopped inches
short on a 4th-and-3.
Clock-eating drives like that
was a game-plan that worked in
Lehmans 15-14 win over the
Warriors back in September, but
its not a healthy game-plan
down by three scores.
Lehmans defense couldnt
stop the Warriors and neither
could the yellow flags. After the
4th down stop, the Warriors
drove 88 yards for a fifth Td in as
manypossessions, but not before
a series of penalties moved the
Warriors from a 1st-and-goal at
the nine, to a 2nd-and-goal back
at the 30. But the penalties only
delayed the inevitable. OBrien
ran 29 yards to the one, then the
yard into the end zone and it was
35-7 with 1:03 left in the half.
Lehman showed some life af-
ter the second half kick off driv-
ing 65 yards for a Td, aided by a
personal foul on WA, one of 11
penalties on the Warriors for 95
yards. The Lehman Td made it
35-14, but as it took over six min-
utes, it didnt get the Knights
back in the game.
The Warriors first-team of-
fense would get two possessions
inthe secondhalf andscoredTds
on both, giving the offense seven
possessions for the game and
seven Tds.
Jeff Skursky scored on a 4-
yard run at 3:35 of the third to
make it 42-14 and OBrien
scored his fourth rushing Td on a
6-yard run at 11:55 to put the
mercy rule in play at 49-14.
OBrien rushed 15 times for
187 yards. The Warriors passed
only nine times but were ex-
tremely efficient as OBrien
completed six for 176 yards.
You talk about this game, its
a playoff game and what hap-
pened in week three, Wyoming
Area coach Randy Spencer said.
Really, its about focus and exe-
cution. I thought we had a good
week of practice. This is as ready
as weve been to play team-wise,
and the kids came out and started
fast.
It was the OBrien show, lets
say that much, Lehman coach
Jerry Gilsky said. You knew
who was getting the ball.
Speaking to the Warriors whop-
ping yards per completion aver-
age of just under 30, Gilsky said,
Coverage-wise, you cant allow
so many big plays like we did.
On defense Talyor, Gercak,
Erzar, Skursky, Zielinski, Mi-
chaels and LaNunziata were in
on numerous tackles.
Being behind and forced to
throw didnt suit the Knights.
Theywere 2-14passing. For WA,
Pegg had a pass break up on a
deep post throw.
OBrien kicked off for the sec-
ond game this season, reviving
coach Fred Marianaccis old
kicking shoe and dropping two
of the kicks inside the five-yard
line.
DI STRI CT 2 FOOTBAL L
A whole different ballgame
Warriors defeat Lake Lehman by 35, avenging a 1-point loss in September
By JACK SMILES
jsmiles@psdispatch.com
The Wyoming Area Warriors came out running Friday night and didnt stop.
See WARRIORS, Page 41
BILL TARUTIS FOR THE DISPATCH
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Wyoming Area (9-2) will host
Lakeland (8-3) at 7 p.m. Friday
in the District 2 2A title game.
Lakeland beat GAR 35-17 Fri-
day.
The Warriors, the D2-2A run-
ners-up last year, will be going
for their first district title since
winning the Class 3A crown in
2003. Lakeland is going for its
first district title since defeating
Wyoming Area for the D2-2Ati-
tle in 2006. That game was also
considered a first round state
tournament game as eight teams
were in the D-2 tourney which
went three rounds.
Lehman ended its season at
6-5.
Scoring
First Quarter
WA Nick OBrien 52 run
(A.J. Lenkaitis kick), 11:43
LL Dustin Jones 3 run
(Kenny Kocher kick), 7:17
WA Cody Schmitz 24 pass
from OBrien (kick failed),
6:23
WA OBrien 39 run
(OBrien run), 3:36
WA Schmitz 12 run (Len-
kaitis kick), 1:17
Second Quarter
WA OBrien 1 run (Lenkai-
tis kick), 1:03
Third Quarter
LL Brady Butler 12 pass
from Bill Hillman (Kocher
kick), 7:41
WA Jeff Skursky 4 run
(Lenkaitis kick), 3:35
Fourth Quarter
WA OBrien 6 run (Lenkai-
tis kick), 11:55
Individual Statistics
RUSHING Lehman, Jones
17-64, Tom Donovan 4-13, Bra-
dy Butler 7-80, Hillman 10-19,
Bobby Wright 1-7. Wyoming
Area, OBrien 15-187, Schmitz
5-36, Zak LaNunziata 2-(mi-
nus-4), Skursky 2-7, Marty Mi-
chaels 1-5, John Urban 2-20,
IsaiahPeoples1-1, Robert Wargo
1-1, Ryan Murray 1-(minus-2),
Kyle Borton 1-(minus-5).
PASSING Lehman, Hillman
2-14-0-16. Wyoming Area,
OBrien 6-9-0-176.
RECEIVING Lehman, But-
ler 2-16. Wyoming Area,
Schmitz 3-67, Jordan Zezza 2-
92, Trent Grove 1-17.
Warriors
Continued from Page 40
Wyoming Areas Jordan Zezza, right, makes a long reception as Lake-Lehmans Bill Hillman moves in for the tackle the District 2 Class
2A semifinal game against Lake-Lehman in West Pittston on Friday night
Nick OBrien off on a Td run just 17 seconds into the game Friday
night.
Wyoming Area tight end Trent Grove makes a reception deep in
Lake-Lehman territory
BILL TARUTIS FOR THE DISPATCH
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The inaugural Stephs 5K, a
run and walk organized to raise
money for a scholarship for a
Wyoming Area athlete and can-
cer research was wildly success-
ful.
We exceeded our goal, said
Stephen Godri the brother of
Stephanie Godri-Johnston, for
whom the race was named. Ste-
phanie died on colon cancer at
age 32 last year. She was a
Wyoming Area track and cross
country athlete.
We are happy to announce
that the scholarship will be
$3,000 instead of the original
Inaugural Stephs 5k raised $3,000 for scholarship
Over 350 attend event to honor the late Stephanie Godri-Johnston
By JACK SMILES
jsmiles@psdispatch.com
Runners break for the start of the inauguarl Stephs 5K on October 27 at the Luzerne County Fields in Forty Fort
Renee Valenti (Pittsburgh) was the overall Female Winner in 22:48 Brenden Ehret (Dallas) was the Male Overall Winner in 17:50.
See STEPH, Page 44
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The overall female winner was
Renee Valenti a Pittsburgh resi-
dent and a West Wyoming native
and Wyoming Area alumnus.
Her time was 22:48. Brenden
Ehret of Dallas was the male
overall winner in 17:50.
Steph
Continued fromPage 44
Right, Male 14-16 medalists,
Zach Gibbons (2nd - Wyoming),
Nick Hromek (1st - Pittston),
Chris Wall (3rd - Exeter). Middle
right, Male 50-59 medalists,
Greg Obrien (2nd - Shavertown)
and Ray Gibbons (1st - Dallas).
Far right, Male 21-29 medalists,
Russ Susko (1st - Shavertown),
Brian Gibbons (2nd - Dallas).
Far left, Female 14-16 winner, Emily Ambruso (Pittston). Middle
left, Female 13-Under winner, Sarah Holweg (West Pittston). Left,
60+ winner, Stan Zalenski (Plains)
Above, Male 40-49 medalists, Ed Grivensky (2nd - Plains), Mark
Wright (1st - Shavertown), and Scott Cresko
Male 13-Under medalists, Alex Ambruso (2nd - Pittston), Brandon
Williams (1st - Wyoming)
Female 21-29 medalists, Kristen OBrien (2nd - Cleveland), Katie Ludlow (1st - Philadelphia), and
Rebecca Ruggles (3rd - West Pittston)
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plan of $2,000. Also, we will be
donating an additional $1,000 to
one of the Colon Cancer Alli-
ances programs. Ill be meeting
with them in DC next week to
discuss what program the dona-
tion made in Stephanies name
will be best used. We are very
grateful to the participants,
sponsors, donators and volun-
teers.
The event at the Luzerne
County fields in Forty Fort on
October 27drew130runners and
65 walkers. Including children,
spectators and volunteers, Godri
estimates 350 people attended
the event.
A pre-race blessing was of-
fered by Monsignor Sempa of
Corpus Christi Parish in West
Pittston. The National Anthem
was sung by Beth Ann Connor, a
Wyoming Area alumnus. Nick
Anzelmi, a retired Wyoming Ar-
ea teacher and coach, was the of-
ficial race starter.
Steph
Continued fromPage 42
Female 40-49 winner, Kim-
berly Rebovich (Bear Creek)
Female 35-39 first and second, Catherine Lehner (2nd - Dover
NJ), Cecilia Dennard (1st - Picatinny Arsenal NJ
Kevin Dryzga (Langhorne), Chris Osmian (Fountainville) and Fumanti (Plains)
Male 17-20, Eric Filipiak (1st - Wyoming), Michael Harding (2nd - Pittston)
See STEPH, Page 43 S
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Abusyhighschool fall regular
season is in the books, wherein
18 teams combined fromWyom-
ing Area and Pittston Area
played 261 games, matches and
meets. Technically, there were
255 events as six of them were
against each other.
All the teams combined for a
winning record of 132-127-2.
The two ties were one each by
the boys soccer teams. The win-
ning record is largely thanks to
the Pittston Area girls soccer,
field hockey and girls cross
country teams which were 40-8
combined.
The Pittston Area girls volley-
ball teamwas 2-15, but their sea-
son was a compelling story. Just
days before the season started it
looked like the team might fold
for lack of a coach. But two for-
mer players, Danielle McAn-
drewand Paula Stravinsky, came
forward to coach the team. With
a just a couple days practice and
a lot of inexperienced players,
McAndrew and Stravinsky kept
morale up as the losses mounted
and the girls hung together and
won two of their last five games.
Two teams won or tied for
WVC divisional titles. The Pitt-
ston Area golf team tied Cough-
lin for the best record in AAA
Division 1. Both were 6-4.
Wyoming Area, 8-2 overall,
won the AA/A football division
with a 6-1 record.
The Pittston area girls field
hockey team deserved a better
fate. They were 13-3 and didnt
get in the playoffs. The Pittston
Area football team was better
than its 3-7 record. They lost
games to Berwick (9-1) by three,
Crestwood (7-3) by two and
Wyoming Area (8-2) by seven.
Individual District 2 medalists
were Catherine Lombardo, Tara
Johnson and Mike Harvilla, PA
cross country; Eric Filipiak, WA
cross country; Ryan Tracy, PA
golf, and Zach Mulhern and
Courtney Melvin, WA golf.
There were players who stood
tall in the fall competing at an
all-star level, but all the players
on all the teams deserve recog-
nition.
The last runners to cross the
finish line in the cross country
meets, the golfers who shot the
highest scores, the often name-
less soccer fullbacks, field hock-
ey defenders and football line-
men who rarely got their names
in the papers and the bench play-
ers who rarely got in games are
all winners in that they competed
and were part of something
larger than themselves.
Having said that, if we were to
name teamMVPs, the list would
go something like this, with the
toughest choice being PA field
hockey, a teamloaded with good
players, any one which could
have been a fair selection.
Sport ................PA ................WA
Football Joe Starinsky Nick
OBrien
Girls tennis Miranda War-
nuek ...................... Valarie Bott
Field hockey Nicole Chiako
Serra Degnan
Girls volleyball Jackie Rae-
bender ................. Gabby Bohan
Golf Ryan Tracy Zach Mul-
hern
Girls soccer Allie Barber
Jordan Chiavacci
Boys soccer Jordan Consa-
gra ................ Zach Sypniewski
Boys cross country Mike
Harvilla ................ Eric Filipiak
Girls cross country - Cathe-
rine Lombardo Emily Wolfgang
HI GH SCHOOL SPORTS
Players, teams stood tall in the fall
By JACK SMILES
jsmiles@psdispatch.com
Pittston Areas Jordan Consagra was among the points leaders in
WVC soccer
Here PAs Paige Danko hustles after a ball. PA was 13-3 in field
hockey, but didnt make the playoffs. WA goalie, Jordan Chiavacci making a save. She helped WA to a winning record.
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Those who love the Old Forge-
Riverside football rivalry have
been treated to a double dose of
the games in four of the last five
seasons with a regular-season
meeting being followed up by a
playoff showdown.
Rematches allowed for re-
venge in the last two playoff
meetings, but Old Forge made
sure that was not the case Friday
night.
The Blue Devils re-establish-
ed their dominance over the Vik-
ings this season with Friday
nights 42-7 District 2 Class A
semifinal romp.
Old Forge posted its biggest
ever win in the rivalry, 54-7, at
Riverside earlier in the season.
With Brian Tomasetti again tor-
turing the Vikings and a defen-
sive front applying relentless
pressure, Friday nights effort as-
sured there would be no repeat of
2009 when Old Forge opened an
unbeaten regular season with a
43-12 rout of Riverside only to
begin the playoffs with a crush-
ing 30-14 loss to the same team.
The Blue Devils continued
chasing history with the semifi-
nal win. They won their
11thgame of the season for the
first time since 1952 and moved
into position to set a school re-
cord for wins if they can again
beat Dunmore in Old Forge Fri-
day night in a meeting of state-
ranked teams for the district
championship.
Tomasetti already made it into
the record book Friday night, be-
coming Old Forges single-sea-
son record-holder in rushing
yards and touchdowns and be-
coming the first Blue Devil to
surpass 1,700 yards in a season.
The senior halfback/defensive
back followed up his 223-yard,
six-touchdown game against
Riverside with another brilliant
all-around effort. Tomasetti car-
ried 22 times for 200 yards and
three touchdowns. He made his
eighth and ninth interceptions of
the season, along with breaking
up two other passes and making
three tackles. Tomasetti even
contributed on special teams,
getting 63 yards and a touch-
down on a fake punt and cover-
ing 70 yards on his only kickoff
return.
The rest of the Blue Devils
provided plenty of help.
Tony DeSando led the way up
front with seven tackles and
three assists. He had a sack for a
six-yard loss and two other tack-
les for five more yards in losses.
Were getting contributions
from so many defensive line-
men, Old Forge coach Mike
Schuback said. Brandon (Yes-
cavage) played defensive tackle;
Corey Souryavong came in and
got a big play in the backfield;
Kyree Toomeyagain; (Paul) Papi
can play both end and tackle; To-
ny DeSando.
Those guys help us play cov-
erage and make a difference in
the football game.
Riversides Nick Dranchak
came in averaging three touch-
downs and more than 250 yards
passing, along with more than 50
yards rushing, per game. His 15
first-half passes resulted in just
16 yards and sacks by DeSando
and Souryavong helped make
sure he finished with minus-9
yards rushing on 10 carries.
Defensively, we didnt
change anything, Schuback
said. The big difference is roll-
ing those guys in, keeping them
fresh. Obviously, its a numbers
game with us and Riverside,
Dunmore and Trail with small
squads, but we can keep firing
guys in there and keep pressur-
ing their quarterback.
Hes an exceptionally good
quarterback.
Linebackers Warren Welsh,
Shane Schuback and Jorden Se-
kol also had big games while
Dranchak was 10-for-25 for 126
yards with four interceptions.
OL D FORGE FOOTBAL L
Record-breaking Devils advance to 1A final
By TOM ROBINSON
For the Sunday Dispatch
See DEVILS, Page 47
Brian Tomasetti became the first Blue Devil to surpass 1,700 yards in a season.
Quaterback Brenden Wahl looks downfield after a fake.
JASON RIEDMILLER FOR THE DIS[PATCH S
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Pittston Area Meet the Wres-
tlers is today Sunday, November
11 at 6 p.m. at the Pittston Area
High School Gym. All wrestlers
from K-12 are encouraged to at-
tend.
A/D LL meeting today
Avoca/Dupont Little League
is meeting today Sunday, No-
vember 11 at 6 p.m. at the Avoca
Boro Building on Main Street.
WWW Little League
The Wyoming/West Wyoming
Little League board will meet at
6:30 p.m. today, Sunday, Nov. 11
at the West Wyoming Borough
Building. Elections for the board
of directors for the 2013 season
will be conducted.
WA baseball meeting Tues.
Wyoming Area Diamond
Club will meet on Tuesday, No-
vember 13 at 7 p.m. in room129
at the Secondary Center. Parents
of 7th -12th graders are encour-
aged to attend.
WA girls basketball parents
date change
The Wyoming Area Girls Bas-
ketball Parent Association will
be having their monthly meeting
on Wednesday, November 14,
6:30 p.m.
The meetingwill be heldinthe
gym lobby at the high school.
All parents of girls playing
basketball in grades 7th thru12th
are asked to attend.
WA football parents
The Wyoming Area football
parents are meeting Thursday,
November 15 at 7:00 p.m. at Sa-
batinis Pizza in Exeter. All par-
ents of players in grades 7th
through 12th grade are urged to
attend.
Youth field hockey club
openings
The KaPow Hockey Klub is a
field hockey club for players ag-
es 5 - 18 years old run by local
Olympian Lauren Powley,
Wyoming Seminary High, Uni-
versity of Maryland, and Nation-
al Team from 2005 - 2010, in-
cluding the 2008 Beijing Olym-
pics.
From all of these experience
she has put together a program
that exposes athletes to high lev-
el training and all of the outside
factors that canhelpmake a play-
er the best they can be: mental
training, nutrition guidance,
strength and conditioning train-
ing, community service projects,
and recruiting guidance.
One of Laurens main focuses
is to get players between 5 - 12
years old to get a stick in their
hands. She sawfirst hand in Hol-
land the benefit of starting the
sport at a young age. It becomes
much more natural for the play-
ers as theygrowupwiththe sport
and learn how to really maneu-
ver the stick and field awareness.
KaPowknows that it is important
to focus on the basics and keep it
fun for this age group. Please
check out the website (www.ka-
powfieldhockey.com)
Black Friday camp
Registrations are being ac-
cepted for the Stan Waleski
Black Friday Basketball Camp
to be held at the St. Josephs Ob-
lates gymin Laflinon November
23 from8:00 am to 12:00 noon
for boys and girls in grades 2
through 8. For camp information
call Coach Waleski at 457 - 1206
or Coach LoBrutto at 457 1206
or email stanwaleski@ya-
hoo.com.
S P O R T S B R I E F S
Meet the Pittston Area wrestlers today
Welsh had six tackles and
three assists, along with recover-
ing a fumble and breaking up a
pass. Schuback and Sekol each
interceptedpasses andmade oth-
er contributions. Schuback had
four tackles, including one for a
loss, and an assist. Sekol broke
up a pass, made two tackles and
assisted on four others.
Blue Devils quarterbackBren-
den Wahl turned two of his three
completions into touchdowns.
He finished 3-for-8 for 76 yards
and added another 19 yards rush-
ing.
Old Forge needed just 2:06 to
open the scoring.
The Blue Devils defense then
got the ball back in Riverside ter-
ritorythree straight times tokeep
the pressure on.
Old Forge had one touchdown
and a pair of fourth-down con-
versions wiped out by penalties,
however, and had to settle for a
14-0 lead after one quarter.
Wahl scrambled then found
Michael Vieira on the right side-
line for a 29-yard score to open
the game. Vieira, who sat out
most of the rest of the game with
a minor ankle injury, made it to
the flag at the right corner to
complete the game-opening, 67-
yard drive.
Old Forge scored again on its
second possession.
Sekols interception led to a
five-play, 26-yard drive that end-
ed with Jake Manettis 9-yard
run for a 14-0 lead with 7:24 still
remaining in the first quarter.
Riverside threatened in the
second quarter when Jim Tucker
recovered a muffed punt and
Dave Sweetman raced 37 yards
on the next play.
The Vikings reached the 15,
but Schuback intercepted a
fourth-down pass at the 4 and re-
turned it 11 yards.
If theygot a touchdownthere,
momentum would have
changed, they would have gotten
a little more life, Shane Schu-
back said.
Instead, Old Forge covered 85
yards in five plays to build a 21-0
halftime lead.
Schuback pulled in a third-
and-eight pass from Wahl for 18
yards. Tomasetti ran eight yards
on the next play.
Tomasetti then scored on a 57-
yard run after appearing to be
stopped. He was hit in the back-
field, took a step back, then
found a hole and sprinted to the
Riverside 5 where he slowed
down to pick up an Anthony Pic-
colini block and complete the
touchdown play.
Tomasetti finished the half
with116 yards rushing on15 car-
ries.
Riverside needed just 1:44 to
open the second half with a
touchdown.
Nico Munley scored on a 57-
yard touchdown pass fromDran-
chak.
The Blue Deviis responded
with three touchdowns in 8:12 to
close the scoring and put the
game in the Mercy Rule by the
end of the third quarter.
Tomasettis kickoff return and
a pair of penalties on Riverside
put the ball onthe1andTomaset-
ti took it in from there.
Manetti got his second touch-
down on a 29-yard pass from
Wahl before the fake punt fin-
ished off the Vikings (6-5).
Shane Schuback said defen-
sive coach Dan Holland empha-
sized stopping Riversides
spread offense on first downs to
allow the Blue Devils combina-
tion of a rush and strong zone
pass coverage to shine.
Following Riversides only
score, the Vikings had a net mi-
nus-13 yards on their eight first-
down plays the rest of the way.
Dave Sweetman carried 14
times for 78 yards for Riverside.
Alec Parchinski led the Vik-
ings with six tackles, including a
sack, and four assists.
Dunmore trailed in the first
half and was tied at halftime be-
fore breaking away from Lacka-
wanna Trail, 32-12, in the other
semifinal. The Bucks (10-1)
were ranked fourth and the Blue
Devils third among state Class A
teams this week, according to the
Harrisburg Patriot-News.
Devils
Continued from Page 46
Mike Vieira takes the handoff from Brenden Wahl in Fridays game versus Riverside.
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The Pittston Stoners U13
girls-3 team took third place in
the Luzerne County Cup tour-
nament last month
Stoners U13 girls excel in County Cup tourney
The Pittston Stoners U13G3
soccer team which placed third
in the Luzerne County Cup
Tournament, front row, from
left, Brooke Costanzo, Gianna
Galli, Olivia Johnson, Alyssa
Deleo, Anjelica Singer, Brittany
Pizano, Megan Dillon. Second
row, Niamh Fox, Holly Daveski,
Kerry Shamnoski, Jillian Wara-
bak.
Not pictured: Andrea Ruby,
Katilynne Parrent and Miranda
Smith.
When Jordan Thomas was
five years old he and entered the
Pennsylvania Dirt Karting Se-
ries races in the Kid Kart class.
He raced karts for nine seasons
through 2011, when he won the
PA Dirt Kart State Champion-
ship and the Burris Tire Series
Championship and retried with a
list of fast-time awards and a
track record at Shellhammers
Speedway.
For the 2012 season Jordan, a
14-year-old Wyoming Area
freshman, moved up to sprint
cars and is one of the youngest
sprint drivers in the country.
Sprint racing, where cars can top
100 mph, is the most competitive
form of dirt track racing.
Jordan competed in 11 sprint
events at 10 different speedways
and qualified for 10 main events.
The season ended on October 26
at Five Mile Point Speedway in
Binghamton on October 26,
where he won his heat and fin-
ished sixth in the main event.
Jordan is also a baseball and
football player. He lives in Hard-
ing with his parents Denise and
Jeff Spider Thomas and broth-
er Colby, a Wyoming area sev-
enth grader.
His grandparents are Yolanda
Kirtland, Archbald and Dick
Peck, Harding.
Jordans sprint car sponsors
are Mechanical Service Co.,
Pittston; Dr. David Scalzo, Du-
ryea; STEnterprise Auto Group,
Swiftwater; A-1 engines, Scran-
ton; Jessup Auto, Ben Cook
Racing, Conyngham and Wind
Dynamics, Selinsgrove.
Thomas one of countrys youngest sprint drivers
14-year-old Harding boy moved up from Karts to sprint cars
Right, Jordan Thomas in his
Sprint car S
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Holy Redeemer senior Maris-
sa Durako, pictured here, a resi-
dent of Laflin and Wyoming Ar-
ea Catholic alumnus, earned the
4th place medal at the PIAA
State Cross Country Champion-
ships last weekend in Hershey
with a time of 19:21.
Durakos Holy Redeemer
teammates Rachel Sowinski and
Cassandra Gill also earned State
medals finishing 5th and13th re-
spectively in the field of 239 run-
ners. Holy Redeemer finished
third, bronze medal finish, in the
team standings.
HI GH SCHOOL CROSS COUNTRY
Duarko, Holy Redeemer cop state medals
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The Care and Concern Golf
Tournament Committee donated
$9,000 to Msgr. John Bendik for
the Care and Concern Free
Health Clinic frommoney raised
at the annual golf tournament.
The clinic and its all-volunteer
staff has served over 2,500 pa-
tients.
In addition to the check pre-
sentation, Dr. John Callahan pre-
sented a trophy to Jenni Knick-
man for a hole-in-one she made
on the fourth hole at Emanon
during the tournament.
Free health clinic gets $9,000 from golf tourney
Above, The Care and Concern Golf Tour-
nament Committee donated $9,000 to
Msgr. John Bendik for the Care and
Concern Free Health Clinic. Fromleft,
Rich Amico, JimConnors, Paula Con-
nors, Bill Joyce, Msgr. John Bendik,
Gloria Blandina, Bernie Ambrosino,
Carmen Ambrosino and JimBlandina.
Right, Jenni Knickman, center, gets a
trophy for a hole-in-one fromDr. John
Callahan and Rich Amico, president of
Emanon Country Club.
Meet the Warriors ice hockey
team was held on Sunday Octo-
ber 28. A program to introduce
new and returning ice hockey
players andcoaches for the 2012-
2013 season which was high-
lighted by a mass at St. Barbaras
Parish.
WA Ice hockey Warriors get introduced
Front row, Tyler Porfirio, Britta-
ni Shearer, Keegan Thomas.
Billy Weiss. Second row, Zach
Lahart, Shawn Tamarantz,
Jonathan Passarella, Zeb Chis-
dock, Aaron Dobbs, CJ Rome,
Alex Chronowski. Third row,
Coach Chronowski, Coach Ko-
pec, Dakota Thomas, Mark
Paluski, Dalton Thomas, Bren-
dan Lee, Ethan Crake, Eric
Smith, Tyler Yarick, Billy Roma-
noski, Brain McNew, Evan Rider,
Daulton Shearer, Jeremy Stach,
Kolton Begley, Coach Shearer,
Zach Scrobola, Coach Terran,
Coach Thomas S
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Three Pittston Area cross country runners won medals at the District 2 3A and 2A cross country
championships at Elk Lake High School last month.
In the girls 2Arace Tara Johnson, 9th, and Catherine Lombardo, 10th, were medalists. In the boys 3A
race Mike Harvilla, 8th, was a medalist.
H I G H S C H O O L C R O S S C O U N T R Y
PA runners win district medals
From left, PA girls coach, Joe Struckus; Tara Johnson, Catherine Lombardo, Mike Harvilla; and PA
boys coach Dave Juinta.
By defeating Pittston Area on
November 2, the Wyoming Ar-
ea football team evened the
Bridge Award standings, 4-4
with the Fall season completed.
Wyoming Area won the girls
tennis, boys cross country, and
field hockey events. Pittston Ar-
ea won boys and girls soccer,
golf and girls cross country.
The schools girls volleyball
teams did not play each other.
The 2012-13 school year is the
ninth year of the Bridge Award
competition, with Pittston Area
having won six of the eight pre-
vious awards and four consecu-
tive. Inthe10school years 2002-
03 through 2011-12 Pittston Ar-
ea teams have a 98-62 record
against Wyoming Area teams.
Thats a .612 winning percent-
age.
The first two school years of
the competition, 2002-`03 and
` 03-`04, the winner was decided
by the overall winning percent-
age of the schools teams in
sports where they played each
other with head-to-head games
weighted for two points. Pittston
Area won both of those years.
Beginning with the ` 04-`05 season
the formula was changed to a
simple head-to-head competi-
tion. Whichever school won the
most games against the rival
school won the trophy.
Pittston Area won decisively
in five of the first seven years of
head-to-head. Pittston Area won
13-8 in 2004-`05, 16-5 in 2007-`
08, and 13-8 in 2008-`09, 13-8 in
` 09-10, 12-5 2010-11and13-5 in
` 11-`12
The only drama in the history
of the award came at the end of
the two school years when
Wyoming Area won. In 2005-`06
WA won 11-9 and had to win the
last two games, softball and
baseball, to clinch. With the
competition tied 9-9, it looked
like Pittston Area was about to
clinch when the softball teams
played at Pittston Area in the
next to last head-to-head game of
the year. Pittston Area had bea-
tenWyomingArea12-2earlier in
the season and 11 consecutive
times since 1997. But Wyoming
Area pulled the upset, 6-5 to give
the school a 10-9 lead with the
just one game left, baseball.
Wyoming Area had to win the
baseball game, because if the
Bridge standings ended 10-10
Pittston Area would have re-
tained the trophy. There is no tie-
breaker. Wyoming Area won
6-5.
In 2006-07 Wyoming Area
won 12-11 after being behind 11-
10 with two games to go, boys
tennis and softball. WA won the
tennis match 3-2 setting up a
winner-take-all softball game.
Lots of drama, as the Bridge Tro-
phy was at the field for all to see.
After winning, 9-3, the Lady
Warriors sat in a circle around
the trophy, pulled up grass and
threw it in the air like confetti.
Pittston Area doesnt go in for
such drama. They clinched early
every time they won.
In the early years there were
two Bridge trophies, one called
the Public Division for the Pitt-
ston Area - Wyoming Area com-
petition.
The second trophy was for the
All-Schools Division which in-
cluded Seton Catholic. Seton,
somewhat surprisingly, won the
first seasonandhunga huge ban-
ner on the school proclaiming
the fact.
Pittston Area won the All-
Schools trophy the next three
seasons and thus took permanent
possession of the trophy after
Seton Catholic closed.
Wyoming Area never won an
All-Schools trophy. Counting
both divisions Pittston Area has
won eight of 11.
The identical Bridge Trophies
were carved from single pieces
of anthracite coal by Laflin coal
sculptor Frank Magdalinski in
2003
The last two school years com-
bined the Patriot teams are 25-10
against the Warrior teams. Last
school year PAled13-1going in-
to the spring.
WA won all three spring
games in girls soccer, boys ten-
nis, baseball and softball and the
final was 13-5.
WA is in much better shape
this year havingalreadywonfour
events, but PA has been very
strong against WA in winter
sports in recent years.
Bridge race deadlocked at 4-4 after fall games
By JACK SMILES
jsmiles@psdispatch.com
OBITUARIES
Connie T. Littzi, of Exeter,
passed away on Sunday, Nov. 4,
2012 at the Wilkes-Barre Gener-
al Hospital.
Born in Italy, she was the
daughter of the late Joseph and
Elizabetha Pagnotta Mastruzzo.
Connie was a member of St.
Anthony of Padua Church ( St.
Barbara Parish), Exeter, and was
a graduate of Pittston Area High
School and the Bradford Beauty
Academy. She was the proprietor
of Connies Beauty Salon in For-
ty Fort having worked as a beau-
ticianandhairdresser since1959,
retiring just recently at the age of
90.
She enjoyed ballroomdancing
with her companion and partner,
John Sabatini.
She was preceded in death by
her brothers, Anthony, Rosario,
Ross and Ralph Mastruzzo.
She will be sadly missed by
her companion, John Sabatini,
and her nephews and nieces,
Matthew and his wife, Lorraine
Mastruzzo, Pittston; Thomas
and his wife, Elaine Mastruzzo,
Stroudsburg; Sharon Argo, Exe-
ter; Ross Mastruzzo, Forty Fort;
Ralph Mastruzzo, West Wyom-
ing; Lora and her husband, Rick
Troy, West Wyoming; Raline and
her husband Larry Center,
Brentwood, Tenn.; Marie and her
husband Roger Brando, Sacra-
mento, Calif. and Jackie Mas-
truzzo Ruch and sister-in-law
Angie Mastruzzo, West Wyom-
ing; numerous grandnieces and
grandnephews and cousins.
Funeral services were Thurs-
day, Nov. 8, 2012 from the Gub-
biotti Funeral Home, 1030
Wyoming Ave., Exeter. A Mass
of Christian Burial in St. Barbara
Parish at St. Anthony of Padua
Church, 28 Memorial Ave., Exe-
ter.
Interment was in St. Cecilias
Cemetery, Schooley St., Exeter.
Connie T. Littzi
November 4, 2012
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Leo E. Vough, 90, of Avoca
passed away Monday Oct. 29,
2012, at his home.
He was born and raised in Avo-
ca, April 13, 1922, and was a son
of the late George and Francis
(Rodejewski) Wolch.
Leo was a former member of
Ss. Peter and Paul Church, Avo-
ca. He was a 1941 graduate of
Avoca High School and a U.S.
Army Air Corps veteran, serving
during World War II. Upon re-
turning from World War II, Leo
joined the Local 261 Carpenters
Union and retired after 60 years
of service with the union. Leo
was a member of the Avoca VFW
Post 8335 and a member of the
Polish Progressive Club, Scran-
ton. He enjoyed polka dancing
and traveling to Las Vegas and
Atlantic City, but most of all he
enjoyed spending time swinging
on his porch
swing with his
long time com-
panion, Rose
Borgna, and
conversing
with anyone
who would walk by their home.
Leos family would like to
thank Dr. James Sheerer and his
nurse, Carol, and the staff and
volunteers in the oncology de-
partment at Moses Taylor Hospi-
tal, Scranton.
In addition to his parents, his
brothers, Edward, Henry, Ches-
ter; sister, Louise Bednarski; his
niece, Linda Wolch; and his ne-
phew, Edward Vough preceded
Leo in death.
His long-time companion,
Rose Borgna, her daughter, Mi-
chele McGowan and husband,
Leo, their children, Bridget,
Megan and Aidan survive Leo.
His niece, Helen Vough and
companion, Mitch; nephew,
Judge Michael T. Vough and his
wife, Cindy; and many great-
nieces, great-nephews, great-
great-nieces and great-great-ne-
phews also survive Leo.
Funeral services were held
Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012, from
Kiesinger Funeral Services Inc.,
255 McAlpine St., Duryea, with
a Mass of Christian Burial at Sa-
cred Heart of Jesus Church, Du-
pont, with the Rev. Joseph Veres-
py officiating. Interment was in
Ss. Peter and Paul Cemetery,
Avoca.
In lieu of flowers, memorial
contributions may be made to a
charity of the donors choice. On-
line condolences may be made to
www.kiesingerfuneralservices-
.com.
Leo E. Vough
Oct. 29, 2012
Rebecca Becky Egan, for-
merlyof Pittston, passedawaySat-
urday morning at Allied Skilled
Nursing Facility, Scranton. Born
inFulton, N.Y., shewas adaughter
of the late John and Gertrude Ko-
rajivo Koval. She was educated in
the Fulton area schools. She and
her husband Donald resided in
JohnsonCity, N.Y., beforemoving
tothePittstonareain1980. Prior to
her retirement, she was employed
by Sheehans Pharmacy, Plains.
She was a member of Our Ladyof
the Eucharist Church, Pittston.
She is preceded in death by her
husbandDonald, whopassedaway
onJuly24, 2009. Inadditiontoher
husband, she
wasalsopreced-
ed in death by
brothers, John,
Thomas and
Roger Koval.
She is sur-
vivedbydaughters, SophieBarber
and her husband Steve of Pittston
Township, and Sandra Smith of
Yatesville; sons, Donald and his
wife Marianne of Jenkins Town-
ship, andStanleyandhis wifeCin-
dyof Exeter;10grandchildrenand
one great-grandchild; sisters, Ste-
phanie Jasak and Patricia Seguin,
both of Florida; brother; Casmir
Koval of Syracuse, N.Y.; numer-
ous nieces and nephews.
Funeral serviceswereWednes-
day, Nov. 7, 2012, from the Mi-
chael J. Mikelski Funeral Home,
293 S. River St., Plains, with a
Mass of Christian Burial at Our
LadyoftheEucharist Church, Pitt-
ston. Interment was in the parish
cemetery, Pittston.
The Egan family would like to
give special thanks to the staff at
Special Care Hospital, Nanticoke,
for the attention and devotion they
provided to their mother while she
was a guest at their facility. This
appreciationcarries over totheAl-
lied Skilled Nursing Facility,
Scranton.
Rebecca Egan
November 3, 2012
Laverne M. Grico, 78, of
Wyoming, passed away on
Wednesday Nov. 7, 2012, at the
Timber Ridge Nursing Home,
Plains Township. Born in King-
ston, shewas adaughter of thelate
Joseph and Helen Perrish Fedor-
sha. Laverne was a member of St.
Anthony of Padua Church (St.
Barbara Parish) and its Christian
Mothers Society, Exeter, and was
a graduate of Exeter High School.
She had been affiliated with Gri-
cos Restaurant until 1969 and lat-
er worked at the CVS, West Pitt-
ston, prior to her retirement.
She was preceded in death by
her husband, Charles Grico, in
June 2001, and a sister, Marcella
Meleski.
Surviving are her children,
RoxanneAllfordandher husband,
Dale Carr, Holly Spring, N.C.;
Reneandher husband, TimReilly,
Larksville; Charles Grico and his
partner, Robert Versteeg, Fort
Lauderdale, Fla.; a brother Joseph
Jr. and his wife, Susan Fedorsha,
Arizona; a brother-in-law Al Me-
leski, Syracuse, N.Y.; grandchil-
dren, Alexandra Allford, Arion
Carr, John, Taylor and Jordan
Reilly; nieces and nephews.
Funeral services will be held
on Monday, Nov. 12, 2012, at 9
a.m. from the Gubbiotti Funeral
Home, 1030 Wyoming Ave., Exe-
ter. A Mass of Christian Burial
will be at 9:30 a.m. at St. Barbara
Parish in St. Anthony of Padua
Church, 28 Memorial St., Exeter.
Interment will follow at Mount
Olivet Cemetery, Carverton. Rel-
atives and friends may call today,
Nov. 11, from4 to 7 p.m. at the fu-
neral home. To send an online
condolence, please visit
www.gubbiottifh.com.
Laverne M. Grico
November 7, 2012
James J. Barrett Jr., 82,
Trucksville, formerly of Long
Pond, died Friday, evening,
Nov. 2, 2012 at home surround-
ed by his loving family.
BorninWilkes-Barre, he was
the son of the late James and
Emma Nicolodi Barrett. He
was a graduate of St Vincent de
Paul High School, Plymouth,
Class of 1947. During his life-
time he was employed by Fair-
child Aircraft Corporation, Ha-
gerstown, Md.; Kanarr Corp.,
Wilkes-Barre; Valley Brook
Machine Tool Corp., Long Val-
ley, N.J.; and Cooks Pharmacy,
Dallas. He was an Air Force
veteran of the Korean War. He
was preceded in death by his
first wife, the former Betty Ga-
rey; sons James III, Edward,
Phillip and Thomas Barrett;
and daughter, Linda Cooper
Barrett.
Surviving are sons Michael
(Natalie), Marshalls Creek; Ri-
chard (Corinne), Pittston, and
Paul (Alice), West Wyoming;
daughters,
Deborah Bar-
rett, Heller-
town, Pa.;
Cathy (
James) Mur-
phy, Trucks-
ville; Mary (Bernard) Olszyk,
Beaumont, and Amy (Ian) An-
thony, Chandler, Ariz.; broth-
ers, John Barrett, Lee Park;
Charles Barrett, Forest Hills,
Md.; Edward Barrett, San An-
tonio, Texas; sisters, Maureen
Morgan, Wilkes-Barre, and
Anne Maher, Swoyersville; 18
grandchildren and 18 great
grandchildren; numerous niec-
es and nephews. Funeral will
was Thursday, Nov. 8, 2012,
from the Kielty-Moran Funeral
Home Inc., 87 Washington
Ave., Plymouth. A Mass of
Christian Burial will follow in
All Saints Parish, Willow
Street, Plymouth, with the Rev.
Robert J. Kelleher officiating.
Interment was in Mt Olivet
Cemetery, Wyoming.
James J. Barrett Jr.
November 2, 2012
Brian P. Williams, 42, of
Lake Winola, died Wednesday
Nov. 7, 2012.
He was born in Wilkes-
Barre on Oct. 18, 1970, son of
Paul F. and Shirley Stage Wil-
liams of Lake Winola.
Brian was a 1989 graduate
of Tunkhannock Area High
School and was employed by
Mountain Energy in Tunkhan-
nock as a truck driver. He was
a member of the Lake Winola
Fire Company.
Brian enjoyed his toys,
which included his trucks and
motorcycles. He was an avid
NASCAR fan, watching the
late Dale Earnhardt, who was
his favorite driver, and now Jr.
Brian was a very hard worker,
working multiple jobs all
hours of the day and night, but
most of all he was a loving
husband, father and son that
will be deeply missed by all.
He was preceded in death
by paternal grandmother, Ha-
zel Williams, and maternal
grandfather, David Stage.
He is survived by his wife
of 23 years, Melinda Goble
Williams; two sons, Dustin
Williams, of Meshoppen, and
Ryan Williams, of Lake Wi-
nola; daughter, Ashlyee Wil-
liams, of Lake Winola; broth-
er, Neil Williams, of Harding;
paternal grandfather, Frank
Williams, of Lake Winola;
maternal grandmother, Margot
Sandtner Stage, of Center Mo-
reland; several nieces, neph-
ews and cousins.
Funeral services will be
held on Monday, Nov. 12,
2012, at 11 a.m. from the Shel-
don-Kukuchka Funeral Home,
73 W. Tioga St. with the Rev.
Joan Dodson of the Lake Wi-
nola United Methodist
Church. Friends and family
may call at the funeral home
today, Nov. 11, 2012, from 4
until 8 p.m.
The family has requested, in
lieu of flowers, memorial do-
nations are to be made to Ash-
lyee Williams Education Fund
c/o National Bank in Tunk-
hannock. For directions and
online condolences, please
visit www.sheldonkukuchka-
funeralhome.com.
Brian P. Williams
November 7, 2012 S
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F U N E R A L S E R V I C E S I N C .
255 MCALPINE STREET, DURYEA, PA 18641 (570) 457-4387
MARK KIESINGER,
FUNERAL DIRECTOR and SUPERVISOR
HEARING LOSS?
We Accept: GEISINGER GOLD
75 William Street., Pittston
Professional Hearing Aid 45th Year
655-3078
BATTERIES $1.99
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OBITUARIES
Ann Marie Rydzy Deluca,
75, of Dupont passed away on
Friday, Nov. 9, 2012, at Geis-
inger Wyoming Valley, Wilkes-
Barre, following an illness.
She was the wife of Malcolm
Deluca, to whom she was mar-
ried for 50 years.
Born Sept. 5, 1937, in Du-
pont, she was a daughter of the
late Valentine and Caroline
Kluck Rydzy. She was a gradu-
ate of Dupont High School.
Ann Marie was a member of St.
Joseph Marello Parish (Our La-
dy of Mount Carmel Church),
Pittston. She was preceded in
death by her infant son, Joseph,
in 1964 and her niece, Rose Ma-
rie Gilhooley. She worked for
many years in the garment in-
dustry but was most proud of
her job as Grammy to Sally,
Dante, Anthony, Dominic and
Nicolas. She was very active in
the Dupont community with
various roles at the Little
League and with the Dupont
Coal Crackers. Mrs. Deluca was
past president
of the Dupont
PTA and a
member of the
Pittston Area
booster club.
She spent the
last years of her life following
her grandchildren at the West
Pittston Little League, West
Pittston Rams and Wyoming
Area Field Hockey, Football,
Basketball and Track. She never
missed a game.
She is survived by her son
Carl, his wife, Ree Ree, and
their children, Sally, Dante and
Dominic Deluca, West Pittston;
daughter Lisa and her husband,
Anthony Nardell, and their chil-
dren, Anthony and Nicolas,
West Pittston. She is also sur-
vived by her brother, Charles
Rydzy of Dupont. Also surviv-
ing are numerous nieces, neph-
ews, cousins and friends.
Grammy was the center of the
Deluca family and the first to
greet her grandchildren after ev-
ery sporting event. She and her
husband, Malcolm, encouraged
their family to be kind, loving
and generous. She was Gram-
my to many people and a true
example that family comes first.
Relatives and friends may
join the Deluca family for vis-
itation on Monday, Nov. 12,
2012, from 5 to 8 p.m. at Gra-
ziano Funeral Home, 700
Township Blvd., Pittston Town-
ship. A Mass of Christian Buri-
al will be held from St. Joseph
Marello Parish (Our Lady of
Mount Carmel R.C. Church),
Pittston, at 9:30 a.m. on Tues-
day, Nov. 13. Celebrant will be
the Rev. Paul McDonnell O.S.J.
Funeral services will begin at 9
a.m. at the funeral home on
Tuesday, Nov. 13. Interment will
take place in St Johns the Evan-
gelist Cemetery, Pittston, at the
convenience of the family.
For directions to or to submit
online condolences, visit
www.grazianofuneralhome-
.com.
Ann Marie Rydzy Deluca
November 9, 2012
Antoinette (Anty) Marcellini,
90, of Pittston Township, passed
away Friday, Nov. 2, 2012 in
Wilkes-Barre General Hospital.
Born in Pittston Township, on
Sept. 14, 1922, she was the
daughter of the late Emilio and
Antoinette (Helen) DeMarco
Colarusso.
She was a graduate of Pittston
Township High School, Class of
1940, and had been employed in
the local garment industry.
She was a member of St. Jo-
seph Marello Parish and its Altar
and Rosary Society; and a mem-
ber of the ILGWunion.
She was a loving and devoted
wife, mother, grandmother and
great-grandmother, and she will
be greatly missed. Her greatest
joy was her family.
She was preceded in death by
her husband, Aldo Marcellini, in
1997.
Surviving are her daughter,
Gloria Musto, Pittston Town-
ship; son, RonaldMarcellini, and
his wife, Don-
na, Pittston
Township; five
grandchildren,
Ronnie Mar-
cellini and his
wife Gina,
Tampa, Florida; Jaime Marcelli-
ni andher companion, Lavar Wil-
liams, Pittston Township; Vin-
cent Musto and his companion,
Megan Ridgway, Downington;
Marina Clarke and her husband,
Patrick, Pittston Township; and
Kristen Nardone and her hus-
band, Joseph, Jenkins Township;
five great-grandchildren, Ethan
and Aidan Clarke, Davonte Wil-
liams, Giovanna and Antoinette
Nardone; sister, Grace Savoia;
numerous nieces and nephews.
Special thank you to Dr. Man-
ganiello, Dr. Martino, Dr. Perni-
koff and Dr. DAndrea, and the
nursing and respiratory staffs at
Wilkes-Barre General Hospital
for the excellent care as well as to
Fr. Jackson and Fr. Brian Clarke
for their spiritual care.
A Mass of Christian Burial
was held on Wednesday, Nov. 7,
2012 in St. Joseph Marello Par-
ish, 237 WilliamStreet, Pittston.
Interment was inthe ItalianInde-
pendent Cemetery, West Wyom-
ing.
Arrangements are by the Peter
J. Adonizio Funeral Home, 251
WilliamStreet, Pittston.
Memorial donations may be
made to St. Jude Childrens Re-
search Hospital, St. Jude Tribute
Program, PO Box 1000, Dept.
142, Memphis, TN38101-9908
or to the American Red Cross,
545 Jefferson Ave, Scranton, PA.
Online condolences may be
madeat www.peterjadoniziofun-
eralhome.com.
Antoinette (Anty) Marcellini
November 2, 2012
Lottie Major, 96, of Avoca,
peacefullyenteredthearmsofthe
Lord with great ease and grace
Tuesday evening, Nov. 6, 2012.
She was borninAvoca, March
4,1916, andwas adaughter of the
late AnthonyandUrsula (Grego-
rek) Kolander. Lottie was a for-
mermemberofSs. PeterandPaul
Church and a member of Queen
of The Apostles Parish, Avoca.
She attended Avoca schools. For
many years, Lottie worked in the
local garment industry. Through-
out her life, she was involved in
local politics.
In addition to her parents, she
wasprecededindeathbyher hus-
band, Adam Major Mazur,
whopassedawayin1975, her sis-
ters, Stella Vols, Sophie Karuzie
and Helen Berlinski, and her
brothers, Anthony, Stanley, Wal-
ter and Ber-
nard Kolander.
She was the
beloved moth-
er of her four
children, Jo-
seph Major
and his wife, Dawn, of Avoca;
JohnMazur andhis fiance, Bar-
baraFairchild, ofAvoca; Jeanand
her husband, Joe Coffee, of Avo-
ca; andDorothyandher husband,
Archie Faulkner, of Greenwood.
Also surviving are 10 grandchil-
drenandseveral great-grandchil-
dren and great-great-grandchil-
dren, and many nieces and neph-
ews. Funeral services were pri-
vate. Interment was in Ss. Peter
and Paul Cemetery, Avoca.
Online condolences may be
made to www.kiesingerfuneral-
services.com.
Lottie Major
November 6, 2012
Ann M. Redding, 90, of Pitt-
ston, passed away Thursday,
Nov. 8, 2012, in Wilkes-Barre
General Hospital.
Born in Pittston on March 11,
1922, she was a daughter of the
lateHenryandAnnaCatell Seri-
no. She was educated in Pittston
schools. She was a homemaker
and a member of St. Joseph Ma-
rello Parish, Pittston.
In addition to her parents, she
was preceded in death by two
sisters, Beatrice Kurt and Roset-
ta Hogan.
Survivingisher husbandof 65
years, John W. Redding; sons,
Kenneth Redding and his wife,
Patricia, Duryea; John Redding
and his wife, Maryellen, Pitt-
ston, Dennis Redding and his
wife, Irene, Laflin; seven grand-
children; one great-grandson;
brothers, Stanley Serino and his
wife, Helen, West Paterson, N.J.;
Anthony Serino and Michael
Serino both of Michigan; nu-
merous nieces and nephews.
A Mass of Christian Burial
will be heldonMonday, Nov. 12,
2012, at 9:30 a.m. in St. Joseph
Marello Parish, 237 WilliamSt.,
Pittston. Those attending are
askedtogodirectlytothechurch
on Monday morning. Interment
will be inSt. Johnthe Evangelist
Cemetery, Pittston. Friends may
call today, Nov. 11, 2012, from 5
to 8 p.m. at the Peter J. Adonizio
Funeral Home, 251 William St.,
Pittston.
Online condolences may be
made at www.peterjadonizio-
funeralhome.com.
Ann M. Redding
November 8, 2012
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OBITUARIES
Rosemary Ann Nardone, 71,
of Exeter Avenue, West Pittston,
passed away Friday, Nov. 2, 2012
in the Geisinger Wyoming Val-
ley Medical Center, Plains
Township.
Born Sept. 2, 1941, in Hazle-
ton, she was the daughter of the
late Joseph and Rose Plesh To-
lerico of Hazleton. She was a
graduate of Hazleton High
School, class of 1958, and
Bloomsburg State University
1962. She was a school teacher
and interior designer. She was a
member of
Trinity Episco-
pal Church,
West Pittston.
Rosemary es-
pecially loved
gardening, an
avid reader and had her guilty
pleasure of reality TV. She was
also a member of Junior Wom-
ens League of West Pittston.
Surviving are her husband, Jo-
seph, of West Pittston; daugh-
ters, Lisa Nardone, West Pitt-
ston; Dominique Nardone,
Drums; sister, the Rev. Marion
Meiss, Drums; several nieces
and nephews.
A memorial liturgy was held
at Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2012 in
Trinity Episcopal Church,
Spring Street and Montgomery
Avenue, West Pittston, with the
Rev. John Major officiating.
Interment was in the Calvary
Cemetery, Drums.
Arrangements are by the Met-
calfe-Shaver-Kopcza Funeral
Home Inc., 504 Wyoming Ave-
nue, Wyoming.
Rosemary Ann Nardone
November 2, 2012
Annette M. Zurewski Norris,
age 51, of Chester Springs, for-
merly of Dupont, died Saturday
evening, November 3, 2012, at
the Bryn Mawr Hospital.
She was the wife of her loving
husband, David Norris, whom
she married on May 29, 1998.
She was born July 5, 1961, in
Scranton, daughter of Stanley
Zurewski, Dupont, and the late
Annette Mary Bonetski Zurew-
ski. She was a class of 1979 grad-
uate of the Pittston Area Senior
High School. In 1983, she re-
ceived her bachelor of science
degree in accounting from Clar-
ion University and in 1998 she
received her master of science
degree in accounting from
Kings College. She was a mem-
ber of Sacred Heart of Jesus
Church, Dupont, and was em-
ployed as an accountant for Air
Gas, Radnor, Pa.
She is also survived by a sister,
Mary Griffin, and her husband,
Nelson, Dupont; a niece, Stepha-
nie Griffin; a nephew, Keith
Griffin, and mother-in-law, Ol-
ive Davenport, Nashville, Tenn.
She was alsoprecededindeath
by her paternal grandparents,
Stanley and Mary Zurewski, and
her maternal grandparents, John
and Mary Bonetski.
Funeral services were
Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2012, from
the Lokuta-Zawacki Funeral
Home, 200 Wyoming Ave., Du-
pont, with a Mass of Christian
Burial in the Sacred Heart of Je-
sus Church, 215 Lackawanna
Ave., Dupont, celebrated by the
Rev. Joseph D. Verespy, pastor.
Annette M. Zurewski Norris
November 3, 2012
Sarah Ann Nuzzalo Mur-
phy, beloved wife, devoted
mother, grandmother and
great-grandmother, passed
away Monday, Oct. 22, 2012,
at Evans Health Center, Fort
Myers, Fla.
Sarah, affectionately
known to friends and family
as Sally, was born Feb. 18,
1936, in Pittston.
Sally had several careers in
the service and retail business
before retiring from the Child
Development Council and
movingtoFort Myers withher
husband, Patrick Murphy, in
February of 1990.
Sally enjoyed traveling with
her husband and privately car-
ing and tutoring for young
children. For 13 years, Sally
was active on the board asso-
ciation for her community in
Fort Myers.
Sally was preceded in death
by her loving parents, James
and Helen Nuzzalo of West
Pittston.
Her memories will be for-
ever cherished by her hus-
band, Patrick J. Murphy Jr.,
with whom she celebrated 55
years of marriage on May 4,
2012.
Surviving are brother, Tho-
mas Nuzzalo, and family of
Pottstown; sister, Marie Mel-
vin, and family of West Pitt-
ston; children, daughters, Pa-
trice Murphy, of Fort Myers,
Fla.; Suzette Murphy Kirkpa-
trick and husband Norman,
Daytona Beach, Fla.; son, Pa-
trick Murphy III, and wife
Erin, of Emmitsburg, Md.;
grandchildren, Joseph Roma-
siewicz of Margate, Fla.; Mar-
la Romasiewicz of Fort
Myers, Fla.; Cory and Reid
Kirkpatrick of Daytona
Beach, Fla.; Patrick Murphy
IV of Emmitsburg, Md.;
great-grandchildren, Skylar
and Brielle Romasiewicz of
Margate, Fla.
A private service was held
at Harvey-Engelhart Metz Fu-
neral Home, Fort Myers, Fla.
Memorial donations may be
made in Mrs. Murphys name
to the Alzheimers Associ-
ation at www.alzfdn.org.
Sarah Ann (Nuzzalo) Murphy
October 22, 2012 S
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OBITUARIES
Thomas MatthewKearns Sr.,
architect, educator, volunteer
and lifelong resident of West
Pittston, passed away peaceful-
ly Friday morning at the age of
81 surrounded by his family.
Tom was born May 24, 1931,
at the home of his parents, the
late Thomas Kearns and Kath-
leen Mangan Kearns. He was a
proudgraduate of the West Pitt-
ston High School and The
Pennsylvania State University,
where he received a degree in
Architectural Engineering. He
joinedthe service upongradua-
tion, where he served as 1st
Lieutenant in the Army Corps
of Engineers. Soon after his
service, he married his wife of
43 years, Patricia Ann Hannon
Kearns.
Mr. Kearns professional ca-
reer spanned five decades be-
ginning as a college professor
at The Pennsylvania State Uni-
versity prior to working as a
Registered Architect and Pro-
fessional Engineer. As propiti-
ator of architectural firms in
Wilkes-Barre and Scranton,
Toms architectural work was
spread throughout the north-
east from Boston to Virginia.
Some of Toms proudest archi-
tectural work was centered
around educational projects at
The Pennsylvania State Uni-
versity University Park and
Scranton campuses, and many
local colleges and school dis-
tricts.
Throughout his life, Tom
volunteeredhis time andexper-
tise to dozens of civic and com-
munity organizations. Tom
served as President of the Pitt-
ston Kiwanis Club, Greater
Pittston Friendly Sons of St.
Patrick, West
Pittston Cher-
ry Blossom
Festival Com-
mittee,
Wyoming Ar-
ea Football
Parents Association, and
Wyoming Area School Board.
He served Vice Presidential
terms for the Wyoming Valley
United Fund and Greater Pitt-
ston Chamber of Commerce.
He sat on the Board of Direc-
tors for the Steamtown USA
Foundation, Red Cross --
Wyoming Valley Chapter,
American Institute of Archi-
tects Northeast PA Chapter,
West Pittston Ambulance As-
sociation, and the Pittston YM-
CA. Other affiliations included
The Pennsylvania Society of
New York, Westmoreland
Club, Fox Hill Country Club,
Wilkes-Barre, Chamber of
Commerce, Scranton Chamber
of Commerce, and the Scran-
ton Rotary Club, Knights of
Columbus and the West Pitt-
ston Library. Tomled the effort
by the Wyoming Area Football
Parents that was instrumental
in salvaging and relocating the
Wyoming Area Victory Bell
fromthe old West Pittston High
School to its current location at
the schools football field.
Toms proudest work was
with the students of the Wyom-
ing Area School District and
specificallythe WADrama De-
partment. Tom loved sharing
his love and knowledge of the
theater with the drama students
and spent countless hours
working with the kids design-
ing and constructing theatrical
sets. He organized visits from
Pulitzer Prize-winning authors
Frank and Malachy McCourt,
tours of the NewYork City the-
ater district and behind-the-
scene tours of the Metropolitan
Opera House to further the
growth and interest in theater
arts. Tom, alongwithhis family
has established an yearly schol-
arship for a senior member of
the drama department.
Tom is survived by his wife,
Patricia, andfour sons, Thomas
Jr. and his wife, Daneen of
West Pittston; John and his
wife, Mary, of West Pittston;
Patrick and his wife, Heather,
of Aurora, Colorado, and Mat-
thew and his wife, Molly, of
Exeter. He has four grandchil-
dren, Thomas III (T.J.), Brady,
Shannon, and Ryan; sister Ma-
ryBoone; numerous nieces and
nephews.
He was preceded in death by
his niece Kathleen Boone.
The Kearns family would
like to thank Tate Dobosh and
the staff at Timber Ridge Nurs-
ing Home for their exceptional
care they have provided for
their father over the last few
years.
A Mass of Christian Burial
was held Thursday, Nov. 8,
2012 in St. John the Evangelist
Church, William Street, Pitt-
ston. Interment was in Moun-
tainViewBurial Park, Harding.
Arrangments are by the Peter
J. Adonizio Funeral Home, 251
William Street, Pittston.
In lieu of flowers, the family
asks that donations be made to
the Wyoming Area Drama
Club or the West Pittston Li-
brary. Online condolences may
be made at www.peterjadoni-
ziofuneralhome.com.
Thomas Matthew Kearns Sr.
November 2, 2012
Dorothy R. Gilbert, RN and
Methodist Missionary, went home
to be with her Lord on Friday eve-
ning, Nov. 2, 2012, at the United
Methodist Homes, Wesley Village
Campus. Dorothy was born in Sy-
racuse on July 26, 1920 to the Rev.
Charles and Ruth Gilbert, who
taught her about the ministry of
Mission.
Dorothy enlisted in the Army
NurseCorpsupongraduatingfrom
Nesbitt Hospital Nursing School
andservedinHawaii andOkinawa,
Japan, during World War II. When
shereturned, sheearnedadegreein
nursingeducationat theUniversity
of Pennsylvania. She was commis-
sioned a missionary of the Metho-
dist Church in 1951 and served in
the Belgian Congo for 27 years.
Duringher furloughsfromthemis-
sion field, she continued her edu-
cation and obtained a certificate in
nurse-midwifery and a master of
public health degree at Johns Hop-
kins University. She continued her
work at Mission Headquarters in
NewYork, Sierra Leone, Zaire and
Benin for a total
of 40 years.
Dorothy came
to live at Wesley
Village in 1992
where she be-
came a beloved
volunteer and friend. She was a
certified lay speaker, delegate to
Wyoming Annual Conference and
organist at twochurches and, at age
77, volunteered in Haiti. Dottie
spoke several languages fluently.
However, inwhatever languageshe
spoke, you heard her love for Jesus
and those who serve Him.
Funeral serviceswere held
Thursday, Nov. 8, 2012, in the Met-
calfe-Shaver-Kopcza Funeral
home Inc., 504 Wyoming Ave.,
Wyoming, withtheRev. NancyPit-
ely, director of Pastoral Services at
Wesley Village, officiating. Inter-
ment wasintheMount ZionCeme-
tery, Exeter Township.
In lieu of flowers memorial con-
tributions maybemadetotheWes-
ley Village Fund for Music, 209
Roberts Road, Pittston, PA18640.
Dorothy R. Gilbert
November 2, 2012
Beatrice M. Alaimo, 83, of Ya-
tesville, passed away Friday, No-
vember 9, 2012 in Little Flower
Manor, Wilkes-Barre.
Born in Manhattan, New York,
on March 23, 1929, she was the
daughter of the late William and
Caroline Troniar Breck.
She was a graduate of Washing-
tonIrvingHighSchool, NewYork.
She was a member of St. Maria
Goretti Church, Laflin. She had
worked for USF&G in New York
as an underwriter.
In addition to her parents, she
was preceded in death by a son,
Salvatore, Jr. and a brother, John
Breck.
Surviving are her husband of 63
years, Salvatore Alaimo; children,
Angelo Alaimo and his wife Con-
nie, New York; Andrea DAngelo
and her husband, John, Dallas; and
WilliamAlaimo and his wife, Cin-
dy, Pittston Township; grandchil-
dren, Christopher Alaimo; Marla
Telford; Carrie Ann Nystrand; Ja-
mie DAngelo; and Heather Au-
gust; numerous nieces and neph-
ews.
Special thank
you to the staff at
Little Flower
Manor and Dr.
Torbik for the ex-
ceptional care
they provided to Beatrice.
AMass of Christian Burial will
be held on Monday, November 12,
2012 at 10am in St. Maria Goretti
Church, Laflin. St. Maria Goretti
Church Bereavement Group will
recite the rosary hour before the
funeral mass. The Alaimo family
will receive friends and relatives in
the church from 9 to 10 a.m. on
Monday morning, Nov. 12. Inter-
ment will be at the convenience of
the family in St. Roccos Cemete-
ry. In lieu of flowers, memorial do-
nations may be made to the charity
of the donors choice. Funeral ar-
rangements are entrusted to the
Peter J. Adonizio Funeral Home,
251 William Street, Pittston.
Online condolences may be
made at www. peterjadoniziofun-
eralhome.com
Beatrice M. Alaimo
November 9, 2012
The Sunday Dispatch publishes obituaries of local individuals who reside, formerly resided or
have family living in the Greater Pittston area.
Obituaries should be submitted by 12 p.m. Saturday to ensure publication in the same weeks
edition.
Email is preferred for submission, but fax or handwritten entries will be acceptable with a
contact name andphone number. Entries not includinga contact name andtelephone number will
not be published.
Email obituaries to sd@psdispatch.com; Fax obituaries to 570.602.0183; or mail them to 109
New St., Pittston, PA18640. For more information call the obituary desk at 570.602.0170, or to
place a memorial ad call 570.602.0168.
Obituary Policy
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SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 PAGE 1B
Social Section
Inside
Schools ...........................2,4
Birthdays............................3
Faith................................5,7
Classified......................8-14
S E C T I O N B
S O C I A L
Robert and Dianna Shimkoski of Dupont celebrated their 50th
wedding anniversary on November 10. They were married by the
late Rev. C. H. Kolalowski at Sacred Heart Church in Dupont.
Robert is the son of the late John and Anna Shimkoski. He is
retired fromKeystone Coca Cola and works for Geisinger Logis-
tics.
Dianna is the daughter of the late Joseph and Lottie Wolak. She
is retired from Giant Markets and works at Gerritys.
They are the proud parents of two children, Robert Jr. and his
wife Delicia of Detroit and Sandra Jonelunas and her husband
Glenn of Dupont. The also have step grandchildren.
The couple renewed their vows at Wedding Anniversary with a
two-week trip to France touring Paris and Monte Carlo. Afamily
gathering was celebrated at Amedeos Restaurant in Moosic.
Robert and Dianna Shimkoski
Shimkoskis wed 50 years
Irene Orloski celebrated her 92nd birthday on Tuesday Novem-
ber 6. She is a loving, caring, generous mother, grandmother and
great-grandmother.
Irene has three daughters, Mary Ann Rinaldi, husband Ronald,
Dupont; Geri Sovinski, Dupont; and Rita Turbridy, husband Jim,
Wyoming.
Irene had five grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. She
celebrated with her family with a brunch at East Mountain Inn.
Irene Orloski
Orloski celebrates 92 years
Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Prebola of Harding celebrated their 50th
wedding anniversary on November 10. The occasion was marked
by a special Mass and dinner with family.
Gerald (Jerry) is the son of the late Andrew Helen Prebola,
Harding. Rose is the daughter of the late HarryandMaryMeschi-
ni of Exeter.
They were married at St. Anthonys in Exeter by Father Enrico
Giovetto. Weddingattendants were NancyMattioli, Patricia Scal-
zo, Judy Sokash, Ronald Neary, Gene Prebola and WilliamRow-
ker.
Rose and Gerry are the parents of Atty. Rose Thomas, Sell-
erville; Deb Bombe, west Pittston and Kim Yochem, Harding.
They have four grandsons, Brandon Bombe, City Thomas, Chase
Yochem and Adam Yochem.
Jerry was formerly employed by Foster Wheeler and was the
owner of Prebola Construction until his retirement.
The couple enjoys golfing, vacationing in Florida and spend-
ing time with their grandchildren.
Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Prebola
Golden Wedding Anniversary
Jason and Melissa Costa of Old Bridge, N.J., proudly announce
the birth of their daughter, Faith Arabella Costa. Faith was born at
CentraState Medical Center in Freehold, N.J., on Friday, Sept. 21,
at 5:57 p.m. She weighed 6 pounds, 14 ounces and was 20 inches
long. Faiths grandparents are Anthony and Celia Lacina of West
Wyoming and Carlos and Luisa Costa of Millstone Township,
N.J. Faith has two big brothers, Luke Anthony who is 3 1/2 years
old and Owen Alberto who is 11/2 years old.
Faith Arabella Costa
Costas welcome a daughter
Students
at Pittston
Area Pri-
mary Center
participated
in a mock
election on
Tuesday
Nov. 6,
Using the
Smart Re-
sponse
Controllers,
Students
were able to
cast a vote
and see the
results in a
Bar Graph
displayed
on the
Smartboard.
PI TTSTON AREA PRI MARY CENTER
Students hold mock election
PAGE 2B SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 SUNDAY DISPATCH
S C H O O L S
On Friday, Oct. 19, the Pittston
Area Primary Center Whats
Special About October As-
sembly was held. The assembly
featured special happenings that
took place during the month of
October. Mrs. Ferentinos 1st
grade class, andMiss Viteks 2nd
grade class highlighted special
happenings by performing po-
ems, songs and movements
about October. All primary stu-
dents will have the opportunity
to perform in one assembly dur-
ing the school year. Both classes
are pictured at right.
Primary Center
Veterans Day
There is no school on Monday,
Nov. 12 in honor of Veterans
Day. School resumes on Tues-
day, Nov. 13.
Veterans Memorial Wall
Names of family members
who served or are serving in the
military are displayed on a
streamer of stars on the two Pri-
mary Center Veterans Memorial
Walls. Classes on each floor
have individual displays to honor
our veterans. Be sure to look for
your family names when you at-
tend conferences. Students will
apply their reading, math, and
writing skills to this project as
they discuss the finished activity
display.
Parent Conference Dates
Parent Conference dates have
been changed due to the recent
weather. New schedules will be
sent home. Students will be dis-
missed at 1p.m. on the following
Parent Conference Days: Friday,
Nov. 16, Monday, Nov. 19, Tues-
day, Nov. 20, and Wednesday,
Nov. 21. If you need to resche-
dule your conference you can
call the school at 655-3785.
Teachers are looking forward to
discussing student progress with
parents.
Thanksgiving Holiday
School will be closed for the
Thanksgiving Holiday on Thurs-
day, Nov. 22, Friday, Nov. 23, and
Monday, Nov. 26. School re-
sumes on Tuesday, Nov. 27.
Math Opportunity
Parents are reminded to point
out numbers in daily life. Li-
cense plates, house numbers,
and prices at the supermarket are
some places where students can
recognize numbers and howthey
are used for different purposes.
Have fun with your child finding
and naming numbers correctly
High school
The Pittston Area Leos Club
and Fibers of the Earth Con-
scious Recycling are conducting
a Clothing and Shoe Drop Box
Program.
There will be clothing drop
boxes placed in all local schools
and in return the Leos will re-
ceive much needed funding.
Items should be placed in
well-tied plastic bags, and drop
them off in the green boxes
around Pittston Area.
Any questions should be di-
rected to Fibers of the Earth at
586 5242 or email fibersofth-
eearth@gmail.com or visit fi-
bersoftheearth.com.
Acceptable items include
clean, wearable adult and chil-
drens clothing and sleepwear,
sneakers and shoes, sheets and
linens, curtains, purses, belts,
bags hats, socks, sporting cloth-
ing and shoes, outdoor clothing
and shoes, stuffed animals and
soft cloth toys. Unacceptable
items include torn, wet or stained
items, books, glass, household
fixtures or furniture, any non-
textile based household item.
Senior Interviews
Taylor Stull, daughter of
Jennie and Tim Saporito, was
bornonJuly25, 1995. She is usu-
ally with her best friends Tiana
Stull, Emily Seaman, and Anto-
nette Scalpi. She is involved in
the Key Club and plays soccer.
Her favorite movie is The Lucky
One. She loves Taylor Swift, and
her favorite meal is mac and
cheese. Her most memorable
high school moment occurred
when she returned fromsummer
break and realized this was her
last year of high school. Looking
back upon her high school years,
she described all of her experi-
ences as memorable. Taylor
plans on attending Bloomsburg
University for elementary edu-
cation and wants to teach second
grade. She looks forward to be-
coming an adult so she can be on
her own, and look back on every-
thing she has done.
Olivia Lanza, daughter of
JimLanza and Sandy McKernan
was born on September 1, 1994.
She lives inDupont andis always
with her best friends Kristen and
Catherine Lombardo, Jordan
Cumbo, and Kristen Fereck. Oli-
via is involved in cross country
and track and field. She finds the
most challenging part of high
school studying, and plans to at-
tend college.
Nick Bolka, son of Lisa, was
born on May 9, 1995 and lives in
Pittston. Nick likes to hang out
with his best friends Mike Hard-
ing, Aaron Black, Matt Pieranto-
ni, and James Lizza. If Nick
could re-do his high school ca-
reer, he would play football. His
favorite food is Napolis Chicken
wing Pizza, Jay-Z is his favorite
artist, and his favorite movie is
Money Ball. His idol is Derek
Jeter and he plans to go to col-
lege andmajor insports manage-
ment at Temple University.
Intermediate Center
Veterans Day
In honor of Veterans Day,
there will be no school on Mon-
day, Nov. 12. Classes will resume
on Tuesday, Nov. 13.
Parent Conferences
The Intermediate Centers Par-
ent Conferences will be held on
Nov. 16, 19, 20 and 21. Car and
walking students will be dismis-
sed at 12:50 p.m. through the
Middle Schools Main Entrance
and bus students will be dismis-
sed at 1 p.m. Information will be
sent home.
Thanksgiving in a Box
The Pittston Area Middle
School Builders Club is pleased
to announce a Thanksgiving in
a Box fundraiser. This is in con-
junction with the Pittston Area
Federation of Teacher, and the
Greater Pittston Food Pantry.
They will be providing an entire
Thanksgiving meal to a needy
family in the Greater Pittston ar-
ea. Collection will begin on
Wednesday, Nov. 7, and con-
clude on Tuesday, Nov. 20. Alist
of items was sent home. The Pitt-
ston Area Federation of Teachers
will provide the turkey for each
box. Homeroom teachers will
coordinate the assignment of the
rest of the items to students.
Thanksgiving Break
In observance of Thanksgiv-
ing, there is no school on Nov.
22, 23 and 26. Classes resume on
Tuesday, Nov. 27.
Middle School
Builders Club
The next meeting of the Build-
ers Club will be Tuesday, Dec. 4
from 3 until 3:30 p.m. in room
206 with Ms. Donahue and Mrs.
Martin. Students are responsible
for their own transportation
home, and rides must be in front
of the Middle School no later
than 3:25 p.m.
Middle School Talent Show
The middle school talent show
will be held in the High School
Auditorium on Nov. 15. If you
have any questions, please call
655-2927.
Veterans Day
The Pittston Area School Dis-
trict will be closed tomorrow,
Nov. 12, in observance of Veter-
ans Day.
Parent/Teacher Conferences
The Pittston Area Middle
School will hold Parent/Teacher
Conferences on Nov. 16, 19, and
20 from 1pm until 3:00pm.
Please note that these dates have
been adjusted from those on the
school calendar due toour Hurri-
cane Sandy days.
Report cards for the first
marking period will be distrib-
uted at this time. Students will be
dismissed at 12:30 p.m. on con-
ference days.
Parents are encouraged to
come and meet with their childs
teachers to discuss any concerns.
Please limit your time with each
teacher to five minutes in order
to allow each parent time for a
conference. If you are unable to
attend Parent/Teacher confer-
ences, report cards will be
mailed home the week following
conferences.
Fundraiser Pick-Up
Fundraiser pickups for both
Kidz First and Gertrude Hawks
will be on Wednesday, Nov. 14
from 5-7 p.m. in the middle
school cafeteria. If you have any
questions, call 655-2927.
Spelling Bee Practice
The next practice for the spell-
ing bee will be held on Tuesday,
Nov. 13 in Mrs. Bradys room.
Students are responsible for
their own transportation home.
Please see Mrs. Brady or Mrs.
Noone if you are unable to at-
tend.
The in school spelling bee will
be held on Monday, Jan. 28.
Wilkes-Barre CTC Tour
Interested members of the 8th
grade class will have the oppor-
tunity to attend a tour of the
Wilkes-Barre Career and Tech-
nical Center onTuesday, Decem-
ber 4.
Permission slips must be re-
turned in order to attend the tour
which will allow students to ex-
perience the career and technical
programs offered to high school
students.
PI TTSTON AREA NEWS
October highlighted at Primary Center
Mrs. Ferentino's 1st Grade Class is pictured, first row left to right: Kaitlin Chernouskas, Evan Ryder, Kristin Zygmunt, Madysen Tho-
mas, Gage Leffler, Brian Antiqua, Gianna Brannen, Jazlynn Miller. Second row left to right: Ethan Sakulich, Tyler Lucas, Dylan Weitz,
Natalie Syms, Michael Cavello, Jacob Halapin, Hannah Mantush. Third row left to right: Riley Nagy, Breeana Bartolomei, Jarret Leach,
Nevaeh Darden, Abigail Chernouskas, Alexis Heffley, Zainab Almoumin, Joseph Jones. Mrs. Ferentino. Absent: Jacob Mason,
Mckenzie Corona.
Miss Vitek's 2nd Grade Class is picature, first row left to right: Bianca Fortini, Jordan Shearer, Mia Decker, Anthony Stynes, Brady
Musloski, Jaden Stoudt, Jacob Gallagher, Zander Bragg. Second row left to right: Ryan Hintze, Leiah Canfield, Evan Brady, Taylor
Griffith, Genevieve Booth, Michael Wojtach, Serenity Lostrick, Madison Karuzie.Third row left to right: Eric Bollman, Morgan Hilbert,
Kaiden Thomas, Emma Rinaldi, Kyle Sarfine, Kaylyn O'Brien, Karissa Norris, Emily Folger. Miss Vitek. Absent: Nehemiah Samuel.
School Lunch
School Lunch - Whats Coo-
kin", the theme for this years
National School Lunch Week, is
about celebrating the positive
changes made in school lunch
programs across the country.
During the month of October,
Wyoming Area Elementary
Schools held promotions spot-
lighting fresh apples in conjunc-
tion with "Great Apple Crunch
Day". The new menu item is in
compliance with the 2012 guide-
lines under the Healthy Hunger
Free Kids Act.
Drama Club
The Wyoming Area Drama
Club and Thespian Society
#4295 is holding Cabaret Night
on Sunday, Nov. 18 in the Wyom-
ing Area Secondary Center
Cafeteria from 6 to 9 p.m.
Tickets are $5 and available
through any Drama Club mem-
ber. They will also be available at
the door. Refreshments will be
served.
WYOMI NG AREA NEWS
Students enjoy fresh apples as part of School Lunch Week
Above, Mary Jean Musto, Food Service employee, preparing
sliced red delicious apples, topped with low fat vanilla yogurt,
sprinkled with raisins and decorated with a juicy cherry. At right,
Mr. Robert Kaluzavich, principal, and Melissa Collevechio, Food
Service director, (back, rear) are students at Sara J. Dymond
Elementary School enjoying a new twist on eating fresh apples,
the "Super Fruit Nacho" way.
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 PAGE 3B
B I R T H D A Y S
7
8
8
1
7
6
HAPPY BIRTHDAY!
Titus Boggetti, son of
Bill and Lori Boggetti,
celebrated his 5th birth-
day on Nov. 9. Titus is the
grandson of Elaine Frei-
tas and Ed and Kathy
Appnel, Avoca. Hes also
got a big brother, Blaise,
9. Titus plays baseball for
the Avoca/Dupont Little
League and loves skate-
boarding and riding his
quad. Hell celebrate by
having a party with fam-
ily and friends.
Titus Boggetti
Mia Regina Rose Ciampi,
daughter of Lou and Lisa
Ciampi, Wyoming, celebrat-
ed her second birthday on
Thursday, Nov. 15. Mia is the
granddaughter of Lou and
Marianne Ciampi, West Pitt-
ston, and Ed and Carol Nie-
winski, Forty Fort. Godpar-
ents are Michelle Reilly, Har-
veys Lake, and Steve Niewin-
ski, Phoenixville. Mia has
two brothers at home: Louis,
7, and Nicholas, 4. A party
with family and friends was
held in Mias honor.
Mia Regina
Rose Ciampi
Kayleen Elena
Dolan, daughter of
Robert and Lynn
Dolan of Avoca
celebrated her 9th
birthday on Nov. 9.
She is the grand-
daughter of John
and Louise Stasik
and Robert and
Elaine Dolan of
Duryea. Kayleen
has a brother, R.J.,
who is 4.
Kayleen Elena
Dolan
Jacob Joseph Hull, son of Jo-
seph and Amy Hull of Duryea
celebrated his eighth birthday
on Saturday, Nov. 10. Jacob is
the grandson of Jack and Ellie
Kuligowski of Dupont and the
late Katie Hull of Dickson City
and Ron Hull of Walkersville,
Md. He is the great-grandson
of the late Joseph and Helen
Kulick of Dupont, Lottie Kuli-
gowski and the late Joseph Ku-
ligowski of Dupont, the late
Susan Hull of Olyphant, and
the late Catherine Brizinski of
Dickson City. Jacob has a
younger brother, Sammy, who
is five.
Jacob Joseph Hull
Ross Anthony Latona of
Duryea celebrated his fifth
birthday on Nov. 7. Ross is
the son of Tracey Latona
and Dr. Ross J. Latona.
Ross is the grandson of Re-
ne Turkos, Duryea, and
the late Stan Turkos, and of
Victoria and Ross C. Lato-
na, Pittston. Rosss great-
grandmother is Rose Ven-
narini, Old Boston. Ross
played T-ball for the Du-
ryea Little League. He at-
tends pre-school at Cookie
Corner in Wyoming.
Ross Anthony
Latona
Lydia Belle Lu-
vender, daughter of
Teresa and Danny
Luvender, celebrat-
ed her first birthday
on Nov. 5. Lydia is a
granddaughter of
Dan and Janice Lu-
vender, Pittston
Township, and Tom
and Judy Lambert,
Duryea. She has a
sister, Ella Mae, Exe-
ter.
Lydia Belle
Luvender
Blake Francis Pribula cele-
brated his first birthday on
Thursday, Nov. 8, 2012. He is
the son of PJ and Lisa Pribula
of Exeter. He is the grandchild
of Frank and Josie Dominick
of Pittston Township and the
late Joseph and Jean Pribula,
formerly of Exeter. Blake has
an older brother, Connor Jo-
seph, who is three. To cele-
brate this special occasion,
Blake is having a Lil Slugger
themed party at Arcaro &Ge-
nell with his family and
friends.
Blake Francis Pribula
Nicole VanLuvender, princi-
pal of the Old Forge Elemen-
tary School, announces Octo-
ber Devil Pride Students. The
students were chosen based on
their recognition for outstand-
ing demonstrations of Devil
Pride (Pride stands for Pre-
pared, Respectful, Independ-
ent, Dependable and Example
to others.) From left, first row,
are Cooper Mordan, Grade 2;
Jake Talarico, Grade1; and Ke-
vin Pepsin, Grade 5. Second
row, Dustyn Miller, Grade 3;
Gina Kuckla, Grade 4; Nina
Zimmerman, Grade 6; and
Mrs. VanLuvender. Absent at
the time of the photo was Betty
Brown, Kindergarten.
October Devil Pride Students named
Stop by or mail your birthday photo to:
The Sunday Dispatch
109 New Street
Pittston, PA18640
Happy birthday!
PAGE 4B SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 SUNDAY DISPATCH
S C H O O L S
Holy Rosary School on Stephenson
Street in Duryea announces the following:
FORENSIC FINALITS
Congratulations to the Varsity Forensic
Team member Denise Pinto, who placed
first in the Varsity Division and to Junior
Varsity team members Grace Berlew, who
placed first, Peyton McNulty, who placed
second, Sarah Liskowicz, who placed third,
and Angelina Falcone, who was awarded
Honorable Mention, in the Junior Varsity
division.
The students will represent Holy Rosary
School in the Diocesan Final Competition,
to be held Thursday, Nov. 15 at Wyoming
Area Catholic School in Exeter.
The whole school is ROYALLY
PROUD of them, and of all the students
who participated in the regional competi-
tion.
YOUNG SCHOLARS
Congratulations to the four eighth grad-
ers who represented Holy Rosary School in
the Scranton Prep Young Scholars Program
on Saturday, Nov. 3.
Emily Mazur, Jonathan Smith, Julie
Chropowicki, and Amelia Desiderio repre-
sented Holy Rosary well, and reached the
semifinal round of competition.
The whole school thanks to them, and to
their moderator, Mrs. Debbie Brady for the
time they spent preparing for the program.
VETERANS DAY
Holy Rosary School will be closed on
Monday, Nov. 12 in observance of Veterans
Day.
GIFT CERTIFICATES
The last day to purchase gift certificates
before Thanksgiving is Thursday, Nov. 15.
The final day to fill a preorder before
Christmas is Dec. 13.
Only regular orders will be filled on
Thursday, Dec. 20. There will be no orders
filled during the Christmas holiday, and the
regular schedule resumes on Thursday, Jan,
3.
If you have any questions, you may con-
tact the school office.
SCIENCE/COMPUTER FAIR
Holy Rosary Schools annual Science and
Computer Fair, under the direction of Mrs.
Lisa Casey, and Mrs. Melissa Skutack, will
be held on Monday evening, Nov. 19, from7
to 8, and Tuesday morning, Nov. 20 during
school hours.
All are invited to take some time to view
the wonderful projects and displays created
by the seventh and eighth grade students.
Last year, several of students advanced to
the State Competition level in the PAJunior
Academy of Science, and the Computer
Fair.
CANDY/COOKIE DELIVERY
Just a reminder that Gertrude Hawk
Candy as well as Cookie Dough orders are
scheduled for delivery on Tuesday, Nov. 13.
Profit fromthese fundraisers can be used as
tuition reduction opportunities.
PICTURE DAY
Lifetouch Photo Day is has been resche-
duled to Wednesday, Nov. 14. The pictures
will be taken in grades PK-8 during the
school day.
Information was sent home a few weeks
ago.
RECYCLING
In addition to cartridge recycling Holy
rosary also has CELL PHONE RECY-
CLING.
Select cell phones can be dropped off and
recycled for credit.
For more information or for a list of qual-
ifying cartridges, visit www.fundingfacto-
ry.com or contact Mrs. Skutack at 457-
2553.
LABLES AND BOX TOPS
Campbells Soup labels and Box Tops for
Education are being collected at Holy Ros-
ary School.
These programs enable Holy Rosary to
provide educational resources that may be
unaffordable through the regular budget.
They offer exciting merchandise like
computers, software, sports equipment, ref-
erence materials, science and art items,
even musical instruments.
Please continue your support of these
programs by sending in your labels to the
school office or by placing them in the
church vestibule. If you have any questions,
please contact the schools office.
Also, please check labels for expiration
dates. They can be sent in immediately and
processed before they expire; there is no
need to wait until you accumulate a quanti-
ty.
TAB COLLECTION
The Holy Rosary Student Council will be
collecting ring tabs for the Ronald McDo-
nald House throughout the school year.
Please send them to school with your chil-
dren.
HOLY ROSARY NEWS
Forensics Team, Young
Scholars see competition
Wyoming Area Catholic School, a part of
the Holy Redeemer Regional School Sys-
tem, announces the following:
DATES TO REMEMBER
Nov. 12, No School, Veterans Day
Nov. 14, Gertrude Hawk Candy Delivery
Nov. 14, Dress Down Day for students
who celebrate their birthday in November.
Nov. 15, Diocesan Forensic Fall Finals
Nov. 21, 9 a.m. Mass, 11 a.m. dismissal
Nov. 22- 26, ThanksgivingHolidayBreak
BARNES & NOBLE BOOK FAIR
On Thursday, Nov. 29, Wyoming Area
Catholic will be holding a Book Fair at
Barnes and Noble Store at Arena Hub Plaza
in Wilkes-Barre from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.
Staff members andparent volunteers will be
available all day long to wrap your purchas-
es.
Samples form the Caf will be offered
during the day. At 6 p.m. the Wyoming Area
Catholic choir along with student readers
will present Olive the Reindeer through
dramatic reading and song. Vouchers have
been sent home that parents can present
when making a purchase.
Should you forget your voucher, simply
tell the cashier you are supporting Wyom-
ing Area Catholic and we will receive credit
for your purchase.
If you cannot attend, purchases can made
online from Nov. 29 to Dec. 4 by logging
onto bn.com/bookfairs and using our book-
fair ID10905586.
STUDENT COUNCIL UPDATE
The following service projects are on-go-
ing at Wyoming Area Catholic School
sponsored by Student Council:
Ring Tab Collection to help defray dial-
ysis costs for a parishioner of Sacred Heart
of Jesus Parish, Dupont. Containers are
placed in each classroomfor this collection.
Eyeglass Collection Year-long Service
Project, students will collect old prescrip-
tion eyeglasses to support the Lions Club
Halloween Candy Collection Parents
who wish to donate excess candy may send
it in to school. The candy will be shipped to
men and women who serve in the military.
LEOS CLUB
Wyoming Area Catholic School has
joined efforts with the Pittston Area PDG
Leos Club to help the world see.
A collection container for used prescrip-
tion glasses has been placed at Wyoming
Area Catholic School. You can drop your
eyeglasses at the school or you can give
themto your children or to the students. Ac-
ceptable eyewear: Prescription glasses or
sun glasses.
Please no eyeglass cases. Donate pre-
scriptionglasses andchange someones life.
Imagine if you could help a child read. A
senior maintain his/her independence. Ev-
eryday Lions International recycled eye-
glass programs do all this and more.
For more information contact Mary Ann
Paddock-Kaminski at 654-7982.
PEET TUTORING
As an on-going service project for the
2012-2013 school year, National Junior
Honor Society is offering peer-tutoring in
Language Arts and Mathematics to stu-
dents in Grades 3-8.
Tutoring will begin in early November.
Sessions will be offered in the library. A
schedule will be set up once it is determined
how many students are interested in this
mentoring program.
The NJHS consists of 7th and 8th graders
who met specific criteria of character,
scholarship, leadership and service. They
must maintain those criteria to remain in the
NJHS. National Junior Honor Society will
be co-moderated by Mary Ann Paddock-
Kaminski, Mrs. Ann Powers and Mrs. Ann
Marie Walsh.
LABELS AND BOXTOPS
Wyoming Area Catholic is a avid collec-
tor of Box Tops for Education.
These box tops can be found on tops of
many products that we purchase at the gro-
cery store.
Please clip them and send them in!
You can drop them in a ziplock bag and
bring them to the office or send them with
your child. This is free money for the
school, and all money earned for this year
will go towards technology needs and
school improvement needs. WAC has $150
collected and will be redeeming fall box
tops in November.
WYOMI NG AREA CATHOL I C NEWS
WAC book fair scheduled for
Nov. 29 at Barnes & Noble
More than 20 students in the Mi-
sericordia University Department of
Nursing, including one from
Wyoming, were among the hun-
dreds of participants who took part
in the 5thA Walk in Her Shoes, to
benefit Ruths Place House of Hope
shelter for homeless women and
children in Wilkes-Barre.
The two-mile walk wound
through the city and ended with a
fundraising rally on Public Square.
The route took participants past
many of the agencies dedicated to
helping the homeless, including the
Salvation Army, Community Coun-
seling Service and St. Stephens
Food and Clothing Pantry.
Misericordia University offers
three undergraduate nursing pro-
grams: traditional, full-time nursing
students; part-time accelerated eve-
ning programfor adult students; and
the RN/Expressway Program. The
undergraduate nursing programs are
designed to meet the special educa-
tional and scheduling needs of adult
and traditional students. They all
lead to the Bachelor of Science in
Nursing (BSN) degree.
Among the Misericordia University students who participated in the ` A Walk in Her Shoes,' to benefit Ruth's
Place House of Hope shelter, first row fromleft, are nursing students Megan Hullihan, Natalie; Lisa Perugino,
Dallas; Kristin Eden, Wapwallopen; and Caitlin Wilkinson, Bridgewater, N.J.; second row, Megan Margavage,
Wilkes-Barre; Amy Austin, Sweet Valley; Lisa Oney, Wyoming; Donna Snelson, associate professor of nurs-
ing, Mountain Top; and Alyssa Smith, Myerstown.
Theyre taking a Walk in Her Shoes
The Wyoming Seminary Mock
Trial team recently won seventh
place in the sixth annual Empire
City Invitational Mock Trial Com-
petition, held at the Kings County
Supreme Court, Civil Division, in
Brooklyn, New York. This was the
third time Sem had been invited to
compete in the event. The Semteam
concluded the tournament with a
6-4 record and posted the highest
combined strength score of any of
the 36 teams in the tournament; the
combined strength score measures
the difficulty of a teams schedule
and is calculated by adding up the
records of a teams four opponents.
In addition, Sem senior Harold Ro-
berts of New York City, was one of
only 10 students to receive an Out-
standingWitness Award, for his por-
trayal of the cases defendant.
The prestigious competition,
sponsored in part by Furman Uni-
versity, brought together 36 mock
trial teams fromschools in the Unit-
ed States and six countries such as
the United Kingdom, Canada and
South Korea
Seen following their return fromthe Empire City Invitational Mock Trial Competition are, first row fromleft:
senior Leah Goldberg, Wilkes-Barre, teamco-captain; and senior Caroline Reppert, Kingston, teamco-cap-
tain. Second row fromleft: junior Connor Scalleat, Wapwallopen; senior Spencer Norris, Kingston; freshman
Sara Edgar, Coopersburg; junior Alxis Rodis, Canadensis; and junior Christina Thomas, Drums. Third row,
fromleft: junior Salvadore Diaz, Avoca; junior Matthew Obeid, Pittston; and senior Harold Roberts, New York
City, N.Y. Not present for photo: senior Alaina Schukraft, Dallas.
Sem Mock Trial team excels in NY
Nursing and Rehabilita-
tion; Martha Hazus, R.N.-
D.O.N., Nanticoke, Birch-
wood Nursing and Reha-
bilitation; Carolyn Diehl,
M.S.N., R.N., Stillwater,
CNO, Berwick Hospital
Center; and Jean Dyer,
Ph.D., R.N., Dallas, dean
of college health sciences,
Misericordia University.
Second row, Gina Harri-
son, R.N., Plymouth, in-
structor, health related
technologies, West Side
CTC; Kim Caruso,
M.S.N., R.N., Hanover
Township, magnet pro-
gram director, Geisinger
The Luzerne County
Community College
Nursing Advisory Board
recently held its annual
meeting at the Colleges
Educational Conference
Center. The purpose of the
advisory board is to pro-
vide professional guid-
ance, provide information
on changes or updated
standards required by ac-
crediting hospital agen-
cies, and to provide feed-
back on clinical rotations
utilized by the nursing
program and on the per-
formance of nursing grad-
uates. Shown at the meet-
ing are, fromleft, first row
, Dr. Annette Calderone,
Edwardsville; Dr. Joanne
C. Chipego, Kingston,
chair, nursing, LCCC;
Jeanne Kravitz, R.N.,
Kingston, instructor,
health related technolo-
gies, West Side CTC; Dr.
Deborah Vilegi-Peters,
Mountain Top, dean, nurs-
ing and health sciences,
LCCC; Kathy Monick,
R.N., HunlockCreek, staff
development, Birchwood
Medical Center; Gail
Marshall, M.S.N., R.N.,
Wyoming, professor,
nursing, LCCC; Peggy
Sosnak, M.S.N., R.N.,
Wilkes-Barre, associate
professor, nursing, LCCC;
KarenNoss, M.S.N., R.N.,
Plains, associate profes-
sor, nursing, LCCC; Dot-
tie Craig, M.S.N., R.N.,
Forty Fort, professor,
nursing, LCCC; and Dr.
Dana Charles Clark,
Kingston, provost and
vice president, academic
affairs, LCCC. Third row,
Norman Honeywell, R.N.,
M.S.N., Laflin, assistant
professor, nursing, LCCC;
Sandra Rochon, R.Nbc.,
M.S.N., Mountain Top,
CNS, Wilkes-Barre Gen-
eral Hospital; Marge Hen-
nelly-Bergin, R.N.,
M.S.N., M.B.A., Wilkes-
Barre, CNO, Geisinger
Health System; Virginia
Clarke, Ph.D., R.N.,
C.N.E., Avoca, professor,
nursing, LCCC; Sandy
Hollock, R.N., M.S.N.,
Wapwallopen, assistant
professor, nursing, LCCC;
and Nick Frusciante, R.N.,
M.S.N., Edwardsville,
professor and coordinator,
nursing, LCCC.
LCCC nursing board holds meeting
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 PAGE 5B
R E L I G I O N
Today, Sunday, Nov. 17, a Ser-
mon, Soup and Sandwich event
will be held in Holy Mother of
Sorrows hall, 212 Wyoming
Ave., Dupont, at noon.
Fr. Walter Placek PhD will
have a 20 minute presentation ti-
tled God and Science in our
Church. Fellowship with soup
and sandwich will follow.
The event is sponsored by Al
and Donna Micka and Dr. Jim
and Elaine Ploskonka. All are in-
vited for this event free of
charge.
Craft and Gift Fair
Holiday Craft and Gift Fair
will be held at St. Maria Goretti
Parish Hall, 32 Redwood Dr.,
Laflin. The dates are Saturday,
November 17 from 9 a.m. to 3
p.m. and Sunday, November 18 9
a.m. - 3 p.m.
There will be 20 +vendors, re-
freshments, raffle and door
prizes will be available
The hall is handicapped acces-
sible with plenty of parking.
Bethel United Methodist
532Main St. Avoca
(570) 457-2566
Pastor Sharon Dietz
(570) 282-0104
Sunday Worship Service -
11:15 a.m.
Communion first Sunday of
each month non perishable
food items will be collected this
day.
Mondays Bible study 6
p.m. alternating each week with
Brick UM Church, Duryea.
1st Thursday of each month
food give-away 4 to 6 p.m. for
needy of Avoca and Duryea.
Non-perishable food items
and monetary donations are ac-
cepted at this time.
Brick United Methodist
935 Foote Ave., Duryea
(570)457-4424
Pastor Sharon Dietz
(570) 282-0104
Sunday Worship Service 9:45
a.m.
Sunday School 10:15 a.m.
during morning Worship Servic-
es for ages 3-12
Communion first Sunday of
each month non perishable
food items will be collected.
Mondays Bible study 6
p.m. alternating each week with
Bethel UM Church, Avoca.
Miracle of Awareness coffee
time 6 p.m. meeting 7 p.m.
Thursday New beginnings
meeting 7 p.m. Third Thursday
of each month United Metho-
dist Women 6:30 p.m.
Christian and Missionary
Alliance
317 Luzerne Avenue
West Pittston
The church is hosting a Soup
Kitchen Monday evenings from
5 to 6:30 p.m. for individuals and
families in the community in
need.
People interested in volunteer-
ing are asked to call the spon-
sors, the Davis family, at 760-
4830.
ASundayeveningteachingse-
ries runs through Nov. 25 at 7
p.m.
Alliance Church
Luzerne Ave. and Parke Street
West Pittston
The clothes closet will open
on Wednesday from 6 to 8 p.m.
People with emergency needs
can call the church office at 654-
2500 for special appointments.
The closet accepts gently used
clothing and shares it with the
community without cost.
First Baptist Church
Rev. James H. Breese, pastor,
Water Street, Pittston
Sunday 9:30 a.m. Worship and
Praise Service/Childrens Sun-
day School, Adult/Teen Sunday
School immediately following
service.
Wednesday 7:15 p.m. Bible
Study
First Congregational UCC
500 Luzerne Avenue
West Pittston
Rev. Joan Mitchell, Pastor
Sanctuary is handicapped ac-
cessible
Sunday,11 a.m. MorningWor-
ship Service
Meetings scheduled for Tues-
day will be held on Sun., Nov. 18
after Service.
.
First Presbyterian Church
14 Broad Street Pittston
Sunday Worship 9:15 a.m.
with Rev. William N. Lukesh.
First United
Presbyterian Church
West Pittston
Rev. James Thyren 654-8121
Services are being held at St.
Cecilias Roman Catholic
Church on 1700 Wyoming Ave,
Exeter as we recover from the
flood of September 2011.
Sunday, Nov. 11:
10 a.m. , Sunday School;
11 a.m., Worship at St. Ceci-
lias.
Tuesday, Nov. 13: 7 p.m., Dea-
cons.
Wednesday, Nov. 14: 9 a.m.,
Morning Circle.
First United Methodist
Church
West Pittston
Nov 11 10 a.m. Worship,
Sunday School.
Full Gospel Chapel
Avoca
Adult Sunday School, 9:30;
Sunday morning worship at
10:30 a.m.
Wednesday evening Bible
study and prayer service at 7:00.
The churchalsohosts the Rose
of Sharon Church with Rev. Vin-
cente Torres on Sunday after-
noon at 3:00 p.m. for the Hispan-
ic community.
Glendale Gospel Church
105 Church Drive
Glendale/Pittston Township
Sunday Service 10:45 a.m.
Harding Church
of Christ
RR 1 Box 187A, Falls
Sunday services: 10 a.m. Sun-
day School and 11 a.m. Church
Service.
Call 388-6534
Holy Mother of Sorrows PNCC
212 Wyoming Avenue, Dupont
Rev. Zbigniew Dawid, Pastor
Sunday Masses - 8:00 a.m.
Traditional Mass - 9:15 a.m.
School of Christian Living and
Confirmation Class also Coffee
Hour; 10:30 a.m. Traditional
High Mass
Daily Mass 9:00 a.m. Tuesday
through Saturday
Thanksgiving Food Drive to
help the Pittston Food Bank. Al-
so neighbors of the Sacred Heart
of Jesus C. Church will be hav-
ing a Food Drive at the same
time.
There will be containers in the
back of the church for donations.
Collection is today Nov 11.
Today, Sunday, Nov. 17, a Ser-
mon, Soup and Sandwich event
will be held in Holy Mother of
Sorrows hall, 212 Wyoming
Ave., Dupont, at noon.
Fr. Walter Placek PhD will
have a 20 minute presentation ti-
tled God and Science in our
Church. Fellowship with soup
and sandwich will follow.
The event is sponsored by Al
and Donna Micka and Dr. Jim
and Elaine Ploskonka.
All are invited for this event
free of charge.
A Community Thanksgiving
Prayer Service will be held on
November 18, Sunday, at 7:00
p.m. at Sacred Heart of Jesus
Church in Dupont. The service
will contain: Prayers, Scripture
readings, homily and several
hymns. Fr. Zbigniew Dawid will
deliver the homily during the
service.
A collection will be taken up
for the needy in the Greater Pitt-
ston Area. Following the Prayer
Service, all are invited to the Par-
ishHall for refreshments andfel-
lowship.
Independent Bible Church
328 Main Street, Duryea, PA
18642.
(570) 451-0346 Home/Office.
JLaCava@TheBibleChurch.org
Inkerman Presbyterian
Main St., Inkerman
Services: Sundays, 9 a.m.
Langcliffe Presbyterian
1001 Main St Avoca
Sunday worship 11:15 a.m.
The Langcliffe Church is
handicapped accessible.
Nursery is provided for chil-
dren during worship.
Moosic Alliance Church
608 Rocky Glen Road, Moosic
Pastor: Doug Jensen 457-
6020
maccma2@verizon.net
Sunday morning Sunday
School for all ages at 9:30 a.m.
Sunday morning Worship at
10:45 a.m.
Prayer meeting, Wednesdays
at 7 p.m.
Celebrate Recovery Ministry,
Thursdays at 7:30 p.m.
Nativity Of Our Lord
Stephenson St., Duryea
Mass Schedule
Saturday
4 p.m. Holy Rosary Church
5:30 p.m. Sacred Heart of Je-
sus Church
Sunday
8 a.m. Holy Rosary Church
9:30 a.m. Holy Rosary Church
11:00 a.m. Sacred Heart of Je-
sus Church
Oblates of St. Joseph
Highway 315, Laflin
Masses are held daily in the
seminary chapel at 7 a.m. (Mon-
day Friday) and on Saturday
mornings at 8 a.m.
There are no weekend Masses.
Confessions are heard daily
from 9 a.m. noon and from 3
6 p.m.
Office hours are Monday
Friday: 9:30 a.m. 5 p.m., eve-
nings and weekends by appoint-
ment.
Office phone number is 654-
7542.
Every Wednesday evening
Mass is celebrated at 7 p.m. in
conjunction with the Novena to
St. Joseph &St. Joseph Marello.
Novena prayers and the blessing
of the first-class relic of St. Jo-
seph Marello, Founder of the
Oblates of Saint Joseph Congre-
gation, immediately follow the
Mass. All are welcome to partic-
ipate!
The Oblates welcome this af-
ternoon the deaf community of
the diocese for their monthly
Mass and meeting.
A community meeting will be
heldthis Wednesday, Nov. 14, en-
titled Operation: Gang-Up at 6
p.m. in the seminary. The meet-
ing is being hosted by local gov-
ernment officials.
The commission for the unifi-
cation of the USA Oblate prov-
inces will meet via video confer-
ence on Thursday, Nov. 15, at 2
p.m. Fr. Paul McDonnell, OSJ &
Fr. Gregory Finn, OSJ, represent
the Oblate PAprovince. The new
unitedprovince is expectedtoof-
ficially begin in March 2013.
Diocesan Council of Catholic
Women (DCCW) will meet on
Saturday, Nov. 17, in the semina-
ry community room.
The inaugural Catholic Radio
banquet is scheduled for this af-
ternoon at St. Anthonys Parish
Center, Erie St., Exeter. Guest
speaker will be Fred Berretta,
survivor of the USAir Flight
1549 of January 15, 2009 that
landed miraculously on the Hud-
son River in NYCafter striking a
flock of geese and losing both
engines after takeoff from NY
LaGuardia Airport.
Fred is also author of the book:
Flight of Faith: My Miracle on
the Hudson. Mass begins at 4
p.m. in St. Anthonys Church,
with the dinner & program im-
mediately following in the parish
center.
The Pittston Knights of Co-
lumbus (Council #372) will hold
a special Mass for their deceased
members in our chapel on Mon-
day, Nov. 19, at 7 p.m.
Celebrant will be Rev. Dan
Schwebs, OSJ, council chaplain
and seminary vice rector.
Advent Retreat, hosted by the
Josephite-Marellian Laity of the
PAOblate province, is scheduled
for Sunday, Dec. 9, from 2 - 5
p.m.
The Capuchin Sisters of Naza-
reth will lead the meditation, fol-
lowed by Eucharistic adoration,
confessions, private prayer and
concluding with the celebration
of Holy Mass.
The public is invited to partici-
pate as a way to enrich their Ad-
vent journey to Christmas. Ob-
lates fathers ask all to mark their
calendars and plan to attend.
St Joseph Marello
William St., Pittston
OUR LADY OF FATIMA.
On Saturday, Nov. 17, the In-
ternational Statue of Our Ladyof
Fatima will be arriving at St. Jo-
seph Marello Parish at 10:30
a.m.
This is a wonderful opportuni-
ty for parishioners and friends to
be able to visit and pray before
this beautiful image. AMass will
be celebrated at 11 a.m.
Next weekend, the church will
be asking for donations at all en-
trances of the church to benefit
Tag Day for BIRTHRIGHT of
Scranton. This all volunteer or-
ganization helps women facing
problem pregnancies by encou-
raging them to choose life by
supporting their emotional and
practical needs.
The Diocese of Scranton has
asked all parishes to take up a
special collection to benefit the
victims of Hurricane Sandy on
Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 17
and 18.
FOOD DRIVE FOR THOSE
IN NEED.
There are boxes placed at all
the entrances during the month
of November so you may drop
off non-perishable food items to
help out the local Food Pantry at
St. John the Evangelist Church,
Pittston.
On Thursday, Nov. 15 there
will be a special Mass at 7 p.m.
for all the Deceased Members of
the Altar & Rosary Society. Af-
ter Mass the monthly meeting
will be held.
A$20payment/reservationfor
the Christmas Party to be held at
the Gramercy Restaurant, Pitt-
ston, on Dec. 9,will be accepted
at the meeting.
There is a choice of roast beef
or stuffed chicken breast.
Reservations close on Decem-
ber 2.
Hostesses for this meeting are
Mary Monichelli, Angela Aita,
Rosaria Aita, Carmel Montini,
Gloria Pupa and Loretta Joyce.
Ladies and young ladies of St.
Joseph Marello Parish are invit-
ed to become member of this
Parish Society.
Next Sunday at 1 p.m. a Mass
of Remembrance will be cele-
brated for all parishioners de-
ceased from November 2011 to
October 2012.
Family and friends are invited
to come and offer prayers for
their loved ones.
Monday, November 12 a Golf
Committee meeting will be held
at 6 p.m. in the Conference
Room of the Parish Center.
Anyone interested in becom-
ing a part of the committee
should attend or e-mail Emory
Guffrovich at epg14@veri-
zon.net New members always
bring new ideas!
The Senior Choir will hold re-
hearsal on Mondays at 7 p.m.
New members are always wel-
come.
Would you like to be a Lector,
Commentator, Eucharistic Min-
ister or Cantor? Contact the Rec-
tory 654-6902.
MASS SCHEDULE:
Monday to Friday at 7:30 and
11:30 a.m.
Saturday Evening: 4 and 7
p.m.
Sunday: 8, 9:30, 11:15a.m. No-
vena to the Miraculous Medal
and Mother Cabrini, every Tues-
day after 7:30 and 11:30 a.m.
Masses. Novena to Saint Joseph
& St. Joseph Marello every
Wednesday after 7:30 and 11:30
a.m. Masses.
Holy Hour every Tuesday at 7
p.m. The Rosary is recited 20
minutes before all week day and
weekend Masses. All are invited
to join in this beautiful devotion
to the Blessed Mother.
Corpus Christi Parish
Immaculate Conception and
Holy Redeemer churches
Luzerne Ave., West Pittston
Our Lady of the Eucharist
535 N Main Street, Pittston
www.eucharist-pittston.org
Mass Schedule
Saturday Vigil: 4:00 p.m.
Sunday: 8:30 a.m. and 10:30
CRAFT AND GIFT FAIR AT ST. MARIA GORETTI CHURCH NEXT WEEKEND
Sermon, Soup, Sandwich event today
Pittston Knights of Columbus John F. Kennedy Council 372 recently sponosored the 86th Knights of Columbus International Bowling Tournament held in Wilkes-Barre
for the first time. A large portion of the profits was donated to the Pittston Food Pantry. A check of $2,000.00 was given to Monsignor John J. Bendik for their refriger-
ation unit. Thanks go out to all who help make this event such a great success.Pictured in photo from L to R DGK Ken Burke, FS John Snitko, Directors of Pittston
Food Pantry Carl Boos and Peggy Burke, MSGR John J. Bendik, Bowling Tournament Chairman PGK Greg Serfass, International committeeman PGK Fran Anken-
brand. Absent from photo International Committeeman Mike Morrissee and International Bowling Congress President Joe Man
See FAITH page 7B
PAGE 6B SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
7
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ALL SALES FINAL. Sale ends Tuesday, November 13th. No adjustments to prior sale purchases. Reduction will be taken at the register. Savings of original prices. Limited quantities.
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SALEHOURS: MONDAYTHROUGHSATURDAY10 AMTO7 PM SUNDAY12 PMTO5 PM
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VETERANS DAYSALE
AT OUR WILKES-BARRE CLEARANCE CENTER
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VALID ON HOME ITEMS, LADIES & MENS FALL SPORTSWEAR
& ALREADY REDUCED COATS AT WILKES-BARRE CLEARANCE CENTER
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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8
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THROUGH TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13
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CLEARANCE CENTER SAVINGS PASS
*THIS LORD & TAYLOR SAVINGS PASS cannot be combined with any other offer. Not valid on
prior purchases. Bonus savings % applied to reduced prices. This Savings Pass must be presented at the
register at time of purchase to receive Savings Pass discount. Not valid on telephone or internet orders.
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PRESENT THIS SAVINGS PASS TO YOUR SALES ASSOCIATE BEFORE EVERY PURCHASE
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SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 PAGE 7B
R E L I G I O N
a.m.
Daily Mass: 8:00 a.m.
Sacrament of Reconciliation
(Confessions)
Saturday from 3:30 p.m. to
3:45 p.m. and by appointment
School of Religious Education
Classes for grades 1 6 are
held on Sunday mornings from
9:15 to 10:15 a.m. Classes in
preparation for the celebration of
the Sacrament of Confirmation
are held on Sunday evenings
from 5:00 to 6:30 pm.
Parents are reminded arents of
their obligation to see that chil-
dren attend weekly Religious
Education classes.
If you have any questions with
regardtothe program, please call
Sister Mary Ann at 654-0263.
Do to the Veterans Day Holiday,
Religious Education Classes, in-
cluding Confirmation, will NOT
meet this Sunday.
Scripture Study
Scripture Study continues this
week. There are two programs,
one on Tuesday mornings from
8:30 a.m. until 10:00 a.m. and
one on Tuesday evenings from
7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Both pro-
grams are held in the parish hall.
Choir Rehearsals
Rehearsals for Christmas will
begin on Wednesday, November
28. If you enjoy singing, please
consider joining the choir - we
are in need of additional mem-
bers.
For more information, please
call Michael Sowa at 655-1419.
November Food Drive
Baskets have been placed at
the entrances to the Church. The
pastor asks that you place non
perishable food items in the bas-
kets. All food will be donated to
the Greater Pittston Area Food
Pantry. Carl Boos will see that all
these items are delivered.
Book of Remembrance
The parish Book of Remem-
brance has been placed in the
front of the Church. All are in-
vited to list the names of their be-
loved deceased in the book.
Those listed will be remembered
throughout the monthof Novem-
ber.
Parish Anniversary Dinner
The 2nd Parish Anniversary
Dinner will be held on Sunday,
November 18. Dinner will be
served from noon to 4 p.m.
There are signup sheets in the
back of the Church for setup,
serving and clean up commit-
tees, donated desserts and for
those interested in helping to
prepare the meal.
The donation for the dinner is
$5.00, with children under 10
years of age eating free.
The menu consists of ziti and
meatballs, with salad, fresh
bread, and beverages. The pastor
looks forward to having as many
of parishioners as possible at-
tend.
Tickets are available at the
back of the Church or by calling
the rectory (654-0263) and all
reservations will close on Mon-
day, November 12.
REMINDER
Starting Sunday, December 2,
Masses on Sunday will be cele-
brated at 8:30 a.m. and 11:00
a.m.
Religious Education Classes,
grades1-6 will be held from9:30
to 10:30 a.m.
Sacred Heart of Jesus
Lackawanna Ave., Dupont
This weeks mass schedule:
Monday through Friday at 7
a.m., Saturday at 7:30 a.m. and 4
p.m., and Sunday at 8:30 a.m.
and 10:30 a.m.
Please note that the Rectory
office will be closed on Monday,
November 12 in honor of Veter-
ans Day.
The Holy Name Society will
meet on Wednesday, November
14 at 7:00 PM in the church hall.
There will be no CCD classes
on Nov. 12.
St. Barbara Parish
28 Memorial Avenue, Exeter
Office Hours: Monday Fri-
day 9:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m.
Evenings, by appointment.
Phone: 654-2103
Monthly Anniversary Mass
The November Wedding
Anniversary Mass will be held
on Tuesday, November 20 at 7
p.m. All couples celebrating
their wedding anniversary in the
month of November are invited
to come and receive a special
blessing.
The American Red Cross
will hold a Blood Drive on Mon-
day, November 12 from 1 p.m.
until 6p.m. at St. Anthonys Hall.
St. Barbara Christian Wom-
ens Organization will hold their
monthly meeting Tuesday, No-
vember 13 at 6:30 p.m. at the
church hall.
All women of the parish are in-
vited to attend. Hostesses for this
meeting are Marilyn Jacobs,
Cynthia Liberski and Geraldine
Connolly.
The Christian Women will
serve a chicken dinner to Men of
Mother Theresas Haven on Nov.
14 at 5 p.m. in St. Josephs Hall,
Wyoming.
Ladies who are donating
chicken and/or potatoes are
asked to bring themto the hall by
12:30 p.m. that day.
Volunteers who are donating
other food and serving are asked
to come by 4 p.m.
Call 654-0936 or 655-1776 for
more info.
Religious Education News
This weeks classes will focus
on:
1st Grade: "Jesus Shares Gods
Love" Jesus loved us so much
that he gave his life for us.
2nd Grade: "Jesus the Savior"
Jesus sacrificed his life on the
cross to save us from our sins.
3rd Grade: "The Gift of the
Holy Spirit" On Pentecost God
the Father sent the Holy Spirit to
help us.
4th Grade: "The Death and
Resurrection of Jesus" Jesus suf-
fered and died and was resurrec-
ted for us.
5th Grade: "The Paschal Mys-
tery" The Paschal Mystery of Je-
sus is his Passion, Resurrection
and glorious Ascension to heav-
en.
6th Grade: "The Suffering
Servant" Jesus suffered death for
the redemption and salvation of
humanity.
.
St. John the Evangelist
Parish Community
35 William Street
Phone: 654-0053
Pittston.
Baptismal Instruction will be
held Tuesday, Dec 4 at 7 p.m. in
the parish center.
Nov 11 11 a.m. Holy Name
Society meeting topics of dis-
cussion - nomination of officers,
Childrens Christmas party, Feb-
ruary Lottery. Installation of Of-
ficers Breakfast All members
are invited. New members are
welcome.
The Greater Pittston Food
Pantry is sponsored by the Care
and Concern Committee of St.
John the Evangelist Parish. Any-
one in need of food is asked to
call 654-9923.
Distribution of food is by ap-
pointment only.
The Free Health Clinic is open
at 5:30 p.m. every Wednesday in
the former Seton Catholic High
School, first come first serve.
Greater Pittston Kids Closet
celebrating its third anniversary
provides new and gently used
clothing.
Hours are Wednesday from 9
to 11:30 a.m. and 5 to 7 p.m.
The Closet always accepts do-
nations of new and gently used
clothing.
St Johns Lutheran
7 Wood St., Pittston
570-655-2505, stjohnspitt-
ston@verizon.com
Pastor John Castellani
Organist: Marcia Colleran
Reader: Amy Saunders
Acolyte: Marrissa Faccipointi
Greeter: Joe Mersincavage
Ushers: Vince Calarusso &
Richard Drummond
Prayer list goes out to Military
personnel and their families: Lu-
cille Champman, Brenda Lispi,
Gerturde Lipert, Robert Schu-
maker, Karen Korney, Howard
Weislogel, Al Palima, Margaret
Borget, Stephen Oceanas, Nan-
cy Dymond Hackett, Ray Mor-
gan, Emalee Karhurka, Bobby
Drummond, Lenoard Peterson,
Gene Rooney, Charles Barone,
Mike & Jodie Farrell, and Barb
Mizenko, and shut ins Mary
Agnes Mangle, Ted Burkel,
Donna Capobianco, Elaine
Proietto, Donna Bobbounie and
Gladys Bowman.
Altar Guild for November:
Carolyn Blockus, Tracy Drum-
mond, Doris Mersincavage and
Cheryl Pipher.
Acolyte schedule for Novem-
ber: 11 Shelby Rinaldi, 18 Trish
Renna and 25 Justin Lazanowicz
Guests are welcomed to attend
and perhaps join this family. If
you have any questions, com-
ments or suggestions call 655-
2505.and leave your name and
number.
St. Johns P.M. Church
316 Main St., Avoca
Pastor Rich Rock
570-457-8281
Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m.
Holy Communion the first
Sunday of every month
Bible Study every Wednesday
6:00-7:30 p.m.
St. Maria Goretti
Laflin Road, Laflin, PA. 18702
Pastor: Monsignor Neil Van
Loon
42redwood@comcast.net
www.stmariagoretti-laflin.org
Please note there is no C.C.D.
today.
Nov. 18 will be the Childrens
Liturgy. Confirmation students
can earn service hours.
Also there is a Confirmation
Class on Sunday Nov. 18 in the
Church from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Monsignor will have an interac-
tive Mass. This is mandatory for
public and parochial students in
our Parish.
In case of inclement weather
your teachers will be informed
and they, in turn ,will call either
the night before or the morning
of class.
FALL PASTA DINNER
Today!
The Fall Pasta Dinner will be
held TODAY, November 11,
fromnoon to 5 p.m. Tickets have
been mailed to all parishioner
families.
Cost is $9.50 per person. This
includes salad, bread & butter,
beverage and dessert. Children
5yrs. & under are free(eat-in
only). Take-outs will also be
available from noon to 4 p.m.
Containers are provided.
HOLIDAY
CRAFT & GIFT FAIR
A Holiday Craft & Gift Fair
will be held in the Parish Center
on Saturday, November 17 and
Sunday, November 18 from 9
a.m. to 3 p.m. each day.
Twenty-plus vendors will be
offering a wide variety of crafts
and gifts. Refreshments, a raffle
and door prizes are also offere-
d.Admission is free.
HELP AFTER
HURRICANE SANDY
A special collection will be
taken up next weekend for peo-
ple impacted by Hurricane
Sandy.
You can contribute to this col-
lection next weekend or send
monetary donations to: Dioce-
san Relief Fund, 300 Wyoming
Ave., Scranton, PA18503.
Samantha Cortese, Geisinger
Registered Dietician, will be at
the Borough Building, Monday,
Nov. 12 at 1:00 pm. She will be
discussing all aspects of healthy
eating.
St. Marys Polish National
Catholic Church
200 Stephenson St. Duryea
Rev. Fr. Carmen G. Bolock,
Pastor Phone: 457-2291
Email: padre@saintma-
ryspncc.org
Website: saintmaryspncc.org
Holy Mass: Sunday 9:30 a.m.
Weekdays: 8 a.m.
Holy Days: 8 a.m. & 7 p.m.
St. Monicas Church
363 West 8th Street, West
Wyoming, PA 18644
Office Hours - 9:00 a.m. to
4:30 p.m., Mon. Fri.
Phone: 570-693-1991
Email: olos363@verizon.net
www.stmonicanepa.com.
Father Leo McKernan, Pastor
Mr. William Jenkins, Deacon
Mass Schedule:
Saturday Vigil: 4:00 p.m.@
OLOS
Sunday: 8:30 a.m. @ STJ
11:00 a.m.@ OLOS
New Daily Mass Schedule:
Daily Mass at OLOS - Tues,
Wed., Fri. - 7:00 a.m. Mon. &
Thurs. - 7:00 p.m.
Adoration of the Blessed Sac-
rament Friday after morning
Mass until Noon. Except on First
Friday Adoration is after 7:00
p.m. Mass until Midnight.
Miraculous Medal Novena -
after Monday Evening Mass
Rosary and Chaplet of Divine
Mercy - Before Morning &Eve-
ning Masses at OLOS site.
Day of Fast and Prayer - On
Thursday, November 15 the Na-
tional Council of Catholic Wom-
en will observe a "Day of Fast &
Prayer to end World Hunger."
All the faithful of the Diocese is
asked to participate by attending
Mass and spending one hour in
Adoration of the Most Blessed
Sacrament for this most impor-
tant intention.
St. Monica Parish Web Site:
www.stmonicanepa.com. Visit
us.
There is a lot of information
on the web and its growing daily.
Keep posted on all the events of
the Parish.
Recently added was Father
McKernans Pastoral letter on
the Year of Faith. There is a
Prayer Garden with most Beauti-
ful prayers. Touch the flowers.
There is also a site to request
your own personal prayer re-
quests. This is a good way to
keep posted on the Parish.
Blessed Mother Sodality - will
attend the 11 a.m. Mass together
on November 18. Girls from 3rd
through 12th grades are wel-
come. Please meet in the Church
Hall before Mass.
High School Theology: will
be held on the1st and 3rd Sunday
of each month in the Rectory
from 9:45 to 10:45. All High
School students are invited.
R.C.I.A: Rite of Christian Ini-
tiation of Adults & Growing in
the Faith through Christian For-
mation- the Parish of St. Moni-
cas invites you to look into the
Catholic Faith; learn more about
your faith if you are a Catholic;
inquiry into the life of Christ and
His Church; enter more into Sa-
cred Scripture.
People of all Faith back-
grounds are welcome. Has your
Christian education stopped in
your teen-age years?
Join the group on Wednesday
nights at 7 p.m. at OLOS Recto-
ry (Back Porch - informal & re-
laxed atmosphere.)
For more information call the
Parish Office at 693-1991 and
speak to Father McKernan.
St. Peters Evangelical
Lutheran Church
100 Rock Street, Hughestown
Stpeters_elc@yahoo.com
654-1009
Sunday School 9 a.m.
Worship service 10 a.m.
Come worship. All are wel-
come
Confirmation classes are on
Sunday at 9:00 a.m.
7th graders 1st and 2nd Sun-
day of the month; 8th graders 3rd
and 4th Sunday of the month
Queen of the Apostles Parish
715 Hawthorne St.
(570) 457-3412
stmarysavoca@verizon.net
www.stmaryavoca.4lpi.com
Daily Masses: 8 a.m.
(Wednesday at 7 p.m.)
Eucharistic Adoration: Tues-
days from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Miraculous Medal Novena:
Wednesday following the 7 p.m.
Mass
Weekends Masses: Saturday
at 4 p.m.; Sunday at 8, 9:30 and
11 a.m.
Confession: Saturdays 3-3:45
p.m.; anytime upon request by
calling 457-3412.
Prayer Chain: 457-5867
George R. Siracuse, president
of Strategic Financial Planners,
Inc. will conduct a free senior
strategies workshop at noon to-
day, Nov. 11in St. Marys School
auditorium, 742 Spring St.
Queen of the Apostles Parish
youth group will meet from6:30
to 8:30 p.m. today, Nov. 11 in St.
Marys School auditorium, 742
Spring St. Call Lori Ostrowski,
director of youth ministry, at
457-8840 for details.
The youth group is collecting
winter hats and gloves for the
needy. Items may be dropped off
in the designated containers lo-
cated in the back of St. Marys
Church, 715 Hawthorne St.
The parishcouncil will meet at
7 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 12 in the
rectory.
The womens guild will meet
at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 13 in
St. Marys School auditorium.
The social concerns/respect
life committee will meet at 6
p.m. onFriday, Nov. 16inSt. Ma-
rys School auditorium. The
committee is accepting food do-
nations for the Thanksgiving
food baskets for the poor. Items
can be dropped in the church un-
til Nov. 16.
The worship committee will
meet at 7:30 p.m. on Monday,
Nov. 19 in the rectory.
The annual appeal committee
will meet at 7:30 p.m. on
Wednesday, Nov. 21 in the recto-
ry.
The building and grounds
committee will meet at 6:30 p.m.
on Monday, Nov. 26 in the recto-
ry.
The parish will host the Rev.
Michael Shea, C.M., as he con-
ducts a Marian Triduumat 8 a.m.
and 7 p.m. November 27-29 at
the church.
The Triduumwill focus on the
three apparitions of Mary to St.
Catherine Laboure.
It will precede the parishs
nine day Miraculous Medal No-
vena which will conclude on the
feast of the Immaculate Concep-
tion, Dec. 8.
Father Shea is a Vincentian
priest currently assigned to the
Central Association of the Mi-
raculous Medal in Germantown.
The womens guild will have
its Christmas party on Sunday,
Dec. 2 at Colarussos LaPalazzo,
Moosic.
To make a reservation, call
Debbie Callahan at 457-8887,
Anne Dillon at 881-5182 or the
parish office at 457-3412.
All women are invited to at-
tend.
Second Presbyterian
143 Parsonage St., Pittston
654-1411
Trinity Episcopal Church
Spring Street and Montgom-
ery Avenue, West Pittston
Parish Mission: To live and
build holy community.
All welcome: Worldwide An-
glican Communion: We believe
in one holy, Catholic apostolic
church.
Web of information and links
at www.trinityepiscopalchurch-
westpittston.org and www.dio-
beth.org.
Sunday Holy Eucharist: 11
a.m. every Sunday.
Food Pantry: October items
needed are hot breakfast cereals
(oatmeal, cream of wheat, etc)
and powdered milk. Gerritys
gift cards, cash donations and
other non-perishable foods also
accepted.
Prayer network. Open To Pub-
lic. Daily prayer for those with
needs requesting prayerful sup-
port.
Start Prayer network at parish
office 654-3261.
Youth Program: 10:45 a.m. ev-
ery Sunday.
Women of Trinity: Every third
Sunday. WOT Ministry Invita-
tion.
Party and Banquet Space.
Newly renovated banquet room
and kitchen. All Day Rental
$100. Reservations at 654-3261.
Music Together Classes: Fun
and music for infants and chil-
dren through age five accompa-
nied by a parent or caregiver.
Visit www.musictogether.com
for information on Music To-
gether.
For registration information
call 654-3261.
United Methodist Church
Corner of Broad & Church
Sts.
Pittston
Rev. Susan Hardman-Zimmer-
man
Sunday Worship Service 9:30
a.m.
Childrens Sunday School
9:30 a.m.
Holy Communion: 1st Sunday
each month
Choir Rehearsal: Thursdays
at 7 p.m. unless told otherwise
United Methodist Women:
2nd Monday unless told other-
wise
Website www.umcpittston.org
Phone 655-4340 leave mess-
age
The bus trip on November 29
to Dutch Apple Theater in Lan-
caster to see "Swingin Christ-
mas" is filled.
Tuesday, November 13 - Hoa-
gie sale - choices are ham &
cheese or turkey & cheese with
or without onion - Price of hoa-
gies is $4 - Orders must be
placed by Sunday, November 11.
For information or to order
call 654-3936 or 693-1572.
Wednesday, November 14 -
Ad. Council meeting at 7 p.m.
FAITH
Continued from page 5B
"Miracle on the Hudson"
US Airways Flight 1549
survivor Fred Berretta will
share his life-changing
story when he serves as
the principal speaker at
JMJ Catholic Radio 750
AMs inaugural fall ban-
quet today. The event will
begin with Mass at 4 p.m.
at St. Anthony of Padua
Church, 28 Memorial St.,
Exeter, followed by the
banquet at 5 p.m. in the
parishcenter locatedadja-
cent to the church. Berret-
ta, one of the survivors of
the ill-fated US Airways
Flight 1549, which had to
make an emergency land-
ing in the Hudson River
shortly after departure
fromNewYorks LaGuard-
iaAirport onJan. 15, 2009,
will recount the harrowing
experience and how it be-
came a life-changing
event. Attendees will also
have the opportunity to
meet fellow listeners and
supporters of JMJ Cathol-
ic Radio, and also to dis-
cuss programming and
share ideas with the sta-
tions executive board
members: St. Joseph Ob-
late Father Paul McDon-
nell, Father Leo McKer-
nan, and station owners,
Ed and Carol Niewinski. All
proceeds will be used to
keep JMJ Catholic Radio
750 AM on the air. Dona-
tions can be sent to JMJ
Catholic Radio 750 AM,
P.O. Box 851, Pittston, PA
18640.
Miracle on Hudson survivor speaks
Fred Berretta
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 PAGE 8
100 Announcements
200 Auctions
300 Personal Services
400 Automotive
500 Employment
600 Financial
700 Merchandise
800 Pets & Animals
900 Real Estate
1000 Service Directory
MARKETPLACE
To place a Classied ad: Call 570-829-7130 or 1-800-273-7130 Email: classieds@thepittstondispatch.com
thepittstondispatch.com
758 Miscellaneous 758 Miscellaneous 758 Miscellaneous 758 Miscellaneous
MERCHANTS VILLAGE
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Microwaves, Vacuum Cleaners, Small
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1201 Oak Street Pittston, PA
THE TIMES LEADER
100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
110 Lost
ALL JUNK
VEHICLES
WANTED!!
CALL ANYTIME
HONEST PRICES
FREE REMOVAL
CA$H PAID
ON THE SPOT
570.301.3602
BEST PRICES
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570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
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To place your
ad call...829-7130
120 Found
LIKE
NEW
Used Tires
&
Batteries
for $20
& Up
VITOS
&
GINOS
949 Wyoming Ave.
Forty Fort
288-8995
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL AD
The Housing
Authority Of The City
Of Pittston, 500
Kennedy Boulevard,
Pittston, Pa. Will
reschedule its regu-
lar monthly meeting
from November 12,
2012 to November
19, 2012 at 6:00
p.m.
William J. Lisak
Executive Director
145 Prayers
THANKSGIVING
NOVENA
TO SAINT JUDE
Oh, Holy Saint Jude,
Apostle and Martyr,
great in virtue, rich
in miracles, near
kinsman of Jesus
Christ, faithful inter-
cessor of all who
invoke your special
patronage in time of
need. To you I have
recourse from the
depth of my heart,
and humbly beg to
whom God has
given such great
power, to come to
my assistance. Help
me in my present
and urgent petition.
In return, I promise
to make your name
known and cause
you to be invoked.
Saint Jude, pray for
us and all who in-
voke your aid.
Amen. GB
150 Special Notices
ADOPT
Adopting your
newborn is our
dream. Joy filled
home, endless
love, security.
Randi & Chuck
1-888-223-7941
ADOPT ADOPT
Caring married
couple wishes to
give love, affec-
tion & security to
your baby.
Expenses paid.
Confidential. Call
Debbi & Frank
anytime
1-888-988-5499
ADOPTION
Your baby will have
a lifetime of love,
support, encour-
agement, happi-
ness and security
with a devoted
mom, dad, and
extended family.
Happily married and
financial secure
couple with strong
education values
would be lucky to
adopt your baby.
Expenses paid.
1-888-368-8909 or
AileenAndKevin2
adopt.com
FOSTER PARENT(S)
NEEDED
IMMEDIATELY
for teens or sibling
groups.
Compensation,
training, and 24
hour on-call sup-
port provided.
Please call
FRIENDSHIP
HOUSE (570)
342-8305 x 2058.
Compensation up
to $1200.00 per
month per child.
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
310 Attorney
Services
DIVORCE No Fault
$295 divorce295.com
Atty. Kurlancheek
800-324-9748 W-B
FREE Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
380 Travel
NYC SHOPPING &
MEADOWLANDS
FLEA MARKET
Bus Trip,
Sat. Dec. 1st.
$35 pp
Free 9/11
Memorial Passes
Call John at
570-947-7982
406 ATVs/Dune
Buggies
TOMAHAWK`11
ATV, 110 CC. Brand
New Tomahawk
Kids Quad. Only
$695 takes it away!
570-817-2952
Wilkes-Barre
409 Autos under
$5000
FORD 95 F150
4x4. 1 Owner.
91K. 4.8 engine,
auto. Runs
great. New
paint, stake
body with
metal floor.
570-675-5046.
Leave message,
will return call.
NOW
$4,295
Selling your
Camper?
Place an ad and
find a new owner.
570-829-7130
412 Autos for Sale
DODGE 02
VIPER GTS
10,000 MILES V10
6speed, collec-
tors, this baby is
1 of only 750 GTS
coupes built in
2002 and only 1 of
83 painted Race
Yellow it still wears
its original tires
showing how it
was babied. This
car is spotless
throughout and is
ready for its new
home. This vehicle
is shown by
appointment only.
$39,999 or trade.
570-760-2365
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H
PAID
570-301-3602
TOYOTA `03
HIGHLANDER
White.
Original Owner.
Garage kept.
Excellent condition.
$9,750. Neg.
570-677-3892
412 Autos for Sale
TOYOTA 04 CELICA GT
112K miles. Blue,
5 speed. Air,
power
windows/locks,
CD/cassette, Key-
less entry, sun-
roof, new battery.
Car drives and
has current PA
inspection. Slight
rust on corner of
passenger door.
Clutch slips on
hard acceleration.
This is why its
thousands less
than Blue Book
value. $6,500
OBO. Make an
offer! Call
570-592-1629
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CHEVROLET `76
PICKUP
4 Cylinder
Very Good
Condition!
NEW PRICE
$1,500.
570-362-3626
Ask for Lee
CHEVY 30 HOTROD COUPE
$47,000
GREAT DEALS!
MERCEDES 29
Kit Car $5,500
OR TRADE
JUST REDUCED
(570) 655-4884
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $7,995.
Call 570-237-5119
MERCEDES-BENZ `73
450SL
Convertible with
removable hard top,
power windows, AM
/FM radio with cas-
sette player, CD
player, automatic, 4
new tires. Cham-
pagne exterior; Ital-
ian red leather inte-
rior inside. Garage
kept, excellent con-
dition. Priced to Sell!
$23,000.
Call 570-825-6272
439 Motorcycles
BRAND NEW
12 SCOOTER
All ready to ride,
electric start, auto-
matic transmission,
disk brakes, rear
luggage trunk,
under seat storage,
around 100 mpg,
fully street legal, all
ready to go! only
$1,595. Call
570-817-2952
SUZUKI 01 VS 800
GL INTRUDER
Garage kept, no
rust, lots of
chrome, black with
teal green flake.
Includes storage
jack & 2 helmets.
$3600
570-410-1026
YAMAHA 08 STAR
RAIDER RAVEN EDITION
Mint condition.
Very low miles.
Asking $7400.
Call for details.
570-472-2327
439 Motorcycles
YAMAHA 97
ROYALSTAR 1300
12,000 miles. With
windshield. Runs
excellent. Many
extras including
gunfighter seat,
leather bags, extra
pipes. New tires &
battery. Asking
$4,000 firm.
(570) 814-1548
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
All
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
DIET COUNSELOR/
TELEMARKETER
Leading Weight
Loss Company look-
ing for a DIET COUN-
SELOR/TELEMARKETER.
Responsible for
customer service
and marketing in the
Wilkes-Barre Area.
Candidate must be
health orientated
and professional.
Part-time morning,
evening and some
Saturday hours.
Hourly rate plus
incentives.
Call Karen at
570-822-4500 or
leave message.
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
FORKLIFT MECHANIC
Action Lift, Inc.,
located in Pittston,
PA, is the exclusive
dealership for
Crown and TCM
forklifts for NEPA.
We are seeking a
full time forklift
mechanic to trou-
bleshoot, repair and
diagnose Crown
and other makes of
lift trucks. Good
written and verbal
communication
skills, as well as
customer care skills
are necessary. A
valid drivers license
and the ability to
safely operate lift
trucks are required.
Previous forklift
mechanical experi-
ence or technical
school graduate will
be considered. We
offer an excellent
wage and benefits
package, as well as
401K Retirement
Savings Plan, paid
holidays, paid vaca-
tion and much
more.
Apply by e-mail
mike.phelan@action
liftinc.com or call
570-655-2100 x115.
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new apartment?
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542 Logistics/
Transportation
Drivers:
Home Nightly
Hazleton,
PA Dedicated Run.
New Higher Pay!
CDL-A, 1 year Expe-
rience. Required.
Estenson Logistics.
Apply:
www.goelc.com
1-866-336-9642
DRIVERS:
Home Nightly
Hazleton,
PA Dedicated Run.
New Higher Pay!
CDL-A, 1 year Expe-
rience. Required.
Estenson Logistics.
Apply:
www.goelc.com
1-866-336-9642
Drivers: Co.
Great Pay/Home-
time!
No-Touch! 80%
D&H.
CDL-A with 1 year
Experience.
866-564-8639 x107
542 Logistics/
Transportation
FRONT-LOAD AND
ROLL-OFF DRIVERS
Minimum 2 years
experience.
Great benefits.
Apply in person at
Solomon Container
Service
495 Stanton St.
Wilkes-Barre
570-829-2206
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
548 Medical/Health
AIDE
Home Health
Aide wanted for a
part time position in
a Wilkes-Barre
based agency. We
are looking for a
candidate able to
travel to areas
throughout the
Wyoming Valley.
Please call
824-9811 or send
resume or letter of
intent to: Preferred
Home Health Care,
328 Scott Street,
Wilkes-Barre,PA
18702
EOE
CHILD WELF CHILD WELFARE ARE
AGENCY AGENCY
Energetic team
player needed
for private foster
care agency.
Job responsibilities
include case man-
agement, writing
home studies and
training foster fami-
lies. Prior experi-
ence working with
children and
families required.
Bachelor Degree
in Social Work or
related field
required. Send let-
ter of interest and
resume to:
Families United
Network, Inc.,
1006 Pittston Ave.
Suite 200,
Scranton, PA 18505
Attn: Supervisor or
Fax: 570-340-1440
EOE
DENTAL ASSISTANT
Full time in busy
Wilkes-Barre office.
Experience pre-
ferred in all aspects
of general dentistry.
Xray certified. Good
benefits package
available. Send
resumes to: c/o
The Times Leader
Box 4210
15 N. Main Street.
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711-0250
FULL-TIME PT
FOR HAZELTON AND
LUZERNE COUNTY
Competitive Salary
and Benefits includ-
ing 401K with Com-
pany match. Appli-
cants with 1 year
clinical experience
can forward their
resumes to:
Kathleen Sokoloski,
Executive Director
Fax: 570-655-3175
ksokoloski@
mhomehealth.com
Ph: 570-655-3581
Other positions open:
PRN CNAs and RNs
www.mhome
health.com
EOE
KEYSTONE HUMAN
SERVICES is seeking
caring
COMMUNITY SUPPORT
ASSOCIATES
to provide support
to individuals with
intellectual disabili-
ties.
Keystone offers an
excellent benefits
package for full and
part time employ-
ees.
Various shifts are
available: Awake
Overnight, After-
noon, Evening and
paid sleep shifts.
Starting rate $9.50
per hour.
Please visit our
website to learn
more and apply
online: Job Requisi-
tion#1718
www.keystone
employment.com
548 Medical/Health
Lifesharing
Independent
Contractor For
Male Consumer
Needed
Become a
Lifesharing Mentor!
Pennsylvania Men-
tor needs a dedi-
cated individual
who has an intel-
lectual/develop-
mental disability.
We are seeking a
one level home.
Experience working
with IDD population
preferred.
Mentors receive
training on our inno-
vative one-to-one
model, 24-hour
support, and up to
an $1800 monthly
stipend, depending
on the individual
being served.
Short-term/respite
opportunities also
available.
Is Lifesharing right
for you?
Call Tracy at 800-
825-7014 ext. 4222
and ask about our
bi-weekly info
sessions.Or visit:
www.pamentor.com
MEDICAL SECRETARY
A FULL TIME POSITION
FOR A MEDICAL SECRE-
TARY IS AVAILABLE AT
VALLEY PEDIATRICS.
PLEASE GO TO THE WEB
SITE AT RHCNEPA.COM
FOR SALARY, JOB
DESCRIPTION AND
BENEFIT INFORMATION.
PCA, COOK &
HOUSEKEEPER
Call for an inter-
view. If no answer,
leave message.
570-883 -2255
Ext #2
551 Other
WEEKENDS
ARE MORE
FUN!
Share
your good times
with children.
FCCY is looking
for weekend and
full time foster
parents. Call
1-800-747-3807
EOE.
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
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557 Project/
Program
Management
BRUBACHER
EXCAVATING, INC.,
a premiere site
contractor, has an
immediate open-
ing in our expand-
ing Northern
Tier location in
Liberty, PA for the
following position:
ESTIMATOR
This position is
responsible for
preparing com-
prehensive site
work proposals
and schedules.
Qualified candi-
dates will have a
strong project
management
and scheduling
background.
Advanced com-
puter skills and
experience with
bidding and oper-
ational software is
needed. In addi-
tion, excellent
math and project
accounting skills,
blueprint reading
and interpretation,
as well
as verbal, written
presentation and
leadership skills
are needed.
Brubacher offers
a complete bene-
fit package.
Mail your
resume to:
Brubacher
Excavating Inc.
P.O. Box 528
Bowmansville, PA
17507
Fax: 717-445-
4964
E-mail: careers@
brubacher.net
To apply in person
at our Liberty
Location:
Please call
570-324-2222
EOE
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
SALES
Experienced Outside
Sales professional
(Commissioned) to
offer our no-cost
financial services.
We are a growing
company with huge
upside potential.
Must have strong
people skills and be
comfortable building
relationships with
senior executives.
Fax Resume to:
(866) 969-0690,
Email to: CMCNorth
east@verizon.net
572 Training/
Instruction
DISLOCATED
WORKERS!
LAID OFF?
NEED A SKILL?
EARLY
RETIREMENT?
Consider Career
Retraining In
TRACTOR
TRAILER DRIVING
November
Classes
Liverpool, NY
1-800-243-9300
WWW.NTTS.EDU
Consumer
Information:
http://ntts.edu/
Programs/
Disclosures
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
600
FINANCIAL
610 Business
Opportunities
NEW
DERMATOLOGY
PRACTICE
Moving back to
my hometown! I
am a PA-C prac-
ticing Dermatolo-
gist with over 13
years experience
in a one-doctor
office. A bright,
hardworking,
honest, motivated
individual interest-
ed in partnering
with an MD or DO
in the Scranton/
Clarks Summit
area to provide
Exceptional Der-
matologic care.
CAPITAL AVAIL-
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Sheli Tinkelman
MS, PA-C at
248-788-0527
630 Money To Loan
We can erase
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Its a process that
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Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
700
MERCHANDISE
742 Furnaces &
Heaters
UTICA OIL
FIRED PACKAGED
CIRCULATING HOT
WATER BOILER
140,000 btu, bc3T,
excellent condition,
tankless hot water
coil. $1950/OBO.
570-735-7736
744 Furniture &
Accessories
CHAIRS, (2)
Genuine
leather, cus-
tom made
recliners.
Taupe color,
like new. $550
each.
570-675-5046
744 Furniture &
Accessories
DEN
FURNITURE
Wood/cloth. Reg-
ular size sofa,
chair and
ottoman. Coffee
table, 2 end
tables. Excellent
condition. $325
for all.
570-675-5046
MATTRESS/box
spring. A brand new
p-top queen. Still in
bags! Must sell!
$150. 280-9628
MOVING SALE
Furniture and Misc
items for sale. 80 x
36 sofa sleeper
(new). 96 x 43
sofa with matching
ottoman. 60x32
setee. Maple sofa
table, chrome/
glass end table
and coffee table.
1960 retro free
standing bar and
stools. Glassware,
pots/pans and
much more.
Call 570 472 3152
WEST WEST WYOMING WYOMING
6th Street
OPEN YEAR ROUND
SP SPACE ACE
A AV VAILABLE AILABLE
INSIDE & OUT INSIDE & OUT
Acres of Acres of
parking parking
OUTSIDE
SPACES
$10
Saturday
10am-2pm
Sunday
8am-4pm
754 Machinery &
Equipment
SNOW
BLOWER.
Craftsman. 12
HP, 32 dual
stage. Electric
start. Track
Drive. $525.
570-675-5046
756 Medical
Equipment
SCOOTER/
POWER CHAIR
Golden Compass
Heavy duty, used
in house only,
excellent
condition. $1,500
570-752-5353 or
702-292-5595
758 Miscellaneous
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
776 Sporting Goods
HELMET, Official
New York Giants full
size, signed by
Tikk Barber. $225.
570-489-2675
788 Stereo/TV/
Electronics
T.V., Toshiba, 36
inch, not a flat, per-
fect. $100.
570-823-2709
800
PETS & ANIMALS
815 Dogs
GOLDEN
RETRIEVER
PUPPIES
Great with kids.
Health record.
Ready now. $300
each. 570-765-1914
815 Dogs
PAWS
TO CONSIDER....
ENHANCE
YOUR PET
CLASSIFIED
AD ONLINE
Call 829-7130
Place your pet ad
and provide us your
email address
This will create a
seller account
online and login
information will be
emailed to you from
gadzoo.com
The World of Pets
Unleashed
You can then use
your account to
enhance your online
ad. Post up to 6
captioned photos
of your pet
Expand your text to
include more
information, include
your contact
information such
as e-mail, address
phone number and
or website.
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
MALTESE-
POODLE PUPPIES
Toy size, non shed-
ding, health guaran-
tee. Ready for
loving home.
$325 each.
570-765-0936
POMERANIAN
AKC, 8 weeks,
2 females, black.
2 males, black &
sable. Shots &
wormed. Vet
checked. Home
Raised. Champion
blood line. $500
(limited papers) to
$600 (full papers)
Each.
570-864-2643
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nations con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
DALLAS
3 bedroom, 2 bath,
modern country
kitchen with Corian
counters, family
room with fireplace,
wet bar and walkout
to patio, multi-level
decks. All appli-
ances included.
$217,000.
570-675-0446
evenings.
DURYEA
76 Main St.
$69,900
Newly remodeled
two bedroom home.
Kitchen is very nice
with granite coun-
ters and tile floor,
bathroom is modern
with tub surround,
tile floor and granite
vanity. New vinyl
windows through-
out. Off street park-
ing for 2 cars. MLS
#12-3966 For more
information and
photos visit www.
atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
570-829-6200
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
Find homes for
your kittens!
Place an ad here!
570-829-7130
www.MattBurneHonda.com
2012 HONDA
ACCORD LX
4 dr, Auto Trans, AC, PW, PL, Cruise, ABS, 6 Air Bags, Tilt,
Keyless Entry, AM/FM/CD, Model #CP2F3CEW
*
MPG
34 HWY
$219 Lease Per Mo. For 36 Months through AHFC. $0 Down Payment. 1st Payment and tags due at delivery. Residual $11,996.40.
$0 DOWN
PAYMENT
Open Monday - Thursday 9-9
Friday & Saturday 9-5
Thank You To Our Customers
0
.9%
APR FINANCING
NOWAVAILABLE!
*On select models to qualied
buyers for limited term.
2012 HONDA CIVIC LX SEDAN
MPG
28 City
39 HWY
***Lease 36 Months through ahfc. $0 Down Payment.
1st payment and tags due at delivery. Residual $11,561.05
Per Mo.
Lease
ease 36 Months through ahfc $0 Down Payment
Per Mo Per Mo
LLease
* **
Model #FB2F5CEW 140-hp
16-Valve SOHC i-VTEC 5-Speed
Automatic Transmission Air Con-
ditioning with Air-Filtration System
Power Windows/Locks/Mirrors
Cruise Control Remote Entry
160-Watt AM/FM/CD Audio System
with 4 Speakers ABS
Dual-Stage, Multiple-Threshold
Front Airbags (SRS) Front Side
Airbags with Passenger-Side Oc-
cupant Position Detection System
(OPDS) Side Curtain Airbags
$0 DOWN
PAYMENT
2012 HONDA ODYSSEY EX
MPG
18 City
27 HWY
****Lease 36 Months through ahfc. $0 Down Payment.
1st payment and tags due at delivery. Residual $17,525.70
Per Mo.
Lease
Model #RL5H4CEW
248-hp, 3.5-Liter, 24-Valve, SOHC i-VTEC
V-6 Engine 5-Speed Automatic Transmission
Vehicle Stability Assist (VSA) with Trac-
tion Control Anti-Lock Braking System (ABS)
Drivers Seat with 10-Way Power Adjustment,
including Power Lumbar Support Power Slid-
ing Doors 17 Alloy Wheels 229-Watt AM/
FM/CD Audio System with 7 Speakers includ-
ing Subwoofer 2GB CD-Library Bluetooth
HandsFreeLink USB Audio Interface
Exterior Temperature Indicator Multi-Function
2nd-Row Center Seat Three-Row Side Curtain
Airbags with Rollover Sensor Front Side
Airbags with Passenger-Side Occupant Position
Detection System (OPDS) Tri-Zone Automatic
Climate Control System with Humidity Control
and Air Filtration One-Motion 60/40 Split
3rd-Row Magic Seat
2013 HONDA CR-V EX
MPG
22 City
30 HWY
Model RM4H5DJW 185-hp
2.4-Liter, 16-Valve SOHC i-VTEC 4-Cylinder
Engine Real Time AWD with Intelligent Control
System Vehicle Stability Assist (VSA) with
Traction Control Automatic Transmission
Cruise Control A/C One-Touch Power
Moonroof with Tilt Feature Remote Entry
System Bluetooth HandsFreeLink
Multi-angle rearview camera with guidelines
160-Watt AM/FM/CD Audio System with 6
Speakers Bluetooth Streaming Audio
Pandora Internet Radio compatibility
SMS Text Message Function
USB Audio Interface
Anti-Lock Braking System (ABS)
Dual-Stage, Multiple-Threshold Front Airbags
(SRS) Front Side Airbags with Passenger-Side
Occupant Position Detection System (OPDS)
Side Curtain Airbags with Rollover Sensor
VTEC
mission
h Trac-
m (ABS)
ustment,
wer Slid-
att AM/
includ-
etooth
LEASES BASED ON APPROVED CREDIT TIER 1 THRU AHFC. MILEAGE BASED ON 2012 EPA MILEAGE ESTIMATES. USE FOR COMPARISON PURPOSES ONLY.
DO NOT COMPARE TO MODELS BEFORE 2008. YOUR ACTUAL MILEAGE WILL VARY DEPENDING ON HOW YOU DRIVE AND MAINTAIN YOUR VEHICLE. OFFERS EXPIRE 1/2/2013.
MATT BURNE HONDA PRE-OWNED CENTER
Call: 1-800-NEXTHONDA View Prices at www.mattburnehonda.com
*1.9% for 36 mos/ 2.9% for up to 60 mos on Certifed Accords thru Am Honda Finance W.A.C.
Certifed Hondas have 1 yr - 12k, Basic Warranty & 7yr - 100k Powertrain from orig. inservice date.
S
1110 Wyoming Ave,
Scranton, PA
1-800-NEXT-HONDA
570-341-1400
ODYSSEY
08 ODYSSEY LX Slate, 72K.....................NOW $14,950
10 ODYSSEY EX Gray, 44K......................NOW $21,500
10 ODYSSEY EX Slate, 24K.....................NOW $22,500
11 ODYSSEY LX Gray, 31K......................NOW $22,950 ACCORDS
09 ACCORD LX SDN Gray, 36K..........................NOW $14,500
10 ACCORD LX SDN Silver, 31K.........................NOW $15,950
10 ACCORD LXP SDN Silver, 29K......................NOW $15,950
09 ACCORD EX SDN Gold, 31K..........................NOW $15,500
09 ACCORD EX SDN Black, 45K.........................NOW $16,500
09 ACCORD EXL V6 SDN Silver, 37K ..............NOW $16,950
10 ACCORD EXL SDN Burgandy, 30K .................NOW $17,950
10 ACCORD EX SDN Burgandy, 19K ....................NOW $18,250
10 ACCORD EXL V6 SDN Silver, 18K ..............NOW $18,950
10 ACCORD EX SDN Silver, 19K.........................NOW $18,950
11 ACCORD EXL V-6 SDN Amber, 21K............NOW $22,950
12 ACCORD EXL SDN Black, 11K ......................NOW $22,950
ELEMENT 4WD
09 ELEMENT EX Red, 53K ...................................NOW $16,950
$0 DOWN
PAYMENT
Lease 36 Months through ahfc $0 Down Payment
Per Mo. Per Mo.
LLease
* ***
1.9% on
Certied
Accords
1.9%
APR
1.9%
APR
CIVICS
08 CIVIC LX SDN Blue, 60K .................................NOW $12,950
10 CIVIC VP SDN Gray, 47K.................................NOW $13,950
09 CIVIC EX SDN Silver, 40K................................NOW $15,250
12 CIVIC LX CPE Silver, 16K.................................NOW $16,950
CRV 4WD
08 CRV LX Silver, 60K...............................................NOW $16,250
07 CRV EX White, 46K ..............................................NOW $16,250
08 CRV LX Green, 57K..............................................NOW $16,250
08 CRV EX White, 46K ..............................................NOW $16,950
10 CRV LX Gray, 35K................................................NOW $18,250
11 CRV SE Titanium, 28K ...........................................NOW $19,950
10 CRV EX Red, 28K ................................................NOW $20,750
10 CRV EXL Titanium, 37K ........................................NOW $22,500
10 CRV EXL Black, 26K............................................NOW $23,500
Lets Take A Moment This Week To Salute,
Thank and Remember Our Veterans.
RIDGELINE 4WD
09 RIDGELINE RTL NAVI Black, 59K ..............NOW $25,500
09 RIDGELINE RTL Cherry, 33K ..........................NOW $26,950
YOURE
NICE
TRADE
HERE
Navy, 71K, Was $9,850
Now $8,500
07 CHRYSLER
SEBRING TOURING
Silver, 37K, Was $11,950
Now $10,350
06 MERCURY GRAND
MARQUIS SDN
Gold, 76K
Now $7,950
04 BUICK RENDEZVOUS
CL AWD
Black, 25K
Now $18,500
10 TOYOTA CAMRY
XLE SDN
Green, 65K
Now $12,950
08 NISSAN ALTIMA
SL SDN
Gray, 23K, Was $18,950
Now $16,950
10 TOYOTA MATRIX
S AWD
Club Cab, Black, 26K
07 DODGE DAKOTA
SXT 4X4
Now $19,500
Red, 35K
Now $14,950
10 TOYOTA COROLLA
S SEDAN
Gray, 56K
Now $13,950
06 HONDA ACCORD
EX SEDAN
White, 56K
Now $15,750
06 HONDA PILOT
EX 4WD
Silver, 121K, As Traded
Now $9,750
03 HONDA CRV
EX 4WD
Red, 114K
Now $7,950
04 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER
LS 4WD
Gray, 90K
Now $7,950
05 DODGE
STRATUS CPE R/T
Silver, 34K
Now $12,750
09 HYUNDAI SONATA
GLS SDN
Silver, 96K
Now $12,750
06 HONDA CRV
EX 4WD
White, 62K
Now $10,950
05 HONDA CIVIC
LX SE CPE
1 White/1 Gray, Both 74K
Your Choice $12,950
06 HONDA ACCORD
EXL SDN
08 VW PASSAT
2.0T S/W
Black, 53K
Now $15,950
Black, 28K
Now $24,950
08 LEXUS
RX350 AWD
White, 87K
Now $16,950
08 HONDA RIDGELINE
RTS 4WD
07 SE V6, 58K $10,750
FORD FUSION SDN
09 SEL, 73K $11,750
PILOT 4WD
11 PILOT LX Gray, 23K............................................NOW $24,500
11 PILOT EX Red, 22K............................................NOW $26,500
11 PILOT EXL-DVD Cherry, 36K...........................NOW $27,950
11 PILOT EXL Silver, 25K .......................................NOW $28,950
11 PILOT EXL Gray, 32K ........................................NOW $29,500
11 PILOT EXL Mocha, 14K......................................NOW $30,750
Beige, 51K
Now $9,950
03 MAZDA
TRIBUTE 4WD
Silver, 128K
As Traded $7,750
01 HONDA CRV
SE 4WD
YOURE
NICE
TRADE
HERE
Nav., R. DVD, Gray, 38K
Now $18,950
10 VW
ROUTAN SE
Silver, 54K
Now $11,950
06 NISSAN
QUEST
Black, 76K
Now $14,750
05 HONDA
PILOT EXL
CRZ HYBRID
12 CRZ EX White, 2K................................................NOW $19,950
PAGE 9 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 SUNDAY DISPATCH
906 Homes for Sale
EXETER
$115,000
527 Clover Court
Wildflower
Village
Well maintained
3 bedroom, 1.5
bath townhouse
in a great com-
munity! Gas
heat/central air,
paved parking for
two vehicles,
rear deck, wood
flooring, full
basement. WA
school district.
Washer, dryer,
stove, refrigera-
tor, microwave,
d i s h w a s h e r
included. Brand
New hot
water heater.
ONLY ONE
OWNER.
A Must
See!
If interested call
570-655-0806
EXETER
362 Susquehanna
Avenue
Completely remod-
eled, spectacular,
2 story Victorian
home, with 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
new rear deck, full
front porch, tiled
baths & kitchen,
granite counter-
tops. All cherry
hardwood floors
throughout, all new
stainless steel
appliances & light-
ing. New oil fur-
nace, washer/dryer
in first floor bath.
Great neighbor-
hood, nice yard.
$174,900 (30 year
loan, $8,750 down,
$887/month, 30
years @ 4.5%)
NOT IN FLOOD
100% OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Call Bob at
570-899-8877
570-654-1490
JENKINS TWP.
$34,900
151 E. Saylor Ave.
Calling all handy-
men! This one is for
you! Fixer upper
with great potential
in quiet neighbor-
hood. 3 bedrooms,
1 bath with off
street parking and
nice yard.
Directions: Rt 315,
at light turn onto
Laflin Rd to bottom
of hill. Turn right
onto E. Saylor.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 12-3672
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
LAFLIN
$129,900
111 Laflin Road
Nice 3 bedroom,
1.5 bath Split Level
home with hard-
wood floors, 1 car
garage, large yard
and covered patio
in very convenient
location. Great curb
appeal and plenty
of off street park-
ing. Rt. 315 to light
@ Laflin Rd. Turn
west onto Laflin Rd.
Home is on left.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-2852
Keri Best
570-885-5082
NANTICOKE
1472 S. Hanover St.
Well maintained bi-
level. This home
features 2 bed-
rooms, 1 3/4 baths,
recreation room
with propane stove.
Walk out to a 3 sea-
son porch. Profes-
sionally landscaped
yard. 1 car garage,
storage shed, new
appliances, ceiling
fans. Close to
LCCC. $153,900.
Call 570-735-7594
TUNKHANNOCK AREA
REDUCED!
3 bedroom home,
2 baths, concrete
porch 3/4 around
the house, garage.
On six acres.
Stonework, stone
fireplace, heat with
wood or oil. Com-
mercial cook stove.
Beautiful view. Well
above flood or high
water. Some farm
equipment. With
gas & oil rights.
$250,000 570-665-
9054
906 Homes for Sale
LAFLIN
$389,900
10 Fairfield Drive
Exceptional & spa-
cious custom built
cedar home with
open floor plan and
all of the amenities
situated on 2 lots in
picturesque setting.
Create memories in
this 5 bedroom, 4
bath home with 18
ceiling in living
room, gas fireplace,
granite kitchen,
large 2 story foyer,
huge finished lower
level for entertain-
ing with bar/full
kitchen & wine cel-
lar. Inground pool
and hot tub. Direc-
tions: Rt 315 to
Laflin Rd., right onto
Oakwood Dr., right
onto Fordham Rd,
left onto Fairfield
Dr., home is on the
right. www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-4063
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
PITTSTON
35 STARK ST
Completely
Remodeled 3 bed-
room. Home in a
great neighbor-
hood. Includes
refinished hard-
wood and new tile
floors, new bath-
room and kitchen
with stainless steel
appliances and
granite counter-
tops. Gas heat, nice
yard and porches.
$74,900
Call (570)654-1490
PITTSTON TWP.
$175,000
110 Front St.
Great price and
great location.
This well-maintained
3 bedroom, 1.5
baths bilevel home
is in move in condi-
tion. Spacious eat-in
kitchen with custom
cabinets, tile floor
and counters.
Unique lower level
family room with
wood burning fire-
place, office space.
laundry/bath combo.
Plenty of storage
including an 8X6
cedar closet. Out-
door space has
covered patio,
columned carport
and well manicured
partially fenced
yard. Detached
large garage.
For more info &
photos, go to
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com
MLS# 12-2053
Call Angie at
570-885-4896
Terry at
570-885-3041
WILKES-BARRE
$99,900
70 McLean Street
Very nicely updated
& maintained 2
story home, 3 bed-
rooms, 1 bath, 4-
season sunroom
with huge backyard
& deck. Newer car-
peting, off street
parking & security
system. ONE YEAR
HOME WARRANTY.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-2886
Keri Best
570-885-5082
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
PLAINS TWP.
4000 sf. Large
corner lot, great for
storage, reduced
$49,000.
570-722-2939
912 Lots & Acreage
LAFLIN
$32,900
Lot#9
Pinewood Dr
Build your new
home in a great
neighborhood. Con-
venient location
near highways, air-
port, casino and
shopping
156 X 110 X 150 X 45
DIRECTIONS Rt 315
to laflin Rd; make
left off Laflin Rd onto
Pinewood Dr. Lot is
on corner of
Pinewood Dr. and
Hickorywood Dr.
MLS 11-3411
atlas realtyinc.com
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
915 Manufactured
Homes
ASHLEY
1991 Schult Mobile
in Ashley Park. 2
bedrooms, 2 baths.
Corner lot. Needs
minor repairs
$12,000. 829-1293
938 Apartments/
Furnished
WILKES-BARRE
FULLY FURNISHED 1
BEDROOM
Short or long term
Excellent
Neighborhood
Private Tenant
Parking
$750 includes all
utilities. No pets.
570-822-9697
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
FORTY
FORT
A AV VAILABLE AILABLE
1-2 1-2
BEDROOMS BEDROOMS
RENOV RENOVA ATED TED
America
Realty Rentals
RENOVATED 1-2
BEDROOMS TO
PERFECTION.
1 BEDROOM
STARTS AT $500
+ UTILITIES.
2 BEDROOMS
$750. & UP
PLUS UTILITIES.
All new maple
kitchens,
appliances,
some carports,
fireplaces,
porches, etc.
EMPLOYMENT
VERIFICATION
REQUIRED, NO
PETS/NO
SMOKING/
2 YEAR SAME
RENT.
MANAGED.
570-288-1422
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
1 bedroom, private
rear entrance, off
street parking,
appliances, gas,
water, hot water
and sewer included
pets considered
$425 per/ month + 1
month security. Call
1-570-606-7884
after 9am before
9pm & call 1-570-
256-7837 before
9am and after 9pm
HUDSON
Newly renovated
2 bedroom, 2nd
floor. Living & din-
ing rooms, wall-
to-wall, washer/
dryer hookup, off-
street parking,
walk up attic, no
pets. $600/month,
+ utilities, security
& references
570-430-1200
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
KINGSTON
1st Ave. 1 bedroom,
single occupancy,
off-street parking,
no pets, references.
$450 + utilities.
Call 570-655-9229
KINGSTON
1st floor, newly
remodeled 1 bed-
room, central heat
and air, off-street
parking, wall to wall
carpeting, washer/
dryer hook-up, No
pets. $450.
Call 570-288-9507
LUZERNE
276 Bennett St.
2nd floor, large,
2 bedroom, large
living room, den,
dining room, tiled
bath, kitchen with
stove and refrig-
erator, washer
and dryer hook
up, mini blinds and
ceiling fans, off
street parking.
Water and sewer
included. $650
plus utilities and
security, no pets
or smoking. Ref-
erences. Call
570-288-7309
Leave Message
MINERS MILLS
2 Story, 4 bed-
rooms, 1.5 bath,
washer/dryer
hookup, 3 season
room, carport.
$650 + utilities.
570-881-7372
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
PARSONS
2nd floor, 2 bed-
rooms, washer,
dryer, fridge, stove
& heat included.
$685/month +
security. No pets.
570-332-9355
PITTSTON
1 Bedroom Apt. 1st
Floor. Deck, Yard,
Renovated, Off St.
Parking, Large
rooms, Private. A
Must see. Please
call for details. No
Pets. $500/MO.
610-574-9142
PITTSTON
152 Elizabeth Street
Spacious 1 bedroom
apartment with
ample closet space.
Off street parking.
All utilities and appli-
ances included. No
pets. $695 + lease &
security. Call
570-510-7325
PITTSTON
2 bedroom apart-
ment. W/W & hard-
wood floors. Wash-
er/Dryer hook-up.
Some off street
parking. No Pets.
$500/per month +
utilities.
570-417-2063
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
PITTSTON
2nd floor, large and
modern. 2 bed-
rooms, living room,
computer room,
laundry room with
washer & dryer. Full
bath, kitchen with
stove, fridge and
dish washer. Fresh
paint and carpet.
Water and trash
incl. No smokers,
no pets. $550/mo
plus security.
570-881-9789 after
6PM
PITTSTON
4 room apt. 2nd
floor, stove &
refrigerator, off
street parking.
Water, sewer &
garbage included.
Non smokers & no
pets. $550/month.
570-655-2567
PITTSTON
Remodeled single
home. 3 bedrooms.
Gas heat. No Pets.
$695/month & 1st
month, & security
deposit. Credit
Check Required.
570-479-0302
PITTSTON/JENKINS
TOWNSHIP
3 1/2 bedrooms,
2 full baths, large
living room, dining
room, kitchen,
stove, washer/dryer
hookup. Off street
parking. Spacious
with heat and
water included.
$875/mo., security,
credit check &
references.
AVAILABLE NOW!
917-753-8192
PLAINS
Available Nov. 1st
First Floor. 3 room
apartment. CLEAN
AND QUIET.
$550/month
includes heat,
water & sewers.
Definitely no smok-
ing and no pets. Off
street parking. First
months rent, first
months security.
Credit and back-
ground check done.
570-899-6710 or
570-820-3906
SCRANTON
Green Ridge Area
2nd floor, 3 bed-
room, living room
kitchen, bath &
laundry. New car-
pet, fresh paint. No
pets. Modern, nice,
clean. $600,
includes sewer.
No pets.
570-344-3608 or
973-541-0686
WEST WYOMING
425 West 8th Street
2nd floor, 2 bed-
room with off street
parking, washer/
dryer hook up,
stove. No pets.
$525/mo + security.
Sewer & garbage
included, other utili-
ties by tenant.
570-760-0458
WILKES-BARRE
Victorian 2 bed-
room in Historic
downtown. All appli-
ances + washer/
dryer, off-street
parking, no pets.
$800/month + utili-
ties, security & 1st
month. 5 minutes
from Rt. 309 & I-81.
(570)239-4067
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
SETTLE IN FOR
THE HOLIDAYS!!
RENTAL APT
KINGSTON:
1 bedroom, 2nd
floor $460.
2 bedroom 1st
floor $500.
3 bedroom 2nd
floor $510.
WYOMING:
2 bedroom
1st floor $500.
PLAINS:
1 bedroom
1st floor $420.
1/2 DOUBLES
KINGSTON:
3 bedroom
$825.
W-B: 4 bedroom
$750.
Appliances
included. Utilities
by tenants. No
pets. Lease,
credit check,
security
required.
UPCOMING:
W-B: 3 bedroom
brick home.
$800.
Qualified
applicants
receive
discounts....!!!!
Call Property
Manager @
570-899-3407
944 Commercial
Properties
DOLPHIN PLAZA
Rte. 315 2,400 Sq.
Ft. professional
office space with
beautiful view of
Valley & Casino.
will divide
office / retail
Call 570-829-1206
PITTSTON
COOPERS CO-OP
Lease Space
Available, Light
manufacturing,
warehouse,
office, includes
all utilities with
free parking.
I will save
you money!
315 PLAZA
1,750 SQ. FT. &
2,400 SQ.FT
OFFICE/RETAIL
2,000 FT.
Fully Furnished
With Cubicles.
570-829-1206
947 Garages
ASHLEY
2,100 sq. ft. Building
Suitable for Storage
Close to 1-81.
$330/month.
570-592-3575
950 Half Doubles
EDWARDSVILLE
3 large bedrooms,
large fenced yard,
hardwood floors
washer/dryer
hookup, pets
welcome.
$625/month +
utilities & 1 month
security. Call
570-313-5414
KINGSTON
Sprague Ave.
Charming, spacious
6 room, 2 bedroom
duplex, includes 2nd
& 3rd floor. Ample
closets. Washer
/dryer hook-up.
$575/ month + utili-
ties, security &
lease. NO PETS.
570-793-6294
PITTSTON
109 Lagrange St.
3 bedroom 1 bath.
New wood floors,
porches, big kitchen
with dishwasher, full
attic, basement, lots
of space! New gas
furnace and new
windows small yard.
Easy on - street
parking. Section 8
welcome. $625/per
month, plus utilities.
Pets okay with addi-
tional rent.
570-798-7051
PLAINS
Spacious 3
bedroom, 1 bath
with Victorian
charm with hard-
wood floors, neutral
decor, stained glass
window, large
kitchen. Washer
/dryer hook-up,
off-street parking.
$700 month +
utilities, security &
lease. NO PETS.
570-793-6294
PLYMOUTH
Large 1/2 double, off
street parking &
yard. 2 bedrooms, 1
1/2 baths, $650 +
security. Utilities by
tenant. Section 8
Ok. Call
570-690-6289
PLYMOUTH
Shawnee Ave.
3 bedrooms, back
yard, basement.
$550/month +
utilities and sewer.
570-332-5723
950 Half Doubles
TRUCKSVILLE
3 bedrooms,
refrigerator &
stove, washer/
dryer hookup, laun-
dry room, off-street
parking. $700/
month + electric,
gas & hot water,
1 month security,
references &
background check.
570-592-2902
953Houses for Rent
CLARKS SUMMIT
4 bedrooms,
2 baths, all appli-
ances, washer/
dryer hookup, no
pets. $1,800/month
+ utilities & security.
Month to month
lease.
(610)256-5352
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
EXETER
Beautiful magnifi-
cent Cape Cod style
home. 3 bedrooms,
2 baths, finished
lower level, 2 car
garage with a rear
deck area. Master
bedroom and bath
on first floor, new
carpets, recently
painted, hardwood
& tile floors, granite
counters & stainless
steel appliances in
kitchen. Gas heat.
$1500 per/ month.
570-479-6722
KINGSTON
Executive Home
Well maintained.
Quaint front porch,
hardwood floors,
living room, dining
room, 4 bedrooms,
2 fireplaces, 2.5
baths, granite
kitchen, sun room,
basement with
plenty of storage,
non smoking.
$1,600/month, or
purchase.
570-472-1110
PLAINS
Modern 6 rooms,
laundry, base-
ment, gas
heat/water, fenced
yard $700/per
month, plus utili-
ties and security,
no pets
570-472-3837
PRINGLE
Out of the Flood
Zone. 2 story sin-
gle. 2 bedrooms,
new bathroom,
stove, washer/dryer
incl. Possible rent
to own. No Pets,
$500 + utilities. 1
month security +
references
570-287-7456
570-852-1857
WEST PITTSTON
Single Family
home. 3 bedroom,
1 1/2 bath
$850. a month
plus utilities
$850. security
deposit.
(570) 885-8592
959 Mobile Homes
WEST WYOMING
Modular Home, nice
neighborhood,
2 bedroom, new
wall-to-wall carpet-
ing, all appliances,
freshly painted, sun
porch, shed, securi-
ty lighting, sewage,
fully maintained
lawn, off-street
parking. $475/
month + utilities.
References, securi-
ty. No pets. No
Smoking.
570-693-2355 or
570-650-8120.
AVAILABLE NOW!
1000
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
1015 Appliance
Service
ECO-FRIENDLY
APPLIANCE TECH.
25 Years Experi-
ence fixing major
appliances: Washer,
Dryer, Refrigerator,
Dishwasher, Com-
pactors. Most
brands. Free phone
advice & all work
guaranteed. No
service charge for
visit. 570-706-6577
1024 Building &
Remodeling
1st. Quality
Construction Co.
Roofing, siding,
gutters, insulation,
decks, additions,
windows, doors,
masonry &
concrete.
Insured & Bonded.
Senior Citizens Discount!
State Lic. # PA057320
570-606-8438
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
HUGHES
Construction
NEED A NEW
KITCHEN OR
BATH????
Seasonal Rooms
Roofing, Home
Renovating.
Garages,
Kitchens, Baths,
Siding and More!
Licensed and
Insured.
FREE
ESTIMATES!!
570-388-0149
PA040387
Shedlarski Construction
HOME IMPROVEMENT
SPECIALIST
Licensed, insured &
PA registered.
Kitchens, baths,
vinyl siding & rail-
ings, replacement
windows & doors,
additions, garages,
all phases of home
renovations.
Free Estimates
570-287-4067
SNOW
PLOWING
RESIDENTIAL/
COMMERCIAL
SIDEWALKS
Insured & Bonded
Senior Citizens Discount!
State Lic. # PA057320
570-606-8438
1087 Entertainment
DJ GIANNI
For all your
dancing &
listening needs.
With over
20 years experi-
ence entertaining
audiences both
young & old in
the
Greater
Pocono
Northeast.
Specializing in
Weddings,
Birthday Parties,
Anniversaries &
Corporate
Affairs,
Now Booking
Holiday Parties
Also hosting
Karaoke
Call DJ Gianni
today; youll be
glad you did.
570-693-0690
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 PAGE 10
timesleader.com
SAVE
MORE
MONEY
WELL HELP YOU
TO SUBSCRIBE CALL
829-5000
or visit us online at
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just by clipping The Sunday Times
Leader coupons. Grab your scissors
and join the coupon craze!
Already a subscriber?
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to place your ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNL NNL NNNL NNLYONE NNNNNNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LLLE LE LE LLE LE EE LE DER D .
timesleader.com
What
DoYou
HaveTo
Sell
Today?
Over
47,000
people cite the
The Times
Leader as their
primary source
for shopping
information.
Motorcycle for sale?
Let them see it here
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
Find homes for
your kittens!
Place an ad here!
570-829-7130
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OnStar w/ Turn-By-Turn Navigation, XM Satellite Radio, Remote
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Navigation, XM Satellite
MSRP
$36,560
Stk. #13029, 3.6L SIDI 6 Speed Manual Transmission,
PW, PDL, Air, Rear Spoiler, Limited Slip Dierential,
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Side Impact Airbags, Stabilitrak, 17 Aluminum Wheels
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21,999
*
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PDL, Air, P. Mirrors, Tinted Glass, Stabilitrak, XM Satellite
Radio, Onstar w/ Turn-By-Turn Navigation, Compass Display,
16 Aluminum Wheels, Tilt & Telescopic Steering Column
2012 CHEVY TRAVERSE
LS FWD 8 PASSENGER
#12780, 3.6L SIDI V6,
6 Speed Automatic,
Traction Control, Remote
Keyless Entry, 3rd Row
60/40 Bench Split
Seat, PW, PDL, P. Mirrors,
Bluetooth, Rear Spoiler,
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Navigation, XM Satellite Radio
MSRP $30,925
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27,599
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PAGE 11 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 SUNDAY DISPATCH
Cc|| e|| Free 1835383 MeIerWer|d Drve 1usI O|| |nIersIcIe 81, W|kes8crre
SHOP 24/7 @ MOTORWORLDGROUP.COM SALES HOURS MON FRI: 9AM-8PM SAT: 9AM-5PM SUN: OPEN FOR OUTDOOR BROWSING NOON-5PM
2003 Honda CR-VLX...........................................
2002 FordExplorer Eddie Bauer.......................
2008 Chevrolet Cobalt LS...................................
2005 Hyundai Santa Fe GLS2.7L V6................
2003 Honda CR-VEX...........................................
2009 Chevrolet Cobalt LT...................................
2007 Dodge Caliber Base....................................
2008 Hyundai Elantra GLS..................................
2009 Hyundai Sonata GLS..................................
2007 Hyundai Elantra GLS..................................
2005 Honda CR-VLX...........................................
2004 Toyota Camry XLE.....................................
2006 Mitsubishi Outlander Limited..................
2008 Chevrolet Impala LT...................................
2007 Honda Element LX.....................................
2006 Chevrolet TrailBlazer LS............................
2007 Mitsubishi Eclipse GS................................
2006 Toyota Avalon.............................................
2007 Hyundai TucsonGLS.................................
2008 ScionxBBase..............................................
2006 Cadillac DTS.................................................
2009 Chevrolet Express VanG2500 WorkVanCargoHD..................
2008 Toyota Camry LE........................................
2008 Toyota Camry LE........................................
2007 Toyota Camry LE........................................
2010 FordFocus SE..............................................
2009 Pontiac Vibe Base.......................................
2007 Honda AccordEX-L...................................
2005 Toyota RAV4 Base......................................
2009 Hyundai Sonata GLS..................................
2010 Suzuki SX4 Base.........................................
2004 Toyota RAV4 Base......................................
2005 SubaruLegacy 2.5i Limited......................
2010 Chevrolet Impala LT...................................
2009 SaturnVUEHybrid.....................................
2010 Honda Civic LX............................................
2008 Hyundai TiburonGT...................................
2010 Toyota Corolla S..........................................
2008 BuickLaCrosse CXL..................................
2004 Lexus ES330................................................
2010 Toyota Corolla S..........................................
2009 Pontiac Vibe Base.......................................
2009 BuickLaCrosse CXL..................................
2010 Chevrolet Impala LS...................................
2009 Hyundai Sonata SEV6..............................
2010 Honda Civic LX............................................
2006 Toyota RAV4 Sport ....................................
2007 Toyota Camry XLE.....................................
2006 Mercedes E-Class E350.............................
2010 Honda Civic LX............................................
2010 Toyota Corolla LE.......................................
2007 NissanMaxima 3.5 SE...............................
2008 JeepLiberty Sport......................................
2008 Chevrolet MalibuLTZ................................
2010 Mitsubishi Outlander ES...........................
2010 JeepPatriot Sport ......................................
2009 BuickLucerne CXL....................................
2010 Toyota Corolla S..........................................
2006 Mazda Miata Sport ....................................
2010 SciontCBase...............................................
2011 Toyota Camry Base....................................
2010 FordFusionSE............................................
2011 Chevrolet Impala LS...................................
2012 Chevrolet Cruze ECO.................................
2008 Hyundai Santa Fe GLS2.7L V6................
2009 Honda Civic Hybrid....................................
2007 Cadillac STSV6...........................................
2009 Honda CR-VEX-L........................................
2007 Toyota RAV4 Limited.................................
2007 JeepWrangler X.........................................
2009 Hyundai Santa Fe GLS2.7L V6................
2009 Hyundai Sonata Limited...........................
2006 Toyota Avalon.............................................
2007 Toyota RAV4 Base......................................
2008 Chrysler Town&Country Touring.........
2007 Chrysler 300CBase....................................
2006 Toyota RAV4 Sport ....................................
2012 Honda Fit Sport...........................................
2007 Honda Pilot EX-L.........................................
2008 Acura RDXBase.........................................
2007 Cadillac DTSBase.......................................
2010 GMCTerrainSLE-1.....................................
2009 Acura TSXTechnology.............................
2010 Toyota Camry LE........................................
2009 Honda AccordEX-L 2.4............................
2011 Hyundai TucsonGL....................................
2010 Honda AccordEX-L 2.4............................
2008 Honda CR-VEX-L........................................
2009 Honda CR-VEX...........................................
2011 Hyundai Sonata Limited...........................
2008 Chevrolet TrailBlazer LT............................
2008 Dodge Dakota SLTCrewCab..................
2009 Dodge Journey SXT..................................
2010 Honda CR-VEX...........................................
2011 Honda AccordEX2.4................................
2010 Honda AccordEX-L 3.5............................
2004 Mercedes SLK-Class SLK320...................
2010 Toyota Prius I ...............................................
2009 Honda AccordEX-L 3.5............................
2010 Honda AccordEX-L 2.4............................
2012 Toyota Corolla S..........................................
2005 BMWX3 3.0i ................................................
2008 JeepWrangler UnlimitedX......................
2008 FordEdge Limited......................................
2010 JeepLiberty Sport......................................
2009 Chevrolet Traverse LS................................
2010 Toyota Sienna LE........................................
2008 Acura RDXBase.........................................
2011 Hyundai Genesis Coupe 2.0T..................
2011 Honda AccordLX-P2.4............................
98,061
82,248
54,344
90,435
96,239
79,352
61,141
84,093
93,061
61,349
92,334
65,106
82,907
65,322
82,202
72,212
44,051
90,179
32,697
59,300
91,128
105,669
68,769
55,859
44,348
44,951
58,965
61,687
57,359
26,131
28,858
47,720
88,696
35,585
54,292
36,355
32,187
15,351
47,277
79,816
55,107
37,700
51,557
46,262
25,905
22,122
72,789
85,118
93,672
13,186
20,386
64,569
47,129
51,548
37,859
30,115
30,012
19,538
37,800
35,343
39,194
20,409
21,496
29,700
62,954
33,339
71,757
70,756
49,285
73,509
45,189
29,426
45,171
47,925
42,629
40,578
44,999
3,204
81,123
71,706
63,267
61,657
85,358
21,899
29,984
10,890
33,017
53,484
38,264
43,192
35,822
63,792
17,185
35,915
20,653
49,844
43,205
22,508
29,427
23,160
4,093
56,948
76,273
62,248
21,815
46,906
42,604
52,583
3,811
4,747
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$8,500
$8,715
$8,727
$9,038
$9,201
$9,242
$9,389
$9,585
$9,618
$9,823
$9,834
$10,160
$10,663
$10,904
$11,079
$11,099
$11,146
$11,174
$11,337
$11,355
$11,430
$11,681
$11,982
$12,413
$12,416
$12,463
$12,924
$13,048
$13,107
$13,131
$13,244
$13,379
$13,489
$13,568
$13,607
$13,730
$13,742
$13,777
$13,796
$13,829
$13,860
$13,883
$13,894
$13,897
$13,940
$13,947
$14,079
$14,231
$14,336
$14,363
$14,367
$14,419
$14,478
$14,655
$14,855
$14,886
$14,900
$14,909
$14,948
$14,968
$14,983
$15,031
$15,044
$15,209
$15,268
$15,499
$15,558
$15,634
$15,642
$15,653
$15,682
$15,721
$15,808
$15,984
$16,096
$16,354
$16,376
$16,382
$16,388
$16,624
$16,649
$16,873
$16,893
$16,999
$17,051
$17,308
$17,334
$17,397
$17,472
$17,473
$17,499
$17,664
$17,675
$17,720
$17,739
$17,762
$17,808
$17,819
$17,960
$17,966
$17,979
$17,989
$18,071
$18,176
$18,442
$18,551
$18,733
$18,756
$18,797
$18,799
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A11558A
T29249A
T30367A
L11902A
H28521A
T30288A
L11882A
K13271A
LP15883
B9730A
A11436A
T29287B
H29104A
J5311A
TS0439
B9792A
J5383A
B9774A
BP15935
T29323A
L11828A
L11717A
L11690A
L11781A
L11820B
C3685A
J5406A
BP15915
B9885A
C3704A
BP15882
BP15877
B9782A
B9685A
B9535A
2011 Hyundai Sonata SE....................................
2011 JeepLiberty Sport......................................
2007 Lexus ES350................................................
2008 Acura TL Base.............................................
2011 Hyundai Sonata SE....................................
2011 Honda AccordLX-P2.4............................
2011 SubaruLegacy 2.5i Premium...................
2007 BMW3 Series 328xi ...................................
2007 Chevrolet Silverado1500 LT1..................
2010 FordMustangV6 Premium......................
2007 Lexus ES350................................................
2009 Hyundai Santa Fe Limited........................
2010 BuickLaCrosse CXL..................................
2008 Toyota Highlander......................................
2011 Hyundai Santa Fe GLS...............................
2007 Lexus ES350................................................
2007 Lexus ES350................................................
2011 Toyota Prius Two........................................
2010 Honda CR-VEX-L........................................
2012 Hyundai Santa Fe GLS...............................
2010 Toyota RAV4 Base......................................
2010 Hyundai Santa Fe SE.................................
2008 Honda Odyssey EX-L.................................
2010 Toyota RAV4 Sport ....................................
2011 Toyota RAV4 Base......................................
2008 Toyota Highlander Sport..........................
2009 Toyota RAV4 Limited.................................
2010 FordEdge SEL.............................................
2009 Honda Odyssey EX-L.................................
2011 Kia SorentoEX............................................
2010 Acura TSX2.4..............................................
2012 VolkswagenPassat 2.5 SE.......................
2011 Hyundai Sonata Limited...........................
2009 Honda Pilot EX............................................
2009 Chevrolet Traverse LT................................
2008 Lexus IS250.................................................
2010 Honda Odyssey EX-L.................................
2011 Hyundai TucsonLimited...........................
2007 Lexus GS350...............................................
2010 Honda Pilot EX............................................
2006 LincolnMarkLTBase................................
2010 Chevrolet Colorado2LT............................
2009 Lexus IS250.................................................
2008 Toyota Highlander Limited.......................
2009 Acura RDXTechnology Package...........
2010 FordF-150 STX............................................
2007 Mercedes M-Class ML350........................
2010 Chevrolet Silverado1500 LT....................
2009 Dodge Ram1500 SLTQuadCab.............
2010 Honda AccordCrosstour EX-L...............
2008 Lexus RX350...............................................
2012 Chrysler Town&Country Touring-L.....
2010 Acura TL Base.............................................
2011 Honda Pilot LX............................................
2010 Toyota RAV4 Limited.................................
2010 Honda AccordCrosstour EX-L...............
2010 Acura TL Base.............................................
2009 Lexus IS250.................................................
2009 Cadillac CTSBase 1SA..............................
2012 Honda CR-VEX...........................................
2009 Cadillac CTS1SB.........................................
2009 Lexus RX350...............................................
2011 GMCTerrainSLT-1......................................
2011 Honda Pilot EX-L.........................................
2010 Honda Pilot EX............................................
2010 Acura RDXTechnology Package...........
2010 Toyota Tundra Grade 4.6L V8 Double Cab....
2009 Lexus IS250.................................................
2011 JeepGrandCherokee Laredo.................
2010 Dodge Ram1500 CrewCab.....................
2010 JeepWrangler UnlimitedSport..............
2009 Acura MDXBase........................................
2010 Lexus IS250.................................................
2010 Lexus ES350................................................
2011 Chrysler Town&Country Limited.........
2010 Acura TL Base.............................................
2010 Toyota Tundra Grade Double Cab..........
2009 Mercedes C-Class C300............................
2010 LincolnMKXBase......................................
2011 Honda Pilot EX-L.........................................
2010 Toyota FJ Cruiser Base..............................
2011 Honda Pilot EX-L.........................................
2012 Honda Ridgeline RTS.................................
2010 Lexus IS250.................................................
2010 Mercedes GLK-Class GLK350 4Matic....
2011 JeepGrandCherokee Laredo.................
2010 Mercedes C-Class C300 Sport 4Matic...
2011 Chevrolet Silverado1500 LT....................
2010 Mercedes GLK-Class GLK350 4Matic....
2012 Toyota Tundra Grade Double Cab..........
2010 Lexus RX350...............................................
2010 Toyota Highlander Limited.......................
2011 BuickEnclave CXL 2XL............................
2010 Mercedes GLK-Class GLK350 4Matic....
2011 Inniti G37 X................................................
2011 Toyota Sienna XLELimited......................
2010 Lexus RX350...............................................
2012 Honda Pilot EX-L.........................................
2010 Lexus RX350...............................................
2011 Chevrolet Avalanche 1500 LTLT1..........
2010 Cadillac CTS3.6L Performance...............
2011 JeepGrandCherokee Overland.............
2010 Mercedes E-Class E350 4Matic...............
2007 Mercedes S-Class S550.............................
2012 Cadillac SRXPerformance Collection...
2011 Mercedes E-Class E350 4Matic...............
2011 Mercedes E-Class E350 4Matic...............
2011 Cadillac CTS-VBase...................................
2009 Mercedes SL-Class SL550........................
2011 Lexus LX570................................................
PreOwned 5upersIere 14 8rcnds p PreOwned 5up 14 8rcnds
21,488
14,799
51,657
45,189
19,573
11,569
15,444
62,636
79,039
7,856
64,950
19,254
54,735
47,600
21,542
60,617
44,000
29,484
43,515
14,081
19,626
34,255
52,806
19,041
21,966
61,657
15,573
35,213
49,486
17,143
44,788
11,422
35,971
43,891
52,385
38,289
57,405
12,184
50,670
64,762
54,296
20,259
49,992
49,131
41,549
20,980
58,225
47,427
10,851
15,124
54,007
23,525
20,161
27,243
17,008
32,581
18,882
29,609
19,147
2,858
56,312
54,076
28,336
38,420
26,984
49,200
24,652
12,228
9,367
47,349
22,330
27,955
35,819
29,683
35,423
29,119
30,122
11,023
23,650
26,153
27,161
46,414
6,811
19,677
32,695
27,046
16,105
5,802
24,250
2,727
41,919
32,894
21,923
24,320
15,027
26,280
36,397
10,873
32,677
20,583
29,782
22,578
36,143
54,667
8,711
25,536
29,953
13,342
33,738
24,769
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H29173A
H29133B
KP15836A
J5439A
H28620B
H28190B
H28934A
J5379B
T30254A
J5347A
H28901A
T29864B
M8033A
T30072A
K13260A
A11476B
H27953B
B9336C
M8079A
T28708B
B9752A
H28684C
T30126A
H27843A
B9455A
H28477B
K13322A
L11801B
H29217A
K13311B
T30361A
T29956A
CH5617A
CH5562A
L11676B
H29062A
J5426A
H28898A
T29975A
C3658B
C3635C
L11550C
T29900A
T30435A
K13423A
BP15885B
K13435A
T30340A
T29608A
H28893A
T30382A
L11750B
T30221A
H29130A
M8115A
J5433A
C3631A
T30322A
A11119A
J5459A
T30304A
J5407A
H29006A
J5320A
L11872A
H29266A
T30067A
H29103A
H28800B
J5377A
T29492A
T30400A
T29673C
H29143A
BP15826B
CH5547A
T30174A
B9650A
T29826A
T29996B
T29816B
H28771A
A11631A
T30383A
H29132A
K13344A
A11469A
L11735B
H28912A
K13355A
H28651A
B9777B
T30307A
H29037A
H28394A
H29185A
BP15744A
H27175A
HP15866
H28746A
H28708A
A11470A
A11363C
K13388A
T30505A
H28861A
T30027B
A11632A
K13254A
H28548A
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
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MILES
MILES
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MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
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MILES
MILES
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MILES
MILES
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MILES
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$18,843
$18,895
$18,975
$19,180
$19,198
$19,249
$19,315
$19,338
$19,388
$19,450
$19,587
$19,632
$19,817
$19,903
$20,079
$20,099
$20,244
$20,420
$20,444
$20,479
$20,479
$20,479
$20,499
$20,544
$20,601
$20,642
$20,906
$20,916
$21,003
$21,022
$21,057
$21,104
$21,151
$21,572
$21,811
$21,854
$21,917
$22,194
$22,449
$22,499
$22,499
$22,499
$22,631
$22,945
$23,178
$23,313
$23,499
$23,499
$24,015
$24,124
$24,127
$24,277
$24,393
$24,479
$24,479
$24,499
$24,556
$24,872
$24,940
$24,979
$24,995
$25,339
$25,342
$25,490
$25,499
$25,599
$25,784
$25,790
$25,853
$26,407
$26,479
$26,704
$26,887
$27,093
$27,403
$27,479
$27,494
$27,507
$27,639
$27,659
$27,769
$27,812
$27,976
$28,253
$28,337
$28,479
$28,483
$28,561
$29,063
$29,250
$29,464
$29,579
$31,300
$31,479
$31,546
$31,680
$32,442
$33,479
$33,749
$34,113
$34,479
$35,580
$36,426
$37,556
$41,988
$42,929
$44,000
$52,036
$54,352
$65,215
*ALL PRICES PLUS TAX, TAG, & TITLE. FINANCING AVAILABLE WITH APPROVED CREDIT. PRIOR SALES EXCLUDED. DEALER NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. WARRANTY ON SELECT MAKES AND MODELS. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. UNITS MAY BE SOLD PRIOR TO PRINTING. OFFERS EXPIRE 11/30/12.
4D Sport Utility.............................
4D Sport Utility.............................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sport Utility.............................
4D Sport Utility.............................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Hatchback...............................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sport Utility.............................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sport Utility.............................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sport Utility.............................
4D Sport Utility.............................
2D Coupe......................................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sport Utility.............................
4D Station Wagon........................
4D Sedan......................................
Cargo Van.....................................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Hatchback...............................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sport Utility.............................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Hatchback...............................
4D Sport Utility.............................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sport Utility.............................
2D Coupe......................................
2D Coupe......................................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Hatchback...............................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sport Utility.............................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sport Utility.............................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sport Utility.............................
4D Sport Utility.............................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sedan......................................
2D Convertible..............................
2D Coupe......................................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sport Utility.............................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sport Utility.............................
4D Sport Utility.............................
2D Sport Utility.............................
4D Sport Utility.............................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sport Utility.............................
4D Passenger Van ........................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sport Utility.............................
4D Hatchback...............................
4D Sport Utility.............................
4D Sport Utility.............................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sport Utility.............................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sport Utility.............................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sport Utility.............................
4D Sport Utility.............................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sport Utility.............................
4D Crew Cab ................................
4D Sport Utility.............................
4D Sport Utility.............................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sedan......................................
2D Convertible..............................
5D Hatchback...............................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sport Utility.............................
4D Sport Utility.............................
4D Sport Utility.............................
4D Sport Utility.............................
4D Sport Utility.............................
4D Passenger Van ........................
4D Sport Utility.............................
2D Coupe......................................
4D Sedan......................................
4D Sedan.....................................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Sedan.....................................
4D Sedan.....................................
4D Sedan.....................................
4D Sedan.....................................
4D Sedan.....................................
4D Station Wagon.......................
4D Crew Cab ...............................
2D Coupe.....................................
4D Sedan.....................................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Sedan.....................................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Sedan.....................................
4D Sedan.....................................
5D Hatchback..............................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Passenger Van .......................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Passenger Van .......................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Sedan.....................................
4D Sedan.....................................
4D Sedan.....................................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Sedan.....................................
4D Passenger Van .......................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Sedan.....................................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Crew Cab ...............................
4D Extended Cab.........................
4D Sedan.....................................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Sport Utility............................
2D Standard Cab.........................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Extended Cab.........................
4D Quad Cab ...............................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Passenger Van .......................
4D Sedan.....................................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Sedan.....................................
4D Sedan.....................................
4D Sedan.....................................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Sedan.....................................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Crew Cab ...............................
4D Sedan.....................................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Crew Cab ...............................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Sedan.....................................
4D Sedan.....................................
4D Passenger Van .......................
4D Sedan.....................................
4D Double Cab ............................
4D Sedan.....................................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Crew Cab ...............................
4D Sedan.....................................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Sedan.....................................
4D Crew Cab ...............................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Double Cab ............................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Sport Utility............................
2D Coupe.....................................
4D Passenger Van .......................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Crew Cab ...............................
4D Sedan.....................................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Sedan.....................................
4D Sedan.....................................
4D Sport Utility............................
4D Sedan.....................................
4D Sedan.....................................
4D Sedan.....................................
2D Convertible.............................
4D Sport Utility............................
AVAILABLE!
APR
0

FINANCING
UP TO
$9,000!
SAVINGS
T
R
U
C
K
&
S
U
V
T
O
W
N
ONLY ONE NEPA DEALER
CAN BE KNOWN AS YOUR...
UP TO UP TO
Call 1.866.356.9383
MeIerWer|d Drve, 1usI O|| |nIersIcIe 81, W|kes8crre
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 PAGE 12
CALL NOW 823-8888 CALL NOW 823-8888
1-800-817-FORD 1-800-817-FORD
Overlooking Mohegan Sun Overlooking Mohegan Sun
577 East Main St., Plains 577 East Main St., Plains
Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B
*Tax and tags extra. Security Deposit waived. All factory rebates applied *See salesperson for details. All payments subject to credit approval by the primary lending source, Tier 0 rate. Special APR
financing cannot be combined with Ford cash rebate. Photos of vehicles are for illustration purposes only. Coccia Ford is not responsible for any typographical errors. See dealer for details. Sale ends
B1809 - - Auto., CD, 17 Alloy Wheels, Tilt,
PW, PDL, Pwr. Seat, Safety Pkg., Side Impact Air Bags, 1st &
2nd Air Curtains, Anti-Theft Sys., Sirius Satellite Radio,
Keyless Entry, Message Center, SYNC
M
O
S.
APR
PLUS
B1786 - - Auto., CD, 17 Alloy Wheels, Tilt,
PW, PDL, Pwr. Seat, Safety Pkg., Side Impact Air Bags, 1st &
2nd Air Curtains, Anti-Theft Sys., Sirius Satellite Radio,
Keyless Entry, Message Center, SYNC
B1715 - - , Auto., CD, 17 Alum Wheels, Tilt,
PW, PDL, Safety Pkg., Side Impact Air Bags, 1st & 2nd Air Curtains,
Anti-Theft Sys., Sirius Satellite Radio, Keyless Entry, Message
Center, SYNC, P
B1866 - - , V6, , Auto., Drivers Vision Group. Blis
w/Cross Traffic Alert, Rearview Camera, Rain Sensing Wipers, Moon & Tune
Pkg., Sony Sound Sys., Reverse Sensing Sys.,
B1890- - Auto., CD, 18 Alum. Sport Wheels, Tilt, PW,
PDL, Pwr. Seat, Safety Pkg., Reverse Sensing Sys., Side Impact Air
Bags, 1st & 2nd Air Curtains, Anti-Theft Sys., Sirius Satellite Radio,
Keyless Entry, Message Center, SYNC,
B1333 - - Auto., Drivers Vision Group. Blis
w/Cross Traffic Alert, Rearview Camera, Rain Sensing Wipers, Moon & Tune
Pkg., Sony Sound Sys., Reverse Sensing Sys., Luxury Pkg., 17 Alum. Wheels,
Alum. Pedals, Premium Mats,
B1335, B1125, B1169, B1262, A4770 -
- Auto., Drivers Vision Group. Blis w/Cross Traffic
Alert, Rearview Camera, Rain Sensing Wipers, Moon & Tune Pkg., Sony
Sound Sys., Reverse Sensing Sys.,
B1073 - -
Auto., Drivers Vision Group. Blis w/Cross Traffic Alert, Rearview Camera,
Rain Sensing Wipers, Moon & Tune Pkg., Sony Sound Sys.
B1092 - - ,
Auto., Drivers Vision Group. Blis w/Cross Traffic Alert, Rearview Camera, Rain
Sensing Wipers, Moon & Tune Pkg., Sony Sound Sys.
B1111 - - , , Auto., Drivers Vision
Group. Blis w/Cross Traffic Alert, Rearview Camera, Rain
Sensing Wipers, Moon & Tune Pkg., Sony Sound Sys., Reverse
Sensing Sys.,
B1062 - - , , Auto., Drivers
Vision Group. Blis w/Cross Traffic Alert, Rearview Camera,
Rain Sensing Wipers, Moon & Tune Pkg., Sony Sound Sys.,
Reverse Sensing Sys.,
B1767 - - Auto., CD, 17 Alloy Wheels, Tilt, PW,
PDL, Pwr. Seat, Safety Pkg., Reverse Sensing Sys., Side Impact Air
Bags, 1st & 2nd Air Curtains, Anti-Theft Sys., Sirius Satellite Radio,
Keyless Entry, Message Center, SYNC
B1745 - - Auto., CD, 17 Alloy Wheels, Tilt, PW,
PDL, Pwr. Seat, Safety Pkg., Reverse Sensing Sys., Side Impact Air
Bags, 1st & 2nd Air Curtains, Anti-Theft Sys., Sirius Satellite Radio,
Keyless Entry, Message Center, SYNC
PAGE 13 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 SUNDAY DISPATCH
542 Logistics/
Transportation
542 Logistics/
Transportation
542 Logistics/
Transportation
542 Logistics/
Transportation
542 Logistics/
Transportation
566 Sales/Business
Development
542 Logistics/
Transportation
566 Sales/Business
Development
542 Logistics/
Transportation
566 Sales/Business
Development
The Dispatch
LOCAL PROS
TRAVEL
Tues. &Wed., Dec. 4 & 5
Complementary room, transportation
& baggage handling. Food, Beverages
& Snacks served on bus.
$25 per person.
Al Lispi: 570-814-3137
or 570-823-9578
Overnight Junket to
Atlantic Citys
Taj Mahal!
PRESSURE WASHING
CONSTRUCTION
CHRIS LATONA
General Contractor
Ceramic Tile Work - Kitchens
- Bathrooms - Garages
- Replacement Windows
- New Homes - Additions - Doors -
Complete Remodeling
FREE Estimates - Insured
457-8145 or 655-0777
Quality Works at Aordable Prices
PA008322
Complete Home
Remodeling, Kitchens,
Baths, Drywall, Windows,
Siding & Roofs.
570-457-0087
PA# HIC EA 18685
JOHN
PREGMON
CONSTRUCTION
NORTHEAST
WINDOW, INC.
Locally Owned & Operated Since 1987
Exterior Home Improvements By
FREE ESTIMATES
570.654.4220
www.northeastwindow.com
Windows
Siding
Enclosures
Fiberglass Doors
Storm Doors
Vinyl Railings
Roong
And More
PA018418
HOME IMPROVEMENT
ADVANCED PRESSURE WASH SYSTEMS
We Clean Gutters, Inside and Out
Leaf Removal
Get black and green mold & moss removed
from your roof Pressure Wash Homes
570-212-8390
Prompt Service
7 Days a Week
1-800-273-7130
for Local Pros
Kung Fu & Tai Chi FREE
Kung Fu is a face-paced workout geared
toward self-defense and Tai Chi is a slow-paced
workout for relaxation and stress relief.
Do you need to Relieve Stress?
Do you need better strength & exibility?
Do you need better balance & muscle tone?
Does your child need more discipline?
Does your child need more concentration?
Does your child need to be more responsible?
Then Try: 2 Free Lessons
Rothrocks Kung Fu &Tai Chi
Call: (570) 457-2591
See more at: rothrockskungfu.com
JOB FAIR!
EVERY
THURSDAY
12-4
Interested Applicants can Apply Online at www.XLCServices.com.
Interviews scheduled Monday thru Friday. Call 800-472-1013 or
walk-ins welcome at Job Fairs.
Hiring Experienced Forklift Operators $12.25 hourly,
after completion of 90 day probation period.
***STRAIGHT DAY SHIFT OR NIGHT SHIFT
(12 hour shifts ave. 42 hours per week)
***75 cent night shift pay differential offered.
***Pay increase based on skill development.
Take charge...LEARNAND EARN!
MUST HAVE 1 YEAR FULL
TIME EXPERIENCE
Skills Required:
High School Diploma/GED
Computer Skills
Valid Drivers License
Criminal Background Check
Pass Pre-Employment Drug
Screen & Physical
*Mehoopany Location
* Benets Available *
Growth Creates Opportunity...Start A New Career!
(Except
Thanksgiving Day)
AT THE
TUNKHANNOCK
LIBRARY
SALES REPS:
$700-$1,200 weekly
We offer motivated individuals an opportunity to earn
the type of income they deserve and set their own
work calendar. Instead of cutting back, we encourage
our winning team to work as much as they want and
earn more money while enjoying a change of scenery
each week working a variety of prescheduled in-store
promotions and special events.
We offer:
Consistent Full-Time Income
Advancement Opportunities
Unlimited Income Potential
Qualifcations:
Strong communication skills & work ethic.
Drivers license & insured vehicle required.
Weekend Availability
CALL NOW: (888) 502-5521
RMS Promotions, Inc.
Apply Online: www.rmspromos.com/jobs
DRIVERS DRIVERS
DEDICATED POSITIONS
$1,000.00 Sign-On Bonus ~ Guarantee $875.00 Pay for first 12 weeks
Premier Transportation is looking to add drivers to its
operation to run freight in to and out of Pittston, PA,
running no touch/drop and hook freight to points in
the mid-west. If youre a Class A CDL driver, then this
is the call to make. This position also comes with a
complete compensation package with mileage pay,
drop & hook pay, insurances, vacations, holidays. In addition, pay is offered for clean
compliance inspections, monthly safety bonus, above stated sign-on bonus and a
$1000.00 longevity bonus which is paid annually.
For addition information, please call
Bob @ 877-542-7949 or apply online at:
www.premiertransportation.com Recruiting. EOE
Local trucking company
looking for
OTR/REGIONAL
TRACTOR
TRAILER DRIVERS
3 years minimum experience
with clean MVR. Full time
& part time needed.
Medical benets after 90 days.
Off on weekends.
Home often.
Earning potential
$50,000 to $55,000 per year.
DRIVERS
Please call 570-270-5145
or Mail resume to:
J & S Ralston Trucking, Inc.
8 East Ann Street
Plains, Pa 18705
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 PAGE 14
Contact us for a FREE quote today!
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Reputation Management
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Search Engine Marketing
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Mobile Landing Pages 570-970-7307 localmantra.com contact@localmantra.com
timesleader.com
PLACE YOUR
GARAGE
SALE AD
CALL 800-273-7130
OR VISIT TIMESLEADER.COM 24/7 TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD
Package includes a sales kit, garage
sale signs, a FREE unsold merchandise
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GET RIDOF
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Plus a FREE BREAKFAST
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STARTING AT
We Need Your Help!
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1-888-796-5519
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Call 829-7130
to place your ad.
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What
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people cite the
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Boat? Car? Truck?
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