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ENGINEERING NOTE. Connectivity to Allen-Bradley Controllers


by Eduardo Ballina

Connectivity to Allen-Bradley Controllers


This Engineering Note describes a number of available communication strategies for Allen-Bradley controllers.

Start here if you have never integrated PLCcontrol with the FactorySuite, or just want to quickly understand connectivity options. The following communication options are discussed:

Wonderware Products
For serial communications: AB Serial I/O Server For DH, DH+ and DH485 communications: AB 1784-KT I/O Server SST 5136-SD I/O Server ABDHPlus DAServer For Ethernet communications: ControlLogix Gateway I/O Server ABCIP DAServer AB Ethernet Direct I/O Server ABTCP DAServer

3rd Party
INGEAR OPC DA Server for AllenBradley

OEM
Rockwell Automation RSLinx

What Interfaces are Available?


From stand-alone lab benches to highly complex distributed applications, all human machine interfaces (HMI) require some sort of data protocol translator and communication manager in order to connect to real-world data devices and fieldbuses. Wonderware provides both 32 bit I/O Servers and our new DAServers, which are dedicated software applications that provide the appropriate

foreign protocol translation service into FastDDE and SuiteLink, the native protocols for the FactorySuite, (and in the case of DAServers also into OPC DA). I/O Servers and DAServers also manage (i.e., optimize) the communications between plant floor devices or industrial networks and MS Windows-based applications. Additionally, a number I/O Servers and OPC Servers are available from third party companies. Most DAServers and I/O Servers can be configured to regularly poll PLCs for the most up-

Connectivity to Allen-Bradley Controllers

to-date sensor value (known as request/response data acquisition), or wait for the PLC to push data only when the sensor value changes (known as the unsolicited data acquisition). The size and complexity of the system greatly determines where the DAServer or I/O Server should be installed. On small systems, the I/O Server or DAServer and the client application(s) typically run on a single computer. Larger systems often employ distributed computing to increase reliability and performance.

FactorySuite Communication Protocols


Wonderware FactorySuite components support a number of communication protocols. Protocols provide a set of rules and standards for enabling software applications to connect and exchange data locally or over a network. Each one has been developed for a specific reason or technology, and certainly the greatest impact on network performance will depend on which protocol you choose. Dynamic Data Exchange (DDE) is a communication protocol developed by Microsoft to allow applications in the Windows environment to send/receive data and instructions to/from each other. It implements a client-server relationship between two concurrently running applications. The server application provides the data and accepts requests from any other application interested in its data. Requesting applications are called clients. Some applications such as InTouch and Microsoft Excel can simultaneously be both a client and a server. Note DDE will provide the best performance when the client and server applications reside on the same computer. FastDDE v3.0 is an optimized version of the standard Microsoft Dynamic Data Exchange protocol allowing faster access to those FactorySuite client applications written to send/receive data and instructions to/from each other. It also adds a Value Time Quality (VTQ) indicator on all data values delivered to VTQ-aware clients. NetDDE extends the standard Windows DDE functionality to include communication over local area networks and through serial ports. Network extensions are available to allow DDE links between applications running on different computers connected via networks or modems. For example, NetDDE supports DDE between applications running on IBM PCs connected via LAN or modem and DDE-aware applications running on non-PC based platforms under operating environments such as VMS and UNIX.

What are DAServers?


The latest addition to the Wonderware Device Integration software product family - DAServers (Data Access Servers) are designed to provide simultaneous connectivity between plant floor devices and modern DDE, SuiteLink, and/or OPCbased client applications running under MSWindows 2000 / XP. DAServers support the OPC Data Access 2.05 specification with additional features beyond the standard, including powerful diagnostics and remote configuration capabilities. DAServers are the perfect complement to our new generation FactorySuite A, which has native OPC client functionality. Of course, as it is our tradition, DAServers and FactorySuite A continue to support SuiteLink and FastDDE, the Wonderware original client communication protocols, as well as DDE to allow users to share data between different applications running in a Windows environment.

What are I/O Servers?


I/O Servers are dedicated software applications that provide the appropriate foreign protocol translation service into one of the native protocols for the FactorySuite (SuiteLink and FastDDE) and also manage (i.e., optimize) the communications between factory floor devices or industrial networks and MS Windows-based applications.

Connectivity to Allen-Bradley Controllers

Note NetDDE should only be used for legacy support. SuiteLink and OPC protocols provide far greater performance and robustness capabilities. SuiteLink is Wonderwares standard communication protocol. Wonderware SuiteLink uses a TCP/IP based protocol. SuiteLink is designed specifically to meet industrial needs, such as data integrity, high-throughput, and easier diagnostics. This protocol standard is only supported on Microsoft Windows NT 4.0, Windows 2000 and Windows XP Professional. SuiteLink was designed specifically for high speed industrial applications and provides the following features: Value Time Quality (VTQ) places a timestamp and quality indicator on all data values delivered to VTQ-aware clients. Extensive diagnostics of the data throughput, the server loading, computer resource consumption, and network transport are made accessible through the Microsoft Windows NT operating system performance monitor. This feature is critical for the scheme and maintenance of distributed industrial networks. Consistent high data volumes can be maintained between applications regardless if the applications are on a single node or distributed over a large node count. The network transport protocol is TCP/IP using Microsofts standard WinSock interface. OLE for Process Control (OPC) is a standard set of interfaces, properties, and methods that extend Microsofts OLE and COM technologies for use in process control applications. The implementation of the OPC DA Specification for the FactorySuite comprises the following components: Wonderware OPCLink I/O Server, which is a DDE/FastDDE/SuiteLink to OPC gateway for all DDE/SuiteLink Wonderware clients that need to communicate with an OPC Data Access Server. Wonderware OPC TagCreator, which is used from within InTouch WindowMaker to browse registered OPC Data Access Servers on the network and generate InTouch tags linked to OPC items. Wonderware DAServers, which are native OPC DA v2.05 servers and also are SuiteLink/DDE

servers compatible with all Wonderware DDE/SuiteLink clients, FactorySuite A clients and OPC Clients. ArchestrA Application Server OPC Client, ArchestrAs native OPC Device Integration Object for connectivity to OPC DA Servers. Note When defining an InTouch I/O Address, OPCLink requires a special syntax for the Item Name. Each item name must be prefixed with a d, r, i, or m to indicate a discrete, real, integer, or message value, respectively. For more information on using and setting up any of these protocols, see your FactorySuite Administrators Guide.

Choosing the Right Server

There are many servers on the market. Deciding which server to use comes down to the one that best answers the following questions: 1. Can the server communicate with the controller? 2. Is the server scalable for my application? 3. Does the server provide simultaneous connectivity via multiple network protocols?

Connectivity to Allen-Bradley Controllers

4. Does the server include additional features important to me? Once a controller and factory floor network is chosen, use the tables included at the end of this note to identify supported servers. Remember some protocols require special network interface cards (for example, a 1784-KT card for DH+). Another important qualification is if the server provides the desired scalability. What does scalability mean? Scalability refers to the ability of the server to handle the required polling rate(s), the maximum number of connections, and ease-ofuse. It also addresses the level of openness if you want to use OPC or connectivity to other systems and protocols. A scalable architecture provides an effective means of managing your factory floor network to meet the changing needs of your operation. Some servers provide features beyond simple Topic definitions and connectivity. You may want a simulation mode, data monitoring or Tagname browsing capability. Added features usually mean added costs, so be sure to carefully plan your system and identify the needs early in the design cycle. The best approach may be a combination of several servers. For example, the architecture below shows a feature-rich and cost effective solution. As shown below, the Engineering Desk has the ABCIP DAServer installed to provide direct communications to a ControlLogix system. The DASABCIP DAServer does not require RSLinx as middleware to communicate with ControlLogix PLCs. Additionally, this computer hosts the DAServer Manager, which allows remote monitoring and diagnostics for all DAServers on the network.

Out on the plant floor, where only connectivity is required, the ABDHPlus DAServer can be used for DH+ connectivity to the PLC5 controller.

Choosing the Right Data Polling Rate


Wonderware servers are based on the concept of polling a hardware device for information. This polling is driven by a need, which is expressed in the form of requests from one or more clients. Once a particular piece of information has been requested by a client, the server formulates its own request and sends that request to the hardware device. The server then waits for a response to its request. Once the information has been received, the server passes that information back to the client, and repeats the process until all clients have ceased requesting information. The rate at which the server will poll a particular device for a specific piece of information is configured in the Topic definition (also called a Device Group definition in the case of a DAServer) using a parameter called the Update Interval. When setting this parameter, there is always a trade-off between the update speed of the topic and system responsiveness. Since you more than likely want very fast response, the temptation is to set the Update Interval to a value close to 20 milliseconds, which is the fastest data-polling rate for Wonderware I/O servers. However, if every point is polled at this rate, the entire system will most likely suffer due to

Connectivity to Allen-Bradley Controllers

slow response time. Therefore, you should set the Update Interval to a value that makes sense according to the nature of the tags in the topic. Reasonable values for operator displays are between 300 to 1200 ms. This allows time for the value to be read from the PLC, transferred to the I/O Server or DAServer, copied to the HMI workstation and refresh the monitor screen. The best approach is to create multiple topics for each device, setting the Update Interval to different values, and then assign different items to different topics depending how quickly the values change, and how quickly you want to see an update of those changes. For example, points that indicate an alarm condition certainly should be polled more frequently then less-important measurements. Safety, human ergonomics and business drivers are all part of the equation when determining appropriate Update Intervals. Alternatively, you can rely on the PLC to inform the server when a critical event has occurred. This approach is called Unsolicited Messaging. Unsolicited Messaging is a programming technique (i.e., using the MSG or PLC-5 Typed Write commands in ladder logic) that generates a reply message to a poll that never occurred. In other words, it can answer the I/O servers question before the server has chance to ask it. Unsolicited Messaging should be restricted to monitoring points that are important, but change very infrequently, such as alarm bits or batch completion states. In the case of alarms, you may require very fast updates when they do change, as due to the nature of the tags you may want to be immediately notified of the change but realistically you may only see them change once a day or week, at best. Because you do not know when this may happen, you may be inclined to set the Update Interval to some small value, approaching 0 milliseconds, which may impact overall system performance. It is recommended that a separate topic be created to group tags used for unsolicited messages.

Sample Architectures
The following architectures demonstrate popular ways to integrate Allen-Bradley controllers with the FactorySuite, namely: Serial communications via: the Wonderware AB Serial I/O Server. DH, DH+ and DH485 communications via: the Wonderware AB1784-KT I/O Server. the Wonderware SST 5136-SD I/O Server. the Wonderware ABDHPlus DAServer. Ethernet communications via: the Wonderware AB Ethernet Direct I/O Server. the Wonderware ABTCP DAServer. the Wonderware ControlLogix I/O Server. the Wonderware ABCIP DAServer Communications via: the InGearTM OPC server Rockwells RSLinxTM Refer to these samples to help choose the best approach for your application. If your application is not represented here, please ask your local Wonderware Distributor for additional connectivity options.

Connectivity to Allen-Bradley Controllers

Serial communications via the Wonderware AB Serial I/O Server. (ABKF2)


(RS-232 connection to a communications interface such as a 1770-KF2, 1770-KF3, 1747-KE, 1785-KE, 1771-KE/KF, 1771-KG, or 5130-RM)

The Wonderware Allen Bradley 1784-KT I/O Server has been a popular choice for many years. It allows FactorySuite and other MS Windows application programs access to data in selected PLCs attached to the DH+, DH, and DH485 networks. The server requires the use of an AllenBradley 1784-KT, 1784-KTX, 1784-KTXD, 1784-PKTx, or 1784-PKTxD card to communicate with the DH+ (Data Highway Plus) network. The server can access data in PLC-2, PLC-3, PLC-5, PLC-5/250, and SLC 500 either directly or indirectly (depending on the PLC type) through the Data Highway Plus network.

The Wonderware Allen-Bradley Serial I/O Server is a Microsoft Windows application program that acts as a communication protocol server. It allows other MS-Windows application programs access to data from certain Allen-Bradley PLCs either directly or indirectly (using the Data Highway, Data Highway Plus or DH485 with the appropriate Allen-Bradley communications interfaces.

DH+ Communications via the Wonderware SST 5136-SD I/O Server (PLC-2, PLC-3, PLC-5, PLC-5/250 and SLC 500)

DH+ Communications via the Wonderware AB 1784-KT I/O Server (PLC-2, PLC-3, PLC-5, PLC-5/250 and SLC 500)
The Wonderware SST 5136-SD I/O Server allows FactorySuite and other Windows application programs access to data in PLCs attached to the Data Highway Plus (DH or DH+) networks. The server requires the use of a SST 5136-SD card. The server can access data in PLC-2, PLC-3, PLC-5, PLC5/250 and SLC-500 PLCs through the Data Highway/Plus (DH or DH+) networks.

Connectivity to Allen-Bradley Controllers

NEW! DH+ Communications via the Wonderware ABDHPlus DAServer (DASABDHPLus)


(SLC 5/0x, PLC-5/x)

Wonderware Allen-Bradley Ethernet Direct I/O Server is a great choice. It allows the FactorySuite and other MS-Windows applications access to data from certain PLCs attached to an Ethernet network running the Allen-Bradley Client Server (CSP) Protocol.

NEW! Ethernet Communications (ABTCP DAServer) (PLC-5/x E, SLC-5/05)

The new Wonderware Allen Bradley ABDHPlus DAServer provides FactorySuite, OPC clients and other MS-Windows application direct and indirect connectivity to the Allen-Bradley families of PLC-5 and SLC-500 controllers attached to a Data Highway Plus network directly or through the corresponding bridge module. If you are leveraging Ethernet as your communications process medium and only have PLC-5/xE and/or SLC 5/05 controllers, the Wonderware Allen-Bradley DASABTCP DAServer is a great choice. It allows the FactorySuite, OPC clients and other MS-Windows applications access to data from certain PLCs attached to an Ethernet network running the Allen-Bradley Client Server (CSP) Protocol.

Ethernet Communications (CSP) via the Ethernet Direct I/O Server. (PLC-5/x E, SLC-5/05)

If you are leveraging Ethernet as your communications process medium and only have PLC-5/xE and/or SLC 5/05 controllers, the

Connectivity to Allen-Bradley Controllers

Ethernet Communications (CIP) via ControlLogix Gateway I/O Server

If you are leveraging Ethernet as your communications process medium and need connection to a ControlLogix Gateway or 5000 Controller, the Wonderware Allen-Bradley ControlLogix I/O Server is a great choice. It allows the FactorySuite and other MS-Windows applications access to data from certain PLCs

applications access to data from certain PLCs attached to an Ethernet network running the new Allen-Bradley Control and Information (CIP) protocol. Note ControlLogix Native Tag addressing not supported in this server.

NEW! Ethernet Communications (CIP) via the ABCIP DAServer

If you are leveraging Ethernet as your communications process medium and need connection to a ControlLogix 5000 Controller, the Wonderware Allen-Bradley ControlLogix DA Server is a great choice. It allows the FactorySuite, OPC clients and other MS-Windows applications access to data from certain PLCs attached to an

Ethernet network running the new Allen-Bradley Control and Information (CIP) protocol using ControlLogix native addressing. Note PLC5 emulation is not supported by the ABCIP DAServer. ControlLogix native tag addressing is.

Connectivity to Allen-Bradley Controllers

Rockwell Automation's RSLinx OEM/Professional (ControlLogix, PLC-5, SLC-5, or MicroLogix)

Note When interfacing Wonderware products with RSLinx via OPCLink, there are several simple things you can do to dramatically improve performance: 1. Confirm you are using the most recent available released versions of RSLinx and OPCLink. 2. Use a single instance of RSLinx to optimize communication packets. Multiple instances of Rslinx to a single ControlLogix processor will prevent the optimization routines to operate correctly. 3. Group tags into topics of similar polling rate requirements. See Choosing the Right Data Polling Rate. 4. Leverage register addressing in blocks for the PLC ladder-logic to minimize the number of packets needed to be transmitted. 5. If you notice slow data updates when switching windows, use the Rockwell OPC Client Tool to put the tags on continuous scan and to avoid occasional read/write errors. For additional strategies and recommendations, refer to the RSLinx 2.1 Service Pack Notes: ControlLogix Optimization document available from Rockwell Software. http://www.software.rockwell.com/download/ comms/rslinx/clx_perf.zip For more information regarding RSLinx, refer to the Rockwell Automation website: http://www.software.rockwell.com/rslinx.

RSLinx, from Rockwell Automation, supports communication services for all Allen-Bradley controllers. Both the OEM and Professional versions provide DDE and OPC connectivity, which is required to use RSLinx as a "middleware" component for the FactorySuite. In small systems where the HMI and RSLinx run on the same computer, use DDE to transfer data. As your system expands and clients are distributed on the control network, install OPCLink on the same computer running RSLinx.

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Connectivity to Allen-Bradley Controllers

INGEAR OPC DA Server for Allen-Bradley (Any ControlLogix, PLC-5, SLC-5, or MicroLogix)

Controller vs Server Tables


To help you better visualize connectivity choices available for given Allen-Bradley controller families, the tables in this section provide a cross- reference listing of available servers vs. Allen-Bradley controller family. In order to simplify the tables in the following pages, we have used abbreviations which denote specific Wonderware Servers. In most cases, the abbreviation corresponds to the name of the executable associated with the server. The following table provides a key to these abbreviations. The left column lists the abbreviation used, the right column the corresponding server it represents. Abbreviation Wonderware Server AB1784KT ABKF2 ABCIP ABTCP SS5136SD WWRSLinx DASABCIP DASABTCP Allen-Bradley 1784KT I/O Server Allen-Bradley Serial I/O Server Allen-Bradley ControlLogix Gateway I/O Server Allen-Bradley Ethernet Direct I/O Server SST 5136-SD I/O Server Wonderware WWRSLinx I/O Server Allen-Bradley ABCIP DAServer Allen-Bradley ABTCP DAServer

The INGEAR OPC DA Server for AllenBradley is a Microsoft Windows application program that acts as a communication protocol server. It allows other MS-Windows application programs access to data from certain Allen-Bradley PLCs using the OPC Foundation protocol. INGEAR fully supports native tag addressing for ControlLogix and has excellent performance and management tools, including a Simulation Mode. INGEAR is a registered Wonderware Partner and additional information is available on the Wonderware website, or visit INGEAR directly at http://ww.ingear.cimquest.com/allen-br.htm.

DASABDHPLUS Allen-Bradley ABDHPlus DAServer

Note The Wonderware Allen-Bradley ControlLogix Gateway and WWRSLinx I/O Servers require the use of Rockwell's RSLinxTM as middleware.

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PLC-5 Processors
Number of Remote/Extended Local-I/O/DH+ Ports 1 DH+/Remote I/O (Adaptor Scan) 1 DH+/Remote I/O (Adaptor Scan) 2 DH+/Remote I/O (Adaptor Scan) 4 DH+/Remote I/O (Adaptor Scan) 2 DH+/Remote I/O (Adaptor Scan) 1 Extended Local I/O 4 DH+/Remote I/O (Adaptor Scan) 2 DH+/Remote I/O (Adaptor Scan) 1 Extended Local I/O 4 DH+/Remote I/O (Adaptor Scan) 1 DH+ 1 DH+/Remote I/O (Adaptor Scan) 4 DH+/Remote I/O (Adaptor Scan) 4 DH+/Remote I/O (Adaptor Scan) 1 Ethernet 1 DH+ 1 DH+/Remote I/O (Adaptor Scan) 1 Ethernet 2 DH+/Remote I/O (Adaptor Scan) 1 Ethernet 2 DH+/Remote I/O (Adaptor Scan) PLC-5/40E (1785-L40E) PLC-5/80E (1785-L80E) ABKF2, AB1784KT, SS5136SD, ABTCP ABKF2, AB1784KT, SS5136SD, ABTCP PLC-5/80 (1785-L80B) PLC-5/26 (1785-L26B) PLC-5/46 (1785-L46B) PLC-5/86 (1785-L86B) PLC-5/20E (1785-L20E) ABKF2, AB1784KT, SS5136SD ABKF2, AB1784KT, SS5136SD ABKF2, AB1784KT, SS5136SD ABKF2, AB1784KT, SS5136SD ABKF2, AB1784KT, SS5136SD, ABTCP PLC-5/60 (1785-L60B) PLC-5/60L (1785-L60L) ABKF2, AB1784KT, SS5136SD ABKF2, AB1784KT, SS5136SD Processor (Catalog No.) PLC-5/11 (1785-L11B) PLC-5/20 (1785-L20B) PLC-5/30 (1785-L30B) PLC-5/40 (1785-L40B) PLC-5/40L (1785-L20L) Wonderware I/O Server ABKF2, AB1784KT, SS5136SD ABKF2, AB1784KT, SS5136SD ABKF2, AB1784KT, SS5136SD ABKF2, AB1784KT, SS5136SD ABKF2, AB1784KT, SS5136SD Notes

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PLC-5 Processors (continued)


Number of Processor Remote/Extended (Catalog No.) Local-I/O/DH+ Ports 1 ControlNet (dual media) PLC-5/20C (1785-L20C15) 1 DH+ 1 DH+/Remote I/O (Adaptor Scan) 1 ControlNet (dual media) PLC-5/40C (1785-L40C15) 2 DH+/Remote I/O (Adaptor Scan) 1 ControlNet (dual media) PLC-5/80C (1785-L80C15) 2 DH+/Remote I/O (Adaptor Scan) 1 ControlNet (dual media) PLC-5/46C (1785-L46C15) 2 DH+/Remote I/O (Adaptor Scan) Wonderware I/O Server ABKF2, AB1784KT, SS5136SD, ABTCP, WWRSLinx ABKF2, AB1784KT, SS5136SD, ABTCP, WWRSlinx ABKF2, AB1784KT, SS5136SD, ABTCP, WWRSLinx ABKF2, AB1784KT, SS5136SD, ABTCP, WWRSLinx Notes

RSLinx + OPCLink

RSLinx + OPCLink

RSLinx + OPCLink

RSLinx + OPCLink

Connectivity to Allen-Bradley Controllers

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SLC 500 Processors


Number of Remote/Extended Local-I/O/DH+ Ports DH-4851 DH-48511 DH-4851 DH-4851 DH-4851 DH-485 DH-485 RS-2322 DH-485 RS-2322 DH+ RS-2323 DH+ RS-2323 DH+ RS-2323 Ethernet RS-2323 Ethernet RS-2323 Ethernet RS-2323 Processor (Catalog No.) SLC 500 (1747-L20) SLC 500 (1747-L30) SLC 500 (1747-L40) SLC 5/01 (1747-L511) SLC 5/01 (1747-L514) SLC 5/02 (1747-L524) SLC 5/03 (1747-L531) SLC 5/03 (1747-L532) SLC 5/04 (1747-L541) SLC 5/04 (1747-L542) SLC 5/04 (1747-L543) SLC 5/05 (1746-L551) SLC 5/05 (1746-L552) SLC 5/05 (1746-L553) Wonderware I/O Server ABKF2, DASABDHPlus ABKF2, DASABDHPlus ABKF2, DASABDHPlus ABKF2, DASABDHPlus ABKF2, DASABDHPlus ABKF2, DASABDHPlus ABKF2, DASABDHPlus ABKF2, DASABDHPlus ABKF2, AB1784KT, SS5136SD ABKF2, AB1784KT, SS5136SD, DASABDHPlus ABKF2, AB1784KT, SS5136SD, DASABDHPlus ABKF2, ABTCP, DASABTCP ABKF2, ABTCP, DASABTCP ABKF2, ABTCP, DASABTCP SLC-5/03 to connect to two DH-485 networks simultaneously. 3. SLC 5/04 and SLC 5/05 processors have an RS-232 port, which can also be configured for a DH-485 network. Notes

1. SLC 500 or SLC 5/01 processors can only receive messages and send reply messages to command messages sent from other nodes on the DH-485 network; it cannot initiate communication. 2. SLC 5/03 has an RS-232 port, which can also be configured for a DH-485 network, enabling the

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ControlLogix 5000 Processors


Number of Remote/Extended Local-I/O/DH+ Ports Ethernet/IP1 ControlNet DH+1 RS-232-C (DF1/DH-485 protocols) Ethernet/IP1 ControlNet DH+1 RS-232-C (DF1/DH-485 protocols)
1 1

Processor (Catalog No.) Logix5550

Wonderware I/O Server ABCIP, DASABCIP2,3

Notes

OPCLink+ RSLinx

DeviceNet I/O1

Logix5555

ABCIP, DASABCIP2,3

OPCLink+ RSLinx

DeviceNet I/O1

1. These are not on-board ports. They are available only thru communication interface modules. 2. In its first releases (v1.0 and v1.1) our ABCIP DAServer supports only direct connection to ControlLogix controllers using CIP over EtherNet/IP

communications. It does not support the use of the ControlLogix as gateway to sub-networks (/ControlNet, DeviceNet, DH+, etc.). This capability will be added to subsequent releases. 3. The ABCIP DAServer does not require RSLinx as middleware.

Connectivity to Allen-Bradley Controllers

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References
For more information, please refer to the User Guides, help files and release notes for the corresponding I/O Servers and/or DAServers. Additionally, the following Allen-Bradley related Tech Notes are available for download from our website, http://www.wonderware.com/Support/MMI/ technotes.htm.

Number 3 20 32 37 40 143 159 177 234 288 289

Title "Troubleshooting Wonderware Serial DDE Servers" "Troubleshooting Allen-Bradley Status Code (STS) Error Messages" "Troubleshooting Allen-Bradley Status Code (STS) Error Messages" "Configuring the AB1784KT DDE Server with the 1784-KTx card" "Configuring the ABTCP DDE Server on Windows NT 4.0" "Configuring the WWRSLinx I/O Server for the AB1784-KT communications card" "Configuring and using OPCLink with the RSLinx OPC server under Windows NT 4.0" "Configuring and using Emulation Mode with the ABCIP (ControlLogix) I/O Server" "Configuring the INGEAR Allen Bradley DA OPC Server, OPCLink, and OPC Tag Browser" "Configuring ABTCP DAServer to Communicate with AB PLC5 Using SuiteLink Protocol" "Configuring the AB1784KT I/O Server With the PKTX Card"

Contact Wonderware or your local Distributor for information about software products for industrial automation. Wonderware Corporation 26561 Rancho Parkway South, Lake Forest, CA 92630 Tel: (949) 727-3200 Fax: (949) 727-3270 www.wonderware.com

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