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TABLE OF CONTENTS Lesson 1 - Introduction to Microsoft Word ...................................................1 Starting Word .................................................................................................2 The Basics of the Word Window ........................................................................3 Menu and Dialog Box Options ...........................................................................4 Change Document Views ..................................................................................5 Lesson 2 – Learning Document Basics ..........................................................7 Creating a New Document ................................................................................7 Saving a Document .........................................................................................8 Opening a Document .......................................................................................9 Selecting a Printer ......................................................................................... 10 Using Print Preview ........................................................................................ 11 Printing a Document ...................................................................................... 11 Exiting Word ................................................................................................. 12 Lesson 3 – Editing a Document ..................................................................13 Editing Basics ............................................................................................... 13 Selecting Text ............................................................................................... 15 Making Multiple Selections .............................................................................. 17 Deleting Text ................................................................................................ 18 Lesson 4 – Cutting, Copying, and Pasting Text ...........................................19 Cutting, Copying, and Pasting ......................................................................... 19 Using Clipboard ............................................................................................. 21 Lesson 5 – Checking Spelling and Grammar ...............................................23 Activating Automatic Spell Check .................................................................... 23 Correcting Misspelled Text .............................................................................. 25 Activating Automatic Grammar Check .............................................................. 26 Correcting Grammar ...................................................................................... 26 Lesson 6 – Paragraph Formatting ..............................................................28 Adjusting Paragraph Alignment ....................................................................... 28 Adjusting Line Spacing ................................................................................... 30 Working with Indents ..................................................................................... 32 Lesson 7 – Text Formatting ........................................................................35 Formatting Text ............................................................................................ 35 Changing Font and Font Size .......................................................................... 36 Changing Character Formatting ....................................................................... 38 Highlighting Text ........................................................................................... 39 Format Painter .............................................................................................. 39 Lesson 8 – Inserting Symbols and Special Characters ................................41 Inserting Symbols ......................................................................................... 41 Inserting Special Characters ........................................................................... 42 Lesson 9 – Page Setup ...............................................................................44 Page Setup’s Margins Tab ............................................................................... 45 Page Setup’s Paper Tab .................................................................................. 45 Page Setup’s Layout Tab ................................................................................ 46

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Lesson 10 – Drop Cap .................................................................................47 Inserting Drop Cap ........................................................................................ 47 Lesson 11 – Footnotes and Endnotes .........................................................49 Inserting Footnotes/Endnotes ......................................................................... 49 Lesson 12 – Columns ..................................................................................52 About Columns ............................................................................................. 52 Creating Columns .......................................................................................... 53 Modifying Columns ........................................................................................ 55 Deleting Columns .......................................................................................... 56 Lesson 13 – Using Clip Art ..........................................................................58 Inserting Clip Art ........................................................................................... 58 Moving Clip Art ............................................................................................. 61 Using Text Wrap ........................................................................................... 62 Modifying Clip Art .......................................................................................... 62 Lesson 14 – Working with Images .............................................................63 Adding Images .............................................................................................. 63 Managing Images .......................................................................................... 64 Wrapping Text Options ................................................................................... 65 Picture Options ............................................................................................. 66 Lesson 15 – Drawing Objects .....................................................................68 Drawing Objects ............................................................................................ 68 WordArt Drawing Objects ............................................................................... 70 Arrange and Transform Objects ....................................................................... 71 Create a Group of Objects .............................................................................. 74 Lesson 16 – Borders and Shading ..............................................................76 Adding Borders and Shading: Toolbar Option .................................................... 76 Adding Borders and Shading: Dialog Box Option ............................................... 78 Lesson 17 – Bullets and Numbering ...........................................................82 Using Bulleted Lists ....................................................................................... 82 Using Numbered Lists .................................................................................... 87 Customizing Bulleted and Numbered Lists ........................................................ 91 Lesson 18 – Creating Headers and Footers .................................................97 Creating a Universal Header and Footer ........................................................... 97 Creating a Different First Page Header and Footer ............................................. 98 Creating Odd and Even Page Headers and Footers ............................................. 98 Inserting Auto Text into Headers and Footers ................................................... 99 Lesson 19 – Watermarks ..........................................................................100 Adding Watermarks ..................................................................................... 100 Removing Watermarks ................................................................................. 102 Lesson 20 – Setting Tabs .........................................................................103 Tab Types .................................................................................................. 103 Working with Tabs from the Ruler ................................................................. 104 Working with Tabs from the Tabs Dialog Box .................................................. 105

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Lesson 21 – Tables ...................................................................................108 Table Basics ............................................................................................... 108 Navigating and Selecting Within the Table ...................................................... 111 Resizing Table Elements ............................................................................... 113 Formatting Tables ....................................................................................... 117 Adding Borders and Shading ......................................................................... 118 Using the Sort Feature ................................................................................. 121 Lesson 22 – Mail Merge ............................................................................123 The Mail Merge Wizard: An Overview ............................................................. 123 About the Mail Merge Toolbar ....................................................................... 126 Mail Merge Terminology ............................................................................... 128 Working with the Recipient List ..................................................................... 129 Working with the Data Source ....................................................................... 134 Lesson 23 – Applying Breaks ....................................................................139 The Show/Hide button ................................................................................. 139 What is a section break? .............................................................................. 140 Applying Section Break ................................................................................ 140 Changing Page Orientation For a Section ........................................................ 141 Applying Custom Page Numbering ................................................................. 142 Lesson 24 – Table of Contents ..................................................................144 Preparing for a Table of Contents .................................................................. 144 Inserting a Table of Contents ........................................................................ 145 Updating a Table of Contents ........................................................................ 147 Lesson 25 – Index ....................................................................................148 Marking Index Entries .................................................................................. 148 Creating an Index Table ............................................................................... 149 Sources ....................................................................................................151

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Introduction to Microsoft Word

LESSON

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In This Lesson:
Starting Word

Microsoft Word is a powerful tool to create professional looking documents. It is currently one of the most commonly used applications for creating critical documents such as reports, letters, business plans, and more for the World Wide Web and for print. The newest version of Word extends this tradition by giving users the tools they need to streamline the process of creating, sharing, reviewing, and publishing their important documents. Word makes it easier for users to discover and use existing functionality and provides intelligent new ways for users to work with their documents. Word now also makes it easier for users to share and review documents with others without changing the way they currently work. A key design goal for Microsoft Word was to empower users to discover and use more of the new and existing functionality in the application. When the functionality is easier to discover and use, users can gain the confidence to try new things and ultimately create more effective reports, business plans, and more. This goal is achieved through new tools such as Task Panes and Smart Tags that are shared throughout the Microsoft Office suite, as well as through improved technology for working with formatting, styles, bullets, and more.

The Basics of the Word Window

Menu and Dialog Box Options Change Document Views + + + +

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Starting Word
To start Microsoft Word: 1. 2. Click the Start button on the Windows taskbar. This opens the Windows Start menu. Point to All Programs, and then select (click) Microsoft Word.

Microsoft Word opens, displaying a new, blank document.

OR

Click on Start --> Programs --> Microsoft Word

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You can also start Word using various shortcuts to the program. The Microsoft Word shortcut icon may appear in the top left of the Start menu (as in the picture above), in the Windows taskbar, and on the desktop.

The Basics of the Word Window
Let's briefly review the basic parts of the Word XP window before we move onto word processing.

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Lesson 1 - Introduction to Microsoft Word

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Shown in the previous page is the Microsoft Word default window. When Word is launched, a new blank document, or default window, opens in Print Layout view. Although window elements are fully explained in our Windows course, here is a brief explanation of the Word window.

Title bar Displays the document name followed by a program name. Menu bar Contains a list of options to manage and customize documents. Standard toolbar Contains shortcut buttons for the most popular commands. Formatting toolbar Contains buttons used for formatting. Ruler Used to set margins, indents, and tabs. Insertion Point The location where the next character appears. End-of-document marker Indicates the end of the document. Help Provides quick access to Help topics. Scroll bars Used to view parts of the document. Status bar Displays position of the insertion point and working mode buttons. Task Pane Provides easy access to commonly used menus, buttons and tools. View Buttons Changes the layout view of the document to normal view, web layout view, print layout view, or outline view. Office Assistant Links to the Microsoft Office Help feature.

Menu & Dialog Box Options
All the commands you use to create, edit, save, and print a document are found in Microsoft Word’s menu bar, located at the top of the window.

Each menu groups together related commands, sometimes using submenus to further group commands: • • File menu – Create, open, save, print, and close documents. Edit menu – Perform editing functions on your document, including copying, cutting, and pasting text and objects, moving to various points in the document, and undoing and redoing actions.

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• • • • • • •

View menu – Change the document’s display size and style. Insert menu – Insert objects into your documents, including graphics, page numbers and other fields, symbols, AutoText, and hyperlinks. Format menu – Apply formatting to the text and objects in your documents. Tools menu – Use Word’s tools, such as the spell and grammar checker, macro recorder, and track changes, and set your Microsoft Word preferences. Table menu – Insert and format tables. Window menu – Work with multiple open document windows. Help menu – Access Microsoft Word’s online help.

Change Document Views
Microsoft Word provides 4 document views, which you can choose from the View menu:

• •

Normal view displays the text and objects you insert, as well as page and section breaks, and natural page breaks (indicated by dotted lines). However, the layout of the page is not displayed—page numbers are not shown, for example, and any text-wrapping you’ve applied to objects does not appear. Web Layout view displays the document as a web page, including any graphics, text-wrapping, and backgrounds you’ve applied. Print Layout view displays the document as it will be printed. Each page is shown in its entirety, including any white space at the bottom, as well as headers and footers, page numbers, and text-wrapping. Outline view displays the structure of the document, allowing you to reorganize text by dragging and dropping headings. You can collapse and expand the document depending on whether you want to view only headings or all the text.

The View Buttons

To quickly change between document views in Word, use the View buttons at the bottom left corner of the window: • • Click Click to switch to Normal view. to switch to Web Layout view.

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Lesson 1 - Introduction to Microsoft Word

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• •

Click Click

to switch to Print Layout view. to switch to Outline view.

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Learning Document Basics

LESSON

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In This Lesson:
Creating a New Document

Once you have opened Word, you will be ready to create your document. The blank screen is like the blank piece of paper. The following instructions will guide you through creating a basic document with Word XP including saving, opening, printing, and exiting.

Saving a Document

Opening a Document Selecting a Printer Using Print Preview Printing a Document

Creating a New Document
You can either create a new document by using the menu option or the toolbar option. The menu option gives you more options while choosing your new document. However, the toolbar is a faster and easier way of getting a blank document on your screen.

Exiting Word + + + +

Creating a New Document: Menu Option

1. From the File menu, select New... The New Document task pane appears. 2. From the New section, click BLANK DOCUMENT A new document appears.

Creating a New Document: Toolbar Option

1. From the Standard toolbar, click NEW BLANK DOCUMENT A new document appears.

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Saving a Document
The Save and Save As commands are located under the File menu. If you are saving a document for the first time, either selection will take you to the Save As dialog box.

Saving a Document: Save As

To save and name your document or to save a copy of your document under another name: 1. From the File menu, select Save As... The Save As dialog box appears.

2. From the Save in pull-down list, make the appropriate selection: To save to your disk, select 3½ Floppy (A:) To save to your hard drive, select (C:) To save to a network drive, select appropriate option

Your personal home directory is generally My Documents. For a quicker way to view files, select appropriate icons on the left side of the Save As dialog box.

3. In the File name text box, type the document name

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To help you locate the file in the future, use a descriptive filename. Do not give the file an extension. Word will automatically add a .doc extension. 4. To save the document, click SAVE

Saving a Document: Save

Use the Save command to save a document that has already been named and saved. If you select the Save command and you have not saved the document before, you will see the Save As dialog box. Use the Save command to save the changes you make to the original document.

To save a document through a menu:

1. From the File menu, select Save Word will automatically save your document where you previously chose.

To save a document through a button:

1. From the Standard toolbar, click SAVE Word will automatically save your document where you previously chose.

Opening a Document
Follow these instructions if you have already created a document or if you want to open a document already created in Word. 1. Open Word 2. From the File menu, select Open… OR From the Standard toolbar, click OPEN OR On the keyboard, press [Ctrl]+[O] The Open dialog box appears.

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Lesson 2 – Learning Document Basics
3. From the Look in pull-down list, make the appropriate selection

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For options, refer to step 3 of Using Save As. If necessary, scroll through the directories and click to open the directory that contains your file.

4. To select the document, click the name of the document you want to open

Word limits the files listed to Word documents with a .doc extension. If the file you want is not listed, the extension may be something other than .doc. To view all files, from the Files of type pull down list, select All Files.

5.

To open the file, click OPEN

Selecting a Printer
In order to print any document, a printer must be selected. These instructions will show you how to select a printer and set a default printer which will remain the selected printer every time you print. 1. From the File menu, select Print... The Print dialog box appears. 2. From the Name pull-down list, select the printer you wish to use Your printer is selected.

To set a default printer:

To make selecting a printer from the Print dialog box easier, simply set a default printer that will automatically be used every time you print. 1. From the Start menu, select Settings » Printers 2. Right click the printer you would like to set as default » select Set as Default Printer Your default printer is selected.

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Using Print Preview
The Print Preview feature is useful for viewing your document prior to printing. You can verify that the page breaks are okay and that there are not any extra pages in your document. You can print directly from the Print Preview screen. 1. From the File menu, select Print Preview OR On the Standard toolbar, click PRINT PREVIEW 2. OPTIONAL: To print from Print Preview, on the Print Preview toolbar, click PRINT 3. To return to your document, on the Print Preview toolbar, click CLOSE

Printing a Document
The general steps to printing an open document are as follows:

Printing a Document: Menu Option

1. From the File menu, select Print… The Print dialog box will appear. 2. In the Page range and Copies sections, make the changes in the range of pages you want to print and/or the number of copies you want 3. To print your document, click OK Printing a Document: Toolbar Option 1. From the Standard toolbar, click PRINT

When you use the toolbar option, all pages of your document will be printed. This print process does not take you through the Print dialog box.

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Lesson 2 – Learning Document Basics

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Exiting Word
When you are done working with your document and would like to take it off the screen, you have two options, depending on whether you would like to start another Word document or exit Word. If you are finished using Word for the day, be sure to select the Exit command.

To close the saved document and begin another document in Word:

1. From the File menu, select Close 2. Open another document or create a new document in Word

To close the saved document and exit Word:

1. From the File menu, select Exit If you have made changes that have not been saved, a dialog box may appear asking you if you want to save the document. 2. To save the document, click YES To close without saving, click NO To continue working, click CANCEL

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Editing a Document

LESSON

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Editing Basics

Once you have created a Word document and typed in some text, you may want to edit your work by adding, moving, or deleting text. This document covers the Undo command and the basic editing functions of selecting, moving, and deleting text.

Selecting Text Making Multiple Selections Deleting Text + + + +

Editing Basics
Insertion Point and Cursor

The blinking vertical line located in the window is the insertion point. Keyed text will appear to the left of the insertion point as you type. If you move the mouse, it is the pointer that moves on screen. The pointer can appear in several ways. Four of the most common are discussed here. When it is moved over the page, it looks like an Ibeam. The insertion point will be placed to the left of the I-beam cursor when you click the mouse button. When you move it over specific formatting areas the following icons will appear under the cursor: align left, align right, center, left indent, left text wrap, and right text wrap. Text to be typed will appear in the format to the corresponding icon.

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When the pointer moves over the Menu bar or the toolbars, it takes the shape of an arrow pointing up and to the left. Clicking the mouse button once over a button or menu option will select that option. When the pointer is moved past the left margin of the text on the page, it takes the shape of an arrow pointing up and to the right. Clicking the mouse button at this point will select that line of text. You can also double click to select the entire paragraph.

Typing Features

As you start on your document, you should be aware of some functions in Word that make writing easier: Word Wrap Microsoft Word wraps text at the end of each line and continues on the next line; you do not have to press the [Enter] or [return] keys as on a typewriter. The [Backspace] key will move the cursor to the left one space at a time, eliminating text or space. The [Delete] key will move the cursor to the right one space at a time, eliminating text or space. The arrow keys move the cursor up or down one line at a time and left or right one space at a time. The arrow keys do not delete; they allow you to position the cursor exactly where you want it. This is especially helpful if you have to add something to your document.

Delete Character

Arrow Keys

Using the Undo Command

If text was accidentally deleted or if there was some type of editing mistake, you may be able to reverse the last action using the Undo command. If your last action cannot be reversed, the option will read Cannot Undo.

Using the Undo Command: Keyboard Option

1. Press [Ctrl] + [Z]

Using the Undo Command: Menu Option

1. From the Edit menu, select Undo

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Lesson 3 – Editing a Document
The Undo menu option will read Undo Typing or Undo Formatting, or Undo X (where X represents your last action).

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Using the Undo Command: Toolbar Option

1. From the Standard toolbar, click the

next to the UNDO button

2. From the list which appears, select the action(s) you would like to undo Use the scroll bar to locate the action you would like to undo.

When you undo an action, you also undo all actions above it in the list.

Selecting Text
Selecting text is a basic editing skill used in Word. You select text for operations such as deleting and formatting. Once your text is selected, you can also cut, copy, or paste your text; for more information, refer to Cutting, Copying, and Pasting Text. When you select text, you indicate to the computer that your next action(s) are meant to affect just what is selected. For

If a block of text is selected, any new text typed will replace the selected text. If you do this by accident, go immediately to the Edit menu and select Undo Typing to restore the original text. For instructions on using the Undo command, see Using the Undo Command. example, by selecting text you can change the font and size of only that selected section.

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Lesson 3 – Editing a Document
There are several methods you can use to select text. Use whichever option is easiest and most comfortable for you or use the technique that best fits the task that you want to accomplish. Keyboard shortcuts can be used in selecting text.

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Selecting Text: Lines

1. Move the mouse to the left side of the document until it turns into an arrow 2. To select a single line of text, click the mouse button once To select multiple lines of text, click and drag

Selecting Text: Specific Areas

1. 2. 3. 4.

Use the mouse to move the I-beam to the left of the beginning of the text to be selected Click and hold the mouse button Drag the mouse over the text you want selected Release the mouse button The selected text will be highlighted.

If the text is near the left margin, it may be easier to start selecting the last letter and drag it to the first letter.

Selecting Text: Single Words

1. Place the I-beam over the word you want to select 2. Double click the mouse button

Selecting Text: Single Paragraphs

1. Place the I-beam over the paragraph you want to select 2. Triple click the mouse button

Selecting Text: Multiple Paragraphs

1. Place the I-beam at the beginning of the text you want to select 2. Press and hold [Shift] 3. Click at the end of the text you want to select All text between the two points is selected.
Selecting Text: Entire Document

1. From the Edit menu, select Select All

To deselect text:

1. Click the mouse button anywhere outside of the selected text area

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Lesson 3 – Editing a Document

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Making Multiple Selections
You can now make multiple, noncontiguous selections of text in your document. This can be used to format multiple selections at one time.

Making Multiple Selections: Click and Drag

1. Make the initial text selection 2. To make additional selections, press [Ctrl] and click and drag 3. To exclude (drop) one of your selections, while pressing [Ctrl] or [command], click the selection 4. Format the selected text as desired

Moving Text with Drag-and-Drop

Drag-and-drop is another option for moving a block of text. This option is best for moving text short distances. Drag-and-drop is done with the mouse and the text never goes to the Clipboard. As you are dragging the text, a gray insertion point appears. When you let go of the mouse button, the text will drop wherever the insertion point is. As you are becoming comfortable with drag-and-drop, remember the Undo command.

To move text with drag-and-drop:

1. Select the text that you wish to move 2. Click on the text and hold the mouse button 3. Drag the text to the desired location

The insertion line will indicate where the text will be dropped.

4.

To drop the text, release the mouse button.

If you dropped the text in the wrong spot, use the Undo command.

To copy text with drag-and-drop:

1. 2. 3. 4.

Select the text that you wish to copy Press and hold the [Ctrl] key Click on the text and hold the mouse button Drag the text to the desired location

The insertion line will indicate where the text will be dropped.

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Lesson 3 – Editing a Document
5. To drop the text, release the mouse button

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Deleting Text
You can delete anything from a few characters to several pages of text. You can also restore deleted text using the Undo command.

If you released the copied text in the wrong spot, use the Undo command.

Deleting Text: Characters

1. Place the insertion point to the right of the text you want to delete 2. Press [Backspace]

Deleting Text: Type Over

1. Select the text you wish to type over 2. Begin typing The selected text will disappear and be replaced with what you type.

Deleting Text: A Line or Block of Text

1. Select the text that you wish to delete 2. Press [Backspace]

To retrieve deleted text:

1.

From the Edit menu, select Undo Typing

You can also use the UNDO button on the Standard toolbar to undo your typing. For more information on using the Undo command, refer to Using the Undo Command.

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Cutting, Copying, and Pasting Text

LESSON

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In This Lesson:
Cutting, Copying, and Pasting

Cutting, copying, and pasting are convenient ways of having control over your text. Once you cut or copy your text it will be saved onto what is called a Clipboard. In order to paste any of the cut or copied text, you must use the paste option or select the text from the Clipboard. The following instructions will show you how to use the Clipboard to cut, copy, and paste text.

Using the Clipboard + + +

Cutting, Copying, and Pasting
These commands are used to rearrange paragraphs, sentences, or words in your document with ease. Before you cut, copy, and paste your text, the text must be selected. Cut or copied text is saved to the Clipboard (a special storage area) to be pasted elsewhere in your document. The difference between Cut and Copy is that cut text is removed, while copied text is simply copied; it remains in its original location while a copy or "picture" of it goes onto the Clipboard. Text can be pasted within the same document or into different documents. You may cut or copy as little as a character of text or as much as an entire document.

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Cutting and Pasting

Cut text is removed from its original location and placed on the Clipboard to be pasted. Up to 24 items can be stored on to the Clipboard. For instruction on how to use the Clipboard, see Using the Clipboard. 1. Select the text that you wish to move 2. From the Edit menu, select Cut OR From the Standard toolbar, click CUT OR Press [Ctrl]+[X] The text will be removed from your document and temporarily stored on the Clipboard. 3. Use the mouse or arrow keys to place the cursor in the location where you would like to move the text 4. From the Edit menu, select Paste OR From the Standard toolbar, click PASTE OR Press [Ctrl]+[V] OR From the Clipboard task pane, click the item you want pasted

Copying and Pasting

Copied text is not removed from its original position; a duplicate copy of the selected text is placed on the Clipboard. Up to 24 items can be copied and saved onto the Clipboard. For instruction on how to use the Clipboard, see Using the Clipboard. 1. Select the text that you wish to copy 2. To copy the text, from the Edit menu, select Copy OR From the Standard toolbar, click COPY OR Press [Ctrl]+[C] A copy of the selected text will be placed on the Clipboard.

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3. Use the mouse or arrow keys to place the cursor where you would like to insert the copied text 4. To paste the text, from the Edit menu, select Paste OR From the Standard toolbar, click the PASTE button OR Press [Ctrl]+[V] OR From the Clipboard task pane, click the item you want pasted.

Using the Clipboard
The Clipboard is a feature that holds cut or copied items before pasting. Every Office XP program uses the same Clipboard, which is housed in a task pane. The Clipboard holds 24 items. Once the item(s) is cut or copied it is automatically saved into the Clipboard. Any time while you are using Word XP, you are able to select the item(s) in the Clipboard and paste it onto your document.

Information on the Clipboard can be pasted multiple times. When the Clipboard contains 24 items and another item is cut or copied, the oldest item on the Clipboard will be deleted.

To view the Clipboard:

1. From the View menu, select Task Pane 2. From the pull-down list on top of the task pane, select Clipboard

The Clipboard task pane appears.

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To select items from the Clipboard:

1. Place your cursor where you want pasted text to appear 2. From the Clipboard task pane, click the text that you wish to paste into your document The text is pasted into the document.

To clear individual items from the Clipboard:

1. Move the pointer over the item on the Clipboard that you want deleted 2. Click the arrow next to the item 3. Select Delete

To clear all items from the Clipboard:

On the Clipboard, click CLEAR ALL

All items on the Clipboard will be erased.

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Checking Spelling and Grammar

LESSON

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Activating Automatic Spell Check

Not only does Word allow you to Undo possible mistakes in your document and Paste corrections, it also automatically reviews your grammar and spelling as you type. Green wavy lines are placed underneath possible grammar mistakes and a red wavy line under possible spelling mistakes. All of Word's grammar and spelling errors may not be correct, so you can choose to ignore these error markings and keep typing, or you can correct the mistakes and/or add the corrections to Word's dictionary.

Correcting Misspelled Text Activating Automatic Grammar Check Correcting Grammar + + +

Activating Automatic Spell Check
By default, Spell Check is automatically on whenever Word is open. Spell Check may be turned off by setting the preferences. When this feature is off, Spell Check will not check through your document while you type. You can easily turn this feature on through the Preferences dialog box. You can also spell check a document after you are finished typing. 1. From the Tools menu, select Options... The Options dialog box appears. 2. Select the Spelling & Grammar tab 3. Under Spelling, select Check spelling as you type 4. Click OK Misspelled words will appear with a red underline.

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Correcting Misspelled Text
When the dictionary recognizes a word as misspelled, it will underline the word with a red wavy line. Word allows you to correct your misspelled text through the Quick menu or through a dialog box. For words that are often misspelled or mistyped, you may use AutoCorrect to automatically correct the mistakes as they are typed.

Correcting Misspelled Text: Quick Menu Option

If you click on the suspected misspelling, Word gives you one or more suggested corrections.

1. Place your I-Beam over the misspelled word and right-click. 2. A menu list displays the following options: boldfaced suggested spellings, Ignore, Add to Dictionary, AutoCorrect, Language or Spelling. 3. Select the boldfaced suggestion to replace the incorrectly spelled word in the document. 4. Select Ignore, and Word ignores all future instances of this spelling in this document. 5. Select Add to Dictionary, and Word adds the underlined word to the dictionary so it won't be flagged as an error in any other document you create. 6. Select AutoCorrect to add the correct spelling to your list of words that Word automatically corrects as you type. 7. Select Language to specify a word as part of another language, preventing Word from seeing this word as a mistake. 8. If you select spelling, the Spelling and Grammar dialog box appears.

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Lesson 5 – Checking Spelling and Grammar
Correcting Misspelled Text: Dialog Box Option

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Using the dialog box is a little more time consuming, but can give you more options for changing the misspelled word. 1. From the Tools menu, select Spelling and Grammar... OR Click the SPELLING AND GRAMMAR button OR Press [F7] The Spelling and Grammar dialog box appears.

2. Make the desired selection

The options for the dialog box include all the options from the Quick menu plus the options described in the following table.

Dialog Box Option Change Change All AutoCorrect

Action Changes the word to the selected suggestion. Changes all identical misspellings to the selected suggestion. Changes the word in the current document and continues to make corrections in subsequent documents as you type them.

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Lesson 5 – Checking Spelling and Grammar
9. When it is finished, a dialog box appears. Click OK.

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Activating Automatic Grammar Check
Grammar Check can work simultaneously to check for errors in a document or it can be completed once you are finished with a document. 1. From the Tools menu, select Options... The Options dialog box appears. 2. Select the Spelling & Grammar tab 3. Under Grammar, select Check grammar as you type 4. Click OK

Correcting Grammar
When Grammar Check finds a sentence which appears to have improper grammar, it will underline the error with a green wavy line. Word allows you to modify your error through the Quick menu or through a dialog box. If it is an error that does not have a clear solution, Word will display the grammatical rule which is being violated.

Correcting Grammar: Quick Menu Option

1. Right click the grammatical error » select the appropriate solution or Ignore Once

Correcting Grammar: Dialog Box Option

For more extensive editing, it may be easier to use the dialog box. 1. From the Tools menu, select Spelling and Grammar... 2. The Spelling and Grammar dialog box appears.

Building skills for success

Lesson 5 – Checking Spelling and Grammar

27

The options function identically to those of the Quick menu with the addition of the IGNORE RULE button, which ignores all the errors due to the current grammatical rule displayed. 3. Make desired selection When Grammar Check is finished, a dialog box appears. 4. Click OK.

Building skills for success

Paragraph Formatting

LESSON

6
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In This Lesson:
Adjusting Paragraph Alignment

This lesson will help you to use paragraph formatting options to achieve the look that you want for your document.

Adjusting Line Spacing Working with Indents + + + +

Adjusting Paragraph Alignment
Word paragraphs can be aligned with the left or right margin, centered between the two margins, or justified. To adjust alignment, use the Paragraph dialog box, the Formatting toolbar, or the keyboard. Instructions for all three methods follow.

Adjusting Paragraph Alignment: Paragraph Dialog Box

1. Select the paragraph(s) you want to adjust 2. From the Format menu, select Paragraph… The Paragraph dialog box appears. 3. Select the Indents and Spacing tab 4. From the Alignment pull-down list, select the desired option 5. Click OK

Adjusting Paragraph Alignment: Formatting Toolbar

To display the Formatting toolbar:

From the View menu, select Toolbars » Formatting The Formatting toolbar appears.

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Align Text Using the Alignment Buttons:

• •

Select the text you want to align.
Click the Align Left, Center, Align Right, or Justify button on the Formatting toolbar.

Aligning Text

Below you will view examples of text that are aligned using the left, right, center, and justified alignment buttons.

Building skills for success

Lesson 6 – Paragraph Formatting

30

Adjusting Paragraph Alignment: Keyboard

1. Select the paragraph(s) you want to adjust 2. Press the appropriate keyboard shortcut Alignment Left Center Right Justify Shortcut [Ctrl] + [L] [Ctrl] + [E] [Ctrl] + [R] [Ctrl] + [J]

Adjusting Line Spacing
Instead of pressing extra returns at the end of each line of text, you can add space between lines by adjusting the line spacing. This is a much more efficient way of adding white space and your editing will be easier.

To Format Line Spacing:

1. Select the text you want to format. 2. Choose Reveal Formatting on the Task Pane and click on any of the blue links under the Paragraph heading. OR 1. 2. 3. 4. Click Format on the menu bar. Select Paragraph. The Paragraph dialog box appears. Click on the Indents and Spacing tab. In the Line spacing drop down menu, you may select single, 1.5, or double spacing. The default is single spacing. 5. Click OK. OR 1. Select the text you want to format. 2. Click on the Line Spacing button on the Formatting Menu. 3. Select an option from the drop-down menu.

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Lesson 6 – Paragraph Formatting

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Paragraph Dialog Box

1. Place your insertion point in the paragraph 2. From the Format menu, select Paragraph…

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Lesson 6 – Paragraph Formatting

32

The Paragraph dialog box appears.

3. Select the Indents and Spacing tab 4. In the Spacing section, from the Line spacing pull-down list, make the desired selection Options include Single, 1.5 lines, Double, At least, Exactly, and Multiple. The At least, Exactly, and Multiple options require that you enter the amount of space between lines in the At text box. 5. Click OK

When you make a line spacing change, it affects only the text in a paragraph that contains the insertion point.

Working with Indents
Rather than tabbing in the first line or every line of a paragraph, you can create an indent, an amount of space between the text and the page margin. You can adjust the indent for an individual paragraph, the indent for a group of paragraphs, or the margins for the entire document.

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Lesson 6 – Paragraph Formatting

33

Word offers three types of indents: normal indents, first line indents, and hanging indents. A normal indent inserts a specified amount of space between the page margin and all the lines in a paragraph. A first line indent inserts space between the first line and the page margin so it looks like you used a tab. A hanging indent uses a normal indent for the first line and then moves subsequent lines farther to the right.

Paragraph indents can be set using the Paragraph dialog box or the Ruler.

Working with Indents: Paragraph Dialog Box

1. Place your insertion point in the paragraph you want to adjust

If you are adjusting more than one paragraph, select all the paragraphs you want.

From the Format menu, select Paragraph… The Paragraph dialog box appears. 2. Select the Indents and Spacing tab 3. In the Indentation section, in the Left and Right text boxes, type the desired measurements (in inches) 4. If you want a different indent for the first line, from the Special pull-down list, select First line or Hanging 5. If you selected a first line or hanging indent, in the By text box, type the amount of space for the indent The amount of space is measured in inches. 6. Click OK

Working with Indents: Ruler

Instead of using the Paragraph dialog box, you can make indent adjustments using the Ruler. Shown here is a graphic of the Ruler.

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Lesson 6 – Paragraph Formatting
Tab Type Normal Indent Hanging Indent First Line Indent Appearance of the Ruler Appearance of the Text A Normal Indent looks like this A Hanging Indent looks like this A First Line Indent looks like this

34

To set the indent:

1. If the Ruler is not displayed, from the View menu, select Ruler 2. Place your insertion point in the paragraph you want to adjust

If you are adjusting more than one paragraph, select all the paragraphs you want. For information on the different types of indents, see the introduction of Working with Indents.

3. Click and drag the appropriate indent button to the desired location

Building skills for success

Text Formatting
LESSON

7
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In This Lesson:
Formatting Text

You can format the text in your Word documents by changing the font style, size, color, character formatting, and text alignment. This document provides instructions for many different formatting options, such as experimenting with different fonts, boldfacing, and italicizing; these formatting options can give your document a unique look.

Changing Font and Font Size Changing Character Formatting Highlighting Text + + + + Format Painter + + + +

Formatting Text
Some rules to remember when formatting your text include the following: • If you know what formatting optionsoptions youyou • If you know what formatting you want, want, can enable can enable them type. After you finish you them before you before you type. After typing the section, you can disable them.can disable you finish typing the section, you When formatting text that is already typed into the them. document, the first step text that is it. Only selected • When formatting is to select already typed text will take on the format that you areis to select it. into the document, the first step applying. Using too many fonts, sizes, and other formatting in Only selected text will take on the format that one document will usually cause it to look see you are applying. For instructions, cluttered; a document with too muchEditing a Document. be hard Selecting Text in formatting may also to read. Try to limit yourself to no more othertwo or • Using too many fonts, sizes, and than three fonts, sizes, in one document document. cause formatting and formats per will usually Once the to look formatted,a document with too much it text is cluttered; deselect the text by clickingformatting may text or pressingread. Try to away from the also be hard to an arrow key. Selected text is vulnerable moremay be deleted or limit yourself to no and than two or three changed unintentionally! fonts, sizes, and formats per document. • Once the text is formatted, deselect the text by clicking away from the text or pressing an arrow key. Selected text is vulnerable and may be deleted or changed unintentionally!

Lesson 7 – Text Formatting

36

Changing Font and Font Size
Word allows you to change the font or font size through the use of the Formatting toolbar or Font dialog box. The toolbar option is an easier and faster way of changing the look of your text. However, the dialog box gives you more options for modifying your text and allows you to preview your text through the Preview box.

Changing Font and Font Size: Toolbar Option

1. Select the text you want to alter 2. From the Formatting toolbar, from the Font pull-down list, select the desired font

3. From the Font Size pull-down list, select the desired font size

Changing Font and Font Size: Menu Option

1. Select the text you want to alter 2. From the Format menu, select Font…

The Font dialog box will appear.

A sample of the selected font will appear in the Preview section.

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Lesson 7 – Text Formatting

37

3. In the Font text box, type the font name OR From the Font scroll box, select the desired font 4. In the Size text box, type the desired size OR From the Size scroll box, select the desired size 5. In the Effects section, click to mark any desired additional font effects (e.g., small caps, superscript, subscript) 6. When finished, click OK

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Lesson 7 – Text Formatting

38

Changing Character Formatting
Word allows you to format text characters using the toolbar, menu, or keyboard options. The toolbar and keyboard options are faster; however, the menu option allows more room for modification. Some of the styles you can apply are boldface, italics, underlining, shadow, superscript or subscript, single or double strikethrough, small or all caps, and color.

Changing Character Formatting: Toolbar Option

1. Select the text you want to alter 2. From the Formatting toolbar, click one or more of the appropriate formatting buttons

To clear character formatting, select the text and click the formatting button a second time.

Changing Character Formatting: Menu Option

1. Select the text you want to alter 2. From the Format menu, select Font… The Font dialog box will appear. 3. In the Font style text box, type the desired style OR From the Font style scroll box, select the desired style 4. If needed, in the Effects section, select a format (e.g., small caps, shadow) 5. When finished, click OK

Changing Character Formatting: Keyboard Option

1. Select the text you want to change 2. Press the appropriate keys:

Enhancement Italics Bold Underline 3.

Keystroke [Ctrl] + [I] [Ctrl] + [B] [Ctrl] + [U]

To deselect your text, click the mouse button once

Building skills for success

Lesson 7 – Text Formatting

39

Highlighting Text
On the Formatting Toolbar, find the Highlighter icon. The down triangle indicates a pull-down window with a list of colors. The icon acts as a toggle switch. Click it on to highlight in the chosen color anything the mouse highlights. Use it anytime during typing. If a user clicks the highlighter when text is highlighted, that text becomes highlighted in the chosen color.

Format Painter
The beauty of using an office suite is that commands, terminology, and techniques that you learn in one program often apply to other programs in the suite. So it is with Microsoft Office — learn to do something in Word and you’ll probably be able to do it in Excel, PowerPoint, and Access with little or no learning curve. In this article you will discover the Format Painter, a tool that lets you copy formatting in one part of a document into another, no matter how complex. Office documents may be formatted in a variety of ways. You can select some text and change their font, size, color, and so on. In Word, you may create and/or use a style and then apply that style whenever you want. If you are working with tables in Word or Excel, you can select an AutoFormat and choose from a variety of attractive settings. PowerPoint lets you pick design templates complete with color schemes, backgrounds, and more. No matter which program or technique you use, however, a time will come when you just want text or paragraphs to use the same format in one part of the document as you have in another part of the document. And that’s where the Format Painter becomes indispensable.

The Format Painter icon:

The Format Painter icon is found on the Standard toolbar looking like a big paintbrush. If you click it, nothing happens. Instead, Microsoft Word determines and remembers the formatting in effect wherever the insertion point is located. When you select text in another part of the document, that formatting is duplicated. In Figure 1, the insertion point is in the word Primo.

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Lesson 7 – Text Formatting

40

The format of the word is unlike the surrounding text — the font, size, attributes, and color are different. The same word appears in the next paragraph, but its formatting is the same as the rest of the text.

Figure 1: Unusually formatted word in the first paragraph

To copy the format of the word to its second occurrence, just click the Format Painter icon, and click on the word Primo in the second paragraph. Voila! Your second word has the same format as the first, as in Figure 2.

Figure 2: Second occurrence of the word has the same format

To copy formatting to more than one word, select the words after clicking the Format Painter icon. To copy paragraph formatting, select the paragraph whose format you want to duplicate first. (Paragraph formatting includes line spacing, tab settings, indentation, bullets, numbering, and alignment.) Click the Format Painter, then click in the paragraph and all paragraph formats are copied. Drag to select several paragraphs to format more than one.
You can set the Format Painter icon to allow multiple copying of selected text:

a. b. c. d. e.

select the text with the formatting that you want to copy double-click the Format Painter icon (the paintbrush icon) on the Standard toolbar drag over the text you want to format repeat this action over other sections of text to turn off the Format Painter function, single-click the paintbrush icon again.

Building skills for success

Inserting Symbols and Special Characters

LESSON

8
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+

In This Lesson:
Inserting Symbols

When creating documents, sometimes you need to use a symbol or character that does not appear on the keyboard. These symbols and characters can be accessed through the Symbol dialog box.

Inserting Special Characters + + +

Inserting Symbols
Use the Symbol dialog box to locate symbols, characters from other languages, arrows, and other characters. Symbols inserted into documents can then be formatted like letters or numbers. 1. From the Insert menu, select Symbol... The Symbol dialog box appears. 2. Select the Symbols tab

Lesson 8 – Inserting Symbols and Special Characters
1. Select the appropriate symbol

42

The available symbols will depend on which fonts you have installed on your machine. Word comes with pre-installed symbols for you use, but other fonts such as, Wingdings, will also offer numerous symbol options.

2. Click INSERT The symbol appears in your document and the CANCEL button changes to the CLOSE button. 3. To close the Symbol dialog box, click CLOSE

Inserting Special Characters
Special Characters, like Symbols, do not appear on the keyboard; however, some have more functionally than Symbols. For example, the nonbreaking hyphen appears like any other hyphen, but the words that it separates will always remain on the same like (i.e., they won't break). 1. From the Insert menu, select Symbol... The Symbol dialog box appears. 2. Select the Special Characters tab

3. From the Character listing, select appropriate character

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Lesson 8 – Inserting Symbols and Special Characters
4. Click INSERT The special character appears in your document and the CANCEL button changes to the CLOSE button. 5. To close the Symbol dialog box, click CLOSE

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Building skills for success

Page Setup
LESSON

9
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+

In This Lesson:
Page Setup’s Margins tab

Before printing your files, you may want to use the Page Setup feature to define your page margins, paper size, and page orientation among other things.

Page Setup’s Paper tab Page Setup Layout tab + + + +

To open Page Setup:

• •

Choose File Page Setup from the menu bar. The Page Setup dialog box appears. Page Setup appears slightly differently in each of the Office programs. Word XP's Page Setup dialog box is pictured below.

Lesson 9 – Page Setup

45

Page Setup's Margins tab
• • • • Click the Top, Bottom, Left, or Right boxes to define the margins. To define page orientation, click the Portrait (prints text so the page is taller than it is wide) or Landscape (prints text so the page is wider than it is tall) option. Use the Multiple pages drop down box to determine how many pages you want to print on each page and other margin options. Preview will show you a thumbnail view of how your document will appear when printed.

Page Setup's Paper tab
• • • • Click the Paper tab and click the Paper Size list box to define the paper size. Use the Width and Height boxes to set a specific paper size. Use the Paper source section to determine what paper source you're using. Preview will show you a thumbnail view of how your document will appear when printed. The Print Options button gives you more printing options.

Building skills for success

Lesson 9 – Page Setup

46

Page Setup's Layout tab
• • • • • • • Use Sections to vary the layout of a file within a page or between pages by inserting section breaks to divide the document into sections. Then, format the section the way you wish. Headers and Footers are in the top and bottom margins or each page in a file. You can insert text or graphics in headers and footers. Use this section to adjust header and footer layout. Preview will show you a thumbnail view of how your document will appear when printed. The Line Numbers button opens the Line Numbers dialog box, allowing you to add and position line numbering. The Borders button opens the Borders and Shading dialog box, allowing you to add and customize borders, page borders, and shading. The Default button allows you to change the default setting for Page Setup. Click OK when you've made necessary changes.

Building skills for success

Drop Cap
LESSON

10
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+

In This Lesson:
Inserting Drop Cap

One of the ways word processors changed the world was to introduce all kinds of fancy formatting features formerly reserved only for the professionals. One example of this once out-of-reach formatting is the drop cap, a large letter inserted at the beginning of the paragraph. Inserting drop caps in Word XP is a cinch.

+

+

+

Inserting Drop Cap

1. Click the paragraph you want to start with a drop cap.

Lesson 10 – Drop Cap

48

2. On the Format menu, click Drop Cap to display the Drop Cap dialog box. 3. Click Dropped if you want the document text to wrap around the drop cap, or In margin if you want the drop cap to appear in the margin and to the left of the text. 4. Make any necessary adjustments to the font, number of lines to drop, and the drop cap's distance from text in the Options area. 5. Click OK.

Building skills for success

Footnotes and Endnotes

LESSON

11
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+

+

+

In This Lesson:
Inserting Footnotes/Endnotes

Footnotes and endnotes contain supplemental information that’s referenced in the body of the document. Footnotes appear at the bottom of the page containing the reference, while endnotes appear together at the end of the document. When you insert a footnote or endnote, you actually insert the reference—a number or symbol—into the body of your text. Once you insert the reference, Word jumps to the location of your reference text, so you can enter it. When you use reference numbers (rather than symbols), Word automatically updates the numbering as you insert new references. The references always remain linked to their corresponding text.

+

+

+

Inserting Footnotes/Endnotes
When there is a need to create a footnote/endnote, make sure you have your cursor in the correct place to add the subscript. Click on the insert pull-down menu, then click on reference and then click on footnotes.

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50

You will then see a footnote and endnote box. The features of this box are simple. Choose whether you want a footnote or an endnote. The endnote usually has all of the bibliographic information at the end of your document. The footnote will (unless you change your preferences) insert the information at the bottom of each page with the number.

2. 3. 4. 5.

Select the Number format from the drop-down list Set the Start at number Choose the Numbering option from the drop-down list Or choose Custom mark if you wish to use a special symbol or mark other than a number. Click on the Symbol button to open the Symbol Dialog Box (see Inserting Symbols and Special Characters) 6. Click Insert

To quickly return to your previous position, right-click inside the reference text and, from the shortcut menu, select Go to Footnote or Go to Endnote, as appropriate. Word returns the cursor to location of the reference in the body of your document.

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Lesson 11 – Footnotes and Endnotes

51

You can also use the shortcut menu to convert a footnote to an endnote, and vice versa. Simply right-click the reference text and choose the appropriate Convert to option from the menu.

You can view reference text at any time by moving your mouse over the reference in the body of the text; when you do this, Word displays the reference text in a popup.

To edit the text, double-click the reference mark, or just move the cursor to the reference text using your mouse or arrow keys. To delete a reference, select the reference mark and press Delete on your keyboard. This removes both the reference mark and the associated text. Word automatically renumbers the remaining references in your document.

Building skills for success

Columns
LESSON

12
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In This Lesson:
About Columns

Columns can help to separate sections of your document and make them look more inviting to read. The length of a line of text inside the columns is shortened, therefore making it easier to read. Columns are a good way to separate sections of your document on one page. For example, when creating a newsletter or bulletin, columns will give a more professional look. The following instructions show you how to create, modify, and delete columns in your document.

Creating Columns Modifying Columns Deleting Columns + + + +

About Columns
By creating columns, you are creating a separate section in your document. Therefore, any formatting changes such as margins, indents, or headers and footers that you make to the column text affect only the section, not the entire document. You can create columns before or after you start typing. You can create columns on your entire document or on selected text only. How you accomplish this depends on your starting point: • If you choose to impose columns before you start typing, the text that you type will flow into columns until you choose to end the section. If you set your cursor within your text, Word will impose columns in the entire document. If you have selected specific text, Word will apply columns to only that text.

• •

Lesson 12 – Columns

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Creating Columns
You can create columns which span a single page or the entire document. Using the toolbar to create columns is quick and easy, whereas the Columns dialog box offers more options for modification.

To accurately view columns:

1. From the View menu, select Print Layout
Creating Columns: Toolbar Option

Adding columns using the toolbar option is an easy way to put columns into your document. If COLUMNS is hidden from the Standard toolbar, click MORE BUTTONS toolbar to locate it and add it to the toolbar. 1. Place your insertion point in the document where you want the columns OR Select the text to be placed in columns. 2. From the Standard toolbar, click COLUMNS A submenu appears. 3. To select the number of columns, drag across the number desired on the Standard

4. Click on desired number of columns

Creating Columns: Dialog Box Option

Using the Columns dialog box gives you more options for modifying columns than using the toolbar option. With the dialog box, you can adjust the width and spacing of columns. Also, the dialog box allows you to create up to 45 columns depending on the size of your paper, however, standard paper allows only 12 columns. 1. Select the text to be formatted into columns

Building skills for success

Lesson 12 – Columns
OR Place cursor within text in document. 2. From the Format menu, select Columns... The Columns dialog box appears.

54

3. To select the number of columns, in the Number of columns text box type the appropriate number OR Under Presets, select the appropriate option

Options One, Two, and Three will give you columns with equal width. Options Left and Right will give you two columns with unequal width.

From the Apply to pull-down list, select the desired option of having columns applied to

Your choices will depend upon whether or not you selected the text or placed your cursor in the text to create columns.

4. Click OK

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Lesson 12 – Columns

55

Modifying Columns
There are several different options you can use to modify your columns to make them appear exactly how you want them. The following section provides instructions on how to adjust column width, add lines, insert column breaks and level column endings.

Adjusting Column Width Using the Ruler Option

Word will not allow you to use this option if Equal column width is selected in the Column dialog box. In order to use rulers for width adjustment you must be in Print Layout (Page Layout) view

1. If necessary, from the View menu, select Print Layout 2. Place the cursor in any column of text 3. Move the cursor over any margin boundary on the ruler so that it turns into a double arrow

4. Click and drag the column boundary for the appropriate column width

The width will be adjusted for the two columns on either side of the column boundary.

Adjusting Column Width Using the Column Dialog Box

1. Place cursor within any column of text 2. From the Format menu, select Columns... The Columns dialog box appears.

3. To create columns of unequal width, make sure that Equal column width is not selected 4. Under Width and spacing, type values for the column attributes you want to change

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Lesson 12 – Columns

56
The Width will alter the width of the column and the Spacing will alter the space between the columns.

5. Click OK

Adding Lines

Adding lines between columns adds creativity and design to your document. You may want to add lines to your column if your are following a style similar to that of a newsletter or bulletin. This feature automatically adds lines between all columns. 1. Place the cursor within the column text 2. From the Format menu, select Columns... The Columns dialog box appears. 3. Select Line between 4. Click OK

Deleting Columns
You can choose to delete all columns in a document or only a section of columns. You can either use the Standard toolbar, which is a quicker way to delete your columns, or you can choose to use the Columns dialog box.

Deleting Columns: Toolbar Option

To delete all columns in a document:

1. From the Edit menu, select Select All 2. From the Standard toolbar, click COLUMNS The Columns pull-down list appears. 3. From the pull-down list, drag to select a single column 4. Click with one column selected

To delete columns from a section in a document:

1. Place the cursor in the column which you want deleted 2. From the Standard toolbar, click COLUMNS

Building skills for success

Lesson 12 – Columns
The Columns pull-down list appears. 3. From the pull down list, drag to select a single column 4. Click on selected number of columns

57

Deleting Columns: Dialog Box Option

To delete all columns in a document:

1. From the Edit menu, select Select All 2. From the Format menu, select Columns... The Columns dialog box appears. 3. Under Presets, select One 4. Click OK

To delete columns from a section in a document:

1. Place the cursor in the column which you want deleted 2. From the Format menu, select Columns... The Columns dialog box appears. 3. Under Presets, select One 4. Click OK

Building skills for success

Using Clip Art
LESSON

13
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+

In This Lesson:
Inserting Clip Art

Word comes bundled with hundreds of Clip Art images that are copyright free and available for your personal use. The clip art images that are available through Word cover many different categories and can really help enhance your pages.

Moving Clip Art Using Text Wrap Modifying Clip Art + + + +

Inserting Clip Art
Inserting free Clip Art in Office XP is easy and can add creativity to your document.

Inserting Clip Art: Search Option

1. From the Insert menu, select Picture » Clip Art. The Insert Clip Art task pane appears.

Lesson 13 – Using Clip Art
2. In the Search text text box, type keywords related to the Clip Art you desire 3. Click SEARCH In the Results section, a list of images appears. 4. Double click the image you would like to insert The Clip Art is now inserted into the document. 5. OPTIONAL: To perform a new search, click MODIFY 6. OPTIONAL: Repeat steps 2-4 as necessary

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Inserting Clip Art: Browse Option

1. From the Insert menu, select Picture » Clip Art. The Insert Clip Art task pane appears. 2. Under the See also section, click CLIP ORGANIZER... The Microsoft Clip Organizer dialog box appears.

3. In the Collection List section, click the plus sign before Office Collections A list of Clip Art categories appears.

Building skills for success

Lesson 13 – Using Clip Art
4. Select a desired category A list of Clip Art appears in the right half of the window.

60

A plus sign indicates subfolders (more specific categories).

5. Move the pointer over the desired piece of Clip Art 6. Click the arrow next to the Clip Art » select Copy

7. Return to the document you are creating by closing Microsoft Clip Organizer 8. From the Edit menu, select Paste The Clip Art appears in the document

Inserting Clip Art: File Option

1. From the Insert menu, select Picture» From File...

Building skills for success

Lesson 13 – Using Clip Art
The Insert Picture dialog box appears. 2. In the Insert Picture dialog box, using the Look in pull-down menu, navigate to the appropriate drive and/or folder 3. Select the image to be inserted 4. Click INSERT The image is inserted.

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Moving Clip Art
You can easily move Clip Art from one location to another on your page.

Moving Clip Art: Mouse Option

1. Select the Clip Art you wish to move by clicking on it once 2. Drag the Clip Art to the desired location on the page 3. Release the mouse button The Clip Art is moved to the new location.

If you are not satisfied with the results, on the Toolbar, click UNDO

Moving Clip Art: Menu Option

For more precise positioning, including text wrap options, access the Advanced options: 1. Select the Clip Art 2. From the Format menu, select Picture... The Format Picture dialog box appears. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Select the Layout tab In the Layout tab, click ADVANCED... Choose the Picture Position or Text Wrapping tab as appropriate Make the appropriate changes Click OK Click OK

Using Text Wrap
The text wrap feature allows you several options for positioning your Clip Art image in or around text.

Building skills for success

Lesson 13 – Using Clip Art
Using Text Wrap: Toolbar Option

62

1. Select the Clip Art image The Picture toolbar appears.

If the Picture toolbar does not appear, from the View menu, select Toolbars » Picture.

2. On the Picture toolbar, click the TEXT WRAPPING button The Text Wrapping pull-down list appears. 3. From the list, select the appropriate Text Wrapping option: o o o o o o o o In Line with Text: the image is placed on the same line as the surrounding text Square: text is wrapped squarely around the image Tight: text is wrapped closely and completely around the image Behind Text: the image is placed behind the text In Front of Text: the image is in front of the text, blocking the text from view Top and Bottom: the image is placed between lines of text Through: text is wrapped closely around the image Edit Wrap Points: you can select where you want the text to wrap around the image

4. OPTIONAL: To deselect the Clip Art, click somewhere else in the document

Using Text Wrap: Quick Menu Option

1. Right click the Clip Art » select Format Picture... The Format Picture dialog box appears. 2. Select the Layout tab 3. In the Wrapping style section, select the appropriate style 4. Click OK The text is wrapped.

Modifying Clip Art
You can modify Clip Art by using the features on the Drawing toolbar. 1. Select the Clip Art that you want to modify 2. On the Drawing or Picture toolbar, click the appropriate button

Building skills for success

Working with Images

LESSON

14
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+

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+

In This Lesson:
Adding Images

Adding visual components to your documents can enhance or reinforce its message. Images from Clip Art collections, WordArt, the Internet, or scanned images can be added to your Word documents.

Managing Images Wrapping Text Options Picture Options + + + +

Adding Images
Adding images from a variety of sources, including scanned images, images saved from the Internet, and Clip Art, is easy in Word XP. Word has an extensive Clip Art Gallery that provides easy access to images. 1. Click the location where you would like the picture to appear 2. From the Insert menu, select Picture » From File… The Insert Picture dialog box will appear.

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3. Locate and select the image file you want to add 4. Click INSERT The picture appears in the desired location.

Managing Images
Once you have inserted an image into your document, you can easily position or resize it as needed. You can also control the way text will wrap around a picture.

Resizing an Image

1. Select the image Boxes called sizing handles will appear around the selected image.

2. Click and hold one of the sizing handles

To keep the image in the same proportions, use one of the corner handles. To distort the image, use one of the side handles. 3. Drag the handle until the image is the desired size

You will see an outline of a box indicating the new size of the image.

4. Release the mouse button The image is now the desired size.

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Wrapping Text Options
There are three options for wrapping text around an image: the Menu Option, the Mouse Option, and the Toolbar Option.

Wrapping Text: Menu Option

1. Select the image 2. From the Format menu, select Picture... The Format Picture dialog box appears. 3. Select the Layout tab 4. Under Wrapping style, select one of the five different wrapping styles 5. Under Horizontal alignment, select the desired alignment

6. Click OK

Wrapping Text: Mouse Option

1. Double click the image OR Right click the image » select Format Picture... . The Format Picture dialog box appear. 2. Select the Layout tab 3. Under Wrapping style, select one of the five different wrapping styles 4. Under Horizontal alignment, select the desired alignment

5. Click OK

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Wrapping Text: Toolbar Option

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Once you insert an image, the Picture toolbar should automatically appear. If the Picture toolbar does not appear, see Picture Options.

1. On the Picture toolbar, click TEXT WRAPPING

2. From the submenu, select the desired wrapping option

Positioning an Image

In order to drag images in Word, the Wrapping Style of the image cannot be In line with text.

drag images in Word, the Wrapping Style of the image cannot be In line with text. 1. Click and hold the center of the image The mouse arrow will turn into a four-headed arrow when you are able to move the image. 2. Drag the image to the desired location 3. Release the mouse button The image is now in the desired location.

Picture Options
Once you have inserted a picture into your document, there are options that can enhance the look of your image. The Picture toolbar lets you change the look of your image by providing options such as line style, transparency, contrast, changing color, and cropping. 1. From the View menu, select Toolbars » Picture The Picture toolbar appears.

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Name of Button: Insert Picture from File Color More Contrast Less Contrast More Brightness Less Brightness Crop Rotate Left Line Style Compress Pictures Text Wrap Format Picture Set Transparent Color Reset Picture

Use it to: Insert another picture Automatic, Grayscale, Black & White, or Watermark Increase color intensity Decrease color intensity Add white to lighten all colors Add black to darken the color Cut the sides of an image Each click turns the image by 90 degrees to the left Customize the border of an image Changes the Resolution of your image Set how text wraps around the image Displays the Format Picture Dialog Box Use eyedropper to make areas of the picture transparent (mainly for web graphics) Return picture to original format

Building skills for success

Word Graphics
LESSON

15
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In This Lesson:
Drawing Objects

Now that you are comfortable adding and formatting text, using columns and inserting clip art, images, and others, let's learn to enhance your documents by adding objects and pictures. The Drawing Toolbar offers many options for including lines, lines with arrows, and many types of shapes into your document.

WordArt Drawing Objects Arrange and Transform Objects Create a Group of Objects + + + +

Drawing objects include:

1. AutoShapes: including Lines, Curves, and Textboxes 2. WordArt drawing objects

Drawing Objects
To Draw Lines and Shapes:

Open the Drawing toolbar by clicking View on the Menu Bar, Select Toolbars and then Drawing from the Cascading Menu.

OR • OR • • Click the Drawing button on the Standard toolbar. The Drawing toolbar will appear. Right-click on any toolbar and select Drawing.

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• OR • o o o o • • •

Choose an AutoShape from the AutoShape drop down menu.

Click any of the drawing tools in the first group of buttons. Line Tool Arrow Tool Rectangle Tool Oval Tool The mouse pointer changes to a crosshair . Drag the crosshair from a starting point until the object is the desired size. Release the mouse button to end the drawing object and turn off the Drawing tool.

Hold the Shift key down to create straight lines, perfect circles, or perfect squares.

AutoShapes are inserted (on their own layer) with the In front of text wrapping style applied.

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WordArt Drawing Objects
Also included on the Drawing toolbar is the WordArt Feature. Using WordArt, you can create text graphics that bend, slant, and appear metallic or wooden and much, much more. WordArt can even be shadowed, skewed, rotated, and stretched. Here are just a few examples of what WordArt allows you to do:

To Insert WordArt: • • Place the insertion point where you would like to insert WordArt. Click the WordArt button on the Drawing toolbar . The WordArt gallery opens.

• • • •

Choose (click) a WordArt style. The Edit WordArt Text dialog box appears. Edit the font, size, and style. Click OK.

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Formatting Drawing Objects Use the Drawing toolbar to format AutoShapes and WordArt. To select several objects hold down the Shift key and click on each object, or use the Select Objects tool. Fill color allow you to color all selected drawing objects. No fill is the color white. Change the line color of a selected object. Changes the text color of a selected object. Changes the line style of a selected object. Changes the line style of a selected object. Includes solid and dotted lines. Changes the style of arrow. Gives selected object some depth. Gives selected object a 3D effect .

Arrange and Transform Objects
Rather than line up objects manually, you can use tools to align and distribute objects relative to other objects or relative to the page. This is more accurate than positioning shapes by eye. You can also transform many types of object. An example of a transformation is to flip an object upside down or rotate it through 90 Degrees.

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In Word, an object must be floating over text or must not have In Line With Text layout in order to apply most arrange/transform commands. Look up the topic "Change an inline picture to a floating picture" if you are not sure how to do this.

To change the order of objects Objects are drawn in layers. The last object to be added appears in the top layer. If you move it over another object it will appear in front of it. You can change the order of any object to move it forward or back. In Word, objects can also either be in front of or behind text on the page • • Select the object(s) that you want to move forward or back On the Drawing toolbar, click the Draw button then select an option from the Order menu

OR • Right-click the selected object(s) then select Order from the shortcut menu

To align objects relative to one another Aligning objects by eye can be quite tricky and time-consuming. It is easier to use the Align and Distribute tools. • • Select the objects to align by Shift-clicking them On the Drawing toolbar, click Draw then from the Draw menu, select Align or Distribute

A submenu of options is displayed.

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Align and distribute options • Select an align option from the list

The objects are aligned along the edge you selected.

If you select more than two objects, you can choose to distribute them. This means that the space between each object will be equalized.

To align objects relative to the page • From the Align and Distribute menu, select Relative to Page/Canvas/Slide

The Relative to Page/Canvas/Slide option is checked. Any align options you choose will now apply in relation to the page, drawing canvas, or slide until you uncheck the Relative to Page/Canvas/Slide option again by clicking it. To rotate or flip an object • Select the object then point to a green handle

The mouse pointer changes shape to the rotate arrow . • OR • • Select the object you want to rotate then on the Drawing toolbar, click Draw Select Rotate or Flip and point to any green handle and drag it to rotate the object Drag the handle to rotate the object

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Create a Group of Objects
Grouping objects enables you to treat multiple objects as a single object. For example, suppose you used the drawing tools to draw a window. Without grouping the objects that comprise the window moving or resizing the window is much harder. Grouping objects combines them so you can work with them as a single object. Even while objects are grouped together, the individual components of the group can still be formatted without having to ungroup the object first.

Individual objects are grouped as a whole

A drawing comprised of many individual objects

To group objects • Select the objects you want to group then on the Drawing toolbar, click Draw and select Group (or right-click the objects and select Group)

If you select more than two objects, you can choose to distribute them. This means that the space between each object will be equalized.

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To select an object within a group to change its formatting Formatting changes can be made to all objects within a group or to one particular object.

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Click on the shape within the group that you want to format

The selected shape appears with grey handles.

Format as required

Centre square selected within the group

Centre square within a group formatted differently

You cannot change the layer order of grouped objects relative to one another. You must ungroup the objects, change their layer order, then regroup them.

Building skills for success

Borders and Shading

LESSON

16
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In This Lesson:
Adding Borders and Shading: Toolbar Option

Borders and shading help you emphasize information and guide a reader's eye through a document. When adding borders and shading, remember that they are both applied to entire paragraphs. As with most other Word features, you can add borders and shading in more than one way. This document covers the following options for adding borders and shading to paragraphs.

Adding Borders and Shading: Dialog Box Option + + + +

Adding Borders and Shading: Toolbar Option
The Tables and Borders toolbar may be used to quickly add borders and shading to paragraphs. The following instructions will guide you in using the toolbar options to add borders and shading to paragraphs. Both borders and shading can be applied to the same paragraph.

To display the Tables and Borders toolbar:

1. From the View menu, select Toolbars » Tables and Borders The Tables and Borders toolbar appears.

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Adding Borders & Shading

1. Select the paragraph(s) that you want to add shading to or place a border around 2. To add a border, click the OR To add shading, click the A pull-down list appears. next to OUTSIDE BORDER

next to SHADING COLOR

3. From the pull-down list, select the desired border or shading option

Removing Borders

1. Select the paragraph containing the border you want to remove

2. Click the

next to OUTSIDE BORDER The Border pull-down list appears.

3. Click NO BORDER

Removing Shading

1. Select the paragraph containing the shading you want to remove

2. Click the

next to SHADING COLOR

The Shading Color pull-down list appears.

3. Click NO FILL

Modifying Borders

1. Select the paragraph containing the border you want to change

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2. Click the

next to OUTSIDE BORDER

The Border pull-down list appears.

3. Click NO BORDER 4. OPTIONAL: On the Tables and Borders toolbar, select a different line weight and line style 5. Again, click the next to OUTSIDE BORDER A pull-down list appears. 6. From the pull-down listing, select a new border

Modifying Shading

1. Select the paragraph containing the shading you want to change 2. Click the next to SHADING COLOR

The Shading Color pull-down list appears.

3. Select the desired shading option

Adding Borders and Shading: Dialog Box Option
The Borders and Shading dialog box is another option for adding borders and shading to your document. With this option, you have more control of your border placement within paragraphs than with the Tables and Borders toolbar.

Adding Borders

1. Select the paragraph(s) to which you want to add a border 2. From the Format menu, select Borders and Shading…

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The Borders and Shading dialog box appears.

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3. Select the Borders tab 4. From the Setting section, select the desired option OR In the Preview section, click where you want a border to appear HINT: The sample graphic will be updated to reflect your changes. 5. OPTIONAL: Adjust the Style, Color, and Width using the scroll box and pull-down lists respectively 6. Click OK

Removing Borders

1. Select the paragraph containing the border you want to remove 2. From the Format menu, select Borders and Shading … The Borders and Shading dialog box appears. 3. Select the Borders tab 4. In the Setting section, click NONE OR In the Preview section, click the borders you would like to remove 5. Click OK

Modifying Borders

1. Select the paragraph(s) with the border you would like to change

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Lesson 16 – Borders and Shading
2. From the Format menu, select Borders and Shading… The Borders and Shading dialog box appears. 3. Select the Borders tab 4. In the Preview section, click the border you would like to change 5. From the Style scroll box, select the desired line style 6. In the Preview area, click where you would like the border The new border appears, replacing the old. 7. Click OK

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Adding Shading

1. Select the paragraph(s) to which you would like to add shading 2. From the Format menu, select Borders and Shading… The Borders and Shading dialog box appears. 3. Select the Shading tab

4. From the Fill, Patterns, and Color areas, select the desired options The Preview section will automatically adjust based on your selections. 5. Click OK

Modifying Shading

1. Select the paragraph(s) with the shading you want to change 2. From the Format menu, select Borders and Shading … The Borders and Shading dialog box appears. 3. Select the Shading tab

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Lesson 16 – Borders and Shading
4. In the Fill and Patterns areas, make your changes The Preview section will automatically adjust based on your selections. 5. Click OK

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Removing Shading

1. Select the paragraph with the shading you want to remove 2. From the Format menu, select Borders and Shading … The Borders and Shading dialog box appears. 3. Select the Shading tab 4. In the Fill section, select No Fill 5. In the Patterns section, from the Style pull-down list, select Clear 6. Click OK

You may add borders to a page by working in the Page Border tab.

Building skills for success

Bullets and Numbering

LESSON

17
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In This Lesson:
Using Bulleted Lists Using Numbered Lists

Using Bulleted Lists
With Word, you can make bulleted lists, numbered lists, or outlines. Word gives you three different ways of applying bullets or numbered lists. Using the the Formatting toolbar, the Bullets and Numbering dialog box, or AutoFormatting will all create bulleted or numbered lists.

Customizing Bulleted and Numbered lists + + + +

Adding Bullets: Formatting Buttons

This is an example of bulleted text. Note that when the text wraps, it does not wrap all the way to the bullet, but only to where the first line of text began. The Bullets button is like a toggle switch: clicking once turns it on, clicking a second time turns it off. If you want to change the bullet style or the indents, you will have to use the Bullets and Numbering dialog box.

Adding Bullets as You Type

When you are ready to add bulleted text to your document, use the following steps: 1. Place the insertion point where you want the bullets to begin 2. From the Formatting toolbar, click BULLETS

Lesson 16 – Bullets and Numbering
The button will become light gray. Word will insert your first bullet and move the cursor a quarter of an inch to the right, where you can begin typing text. 3. Type the text If the text wraps, Word maintains the quarter-inch indent. When you press [Enter] or [return], another bullet appears.

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To end the bullets:

1. Finish typing the last line of bulleted text and press [Enter] or [return] The cursor should be on a blank bulleted line. 2. From the Formatting toolbar, click BULLETS

Adding Bullets to Existing Text

1. Select the text you want to bullet 2. From the Formatting toolbar, click BULLETS

To remove bullets:

1. Select the bulleted text 2. From the Formatting toolbar, click BULLETS

Adding Bullets: Bullets & Numbering Dialog Box

The Bullets and Numbering dialog box can be used to add or remove bullets and numbers, just as the Formatting buttons can. However, the dialog box gives you many more options in modifying the numbers, bullets, and the spacing around the numbers and bullets. Also, the Bullets and Numbering dialog box gives you the option to customize your bullets or numbers.

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Lesson 16 – Bullets and Numbering
The following image is the Bullets and Numbering dialog box.

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The following sections require you to access the Bullets and Numbering dialog box from the Format menu; however, you can also access the Bullets and Numbering dialog box by right clicking the mouse.

To access the dialog box through the Quick menu:

1. Right click the area that has or will have bullets or numbers » select Bullets and Numbering... The Bullets and Numbering dialog box appears.

Adding Bullets as You Type

• This is an example of bulleted text. Word inserts a quarter-inch indent between the bullet and the text, maintaining the indent if the text wraps. When you press [Enter] or [return], the next bullet appears. 1. Place the insertion point where you want the bullets to begin 2. From the Format menu, select Bullets and Numbering... The Bullets and Numbering dialog box appears. 3. Select the Bulleted tab 4. Select the bullet style you want 5. Click OK

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6. Type the text When you press [Enter] or [return], another bullet appears.

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To stop the bullets:

1. Finish typing your last line of bulleted text and press [Enter] or [return] The cursor should be on a blank bulleted line. 2. From the Format menu, select Bullets and Numbering… The Bullets and Numbering dialog box appears. 3. Select the Bulleted tab 4. Click NONE 5. Click OK

Adding Bullets to Existing Text

1. Select the text you want to bullet 2. From the Format menu, select Bullets and Numbering... The Bullets and Numbering dialog box appears. 3. Select the Bulleted tab 4. Select the bullet style you want 5. Click OK

To remove bullets:

1. Select the bulleted text 2. From the Format menu, select Bullets and Numbering… The Bullets and Numbering dialog box appears. 3. Select the Bulleted tab 4. Click NONE 5. Click OK

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Adding Bullets: AutoFormatting

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Bullets can be created automatically as you type if you have those options selected in the AutoCorrect dialog box. If you have created a specific bullet style, you may want to turn this option off. An option in the AutoCorrect dialog box is selected and active when a check appears in the checkbox corresponding to that option.

To enable/disable AutoFormatting:

1. From the Tools menu, select AutoCorrect Options... The AutoCorrect dialog box appears. 2. Select the AutoFormat As You Type tab 3. To enable AutoFormatting: Under Apply as you type, select Automatic bulleted lists To disable AutoFormatting: Under Apply as you type, deselect Automatic bulleted lists 4. Click OK

To create bulleted lists:

1. Enable the appropriate AutoFormat as You Type option 2. Type bulleted list items as shown in the table below Word converts the text to a list, adding a bullet each time [Enter] or [return] is pressed Formatting Applied Hibbard Humanities Hall

Option

What You Type

Automatic bulleted lists

* (space) Hibbard Humanities Hall [Enter] or [return]

Automatic bulleted list: Hyphen Automatic bulleted list: Double Hyphen

- (space) Hibbard Humanities Hall [Enter] or [return] -- (space) Hibbard Humanities Hall [Enter] or [return]

- Hibbard Humanities Hall Hibbard Humanities Hall

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To end the list:

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1. After typing your last list item, press [Enter] or [return] twice

Using Numbered Lists
With Word, you can make bulleted lists, numbered lists, or outlines. Word gives you three different ways of applying bullets or numbered lists: the Formatting buttons, the Bullets and Numbering dialog box, and AutoFormatting.

Adding Numbers: Formatting Buttons

IV.

This is an example of numbered text. Note that when the text wraps, it does not wrap all the way to the number, but only to where the first line of text began.

If you want to change the number style, the first number in the list, or the indents, you will have to use the Bullets and Numbering dialog box.

Adding Numbered Text as You Type

1. Place the insertion point where you want the numbers to begin 2. From the Formatting toolbar, click NUMBERING Word will insert the first number and move the cursor a quarter of an inch to the right, where you can begin typing text. 3. Type the text If the text wraps, Word maintains the quarter-inch indent. When you press [Enter] or [return], another number appears.

To stop the numbers:

1. Finish typing the last line of numbered text and press [Enter] or [return] The cursor should appear on a blank line. 2. From the Formatting toolbar, click NUMBERING

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Adding Numbers to Existing Text

1. Select the text you want to number
2.

From the Formatting toolbar, click NUMBERING

To remove numbers:

1. Select the text 2. From the Formatting toolbar, click NUMBERING

Adding Numbers: Bullets & Numbering Dialog Box

The Bullets and Numbering dialog box can be used to add or remove bullets and numbers, just as the Formatting buttons can. However, the dialog box gives you many more options in modifying the numbers, bullets, and the spacing around the numbers and bullets. Also, the Bullets and Numbering dialog box gives you the option to customize your bullets or numbers. The following image shows the Bullets and Numbering dialog box.

The following sections have you access the Bullets and Numbering dialog box from the Format menu; however, you can also access the Bullets and Numbering dialog box by clicking the right mouse button.

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To access the dialog box through the Quick menu:

1. Right click the area that has or will have numbers » select Bullets and Numbering... The Bullets and Numbering dialog box appears.

Adding Numbered Text as You Type

IV.

This is an example of numbered text. Note that when the text wraps, it does not wrap all the way to the number, but only to where the first line of text began.

1. Place the insertion point where you want the numbers to begin 2. From the Format menu, select Bullets and Numbering… The Bullets and Numbering dialog box appears. 3. Select the Numbered tab 4. Select the numbering style you want 5. Click OK 6. Type the text If the text wraps, Word maintains the quarter-inch indent. When you press [Enter] or [return], another number appears.

To stop the numbers:

1. Finish typing your last line of numbered text and press [Enter] or [return] The cursor should appear on a blank line. 2. From the Format menu, select Bullets and Numbering… The Bullets and Numbering dialog box appears. 3. Click NONE 4. Click OK

Adding Numbers to Existing Text

1. Select the text you want to number 2. From the Format menu, select Bullets and Numbering… The Bullets and Numbering dialog box appears. 3. Select the Numbered tab

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Lesson 16 – Bullets and Numbering
4. Select the numbering style you want 5. Click OK

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To remove numbers:

1. Select the numbered text 2. From the Format menu, select Bullets and Numbering... The Bullets and Numbering dialog box appears. 3. Select the Numbered tab 4. Click NONE 5. Click OK

Adding Numbers: AutoFormatting

Numbers can be created automatically as you type if you have those options selected in the AutoCorrect dialog box. If you have created a specific number style, you may want to turn this option off. An option in the AutoCorrect dialog box is selected and active when a check appears in the checkbox corresponding to the option.

To enable/disable AutoFormatting:

1. From the Tools menu, select AutoCorrect Options... The AutoCorrect dialog box appears. 2. Select the AutoFormat As You Type tab 3. To enable AutoFormatting: Under Apply as you type, select Automatic numbered lists To disable AutoFormatting: Under Apply as you type, deselect Automatic numbered lists 4. Click OK

To create numbered lists:

1. Enable the appropriate AutoFormat as You Type option 2. Type numbered list items as shown in the table below Word converts the text to a list, adding a number each time [Enter] or [return] is pressed What You Type 1. Hibbard Formatting Applied 2. Hibbard

Option Automatic

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Humanities Hall [Enter] or [return] D. Hibbard Humanities Hall [Enter] or [return] OR e. Hibbard Humanities Hall [Enter] or [return] X. Hibbard Humanities Hall [Enter] or [return] OR xi. Hibbard Humanities Hall [Enter] or [return] XII. XIII. OR xiv. Hibbard Humanities Hall xv. Humanities Hall 3.

numbered list

F. Hibbard Humanities Hall G. OR h. Hibbard Humanities Hall i.

Automatic lettered list

Hibbard Humanities Hall

Automatic Roman numeral list

To end the list:

1. After typing your last list item, press [Enter] or [return] twice

Customizing Bulleted and Numbered Lists
By modifying numbered or bulleted lists, you are able to change the way the information is displayed. For example, you can create multilevel lists. By customizing numbered or bulleted lists, you are able to change the appearance of each bullet or number. For example, instead of a plain bullet, you could use a symbol or a picture.

Modifying Bulleted Lists

In addition to creating your lists, Word gives you ways of modifying the format of your information. The following instructions will show you how to add explanatory text within your list without creating additional bullets and how to create a multilevel list.

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Adding Text to the List

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Perhaps you want to add information to a list item but do not want to create a separate list item. Using this simple keystroke will place your cursor on the next line without a bullet appearing. 1. Place the cursor after the last character in the list item where you want to add text 2. Press [Shift] + [Enter] Your cursor will appear underneath the previous list item.

3. Type the additional text

Creating a Multilevel List (Outline)

Sometimes, single bulleted steps are not enough. Creating an outline can help organize your document for clearer presentation. Word allows up to nine different levels for outline lists. It is easy to demote or promote a list item from one level to another using the INDENT buttons as described here. 1. From the Format menu, select Bullets and Numbering... The Bullets and Numbering dialog box appears. 2. Select the Outline Numbered tab

3. 4. 5. 6.

Select the bulleted outline list example Click OK Start typing your list To create subsequent list items, press [Enter] or [return]

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7. To demote a list item, place your cursor before the list item and click INCREASE INDENT

OR Press [Tab] 8. To promote a list item, place your cursor before the list item and click DECREASE INDENT

OR Press [Shift] + [Tab]

Customizing Bulleted Lists

Customizing your bulleted list allows you to use creative and eye-catching bullets. Word provides many different images to choose from. The following instructions assume that a bulleted list has already been created. 1. Select the bulleted list you wish to customize 2. From the Format menu, select Bullets and Numbering... The Bullets and Numbering dialog box appears. 3. Select one of the bullet choices 4. Click CUSTOMIZE... The Customize Bulleted List dialog box appears. NOTE: Under Bullet character, one of the icons should be selected.

5. Under Bullet character, select the desired bullet character OR To change the style, color, and size of the bullet, click FONT... To select a symbol for your bullet: Click CHARACTER... To select a picture for your bullet: Click PICTURE... 6. Click OK

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Modifying Numbered Lists

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Word gives you ways of modifying numbered lists. The following instructions will show you how to add explanatory text within your list without creating additional numbers and how to create a multilevel list.

Adding Text to the List

Perhaps you want to add information to a step but do not want to create a separate step. Using this simple keystroke will place your cursor on the next line without a number appearing. 1. Place the cursor after the last character in the step where you want to add text 2. Windows: Press [Shift] + [Enter]

3. Type the additional text

Creating a MultiLevel List (Outline)

Sometimes, single numbered steps are not enough. Creating an outline can help organize your document for clearer presentation. Word allows up to nine different levels for outline lists. These instructions will show you how to create multi-level lists. It is easy to demote or promote a list item from one level to another using the INDENT buttons as described here. 1. From the Format menu, select Bullets and Numbering... The Bullets and Numbering dialog box appears. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. OR Press [Tab] 8. To promote a list item, place your cursor before the list item and click DECREASE INDENT Select the Outline Numbered tab Select the desired outline option Click OK Start typing your list To create subsequent list items, press [Enter] or [return] To demote a list item, place your cursor before the list item and click INCREASE INDENT

OR Press [Shift] + [Tab]

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Customizing Numbered Lists

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Customizing your numbered list allows you to have a wider variety of styles for numbers. Word provides several different ways of customizing your numbers in order to create an effective looking numbered list. The following instructions assume that a numbered list has already been created. 1. Select the numbered list you wish to customize 2. From the Format menu, select Bullets and Numbering... The Bullets and Numbering dialog box will appear. 3. Select the Numbered tab 4. Select the desired numbered list choice 5. Click CUSTOMIZE... The Customize Numbered List dialog box appears.

6. To change the number style, from the Number style pull-down list, select the desired option 7. To change the starting number for the list, in the Start at text box, type or use the nudge buttons to indicate the appropriate number 8. To position the numbers in a list, under Number position, complete the appropriate text boxes

If you would like the numbers to be right aligned rather than the default setting of left aligned, from the Number position pull-down list select Right. This may be useful if your numbered list has more than nine steps and you want it to look polished with the single digit numbers all appearing on the right side rather than the left. 9.

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Left aligned Right aligned

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10. To change font, font style, or size of the numbers, a. Click FONT... The Font dialog box appears. b. Under Font, Font style, or Size, select the appropriate options An example of your number formatting will appear in the Preview box. c. When you are done customizing the font of your numbered list, click OK Your customized number will now show in the Number format box. 11.To exit the Customize Numbered List dialog box, click OK

Building skills for success

Creating Headers and Footers

LESSON

18
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Creating a Universal Header and Footer

You can create headers and footers in your Word document so that information such as the author's name, document title, or page numbers will appear in the top and/or bottom margin of your document. You can create a header and footer which appears the same on every page, or customize the pages with different headers and footers.

Creating a Different First Page Header and Footer Creating Odd and Even Page Headers and Footers Inserting AutoText into Headers and Footers + + + +

Creating a Universal Header and Footer
If you want the same header and footer to appear on every page, create a universal header and footer. By using the buttons located on the Header and Footer toolbar, you can insert the page number, date, or time into the header and/or footer. In order to insert a particular field into the header or footer, see Inserting AutoText into Headers and Footers. 1. Place the cursor on any page of the document 2. From the View menu, select Header and Footer The Header and Footer toolbar appears.

3. In the Header, type the information you want to appear 4. Click SWITCH BETWEEN HEADER AND FOOTER 5. In the Footer, type the information you want to appear 6. To hide the Header and Footer toolbar, click CLOSE

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Creating a Different First Page Header and Footer
You can create a first page header and footer that contains different information than the header and footer in the rest of the document. 1. Place the cursor on the first page of the document 2. From the View menu, select Header and Footer The Header and Footer toolbar will appear. 3. Click PAGE SETUP The Page Setup dialog box appears. 4. 5. 6. 7. Select the Layout tab In the Headers and Footers section, select Different first page Click OK In the First Page Header, type the information you want to appear

8. Click SWITCH BETWEEN HEADER AND FOOTER 9. In the First Page Footer, type the information you want to appear 10. To create a header and footer for the rest of the document, click SHOW NEXT 11. Follow steps 3-5 in Creating a Universal Header and Footer 12. To hide the Header and Footer toolbar and return to your document, click CLOSE

Creating Odd and Even Page Headers and Footers
If you need to align information differently or include different information on the odd and even page headers and footers, creating odd and even page headers and footers is the best choice. You can also create a different first page and odd/even page headers and footers within the same document. 1. Place the cursor on the first page of the document 2. From the View menu, select Header and Footer The Header and Footer toolbar will appear. 3. Click PAGE SETUP The Page Setup dialog box appears. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Select the Layout tab In the Headers and Footers section, select Different odd and even OPTIONAL: To also create a different first page, select Different first page Click OK In the Odd Page Header, type the information you want to appear

9. Click SWITCH BETWEEN HEADER AND FOOTER 10. In the Odd Page Footer, type the information you want to appear 11. Click SHOW NEXT 12. In the Even Page Header, type the information you want to appear

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13. Click SWITCH BETWEEN HEADER AND FOOTER 14. In the Even Page Footer, type the information you want to appear 15. To hide the Header and Footer toolbar and return to your document, click CLOSE

Inserting AutoText into Headers and Footers
With the Insert AutoText command in Word, you can quickly and easily add elements like filename and path, author's name, and save date to headers and footers without having to go through many menu options. 1. From the View menu, select Header and Footer The Header and Footer toolbar will appear. 2. 3. 4. 5. Place your cursor in the header or footer area where you want to add AutoText On the Header and Footer toolbar, click INSERT AUTOTEXT Select the desired AutoText option Click CLOSE

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Watermarks
LESSON

19
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Adding Watermarks

A watermark is an image or text that appears behind the main text of a document. It is usually a lighter shade than the text so you can read the document easily. Text Watermarks are often used to categorize or to show the purpose of a document with words such as ASAP. Picture Watermarks add visual attention and attractiveness to a document with the use of significant imagery such as logos.

Removing Watermarks + + +

Adding Watermarks
You can insert Clip Art, pictures, or text as watermarks in your print documents. For example, you might want the word Confidential to appear on all the pages of your document to remind readers the material is not to be read by everyone.

Adding Watermarks: Picture Watermarks

1. Open the document you want to add the watermark to The document must be in Print Layout view. 2. From the Format menu, select Background » Printed Watermark... The Printed Watermark dialog box appears.

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1. Select Picture watermark 2. Click SELECT PICTURE... The Insert Picture dialog box appears. 3. Using the Look in: pull-down list and navigation window, locate and select the image file you want to use 4. Click INSERT 5. OPTIONAL: To change the size of the image, from the Scale pull-down list, select a size 6. OPTIONAL: To make the image less vivid, select Washout Using the Washout option will make text that overlaps the watermark more readable. 7. Click OK The watermark appears on all pages of your document.

Adding Watermarks: Text Watermarks

1. Open the document you want to add the watermark to 2. From the Format menu, select Background » Printed Watermark... The Printed Watermark dialog box appears. 3. Select Text watermark 4. In the Text text box, type the text of the watermark

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5. Format the text by making the appropriate selections from the Font, Size, and Color pulldown lists 6. OPTIONAL: To make the text of the watermark semitransparent, select Semitransparent Using the Semitransparent option will make text that overlaps the watermark more readable. 7. Select the desired layout 8. Click OK The watermark appears on all pages of your document.

Removing Watermarks
1. Open the document you want to remove the watermark from 2. From the Format menu, select Background » Printed Watermark... The Printed Watermark dialog box appears. 3. Select No watermark 4. Click OK The watermark is removed from the document.

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Setting Tabs
LESSON

20
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Tab Types

In the days of the typewriter, fonts were monospace characters (i.e., spaces between characters were equal). Now, computers use proportional space fonts (i.e., characters and spaces use only the amount of space that they need). With monospace fonts we could press the space bar to align text, but when we try that with proportional space fonts, we often end up with undesired results, even if it looks good on the screen. To avoid problems with text lining up, use tabs instead of spaces. The default tab settings for Microsoft Word are every half-inch. If you do not like the Word settings, you can set your own tabs.

Working with Tabs from the Ruler Working with Tabs from the Tabs Dialog Box + + + +

Tab Types
Tabs come in different types which are defined by the way text lines up with the tab. The following table explains the different tab types.

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Tab Type Left (Normal)

Icon

Purpose The Left tab is similar to the typewriter tab. Text will begin at the tab position and continue to the right of the tab. With the Right tab, text will end at the tab and flow to the left. The Center tab works similar to centering a line of text but instead of centering between margins, text is centered at the tab location. The Decimal tab is used to line up numbers and text with a period. This is useful for a group of numbers or a list of instructions. The Bar tab is used to add a vertical line at that position. This could be used when you want to set off some text. Set this tab in the Tabs dialog box, found under the Format menu.

Right Center

Decimal

Bar

Setting a tab does not automatically align your text. You still have to press [Tab] at the appropriate places.

Working with Tabs from the Ruler
Working with tabs using the Ruler option is a quick and easy way to set and adjust tabs. The Ruler options allow you to set, move, delete, or change tabs.

Setting Tabs

1. Select the paragraph(s) that will receive a new tab 2. To select the desired Tab type, click the TAB TYPE icon until the tab type you want is selected

3. In the white area of the Ruler, click where you want the tab to be

Using Tabs

1. Place the insertion point where you want text to align with the tab 2. Press [Tab]

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Moving Tabs

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1. On the Ruler, click and hold the tab you want to move 2. Drag the tab to the new location and release the mouse button

Deleting Tabs

1. Select the type of tab you want to delete 2. Click and hold the tab you want to delete 3. Drag the tab into the document area of the screen and release the mouse button

Changing Tab Type

To change the tab type you can either delete the tab and add a new tab of the correct type or you can use the Tabs dialog box.

Working with Tabs from the Tabs Dialog Box
The Tabs dialog box allows you to adjust the placement and type of tab. Although the Ruler option is a quicker way to adjust tabs, the dialog box allows you to use leaders and enter specific tab locations. In the Tabs dialog box, you can set leaders for the tabs. Leaders are lines (solid, dashed, or dotted) that appear in the blank space created by a tab. The most common use for a leader is in a table of contents where a dotted line leads up to the page number. Leaders guide the reader's eye across the page.

Setting Tabs

1. Select the paragraph(s) that will receive new tab settings 2. From the Format menu, select Tabs… The Tabs dialog box will appear.

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3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

In the Tab stop position text box, type the desired location Adjust the tab alignment and leader if necessary Click SET To set additional tabs, repeat steps 3-5 After all tabs have been set, click OK

Using Tabs

1. Place the insertion point where you want text to align with the tab 2. Press [Tab]

Moving Tabs

Moving tabs in the Tabs dialog box involves adding a new tab and deleting the old one. 1. Select the desired paragraph(s) 2. From the Format menu, select Tabs… The Tabs dialog box will appear. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. From the Tab stop position list, select the tab to be moved In the Tab stop position text box, type the new tab location Click SET From the Tab stop position list, select the original tab location Click CLEAR To move other tabs, repeat steps 3-7 Click OK

Deleting Tabs

1. Place cursor within text where tabs are set 2. From the Format menu, select Tabs…

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Lesson 19 – Setting Tabs
The Tabs dialog box will appear. 3. From the Tab stop position list, select the tab(s) to be deleted 4. Click CLEAR OR To delete all tabs, click CLEAR ALL 5. To delete other tabs, repeat steps 3 and 4 6. Click OK

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Changing Tab Type

1. Select the desired paragraph(s) 2. From the Format menu, select Tabs… The Tabs dialog box will appear. 3. From the Tab stop position list, select the tab to be changed 4. Under Alignment, select the new tab type

Depending on the text alignment, the tab position may need to be adjusted. See Moving Tabs.

5. Click SET 6. To change other tabs, repeat steps 3-5 7. When done, click OK

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Table Tables

LESSON LESSON

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In This Lesson: In This Lesson:
Tab Types Table Creating a

In table is composed of columns (vertical) and rows A the days of the typewriter, fonts were monospace characters (i.e., spaces between characters were equal). (horizontal). Where a column and row meet, a cell is formed. Now, computersyou want to create a table to (i.e., course For example, if use proportional space fonts show characters and spaces use only the amount of spaceas the assignments and their due dates, information such that they need). With monospace fonts left column. Information course names might go in the far we could press the space bar toas the text, but when we try that row. The information such align dates might go in the top with proportional space fonts,would represent the specific assignmentseven if a in the cells we often end up with undesired results, (e.g., it looks good on the screen. research paper) due for a particular class on a particular date. To avoid problems with text lining up, use tabs instead of spaces. The default tab settings for Microsoft Word are every The following graphic is an example of a table with three half-inch. and four rows.like the Word settings, you can setthe columns If you do not The highlighted cell is just one of 12 cells tabs. your ownin the table.

Working with Tabs from the Navigating and Selecting Ruler the Table Within Working with Tabs from the Resizing Table Elements Tabs Dialog Box Formatting Tables + + + + Adding Borders and Shading Using the Sort Feature + + + +

Tab Types
Tabs come in different types which are defined by the way text lines up with the tab. The following table explains the different tab types.

Creating a Table
When creating a table, some preliminary planning reduces the amount of time needed later to make the table look right. Sometimes even a simple sketch of one or two lines of the table can save a lot of time. Once you have an idea of what you want the finished table to look like, you can begin creating it by using the Table Menu, the Toolbar, Existing Text, or the Drawing Button.

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Creating a Table: Menu Option

1. Place the insertion point where you want the table to appear 2. From the Table menu, select Insert » Table... The Insert Table dialog box appears.

3. In the Insert Table dialog box, type the number of columns and rows that you want for your table 4. OPTIONAL: To change the column width, a. Select Fixed column width and type a value for the width b. To let the table expand as you type, select AutoFit to contents c. To let the table expand or shrink along with the size of the window, select AutoFit to window 5. To create the table, click OK An empty table appears on your screen and you are ready to begin adding information. Creating a Table: Toolbar Option 1. Place the cursor where you want the table to appear 2. From the Standard toolbar, click and hold INSERT TABLE

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A menu appears.

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3. To indicate the size of your table, select the appropriate dimensions by dragging across to select columns; drag down to select rows. 4. When the correct size is selected, release the mouse button An empty table appears on your screen and you are ready to begin adding information.

Creating a Table: Existing Text Option

If you have already typed the information for a table, you do not have to retype it into a new table. You can convert the existing text into a table. Word converts special characters such as paragraph marks, tabs, commas, or periods into the rows and columns of a table. You can also define an alternative special character (e.g., the tilde~). 1. Select the text that you want to convert to a table 2. From the Table menu, select Convert » Text to Table... The Convert Text to Table dialog box appears.

3. Verify the number of columns you want and their width; change if necessary 4. Under the Separate text at section, select the appropriate option for separating the text into table cells (e.g. paragraphs, tabs, or commas)

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5. Click OK The text is converted to a table.

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Creating a Table: Drawing Button Option

1. From the Table menu, select Draw Table OR On the Tables and Borders toolbar, click DRAW TABLE Your cursor turns into a pencil. 2. Click and drag your pencil until the outline of the table is the size you want 3. Release mouse The outside frame of a table appears. 4. To draw vertical and horizontal lines for your columns and rows, click and drag the pencil within the table

To correct a mistake:

1. On the Tables and Borders toolbar, click ERASER Your pointer turns into an eraser. 2. Click and drag the eraser over the mistake

Adding Information to the Table

You can enter information into the cells in your table by typing, just like you add text to your documents. However, you will need to be able to move from cell to cell in your table in order to place your information appropriately. When you want to move to another cell in a table, use one of the following methods: • Press the [Tab] key • Press an [arrow] key • Use the mouse to click in the appropriate cell

Navigating and Selecting within a Table
Since the Tab key is used to move between cells, you need to press the following keys to insert a tab character within a cell: [Ctrl]+[Tab]. Other helpful keyboard shortcuts for moving around and selecting within a table are listed in next page.

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To Move To... Keys

You can use the keyboard to navigate through your table. The following table illustrates these keyboard shortcuts and their functions. TO MOVE TO... next cell previous cell next row previous row end of cell Tab stop within a table cell first cell in a row last cell in a row first cell in a column last cell in a column PRESS... [Tab] or right arrow until you are in the cell [Shift]+[Tab] or the left arrow until you are in the cell down arrow up arrow [End] [Ctrl] + [Tab] (after setting the tab stop) [Alt] + [Home] [Alt] + [End] [Alt] + [Page Up] [Alt] + [Page Down]

To Select... Keys

You can use the keyboard to select data in your table. The following table illustrates these keyboard shortcuts and their functions. TO SELECT... next cell previous cell entire row PRESS... [Tab] [Shift] + [Tab] Drag the I-beam across the rows OR Place the pointer to the left of the row and click OR With the cursor in the left most cell of the row, press [Ctrl] + [Shift] + right arrow [Alt] + click OR Place the pointer at the top of the column, when down arrow appears, click

entire column

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Lesson 20 – Tables
OR With the cursor in the upper most cell of the column, press [Shift] + down arrow entire table Multiple contiguous cells, rows or columns Multiple non-contiguous cells, rows or columns On the 10 keypad with the num lock off, press [Alt] + [5] Drag across the cells Make your first selection, then [Ctrl] + drag across additional cells

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Resizing Table Elements
As you create your table, Word may assign default dimensions to rows, columns and cells, which may or may not suit your purposes. This document explains how to resize various table elements.

Adding and Deleting Rows and Columns

It is common to add or delete rows and columns to your table, especially if you do not know exactly what information you need, or if you want to add to the table once you get the basics down.

Adding Rows

To add a row at the end of a table:

1. Place your cursor in the last cell (last row, last column) 2. Press [Tab]

To add a row within the table:

1. Place your insertion point in a cell above or below where you want to add a row 2. From the Table menu, select Insert » Rows Above or Rows Below

Deleting Rows

1. Place your insertion point in the row to be deleted 2. From the Table menu, select Delete » Rows The row and all of its contents are deleted.

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Adding Columns

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To add a column at the end of the table:

1. Place your insertion point in the last column 2. From the Table menu, select Insert » Columns to the Right

To add a column within the table:

1. Place your insertion point to either side of where you want to insert a column 2. From the Table menu, select Insert » Columns to the Left or Columns to the Right

Deleting Columns

1. Place your insertion point in the column to be deleted 2. From the Table menu, select Delete » Columns The column and all of its contents are deleted.

Adjusting Column and Row Sizes

When a table is initially created, all columns have equal column widths. Depending on what you are doing, this may or may not be appropriate. If you do need to adjust column widths you may do so using the ruler or the Table Properties dialog box available from the Table menu.

Adjusting Column and Row Size: Ruler Option

To display the ruler:

1. From the View menu, select Ruler

To adjust column width:

1. Place the insertion point within the column you want to adjust 2. Click and hold the table border that is between the columns you want to adjust OR On the horizontal ruler, click the MOVE TABLE COLUMN icon

Your pointer will turn into a double arrow. 3. Drag the table border or the MOVE TABLE COLUMN icon to the desired location 4. Release the mouse

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Lesson 20 – Tables
To adjust row height:

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When adjusting row height with the ruler, only the row border you move will change size. You must be in Print Layout view to adjust the row height from the ruler line. To access this view, from the View menu select Print Layout 1. Place the insertion point within the table 2. Click and hold the table border that is between the appropriate rows OR On the vertical ruler, click the ADJUST TABLE ROW icon

Your pointer will turn into a double arrow. 3. Drag the table border or the ADJUST TABLE ROW icon to the desired location 4. Release the mouse

Merging and Splitting Cells

Depending on the setup of your information, you may want to combine two cells. The most common use of combining cells is for column headings. You can merge cells horizontally or vertically. To avoid having to redo your table headings, use the merge and split features as the final step in formatting your table. If there is text in more than one of the cells being merged, the text from each cell will be separated by paragraphs in the resulting cell.

Merging Cells: Menu Option

1.

Select the cells that you want to combine

2.

From the Table menu, select Merge Cells

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Merging Cells: Toolbar Option

The following instructions assume that the Tables and Borders toolbar is displayed. If it is not, right click on the Menu Bar and click Tables and Borders. 1. Select the cells that you want to combine 2. From the Tables and Borders toolbar, click MERGE CELLS

Splitting Cells: Menu Option

If necessary, you can divide a cell into two or more cells. 1. Select the cell that you want to split

2. From the Table menu, select Split Cells... The Split Cells dialog box appears.

3. In the Number of columns and/or Number of rows boxes, type the number of rows and/or columns that you want to divide the cell into 4. Click OK

Splitting Cells: Toolbar Option

The following instructions assume that the Tables and Borders toolbar is displayed. If it is not, right click on the Menu Bar and click Tables and Borders. 1. Select the cell that you want to split 2. From the Tables and Borders toolbar, click SPLIT CELLS The Split Cells dialog box appears.

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3. In the Number of columns and/or Number of rows boxes, type the number of rows and/or columns that you want to divide the cell into 4. Click OK

Formatting Tables
After you create a table, you may want to add some finishing touches to enhance its appearance.

Applying AutoFormat

AutoFormat can apply a style to tables you have created. You may select from numerous predesigned table formats. AutoFormat is a timesaving feature that automatically applies predesigned combinations of borders, shading, fonts, colors, and AutoFit column widths. 1. Place the insertion point inside the table 2. From the Table menu, select Table AutoFormat...

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Lesson 20 – Tables
The Table AutoFormat dialog box appears.

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3. From the Table styles scroll box, select a predefined format The Preview box displays an example of the format you select. 4. If you want to apply formats to only portions of your table, in the Apply special formats to section, select the appropriate parts of the table 5. When you find a table format that you like and the options are selected, click APPLY The formatting is applied to your table.

Adding Borders & Shading
Borders are one way that you can enhance the appearance of your table. Shading cells can help emphasize the information contained in it or differentiate headings from content.
Adding Borders and Shading: Toolbar Option

In order to use the toolbar option, the Tables and Borders toolbar must be displayed.

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Lesson 20 – Tables
To display the Tables and Borders toolbar:

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1. From the View menu, select Toolbars » Tables and Borders The Tables and Borders toolbar appears.

To add a border by drawing:

1. On the Tables and Borders toolbar, from the Line Style pull-down list, select a line style Your pointer changes to a pencil. 2. From the Line Weight pull-down list, select a line weight 3. In your table, click individual cell borders or drag along borders to apply the new style The border will be applied.
To add a border using the BORDER button:

1. Click within or select the cells that you want to apply the border to 2. On the Tables and Borders toolbar, from the Line Style pull-down list, select a line style Your cursor changes to a pencil. 3. From the Line Weight pull-down list, select a line weight 4. Click the on OUTSIDE BORDER 5. From the choices that appear, select the appropriate border placement The border will be applied.
To add shading:

1. Click within or select the cells in your table to which you want to apply the shading 2. From the Tables and Borders toolbar, click the on SHADING COLOR 3. From the shading choices that appear, make your selection The shading will be applied to your table.

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Adding Borders and Shading: Dialog Box Option

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The Borders and Shading tabs in the Borders and Shading dialog box allow you to add borders and shading to an individual cell or the whole table.
To add borders:

1. Click within or select the cells that you want to apply the border to 2. From the Format menu, select Borders and Shading... The Borders and Shading dialog box appears.

3. Select the Borders tab 4. In the Setting, Style, Color and Width sections, select the desired options 5. OPTIONAL: To apply custom border settings, in the Preview diagram, click the lines or buttons 6. Click OK
To add shading:

1. Click within or select the cells to which you want to apply the shading 2. From the Format menu, select Borders and Shading... The Borders and Shading dialog box appears.

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3. Select the Shading tab

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4. In the Fill section, select the desired shading option 5. OPTIONAL: In the Patterns section, from the Style pull-down list, select a pattern 6. Click OK

Using the Sort Feature
Sorting tables is a feature designed for sequencing lists (e.g., experiment sites, number grades, or a bibliography). You can sort a table by up to three columns, in either ascending or descending order. For example, you can sort a table of committee members by last name then, within that sort, by first name. You can also sort numbers or dates.
Sorting a Table

Sorting elements of your table is useful for organizing your data, whether it is text, numbers, or dates. You can also perform subsequent sorts on the data, initially sorting by one criterion then sorting by a second criterion within that sort. 1. Select the rows you want to include in the sort

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2. From the Table menu, select Sort... The Sort Text dialog box appears.

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3. From the Sort by pull-down list, select the first column you want to sort by 4. From the Type pull-down list, select Text, Number, or Date 5. Select either Ascending or Descending order 6. OPTIONAL: To sort additional columns, from the Then by pull-down list, select the features you want 7. OPTIONAL: To make the sort case-sensitive: a. Click OPTIONS... The Sort Options dialog box appears. b. Select Case sensitive c. Click OK 8. Click OK
Sorting a List

The Sort command can also be used in lists which are not in a formatted table. The same sorting options are provided. 1. Select the list you want sorted 2. Follow steps 2-8 in Sorting a Table

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Mail Merge
LESSON

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In This Lesson:
The Mail Merge Wizard: An Overview

The Mail Merge Wizard: An Overview
The Mail Merge Wizard takes you step-by-step through the process of creating merged documents. It is always available and easily accessible in the task pane. At each step there are options to choose form that will help you to tailor the merge to your needs. This document describes each step in general and the options available. At any point while using the wizard, you can go back to a previous step to adjust your choices.

About the Mail Merge Toolbar Mail Merge Terminology Working with the Recipient List Working with the Data Source + + + +

To Access the Mail Merge Wizard:

From the Tools menu, select Letters and Mailings » Mail Merge Wizard... The Mail Merge task pane appears.

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STEP 1: Selecting the document type Your options for document type are: Letters: Allows you to tailor one letter to many individuals. E-mail messages: Allows you to personalize a message as you would form letters and send them via email. Envelopes: Allows you to print envelopes with different addresses. Labels: Allows you to print labels with different addresses. Directory: Allows you to gather varied but related information into a list. For example, list the names, office locations, and phone numbers to create a departmental or organizational directory. STEP 2: Establishing the starting document Your options for the starting document are: Use the current document: uses the document currently open Start from a template: uses a preset Word design. Once you make this selection a link appears. Clicking it takes you to the Select Template dialog box where you can choose the template you want to use. Start from existing document: uses a previously saved document. Once you make this selection, you can choose from a list of recently used files or select another of your files. STEP 3: Selecting the recipients

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Lesson 21 – Mail Merge
Your options for selecting recipients are: Use an existing list: uses a previously saved list. Once you make this selection, a link appears. Clicking it takes you to the Select Data Source dialog box where you can choose the file you want to use. Select from Outlook contacts: uses your Outlook contacts as recipients. You must use Outlook and have existing Contacts. Once you make this selection, Word retrieves your Outlook Contacts in the form of an editable recipient list. Type a new list: allows you to create your own list by typing each recipient. STEP 4: Writing your letter During this step you will be adding text and variable information to your letter. To assist you in this, Word has a number of pre-formatted entries along with the fields from your recipient list. Frequently used options include: Address block: lets you specify the format of recipients' names, whether to insert the company name and postal address, and format the postal address. Greeting Line: allows you to format how the greeting line will appear (e.g. Dear Mr. Randall,) and choose which format to use for invalid names (e.g. Dear Sir or Madam,). More items: enables you to insert additional address and database fields. STEP 5: Previewing your letters At this point, you are almost ready to merge. Before you do so, it is a good idea to preview your letters. You can browse through the letters by clicking either the PREVIOUS or NEXT button. You can also locate specific recipients. Based on what you see during this preview, you may decide to edit your letter, edit the recipient list, or exclude one or more recipients from the merge.

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Lesson 21 – Mail Merge
STEP 6: Completing the merge Once the merge is complete, you can print the merged letters or, prior to printing, you can edit individual letters.

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About the Mail Merger Toolbar
Within Mail Merge, there is a special toolbar to help make the mail merge quick and easy. Toolbars allow you to simply click a button, instead of using the main menus. This document shows the Mail Merge toolbar and describes the functions of each button. If the Mail Merge toolbar is not displayed when you are working in your main document: From the View menu, select Toolbars » Mail Merge The Mail Merge toolbar appears.

Button

Function Allows you to select a document type for your main document. Allows you to select a data source for your merge. Opens the data source, making it available for editing. Inserts an address block in your letter. Inserts a greeting line in your letter.

Building skills for success

Lesson 21 – Mail Merge
Inserts the code referencing a merge field from the data source. Inserts a special merge code to control how the merge will continue (e.g., next record; If, Then, Else). Views the main document with information from the data source. This is helpful for editing the contents, punctuation, and grammar of the main document. Highlights the merged fields in your document Matches fields in your data source to merge fields in Word so as to avoid renaming them. Merges fields and text to labels. Moves through merged records: • The end buttons will move to the first or last record in the data document. • The middle buttons will move to the previous or next record in the data document. • The number in the center identifies the current record.

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Locates a record in the data document. Reviews the current document for errors in the merge commands. For example, you may discover a reference to a field in the data document that does not exist or discover that a merge code is missing the end code ( » ). Merges the documents to a new file. Merges the documents directly to the printer. To save paper, use this button when you are confident that the merge is working properly (especially if you have a lot of records). Merges the documents and sends them as email messages. Merges the documents and sends them as a fax to each recipient. This option is available only if you have the properly compatible components as part of your computer system.

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Lesson 21 – Mail Merge

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Mail Merge Terminology
With Word's Mail Merge feature, you can take static text (e.g., a letter) or a static format (e.g., labels) and personalize it. Understanding some of the terminology associated with the feature will help you as you create merged documents.

The Documents

Starting Document

The starting document contains the format for the document with field references to the data source.

Data Source

Referred to as a recipient list, the data source contains the unique information for each record. It is merged with the main document to create the customized form letter or mailing list.

Components of the Data Source

The data source is organized by fields and records, as shown here:

Recipient Records

A record is made up of related information in the data document. If your data file contains members of a student organization, one record will be the information that applies to a specific student. This information runs horizontally across the data grid.

Fields

In the data document, a field is a subsection of a record, such as a name or zip code. Fields can be big or small. For example, a field can contain an entire address, or separate fields may break the address down into street address, state, and zip code. Separating the fields allows you to use them together as a group (e.g., print the entire address at the top of the letter) or use them individually (e.g., address the recipient by first and last name, or first name alone). It also allows you to sort your addresses by name, state, or zip code. The nature of the task determines how distinct your fields should be. Field information runs vertically down the data grid.

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Working with the Recipient List
For a successful Mail Merge, you will need to establish a recipient list, also referred to as the data source. This contains the information that will vary with each record, such as names or identification numbers. If you are creating a mailing list, for example, names and addresses will be included in your data source. You can either create a new data source or use a pre-existing source, such as your Outlook Contacts. You may also wish to alter the entries in your data source without having to open it, change the appropriate entries, and then save the changes. Mail Merge allows you to specify which individual entries you want to include as well as add and delete data document entries and fields.

Creating a New Data Source

Before creating the data document, take a moment to plan out the information you want to include. While creating your data document, you can add or remove fields to tailor the document to suit your needs. Creating a new data source is an option in the third step of the Mail Merge Wizard. 1. From the Tools menu, select Letters and Mailings » Mail Merge Wizard... The Mail Merge task pane appears.

2. Under Select document type, make the appropriate selection 3. Click NEXT: STARTING DOCUMENT 4. Under Select starting document, make the appropriate selection 5. Click NEXT: SELECT RECIPIENTS 6. From the Select recipients section, select Type a new list 7. From the Type a new list section, click CREATE...

Building skills for success

Lesson 21 – Mail Merge
The New Address List dialog box appears.

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8. In the Enter Address information section, enter the appropriate information in the desired fields 9. OPTIONAL: 1. 2. 3. 4. To remove fields, refer to Deleting Fields To add fields, refer to Adding Fields Repeat steps a and b until you are left with the desired data fields Click OK to return to the New Address List dialog box

10. OPTIONAL: 1. 2. 3. 4. To add additional entries, refer to Adding an Entry To delete an entry, refer to Deleting an Entry Repeat steps a and b until all of your entries have been made Click OK to return to the New Address List dialog box

11. When all entries are complete, click CLOSE The Save Address List dialog box appears.

The default save location is My Data Sources and the file extension is .mdb (Microsoft Office Address Lists). 12. Using the Save in pull-down list, navigate to the desired save location

Building skills for success

Lesson 21 – Mail Merge
13. In the Field name text box, type the desired name for your address list 14. Click SAVE The Mail Merge Recipients dialog box appears. 15. OPTIONAL: Click on the desired heading which you want the list to be sorted by 16. When finished typing the list, click OK

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Adding and Deleting Data Document Entries

You can add, edit, or delete records even after you have merged the data and main documents. For the changes to take effect, however, you will have to re-merge the documents. If you want to create a new data document, see Creating a New Data Source.

Accessing the Data Document

1. Open the main document 2. From the Tools menu, select Letters and Mailings » Show Mail Merge Toolbar The Mail Merge Toolbar appears. 3. From the Mail Merge Toolbar, click OPEN DATA SOURCE The Select Data Source dialog box appears. 4. Using the Look in pull-down list and other navigational tools, navigate to and select the data document. 5. Click OPEN 6. From the Mail Merge Toolbar, click MAIL MERGE RECIPIENTS

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Lesson 21 – Mail Merge
The Mail Merge Recipients dialog box appears.

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7. Select the desired entry by clicking it once 8. Click EDIT... The Address List dialog box appears.

Building skills for success

Lesson 21 – Mail Merge
Adding an Entry

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1. Open your data document by following the instruction under Accessing the Data Document 2. Click NEW ENTRY If you previously had four records, the number shown in Total entries in list should change to five. 3. Type the new record information 4. Repeat steps 2 and 3 as necessary 5. To save the new information, click CLOSE

Deleting an Entry

1. Open your data document by following the instruction under Accessing the Data Document 2. In the View Entries section of the Address List dialog box, click the buttons to display the record you want to delete 3. Click DELETE ENTRY A dialog box appears prompting you to confirm the deletion 4. Respond appropriately 5. Repeat steps 2-4 as necessary 6. To save the data document, click CLOSE

Adding and Deleting Data Document Fields

You can add field names or delete field names even after you have merged the data and main documents.

Adding Fields

1. Open your data document by following the instruction under Accessing the Data Document 2. From the Address List dialog box, click CUSTOMIZE... The Customize Address List dialog box appears. 3. Click ADD... The Add Field dialog box appears. 4. In the Type a name for your field text box, type the desired field name

Building skills for success

Lesson 21 – Mail Merge
5. Click OK The new field appears in the Field Names section. 6. Repeat steps 3-5 until all desired fields have been added 7. Click OK 8. In the new field(s), type the appropriate information 9. Click CLOSE The Mail Merge Recipients dialog box appears, with the new field and information added.

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Deleting Fields

If you delete a field, the data in the field is also deleted. 1. Open your data document by following the instruction under Accessing the Data Document 2. From the Address List dialog box, click CUSTOMIZE... The Customize Address List appears. 3. In the Field Names section, select the field you want to remove 4. Click DELETE A dialog box appears prompting you to confirm the deletion appears. 5. Respond appropriately

Working with the Data Source
For a successful Mail Merge, you will need to establish a recipient list, also referred to as the data source. This contains the information that will vary with each record, such as names or identification numbers. If you are creating a mailing list, for example, names and addresses will be included in your data source. You can either create a new data source or use a pre-existing source, such as your Outlook Contacts. You may also wish to alter the entries in your data source without having to open it, change the appropriate entries, and then save the changes. Mail Merge allows you to specify which individual entries you want to include as well as add and delete data document entries and fields.

Creating a New Data Source

After selecting the main document type, creating a new data source is the second step when using the Data Merge Manager. Before creating the data source, take a moment to plan out the information you want to include. While creating your data source, you can add or remove fields to suit your needs.

Building skills for success

Lesson 21 – Mail Merge
1. If the Data Merge Manager is not displayed, from the Tools menu, select Data Merge Manager 2. In the Data Merge Manager, under Data Source, click GET DATA » select New Data Source... The Create Data Source dialog box appears. 3. To remove unnecessary fields, a. In the Field names in header row scroll box, select the field b. Click REMOVE FIELD NAME 4. To add a field, a. In the Field name text box, type a name for the new field which only contains letters and numbers only, no other characters. b. Click ADD FIELD NAME 5. To change the location of a field within the list a. In the Field names in header row scroll box, select the field b. Click the up or down arrows 6. When you have all of the desired fields for your data source, click OK The Save As dialog box appears. 7. In the Save As text box, type a name for the data source 8. Using the Where pull-down list, select the save location 9. Click SAVE The Data Form dialog box appears. 10. Type the information for each record of the Data Source To move to the next field , press [Tab] To move to a previous field, press [Shift] + [Tab] To add the next record, click ADD NEW 11. When finished typing the Data Source, click OK

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Editing the Data Source

You can add, edit, or delete records even after you have merged the data and main documents. For the changes to take effect, however, you will have to re-merge the documents.

Accessing the Data Source

1. Open the main document 2. If the Data Merge Manager is not displayed, from the Tools menu, select Data Merge Manager

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3. In the Data Merge Manager, under Data Source, click EDIT DATA SOURCE The Data Form dialog box appears.

Adding a Record

1. Open your data document by following the instruction under Accessing the Data Source 2. Click ADD NEW If you previously had four records, the number shown in Record should change to five. 3. Type the new record information 4. Repeat steps 2 and 3 as necessary 5. To save the new information, click OK

Deleting a Record

1. Open your data document by following the instruction under Accessing the Data Source 2. In the Record section of the Data Form dialog box, click the buttons to display the record you want to delete 3. Click DELETE 4. Repeat steps 2 and 3 as necessary 5. To save the Data Source, click OK

Adding and Deleting Data Document Fields

You can add field names or delete field names even after you have merged the data and main documents.

Adding Fields

1. Open your data document by following the instructions under Accessing the Data Source 2. In the Data Form dialog box, click VIEW SOURCE Your data table appears. 3. With the cursor, select the last column (or any other column where you would like another column added) 4. From the Table menu, select Insert » Columns to the Left or Columns to the Right 5. In the header row of the new column, type the new field name

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Lesson 21 – Mail Merge
6. To save the change, from the File menu, select Save 7. To add the new field to your main document,

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a. From the Window menu, select the main document b. Position the insertion point where you want to insert the new field name c. From the Merge Field section of the Data Merger Manager, drag and drop the new data field into your main document 8. To add data to the new field for each record, see Editing the Data Source

Deleting Fields

If you delete a field, the data in the field is also deleted. 1. Open your data document by following the instruction under Accessing the Data Source 2. In the Data Form dialog box, click VIEW SOURCE 3. Select the column that you want deleted 4. From the Table menu, select Delete » Columns 5. To a. b. c. delete the field from your main document, From the Window menu, select the main document In the main document, select the field name Press [Delete]

Selecting a New Data Source

The same main document may be used with different data sources. For example, you may make a list for different committees or organizations. Each document may have only one data source at a time. If you wish to merge your main document with a new data source, you must select the new data source and replace the old one. You simply use the New Data Source command in the Data Merge Manager to select the data source to be merged with the main document. 1. Open the main document file 2. If the Data Merge Manager is not displayed, from the Tools menu, select Data Merge Manager The Data Merge Manager appears. 3. To create a new data source, under Data Source, click GET DATA » select New Data Source... Follow the Creating a New Data Source instructions. OR To select an existing data source, click GET DATA » select the file that contains the data

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When you have more than one data source for a main document, you simply select the data source you want to merge with by using the Get Data menu which was used above to select the data file.

Building skills for success

Applying Breaks
LESSON

23
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In This Lesson:
The Show/Hide button What is a section break?

When you are working with long documents, you might want certain sections to be formatted differently from others. For example, you might want to omit the page numbers on the first few pages of a document, or you may need one page to be ‘landscape’ rather than ‘portrait’ orientation. To do these things, you need to use a feature called a section break. Section breaks allow you to split your document up, so you can apply different formatting to the different sections. This document will show you how to apply section breaks, and will show you how to use them to format your document.

Applying Section break Changing Page Orientation For a Section Applying Custom Page Numbering + + + +

The Show/Hide button
One of the most useful tools you can use when formatting documents in Word is the Show/Hide button (Fig. 1). When on, the tool will show you where all the formatting in your document is – spaces between words, paragraph breaks, tabs, page breaks, section breaks, and so on. For example, wherever there is a paragraph break you will see this symbol: ¶. When working with section breaks, it is useful to have this tool switched on. It will show you where your section breaks occur, and will help you iron out any problems with their placement.

Lesson 23 – Applying Breaks

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What is a section break?
There are two main types of section break that you may want to use – Next page and Continuous. Next page Next page inserts a section break, breaks the page, and then starts the new section on the next page:

Generally, you will find Next page section breaks the most useful, as you will usually need a new section and/or formatting style to start on a new page.

Applying Section Break
1) Place your cursor where you want the section break to go:

Fig. 4 Insert cursor 2) Click on the Insert menu 3) Choose Break… The Break window will appear (Fig. 5)

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Lesson 23 – Applying Breaks

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Fig. 5 The Break window

4) Under section break types choose the type of break you wish to use (Next page or Continuous) 5) Click OK Your Section Break should now appear as shown in Fig 6:

Fig. 6 A section break

Changing Page Orientation For a Section
You need to use section breaks if you require a page or pages in the middle of a document to be of a different orientation. For example, if all pages in your document are portrait but you would like page 10 to be landscape: 1) Create a Next page section break at the end of page 9, where you want to change from portrait to landscape 2) Create another Next page section break at the end of page 10 where you want to return to portrait 3) Make sure your cursor is on page 10 4) Click on the File menu 5) Select Page Setup… The Page Setup window will appear 6) Make sure the Margins tab is selected

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7) Underneath the Orientation heading click on Landscape 8) In the Apply to: drop-down box, make sure This section is selected 9) Click OK In this example, page 10 would now be in Landscape orientation, but the pages surrounding it (9 and 11) would remain in Portrait

Applying Custom Page Numbering
Section breaks allow you to apply custom page numbering to your documents. For instance, you may want to start you page numbering after the title and contents page, and so on. As an example, the steps below show you how to begin the page numbering on page 5 of a document. 1) Place your cursor at the bottom of the text on page 4 of your document

2) Insert a Next page section break

3) Move your cursor to page 5 4) Click on the View menu 5) Select Header and Footer

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The main text in your document is now greyed out and the header area is visible. The Header and Footer toolbar is opened. 6) Deselect the Same as Previous button This means you can make changes to the header in the current section without it affecting the header in the previous section

7) Add page numbering by clicking on the Insert Page Number button (Fig. 9) 8) If required, you can apply further formatting to your page numbers by clicking on the Format Page Number button

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Table of Contents
LESSON

24
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In This Lesson:
Preparing for a Table of Contents

To simplify your document production process, Microsoft Word automates the generation of a table of contents. This feature enables you to easily and efficiently generate and update a table of contents, which is an important aspect of an effective document.

Inserting a Table of Contents Updating a Table of Contents + + + +

Preparing for a Table of Contents
Before Word can create the table of contents, you must decide which material will be included and how it should appear. To indicate which elements should be included, you should designate each element using either the headings option the paragraph settings option. You can not only designate what elements will be included in the table of contents, but how they are arranged as well. For example, a page title might be labeled Heading 1, and the subtopics that fall below it might be labeled Heading 2. When the table of contents is generated, its style will reflect the differences in your Heading designations.

Preparing for a Table of Contents: Using Heading Styles

1. Place your cursor within the item to be included in the table of contents 2. On the Formatting toolbar, from the Style pull-down list, select the desired heading

3. Repeat steps 1-5 as necessary for each item to be included in the table of contents

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Preparing for a Table of Contents: Using Paragraph Settings

1. Place your cursor within the item to be included in the table of contents 2. From the Format menu, select Paragraph... The Paragraph dialog box appears.

3. Select the Indents and Spacing tab

4. From the Outline level pull-down list, select the appropriate level By default, levels 1, 2, and 3 are included in the table of contents. 5. Click OK 6. Repeat steps 1-5 as necessary for each item to be included in the table of contents

Inserting a Table of Contents
After you have prepared a document, you can insert a table of contents. To add a table of contents to a document, use the following instructions. 1. Place your insertion point where the table of contents should appear

2. From the Insert menu, select Reference » Index and Tables...
Select the Table of Contents tab

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3. From the Formats pull-down list, select the desired style for the table of contents Your selection will be shown in the Print Preview and Web Preview scroll boxes. 4. To change the formatting of a level within the table of contents: a. Click MODIFY... The Style dialog box appears. b. From the Styles scroll-box, select the level that you want to modify c. Click MODIFY... The Modify Style dialog box appears. d. Make the desired formatting changes e. Select Add to template f. Click OK You are returned to the Style dialog box where your changes are shown in the Preview box. To make additional changes to the same level, repeat steps c - g g. When finished, in the Style dialog box, click OK h. In the Index and Tables dialog box, click OK 5. To change the levels to be included within the table of contents, in the Show levels text box, select the appropriate number of levels a. To include a heading in the table of contents, in the TOC level text box for the appropriate heading, type the table of contents level at which the heading should be included b. Click OK 6. In the Index and Tables dialog box, click OK The table of contents is generated and appears in your document.

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Updating a Table of Contents
After you have worked on a document which contains a table of contents, you have the option of updating the table of contents to reflect the changes you have made. You can make formatting changes (i.e. text size and color) to the table of contents as you would to ordinary text. 1. From the Outlining toolbar, click UPDATE TOC If the Outlining toolbar is not present, from the View menu, select Toolbars » Outlining. OR Right click the table of contents » select Update Field 2. If only page numbers have changed in the document, select Update page numbers only If headings have changed, select Update entire table 3. Click OK

Building skills for success

Index
LESSON

25
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In This Lesson:
Marking Index Entries

An Index shows the position of selected words or phrases in a printed document. In Word there are two stages to creating an index. First mark the text to be included in the index, and then create the index table.

Creating an Index Table + + +

Marking Index Entries
1. Highlight the desired word. 2. From the menu select Insert | Reference| Index and Tables… 3. Select the Index tab.

4. Click on the Mark Entry button to view the Mark Index
Entry dialog box.

Lesson 25 – Index
5. Ensure Current page from Options is set. Check Italic in Page number format.

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You can edit the Main entry text at this point if you want the text that appears in the index to be different from the text in the document. You can also create a subentry if you think people will look up different words for the topic. For example if the text in the document is about mountaineering you may wish to create a subentry for climbing. 6. Click the Mark All button to create an index entry for all occurrences of the words Health and Safety. Mark All marks only the first occurrence in each paragraph, so repetitions within a paragraph will not be marked. 7. Click Close. Notice an XE is marked after the desired word. The keyboard shortcut Alt/Shift/X can be used to create an index. You don’t have to close the Mark Index Entry dialog box until you have finished marking all the entries for the index. Scroll through the document and add two or three more appropriate words to the index. Indexes are case sensitive. For example Health is not the same as health. Index entries can also be marked by entering all the words to be indexed in a separate document. Save that document and from the Index tab of the Index and Tables dialog box click on the AutoMark button. Select the created file and Word will automatically index every occurrence of the words.

Creating an Index Table
Once index entries have been marked, it is a simple process to create the index table. This is usually placed at the end of the document, perhaps in a separate section.

1. Position the cursor at the end of the document and insert a Next Page Section Break. 2. Select Insert | Reference | Index and Tables. The Index and Tables dialog box appears.

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3. Select the Index tab and choose a Format from the drop down list. 4. Click OK. 5. Look at the index that has been created. 6. Close the document without saving any changes.

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