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COMMUNITY EMPOWERMENT FOR ELIMINATION OF CHILD LABOUR (COMEECA)

A COMMUNITY EDUCATION MANUAL FOR LOCAL COMMUNITY FACILITATORS ON PREVENTION OF CHILD LABOUR

Prepared By Community Development and Conservation Agency (CODECA) OCTOBER 2011

Development Through Conservation

Community Development & Conservation Agency

COMMUNITY EMPOWERMENT FOR ELIMINATION OF CHILD LABOUR (COMEECA)

COMMUNITY EMPOWERMENT FOR ELIMINATION OF CHILD LABOUR (COMEECA)

A COMMUNITY EDUCATION MANUAL FOR LOCAL COMMUNITY FACILITATORS ON PREVENTION OF CHILD LABOUR

Prepared By Community Development and Conservation Agency (CODECA) OCTOBER 2011

COMMUNITY EMPOWERMENT FOR ELIMINATION OF CHILD LABOUR (COMEECA)

TABLE OF CONTENTS
LIST OF ACRONYMS .............................................................................................................................................III FOREWORD ............................................................................................................................................................Iv ACKNOWLEDGEMENT .........................................................................................................................................vI INTRODuCTION .................................................................................................................................................. vII COMEECA PrOjECt BriEf ........................................................................................................................................................Vii The Immediate Objectives: ......................................................................................................................................... VII Project Activities ............................................................................................................................................................ VII Expected results ............................................................................................................................................................. VII PurPOsE Of thE MAnuAl ...........................................................................................................................................................Viii WhO is thE MAnuAl fOr ...........................................................................................................................................................Viii OrgAnisAtiOn Of thE MAnuAl ..................................................................................................................................................Viii Chapters in the Manual ..............................................................................................................................................Viii hOW tO usE thE MAnuAl .........................................................................................................................................................Viii ChApTER ONE: ChILD LAbOuR .......................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 sEssiOn OnE: WhO is A Child ...........................................................................................................................................1 sEssiOn tWO: Child WOrk And Child lABOur ..................................................................................................................2 sEssiOn thrEE: fOrMs Of Child lABOur ...........................................................................................................................3 sEssiOn fOur: CAusEs Of Child lABOur ..........................................................................................................................4 sEssiOn fiVE: EffECts Of Child lABOur .............................................................................................................................5 sEssiOn six: APPrOPriAtE intErVEntiOns fOr PrEVEntiOn And EliMinAtiOn Of Child lABOur .........................................6

ChApTER TWO: ChILDRENS RIGhTS ................................................................................................................ 7 2.1 2.2 2.3 sEssiOn OnE: WhAt ArE ChildrEns rights .......................................................................................................................7 sEssiOn tWO: ChildrEns rEsPOnsiBilitiEs And OBligAtiOns ............................................................................................8 sEssiOn thrEE: hOW tO hAndlE dEViAnt ChildrEn..........................................................................................................9

ChApTER: ThREE ChILD pROTECTION ...........................................................................................................11 3.1 3.2 sEssiOn OnE: lEgAl And POliCy frAMEWOrk ................................................................................................................. 11 sEssiOn tWO: institutiOnAl frAMEWOrk ........................................................................................................................ 12

ChApTER FOuR: STAKEhOLDERS ....................................................................................................................14 4.1 4.2 sEssiOn OnE: WhO ArE thE MAin stAkEhOldErs inVOlVEd in EliMinAtiOn Of Child lABOur........................................ 14 ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF KEY STAKEHOLDERS.............................................................................. 15

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LIST OF ACRONYMS
AIDS: BATU: CLEAN: CODECA: COMEECA: ECLATU: HIV: IGA: ILO: MGLSD: MOES: NFEP: PLA: UTC: VCLC: Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome British American Tobacco Uganda Child Labour Elimination Advocacy Network Community Development and Conservation Agency Community Empowerment for the Elimination of Child labour Elimination of Child Labour in Tobacco growing in Uganda Human Immune Virus Income Generating Activities International Labour Organization Ministry of Gender Labour and Social Development Ministry of Education and Sports Non Formal Education Program Platform for Labour Action Uganda Technical Collage Village Child Labour Committee

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FOREWORD
The government of Uganda under International treaties and conventions is obliged to ensure good lives of its citizens by providing quality services. Top on the agenda of human development is the child whose shaping determines the productivity, usefulness and relevance in nation building hence Uganda governments commitment to provide Universal Primary and Secondary Education (UPE/USE) to all school going age children which is also in line with the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) of achieving universal primary education by the year 2016. The government has also recognized the importance of technical and vocational education which contributes towards job creation, wealth creation and solving the problem of youth unemployment in the country by supporting the Non Formal Education (NFE) program to provide skills for the youth. However, though government has all the will and desire to provide educational opportunities to the children, there are a number of obstacles in achieving this goal. One of such obstacle is child labour which deprives the children of their opportunity to pursue education in order to get the relevant knowledge, skills and literacy to become productive and useful citizens in their society. CODECA in partnership with Platform for Labour Action (PLA) is implementing Community Empowerment for the Elimination of Child labour in tobacco (COMEECA) project with funding from ECLTFoundation. The overall goal of the project is to contribute to the elimination of hazardous child labour in tobacco growing areas in Uganda. CODECA has been working with communities in Masindi and Kiryandongo districts to eliminate child labour in tobacco growing through sensitization, advocacy and capacity building of Village Child Labour Committees, education and community development departments of the two district local governments, teachers and the media on sustainable ways to eliminate child labour through education. As part of capacity building process, this training manual has been developed to be used by VCLCs in their day to day awareness creation in their respective communities. It aims at ensuring a uniform approach and quality transmission of knowledge and information on child labour and childrens rights within the tobacco growing industry and may be applied to the agricultural sector as a whole.

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COMMUNITY EMPOWERMENT FOR ELIMINATION OF CHILD LABOUR (COMEECA)

The VCLCs are seen as pivotal in the elimination of child labour as they are community based and able to detect, identify, withdraw children from child labour, place in school and follow-up the children so as to enable them be retained in schools to complete their educational cycle. As front line activists and change agents, it is important that their capacity in terms of information provision on child labour, child rights, child participation and protection geared towards elimination of child labour is built. It is in this respect that this training manual has been developed to give them the requisite information they need for community awareness creation on child labour and education as a sustainable alternative to elimination of child labour. The manual has been simplified so that it gives relevant information which is easy to grasp to make it easy to be passed to members of the community using the most appropriate methods that have also been suggested. The manual is divided into four chapters and each chapter has sub-topics presented in a logical order. At the end of each chapter, there are answers to the sub-topics which shall be used by the VCLC to guide in the discussion. However, it should be noted that all the answers are not exhaustive enough and therefore new ideas and issues that arise out of the discussions during sensitization meetings should be incorporated to enrich the information in the manual. It is my sincere prayer that this manual will be of great use and value to the VCLCs and other interested stakeholders for use in the campaign to eliminate child labour in Uganda.

Asiku Micah Project Manager COMEECA Project.

COMMUNITY EMPOWERMENT FOR ELIMINATION OF CHILD LABOUR (COMEECA)

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
It is not an easy task to collect information and assemble in a manner that would make it logical, relevant and useful for intended users if one is not patient, determined, focused and inspired to undertake such a tusk. The completion of this work has been a collective effort and responsibility of a motivated team who are committed and inspired to devote their time to the campaign to eliminate child labour in Uganda. The development of this training manual for the Village Child Labour Committees (VCLCs), religious and cultural leaders has been made possible by a team of experienced persons with vast knowledge in child labour that drew lessons from several existing materials on child labour by different players in the campaign to eliminate child labour. CODECA would like to acknowledge the following for their contributions in making this piece of work together; criticize it so that a simplified information package is assembled for the consumption of the intended end users: Mr. Kiirya Edward District Education Officer Kiryandongo, Mr. Dabanja Geoffrey the District Community Development Officer Kiryandongo, Mr. Kyomuhendo Francis the District Education Officer Masindi, Mr. Bahemuka Godfrey the District Community Development Officer Masindi, Mr. Wobusobozi Stanley the Monitoring and Evaluation Specialist COMEECA project and Mr. Mwesigwa Patrick the Program Assistant COMEECA project, the latter two being employees of CODECA. Special thanks go to Mr. Madira Davidson the Executive Director CODECA for giving inspiration and direction while developing this manual, Ms. Fredah Nabukalu for providing logistical support while developing the manual, Nyago Moses who was the rapporteur and Mr. Asiku Micah the Project Manager COMEECA for coordinating the team and ensuring that the final document is in place. Finally CODECA would like to extend its sincere appreciation to Eliminating Child Labour in Tobacco (ECLT-Foundation) for the financial support it extended to the COMEECA project which made it possible for the manual to be produced. Thank you so much to all
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COMMUNITY EMPOWERMENT FOR ELIMINATION OF CHILD LABOUR (COMEECA)

Introduction
Community Empowerment for the Elimination of Child labour in tobacco growing areas in Uganda (COMEECA) project is a follow-up project of the former Elimination of Child Labour in Tobacco growing in Uganda (ECLATU) running from January 2010-June 2011. The COMEECA project focuses on efforts to eliminate child labour using community based approach by empowering members of the community to take lead and charge in addressing child labour through awareness creation, prevention; identification, withdrawal, placement and retention in schools of children involved and those at risk of joining child labour in tobacco. The project also incorporates public awareness, advocacy, gender issues and childrens rights as an integral part of the interventions. The overall goal of the project is To contribute to the elimination of hazardous child labour in tobacco growing areas in Uganda. To achieve the overall goal, the project has 2 immediate objectives;

The Immediate Objectives:

1. By the end of the project, the incidence of child labour in Masindi and Kiryandongo districts will have reduced by 3000 children; 2. By the end of the project, national stakeholders knowledge to address hazardous child labour in tobacco growing areas has improved.

Project Activities

The major areas of activities (themes) of the project include: Undertaking training needs assessments, developing training programme based on identified needs, training of Village Child Labour Committees and Child Labour Elimination Advocacy Network members in advocacy and child rights, ToT training, Developing training packages for Schools using SCREAM Materials, Purchasing of supplies for recreation facilities for selected schools and Uganda Technical College Kyema and providing grants to children withdrawn from child labour and those at risk of joining child labour for vocational education under the non-formal education program at UTC Kyema.

Expected results

The project has the following results areas; 1. By June 2012, local leaders. district officials, tobacco farmers, tobacco extension workers, cultural and religious leaders, law enforcement agencies, children and young people, parents/guardians, volunteers and the wider community will have been equipped with the knowledge and skills to address hazardous child labour in tobacco growing areas in Masindi and Kiryandongo districts; 2. By June 2012, 3,000 at risk children and children withdrawn from hazardous work in tobacco growing areas in Masindi and Kiryandongo districts have access to improved quality education and training;

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3. By June 2012, implementing partners, government and other national level stakeholders have improved understanding of hazardous child labour in tobacco growing areas and sustainable interventions against it.

Purpose of the Manual

The main purpose of this manual is to provide the necessary knowledge, skills and desired attitude change for the child labour committee members while facilitating community awareness processes on child labour issues. It should be noted that this manual is generic and so it can be utilised even in awareness creation in other forms of exploitative and hazardous child labour.

Who is the Manual intended for

This Manual is for individuals or institutions that are interested in participating in service delivery to promote elimination of all forms of child labour. The Manual is for training community facilitators who are expected to guide in awareness creation on child labour in the target communities.

Organisation of the Manual

The manual is divided into four (4) chapters. Each chapter is divided into sessions with an objective, required materials, necessary preparations prior to conducting the session, duration, how to conduct the session and the notes/content of the session. This is intended to assist the community facilitator know how to go about each session if maximum output is to be achieved.

Chapters in the Manual

The following chapters are covered in this manual: 1. Child Labour; 2. Childrens Rights; 3. Child Protection; 4. Key Stakeholders in the elimination of child labour

How to Use the Manual

A manual is usually a brief sketch of raw resource base that spells out what is to be covered and approaches to be used. It does not bring out all the answers to each aspect being discussed. It is usually the responsibility of the community education facilitator to dig out for the details from the various sources in form of the expected answers, write-ups, and hand outs and by asking participants. To help the community education facilitators who are to use this manual, a list of reference materials/books have been suggested under each area covered. The community education facilitator is advised to read relevant topics/chapters in the suggested references before any session(s) so as to be in position to direct the session appropriately and enable the participants acquire the anticipated knowledge and skills. In addition some notes for each session have been included at the end of each session as a way to standardize the information facilitators give to the community members. The notes will also serve as handouts for those who can read and write in English.

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Chapter One:

Child Labour
1.1 Session One: Who is a Child?
Objective: Materials: Time: 20 min Methods: Brainstorming, buzzing Step 1 1 Brainstorming (10Min) Ask participants what they understand by what a child is. Acknowledge answers and make additions How to conduct the Session: Step 2 Buzzing (5Min) pair up members and ask them to give the reasons as to why children are valued so much in African traditional society. Step 3 Evaluation (5Min): define child and give reasons as to why children are valued so much in traditional society. References Uganda Child labour policy, Child labour manual At the end of the session participants should be able to define who a child is Cards, Markers, News print, Masking tapes Photos

TRAINERS NOTES FOR SESSION ONE


Who is a child?
According to the Constitution of the Republic of Uganda, a child is a person aged below 18 years. In traditional Uganda a child belongs to the community who are supposed to shape and provide care as the child matures into an adult. The African Charter on the rights and welfare of a child defines a child as any human being below the age of 18 years. The National Childrens Act Chapter 59 defines a child a person below the age of 18.

COMMUNITY EMPOWERMENT FOR ELIMINATION OF CHILD LABOUR (COMEECA)


In Africa tradition, a child is somebody who needs care and guidance of the parents/guardians until such a time he/she is initiated into adulthood. Before a child is initiated, he/she is not supposed to marry and engage in activities be it social, religious etc which are a preserve for the adults. At family level a child is supposed to provide old age security to the parents in their waning years. In African tradition a person who does not have a child is considered cursed and without a future. Children were therefore in the past treated with respect and dignity as they are seen as a blessing and groomed to carry the family tree forward.

1.2 Session Two: Child work and Child Labour


Objective: Materials: Time: 60 min Methods: Group work, plenary, brainstorming Step 1: Divide participants into groups (10min) Step 2: Let one group define child work and examples of work that they think children can do. The next group should define child labour and give examples of what they think is child labour (20min) Step 3: group presentations and contributions from members (20min) Step 4: Conclusion (10 min): give definitions of child work and child labour and local examples of both. Community education manual At the end of the session participants should be able to understand and distinguish between child work and child labour Posters, flip charts, markers, masking tapes

How to conduct the Session:

References

TRAINERS NOTES FOR SESSION TWO


Child work/light work
Child work is often referred to as light work for clarity and refers to work that is non-hazardous, within the ability of the child and done at home under close supervision by family members in an environment free from harassment or exploitation. It is work that will be enjoyed by the child to appreciate their contribution to family welfare and prepares them to appreciate the dignity of work in preparation for adulthood roles. Examples include washing utensils, fetching water, firewood etc.

Child labour

Child labour is defined in many terms describing the nature and the environment in which the work is done. It is work that:
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COMMUNITY EMPOWERMENT FOR ELIMINATION OF CHILD LABOUR (COMEECA)


Deprives children of their childhood, their potential and their dignity, and hinders their physical, mental or social development; I Is mentally, physically, socially or morally dangerous and harmful to children; or Interferes with their schooling by: depriving them of the opportunity to attend school; obliging them to leave school prematurely; or requiring them to attempt to combine school attendance with long and heavy work. According to the National Child Labour Policy, child labour refers to: Work that is mentally, physically and or morally dangerous and harmful to children. Work by nature and the circumstances/environment under which it is done is hazardous and jeopardizes the health, safety and morals of the child. Work that is exploitative and denies children the right to education

1.3 Session Three: Forms of Child Labour


Objective: Materials: Time: 70min Methods: Brainstorming, group work, plenary Step 1: Brainstorming (5min): ask participants to mention the different forms of child labour Step 2: Divide participants into groups (5min) Step 3: Let each group list the different forms of child labour (20min) Step 4: Group presentations (20mins) Step 5: brainstorm to sort out the worst forms of child labour from their presentations (10min) Step 6: Evaluation (10min) Community education manual At the end of the session participants should be able to identify the different forms of Child Labour in the Community Posters, flip charts, markers, masking tapes

How to conduct the Session:

References

TRAINERS NOTES FOR SESSION THREE


There are different forms of child labour and over 70% is found in agriculture. These include: Child labour in tobacco growing Sugarcane growing used as labour force for planting, weeding, harvesting and loading sugarcane Oil seed production such as sunflower Grains production such as rice and maize Children engaged in animal traction Children engaged in fishing Children engaged in herding Children engaged in sand mining and stone querying
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COMMUNITY EMPOWERMENT FOR ELIMINATION OF CHILD LABOUR (COMEECA)


Children engaged in petty trade such as hawking, boda-boda riding, selling edibles to travellers on the main high ways Children recruited as domestic workers Children working in hotels, restaurants and bars Child soldiers drawn into armed conflicts Children used in drug trafficking

According to the International Labour Organization (ILO) Convention No. 182 of 1999, worst forms of child labour include: Child slavery or practice similar to slavery such as sale and trafficking of children, debt bondage and serfdom, use of children in armed conflicts Use, procurement and offering a child for prostitution and pornography Use of children in activities such as drug trafficking Work that is likely to harm the health, safety and morals of the children. Note: In Uganda working in the tobacco sector is listed among the hazardous child labour not permitted to be done by the children. 1.4 Session Four: Causes of Child Labour
Objective: Materials: Time: 60min Methods: Brainstorming, role play, group discussion Step 1: brainstorming (10min): Ask participants to mention the causes of child labour Step 2: Role play (20min): identify volunteers to play the following roles; parents, children and clearly explain the roles of each category and let them act a play that depicts the situation at home that leads to child labour Step 3: Acting the play (10min): the rest of the participants observe and take notes Step 4: Receive comments from participants (10min) Step 5: Evaluation (10min) Community education manual At the end of the session participants should be able to identify the causes of child labour Posters, flip charts, markers, masking tapes

Worst forms of child labour

How to conduct the Session:

References

TRAINERS NOTES FOR SESSION FOUR


There are a number of factors that lead to subjecting children into child labour. Some of the factors are the following: Looming poverty among the general population Tobacco growing is labour intensive and children are seen as cheap source of labour Increasing cases of HIV/AIDS leaving children helpless but to look for their own survival Some homes are headed by children who have to work to cater for their younger brothers and sisters Large families who cannot meet their basic requirements Lack of food security in homes forcing children to work in return for payment in form of food from neighbours
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COMMUNITY EMPOWERMENT FOR ELIMINATION OF CHILD LABOUR (COMEECA)


Low levels of education among the community which has led them not to place value in the education of their children Traditions that value early marriage instead of education of the children hence children beginning to look after your families at tender age. Lack of awareness on the childrens rights and the dangers of child labour Education systems that does not identify different talents in children but rather promotes academics forms those who are not academically gifted out of school Exposure of children to money at tender age lures them to love money other than education Long distances to school, poor road net-works and hostile school environment often times forces children to drop out of school and join child labour Bad peer groups often influence other children to join child labour Lack of enforcement of laws that prohibit child labour Breakdown in traditional systems that used to value children as belonging to the clan and collective responsibility of disciplining them now to individual parents only.

1.5 Session Five: Effects of child Labour


Objective: Materials: Time: 60min Methods: Brainstorming, group discussion Step 1: Brain storming (10min) Ask participants to mention the effect of child labour generally Step 2: Divide the participants into groups let each group list the effects of child labour (20min) Step 3: Group presentations (20min) Step 4: Evaluation (10min) Community education manual At the end of the session participants should be able to understand and appreciate the consequences of child labour Posters, flip charts, markers, masking tapes, body maps

How to conduct the Session:

References

TRAINERS NOTES FOR SESSION FIVE


Children subjected to child labour suffer serious consequences some of which are seen immediately while others appear at a later time especially at old age. They include the following: Physical injuries while at work Accidents that may result into death Pains and strains as a result of long hours of work Skin diseases and respiratory infections as a result of contact with tobacco leaves and inhalation of toxic substances into the respiratory system Moral degeneration as children learn immoral acts especially children in armed conflicts, pornography, drug trafficking and street children Children miss opportunity to go to school hence are deprived of their future livelihoods Children lack opportunities for descent work and often used as porters in low paying jobs The community misses out the opportunities of better services that should have been rendered by the child is he/she was educated.

COMMUNITY EMPOWERMENT FOR ELIMINATION OF CHILD LABOUR (COMEECA)


The child may develop deviant behaviour and become a social problem instead of being developmental There will be vicious circle of poverty because the children cannot get descent and better paying jobs 1.6 Session Six: Appropriate Interventions for prevention and Elimination of child labour
Objective: Materials: Time: 60min Methods: Brainstorming Step 1: Ask participants what they would suggest to prevent and eliminate child labour (30min); take notes Step 2: Review the answers and sort out those that are practical in order of priority (20min) Step 3: Conclusion (10min) Community education manual At the end of the session, participants should be able to address child labour with appropriate actions Posters, flip charts, markers, masking tapes

How to conduct the Session:

References

TRAINERS NOTES FOR SESSION SIX


Looking at the dangers of child labour, it is important that action is taken to ensure that the plight of children engaged in child labour is addressed. It is the responsibility of everyone to ensure that children are brought up to exploit their full potentials to be productive citizens in society and serious actions need to be taken as such. Scale up community awareness on the dangers of child labour and the importance of education as the best means for a better future for the children Bye-laws and Ordnances should be put in place from village to district level against child labour and enforced so as to bring into order the perpetrators of child labour Educational opportunities should be made available, accessible, affordable and relevant to the educational needs of the children Provide conducive learning environment for children both in school and at home. Parents should support the education of their children by proving the basic needs for effective learning of the child e.g. uniforms, scholastic materials, meals and medical care. Alternative appropriate technologies should be employed by parents/guardians in the production cycle so as to relieve them of the labour needs Financial discipline should be upheld by parents/guardians so as to plan effectively to use the money generated from their economic activities to plough back into the production cycle using paid adult labour force and or machinery instead of relying on child labour as a cheap source of labour Career guidance and counselling services should be provided by teachers and community leaders to enable children appreciate the value of education so as to pursue it until attaining what they desire.

COMMUNITY EMPOWERMENT FOR ELIMINATION OF CHILD LABOUR (COMEECA)

Chapter Two:

Childrens Rights
2.1 Session One: What are childrens Rights
At the end of the session participants should be able to understand and appreciate the different rights of children Posters, flip charts, markers, masking tapes Objective: Materials: Time: 50min Methods: How to conduct the Session: References Brainstorming, lecture method Step 1: Ask participants what childrens rights are? (10min) Step 2: Take participants through the childrens rights (30min) Step 3: Evaluation (10min)

TRAINERS NOTES FOR SESSION ONE


Childrens rights
Children have a right to legally registered name and nationality and also to know as far as possible to be cared for by their parents, caregivers and government Children have a right to be protected from conflict, cruelty, exploitation and neglect and a responsibility not to bully or harm each other. Children have a right to a clean environment and an obligation to do what they can to look after their environment Children have a right to education and an obligation to learn as much as their capabilities allow and where possible share their knowledge and experiences with others Children have the right to freedom of opinion, thought, conscience and religion and an obligation to respect others thoughts, opinions and religious principles Children have a right to get and share accurate information so long as this information is not damaging to them and others and obligation to share accurate and useful information Children have the right to meet together and join groups or organizations and obligation to ensure that in those groups they are not stopping others from enjoying their rights

COMMUNITY EMPOWERMENT FOR ELIMINATION OF CHILD LABOUR (COMEECA)


Children have a right to privacy and the law should protect them from attacks on their way of life, their families and homes and have obligation to respect other peoples privacy Children have a right to quality medical care and to take care of themselves Children have a right to be fed and obligation not to waste food Children have a right to clothing and shelter and obligation to keep them clean In addition to the childrens rights, parents and caregivers have responsibilities towards achievement of the rights of the children and these include the following: 2.2 Take maximum care and provide security to the child Listen to the childrens views on issues that concern the family Ensure the child has a name and clearly understands his/her cultural identity Protect the child from hazardous work Ensure the child attends and completes education Protect the child from any form of exploitation Session Two: Childrens Responsibilities and Obligations
Participants should be able to identify and differentiate between the responsibilities and obligations of children Posters, flip charts, markers, masking tapes

Objective: Materials: Time: 50min Methods: How to conduct the Session: References

Brainstorming, lecture method Step 1: Ask participants what they understand by childrens responsibilities and obligations (10min) Step 2: Take the participants through the responsibilities and obligations (30min) Step 3: evaluation (10min) Community education manual

TRAINERS NOTES FOR SESSION TWO


While children are entitled to their rights, they have responsibilities and obligation to perform in order to enjoy their rights. These include some of the following: Going to school and attending classes regularly Keeping a clean environment both at home and in school Contributing to the family welfare Advocate for better learning environment Abide by the laws and regulations governing smooth learning Appreciate the contribution of parents/guardians and other stakeholders in enhancing their learning Observe their fundamental rights for their enjoyment

COMMUNITY EMPOWERMENT FOR ELIMINATION OF CHILD LABOUR (COMEECA)

2.3 Session Three: How to handle Children with deviant behaviour


Objective: Materials: Time: 60min Methods: Brainstorming, case story Step 1: Ask participants what they understand by children with deviant behaviour (10min) Step 2: let a volunteer narrate a story of a child with deviant behaviour in his/her village (10min) Step 3: Participants give responses on how to handle the child in the case story (20min) Step 4: Take the participants through the steps that can be used to handle children with deviant behaviour (15min) Step 5: Evaluation (5min) Community education manual At the end of the session participants should be able to understand the deviant behaviour in children and how to appropriately handle them Flip charts, markers, masking tapes

How to conduct the Session:

References

TRAINERS NOTES FOR SESSION THREE

Deviant behaviour is a situation where one does not follow the normal accepted norms of a society. There are children who often respond negatively to a cause that needs positive response. Such children are termed as having deviant behaviour. Notable examples are children who refuse to go to school despite the fact that their parents/guardians are willing to support their education fully. It is important to understand the unique behaviour before handling such children. The following are some of the steps to take when handling such children with deviant behaviour. 1. Assess the childs interest in various fields (the child might be good in co-curricular activities than academics) The child might be more interested in practical work than theoretical work in class. The school environment might not be conducive for the child (teachers might be harsh, pressure from peers etc) The child might be extremely bright and thinks the school environment is wasting his/her time The child might be influenced by wrong peer groups The home environment might not be conducive for learning and the child feels out of home 2. Provide career guidance and counselling for the children Ensure that you establish friendship with the child Show the child that you are more interested in sharing his/her problem Show the child that you are more than willing to give a helping hand to address the problem Show the child the different career options and the paths to take to achieve the preferred career

COMMUNITY EMPOWERMENT FOR ELIMINATION OF CHILD LABOUR (COMEECA)

Identify other people the child is easily associated with to help guide the child in the right course Encourage the child to tell you what his/her interests are and guide the child tactfully to achieve that with a positive attitude Work together and develop a course of action for the child to take to fulfil the future dream Provide guidance and counselling to the parents/guardians on how to handle the child having got the areas of interest and a course of action to take to ensure the child pursues the career of interest At school level, the school administration should assign a staff who will monitor and guide the child to achieve the educational plan agreed upon

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COMMUNITY EMPOWERMENT FOR ELIMINATION OF CHILD LABOUR (COMEECA)

Chapter Three:

Child Protection
3.1 Session One: Legal and policy Framework

Objective: Materials: Time: 60min Methods:

At the end of the session, participants should be able to become aware of the existing legal and policy frameworks that protect children rights Posters, flip charts, markers, masking tapes

Brainstorming, lecture method Step 1: Ask participants to mention local examples of laws that protect children (10min) Step 2: Take the participants through the legal instruments and policy framework on child protection (40min) Step 3: Evaluation (10min) Community education manual

How to conduct the Session:

References

TRAINERS NOTES FOR SESSION ONE

There are several child related instruments. Key among them are: 1. At International level The United Nations Convention on the right of the child The ILO convention 138 on the minimum age of admission of employment. (This puts 15 years as the minimum age of admission while it recommends 14 years for developing countries Uganda inclusive) The ILO convention 182 on the worst forms of child labour prohibits the use of children in worst forms of child labour The optional protocol for the United Nations Convention on the Right of Children (UNCRC) on the sale of children, child prostitution and trafficking. 2. At regional level The African Charter on the on the rights and welfare of the child.

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COMMUNITY EMPOWERMENT FOR ELIMINATION OF CHILD LABOUR (COMEECA)

3. At national level The Constitution of the Republic of Uganda (1995 as amended in 2005) The Childrens Act 2000 Chapter 59 The Employment Act 2006 The National Orphans and other Vulnerable Childrens Policy 2004 The national Child Labour Policy 2006

3.2 Session Two: Institutional Framework


Objective: Materials: Time: 60min Methods: Brainstorming, open discussion Step 1: Ask participants where child labour issues can be addressed in their communities (10min) Step 2: Discuss with the participants the available institutions that can help address child labour following a ladder approach (40min) Step 3: Conclusion (10min) Community education manual At the end of the session participants should be able to become aware of various institutions that provide child protection services Flip charts, markers, masking tapes

How to conduct the Session:

References

TRAINERS NOTES FOR SESSION TWO


There are a number of institutions recognized culturally and by the Constitution of the Republic of Uganda where issues of child labour can be addressed. Below are some of the institutions that can be used to address the problems of child labour in the community. The family: This is the lowest unit of administration in society. Families have unwritten rules and regulations that can either result into promotion of child labour or to address the problem of child labour. Where the family fails to address child labour, the close relatives and council of elders can be a good source of arbitration. Cultural and religious institutions: These can provide a neutral ground for arbitration, guidance and counselling to address the problem of child labour. Local Councils; these ranges from village to Sub-County level: The Vice Chairperson is also the Secretary for Children Affairs hence the issue of child labour falls within this office. Cases of child labour can be reported to the LC I and where it is impossible to settle can be referred to LC II and later LC III for redress. At Sub-County level, the Community Development Officers are the technical wing where child labour issues can be handled.

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COMMUNITY EMPOWERMENT FOR ELIMINATION OF CHILD LABOUR (COMEECA)

At district level, the probation office and that of the district Labour Office also handle matters of child labour including follow-up and possible prosecution of perpetrators of child labour. The Police are also another institution that can handle child labour cases especially the office of the Community Liaison Officer and Child Welfare and Family Protection Unit. They can follow cases, arrest suspects and produce to court for prosecution. The Magistrate Court: This institution is charged with administration of law and Order and hence responsible for either releasing suspects when proved innocent or sentencing them to jail if found guilty. Note: It would be important if bye-laws are made at village and Sub-County levels against child labour giving the specific environmental factors in that village an a Sub-County so that there is speedy administration of justice against perpetrators of child labour as the other established institutions intervention is sought after the issue can no longer be handled at lower levels. The Village Child Labour Committees and other community workers addressing child labour issues in the community should find this useful for taking actions.

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COMMUNITY EMPOWERMENT FOR ELIMINATION OF CHILD LABOUR (COMEECA)

Chapter Four:

Stakeholders
4.0 Session One: Who are the main stakeholders in the elimination of child labour
Objective: Materials: Time: 50min Methods: Brainstorming, group discussion Step 1: Ask participants to define a stakeholder (5min) Step 2: Divide the participants into groups and let each group list the key stakeholders in the elimination of child labour in society (15min) Step 3: Group presentations (20min) Step 4: Evaluation (10min) Community education manual At the end of the session participants should be able to identify the main stakeholders involved in elimination of child labour Posters, flip charts, markers, masking tapes, cards

How to conduct the Session:

References

TRAINERS NOTES FOR SESSION ONE


A stakeholder is a person or institution that has vested interest in what the other person or party is doing in such a way that they can influence or affect what the person is doing either positively or negatively. This therefore calls for serious action to understand the kind of influence stakeholders have on an action or intervention. Key stakeholders in the elimination of child labour Children Parents/guardians Teachers Village Child Labour Committees Tobacco Companies

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COMMUNITY EMPOWERMENT FOR ELIMINATION OF CHILD LABOUR (COMEECA)


Media Houses Local Councils Local Governments Police Religious/cultural leaders Civil society organizations

4.1 Session Two: The roles of different stakeholders in the elimination of child labour
Objective: Materials: Time: 90min Methods: Group discussion Step 1: Form participants into groups (5min) Step 2: Assign a few stakeholders per group and let them give their roles in the elimination of child labour (30min) Step 3: Group presentations (30min) Step 4: Discussion of group presentation (25min) Step 5: Conclusion (10min) Community education manual At the end of the session participants should be able to identify the roles key stakeholders can play in the elimination of child labour Flip charts, markers, masking tapes, cards

How to conduct the Session:

References

TRAINERS NOTES FOR SESSION TWO


Roles and responsibilities of key stakeholders 1. CHILDREN Report cases of child abuse to local councils Encourage fellow children to attend school Enrol in school and remain until completion or the education cycle Conduct sensitization on the dangers of child labour and importance of education through childrens clubs Exert peer pressure on children engaged in child labour to come out of child labour. Exert peer pressure on parents to allow children engaged in child labour to be released to go back to school Exert pressure on parents and guardians to provide scholastic materials for children to make learning effective

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COMMUNITY EMPOWERMENT FOR ELIMINATION OF CHILD LABOUR (COMEECA)

2.

PARENTS/GUARDIANS Report children who do not want to go to school to local authorities Ensure that children are sent to school and retained in school Provide scholastic materials and other essentials to enable the children to study effectively Encourage fellow parents/guardians to take their children to school Ensure that children are provided with care and basic needs Ensure that children are not engaged in child labour

3. TEACHERS Include child prevention activities in school co-curricular activities Monitor class attendance of children in school Provide guidance and counselling services to both children and parents/guardians Follow-up on children who miss out in school Provide a conducive learning environment so as to attract and retain children in school 4. VILLAGE CHILD LABOUR COMMITTEES Sensitize and educate communities on the dangers of child labour and the rights of children Identify and report incidences of child labour to local councils, Community Development Officers, labour officers and the Police for follow-up actions Encourage parents to send children to school Identify, withdraw and place children in schools Conduct home visits to guide and counsel both parents/guardians and children on the value of education as opposed to child labour Follow-up children to ensure that they are retained in school 5. TOBACCO COMPANIES Include child labour matters in farmer sensitization program Support communities to develop programs that are geared towards elimination of child labour and promote education of the children Set production policies and agreements that prohibit farmers to use child labour in tobacco growing 6. MEDIA HOUSES Act as whistle blowers and raise red flags on the incidences of child labour Create public awareness on the dangers of child labour and the value of education to children Monitor enforcement of laws concerning the prohibition of child labour Document incidences of child labour for dialogue with responsible bodies 7. LOCAL COUNCILS Sensitize the communities on child labour Follow-up cases of child labour Set bye-laws against child labour and enforce them Conduct clean up operations to mop out child labour in the community Conduct school monitoring visits to ensure that children are retained in school

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COMMUNITY EMPOWERMENT FOR ELIMINATION OF CHILD LABOUR (COMEECA)

8. LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Local governments range from the Sub-Counties to the District. All have key roles to play in the elimination of child labour and promotion of education Formulate bye-laws and Ordinances on child labour elimination Conduct sensitization on the dangers of child labour and the importance of education for the children Provide educational facilities for children to acquire knowledge and skills for prevention of child labour Follow-up cases of child labour with employers 9. THE POLICE Conduct community awareness on crime prevention through community Policing Receive cases of child labour and child abuse Follow-up cases of child labour and child abuse reported Arrest perpetuators of child labour/abuse and prosecute them 10. RELIGIOUS/CULTURAL LEADERS Speak out against child labour Mobilize the community to embrace education for their children for a better future Provide guidance and counselling services to children, parents/guardians and the general community so as to create a favourable environment for the education of the children Appeal to government for improved access to educational facilities for children and improving quality and relevancy of education for community development 11. CIVIL SOCIETY ORGANIZATIONS Create awareness on child labour and importance of education for children in promoting positive development Advocate and lobby for better reforms and educational services for the children Mobilize resources to address the problem of child labour and promote educational opportunities for children

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COMMUNITY EMPOWERMENT FOR ELIMINATION OF CHILD LABOUR (COMEECA)

This publication is produced by CODECA. The document has been produced with the financial assistance from ECLT Geneva. The contents of this document are the sole responsibility of CODECA, and can under no circumstances be regarded as reflecting the position of ECLT Geneva.

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P.O. Box 11279, Kampala-Uganda Plot 105, Ntinda - Nakawa Road Tel +256-414-268286 Fax: +256-414-501582 Email: info@codecauganda.org/ed@codecauganda.org

(CODECA)