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Loyola House of Studies Ateneo de Manila University Loyola Heights 1108 Quezon City Tel. No.

(02) 426-6101 loc.3441 Telefax No. (02) 426-5968 Web:www.slb.ph

Rm. 301 Pius XII Catholic Center, 1175 United Nations Avenue Paco, Manila, 1007 Philippines Tel.Nos. (02) 521-5005/ 524-2855 Fax No. 528-0149 Email: parishpcrv@yahoo.com

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CONTENTS

Foreword Module 1: Engaged Citizenship Module 2: Empowerment Module 3: Towards 2016 Annex 1: National Situationer Annex 2: Church Social Teachings Annex 3: The CBCP on Elections Annex 4: The Automated Election System

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Welcome PINOY BIG VOTER. This voters education manual was made especially for you. Its not about size, your size . . . big or small, XL or XXL. Its about your importance, your power as a VOTER. Your power that is equal in value with that of the rich and the famous, with that of generals and presidents, also with that of the garbage collectors, even with that of the detainees. Its only during elections when you exercise your right and responsibility to vote that indeed you are PINOY BIG VOTER! Beholden to none but to your conscience, your country and your God. Parish Pastoral Council for Responsible Voting PPCRV and Simbahang Lingkod ng Bayan SLB have clasped hands, minds and hearts since 1991 when we heard loud and clear the call of PCP II: RESTORE ALL THINGS IN CHRIST. When you are asked to restore something, it could mean you have to give back what was taken away. Or you have to fix what was destroyed. What did we need to restore? Many things. But particular to our response to that call, we needed and still need to restore POLITICS in Christ. Then and now 21 years after, Politics the way it is lived and practiced in our country is a main obstacle to the development of the just life and of the just society which serves that life. Elections are a vital element in the restoration of Politics. We see It an imperative to make alive our PPCRV vision of CHAMP Clean Honest Accurate Meaningful Peaceful Elections as a first step towards such restoration. CHAMP for us is basically and ultimately CHRIST. He is the content of our voters education. All he stands for Truth, Life, Love, Justice, Compassion, Unity, Peace are what our country needs, what we as a people need, more particularly what PINOY BIG VOTER must become.

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PPCRV and SLB believe that the formation of conscience configured in Christ would be the moral force to enable the voter to see beyond personality, popularity and money when choosing candidates worthy of her/his ballot. We also realized through all these years that honing the skills of the voter to see, judge, act on issues closer to home will provoke her/his consciousness to critique the national issues that cause, affect and impact these issues. Our exposure to giving voters education validates a number of interesting things about the Pinoy Big Voter. About Pinoys in general. That to educate effectively calls for inserting an ounce of entertainment. Perhaps because the Filipinos are basically a happy people who drown their sorrows in laughter, whose smiles in the midst of poverty and pain are sustained by frolic and fun. We offer all these in our PINOY BIG VOTER education manual. Come to our training sessions to be announced by PPCRV and SLB. Become a trainer yourself. Discover the joy that what you teach you become. Pinoy Big Voter . . . the first of many many PINOY BIG VOTERS.

Ambassador Henrietta T. de Villa


PPCRV National Chairperson

10 Commandments for Responsible Voting


1. Vote according to the dictates of your conscience. 2. Respect the decision of others in choosing their candidates. 3. Seek to know the moral integrity, capabilities, and other personal qualities of the candidates you will vote for. 4. Strive to understand the issues, platform, and programs of candidates and parties campaigning for your vote. 5. Do not sell your vote. 6. Do not vote for candidates using guns, goons, gold, and glitter. 7. Do not vote for candidates tainted with graft and corruption. 8. Do not vote for candidates simply because of utang na loob, popularity, good looks, or pakikisama. 9. Do not vote for candidates living an immoral life. 10. Always put the welfare of the country as top priority in choosing the candidate you will vote for.

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MODULE 1

MODULE 1: ENGAGED CITIZENSHIP


OB JE C T I V E S At the end of the module, the participants must be able to: a. Understand that their situations become part of the basis of action for electoral engagement. b. Discuss the local situations in the locality and locate its relevance in the National picture. c. Appreciate the Philippine National and Local Situation. P R E L I M I NA RY A CT IV IT IE S Registration of Participants Singing of the Philippine National Anthem Leveling-off Participants shall be asked to inform the body and the facilitators of their expectations from: (1) themselves, (2) fellow-participants, (3) facilitators, (4) and the Voters Education run itself.

ENGAGED CITIZENSHIP GU I D ED CONT E MP LA T ION 1. The Facilitator shall invite all the participants to silence and reflection. (Note: This process is best done if the participants eyes are closed.)
Prayer

Lord, in the midst of our troubles and problems in life, In the midst of our upcoming polls and potential changes In the leadership of our country, We pray that we may be able to see your will, And be able to respond to your call of being of service to others. Grant us the grace To be open to receive the mandate you have entrusted us, To be strong to do what is right, And be steadfast to follow you without second thoughts.

(Before ending the prayer, the facilitator shall insert the following questions within the prayer.) a. How would you describe your personal feelings towards yourself? (Pauses for 15 seconds) b. How would you describe your personal feelings towards your family? (Pauses for 15 seconds) c. How would you describe your personal feelings towards your community? (Pauses for 15 seconds) d. How would you describe your personal feelings towards your country? (Pause for 15 seconds)
May we feel the promptings of the Holy Spirit, That would guide and show us the way to find your most holy Will in the situations and realities which underlie our self, our family, Our community and our nation as a whole. Amen.

MODULE 1

2. After the contemplation, the facilitator shall recall in plenary the questions he/she gave during the guided contemplation and solicits responses from the participants. 3. The Facilitator shall synthesize the responses from the participants. He then introduces the module by saying: After we have reflected on our personal situation with regards the self, family, community, and country, let us now try to see what the experts have to say about the situation of our country as a whole. 4. The Facilitator shall introduce the inputs.

INPUTS I PROCESSING ACTIVITY

II NATIONAL SITUATIONER
For further details, please refer to Annex 1 on p. 31

NOTE:

The Philippine National Situation shall be introduced through a processing activity. (see figure 1)

ENGAGED CITIZENSHIP P R OC E S S ING A CT IV IT Y How many squares are there in the picture?

figure 1

MECHANICS

A 4x4 square shall be flashed/displayed before the participants. Based on the 4x4 square, the participants shall be asked to identify how many, squares there are in totality. It is the duty of the facilitator to link the relevance of the game as a simple parallel in understanding the interconnectedness of participants local situations to the Philippine National Situation.

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MODULE 1

OUR PHILIPPINES: NATIONAL SITUATIONER Outline: 1. 2. 3. 4. Social Economic Political Environmental

S OC I ET Y On Poverty:
Family self-rating as Mahirap/Poor (SWS, July 2012) 51% or 10.3 M families (2Q 2012)

On Education (UNDP, May 2009):


65/100 complete elementary (6 years); 58/65 go on to high school; 42/58 graduate 4 years later Educational Reform: K-12, Enhanced Basic Education Act of 2012

On Health:

Healthcare professionals: Rising number of jobless nurses Unemployed (expected): 298,000 (Manila Bulletin, 2012) Nurse-to-Patient Ratio per hospital per shift in the Philippines
Ideal: 1:4 vs Reality: 1:40-50

(Source: inquirer.net)

ENGAGED CITIZENSHIP E C ON OM I C
Different bodies have a positive outlook on the countrys upcoming economic performance for year 2012 and beyond: World Bank: 5% possible growth in 2013 Institute for Development Studies: 5.6% GDP growth for 2012. GDP grew by 6.4 percent in the first quarter of 2012 (NSCB) Why this Outlook? There seems to be An improving backdrop from rebounding exports and manufacturing output at the start of the year alongside reports of an easing jobless rate and OFW remittances back to familiar growth OFW remittances fell back to within trend growth of 5.4% in January. Employment: (Source: census.gov.ph) Rate/Year Labor Force Participation Employment Unemployment Underemployment 2011 63.7% 92.6% 7.4% 19.4% 2012 64.3% 92.8% 7.2% 18.8%

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MODULE 1 Investment:
Internationally recognized as a prospect investment area Bloomberg (Source: topics.bloomberg.com/philippines/): Increased Investors confidence on Philippine market Philippine Economy growing at a rapid rate that may even overtake Chinas growth

Investment commitments from foreign investors surged 249% in February this year to P3.22 billion from only P924 million during the same month last year (business.inquirer. net) Taxation:
Current administration promotes more efficient and effective tax collection for higher budget allocating. Tax collection as of July 2012: P604.68 billion (13.7% higher than 2011 but missed the administrations target by 4%

P OL I T I C S The 2013 elections: a prelude to the 2016 Presidential elections.


Political analysts said it will take at least three (3) consecutive reform-oriented Presidents to effect and implement needed reforms for the country. Different politicians are already consolidating their ranks in preparation for the 2013 elections. What happens after Noynoys administration? The questions Who will replace Noynoy? and Will reform be sustained by the next President? are of paramount concerns given the political analysts opinion that it will take at least three (3) consecutive reform oriented administrations to totally effect much anticipated and needed reforms in our country.

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ENGAGED CITIZENSHIP Constitutional Reform or Charter Change (Cha-cha) through the years
Fidel V. Ramos: first attempt through the Peoples Initiative Erap Estrada: CONCORD (Constitutional Correction for Development). Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo: Cha-cha became one of the priorities. President Noynoy Aquino: Reconsiderations in light of economic considerations (Mining among them) Agrarian Reform
Hacienda Luisita and the distribution of lands as a test case for CARPER

EN V I R O N ME NT
Ecosystems and Environment Stability: Marine Resources
Damage of Coral Reef Habitat due to Cyanide, Dynamite, Muro-Ami, and Small-Mesh Nets Fishing led to the inability of ecosystem to replenish marine creatures necessary in the sustenance of the island ecosystems human inhabitants. 11 out of 50 traditional Fishing Grounds already destroyed (Rio watch 2010). Recently Forest Cover improved, however Natural Forests continue to be denuded due to illegal cutting and conversion to other uses. Deforestation high number of natural incidents high number of flood incidents.

Forest

MODULE 1
Disaster:

3rd out of the top 10 countries with a 24.32% disaster risk (United Nations Disaster Risk Index ) Vulnerability heightens exposure and inherent susceptibility 20 typhoons/year (Almost 50% are considered destructive)

Waste Management: An average Filipino generates 0.3 and 0.5 kg (rural and urban areas, respectively) of solid waste daily Inadequacy of disposal activities open dumping sites Barangay: Materials Recovery Facility (MRF), segregation, and collection of biodegradable and recyclable waste City & Municipality: collection and disposal of residual non-biodegradable and hazardous waste (except in Metro Manila where disposal falls under the mandate of MMDA) Increasing population composing urban ecosystem increasing waste (2% increase rate per year with only 12% recycled and/or reused) Ecological Footprint: NCR* 4.6666 global hectares per person (gha/person) Highest: Quezon City with 1.2048 gha/person Living within sustainable limits: Mandaluyong with 0.4143 gha/person Highest consumption category: Food Top land-use component: Pasture and arable land 60% lived within citys resources, 70% had normal Body Mass Index (BMI)
(*Source: Serafico, M., Espinoza, M., Perlas, L., & Tanchoco, C. (June 2012). Ecological footprint of the National Capital Region Households: Bridging the Gap Between Nutrition and Environment. Philippine Journal of Science. Taguig City: Food and Nutrition Research Insitute, DOST.)

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ENGAGED CITIZENSHIP
Initiatives/Specific Laws: Philippine Agenda 21: Urban Development Ecological Solid Waste Management Act of 2000 (R.A. 9003) The Philippines is on track to adopt the Ecological Footprint at the national level. (www.footprintnetwork.org) Mining:
The issue on mining mainly encompasses three general areas of concern: Economic, Environment, and Social Justice. The Mining Act of 1995 (RA 7942) was a result of a slump in the mining industry in the 80s and 90s and the reputation of the Philippines as a difficult country for foreign investors. As a result of this and also due to pressure from international financial institutions, a liberalization of policies on mining was undertaken.
PERKS
Tax Breaks 100% Foreign Ownership Investment Guarantees

BOOS
Government discretion in mineral agreements Minimum tax payments ECCs procured by fraudulent representations Vitiated consent from affected communities

This led to a deterioration of the environment, a continuous crushing of the right of local communities especially the indigenous people, and minimizing economic benefits for the Philippines (if there is indeed any).
(Source: Tanada. (2010). HB6342:The Alternative Mining Bill, Making Responsible Mining a Reality)

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NOTES

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MODULE 2

MODULE 2: EMPOWERMENT
OB JE C T I V E S
At the end of the module, the participants must be able to: a. Know their rights and what to demand from their local leaders. b. Appreciate the importance of the Filipino Citizens right of suffrage. c. Understand the Churchs Social Teachings in relation to the concrete socio-political realities surrounding them.

THE LOCAL GOVERNMENT CODE OF 1991


The Local Government Code of 1991 specifies provisions for powers and responsibilities of our local leaders. It is essential for Filipinos to know what he/she can demand and expect from his/her elected local official.

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EMPOWERMENT

GE N E R A L P OINT S
The Local Government Code allows for the transfer of powers, responsibilities and resources from the national government to the local government units. (e.g. Basic services, and exercise of regulatory powers) Local Chief Executives such as: Governors, Mayors, and Barangay Captains has almost similar functions, differing only in scope of jurisdiction. The main function and duty of Councils (e.g. Sangguniang Barangay, Sangguniang Bayan, Sangguniang Panlungsod and Sangguniang Panlalawigan) is to create and pass ordinances. The Local Government Code contains provisions granting local officials powers and duties to perform certain roles, which each Filipino can demand. These powers and duties are as follows: a. Basic Services b. Economic Interventions c. Peoples Participation d. Natural Resources Management

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MODULE 2

Highlights of the Local Government Code that are useful to us, voters.
The Local Government Code transferred powers, responsibilities and resources from the National Government to the Local Government to improve basic services delivery to the people at the local level. We should expect that our Local Government Officials perform the following:

On Basic Services:
1. Ethical basic services delivery training for LGU personnel 2. Field health and hospital services (barangay health centers and medical services) 3. Social welfare (Conditional Cash Transfer, Livelihood programs etc.) 4. Community-based forestry 5. School building program 6. Tourism facilities 7. Projects on agricultural extension and on-site research 8. Public works funded by local fund (e.g. construction of DayCare centers, waiting sheds, multi-purpose halls.)

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EMPOWERMENT On the provincial and city-level


9. Telecommunication projects 10. Housing projects 11. Investment support On Economic Interventions: 1. Creation of Employment opportunities. 2. Attract investments and businesses (e.g. streamlining of business permits and licensing processes, identification of strategically located sites for businesses.) 3. Sustainable Development Strategies (creation of livelihood opportunities for constituents without damaging the environment.) 4. Funding of small and medium-scale livelihood projects 5. Credit financing for small and medium business enterprises 6. Creation of Income Generating Projects 7. Support in establishing cooperative programs 8. Efficient economic services delivery On Peoples Participation: 1. 2. 3. 4. Passage of Peoples Empowerment Ordinance (EO) Creation of Peoples Council through EO Crafting of Peoples Charter Initiative (a certain number of voters may propose a statute, constitutional amendment ordinance and compel its passage by popular vote) and Referendum (vote of yes or no casted by a citizen in either accepting or rejecting a particular proposal or policy.)

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MODULE 2

5. Recall (an accountability mechanism allowing for the removal of public officials through the vote of a particular percentage of registered voters.) 6. NGO-PO and sectoral participation in the following:
Local-special bodies Sectoral representation in local legislative bodies Barangay Participatory Planning and Budgeting Mandatory consultations on local and national budgets and projects

On Natural Resource Management:


1. Invite technical interventions of local, national and international environmental organizations and experts managing crucial or endangered resources. 2. Inter-LGU and NGO environmental cooperation (e.g. reforestation campaigns involving civic and non-governmental organizations.) 3. Consultative environmental policy-making with community and local sectors. (e.g. Technology of Participation (ToP) approach in extracting participation during the planning period.) 4. Create Natural Resource Management Council (NRMC) among community groups, NGO-POs, local government officials and line-agencies as local planners. 5. Community, NGO-PO, Government Agencies and LGU counterparting 6. Creation of ordinance allowing for the legitimization and budget allocation of the plans created by the NMRC.

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EMPOWERMENT Right of suffrage: YOUR HUMAN RIGHT THE RIGHT TO VOTE


It is an inalienable right. Everyone can exercise this right unless disqualified by law. It is one of the most critical and important ways that individuals can influence governmental decisionmaking. It is a tool and formal expression of preference for a candidate for office or for a proposed resolution of an issue.

PARTICIPATORY GOVERNANCE
Everyone has the right to take part in the government of his/her country, directly or through freely chosen representatives. Everyone has the right of equal access to public service in his/her country.
Article 21 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR, 1948.)

TRUE DEMOCRACY
The will of the people is the basis of the authority of the government. It underpins the transfer of mandate and legitimacy to a set of leaders by virtue of the peoples vote. This can be expressed in periodic and genuine elections that is universal, equal, and subject to voting procedures.

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MODULE 2

SO WHY VOTE? 1. Because the right to vote is a PRIVILEGE


By voting, one takes a stake in national interest and policies. It is an opportunity for one to be directly involved in the affairs of the nation

2. Because it is the ultimate SOCIAL EQUALIZER


One person, one vote. The Presidents one vote is as important as your one vote. Regardless of a persons religion, gender, educational attainment, social and economic status, your vote is as weighty as that of the other.

3. Because it is your RESPONSIBILITY


To the future Filipino generations. The future is shaped by what we do now. If we send incompetent and corrupt officials to lead us, it would mean societal and economic regress, which will also affect future generations. Your choice to exercise this right is a reflection of your discernment and the things we have learned in this Voters education manual.

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EMPOWERMENT The Right to Vote: Empowering the Seven (7) Vulnerable Sectors Who are the Seven (7) Vulnerable Sectors?
The 7 vulnerable sectors identified by the Commission on Human Rights are the different groups of people or segments of the Philippine Society found to be mostly disenfranchised due to different factors extant and exclusive to their respective sectors and loopholes in our countrys electoral system.

The Vulnerable Sectors are as follows:


1. Internally Displaced Persons or IDPs (estimated to be around 600, 000 individuals are displaced in 2008) 2. Indigenous People or IPs- approximately 14 million all over the Philippines. 3. Elderly- eight million as of recent count 4. First-Time Voters/Youth-11 million unregistered around 2009. 5. Persons with Disabilities- 1.23% of total Filipino population belong to this sector. 6. Detainees- 95% of detainee population are eligible to vote under existing legal mechanisms. 7. Overseas Absentee Voters- 8-13 million Filipinos scattered all over the world.

Why is there a need to enfranchise these vulnerable sectors?


1. The Right of Suffrage, regardless of conditions unless prescribed by law, is a universal right accorded to all. 2. The Right of Suffrage underpins the legitimacy of democratic rule for it is through this process that mandate is transferred from the governed to the governor. 3. In engendering genuine democracy, the electoral process must be as inclusive as possible. 4. In order to expand and include segments of society systemically and historically disenfranchised in our electoral processes, concerted efforts must be done to enfranchise these vulnerable sectors.

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MODULE 2

CATHOLIC SOCIAL TEACHINGS PERTAINING TO POLITICS 1. The Church has no identification with political community/ system. 2. The Church has no political ambitions. 3. The competence of the Church is religious and moral in nature. 4. Members are encouraged to take full responsibility as citizens of a given nation. 5. Authority has its source from God. 6. Political power is not absolute. 7. An authority is needed to put order in the political community. 8. Political authority must be exercised within the limits of the moral order. 9. The Churchs call to provide civic and political education.

(For a thorough discussion about the Catholic Social Teachings refer to Annex 2)

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EMPOWERMENT

P R OC E S S ING A CT IV IT Y Before proceeding to the Commitment Pledging, the facilitator shall synthesize the previous discussions and inputs through the BALLPEN ACTIVITY: Ballpen Activity MECHANICS
The facilitator shall ask for a participant from the audience to join him/her in front for a simple activity. The facilitator shall produce a ballpen and shall hold it up so everyone in the audience can see it. The facilitator shall face the volunteer participant and tell him/her that the ballpen is his/her possession. (Important: the facilitator should not give any hint or gesture that he/she is handing the pen to the participant). If the participant does not take the ballpen from the facilitator, the facilitator shall tell the participant repeatedly that the ballpen is his/hers. After several repetitions of telling the participant that the ballpen is his/hers, the facilitator shall ask the volunteer to sit down. The facilitator shall synthesize the activity.

Observe that no matter how many times the facilitator tells the participant that he/she is the owner of the ballpen, more often than not, the participant will not take the pen from the facilitators hands. This is despite multiple attempts by the facilitator to have the participant do so.

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MODULE 2

The facilitator shall synthesize the activity by explaining the following The same goes with everyones right of suffrage. It is an entitlement universally accorded to every individual qualified to exercise this right. However, despite being a universally accessible right, Filipino voters do not grab the opportunity to exercise this right and influence the political life of this country. One cannot enjoy ones right of suffrage without fully owning up to it and taking it as his/hers by registering and going out to actually vote. It is a right, responsibility, and privilege to get that ballpen and use it because it is his/hers. Everyone knows it. But it is only up to oneself if he/she would grab and use it.
After knowing these Church Social Teachings, what pledge must we do as citizens?

Commitment Pledge
1. The facilitator shall instruct the participants to fill-out the Commitment Pledge after a brief moment of silence and explanation of the pledge. 2. The facilitator shall likewise instruct the participants to solicit their co-participants signature (their seatmate to the left and to the right) as witnesses to the signing of the Commitment Pledge. 3. After accomplishing the Commitment Pledge woksheet, the facilitator shall ask the participants to read in unison their Personal Commitment Pledge & submit its duplicate copy to the secretariat present. 4. The facilitator should synthesize the discussion and should go back to the objectives earlier discussed.

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EMPOWERMENT

COMMITMENT PLEDGE
I, _________________________________, a resident of Barangay ___________________________, Municipality or City of ________________________, province of _______________________________ in adherence to my belief that Politics and Suffrage must be clean, honest, accurate, meaningful and peaceful, I do hereby solemnly pledge to: ___________________ ___________________________________________ ___________________________________________ ___________________________________________ and in doing so, likewise commit myself to be part of the PPCRV and SLB Apostolate. SO HELP ME GOD.

Signature

Date

Witness

Witness

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NOTES

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MODULE 3

MODULE 3: TOWARDS 2016


OB JE C T I V E S At the end of the module, the participants must be able to: a. Articulate what they want to improve in their situations. b. Describe the kind of Government and Candidates who can deliver these improvements. c. Identify, plan and commit to their contributions.

What I want from my candidate and my Government?

Part 1:

PL EN A R Y A CT IV IT Y In connetion to the reflections made in Module 1 and guided by the inputs from Module 2, the facilitator then directs the participants in identifying what they want to (a) remain and (b) change in: (1) themselves, (2) family, (3) community and (4) Country using the matrix found on the next page.

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TOWARDS 2016
ASPECT
PERSONAL 1. 2. 3. 1. FAMILY 2. 3. 1. 2. 3. 1. COUNTRY 2. 3.

REMAIN
1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3.

CHANGE

COMMUNITY

MY EXPECTATIONS FROM THE GOVERNMENT & CANDIDATES THAT I WILL ELECT & SUPPORT

1. 2. 3.

1. The facilitator shall guide the plenary in answering each cell of the matrix. 2. Answers shall be summarized and processed by the facilitator.

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MODULE 3

My Contributions: what I will do to help my candidates and Government achieve what I need and want
PL EN A R Y A CT IV IT Y After articulating the expectations, the facilitator then leads the participants in a planning activity using the sample Action Planning matrix found on the next page. Depending upon their composition, the facilitator shall group the participants according to their barangay, sector or size. The participants are expected to identify and discuss among themselves issues and concerns affecting them. The facilitator shall ask the participants to provide answers that are realistic, attainable and time-bound.
(Note: Dont forget to make your action plans S.M.A.R.T.: Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic, Time-Bound.)

Part 2:

MECHANICS 1. 2. 3. 4. The facilitator shall group the participants according to their sector or barangay. The facilitator guides the participants in accomplishing their action plans (Action Planning Matrix on the next page) by discussing the following. The facilitator then processes the entire activity by sharing that their action plans are not mere tokens but clear and vivid reminders of their commitment and love for their community and country. The facilitator further explains that the action plan shall be used as a basis for the covenant that they have to enter into with candidates that they see as worthy of their vote and support. Note that the identification of these worthy candidates was done in the plenary activity. The participants shall now be asked to sign the action plans that they have produced as their sign of commitment to its achievement. After the participants are done accomplishing their action plans, each action plan shall be presented before the plenary.

5. 6.

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TOWARDS 2016

TOWARDS 2016 ACTION PLANNING MATRIX


TOP 3 GOALS NECESSARY STEPS PERSON(s) RESPONSIBLE TIME TABLE

1.

2.

3.

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NOTES

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OUR PHILIPPINES: NATIONAL SITUATIONER

ANNEX 1

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ANNEX 1 OUR PHILIPPINES: NATIONAL SITUATIONER Outline: 1. 2. 3. 4. Social Economic Political Environmental

S OC I ET Y
On Poverty: Second Quarter 2012 Social Weather Survey (as of July 2012): Families rating themselves as Mahirap or Poor abate to 51% (10.3 M families) from 55% (11.1 M families) in March 2012 On Hunger:
Second Quarter 2012 Social Weather Survey (as of July 2012):

Hunger subsides to 18.4% of families (3.8 M families) from 23.8% in March 2012; Moderate Hunger at 13.7% (2.8 M families) from 18.0% (3.7 M families) in March 2012, Severe Hunger at 4.8% (974,000 families) from 5.8% (1.2 M families) in March 2012 On Education: Out of 100 children who enter Grade 1, only 86 move to Grade 2; 76 to Grade 4; 67 to Grade 6; and only 65 finally complete the full elementary cycle of six years. Further, of these 65, only 58 go on to high school, of whom only 42 graduate four years later. (UNDP May 09)

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Educational Reform: K-12, Enhanced Basic Education Act of 2012, ...[T]he State shall create an enhanced basic education system that can generate responsible and productive citizens equipped with the essential competencies and skills for both life-long learning and employment, DepEd P238.8-billion budget this year, or P30 billion higher compared to last year: 66,800 more classrooms being constructed; no more backlog in textbooks and school furniture.-Sec. Luistro On Health: Healthcare professionals: Statistics show a 42 percent decline in nurses seeking US employment, the number of jobless nurses continues to rise, with the unemployed expected to reach 298,000 this year. (Manila Bulletin, 2012) Nurse-to-Patient Ration per hospital per shift in the Philippines (Source: inquirer.net)
Ideal: 1:4 Reality: 1:40-50

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ANNEX 1

E C ON OM Y
Different bodies have a positive outlook on the countrys upcoming economic performance for year 2012 and beyond: World Bank: 4.2% increase on 2012 GDP; 5% possible growth in 2013 Institute for Development Studies: 5.6% GDP growth for 2012. National Economic and Development Authority: 5.5% growth for the first quarter GDP grew by 6.4 percent in the first quarter of 2012 compared to an upwardly revised growth of 4.9 percent last year. GNI/GNP growth to 5.8 percent from 3.5 percent in 2011. With projected population reaching 95.2 million, per capita GDP grew by 4.6 percent while Per capita GNI grew by 4.0 percent The foreign exchange rate registered a 1.3 percent decline in the first quarter of 2012 at PhP 43.25 per US dollar from PhP43.80 in the 1st Quarter of 2011. Why this Outlook? There seems to be An improving backdrop from rebounding exports and manufacturing output at the start of the year alongside reports of an easing jobless rate and OFW remittances back to familiar growth PPP roll out of the school infrastructure program (Php10bn). Scope for disinflation in Mar despite higher oil prices. (Jun Trinidad, Citi Group Global Markets)

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The jobless rate eased to 7.2% in January (vs. 7.4% a year-ago) OFW remittances fell back to within trend growth of 5.4% in January. Crisis of Economic Survival: Inflation rate: 2.8% (June 2012) [Source: nscb.gov.ph] Oil price (as of 31 July 2012) [Source: doe.gov.ph] Diesel: P43.40/liter (common price) Gasoline: P52.50/liter (common price) Auto LPG: P23.99-P25.70 LPG (P/11-kg cylinders): P516-P640

Rice price (NFA) as of July 2012: P27.00/kilo (Source: bas. gov.ph) Minimum fare (as of May 2012): P8.00 /400 meters (Jeepney) [Source: mb.com.ph] Employment (Source: census.gov.ph) Labor Force participation Rate: from 63.7% in January 2011 to 64.3% in January 2012 Employment Rate: 92.6% in January 2011 to 92.8% in January 2012 Unemployment Rate: 7.4% in January 2011 to 7.2% in January 2012 Underemployment Rate: 19.4% in January 2011 to 18.8% in January 2012

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ANNEX 1

Unemployment: Across educational groups, one-third (33.7%) of the unemployed were high school graduates, 13.5 percent were college undergraduates, while 17.8 percent were college graduates. (census.gov.ph) SWS- among 1,200 adults surveyed nationwide: 55.9% of respondents ages 18-24 years 45.4% among those ages 24-34 years Labor Force: Out of the estimated 62.7 million population 15 years old and over in January 2012, those in the labor force was estimated at 40.3 Million: Services sector= 52.7% Agriculture sector= 32.6 % Industry sector= 14.7 % With: Laborers and unskilled workers =32.1 % Farmers, forestry workers and fishermen= 15.4% of the total employed persons in January 2012 (census. gov.ph) Child Laborers: International Labor Organization (ILO): 3 M Child laborers. 18.9% (5.59 M out of 29.019 M Filipino children aged 5-17 years old) [Source: NSO 2011 Survey on Children]
Child Laborer: 3.028 M Exposed to hazardous child labor: 2.993 M 3% work in mines, quarries, or factory sites

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Regions with the highest incidence of child labor: Central Luzon, Bicol, Western Visayas, Northern Mindanao, and Central Visayas Root Cause: poverty, lack of decent productive work of parents The Philippines has pledged to reduce by 75 percent all worst forms of child labor by 2015, which is anchored on the millennium development goal of achieving universal education. Wages: Minimum wage rate (as of July 2012): P409-P446/day (NCR) [Source: nwpc.dole.gov.ph] Minimum wage rate (as of July 2012): P409-P446/day (NCR) [Source: nwpc.dole.gov.ph] Higher Wages= attracting more workers; But, with the higher minimum wages, some marginal firms will be faced with rising costs of doing business Instead of creating jobs, firms will give up jobs (BusinessWorldOnline) Investment Internationally recognized as a prospect investment area Bloomberg (Source: topics.bloomberg.com/philippines/):
Investors are growing confidence on Philippine market Philippine Economy is growing in a rapid rate that may even overtake Chinas growth.

Investment commitments from foreign investors surged 249% in February this year to P3.22 billion from only P924 million during the same month last year (business.inquirer. net

39

ANNEX 1

Market Drivers
(Source: The Market Briefing: Strong and Sustainable LT Uptrend. Citisiteonline.com)

Low interest rates Shift from developed to developing economies Taxation Current administration promotes more efficient and effective tax collection for higher budget allocating.
Aprils collection (P116.22B) 12.41% more that its last years counterpart (P103.393B) The BIR had collected approximately P345.26 billion in the first four months of the year, a 13.97% jump from the P302.942 billion recorded in the same period in 2011.

Budget Expenditures were increased alongside a push for more efficient allocation. Reduce the government deficit from 3.9% of GDP to 2% of GDP by 2013 Aquinos first budget emphasizes education, health, conditional cash transfers for the poor, and other social spending programs, relying on the private sector to finance important infrastructure projects. Improving Government Finances (Source: The Market Briefing: Strong and Sustainable LT Uptrend. Citisiteonline.com)
Revenues/GDP: 14,2% in 2010 to 14.0% in 2011 Deficit/GDP: 3.7% in 2010 to 2.0% in 2011 Debt/GDP: 55.4% in 2010 to 50.9% in 2011

40

P OL I T I C S The 2013 elections as a prelude to the 2016 Presidential elections.


2013 elections is already within the ambit of the 2016 elections. (Casiple, IPER) Recently, political analysts have objectively read that it will take at least three (3) consecutive reform-oriented presidents to effect and implement needed reforms for the country. Different politicians are already consolidating their ranks in preparation for the 2013 elections. The political possible landscape on 2016 maybe dictated by the outcome of the 2013 elections given the current movements of political personalities and partisan groups. Examples: a. UNA (marriage of PDP-Laban and Partido ng Masang Pilipino) coalition is in the works recruiting new members to its senatorial slate. (Philippine Daily Inquirer, April 2012) b. Interestingly, a possible alliance between and among the Liberal Party (LP), Nacionalista Party (NP) and Nationalist Peoples Coalition (NPC) is being glued together by Aquinos Reform-based Agenda despite differences. (www.gmanetwork.com, July 11, 2012)

41

ANNEX 1

E N V I R O NME NT
I. Ecosystems and Environment Stability a. Marine Resources

Damage of Coral Reef Habitat due to Cyanide, Dynamite, Muro-Ami, and Small-Mesh Nets Fishing led to the inability of ecosystem to replenish marine creatures necessary in the sustenance of the island ecosystems human inhabitants. Of the 50 traditional Fishing Grounds, 11 are already destroyed (Rio watch 2010). The Philippines harvests 1.3 million metric tons of fishes annually, inching nearer the maximum production limit of 1.45 to 1.8 million metric tons.

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b. Forest Resources Forest (a landscape of opposites) The Philippines needs an ideal 54% of forest cover to maintain its natural ecological processes (Sajise,1996) Forest (a landscape of opposites) The Philippines needs an ideal 54% of forest cover to maintain its natural ecological processes (Sajise,1996) The Philippines has 23% of forest cover left. (NAMRIA, 1988) From 17 million hectares in 1934 to merely 6 million in 1990 where 800,000 to 900,000 are considered VIRGIN or old growth forests. Although recently Forest Cover improved, Natural Forests continue to be denuded due to illegal cutting and conversion to other uses. 8.02% of remaining Philippine Forest Cover is under existing mining permits and active timber license agreements. (HARIBON) 13 out of 18 Major River Basins have forest cover of less than 20% of its total area (Haribon, 2005) With deforestation being the top environmental concern for more than a decade, the high number of natural incidents was driven by the high number of flood incidents. II. Disaster Philippines Ranked 3rd on the United Nations Disaster Risk Index with a 24.32% disaster risk out of top 10 countries (highest was Vanuatu, 32%) Top 5 Disasters in 2011: 1) Flood (121 incidences), 2) Fire (98 incidences), 3) Earthquake (78 incidences), 4) Landslide (66 incidences), and 5) Tornado (23 incidences) Frequency by Types of Disaster (Source: PDR, 2011)

43

ANNEX 1

1. 2. 3.

Natural Disasters- 121 incidences (29%) Human-Induced Disasters- 116 incidences (27%) Combination- 191 incidences (44%)

Exposure and inherent susceptibility to disasters due to its geophysical characteristics (located at the Pacific Ring of Fire and Typhoon Belt) is worsened by its vulnerability (poverty, poor housing materials, reactive attitude, etc.). An average of twenty (20) typhoons enter the country annually and almost 50% of this are considered destructive, e.g. Ondoy, Sendong etc. Climate change increases disaster risk. Climate unpredictability endangers food security.
ON FOOD SECURITY

GOOD NEWS
Country is reducing rice imports by 2013 to merely 500,000 Metric Tons. (World Food Program)

BAD NEWS
Rapid urbanization of rural/agricultural lands.
(World Food Program)

Challenge: Participation We have good laws and good disaster response management (i.e. RA 10121, RA 9729 and The National Climate Change Action Plan 2011-2028). The effectiveness of these laws, however, lies in the implementation and community.

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Waste Management: 10,000 million tons of solid waste per year 12% recycled/reused An average Filipino generates 0.3 and 0.5 kg (rural and urban areas, respectively) of solid waste daily 2010 (projected): 28,875 metric tons/day Inadequacy of disposal activities open dumping sites Barangay: Materials Recovery Facility (MRF), segregation, and collection of biodegradable and recyclable waste City & Municipality: collection and disposal of residual non-biodegradable and hazardous waste (except in Metro Manila where disposal falls under the mandate of MMDA) Increasing population composing urban ecosystem increasing waste (2% increase rate per year) Ecological Footprint: NCR* 4.6666 global hectares per person (gha/person) Highest: Quezon City with 1.2048 gha/person Living within sustainable limits: Mandaluyong with 0.4143 gha/person Highest consumption category: Food Top land-use component: Pasture and arable land 60% lived within citys resources, 70% had normal Body Mass Index (BMI)
(*Source: Serafico, M., Espinoza, M., Perlas, L., & Tanchoco, C. (June 2012). Ecological footprint of the National Capital Region Households: Bridging the Gap Between Nutrition and Environment. Philippine Journal of Science. Taguig City: Food and Nutrition Research Insitute, DOST.)

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ANNEX 1

Initiatives/Specific Laws: Philippine Agenda 21: Urban Development Ecological Solid Waste Management Act of 2000 (R.A. 9003) Pertinent Provisions
Section 1 (c) Set guidelines and targets for solid waste avoidance and volume reduction through source reduction and waste minimization measures, including composting, recycling, re-use, recovery, green charcoal process, and others, before collection, treatment and disposal in appropriate and environmentally sound solid waste management facilities in accordance with ecologically sustainable development principles; Section 1 (d) Ensure the proper segregation, collection, transport, storage, treatment and disposal of solid waste through the formulation and adoption of the best environmental practice in ecological waste management excluding incineration; Section 1 (e) Promote national research and development programs for improved solid waste management and resource conservation techniques, more effective institutional arrangement and indigenous and improved methods of waste reduction, collection, separation and recovery Section 1 (g) Retain primary enforcement and responsibility of solid waste management with local government units while establishing a cooperative effort among the national government, other local government units, non- government organizations, and the private sector; Section 1 (h) Encourage cooperation and self-regulation among waste generators through the application of market-based instruments; Section 1 (i) Institutionalize public participation in the development and implementation of national and local integrated, comprehensive, and ecological waste management programs;

Ratification of the Kyoto Protocol in 2003 thereby agreeing to limit emissions and promote adaptation to future climate change, submit information on their national climate-change program and inventories, promote technology transfer, cooperate on scientific and public research, and promote public awareness and education. (Source: reyadel.wordpress.com)

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The Philippines is on track to adopt the Ecological Footprint at the national level. (www.footprintnetwork.org) 2011: incorporation of Ecological Footprint to National Land Use Act of 2012 to protect areas from haphazard development and plan for the countrys use and management of the countrys physical resources. Aim: Philippines as the 1st country in SEA to adopt Ecological footprint at the National Level

III. Mining The issue on mining mainly encompasses three general areas of concern: Economic, Environment, and Social Justice. The Mining Act of 1995 (RA 7942) was a result of a slump in the mining industry in the 80s and 90s and the reputation of the Philippines as a difficult country for foreign investors. As a result of this and also due to pressure from international financial institutions, a liberalization of policies on mining was undertaken.

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ANNEX 1

PERKS
Tax Breaks 100% Foreign Ownership Investment Guarantees

BOOS
Government discretion in mineral agreements Minimum tax payments ECCs procured by fraudulent representations Vitiated consent from affected communities

This led to a deterioration of the environment, a continuous crushing of the right of local communities especially the indigenous people, and minimizing economic benefits for the Philippines (if there is indeed any).
(Source: Tanada. (2010). HB6342:The Alternative Mining Bill, Making Responsible Mining a Reality)

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In answer to this, the Alternative Mining Bill was proposed in Congress as House Bill 6342. AMB advocated the following points (Source: Alyansa Tigil Mina. Alternative Mining Bill: In Brief). Responsible Mining Rational Extraction and Use of Resources Good Governance from the Government and Accountability and Respect from Mining Contractors Exclusivity for members of Philippine Mining Another bill was proposed in Congress in 2011 named Peoples Mining Bill. Its pertinent points are as follows (Source: Center for Environmental Concerns-Philippines. A Primer on the Peoples Mining Bill, HB 4315): Agrarian reform and agricultural modernization to integrate mineral development and agricultural production and prohibit mining in areas specified for food production. Domestic capitalization of mining through participation of Filipino corporations and internal funding for capital requirements from re-channeling government budgets for foreign debt payments, military expenditures, and government shares from the Malampaya Natural Gas Project. Respect for indigenous peoples and Moro communities rights to self-determination. Support for workers rights and occupational safety standards Support for small-scale miners and their integration into the national mining industry

49

ANNEX 1
Demilitarization of mining operations by military, police, private security, and paramilitary groups. Development of industrial knowledge, technology, and methods to be more appropriate, economicallyefficient and less environmentally-destructive. Promotion, development, enforcement, and monitoring of ecologically-sound mining practices and standards Rehabilitation of all mining-affected areas and abandoned mines. Heated debates have been sparked between mining contractors and advocacy groups that want reform in Mining putting the government in a delicate position in between the contractors and the concerned citizens. EO 79 as a response. The administration released its first official resolution to the conflict on mining through the EO 79. The said EO sparked controversy and critiques from both side of the debates. In essence, the EO tried to consolidate and come up with a common point for each concerned party. (Source: Office of Executive Secretary Paquito Ochoa. FAQs on Executive Order 79 on Mining.)

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CHURCHS SOCIAL TEACHINGS

ANNEX 2

ANNEX 2 ANNEX 2A TEN BUILDING BLOCKS OF THE CHURCHS SOCIAL TEACHINGS


By: William J. Byron

1.) The Principle of Human Dignity


Every human being is created in the image of God and redeemed by Jesus Christ, and therefore is invaluable and worthy of respect as a member of the human family. This is the bedrock principle of Churchs social teaching. Every person regardless of race, sex, age, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, employment or economic status, health, intelligence, achievement or any other differentiating characteristicis worthy of respect. It is not what you do or what you have that gives you a claim on respect: it is simply being human that establishes your dignity. Given that dignity, the human person is, in the Church view, never a means, always an end.

2.) The Principle of Respect for Human Life


Every Person, from the moment of conception to natural death, has inherent dignity and a right to life consistent with that dignity. Human life at every stage of development and decline is precious and therefore worthy of protection and respect. It is always wrong directly to attack innocent human life. The Church tradition sees the sacredness of human life as part of any moral vision for a just and good society.

3.) The Principle of Association


Our tradition proclaims that the person is not only sacred but also social. How we organize our societyin economics and politics, in law and policydirectly affect human dignity and the capacity of individuals to grow in community.

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The centerpiece of society is the family; family stability must always be protected and never undermined. By association with othersin families and in other social institutions that foster growth, protect dignity and promote the common goodhuman persons achieve their fulfillment.

4.) The Principle of Participation


We believe people have a right and a duty to participate in society, seeking together the common good and well-being of all, especially the poor and the vulnerable. Without participation, the benefits available to an individual through any social institution cannot be realized. The human person has a right not to be shut out from participating in those institutions that are necessary for human fulfillment.

5.) The Principle of Preferential Protection for the Poor and Vulnerable.
In society marred by deepening divisions between rich and the poor, our tradition recalls the story of the last judgment (Mt. 25:31-46) and instructs us to put the needs of the poor and vulnerable first. Why is this so? Because the common goodthe good of society as a wholerequires it. The opposite of rich and powerful is poor and powerless. If the good of all, the common good, is to prevail, preferential protection must move toward those affected adversely by the absence of power and the presence of privation. Otherwise, the balance needed to keep society in one piece will be broken to the detriment of the whole.

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ANNEX 2

6.) The Principle of Solidarity


The Church social teaching proclaims that we are our brothers and sisters keepers, wherever they live. We are one human family. Learning to practice the virtue of solidarity means learning that loving our neighbor has global dimensions in an interdependent world. The principle of solidarity functions as a moral category that leads to choices that will promote and protect common good.

7.) The Principle of Stewardship


The Church tradition insists that we show our respect for the Creator by our stewardship of creation. The steward is a manager, not an owner. In an era of rising consciousness about our physical environment, our tradition is calling us to sense of moral responsibility for the protection of the environmentcroplands, grasslands, woodlands, air, water, minerals, and other natural deposits. Stewardship responsibilities also look toward our use of our personal talents, our attention to personal health and our use of personal property.

8.) The Principle of Subsidiarity


This principle deals chiefly with the responsibilities and limits of government, and the essential roles of voluntary associations The principle of subsidiarity puts a proper limit on government by insisting that no higher level of organization should perform any function that can be handled efficiently and effectively at a lower level of organization by human persons who, individually or in groups, are closer to the problems and closer to the ground. Oppressive governments are always in violation of the principle of subsidiarity; overactive governments frequently violate this principle.

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9.) The Principle of Human Equality


Equality of all persons comes from their essential dignity. While differences in talents are a part of Gods plan, social and cultural discrimination in fundamental rights are not compatible with Gods design. Treating equals equally is one way of defining justice, also understood classically as rendering to each person his or her due. Underlying the notion of equality is the simple principle of fairness; one of the earliest ethical stirrings felt in the developing human person is a sense of what is fair and what is not.

10.) The Principle of the Common Good


The common good is understood as the social conditions that allow people to reach their full human potential and to realize their human dignity.

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ANNEX 2 ANNEX 2B FILIPINO VALUES AND CHURCH SOCIAL THOUGHT The principles of Church social thought are not foreign to Filipino culture. They can be recognized in the context of Filipino national tradition existing within the Filipino community. Fr. Horacio de la Costa, S.J. lists these Filipino values as:

Pagsasarili: the willingness to develop oneself into a responsible human being Pakikisama: willingness to share with one another both the burdens and rewards of living together. Pagkakaisa: building up the national community through forms of social organizations understood, accepted, and undertaken by the people themselves. Pakikipagkapwa-tao: treating the other person as an equal, giving him or her equal importance as you give yourself, eventually leading to the total development of mankind. Pagkabayani: the readiness to put the common good of the nation above private interest.

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THE CBCP ON ELECTIONS

ANNEX 3

39

ANNEX 3 ANNEX 3 THE CBCP ON ELECTIONS The Catholic Bishops Conference of the Philippines (CBCP) throughout the years has always been articulate in teaching and guiding the lay faithful to actively participate in nation-building and peacemaking through involvement in principled politics. The following are some important notes gathered from the various CBCP Pastoral Letters the past twenty years. 1. There are indispensable requirements that will serve as democratic instruments for establishing and securing societal changes.
The first requirement is a wise, informed and formed electorate. The second requirement is the existence of conditions that will enable voters to choose freely. The third requirement is the organization of our people down to the precinct level to combat the age-old practices calculated to falsify the expressed wishes of the people and to attain victory at any cost. (CBCP Pastoral Letter on Preparing for the 1992 Elections, 22 July 1991)

2. Candidates and their followers are asked to fight fairly.


We ask the candidates and their followers: fight fairly. Do not buy votes, cheat, or use force. Abide by the covenants you have signed. We ask the winners to be magnanimous in victory and the losers to be gracious in defeat. We ask both winners and losers to work together for the unity and progress of our people after the elections. (Pre-Election Statement of the Catholic Bishops Conference of the Philippines, 5 May 1992)

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3. The media is asked to report truthfully.


We ask the media to report faithfully election happenings and irregularities. But do not concoct news or make exaggerated reports to agitate the people. Discriminate between speculation, rumor, and fact. (Pre-Election Statement of the Catholic Bishops Conference of the Philippines, 5 May 1992)

4. The Church respects freedom of the citizens to vote.


We want to make it clear that we, as a body, do not endorse any particular party or candidate. We do not want to dictate to you whom you should vote for. We respect your freedom in voting. This freedom is part of the exercise of your freedom of conscience which we, your pastors, are obliged to respect. (Do Everything in the Name of the Lord Jesus[ Col. 3:17] CBCP: A Call to Christian Participation in the Elections, April 9, 1995)

5. Our Church leaders encourage our candidates to advocate for clean and honest elections.
Stop violence. Those who want to serve the people should not grab power by hurting or killing the people they profess to serve. Do not cheat. To cheat is to steal public office. A person who wins by cheating has no moral right to occupy a position stolen from another. Do not buy votes. This is a particularly degrading form of cheating. You do not start serving the people by corrupting them and degrading their dignity. Do not trivialize the campaign period. Educate the people during the campaign by explaining to them your platform and the issues involved. Do not be satisfied to be reduced to singing, dancing and clowning before the people. Do not tell lies to destroy the good name of another person. A person who destroys the good name of another will probably not mind doing evil to others. If the campaign remains on the level of issues much black propaganda and mudslinging will

59

ANNEX 3

be avoided. (Do Everything in the Name of the Lord Jesus [Col. 3:17] CBCP: A Call to Christian Participation in the Elections, April 9, 1995)

6. The Church recognizes the relevance of meaningful elections and the importance of active participation by the citizenry.
Election time is one of those rare times in our democracy when people directly exercise political power, which is meant to serve the common good. Do not squander or barter away the exercise of this power. Use it to give our country and people a better life. Dear fellow Filipinos, the elections are the key to good government. Credible elections will make for a credible government. Meaningful elections will make for good governmentLet us all together make these elections truly honest, peaceful and meaningful. (Do Everything in the Name of the Lord Jesus[ Col. 3:17] CBCP: A Call to Christian Participation in the Elections, April 9, 1995)

7. The citizens are reminded to vote intelligently.


Do not be fooled by appearances, words and promises. Study the issues involved, the platforms of the candidates and their past records. Vote for persons who act in a manner consistent with Christian principles. Do not vote for opportunists. Do not sell your votes. Your vote, your honor. When you sell your vote, you sell your honor. You become nothing in the eyes of those who buy you. You harm your future and that of your countrymen. (Do Everything in the Name of the Lord Jesus[ Col. 3:17] CBCP: A Call to Christian Participation in the Elections, April 9, 1995)

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8. The citizens are reminded to work for clean elections.


We appeal to you, our countrymen and countrywomen, not to cheat or allow yourselves to be used in any way for cheating in the elections. Do not vote more than once. Do not buy votes. Do not intimidate others. Do not miscount the votes or report falsely the results of the voting. God sees what we do, even when no one else seems to know. (CBCP Pastoral Exhortation on the 1998 Elections, 31 January 1998)

9. We say no to vote buying.


One form of cheating--vote-buying--is particularly revolting. It demeans both the person who buys the vote of another and the person who sells his vote. The person who sells his vote shows that his choice can be bought, and that he is willing to sell his and the countrys future to the vote-buyer. In so doing he confirms the vote-buyers low opinion of him. The person who buys votes makes clear that he will not hesitate to demean the dignity of the voters to obtain an elective position, and by that fact shows he does not deserve to be elected. We must not give even the impression of condoning this immoral practice of vote-buying. Hence, we ask our voters not to accept money from those who would buy their votes, but to shame vote buyers by their outright refusal to be bought. (CBCP Pastoral Exhortation on the 1998 Elections, 31 January 1998)

10. While our Church leaders give us guidance, it is the task of the lay faithful to know the candidates.
We wish to make clear that it is not our pastoral duty, nor does it fall within our pastoral competence, to name for you the persons who meet these qualifications best. It is your task, our dear lay faithful, to inform yourselves of the qualifications of each candidate and to judge how they conform to the guidelines we have furnished. We can only tell you what kind of persons you should vote for. We are not entitled

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ANNEX 3

to dictate to you whom to vote for. (CBCP Pastoral Exhortation on the 1998 Elections, 31 January 1998)

11. The Philippine Bishops give us some guidelines in choosing candidates to vote for, namely: competence, personal integrity, and commitment to the common good.
The most necessary qualification that a candidate must have is competence in relation to the office he is seeking to be elected to. The competence of a candidate is to be measured from his native qualities and his track record in serving the community. The way a person has served in the past is a better gauge of his competence than any academic credentials he may hold. Performance, not promises or popularity, is the test of competence. The second qualification necessary is the personal integrity of the candidate. The candidate should not only be competent. He should also be God-fearing, God-loving (makaDiyos) and moral. Personal integrity means that we have a right to expect them to hold on to sound moral principles and to follow those principles with consistency. A third paramount quality we should seek in candidates for public office is a proven commitment to the common good. We should elect persons who can transcend narrow self and family interests and are willing to make sacrifices for the public good. (CBCP Pastoral Exhortation on the 1998 Elections, 31 January 1998)

12. The Church reiterates the call to active involvement by the Catholic laity in politics.
We have to uphold the constitutional process and the rule of law. Clean, honest, and orderly elections are the hallmarks of a working democracy. There are indeed shortcomings and threats to our democratic way of life. But the freedoms we cherish are best safeguarded by a vigilant and informed citizenry during times of election. We reiterate the call to the Catholic laity to exercise their

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Christian responsibility and noble calling to be involved in politics through education in social responsibility, non-partisan poll-watching, in the conscientious choices of candidates, etc. (CBCP Pastoral Statement on the coming 2004 Elections, 26 January 2004)

13. We, especially the poor, can transform our society.


We have to believe in our own power to transform society. Clean and meaningful elections and transformed politics depend on ordinary people and on each one of us. In a Church of the Poor, it is the poor who must take the lead in transforming our society. All of us, especially the poor, must realize that this transformed society requires leaders to be public servants, not providers of favors. (CBCP Pastoral Statement on the coming 2004 Elections, 26 January 2004)

14. The lay faithful are called to get involved in principled politics.
We call upon those who are competent, persons of integrity, and committed to change to get involved directly in principled partisan politics, and become candidates for political election, aware that the common good is above the good of vested interests. We remind the laity that it is within their right as well as their duty to campaign for candidates they believe to be competent, honest, and public-service minded in order to reform our country. (CBCP Pastoral Statement on Lay Participation in Politics and Peace: Love and truth will meet; justice and peace will kiss [Ps 85, 11] 12 July 2009)

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NOTES

64

THE AUTOMATED ELECTION SYSTEM

ANNEX 4

47

ANNEX 4 ANNEX 4 THE AUTOMATED ELECTION SYSTEM OB JE C T I V E S


At the end of the module, the participants would be able to: a. Understand key aspects of the automated election system and how the said system works. b. Imbibe the necessary knowledge in order to effectively maximize the exercise of the latters right to vote. DEFINITION OF TERMS:

BEI EDCVL
Hesitation Marks

Board of Election Inspectors Election Day Computerized Voters List Marks one creates signifying a tentative/ unsure answer. (e.g. X, check mark, asterisk or dots.) Voting for more than the allowable or required number of candidates for a particular position. (e.g. selecting or shading 2 candidates for the position of president which requires only one.) Precinct Count Optical Scan Machine; the machine that will be used in the 2013 elections. Posted Computerized Voters List.

Overvote

PCOS Machine

PCVL

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Pre-Election Day Preparations:


1. It is important to do ones homework, Research.
a. Research where your Voting precinct is one or two days ahead of time. This is important, as it will lessen the possibility of the cluttering of ones respective voting precinct. It will also enable the voter to avert and promptly address any possibility of disenfranchisement produced by any technical complications. Research on the candidate(s) that you will vote for. Check their platforms of governance and their backgrounds. Keep in mind the numbers of the Party-List groups and candidates you intend to support or vote for. It does not hurt to keep a list of the candidates we intend to support or vote for come election time. Keeping a list of the candidates, we intend to vote for enables us to contribute positively to the general outcome of the actual process of voting as it shall lessen the time one spends recalling the names and platforms of these candidates. The lesser time we spend inside the polling precinct, the lesser the delay we shall cause and the higher the possibility of other voters exercising their right to vote.

b.

c.

2. Make sure that you just have the right number of candidates to vote for per position in your list. It is important not to OVERVOTE as it will be an automatic ground to invalidate votes casted for other candidates running for the same position.

Election Day Preparations:


1. Bring the following: (a) Identification Card (ID) bearing ones complete name, address and signature. (b) Registration Stub and (c) List of candidates one wants to vote for.

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ANNEX 4 Step by Step Procedure of Voting


1. Look for your name and sequence number in the PCVL* posted at the precinct. 2. Approach the BEI* and tell your name, address, and other details pertaining to your identity. Listen carefully to the BEIs instructions on voting. 3. Place your signature on the corresponding space on the EDCVL. 4. Carefully get the ballot placed inside the secrecy folder, and the marker from the BEI and proceed to the voting area. 5. Fill-up the ballot by shading the respective ovals assigned to your favored candidates name (s) using the marker provided.
Make sure to fully shade the oval that corresponds to the name of the candidate of your choice. Avoid hesitation marks. Be careful NOT to TEAR, FOLD, CRUMPLE or DAMPEN the ballot. Do not exceed the required number of votes in each position. DO NOT OVERVOTE.

6. Place your duly accomplished ballots lengthwise (vertically) inside the secrecy folder. Make sure that it is the only paper inside the folder and that 2 to 3 inches from the top part of the ballot sticks out from the secrecy folder. Proceed to the PCOS machine. 7. Carefully hold the secrecy folder and feed the part of the ballot that is sticking out from the folder to the machine. Do NOT forcefully push the ballot into the machine. Wait until the ballot is dropped into the ballot box. 8. Return the secrecy folder and the marker to the BEI. 9. Have your right index fingernail marked with the indelible ink. 10. Place your thumb marks on the corresponding space on the EDCVL before leaving the precinct.

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