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REVIT BIM REFERENCE GUIDE QUICK REFERENCE QUIDE - VERSION 4 DATE: 18/07/2011
REVIT BIM REFERENCE GUIDE
QUICK REFERENCE QUIDE - VERSION 4
DATE: 18/07/2011

Copyright Notice:

Autodesk, Revit, DWG, DWF are registered trademarks or trademarks of Autodesk, Inc.

Intellectual Property Rights:

This Manual has been produced with the assistance of 4th Dimension Software/RevitStore, and may not be copied or distributed outside Stride Treglown Architects, without prior consent from the Production Director.

Table of Contents:

PROCEDURES

Naming Conventions

1

Naming of Files including Workset‟d Projects

1

Naming of Views

1

Numbering of Sheets

1

Typical Workset Naming

1

Material Naming Convention

2

Family / Nested Family Naming Convention

2

Parameter Naming Conventions

2

Initial Project Setup

2

Project Template File

2

Project Location/Orientation and Co-ordination

2

Location and Co-ordination

2

Project Linking or Single File Worksetting

2

Location of Callouts

2

Avoiding large files and Economic Modelling:

2

WHAT SLOWS PROJECTS DOWN and MADE LEAD TO LARGER FILE SIZES

2

WHAT CAN BE DONE TO AVOID LARGE LETHARGIC PROJECTS?

3

Speeding Revit Up and reducing Revit file sizes

3

Later Project Setup

3

Coordination: Project and True North

3

Coordination: Acquiring Coordinates

3

Project Configuration

3

Where you should store Project support files

3

Where you should Save/Store Families

3

Where you should Save/Store Groups

3

Exporting to DWG/DXF/DGN

3

Procedure: Pointing to DWG Export File

3

Keynote file location

3

Procedure: Locating Keynote File

3

Shared Parameters

3

Project Organisation

4

Working with Sheet Views

4

Project Browser Organisation

4

Worksets Multi-User Projects

4

Hotdesking and Changing Username

4

When to Save

4

Synchronising changes made by the team:

4

Recreating a Central File:

4

Editing Requests/Worksharing Monitor:

4

File Compact/Compression:

4

Project Archiving and Backups

4

Archiving Projects

4

Backups and Rolling Back

4

Keynoting

5

Procedure for creating Keynote file:

5

Project Pointing/configuration:

5

Saving/Creating and applying View Templates

5

Upgrading Projects

5

Workset Projects

5

Standalone Projects

5

Project Output

5

Detailing

5

Drawing Production Information

5

Support and Help

6

Naming Conventions

Naming of Files including Workset’d Projects

Naming of Project files (Standalone Project):

Project Number_Description

e.g. 12345_Building.rvt for a single Building e.g. 12345_Block A.rvt for multiple Buildings on a site e.g. 12345_Site.rvt for a Site Topography file e.g. 12345_Massing.rvt for a Massing study or neighbouring buildings

Naming of Project files (Workset‟d Project – Multi-user Project) Project Number_Description CENTRAL for Central Files Project Number_Description USERSNAME for Local Files

e.g. Central File Example: 12345_Building CENTRAL.rvt

e.g. Local File Example:

12345_Building TANJA RYCROFT.rvt

For more detailed information Refer to Big BIM Manual

pg. 2

Naming of Views

Views that are created from existing or new levels in a project, shall all be suffixed by either the word “Wrkg”, ”WORKING” or ”Working” . These views are to be considered working views that will not be assembled on a drawing sheet. Consider these as being views that you will work-up, they will contain all categories in a visible form including all constraints.

All Duplicated views for assembly onto Drawing Sheets are to be named logically, by Level first followed by a description of that views primary purpose.

For Example of typical view naming refer to Big BIM Manual

Pg. 2

Plan Views:

The preferred naming of your original floor plans, should be:

00_Ground Wrkg

The prefixing numerals, align themselves with the actual floor level (e.g. 00 for Ground, 01 for First, -01 for foundation/basement level) When these views are duplicated they should all be renamed so that all views are neatly sorted/grouped as the original and suffixed by the views intended use (e.g. 00_Ground Fire Strategy).

Callout Views:

When an enlargement of a Plan is made from a Callout these should be renamed as other plans by their level first followed by a description of the callouts purpose. Callouts should also include the word Callout, so that it is clear how that view was formed being a Callout rather than a duplicated view.

Examples (Plan Views): 00_Ground Callout of Changing Rooms. 00_Ground Callout of Lift/Cores

Examples (Sections):

Section X Callout Wall Strip on GL12 Section Y Callout Lift Shaft

Callouts added for detail purposes, both in Plan and Section views shall be prefixed by the word Detail then a brief description of what the detail is about.

Examples (Plan Views): Plan Detail Typical Window Closure Plan Detail Typical Door Jamb

Examples (Sections):

Section Detail Typical Eaves Section Detail Window Section

BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011
BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011
– Window Section BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011 Important: All Callouts should be placed in

Important: All Callouts should be placed in views that are to be placed on Drawing dependent views (do not place these on the Original/Parent view)

For more detailed information Refer to Big BIM Manual

pg. 3

Sheets; this includes

Dependent Views:

Dependent views are views that have been created specifically where a projects footprint is too large to be placed onto one sheet.

For more detailed information Refer to Big BIM Manual

pg. 3

3D Views:

All 3D Parallel projection views (i.e. non Perspective) shall be prefixed by 3D_ then followed by a logical description

of the view

Examples:

3D_Cropped Ground Floor 3D_NE Axonometric

Camera Perspective views shall be prefixed by Perspective_ then followed by a logical description.

Examples:

Perspective_View from Parsons Street Perspective_Front Entrance

Schedule Views:

All Schedules should be named logically. The only restriction this document enforces is that Schedule Keys shall be named in a way that it is clear that it supports other Schedules; this can be done by removing the word Schedule and replacing it for the words Key Style.

Examples:

Ironmongery Key Style (for a specification of Ironmongery Sets) Door Key Style Finishes Key Style

For more detailed information Refer to Big BIM Manual

pg. 3

Numbering of Sheets

The Stride Treglown drawing numbering system is based on the CI/SfB and BS1192 part 5 Systems which are nationally recognised standards. Any changes to this system requested by a client should be resisted, as the STL adopted system is widely used and understood.

Typical drawing number.

AL_(2)_0204

and understood. Typical drawing number. A L _ (2) _ 0204 0204 Drawing Number (Unique) (2)

0204

Drawing Number (Unique)

(2)

(CI/SfB) Code

L

LACS Code

A

Discipline

For more detailed information Refer to Big BIM Manual

pg. 4

Typical Workset Naming

A good guide to the number of Worksets in a project is somewhere between 8 and 30. There are no strict guide-

lines but the structure of your naming should be logical and easily identifiable by all users. Typical Workset Naming might include:

External Envelope GF Internal Layout FF Internal Layout etc… for potentially all floors Revit Links Atrium/Entrance

External Works Lifts and Core Areas Roofing Package CAD Format Data

Users should resist the temptation to create temporary Worksets so that certain parts of the building can be turned off. Users should exhaust all Revit Functionality first:

For more detailed information Refer to Big BIM Manual

pg. 5

Quick Reference

1
1

Material Naming Convention

Materials inside Projects and Families should be named as follows:

By the actual material first followed by a description of its colour/texture etc Examples:

Wood Beech Natural or Wood Beech Polished Metal Aluminium Powder Coated Light Blue Metal Copper bronze matt Finishes Render Pink Pebbledash Finishes Paint Magnolia Emulsion

Family / Nested Family Naming Convention

There is no strict outline for this however it should follow that same logical convention as set out in the Autodesk Metric Library. Temporary naming should be avoided. 2D families should be prefixed by “2D_FamilyName. If there are a number of families in a series of similar styles then they should all be named the same prefixed by a number. e.g. Chair(1), Chair(2), or Man(1), Man(2), or Kitchen Corner Unit(1), Kitchen Corner Unit(2).

Autodesk Abbreviations in common use in family Naming:

W

= With

Ext

= External

Int

= Internal

Dbl

= Double

Sgl

= Single

Tpl

= Triple

Parameter Naming Conventions

All Parameters within families should be clearly and logically named. Don‟t abbreviate unless it is obvious; remember your logic is not always the same as someone else‟s! Follow the examples within the standard Autodesk Content, these serve as good examples.

For more detailed information Refer to Big BIM Manual

pg. 5

Initial Project Setup

Project Template File

Always start a new project from a Company Template file, located in the following location - O:\Revit\Templates. The initial Drafting view should be filled out with the required project/management information.

Project Location/Orientation and Co-ordination

Location and Co-ordination

Outline Procedure:

1. Draw the Building in the predominant orientation that it is require on a sheet.

2. Link your Site plan Normally an AutoCAD drawing file.

3. Move and Rotate the Site Plan (Linked CAD File), so that it is located correctly, relative to the Building.

4. Pin the linked geometry so that it can‟t inadvertently be moved or deleted.

5. Acquire the coordinates of the DWG/External Geometry. (In Early Stage design this may not be the best option, it may be better to use Rotate True North until the buildings location on the site is firmed up)

6. All remaining Referenced DWG information may be linked using the shared coordinates.

Note all linking, acquiring and reloading of CAD information should only be undertaken when a views orientation is set to Project North NEVER when views are set to ‘True North’.

For an image explaining this - Refer to Big BIM Manual

pg. 7

2
2

Quick Reference

Project Linking or Single File Worksetting

For information on how to build your model, either as a single file that is worksetted, or multiple files linked

together Refer to Big BIM Manual

pg. 7

Location of Callouts

Callouts should only be placed in views that are to be placed on drawing sheets; this includes parent views of dependent views.

For more detailed information Refer to Big BIM Manual

pg. 8

Avoiding large files and Economic Modelling:

Large Revit files obviously impact on the performance of your project. There are a number of things that can cause various degrees of performance related slowdown, amongst them the following:

WHAT SLOWS PROJECTS DOWN and MADE LEAD TO LARGER FILE SIZES

Project Management:

Unresolved Errors (Warnings) Too Many Unused views Too Many unused elements (Purge Unused) Compression of Database Incorrectly working with Worksets Not closing unnecessary views, when no longer needed. Limiting extents of far clipping in views

Modelling:

Over Modelling your Project Improper use of 2D/3D Components Incorrect Level of Detail Over-constraining the Model Incorrect use of Groups and Families Use of Arrays Design Options Visualisation Rendering and Shadows Level of Detail

Project Setup:

Don‟t always assume the Model should be built as one file, it might be better as separate files linked together.

Use of CAD Data:

Incorrect use of DWG/CAD imported data Imported DWG files rather than Linked DWG files. Non removal of redundant/old DWG/CAD files DWG information inside Families

Detailing:

Incorrect Detailing methodology Over-constraining detailing against the 3D model. Non use of Families, not items that are grouped and copied around your project Repeating Details when items would normally be arrayed

For more detailed information Refer to Big BIM Manual

pg. 9

BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011
BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011

WHAT CAN BE DONE TO AVOID LARGE LETHARGIC PROJECTS?

Project Management:

1. Regular correction of Unresolved Errors (Warnings).

2. Delete Temporary/Unused views.

3. Purge unused elements.

4. Compress Database

5. Review management of Worksets

6. Close unnecessary views

7. Limit extents of far clipping

For more detailed information Refer to Big BIM Manual

pg. 9

Speeding Revit Up and reducing Revit file sizes

Below is a checklist of things to look out for and can help in speeding Revit up and reducing overall file sizes:

Revit Project Compression.

Purge your file of unused Content

Delete any unused Model and Detail Groups

Try to make all/most DWG information Linked rather than imports in Revit

Close all hidden Windows

Turn off Categories/Sub-Categories where they are not required

Close any Worksets that you are currently not interested in.

Resolve warnings.

Ensure Calculation of Rooms Volumes is turned off.

Keep on top of your project housekeeping.

Finally, keep your model as simple as possible.

For more detailed information Refer to Big BIM Manual

pg. 13

Later Project Setup

Coordination: Project and True North

Ignore the actual orientation of your Building on the site. Align your project Geometry with the North/South axis. Project North is “top of the screen”, South “Bottom of your Screen”. The default orientation of all Plans is set to „Project North‟, ie: Building set orthogonally on your Drawing Sheets. True North may be set and any view (Normally Site Plan‟) can be toggled to display in its actual orientation.

For more detailed information Refer to Big BIM Manual

pg. 14

Coordination: Acquiring Coordinates

Do not acquire coordinates from a linked file too early.

For more detailed information Refer to Big BIM Manual

pg. 14

Project Configuration

Where you should store Project support files

Users should store project specific Shared Parameter/Keynote and DWG Layer Export files in O:\Revit\Project Support Files\XXXXX(Your Project Number).

Where you should Save/Store Families

Users should store project specific Family Content in O:\Revit\Project Support Files\XXXXX(Your Project Number). Your folder can then be further divided as you see fit.

Where you should Save/Store Groups

Groups should be saved out externally from the project, so that they may be used on future projects. They should be saved in O:\Revit\Project Support Files\XXXXX(Your Project Number), within a folder called Groups.

BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011
BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011

For more detailed information Refer to Big BIM Manual

pg. 14

Exporting to DWG/DXF/DGN

Exporting Layers:

DWG Export file there is a text file that maps Revit Categories and Sub-Categories to AutoCAD Layers with AutoCAD Layer Colours. This text file needs to be copied to your project support folder on the „O‟ drive „Revit Project Families‟ and the project needs to point at this file. Ensure that the file is not read-only as this file needs to be updated by Revit each time you export.

For Exporting to correct Location and more detailed information on this section - Refer to Big BIM Manual

pg. 15

Procedure: Pointing to DWG Export File

The original export file to export to Stride Treglowns AutoCAD Layering standards is located in the following location: „O:\Revit\ Library\Revit Library XXXX(Current Version)\Stride\Titleblocks\ Stride-Dwg-Exportlayers.txt‟.

This needs to be copied to your project support folder and renamed “Project Number _ Strides Export Layers.txt”.

Each time you export from Revit to DWG/DXF you will need to ensure that you are pointing at the file that relates to your project.

Keynote file location

the file that relates to your project. Keynote file location The location of the projects Keynote
the file that relates to your project. Keynote file location The location of the projects Keynote

The location of the projects Keynote file is set from the „Keynote Settings‟ dialogue, found within the Tag panel on the Annotate ribbon. … „Out of the Box‟ Revit‟s initial settings, point to the standard AutoDESK Keynote file, which is in the root folder of the Metric Library. As each project‟s Keynotes will vary project-to-project a copy of this file should be placed in the projects support folder, and the Revit project be pointed to that file:

Procedure: Locating Keynote File

Navigate to the Metric Library folder and copy “RevitKeynotes_GBR.txt” file to the clipboard Now navigate to your project folder beneath O:\Revit\Project Support Files and copy the file there. Right click over the file and remove the „read only‟ attribute. Rename the File to include your project number at the start of the filename.

Shared Parameters

Should you require any Parameters that you may need to export to a database or may need to include within an annotation tag, these Parameters have to be „shared Parameters‟.

Shared Parameters should be considered an advanced subject and as such you will need to refer to Big BIM

Manual

pg. 15

Quick Reference

3
3

Project Organisation

Working with Sheet Views

At the point the first view is placed on a sheet the Project Browser should be toggled to displaying “Views not on Sheets”.

For more detailed information Refer to Big BIM Manual pg. 16

Note: The quickest way to enter details for drawing sheets is through the drawing sheet list that is in the template under schedules.more detailed information Refer to Big BIM Manual pg. 16 Note: There are two types of

Note: There are two types of Elevation within the Stride Template, one for External and the other for Internal Elevations. This will ensure that your Elevations are structured correctly in the Project Browser.drawing sheet list that is in the template under schedules. Project Browser Organisation The Project Browser

Project Browser Organisation

The Project Browser is organised/set to “Views not on Sheets” as a default in the Strides Template.

For customisation of the Project Browser Refer to Big BIM Manual pg. 16

Worksets Multi-User Projects

Worksharing in a project team allows simultaneous access to a shared model through use of a central file, where users work on their own Local copies. Note the Local file is tied to your Workset Username found in the Options dialogue.

Hotdesking and Changing Username

Please note that you need to Check/change your Username under the following circumstances:

On all new Software Releases

On opening Revit on a Hotdesk PC (Remember to set the name back to what it was at the end of the hotdesk period).

Check your Username, should someone have logged onto your PC prior to your Windows Logon.

When to Save

Save to your Local file every 15-20minutes. Save to Central every hour or when you are ready to publish your work back to the Central file for others to review/reference.

Important notes: You should save to Central and relinquish everything

When you are about to leave for the evening.

When you are leaving to attend a meeting or something that will take you away from your computer.

Immediately before your lunch-break (failing to do this may result in downtime for those who are working through the break).

For more detailed information Refer to Big BIM Manual

pg. 17

Synchronising changes made by the team:

It is essential that your Local file be up-to-date during the day, so that you are in touch with the project progression.

Procedure: When to reload latest

When you first open the project, so as to ensure you have the previous day‟s work synchronised.

Immediately following any Lunch-break, so your file reflects morning work and any work done during the break.

When alerted by team members of their published work.

Recreating a Central File:

New Central files will need to be created from time to time. This is generally for any of the following reasons:

The Project needs to be upgraded to the new software version.

The Central file needs to be recompressed

4
4

Quick Reference

Projects having serious errors that require recreation.

For the Procedure of how to recreate a Central file - Refer to Big BIM Manual pg. 17

Method of working:

Ensure elements are on the correct Workset.

Utilise the function “Grey Inactive Workset Graphics” (See button in image below)

Inactive Workset Graphics” (See button in image below)  Ensure Elements are “Borrowed” and you don‟t

Ensure Elements are “Borrowed” and you don‟t check-out the Workset and become the owner.

“Make Elements Editable” = Borrowing

“Make Workset Editable” = Owner

(User only borrows what he/she needs to amend) (User owns every element on that Workset)

needs to amend) (User owns every element on that Workset) For more detailed information Refer to

For more detailed information Refer to Big BIM Manual pg. 17

Editing Requests/Worksharing Monitor:

Please ensure that once you have started Revit, that you remember to check/start the Worksharing Monitor application. Without the Worksharing Monitor application running, any editing request that you make or are made to you will not automatically be announced to the other team member.

For more detailed information Refer to Big BIM Manual pg. 18

File Compact/Compression:

All Revit files at some point require compaction to minimise their file size. Revit files are database files and database programmes typically feature a compression utility. As a file is opened that file is expanded; similarly as you close it, it should recompress itself. However; you should monitor file sizes for unexpected growth and go through a number of measures to ensure your file-size is as compact as it could be.

For more detailed information Refer to Big BIM Manual pg. 19

Project Archiving and Backups

Archiving Projects

As your Revit Project files are dynamic, in that a change will affect many drawings, you may consider create an archive at strategic milestone/points in time. Typical points at which you might consider archiving might be:

At specific design/Work Stages eg:

RIBA Stage D (Planning Submitted) RIBA Stage G (Tender documentation) RIBA Stage L (Completion/As-Built documentation)

For more detailed information on Project Archiving Refer to Big BIM Manual pg. 20 Drawing Sheet Archiving - Refer to Big BIM Manual pg. 20

Backups and Rolling Back

BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011
BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011

Backups:

Files>backups

It is unusual to create a backup of this type, unless you are trying to recover from a system/network crash and can‟t get into/save your files and you have done work this day that you cannot afford to lose. On a multi-user Workset project, Revit does not have any backup files that can be accessed immediately; these may be generated when required, although the immediate backup is in the form of all the users Local Copies.

For more detailed information Refer to Big BIM Manual pg. 20

Rolling Back:

information Refer to Big BIM Manual pg. 20 Rolling Back: Never use the Roll Back feature

Never use the Roll Back feature of worksets as there is no way of undoing it and as you can‟t roll forward once done. It is safer to create a backup “Save As”, investigate the contents of that file and then remake new Central/Local files.

IT Backups

Outside the Backup facility inside Revit there should also be IT Backups made that can be restored. Before doing so, it is recommended that you copy your existing files to a reference folder, so that you can copy and paste out any new work to merge into the older restored files.

Keynoting

Procedure for creating Keynote file:

In Windows explorer copy the „RevitKeynotes_GBR.txt‟ (from the default library location) to your project folder.

Remove the read-only attribute, by right clicking over the file and going into its properties

Rename the file so that it includes the project number e.g. ProjNumber_RevitKeynotes.txt

Project Pointing/configuration:

From the „Annotate‟ Ribbon, „Tag‟ panel (extended „arrow down‟) choose „Keynote Settings…‟

Change the „Path Type‟ from „At Library Locations‟ to „Relative‟ and browse to your project folder and select the Keynote file.

For more detailed information Refer to Big BIM Manual pg. 21

Saving/Creating and applying View Templates

View Templates give users the ability to capture any number of view property settings, such as Scale, Detail Level, Visibility settings. These can then be saved/applied to a number of common views to ensure consistent display in those views.

Existing Stride Standard View Templates are:

STL - Colour Fill Plan/Section STL - Detailing View (no Model) STL - Detailing View (Underlay) STL - Elevations External STL - Elevations External Presentation STL - Fire Strategy Plan STL - GA Plan

STL - Massing Study (Only) STL - Plan Enlargement STL - Reflected Ceiling Plan STL - Room Elevations STL - Site Plan STL - Site Presentation Plan STL - GA Section

For more detailed information Refer to Big BIM Manual pg. 21

BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011
BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011

Upgrading Projects

Workset Projects

It is always a good Idea to make a backup copy of your CENTRAL/Local Files prior to the upgrade in case anything happens and you need to get back to your original.

Whenever you get a new version of Revit and you are dealing with a Workset‟d project (Multi-User), the CENTRAL File should be upgraded and saved in the latest version first. Then new local copies should be remade from the Central File. Also, ensure that any other Revit files (e.g. Site Models or Linked Revit files) are also upgraded.

For more detailed information Refer to Big BIM Manual pg. 22

Standalone Projects

Again, create a copy as a backup; in-case the upgrade causes any corruption.

Open a copy of your project in the new version.

Review any warnings

Provide a cursory check to confirm your project has upgraded satisfactorily

Project Output

Detailing

Detailing fundamentally can be accomplished in two ways:

Either by Detailing fully over the 3D model and then the 3D Geometry turned off, or

By creating a “Hybrid” detail containing some of the 3D model and 2D detail components and by masking what is not required of the 3D or turning Categories off in visibility.

For more detailed information Refer to Big BIM Manual pg. 22

Drawing Production Information

It is extremely easy to produce lots of views/drawings in Revit, therefore it is essential that we control ourselves and reduce the number of drawings created unnecessarily. The first step before producing drawings, should be the production of a drawing issue/register; this will help to ensure that people only produce drawings that are required.

For more detailed information and a schedule of what should typically be shown of each drawing type - Refer to Big BIM Manual pg. 22

Quick Reference

5
5

Support and Help

Don‟t struggle alone for more than a few minutes. Ask for help and escalate the issue as necessary.

Chain of Escalation Time spent sourcing solution – Don‟t waste hours find help quickly Follow the flow chart below:

COLLEAGUE
COLLEAGUE
find help quickly Follow the flow chart below: COLLEAGUE 1-2 Minutes REVIT HELP 5 Minutes FORUMS

1-2 Minutes

REVIT HELP
REVIT HELP
the flow chart below: COLLEAGUE 1-2 Minutes REVIT HELP 5 Minutes FORUMS 5 Minutes REVIT CHAMPIONS

5 Minutes

FORUMS
FORUMS
below: COLLEAGUE 1-2 Minutes REVIT HELP 5 Minutes FORUMS 5 Minutes REVIT CHAMPIONS 5 Minutes CAD

5 Minutes

REVIT CHAMPIONS
REVIT CHAMPIONS
REVIT HELP 5 Minutes FORUMS 5 Minutes REVIT CHAMPIONS 5 Minutes CAD MANAGER Ask People near

5 Minutes

CAD MANAGER
CAD MANAGER

Ask People near to you

Look in the Help Section (Product Help)

Check Internet/External Forums www.augi.com

Use your Studio Champions or Other studios when not available

Contact CAD Support who might need to escalate to RevitStore / Dealer / Autodesk

6
6

Quick Reference

BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011
BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011
REVIT BIM REFERENCE GUIDE FULL EDITION - VERSION 4 Date: 09/05/2011
REVIT BIM REFERENCE GUIDE
FULL EDITION - VERSION 4
Date: 09/05/2011

Revision History

Release

Issue Purpose

Date

Version1

User Base Issue

20/12/2007

Version 2 Revisions:

Full Issue

16/05/2008

Document Topics

Re-Ordered

View Naming and Drawing Sheet Naming

Extended

Saving and Storage of Groups

Added

Working with Sheets

Added

Project Browser Organisation

Added

Project Output

Added

Exporting DWG/DXF/DGN

Added

Redlining Process DWF Mark-ups

Added

Keynoting

Amended

Exporting to CAD, using the correct origin

Added

Detailing

Extended

Version 3 Revisions:

Full Issue

06/05/2009

Detailing How to Detail in Revit (Best Practice)

Amended

Revisions in Revit

Added

Location of Callouts

Added

Avoiding Large files and Economical Modelling

Added

Worksets Multi-User Projects

Added

View Templates How to

Added

Document Hyper-linking and Cross-referencing [Admin]

Added

User Group Comments

Amended

Version 4 Revisions:

Full Issue

18/07/2011

Amended to Suit new Ribbon Interface

Amended

Design Options Naming Convention

Added

Detailing How to Detail in Revit (Best Practice)

Amended

Redlining Process DWF Mark-ups

Amended

Project Archiving

Added

Workset Closing

Added

Document reformatted to A3,etc…

Amended

Autodesk, Revit, DWG, DWF are registered trademarks or trademarks of Autodesk, Inc.

Intellectual Property Rights:

This Manual has been produced with the assistance of 4 th Dimension Software/RevitStore, and may not be copied or distributed outside Stride Treglown Architects, without prior consent from the Production Director.

Table of Contents:

PROCEDURES

Starting a Project Naming Conventions Naming of Files including Workset‟d Projects Naming of Views Numbering of Sheets Material Naming Convention Family / Nested Family Naming Convention Parameter Naming Conventions Design Options Naming Conventions

Initial Project Setup Project Template File Strides Default Weight-lights table Project Location/Orientation and Co-ordination Location and Co-ordination Project Linking or Single File Worksetting Location of Callouts Avoiding large files and Economic Modelling:

Use of CAD Data:

Speed and Performance Speeding Revit Up and reducing Revit file sizes Coordination Coordination: Project and True North Coordination: Acquiring Coordinates Coordination: Re-Acquiring Coordinates Project Configuration Where you should store Project support files Where you should Save/Store Families Where you should Save/Store Groups Exporting to DWG/DXF/DGN Procedure: Pointing to DWG Export File Keynote file location Procedure: Locating Keynote File Shared Parameters Procedure: Shared Parameters pointing Use of Shared Parameters Project Organisation Working with Sheet Views Project Browser Organisation Worksets Multi-User Projects Hotdesking and Changing Username When to Save Synchronising changes made by the team:

Recreating a Central File:

Method of working:

Editing Requests:

Worksharing Monitor:

File Compact/Compression:

Standalone Project and Family Compaction Multiuser Project Compaction

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15

15

15

15

15

16

16

16

16

16

16

17

17

17

17

18

18

19

19

19

Project Archiving and Backups

19

Backups and Rolling Back

19

Procedure: Creating a Workset Backup:

19

Project Archiving Introduction

20

Drawing Sheet Archiving:

20

Project Archiving:

20

Procedure - Project archiving (Standalone Project file) :

20

Procedure - Project archiving (Worksetted/ Multi-user Project) :

20

Keynoting

21

Procedure for creating Keynote file:

21

Project Pointing/configuration:

21

Amending the Keynote file:

21

Saving/Creating and applying View Templates

21

Procedure for specifying a default view template:

21

Procedure to apply a default view template:

21

Upgrading Projects

22

Workset Projects

22

Standalone Projects

22

Project Output

22

Detailing

22

Drawing Production Information

22

Support and Help

25

HOW TO SECTION

1

Worksets

1

How to create a workset‟d Project

1

Procedure (Creation of Central File):

1

Procedure (Creation of Local file):

1

Identification of Project Type

1

How to move items onto the correct Worksets.

1

Procedure (Move items onto correct Workset):

1

Revisions in Revit

2

Procedure: - Adding Revisions

2

Procedure: - Issuing Drawings

2

Procedure: - Visual Control of Revisions

2

Coordination and Orientation

3

Coordination: Acquiring Coordinates of a CAD file

3

Procedure: - Acquiring Coordinates

3

Procedure: - Re-Acquiring Coordinates

3

Coordination: Relocate this project

3

Project Orientation

4

How to detail in Revit (Best Practice)…

6

Project Browser Organisation

8

Redlining

9

Redlining changing attitudes and workflow.

9

Traditional Workflow (for marking up changes to drawings).

9

Reasons for resisting change.

9

Benefits of using Electronic Marking up.

9

How to use Redline in Revit.

9

Using Autodesk Design Review

10

DWF Compare

10

Strides Keynoting

10

Starting a Project

Before diving headlong into your new project in Revit, there are a number of things you need to think about, no matter how experienced you are in Revit (AutoCAD experience does not count in so far as the two products are completely different). Failure to think ahead may cause untold headaches later, with possible consequences that may require the project to be rebuilt; as this is not very sensible it is vital that you spend a small amount of time at the outset technically planning how to go about building your model in Revit.

The fundamental difference between AutoCAD and Revit is in understanding the difference between CAD (Computer Aided Design) and BIM (Building Information Modeller). One obvious point is when you understand that information changed in BIM is propagated across the entire project unlike CAD.

Revit Rule #1: A change ANYWHERE, changes EVERYWHERE.

BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011
BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011

Project Implementation

Project Team It is essential to the success of your project that correct implementation is followed, this includes:

1. Assess the experience of the resource available.

2. Use your Revit Champions to book in specific training.

3. Has it been done before? Use your Champion and „everyone‟ email to contact other Studios to see if other Studios (could be in other Offices) have done it before.

4. Plan, plan and plan. Use other Studio experience and plan the project using the rules below.

5. Use the JUD (Joined up Design) process at each milestone/gateway in the project.

Project Methodology If your project contains multiple buildings or is very large and complex, there are many areas you may need to investigate including:

Worksetting One file or Multiple Project Linking Linked Revit files (repeating Units) verses Groups. Sharing and Communicating design changes with internal/external design teams.

Follow these Standards.

It is vital as everyone uses the same information, that company standards/procedures are followed, especially in

matters concerning naming of files/views etc structured well and is difficult to navigate.

There

is nothing more confusing on a project than one that is not

Minimise 3D Content. Do not over-model (model for modelling sake). Do not add 3D fixtures and fittings in every room, this will result in a sluggish model. Only add 3D fixtures and Modelling to those rooms that you will be sectioning or elevating/visualising. The same goes for the use of „Host Sweeps‟, Skirting‟s etc. If it is crucial that full scheduling of these items is required consider using the perimeter parameter in Rooms.

Less Views as possible. It is extremely easy to create multiple views at multiple scales; therefore it is very easy for users to get carried away. It is essential for a number of reasons that a minimum number of drawings are produced:

Maximise efficiency and profit. Environment saving of printing etc Fewer drawings need to be checked and revised.

Plan, Plan & Plan. Therefore plan & list drawings in advance and do not add drawings unless authorised by the project leader.

SPEND A DAY HERE, WILL SAVE YOU AT LEAST A WEEK LATER.

BIM Manual/Procedures

1
1

Naming Conventions

Naming of Files including Worksetd Projects

Naming of Project files (Standalone Project):

Project Number_Description

e.g. 12345_Building.rvt for a single Building e.g. 12345_Block A.rvt for multiple Buildings on a site e.g. 12345_Site.rvt for a Site Topography file e.g. 12345_Massing.rvt for a Massing study or neighbouring buildings

Naming of Project files (Workset‟d Project – Multi-user Project) Project Number_Description CENTRAL for Central Files Project Number_Description USERSNAME for Local Files

e.g. Central File Example: 12345_Building CENTRAL.rvt

e.g. Local File Example:

12345_Building TANJA RYCROFT.rvt

e.g. Local File Example: 12345_Building TANJA RYCROFT.rvt Note: Please ensure that your Project Filename is

Note: Please ensure that your Project Filename is appropriately named as this filename and location is printed out on your drawing to the side of the title panel. There is an option not to print this with the drawing for each drawing sheet, by selecting the sheet and going into Element Properties and toggling off the visibility of the Parameter called “VIS – CAD Filepath”.

Naming of Views

Views that are created from existing or new levels in a project, shall all be suffixed by either the word “Wrkg, WORKINGor Working. These views are to be considered working views that will not be assembled on a drawing sheet consider these as being views that you will work-up, they will contain all categories in a visible form, all rooms and all object tags (e.g. Room Tags/Door and Window Tags etc…). These views will also contain any constraining (Locking) dimensions to ensure everyone involved in the project understands immediately what constraints have been added by all users (e.g. Doors constrained a set distance from an adjoining partition or Equalisation dimensions for rooms of equal width, or objects set out and constrained so that they are central within a bay (e.g. Door set out central within a corridor).

All Duplicated views for assembly onto Drawing Sheets are to be named logically, by Level first followed by a description of that views primary purpose.

2
2

See Examples in the following image.

BIM Manual/Procedures

2 See Examples in the following image. BIM Manual/Procedures Naming - Plan Views: The preferred naming

Naming - Plan Views:

The preferred naming of your original floor plans, should be:

00_Ground Wrkg

Views to be placed on sheets named by Level first followed by description of the views primary purpose. (This helps in Navigation. The title that appears on the sheet may contain different text – use parameter “Title on Sheet”).

Note 1: Callout Views - Below

Note 1: Callout Views - Below

Note 1: Callout Views - Below

The prefixing numerals, align themselves with the actual floor level (e.g. 00 for Ground, 01 for First, -01 for foundation/basement level) When these views are duplicated they should all be renamed so that all views are neatly sorted/grouped as the original and suffixed by the views intended use (e.g. 00_Ground Fire Strategy).

BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011
BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011

Naming - Callout Views:

Callouts can be added to Plan, Elevation and Section views, they can either create an enlarged area of the Plan or a Strip Section.

Important: All Callouts should be placed in views that are to be placed on Drawing dependent views (do not place these on the Original/Parent view)create an enlarged area of the Plan or a Strip Section. Sheets; this includes When an

Sheets; this includes

When an enlargement of a Plan is made from a Callout these should be renamed as other plans by their level first followed by a description of the callouts purpose. Callouts should also include the word Callout, so that it is clear how that view was formed being a Callout rather than a duplicated view.

Examples (Plan Views): 00_Ground Callout of Changing Rooms. 00_Ground Callout of Lift/Cores

Examples (Sections):

Section X Callout Wall Strip on GL12 Section Y Callout Lift Shaft

Callouts added for detail purposes, both in Plan and Section views shall be prefixed by the word Detail then a brief description of what the detail is about.

Examples (Plan Views): Plan Detail Typical Window Closure Plan Detail Typical Door Jamb

Examples (Sections):

Section Detail Typical Eaves Section Detail Window Section

Note 1: (See Image on Previous Page) Detail Views created from Callouts can be created as “Floor Plan” or “Detail Views”, this is achieved by selecting the type while creating the view from the Type Selector (this can‟t. Be changed afterwards). For creation of Details the “Detail Views” type is the preferred method. Should you need to change the View Range this can only be achieved in a Floor Plan view, therefore a combination may well be necessary.

Naming - Dependent Views:

Dependent views are views that have been created specifically where a projects footprint is too large to be placed onto one sheet. All Dependent views and their (Parent) view are linked so that changes made to annotation and graphics are replicated in all these linked views; unlike when you simply duplicate a view „with or without Detailing‟. Warning:

1. Be aware that when you place Dependent views on sheets and the Project Browser is set to „not on sheets‟ these views will not disappear from the browser unless all dependent views including the parent are located on drawing sheets. 2. Also be aware that Callouts should be placed on the Child/ Dependant views and not the Parent/Original views

Dependant views and not the Parent/Original views – Location of Callouts on Page 8 BIM Manual

Location of Callouts

on Page 8

BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011
BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011

Naming - 3D Views:

All 3D Parallel projection views (i.e. non Perspective) shall be prefixed by 3D_ then followed by a logical description of the view

Examples:

3D_Cropped Ground Floor 3D_NE Axonometric

Camera Perspective views shall be prefixed by Perspective_ then followed by a logical description.

Examples:

Perspective_View from Parsons Street Perspective_Front Entrance

In this way the views are categorised and a clear distinction is formed between Parallel and Perspective projection views.

Naming - Schedule Views:

All Schedules should be named logically. The only restriction this document enforces is that Schedule Keys shall be named in a way that it is clear that it supports other Schedules; this can be done by removing the word Schedule and replacing it for the words Key Style.

Examples:

Ironmongery Key Style (for a specification of Ironmongery Sets) Door Key Style Finishes Key Style

of Ironmongery Sets) Door Key Style Finishes Key Style Tip: It is a Good Idea to

Tip: It is a Good Idea to create a full schedule and name this “Working” similar to Working plan views, eg: “Door Schedule – Wrkg”. These Schedules will never be issued, they contain all fields and contain no filtering. The purpose of these Schedules is to allow a fully coordinated view of the data. This helps keep oversights and mistakes to a minimum which might otherwise be overlooked in filtered/stripped down versions.

BIM Manual/Procedures

3
3

Numbering of Sheets

The Stride Treglown drawing numbering system is based on the CI/SfB and BS1192 part 5 Systems which are nationally recognised standards. Any changes to this system requested by a client should be resisted, as the STL adopted system is widely used and understood.

What follows is an example of a typical drawing number.

Typical drawing number.

AL_(2)_0204

drawing number. Typical drawing number. A L _ (2) _ 0204 0204 Drawing Number (Unique) (2)

0204

Drawing Number (Unique)

(2)

(CI/SfB) Code

L

LACS Code

A

Discipline

A

=

Discipline

(Refer 1)

L

=

LACS Code

(Refer 2)

(2)

=

CI/SfB Code

(Refer 3)

0204

=

Drawing Number

(Refer 4)

1 Discipline

This field is for the Discipline/Agent responsible. As Stride is primarily an Architectural Practice, this will be an A, which is therefore optional. There are however other disciplines within the practice, such as Landscape and Planning and a different code will be required. See table below for full list of Discipline codes.

A

Architects

F

Facilities Managers

L

Landscape

T

Town & Country Planners

Architects

B

Building Surveyors

G

Geographical Information System (GIS) Engineers and Land Surveyors

M

Mechanical

W

Contractors

Engineers

C

Civil Engineers

H

Heating and

P

Public Health

X

Subcontractors

Ventilating

Engineers

Engineers

D

Drainage, Sewage and Road Engineers

I

Interior Designers

Q

Quantity

Y

Specialist

Surveyors

Designers

E

Electrical Engineers

K

Client

S

Structural

Z

General (non-

Engineers

disciplinary)

NOTE J, R, U or V may be allocated to other agents on particular projects.

2 LACS Code

This field is for the drawing purpose several are as follows.

L

= Location Drawings (general arrangement (GA) and Large Scale layout Drawings)

A

= Assembly Drawings (Details)

C

= Component drawings (for specially made components such as balustrading etc.

P

= Planning drawings

SK

= Sketch Drawings

S

= Schedules (written or drawn)

EX

= Existing Drawings

D

= Demolition Drawings

Examples

L : Location

e.g. Site & Floor Plans/Layouts, Elevations and Large

4
4

BIM Manual/Procedures

scale Sections down to scale of say 1:20

A

: Assembly

e.g. Sections & Details 1:10 1:1

C

: Component

e.g. Windows/Curtain Wall assembly generally from a scale of 1:20 1:10

S

: Schedules

e.g. door schedules

3 CI/SfB Code

Cl/SfB is in use for the coordination of information by offices with one or two staff up to one to two thousand staff, for all sizes of projects, for new work and alterations. The initials CI stand for 'Construction Index'. SfB stands for 'Samarbetskommitth for Byggnadsfragor', the name of the classification system authorized by the International Council for Building Research Studies and Documentation (CIB) for the structuring and filing of construction industry information.

For the Stride drawing numbering purposes this field should use 1 number predominately, to describe the information contained within the drawing. For more complex and large projects the 2 number system can be used refer to the CI/SfB Construction Index Manual available on the internet.

There are three main divisions of table 1:

The building fabric at (1) to (4); Services coded (5) to (6); Fittings coded (7) to (8). Numbers not included in this table may be used for any purpose in private applications.

If an exact code cannot be found in the table for the information contained within the drawing, the main element heading closest to the contained information should be used.

Table 1

(0)

General, Site, Project

 

(1)

Substructure

Foundations, Retaining Walls, Tanking, Substructure elements

(2)

Structure

Primary Elements:

Walls//Floors//Stairs//Ramps//Roofs//Frames

(3)

Secondary Elements

Secondary Elements to Walls: Doors/Windows. Secondary elements to Floors(Raised Access)/Stairs(Railings). Suspended Ceilings. Secondary elements to Roofs: Roof Lights//Windcatchers. Other Secondary elements.

(4)

Finishes

Finishes to External/Internal Walls//Floors//Stairs//Roofs//Other finishes to Structure

(5)

Services

All items Mechanical and Plumbing

(6)

Electrical Services

All items Electrical

(7)

Fittings

Kitchen Cabinets(Casework),Sanitary

(8)

Equipment and Furniture

Loose Furniture and Specialist Equipment

(9)

Externals

Externals: Barriers/Railings/Bollards/Cycle Shelters, Fencing, Lakes etc

4 Drawing Number

This field is for the drawing number, which should be four digits long. All drawing numbers need to be unique.

Therefore even in a Complex project numbering situation where 2 CI/SfB coding is employed, the following should not ever happen:

Example AL(21)0001 and AL(24)0001.

In this case the four digit number needs to be changed.

BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011
BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011

Example Numbering of Sheets

Before creating any Drawings within your Revit project, a drawing register should have been created first.

A Typical project will have Floor Plans and Elevations in one section i.e. AL (.) … then Details and Sections in AA(.)

… and Schedules in the section AS (.) …. So if this project is assumed to need 20 plans/Elevations, then leave a reasonable gap in your numbering to allow for additional views that you may have overlooked or require due to changes of design or outside forces such as clients or design team members requiring additional information. This

should be a large enough a gap to allow for the unforeseen, in small project a gap of 10 drawing numbers may be OK, whereas in larger projects you may consider a gap of 50 drawing numbers being appropriate. The Numerical portion of a Drawing Number, can be duplicated throughout the project, but is often beneficial when it

is not duplicated. In other words the first construction detail should not start at drawing 001 as this may duplicate a

plan 001, even though the drawing prefix is different. Typical Project Example:

Plans and Elevations (25 Drawings)

AL(.) 001 025

A gap left of say 10 Drawings Details and Sections (40 Drawings)

AA(.) 036 076

A Gap left of say 20 Drawings Schedules (15 Drawings)

AS(.) 097 112

BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011
BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011

Typical Workset Naming

Two reasons for using Worksets, other than multiple users working on the same project file:

Areas of the building can be unloaded from memory, therefore helping performance. Worksets may be controlled in visibility.

A good guide to the number of Worksets in a project is somewhere between 8 and 20. More than 20 becomes time-

consuming ensuring that all elements are correctly associated with their workset. It is easier to work with a smaller number of Worksets than a large one! There are obviously exceptions for instance where a multi-building projects Worksets may be further divided for each building type/name in this case prefix all Worksets by the building reference (e.g. Block A - External Envelope). The Naming of Worksets depends on the type of project. For example a Hospital Building might be split down into department names and vertical and horizontal circulation areas, whereas an Office building would typically be divided into Floors, Cores and Envelopes. Therefore there can be no strict guidelines but the structure of your naming should be logical and easily identifiable by all users. Also, there should be Worksets made for each Revit Link and also one for Linked/Imported CAD Data.

Typical Workset Naming might include the following:

External Envelope External Works GF Internal Layout FF Internal Layout etcfor potentially all floors Lifts/Stairs and Core Areas Fixtures and Fittings FF&E Atrium/Entrance Roofing Package Revit Links CAD Format Data

Users should resist the temptation to create temporary Worksets so that certain parts of the building can be turned off. Users should exhaust the following areas of Revit Functionality first:

Visibility Graphics Hide in View Visibility Filters

- for hiding Category - for hiding elements in view - for hiding filtered selections

Material Naming Convention

Materials inside Projects and Families should be named as follows:

By the actual material first followed by a description of its colour/texture etc Examples:

Wood Beech Natural or Wood Beech Polished Metal Aluminium Powder Coated Light Blue Metal Copper bronze matt Finishes Render Pink Pebbledash Finishes Paint Magnolia Emulsion

If this is not done, then it becomes difficult for yourself and others, to find if there is a material that can be assigned without the need to create any additions.

BIM Manual/Procedures

5
5

Family / Nested Family Naming Convention

There is no strict outline for this however it should follow that same logical convention as set out in the Autodesk Metric Library. Temporary naming should be avoided. One observation when naming families is that if there are two families for-instance a 2D Detail and a Corresponding 3D family, or families of differing categories but of the same object (i.e. Steel Beam) then the family may not have the same name as an incompatibility will result in the later family from not being able to be loaded. Therefore the 2D family should maybe be prefixed by “2D_”FamilyName. If there are a number of families in a series of similar styles then they should all be named the same prefixed by a number. e.g. Chair(1), Chair(2), or Man(1), Man(2), or Kitchen Corner Unit(1), Kitchen Corner Unit(2). Please try to restrict the length of the filename – don‟t get carried away and end up with a filename the length of a short essay/story. Regarding nested families; the nested family should be named according to what the element is e.g. “Chair Modern” and the Host family named as the complete item e.g. “Conference Table w Chairs”. Note the abbreviation of w is used rather than the complete word “with”. Other Autodesk Abbreviations in common use in family Naming:

W

= With

Ext

= External

Int

= Internal

Dbl

= Double

Sgl

= Single

Tpl

= Triple

Parameter Naming Conventions

All Parameters within families should be clearly named. If you create a Parameter within your family the person using your family next should easily identify what each Parameter does, just from its name. Don‟t abbreviate unless it is obvious; remember your logic is not always the same as someone else‟s! Follow the examples within the standard Autodesk Content, these serve as good examples.

the standard Autodesk Content, these serve as good examples. Note you can view the Parameter without

Note you can view the Parameter without the need to open the family by going into the Element properties of a family, click the preview button, and then the relevant Parameter. In the Preview Pane change the view to say a Plan/Section/Elevation and Revit will highlight the Parameter in Red within the contents preview.

If you do abbreviate parameters whilst testing, ensure that you go back and rename them.

Remember that there are two types of Parameters inside Revit. See later sections on Shared Parameters. However, listed below are the two types that will make it clear if the parameter should be a “Family” or a “Shared” parameter.

Family Parameters:

These may occur in Schedules but not in tags. However this is only true if the parameters have been created inside the project, not in a family!

Shared Parameters:

These can be shared within multiple projects and families and appear in Schedules and Tags, also they can be exported to an external database. Care must be taken in using Shared Parameters see later section for details.

6
6

BIM Manual/Procedures

Design Options Naming Conventions

All Design Options and Design Option Sets should be named logically, so that all users on the project understand

immediately what the options relate to. It is not acceptable to call them Option 1, Option 2 etc should describe the purpose of that design option. Examples:

There naming

Design Option Set

Design Option

Example 1

Balcony Alternatives

Flank Walls with Mess Railing

 

Glass Railing Surround

Example 2

Plantroom Treatments

Cladding with Louvre Grilles

 

Rendered Walls with Grilles

Example 3

Entrance Alternatives

Curtain Wall (Planar Glazing)

 

Single Storey, Projecting Brickwork

BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011
BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011

Initial Project Setup

Project Template File

Always start a new project from a Company Template file, located in the following location - „O:\Revit\Templates‟. Within this are, you will find the general Strides template and any other Sector/Studio specific templates. All Client specific templates shall also be located in client specific folders beneath this location. This area is locked out for editing, therefore if you have a template that should be located there, it needs to be approved and copied into this area by the CAD Manager.

The initial Drafting view containing Project Information and Project BIM Roles‟ should be filled out and maintained throughout the lifecycle of the project. This initial View should also be the last view open before saving and exiting your project. Closing all other views will help in subsequent re-opening of the file.

Strides Default Weight-lights table

re-opening of the file. Strides Default Weight-lights table BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011 Project
BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011
BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011

Project Location/Orientation and Co-ordination

Location and Co-ordination

Outline Procedure:

1. Draw the Building in the predominant orientation that it is required on a sheet.

the predominant orientation that it is required on a sheet. 2. Link your Site plan –
the predominant orientation that it is required on a sheet. 2. Link your Site plan –

2. Link your Site plan Normally an AutoCAD

drawing file.

3. Move and Rotate the Site Plan (Linked CAD File), so that it is located correctly, relative to the Building.

4. Pin the linked geometry so that it can‟t inadvertently be moved or deleted.

5. Acquire the coordinates of the DWG/External Geometry. (In Early Stage design this may not be the

best option, it may be better to use Rotate True North until the buildings location on the site is firmed up)

– until the buildings location on the site is firmed up) See Also “How To” Section

See Also “How To” Section on Project Orientation

on

Page 4

See Also “How To” Section on Project/True North

on

Page 5

6. All remaining Referenced DWG information may be linked using the shared coordinates.

Project Linking or Single File Worksetting

Single file: (Project Building(s) in a single file) Pros

Changes to building objects can be made and reloaded only once to amend complete project.

Healing of Building Junctions; e.g. Walls Joins also Areas/Rooms between Building junctions/Links joining Buildings.

Changes made to Project Standards can be made once and are reflected across the whole project.

Cons

Potentially large file size, therefore needs careful consideration given to getting best performance.

May be busy with lots of levels for stepped site terrains, therefore more to navigate in an elements properties e.g. base and top constraints.

Multi Building files: (Project Building(s) split over multiple files) Pros

Smaller individual file sizes, therefore faster performance.

Simplified Revit navigation/structure

Simplified masterplan coordination

Cons

Content, Systems Families and Project Standards need to be reloaded/transferred to other projects more potential to forget what has changed.

Additional processes/complexity required to get views of linked buildings to appear how you want them.

BIM Manual/Procedures

7
7

Location of Callouts

Callouts should only be placed in views that are to be placed on drawing sheets; this includes parent views of dependent views. The Reason for this is explained below:

Normal Callout in regular views:

If Callouts are placed on views other than those views placed on sheets, you would not be able to determine where the detail/plan callouts were located. Having them on views placed on sheets enables the callout locations to be identified on a location plan/section on your drawing. It is possible to find out a views origins/parent view from its view properties. However callouts must come from sheet views in order to create properly coordinated drawing sets. Further to this, if required a view on a sheet can display from which drawing it came from in the viewports title, providing the annotation Family within the viewport type includes the label „Referencing Sheet‟.

Callouts in Dependent views:

Callouts MUST be placed on dependent views created from the Parent view, NOT placed on the Parent (Original View). This is because if the callouts are created on the original (Parent) view then they will reference the drawing sheet that the first Dependent view gets dropped on, (This appears to be a bug). This situation may occur accidently when all detail callouts are positioned on a plan first and then it is decided that the plan is too large to be placed on one sheet and dependent views are considered. Should this be the case, then before you start detailing the Callouts, the Callouts should be cut and pasted into the dependent views from the Parent view.

and pasted into the dependent views from the Parent view. See Also Section on naming of

See Also Section on naming of Callouts

on

Page 3

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BIM Manual/Procedures

BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011
BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011

Avoiding large files and Economic Modelling:

Large Revit files obviously impact on the performance of your project. There are a number of things that can cause various degrees of performance related slowdown, amongst them the following:

WHAT SLOWS PROJECTS DOWN and MAY LEAD TO LARGER FILE SIZES

Project Management:

Unresolved Errors (Warnings) Too Many Unused views Too Many unused elements (Purge Unused) Compression of Database Incorrectly working with Worksets Not closing unnecessary views, when no longer needed. Limiting extents of far clipping in views

Modelling:

Over Modelling your Project Improper use of 2D/3D Components Over-constraining the Model Incorrect use of Groups and Families Use of Arrays Design Options Visualisation Rendering and Shadows Level of Detail

Project Setup:

Don‟t always assume the Model should be built as one file, it might be better as separate files linked together.

Use of CAD Data:

Incorrect use of DWG/CAD imported data Non removal of redundant/old DWG/CAD files DWG information inside Families

Detailing:

Incorrect Detailing methodology Over-constraining detailing against the 3D model. Non use of Families, not items that are grouped and copied around your project Repeating Details when items would normally be arrayed

BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011
BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011

WHAT CAN BE DONE TO AVOID LARGE LETHARGIC PROJECTS?

Project Management:

1. Regular correction of Unresolved Errors (Warnings).

2. Delete Temporary/Unused views.

3. Purge unused elements.

4. Compress Database

5. Review management of Worksets

6. Close unnecessary views

7. Limit extents of far clipping

Regular Correction of Unresolved Errors (Warnings)

There are two types of errors in Revit. One that will not allow you to progress any further so you have to cancel out of what you are doing. The other error is a warning that informs you of something but allows you to continue in what you are doing, this error should wherever possible be resolved.

Revit 2011 - You can see how many warnings your project has by going to “Warnings

Panel. If there are no warnings this item will be greyed out. Since the release 2009, warning functionality has been enhanced so that if you make a selection on screen, if there is any warning related to anything you have selected it will display Revit 2011 – as a warning icon on a “Warning” Panel. These warnings should be dealt with as much as possible when they occur, if not they can significantly slow your project down or cause mistakes such as double counting items in schedules. These warnings should not be ignored and time should be set aside to correct them.

Delete Temporary/Unused views

It is too easy to create additional views when views already exist. Prime candidates being the creation of additional sections for viewing the model; these temporary views should be deleted as soon as possible. Views push up the overall file size, especially highly filtered and complex schedules. So regular project maintenance should involve the deletion of views that are not placed on sheets and are not working views, this should also include the removal of older sketches that are no longer relevant.

on the Modify Tab “Inquiry”

Purge unused elements

Purging a file will clear the Database of Families/Groups and other styles that are unused. Care should be taken that you don‟t purge too early, for instance; you may be forced to “Transfer Project Standards” from a new project to be able to add curtain wall mullions if no curtain wall had so far been placed. Normally purging your project makes a very small saving on file-size, apart from where there are numerous unused groups.

Compress Database

Revit is a proprietary Database, where you manipulate data that generates the graphics in a projects views, rather than traditional CAD software that you drive graphically, that may or may not contain additional data attached to the drawn elements. Database programmes typical feature a compression utility, this is because as you open the file it expands and similarly as you close it, it should recompress itself. However; you should monitor file sizes and unexpected growth and go through a number of measures to ensure your file-size is as compressed as it can be. “Therefore compression of the Database is essential”. All Revit files can be compressed; this includes Revit project (rvt) and also Families (rfa) files. The method of compression varies depending on if the project file is standalone or the file is part of a Workset system of files.

Method of Compression:

Standalone Revit Projects and Families can be compressed as follows

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Compacting these files is performed using the “Save As” dialogue – under the “Options

using the “ Save As ” dialogue – under the “Options ” button. Toggle the option

” button.

Toggle the option to Compact the file, if it is not already.

Should this make little/no difference to the size of your file, then a save as a different name will maximise the compressed state of a file.

Compacting Families:

Note: It can be really important to ensure that Families are Purged and Compacted, especially if these become Company Library items. Families can grow in size and a Simple “SaveAs” has often compacted Families down to 50-25% of the original file size.

Worksetted files are compressed differently. This is explained in the section of this manual on Worksets.

Review management of Worksets

of this manual on Worksets. Review management of Worksets Method of Working with Worksets Workset File

Method of Working with Worksets

Workset File Compression

on

Page 17

on

page 19

Close unnecessary views

Closing Views down when they are no longer needed. The more views of the model that Revit has open the more views that Revit has to recalculate when it needs to regenerate the current view. Therefore if you no longer require the view, close it down. Only keep open the views that are essential for you to carry out your work. It will take less time to open any new views rather than the alternative of Revit forcing a regen in each and every opened view. As an example, in the case of complex changes to Model groups this could take several minutes for Revit to regenerate the current view let alone having a similar regen in the dozen views that have been left open. When you notice the status bar constantly reporting regeneration and redrawing of views then you should check to see if any more views may be closed, but keep your eye on the number of views you have open at all time.

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Limit extents of far clipping

In an effort to limit processing time that Revit needs to regenerate/display a View, it is wise to control the extent of view clipping; failure to address view clipping could result in unnecessary view regeneration and extended plotting time. This normally applies in Sections and Elevations, not so frequently to Plan views. If you consider that Revit has to do a complex hidden line removal computation as it refreshes the view and when it comes to plot creation, then the far clip should be limited to displaying only what is required and no farther. So in the case of Sections, pull back the far clipping plane in Plan so that you limit the extents.

far clipping plane in Plan so that you limit the extents. Before – the default view

Before the default view depth.

you limit the extents. Before – the default view depth. After – controlling the far clip.

After controlling the far clip.

Internal Elevations should be controlled to avoid Revit from having to process additional information that is behind the wall that you are elevating. This will increase plotting time and regeneration of the view, as the Images above depict. Without changing the far clip would result in Revit having to calculate all the geometry of the Canteen furniture behind the Gymnasium Wall, whereas the image to the right will result in Revit only generating the necessary geometry for the view. Therefore if you manage the far clip you could find a significant improvement.

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BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011

Modelling:

Over Modelling your Project

Over-modelling is a classic culprit of causing a project to run slowly. It is not necessary to model everything! Remember, you should only be trying to produce sufficient information for plans/elevations and sections not to create a photo realistic model in 3D. Examples of Modelling pitfalls:

Weep Holes and DPC/DPM although these make the 3D look very nice, these should be added as detail components in elevations/sections.

Wall Sweeps and Reveals in Walls – don‟t model if a simple surface pattern will do! Also Reveals and Sweeps may cause complications to openings within the wall.

Standing Seam roof profiles may appear all very nice in 3D, but would a surface pattern suffice? Bear in mind what you used to show in previous non Revit projects.

Don‟t model items, if there is a tool for it for example railings

Coordination exercises cause many to resort to over modelling – Don‟t get drawn into modelling other Disciplines components. It is acceptable to Model Structural Steelwork for Columns and Beams that benefit the project for say co-ordination, however a step too far may be items such as Haunches and Castellation‟s on Rafters, Column Base Plates, Bracing etc

Floor expansion joints - rather than splitting floors, simple Model lines could be employed, or a better alternative is to use detail lines in the relevant view.

Avoid wherever possible the use of inplace families try to create them as standard component families (library items), especially where there are a number of them of the same type.

Only place skirting‟s into rooms where a visual is required or where typical room elevations are needed, but think if you can add them as simple detail lines in the room elevations. Remember to turn wall sweeps off in plan if you don‟t wish to see them as they and other wall sweeps will appear automatically.

Simple rule to remember is only Model what you need to, „those items you wish to Schedule or display in multiple views‟ – read this statement in conjunction with the section on Level of detail.

Improper use of 2D/3D Components

Do not place 3D Components throughout the Model, when 2D representations will suffice:

In most cases it is only necessary to see 3D Components, such as Furniture/Sanitary items etc

and the occasional cropped 3D view (3D Section Box) this typically covers client presentation and early planning/concept production information.

In all other cases a 2D representation will save regeneration time and project size.

in perspectives

Outside any 3D views, 2D families are sufficient (This includes 3D Families with 2D linework not 3D Geometry), saving regeneration and plotting processing time, in that they do not cause Revit to perform Hidden Line calculations typically 2D representations are sufficient for Construction drawings.

As an example, you might create a Plumbing Fixture that contains 2D Plan/Front and Side Elevations of a Basin or Toilet these may either contain symbolic lines and Masking Regions, or they could even be Detail Components loaded into their appropriate view. As there is a lack of 3D geometry in this Family Revit will process it much quicker and the symbolic appearance is easily achieved. (Note: Remember to set geometry visibility for each view and level of detail correctly, so that items are efficiently processed.)

Where model groups are used in a project consider having 3D and 2D alternatives. Use 3D Groups in presentation views and 2D Groups throughout the rest of the project. Example: Adding 3D Hospital Beds to every room in the Hospital project will bring any software package to its knees!

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BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011

Over-Constraining the Model

Your Model may have too many Constraints built into it – „objects constrained against others. If the Model has too many Constraints they can cause serious problems in the performance of your project.

Examples of Constraints:

Dimensions that are locked e.g. locking the width of a corridor

Equalising Dimensions

Aligning Walls together and locking them excessive use of locking elements will cause Revit to have to perform additional calculations whilst regenerating the view and whilst checking for interferences.

Pinned Objects.

All Constraints should be indicated in the working views Equalising dimensions and locking dimensions should be left visible in these views. Do NOT delete Equalising dimensions without clicking the “Unconstrain” button – failure to do this i.e. clicking OK will result in the constraint still being active and users will be unaware of this.

still being active and users will be unaware of this. Example: A Penthouse level needed to

Example: A Penthouse level needed to be changed, but where the levels had been equalised and the dimension deleted. It was extremely difficult to find the EQ symbol amongst the model geometry so that it could be unconstrained allowing the level to be changed this wasted considerable time.

Minimising constraints will reduce such errors as “Can‟t keep joined” when moving objects and Work-sharing issues where users may unknowingly take ownership of an object.

Incorrect use of Groups and Families

Groups are very powerful. However updating large quantities of groups can create large demands on your computers resources. Wherever you can, try to use families instead of groups.

You should endeavour to limit the number of families that incorporate nested parametric families, ask yourself do I require this functionality and is there an alternative way.

Try to limit the use of Voids in families. If you can create the same geometry by creating an inner loop within an extrusion, this is better as Revit only has one object to consider rather than two. Also remember that Extrusions are more economical in their use than Sweeps.

Avoid In-Place families wherever possible especially if there are multiple instances of them. Remember In- Place Families do not schedule with parametric data, or save space; each time they are copied it creates new objects that Revit has to deal with as opposed to referencing the initial type.

Where possible avoid formulas and arrays in families, if there is an alternative.

Use of Masking Regions and Symbolic lines are less taxing on your system than the 3D geometry, so use this to replace the geometry in plan views and maybe in elevation as well.

Use Non-Parametric content or only necessary parameters rather than building the family fully parametric just as a good exercise. If it doesn‟t need to be altered then there should be no reason for any parameters in the family.

Avoid using “Instance” parameters in Families as Revit has to remember all occurrences of that family as individuals rather than “Type” parameters where Revit references all of that family type.

Use 2D families in all cases where the 3D geometry is not essential.

Remove all imported geometry from a Revit Family once you have created the representation of it using Revit geometry As well as imported geometry dont forget to remove all imported line patterns and imported layers. (If you are creating a family from an external CAD file, ensure the imported CAD file has

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been stripped down/purged and elements placed on the base layer/level. This will save time having cleared the Revit Family of imported data).

save time having cleared the Revit Family of imported data). Ensure groups contain families rather than

Ensure groups contain families rather than lines remember Families save space whereas Groups don’t!

Example:

Families save space whereas Groups don’t! Example: Typical Statistics: 320 Groups, containing 2500 lines

Typical Statistics:

320

Groups, containing 2500 lines (Representing room fittings)

= 100Mb

320

Groups, containing families of 2500 lines

= 4Mb

Therefore using Groups that contain lines, rather than the equivalent families will render your project unworkable!

Use of Arrays

Arrays can be used to create copies of an object(s); these can be associated so that the number of elements within the array can be adjusted at any point. By removing the parametric associations either at the point of undertaking an Array or retrospectively by ungrouping the element, performance may be improved. Don‟t “Group and Associate” items in an Array where there is no intension of changing the number at a future point.

Design Options

It is recommended that you limit the use of rooms in design options to the absolute minimum as additional processing time is spent in determining room option conflicts.

Separate Models should be considered for variations to the whole building, or a significant percentage of the whole.

When changes are made to the main model all design options will be updated, therefore retain design options only as long as they are needed.

Review if the design options could be maintained in external models and linked in as required.

Remember to set the visibility of the design option statically in all views other than working views, so that once the Primary option is “Accepted” then those views can be deleted from your model, therefore tidying your model of unwanted views.

Visualisation Shadows and Rendering

Shadows:

Shadows create a form of rendering within your view and therefore force Revit to regenerate the view when the viewpoint is changed or panning within the view. Shadows should only be displayed where necessary and certainly not present on your regular working views, only on views such as presentation elevations.

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Rendering and Raster Images:

BIM Manual/Procedures

When you create a Render, consider exporting out of Revit to any of the available formats, rather than saving rendered views in your project, as this will increase your file size. Remember if each Render was to a high quality and if exported would be say 6Mb and you had say 5 rendered views that would increase your project size by 30Mb!

You should remove all unneeded raster images as these add weight to performance slowdown and to project size. In a Multi-user project, consider placing large raster images on a separate Workset, so the Workset can be closed to save on memory.

Level of Detail

Level of Detail, is important. If you like to think of the 3 Levels of detail as:

Course Level of Detail

Used for Planning drawings and information at an early stage.

Medium Level of Detail

Used for GA Plan/Sections and Construction Elevations

Fine Level of Detail

Detailed Views e.g. Plan Callouts and Construction details

Remember, if you didn‟t model the elements to this level of detail in CAD, why are you doing so now?

Example: An Elevation at 1:100 with a balcony mesh railing this would be shown with a few lines in CAD at about a spread of 100mm. If you model the railing accurately then the balcony will plot out a black mess as there will be too many items to plot at the scale. Therefore model the Railing in a simplified form e.g. with a solid panel that has a material mapped that reduces to a model pattern at 100mm centres. Then the railing may be detailed in 2D when you get down to that level of detail in your 1:20/1:10 detail, it might appear that you are doing twice as much, but it is extremely important for the health of your project.

Project Setup:

The Initial project assessment is one of the most important areas ensuring that your project “Heads off in the correct Direction”. Failure to think carefully about how your project should be built and how it might be kept “Lean and Mean” will result in a sluggish project that may have to undergo severe surgery, to once more look and feel healthy! As this is the most important area to think about, you should devote a reasonable amount of time and effort to think the project though. Remember colleagues and your CAD Support staff can be a good sounding board, and they may anticipate issues that you may not have thought about or think of alternatives you may not have considered employing.

think of alternatives you may not have considered employing. Here are some things to consider while

Here are some things to consider while you evaluate your projects setting up:

Can the project be split-up? Are there natural breaks in the building(s)? Therefore Linked Revit files may be considered. Always consider splitting Site and the surrounding/neighbouring buildings as separate files. Possibly consider the neighbouring buildings as massed objects and again maybe these could be separate to the Site Model. Separating files enables you to unload those files you currently do not need to see and reload them only when they need to be viewed/plotted.

How can any complexity in the Model be simplified at an early design stage and how might it be detailed to a higher level of detail at Detail Design stage. Review the level of detail and information that is essential to provide other team members and your client, avoid the situation of over-modelling.

Anticipate what other CAD/Graphics software packages are going to be employed on this project and how Revit will be best set-up to work with them and how this might affect the project setup, not just in your in-house team but the whole construction team.

How many people are expected to work on the project? Consider Worksetting your project.

Try to allocate a member of staff that will coordinate and look after the model. This person should be well versed in setting up Revit projects from the start as opposed to users that help out with editing. As with all projects, avoid bringing in too many people into the project to help out this may cause an inability to control your work quality and may cause inefficiencies later in the projects cycle.

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BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011

Use of CAD Data:

Incorrect use of DWG/CAD imported data

CAD Files should wherever possible be linked not imported as a Link does not load the geometry into the project and increase the files size, whereas Imported files do! Imported CAD files can be extremely difficult to find. Both Imported and Linked CAD files will display in the Visibility Graphics dialogue, Linked files may be removed simply by Managing Links; however, Imported files have to be located in the view they were placed. That means that each View firstly has to be checked in Visibility Graphics to ensure it is on and then all elements filtered to try to locate the CAD file and this could take a long time most people give up!, but the file still exists in the project and will potentially slow the project down.

Non removal of redundant/old DWG/CAD files

CAD files should be removed when they are no longer required, many users forget to remove the link, therefore periodically projects should be checked and redundant information removed.

DWG information inside Families

The inclusion of CAD files within Revit Families should be avoided, wherever possible; CAD files create performance issues. Revit prefers its own format. Too much use of CAD Manufactures data inside Families for

detailing a project, will slow the project down. It is therefore recommended that the use of Revit objects (Lines, Filled

Regions etc

)

replace the CAD information within these Families and that the CAD files are deleted from them.

Detailing:

One thing that will cause Revit not to run efficiently is detailing in an inefficient method/way. Inefficient detailing practices include:

1. Non use of Families, not items that are grouped and copied around your project

2. Incorporation of large quantities of AutoCAD files for detailing.

3. Arraying objects that repeat on a regular spacing.

4. Over-constraining detailing against the 3D Model.

1. Whilst selecting a number of Lines and filled regions to make a group is easy, it is not efficient, as many objects locations constantly need to be recorded.

as many objects locations constantly need to be recorded. Recommendation: Build more items that are in

Recommendation: Build more items that are in use in a number of locations as Detail families, these are way

more efficient and can be utilised in future project. Detail Components are easy to create and the process will take no longer than drawing the individual object within the project!

2. Revit is less efficient in using Imported CAD file information than its own native objects.

Recommendation: Try wherever possible to recreate as Revit Families by drawing/picking over the geometryImported CAD file information than its own native objects. and then deleting the CAD file from

and then deleting the CAD file from the Family. If you have to use CAD data, ensure it is as clean as it can be; this may be done by purging the item and ensuring all entities are on one layer and remove hatches these may be placed using “Filled Regions”.

3. As mentioned previously Arrays need to be recalculated and for this reason they are best avoided in detailing.

and for this reason they are best avoided in detailing. Recommendation: Resolve this by using the

Recommendation: Resolve this by using the “Repeating Detail” tool, this is more efficient. Again, these

“Repeating Details” can be used in future projects.

4. Detailing may slow Models down if you try to constrain too much of your 2D detailing against the 3D Model.

too much of your 2D detailing against the 3D Model. Recommendation: Try an alternative, don‟t constrain

Recommendation: Try an alternative, don‟t constrain your detailing against the model and utilise Detail Groups

that may be simply amended in your co-ordinated detailing views.

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BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011

Speed and Performance

Speeding Revit Up and reducing Revit file sizes

Below is a checklist of things to look out for and can help in speeding Revit up and reducing overall file sizes

Compressing your Revit file - Revit's file is highly compressed and once opened Revit expands the size to approximately twice the size. Occasionally Revit fails to compress the file as it exits! You may find that your file size grows for no particular reason. Try the following:

a. Try doing a Save As and in the Options tick the box to compress the file. b. If that fails do a Save As and save as another filename as well as compressing it - this should do it! Remember this compression applies to Multi-User (Worksetted) projects as well as standalone one, so remember to compress the Central File occasionally.

Purge your file of unused Family Content - Do not do this too early as you may need to add say curtain walling as an example and find that you have few mullion types.

Delete any unused Model and Detail Groups - from the Project Browser right click over the group and if "Select All Instances" is greyed out then you are safe to delete as there will be no references in the file.

Try to make all/most DWG information Linked rather than imports in Revit. Importing DWG will push your file size up by the size of the DWG. Links are more beneficial, but in all cases DWG information that is no longer required should be removed. Also, Unloading Linked DWG files will speed Revit up.

Close all hidden Windows - Remember if Revit requires the Model to regenerate it will do so in all currently opened views, therefore reducing the number of opened views will reduce generate/plot information such as sanitary ware and Furniture. If you are doing this for plans remember to create and apply View Templates rather than constantly redoing this operation.

If using Worksets, Close any Worksets that you are currently not interested in, this will speed Revit up more than turning them off in Visibility.

Try to resolve as many warnings as you can - Revit may tie itself down on performing computations on these items - these items may impact on what you are trying to do currently. To review the warnings go to the „Manage‟ ribbon, "

„Inquiry‟ panel and choose "Review Warnings

Only toggle the calculation of Room Volumes when required. The toggling of this property should only be on when you need to access or output this data, after which it should be returned to the default value of only calculating areas. Areas are re-calculated

Try to keep on top of your project housekeeping - like real housework it is better to do a little occasionally rather than spend a weekend of it!

Finally, keep your model as simple as it can be, don't over model/detail because you can

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Later Project Setup

Coordination

Coordination: Project and True North

The default orientation is setup to Project North. Project North being that the top of the screen represents North, to the right being East, bottom of the screen South and left being West. Plan views all have the ability to toggle between Project and True North. Essentially Site views normally need to reflect the true orientation whereas building plan views are normally orientated on the sheet so that they can be easily read and for economic paper use.

so that they can be easily read and for economic paper use. See also “How To”

See also “How To” Section on Project Orientation

on

Page 4

Coordination: Acquiring Coordinates

Coordinates can be captured only from a linked project file, traditionally from a survey file in DWG/DXF/DGN. This is not just limited to traditional files it could also be a Revit file, although normally Publish Coordinates is used between Revit files.

Note: Acquiring Coordinates should only be done if:normally Publish Coordinates is used between Revit files. The Buildings location on the site is fairly

The Buildings location on the site is fairly fixed and is not likely to undergo rotational change on the site footprint. Coordinates need to be picked for setting out information, or The Revit Model needs to be exported back into AutoCAD/Microstation in the correct location. (This last option is normally demanded by external consultants)

Coordination: Re-Acquiring Coordinates

It is simple to Acquire the coordinates of a CAD file, so that your Building refers to World Coordinates or Coordinates based on a Local Grid. However it is often difficult to change the rotation of your Building on the site without messing up its coordinates.

Building on the site without messing up its coordinates. Procedure on Re-Acquiring Coordinates “How To” on

Procedure on Re-Acquiring Coordinates “How To”

on Page 3

Project Configuration

Where you should store Project support files

Users should store project specific Shared Parameter/Keynote and DWG Layer Export files in O:\Revit\Project Support Files\XXXXX(Your Project Number).

Where you should Save/Store Families

Users should store project specific Family Content in O:\Revit\Project Support Files\XXXXX(Your Project Number). Your folder can then be further divided as you see fit.

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Where you should Save/Store Groups

Groups should be saved out externally from the project, so that they may be used on future projects. They should be saved in O:\Revit\Project Support Files\XXXXX(Your Project Number), within a folder called Groups.

It is essential for effective use of the system that groups are saved out, in-order that these groups can be loaded into new projects saving the time of having to recreate them.

Note: Remember to review the exported groups and to overwrite them, as the ones in the project are predominately more up-to-date.

Groups when created may be of two types, Model or Detail Groups. As well as these two types, detail groups may be attached into model groups.

Model groups can be used for repeating units such as:

Hotel Room Layouts Apartment/Flat Layouts Typical Kitchen Layouts Typical Toilet Layouts Furniture items grouped for ease of space planning activities.

Detail groups can be used to embellish the Model but are nearly always used in Detailing a project in 2D. These Groups can be nested to ensure that say a typical section through a window is repeated several times in a Strip section.

How much time may be saved? Model Groups:

If a user needs to create a basic Kitchen layout with all the kitchen units/worktops/sanitary items, this may take approximately 3/4Hour to sort out which units to load and from where, also duplicating for the unit sizes etc… and placing/aligning all the elements together. Whereas, if there were a few basic Kitchen assemblies pre-built these could be loaded and adjusted in minutes. Detail Groups:

Most of the time in Detailing what takes time is locating the components, it would be more beneficial if a basic detail (not a standard detail) could be loaded and that contained 90% of the elements you needed for that detail. For Example:

Much like going to a supermarket and picking a preloaded trolley that contained a week‟s standard groceries rather than spending time finding the produce on shelves down particular isles; in this way you can get on with the cooking sooner!

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BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011

Exporting to DWG/DXF/DGN

Exporting Layers:

DWG Export file there is a text file that maps Revit Categories and Sub-Categories to AutoCAD Layers with AutoCAD Layer Colours. This export file also stores information on the layers of CAD data that is linked into your project; therefore this file is project specific.

This text file needs to be copied to your project support folder on the „O‟ drive „Revit Project Support‟ and the project needs to point at this file. Ensure that the file is not read-only as this file needs to be updated by Revit each time you export.

Exporting to correct location/co-ordination:

Revit has two co-ordinate systems; these are explained in detail in the following section.

2010 Interface: When you have chosen the CAD format to export to from the Application menu, you will need to

Choose the DWG/DFX/GDN Properties Tab to choose the coordinate system.

Note: Failure to select the “Shared” co-ordinate system will result in the model being exported to the other CAD package with -ordinate system will result in the model being exported to the other CAD package with the 0,0 origin being located in an arbitrary location (approximately in the centre of the building), rather than in the correct location in space!

Note: Should you export from a SHEET , Revit always exports using Revits Internal Origin, even though you may well have SHEET, Revit always exports using Revits Internal Origin, even though you may well have selected to export using the Shared Origin! Should you require your exported CAD files to be exported in the correct location for other Individuals/Companies set-out in the correct orientation/position, you will need to export the View only (i.e. Not on a sheet).

will need to export the View only (i.e. Not on a sheet). 2010 Interface Revits Coordinates

2010 Interface

Revits Coordinates system explained:

Revit has two Origins; it has a “Project Internal” origin and also a “Shared” origin. Revit‟s “Project Internal” cannot be moved, this is fixed. However, the “Shared” origin can be moved/relocated or its position matched to a CAD Files co-ordinate system (by use of Acquiring Co-ordinates).

Project Internal, is Revit‟s internal Origin I.E. 0,0, this normally is situated approximately in the centre of your model (Centre position of the original four elevations), so that all elements are a relatively small distance from this origin. However, the “Shared” origin can be moved to coincide with a CAD files co-ordinate system. When you have acquired the Co-ordinates of a CAD file (Normally the Site Survey), then Revit reports Co-ordinates correctly rather than from its internal origin.

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BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011

Procedure: Pointing to DWG Export File

The original export file to export to Stride Treglowns AutoCAD Layering standards is located in the following location: „O:\Revit\Library\Revit Library XXXX(Current Version)\Stride\Titleblocks\ Stride-Dwg-Exportlayers.txt‟.

This needs to be copied to your project support folder not the folder your project resides in.

This file then needs to be renamed Project Number _ Strides Export Layers.txt

Each time you export from Revit to DWG/DXF you will need to ensure that you are pointing at the file related to your project. This can be done, by either of two ways:

to your project. This can be done, by either of two ways:  From the Application

From the Application menu choose Export then Options (for options scroll to the bottom of the list) and then Export Layers DWG/DXF or Export Layers DGN…

From the Export dialogue (Application menu, Export, DWG/DGN), click the DGN or DWG Properties tab, then click Layer Settings …

Once in the Export Layers dialogue you can click the Load button and choose the relevant export text file for your project.

Keynote file location

The location of the projects Keynote file is set from the „Manage Ribbon, Project Settings panel‟ under the „Settings‟ tool pick „Keynoting…‟. „Out of the Box‟ and Revit‟s initial settings, point to the standard AutoDESK Keynote file, which is in the root folder of the Metric Library. As each project‟s Keynotes will vary project-to-project a copy of this file should be placed in the projects folder, and the Revit project be pointed to that file:

Procedure: Locating Keynote File

Navigate to the Metric Library folder and copy “RevitKeynotes_GBR.txt” file to the clipboard Now navigate your project folder beneath O:\Revit\Project Support Files and copy the file there. Right click over the file and remove the „read only‟ attribute. Rename the File to include your project number at the start of the filename.

Shared Parameters

Should you require any Parameters that you may need to export to a database or may need to include within an annotation tag, these Parameters have to be „shared Parameters‟.

Important: before creating and using shared Parameters, you need to understand there implications. So please read the section on shared Parameters and fully understand what is written in this document before “trying” to use them.

Procedure: Shared Parameters pointing

Make a copy of the Company Parameters text file from the O: drive Location is O:\Revit\Library\Revit Library XXXX(Current Version)\Stride\External ParametersPlace the copy in your project folder on the O:\Revit\Project Support Files. Rename this „Project Number_Parameters.txt‟

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Use of Shared Parameters

Shared Parameters should be considered an advanced subject and not to assume that it is relatively simple, far from it. Firstly, care should be taken when creating/amending Shared Parameters and shared Parameter text files. There is within the company a “Shared Parameters text file” this is locked down to ensure that normal users can‟t amend this file. This is done to protect the data, as the use of Shared Parameters are embedded with Family Content and the project/project template. If someone removes a Parameter from this file and later adds it back in, all families previously using this Parameter will need this to be reloaded and project/ Company Templates also reload with the new Parameter even if the name remained the same. Technical reason why:

This is due to a unique numerical identifier being assigned to the Parameter at that exact point in time it was made and therefore another Parameter of the same name made at a different point in time would have another identifier. This unique identifier has to correspond in both the family and the project in which it is loaded.

Project Organisation

Working with Sheet Views

At the point the first view is placed on a sheet the Project Browser should be toggled to displaying “Views not on Sheets”.

This has many benefits:

Keeps the Project Browser clear, making navigation easier

Prevent users unknowingly from making changes to the drawing. (In effect this locks drawing views away, someone would clearly know that any changes to visibility/scale/detail levels etc… would immediately change the production information.)

As the views get placed on the drawing sheets they will disappear from the Project Browser, they can be seen/explored and opened from either activating the view on the sheet or alternatively from expanding the sheet on the Project Browser.

Once your views are placed onto a sheet, don‟t forget to select the viewport and swap for the appropriate viewport type in the type selector and also go into element properties to change the Parameter “Title on Sheet”, rather than rename the view!.

Note: The quickest way to enter details for drawing sheets is through the drawing sheet list/View list that is in the template under schedules.“Title on Sheet”, rather than rename the view!. Note: There are two types of Elevation within

Note: There are two types of Elevation within the Stride Template, one for External and the other for Internal Elevations. This will ensure that your Elevations are structured correctly in the Project Browser.list/View list that is in the template under schedules. 16 BIM Manual/Procedures Project Browser Organisation As

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Project Browser Organisation

As this manual sets out in the previous section, “at the point the first view is placed on a sheet the Project Browser should be toggled to displaying “Views not on Sheets” “. This is one of the simplest actions that when performed clears the Project Browser so that views can be more easily navigated. The Project Browser can also be customised so that the views are displayed to meet your project requirements. For example a project that has several buildings within it can be broken down in the Project Browser to display per building and then by Floor Plans/Ceiling Plans/Elevations/3D views etc… Or the Project Browser can be broken down by Discipline, so that Architectural and Structural views are separated and then further broken down into Floor Plans/Ceiling Plans/Elevations/3D views. To customize the way the Project Browser displays the information, you will need to look into the following areas „Project Parameters‟ and „Browser Organisation‟. 2011 Interface, Project Parameters are located on the Project Settings Panel of the Manage Tab Ribbon, Browser Organisation is located on the Windows Panel of the View Tab Ribbon, under the User Interface Tool options.

the View Tab Ribbon, under the User Interface Tool options. See also “How To” Section on

See also “How To” Section on - Browser Organisation

on

Page 8

Worksets Multi-User Projects

Two reasons for using Worksets, outside multiple users working on the same project file:

Areas of the building can be unloaded from memory, therefore helping performance.

Worksets may be controlled in visibility.

Worksharing in a project team allows simultaneous access to a shared model through use of a central file, where users work on their own Local copies. Note the Local file is tied to your Workset Username found in the Options dialogue.

tied to your Workset Username found in the Options dialogue. Hotdesking and Changing Username Please note

Hotdesking and Changing Username

Please note that you need to Check/change your Username under the following circumstances:

On all new Software Releases

On opening Revit on a Hotdesk PC (Remember to set the name back to what it was at the end of the hotdesk period).

Check your Username, should someone have logged onto your PC prior to your Windows Logon.

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BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011

When to Save

Save to your Local file every 15-20minutes. Save to Central every hour or when you are ready to publish your work back to the Central file for others to review/reference.

back to the Central file for others to review/reference. Whenever you save to Central be sure
back to the Central file for others to review/reference. Whenever you save to Central be sure

Whenever you save to Central be sure you pick it from either the „Quick Access Toolbar‟ or the „Collaborate‟ Ribbon and choose „Synchronise and Modify Settings‟, as this allows full control through its dialogue. This allows you to do the following that the „Synchronise Now‟ does not:

Add comments at strategic points in time.

It allows you to choose what you wish to relinquish.

Ability to save to your Local file directly after the Save to Central is complete (rather than two separate commands).

Compact the file (see section on how often this should be done).

Important notes: You should save to Central and relinquish everything

When you are about to leave for the evening.

When you are leaving to attend a meeting or something that will take you away from your computer.

Immediately before your lunch-break (failing to do this may result in downtime for those who are working through the break).

Synchronising changes made by the team:

It is essential that your Local file be up-to-date during the day, so that you are in touch with the project progression.

Procedure: When to reload latest

When you first open the project, so as to ensure you have the previous day‟s work synchronised.

Immediately following any Lunch-break, so your file reflects morning work and any work done during the break.

When alerted by team members of their published work.

Recreating a Central File:

New Central files will need to be created from time to time. This is generally for any of the following reasons:

The Project needs to be upgraded to the new software version.

The Central file needs to be recompressed

Projects having serious errors that require recreation.

Procedure:

Ensure that everyone saves to Central and relinquishes everything.

Make a copy of the original Central file and store it in a superseded folder.

Navigate to the old Central file. Before opening it, tick the “detach from centraland auditoptions.

Once opened, “Save Asand give it a new name (In accordance with Worksetted Project Naming Convention). Make sure under options “Make this a Central File after save” is ticked.

Once saved everyone can create their new Local files from the new Central file.

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BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011

Method of working:

Placing elements on correct Workset

To ensure new elements and to check existing elements are positioned on the correct Workset, it is necessary to utilise the function “Grey Inactive Workset Graphics” (See button in image below)

Inactive Workset Graphics” (See button in image below) Ownership and Borrowing? Ensure Elements are “Borrowed”

Ownership and Borrowing?

Ensure Elements are “Borrowed” and you don‟t check-out the Workset and become the owner (see image below).

-out the Workset and become the owner (see image below). Make Elements Editable = Borrowing Make

Make Elements Editable = Borrowing Make Workset Editable = Owner

(User only borrows what he/she needs to amend) (User owns every element on that Workset)

Borrowing is the preferred method of working as it results in fewer editing requests; therefore you can work more rapidly/efficiently.

Element Borrowing - Allows you to edit an element that is in a Workset you do not own. If no one owns the Workset, permission to borrow is automatically granted. If another team member is currently the owner or borrowing those element(s) you must place a request to borrow the element from that team member.

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Closing Worksets

It is important, especially on large projects that Worksets are closed when not required. When Worksets are Closed as opposed to turned off (Visibility Graphics) a proportion of your project file is unloaded from memory, providing better project performance.

As an example, if you are working on the Core areas of the Building, then you have no need for Worksets that relate to the Fixtures and Fittings, the External Envelope or the Site and Landscaping. Also potentially other Worksets that contain elements that are unlikely to change or required for reference to make those changes on the Cores. If the number of Worksets that are closed equates to say 50-70% of the project geometry then Revit now only has to load 30-50% of the total file into memory. At any point those Worksets can be re-opened.

Worksets can be unloaded/closed by going into the Worksets dialogue and selecting the Workset to be unloaded and clicking the “Close” button.

Workset to be unloaded and clicking the “Close” button. It should be noted that only remote

It should be noted that only remote Worksets should be closed and not any Workset that interface with your ongoing work on the model.

Should you close a file down that still has Worksets closed, next time you re-open the file you can either select which ones you require for the next operation, or simple Open the file and Revit will have preserved your last Workset state.

file and Revit will have preserved your last Workset state. Extract from File „ Open ‟

Extract from File Opendialogue: displaying options for opening Worksets on initial open/loading of project.

for opening Worksets on initial open/loading of project. Above is a graphical representation of Workset Ownership,

Above is a graphical representation of Workset Ownership, Borrowing and Closing. First Segment (Left) show Workset Ownership, Second (Middle) shows elements requiring amendment spread over several Worksets, Thirdly (Right) the Closing of all other Worksets that are un-necessary for making your modifications.

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Editing Requests:

Please ensure that once you have started Revit, that you remember to check/start the Worksharing Monitor application. Without the Worksharing Monitor application running, any editing request that you make or are made to you will not automatically be announced to the other team member.

Placing elements on the correct Workset:

Firstly it is important that you place items on relevant Worksets and NOT leave them all on Workset1. Also it is imperative that elements are placed on their correct Workset, so that the elements may be turned off in the Visibility Graphics dialogue and further that they may be unloaded from the current session to speed performance by leveraging lazy parsing.

Worksharing Monitor:

This program needs to be run at the same point that your Revit application is initialised. This is important so that any communication between team members is automatically announced to the appropriate person, regarding editing requests. It must be stressed that this software needs to be running on each computer for it to communicate with the required person. As well as communicating any editing requests, this application can be set up to inform the user of any of the following:

can be set up to inform the user of any of the following: To set up
can be set up to inform the user of any of the following: To set up

To set up the Worksharing Monitor to alert you to any additional changes you will need to go into Options within the application.

Workshare Monitor is now included inside 2012, so there is no longer a need to use the Add-in mentioned above unless you are using Revit 2010/2011.

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BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011

File Compact/Compression:

All files within Revit are subject to unexpected growth in file size. This is due to Revit‟s file format, be it a Project or Family file, Revit is a bespoke database and as with all databases they need periodic compaction. This is because as you open the file it expands and similarly as you close it, it should recompact itself. However; you should monitor file sizes for unexpected growth and go through a number of measures to ensure your file-size is as compressed as it can be

Standalone Project and Family Compaction

Standalone Projects and Families should periodically be monitored for unexpected growth in file size. There are a couple of ways to Compact the database. Within the „Saveas‟ dialogue under the Options button, there is a „Compact File‟ option that when ticked attempts to re-compress the file on saving. You need to close the file down to view the results as it will remain in an inflated state while opened. This method is not 100% guaranteed to compact the file. The only way to fully guarantee that the file is compacted into its minimum size, is to perform a „Saveas‟ and give the Project/Family a new name.

Multiuser Project Compaction

Compaction of a Multiuser Project works in a similar manor. If your Project is Worksetted, then there are more areas to explore. Firstly, ensure that each file, both the Local files and the Central file have been Compressed.

ticking the Compact button as image

For the Central file, this is normally done by Saving to Centralbelow.

and

is normally done by „ Saving to Central ‟ below. and  For a Local file,

For a Local file, this is done by performing a “Save As” clicking the “Options” button and ticking the “Compact” option.

Next check all the Local and Central files to see that they are roughly all the same size, this should be done when the files are closed and all up-to-date with one another (i.e. the project is fully synchronised). If there is a significant difference between them, then the smallest one may be remade into a new “Central file” and new “Local files” made from it.

If all these measures appear not to compact the file fully, then it will be necessary to save the file as a new name, this will automatically compact the file. Should you perform a Saveas on the Central file, it will be necessary to re- create new local files. Remember to clear old local and Central files and their respective backup folders once the new Central and Local files have been proven to operate correctly.

and Local files have been proven to operate correctly. See Section on Naming of Worksets See

See Section on Naming of Worksets

See “How To” Section on Worksets

on Page 5

on Page 1

See Section on Speeding Revit up and Reducing file sizes

on Page 13

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BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011

Project Archiving and Backups

Backups and Rolling Back

Project files are backed-up in a number of ways, depending on if the project is Standaloneor Multiuser.

Standalone Project Backups

Standalone project generate a default of three backup files, all have the same file extension as the current project file. As you save your project Revit deletes older backups automatically, always maintaining three. These three backups are of the same name as your project, but are appended with a number; the higher the number the more recent the backup. Should your project file ever be in a state of corruption or you are unable to open this file, the backups allow you to investigate these.

Multiuser Project Backups

On a multi-user Workset project, Revit does not have any backup files that can be accessed immediately; these may be generated when required, although the immediate backup is in the form of all the users Local Copies. Restored backups normally follow recovery of a system/network crash, where you can‟t save your work. It might be the only way forward in this situation is to create a restored project and copy and paste your unsaved work between the two files. These backups/restored project files are built by Revit on the fly‟ and are generated from files that are contained within the backup folders. These backup folders should not be edited or deleted while your project is open. The default number of backups, set at 20 is set so that if you had a team of 4 people and each saved back to the Central file ever hour, you could go back and create a backup file going back 5 hours ago; beyond this you would need to restore the previous night‟s IT backup. Therefore the number of backups may have to be increased when you have a large team working on the project.

Procedure: Creating a Workset Backup:

From the Synchonise panel of the Collaborate Ribbon, choose Restore Backup

panel of the Collaborate Ribbon, choose Restore Backup  Navigate to the required backup folder, either

Navigate to the required backup folder, either the Central or a users Local.

Select the version/point in time.

Click the “Save As” button to generate a file that may be opened and if it is the correct restoration point a new Local or Central file may be created. If you are going to recreate a new Central/Local file please rename appropriately and always remember to save a copy of your previous files as an alternative.

to save a copy of your previous files as an alternative. Rolling Back: Never use the

Rolling Back:

copy of your previous files as an alternative. Rolling Back: Never use the Roll Back feature

Never use the Roll Back feature of worksets as there is no way of undoing it and as you can‟t roll forward once done. It is safer to create a backup “Save As”, investigate the contents of that file and then remake new Central/Local files.

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IT Backups

Outside the Backup facility inside Revit there should also be IT Backups made that can be restored. Before doing so, it is recommended that you copy your existing files to a reference folder, so that you can copy and paste out any new work to merge into the older restored files.

Project Archiving Introduction

This topic covers the following two areas:

Drawing Sheet Archiving - (Creation of Static file formats for drawing issues, for reference/(archive) and issue to consultants/clients).

Project Archiving - (Strategic archiving of project models at specific points in time/work stages).

In a traditional CAD environment, CAD files when changed can easily be archived and filed away for each drawing issue. This can easily be done, as normally a CAD file contains a single drawing, whereas in a BIM environment all drawings are contained within the single model. If a change is made in a BIM project then that change is propagated across all drawings reflecting those elements, making it very difficult to know precisely how many and which drawings have been effected.

Drawing Sheet Archiving:

Drawings may be archived in many formats, these include:

DWG/DGN native CAD file formats PDF (Predominantly preferred by clients) DWF (Preferred by consultants and some clients using project hosting sites)

CAD file exporting may be around for some considerable time to come, for issue to consultants using non BIM, also for static archiving. This or DWF format should be considered the main archive formats for drawing sheets. If you export DWG/DGN (CAD) format for your external consultants, there should be no other reason other than for redline/mark-ups why you create DWF files. However, if you don‟t need to share CAD files with your design team, then DWF files are an adequate source for your archived drawing sheets. PDF exports are often requirements that clients make, but some can be convinced to move to DWF format as they provide more functionality and information/data. DWF archives are considerably smaller than their CAD file counterpart and have the additional benefit of comparisons made between drawing revisions, so that revision notes are more comprehensive in their description (See the section on Relining/Mark-ups).

Project Archiving:

As your Revit Project files are dynamic, in that a change will affect many drawings, you may consider create an archive at strategic milestone/points in time. Typical points at which you might consider archiving might be:

At specific design/Work Stages eg:

RIBA Stage G (Tender documentation) RIBA Stage L (Completion/As-Built documentation) Also you might consider archiving at other points in time; for instance, at RIBA Stage B (Design Brief) where you may have put forward numerous design alternatives, where there could be the possibility of the client changing their mind on which version to go with. If design options are utilised at this point and you remove all other alternatives and go forward into Stage C (Concept) with the clients choice; should the client then require a previous design then you

would be able to retrieve this from the archive file.

RIBA Stage D (Planning Submitted)

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Procedure - Project archiving (Standalone Project file) :

Archiving a standalone Revit project is a simple case of copying it to an archive folder and giving it an appropriate name.

Eg:

(Original file name) (Archive name)

- Barnstaple School.rvt - Barnstaple School Stage D.rvt

Procedure - Project archiving (Worksetted/ Multi-user Project) :

In Revit „Open‟ and Navigate to the folder containing the Central file for your project. Do not open it! At the bottom of the „Open‟ dialogue, note the option „Detach from Central‟.

dialogue, note the option „Detach from Central‟. Click „Detach from central‟, a warning will appear about

Click „Detach from central‟, a warning will appear about the creation of an independent file.

will appear about the creation of an independent file. Click „Yes‟ to create an independent file.

Click „Yes‟ to create an independent file. This file can now be saved to an archive folder with an appropriate file name. Note there are no longer any live links back to your on-going project changes (Central File).

Links within this archived project:

All links within this archive will still be live, therefore those linked elements (CAD files/Revit Links) can, if changed, amend the views/sheets within this archive. This may or may not be desired; therefore:

If you require a totally fixed file at this point, you should archive all Revit Linked files in the same way as the main project file, re-path the newly archived Revit links (using „reload From…‟) and all CAD files should be “bound-in” using the „Import‟ button within the „Manage Links‟ dialogue.

„Import‟ button within the „Manage Links‟ dialogue. You may of course consider binding all links within

You may of course consider binding all links within this archive as being not necessary, as you will undoubtedly have all your drawing sheet archives. If you elect to keep your CAD files linked (not bound), this might simplify remaking this archive into a new live project should it ever be required. However; you will still need to archive any linked in Revit files and re-path the Revit link within the „Manage Links‟ dialogue.

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BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011

Keynoting

Procedure for creating Keynote file:

In Windows explorer copy the „RevitKeynotes_GBR.txt‟ (from the default library location) to your project folder.

Remove the read-only attribute, by right clicking over the file and going into its properties

Rename the file so that it includes the project number e.g. ProjNumber_RevitKeynotes.txt

Project Pointing/configuration:

From the „Annotate‟ Ribbon, „Tag‟ panel (extended „arrow down‟) choose „Keynote Settings…‟

(extended „arrow down‟) choose „Keynote Settings…‟  Change the „Path Type‟ from „At Library

Change the „Path Type‟ from „At Library Locations‟ to „Relative‟ and browse to your project folder and select the Keynote file.

Amending the Keynote file:

Open the Keynote file in excel. This is a TAB eliminated text file, where you can add additional Keynote references and text. When you save the file, keep the „incompatible features‟ by saying yes to all prompts.

To get Revit to re-read this text file you will either have to close your project down and reopen it; or a quicker way is to use a workaround as described below:

From the „Annotate‟ Ribbon, „Tag‟ panel (extended „arrow down‟) choose „Keynote Settings…‟ then select the Browse button and Re-browse to the revised Keynote file. This will force Revit to read the file in and the new NBS/Keynote references will now be available.

in and the new NBS/Keynote references will now be available. See “How To” Section on -

See “How To” Section on - Strides keynoting

on

Page 10

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BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011

Saving/Creating and applying View Templates

View Templates give users the ability to capture any number of view property settings, such as Scale, Detail Level, Visibility settings. These can then be saved/applied to a number of common views to ensure consistent display in those views. You may also exclude properties so they are not overridden when you apply the view template. If you have created view templates in one project, these may be imported into other projects using the “Transfer Project Settings” tool, from the Files menu. View Templates are not linked dynamically, so if you amend the settings, the template needs to be reapplied in-order to update the views.

You may for example want all your Fire Strategy Plans or Internal Elevations to appear identical to meet the specific presentation requirements of your project, or as a method of adhering to Company Standard drawing outputs.

There are several ways to create a View Template:

2011 Interface: From the „View‟ ribbon, „Graphics‟ panel, Click `View Templates‟ Select Create view template from current view and enter a template name.

Rick Click in the Project Browser over your view and Save/Create a view template.

Existing Stride Standard View Templates are:

STL - Colour Fill Plan/Section STL - Detailing View (no Model) STL - Detailing View (Underlay) STL - Elevations External STL - Elevations External Presentation STL - Fire Strategy Plan STL - GA Plan STL - GA Section STL - Massing Study (Only) STL - Plan Enlargement STL - Reflected Ceiling Plan STL - Room Elevations STL - Site Plan STL - Site Presentation Plan

View Templates may be applied to selected view(s), or as a default. You can apply a default View Template to a number of views so they have the desired output before printing or exporting. When applying the default view template to multiple views, the specified default view template in each view is applied (Note: Each view may contain a different default).

Procedure for specifying a default view template:

Go into a View‟s Properties.

Under the Group “Identity Data”, find the parameter “Default View Template”.

Select the appropriate template from the list of view templates and click OK.

Procedure to apply a default view template:

Select any number of Views in the Project Browser, that you intend to apply the default template(s) to. (Note Use the CTRL key to multi-select your choice of views)

Right click over these views in the Project Browser and select “Apply Default View Template”.

The Default template defined in each view will now be applied.

Should you wish to apply Default View Templates when views are on Sheets then, Right Click over the

Sheet(s) and Select “Apply Default View Templates to All Views

”.

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Upgrading Projects

Workset Projects

It is always a good Idea to make a backup copy of your CENTRAL/Local Files prior to the upgrade in case anything happens and you need to get back to your original.

Whenever you get a new version of Revit and you are dealing with a Workset‟d project (Multi-User), the CENTRAL File should be upgraded and saved in the latest version first. Then new local copies should be remade from the Central File. Also, ensure that any other Revit files (e.g. Site Models or Linked Revit files) are also upgraded. If there are any old local copies from users that are no longer working on the project, it is better to delete these from the system, so if these users re-join the project they also remake their new local copies. As well as deleting any obsolete users Local Files you should also delete the corresponding users backup folder, if you are at all unsure ask your support team, as it may have devastating effects if the wrong backup folder is deleted!.

Standalone Projects

Again, create a copy as a backup; in-case the upgrade causes any corruption.

Open a copy of your project in the new version.

Review any warnings

Provide a cursory check to confirm your project has upgraded satisfactorily

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Project Output

Detailing

Detailing fundamentally can be accomplished in two ways:

Either by Detailing fully over the 3D model and then the 3D Geometry turned off, or

By creating a “Hybrid” detail containing some of the 3D model and 2D detail components and by masking what is not required of the 3D or turning Categories off in visibility.

required of the 3D or turning Categories off in visibility. See “How To” Section on –

See “How To” Section on Detailing Best Practice

on Page 6

Drawing Production Information

It is extremely easy to produce lots of views/drawings in Revit, therefore it is essential that we control ourselves and reduce the number of drawings created unnecessarily.

1. Plan, Plan, Plan. Spend a day, save a week.

2. Use the JUD (Joined up Design) process to review your drawing list. Use your Studio JUD Champion to arrange a review at the start of key milestones:

i. Inception

ii. Planning

iii. Detail Design

iv. Construction

v. Completion/Feedback.

The first step before producing drawings, should be the production of a drawing issue/register; this will help to ensure that people only produce drawings that are required. To give people a sense of how easy it is to get carried away, a particular project was reduced from 24 drawings to 14. Provide enough information on a drawing so that it can easily be read, but not so little that the paper is bare. This table provides typical information that should be covered on certain drawings, to keep the amount of paper and checking of drawings to a minimum. Remember on smaller projects it may be that information for a number of drawings can be combined, so long as the information can be extracted easily.

Note: This affects all Revit Views . To Speed up printing, turn off all information/Categories that This affects all Revit Views. To Speed up printing, turn off all information/Categories that are not required in the view (Including hidden elements), otherwise Revit has to process all elements to work out what is hidden and what should be plotted out. Failure to do may result in unnecessary and prolonged plotting time.

BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011
BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011

PLANNING Drawings

Site Plan Scales: 1:200 / 1:500

Information normally associated with drawing:

Boundary lines Landscape information Parking layouts and numbering Site signage North Point A site location plan / block plan (scale 1:1250) can also be included on the same sheet

Revit Notes:

Level of Detail: Coarse

GA Plans Scales: 1:100 / 1:200

Information normally associated with drawing:

Grid Lines (optional) Internal layouts Room identity North Point

Revit Notes:

Level of Detail: Medium, Furniture etc… to be halftoned

GA Elevations Scales: 1:100 / 1:200

Information normally associated with drawing:

Grid Lines (optional) Finishes Finishes Legend

Revit Notes:

Level of Detail: Medium All information behind the elevation view should be turned off to save plotting processing time! Items such as : Furniture / casework / specialty equipment /Plumbing turned off

GA Sections Scales: 1:100 / 1:200

Information normally associated with drawing:

Grid Lines (optional) Room identity Grid Lines Vertical Dimensions

Revit Notes:

Level of Detail: Medium, Furniture etc… to be half-toned

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BIM Manual Version 4 - 18/07/2011

CONSTRUCTION Drawings

Site Plan Scales: 1:200 / 1:500