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WILKES-BARRE, PA WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013 50
THE TIMES LEADER
6 09815 10011
A NEWS: Local 3A
Nation & World: 5A
Obituaries: 6A
Editorials: 9A
INSIDE
Slim win
RailRiders clip
Red Wings, 1-0
SPORTS, 4B
Weather: 10A
B SPORTS: 1B
B BUSINESS: 9B
Stocks: 9B
Comics: 10B
C TASTE: 1C
Birthdays: 4C
Television: 6C
Movies 6C
Puzzles: 7C
D CLASSIFIED: 1D
Going green?
Not here.
Not your moms salad bar. TASTE, 1C
Gambling with
the Russian
mob?
BUSINESS, 9B
PHILADELPHIA The way
to compete in the casino indus-
try doesnt have much to do
with the games themselves, but
instead its the other attractions
a venue offers.
Whether its concerts, shop-
ping, salons or golf, casinos
need other amenities in addi-
tion to slot machines and table
games if Pennsylvania wants to
remain the second biggest gam-
ing state in the nation. That was
an often-repeated message Tues-
day at the eighth annual Penn-
sylvania Gaming Congress held
in Center City Philadelphia.
I dont think I can stress
enough the importance of a
destination resort, said Steven
Geller, a former Florida legisla-
tor who works in the gaming law
practice group at Greenspoon
Marder.
Mohegan Sun at Pocono
Downs President and General
Manager Mike Bean said the
addition of a hotel, salon and
conference center later this year
at the Plains Township casino al-
ways has been in the plans, and
he believes it will go a long way
toward keeping the venue com-
petitive and attractive to gam-
blers and non-gamblers.
Not only will it give guests
more reason to come to the ca-
sino, but it also will give them
reason to stay longer and come
from greater distances.
Convenience is the number
one factor for peoples decision
to game, followed by overall
gaming experience, Bean said.
Added attractions beer fes-
A future
beyond
oor of
casinos
Experts at Gaming Congress
say added amenities will keep
people coming back.
By ANDREWM. SEDER
aseder@timesleader.com
Pa.s No. 2,
but maybe
not for long
PHILADELPHIA The
eighth annual Pennsylvania
Gaming Congress kicked off
with a cocktail reception at
the Loews Philadelphia Hotel.
But while the toasting is well
earned, the cork popping might
not last forever.
While many in the casino in-
dustry spent much of the Eighth
Annual Pennsylvania Gaming
Congress on Tuesday celebrat-
ing the states meteoric rise
from hosting zero casinos in
2005 to now boasting the sec-
ond highest casino revenues in
the nation behind only Nevada,
they warned there will be more
competition.
By ANDREWM. SEDER
aseder@timesleader.com
See GAMING, Page 7A
See CASINOS, Page 7A
WILKES-BARRE The
Senate Democratic Campaign
Committee this week released
a list of upcoming fundraisers
for four sitting state senators,
including one
event in Pitts-
burgh for Sen.
John Yudichak
of Plymouth
Township.
Pittsburgh
is not in Yu-
dichaks 14th
S e n a t o r i a l
District; in fact, the two areas
are roughly 300 miles apart.
The reception in honor of Yu-
dichak was listed for Vallozzis
Pittsburgh, 220 Fifth Ave.,
Pittsburgh. Contribution lev-
els were listed as individual, at
$500, and political action com-
mittee at $1,000.
A call to the committee in-
quiring about the event, why it
is being held in Pittsburgh and
who would be on the invitation
list was not returned.
Sandy Ritz, representing the
campaign committee of state
Sen. Lisa Baker, R-Lehman
Township, said she is not aware
of any fundraising events held
for Baker outside her district. I
do not know of any events held
in cities like Pittsburgh or Phil-
adelphia for Sen. Baker, Ritz
said. I dont know of any held
outside of the 20th District.
Within ve minutes after
the call was made Monday
from The Times Leader to the
SDCC, a new email was sent
and Yudichaks event was listed
as postponed.
We have events throughout
Pennsylvania, Yudichak said.
Were blessed to have support-
ers beyond the 14th District
who reach out to try to help
For campaign backing, Yudichak goes far beyond his district
State senator from Luzerne
County apparently nding
fans in Pittsburgh.
By BILL OBOYLE
boboyle@timesleader.com
Yudichak
See YUDICHAK, Page 6A
BOSTON MARATHON BOMBINGS
BOSTON Third-grader Martin
Richard had just gotten ice cream and
was near the Boston Marathon nish
line, eagerly watching for friends to
run by. Krystle Campbell was enjoying
the race with her best friend, hoping
to get a photo of the other womans
boyfriend after he conquered the last
mile.
Then the unthinkable struck. The
spirited 8-year-old with a wide grin
who dressed up one Halloween as
Woody from Toy Story was dead,
along with the outgoing 29-year-old
woman and a Boston University grad-
uate student victims of twin blasts
that turned a scene of celebration into
chaos.
About 180 others suffered injuries
that included severed limbs, shrapnel
Lives lost or forever changed by explosions
Race is on to catch bomber
AP PHOTO
A mourner places a note at a police barricade Tuesday near the nish line of the Boston Marathon. Bombs that ripped through the crowd at the marathon a day
earlier were fashioned out of pressure cookers and packed with metal pieces to inict maximum carnage, a person briefed on the investigation said Tuesday.
Campbell Richard
Investigators appeal for amateur videos of blast scene
BOSTON The bombs that ripped through
the crowd at the Boston Marathon, killing three
people and wounding more than 170, were fash-
ioned out of pressure cookers and packed with
metal shards, nails and ball bearings to inict
maximum carnage, a person briefed on the in-
vestigation said Tuesday.
The details on the apparently crude but dead-
ly explosives emerged as investigators appealed
to the public for amateur video and photos that
might yield clues to who carried out the attack.
The chief FBI agent in Boston vowed we will
go to the ends of the Earth to nd those re-
sponsible.
A person who spoke on condition of anonym-
ity because the investigation was still going on
said the explosives were put in 6-liter kitchen
pressure cookers, hidden in black duffel bags
and left on the ground. They were packed with
shrapnel, the person said.
The person said law enforcement ofcials
have some of the bomb components but do not
yet know what was used to set off the explo-
sives.
A doctor treating the wounded appeared to
corroborate the persons account, saying one
of the victims was maimed by what looked like
ball bearings or BBs. Doctors also said they re-
moved a host of sharp objects from the victims,
including nails that were sticking out of one
little girls body.
At the White House, President Barack Obama
said that the bombings were an act of terrorism
but that investigators do not know if they were
carried out by an international organization, a
domestic group or a malevolent individual.
He added: The American people refuse to be
terrorized.
Across the United States, fromWashington to
Los Angeles, police stepped up security, moni-
M O R E
I N S I D E
LOCAL RE-
SPONSE: Se-
curity hiked at
Harveys Lake
run 10A
ANOTHER AT-
TACK? Poison
mailed to U.S.
senator 10A
THE FUTURE:
Evaluating
safety of mara-
thons 1B
See MARATHON, Page 10A
By EILEEN SULLIVAN] and JAY LINDSAY
Associated Press
By BRIDGET MURPHY
The Associated Press
See VICTIMS, Page 10A
COURTDALE Mayor
Dorothy Duesler announced
Tuesday the boroughs deci-
sion against using the Larks-
ville Police Department to pro-
vide police services.
At over $100,000 per year,
thats not something that
would be cost effective for the
us, Duesler said.
He also addressed the bor-
oughs consideration of partici-
pation in the West Side Coun-
cil of Governments.
Although there are cer-
tainly benets, there is also a
potential cost, he said. We
should step lightly as me move
forward on this.
The council also discussed
residents request to have gas
lines extended to properties
on Wood Street.
Although we will certainly
help you in any way that we
can, said council President
Carl Hodorowski, we are not
the gas company and we dont
own those lines.
Also, council tabled the is-
sue of adjusting sewer fees af-
ter a nal payment on a sewer
related loan.
We are going to look into
the boroughs sewer mainte-
nance costs, including any
type of emergencies that
might arise throughout the
year, said Hodorowski, then
we will come back to the issue
and discuss numbers.
Council also named North-
east Recycling Solutions as
provider of its recycling ser-
vices, citing cost effectiveness
and quality of services. The
borough previously used Ex-
eter Boroughs recycling ser-
vices.
Hodorowski said some con-
crete work would be needed
near the borough building to
prepare for the on-site recy-
cling program probably be-
ginning in May. He also an-
nounced a general cleanup day
for May 4, starting at 9 a.m.
All borough residents are
encouraged to come and help
in maintaining their borough,
he said, it is a great opportu-
nity to participate as a com-
munity.
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pAGE 2A
ChurCh building razed in duryea
CLARk VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER
EXETER Wyoming Area
School Board members con-
tinued Tuesday to agonize
over what to do about the use
of the districts sports facilities
by private groups.
Several groups including
the West Pittston Rams are re-
questing fee waivers.
Board member Frank Casa-
rella said he believed the
groups should contribute
something to the upkeep of
the elds and facilities they
use.
Fees, as per district policy,
stand at $300 for use of the
gym, $500 for the use of the
auditorium and $1,000 for use
of the stadium.
Board Vice President Dean-
na Farrell said no freebies
should be given out while the
teachers remained without a
contract. But board member
Carl Yorina said the board
found itself in a dilemma.
You have these wonderful
facilities, he said. You want
kids to use them.
We should reconvene our
policy committee and come
up with something fair and eq-
uitable, Superintendent Ray
Bernardi said.
In another matter, the next
negotiations on ending the
three-year stalemate on a con-
tact for district teachers will
take place today.
After the meeting, teacher
union President Melissa Dol-
man was less than hopeful
about the talks chances. With
the upcoming election, things
are a little slower, she said.
But Bernardi was more up-
beat about nally reaching an
agreement. Were always opti-
mistic, he said.
In other matters:
The board discussed a plan
to create a tax-exempt foun-
dation similar to those which
have been created by other
districts.
Business Manager Tom
Melone said the state has
lowered the amount of excep-
tions the district can claim
in calculating the need for a
tax increase. This will reduce
the amount of possible tax in-
creases the board can approve.
YATESVILLE For the sec-
ond month in a row, the Pittston
Area School Board on Tuesday
voted down a motion intended
to change the job function of
current Primary Center prin-
cipal and former high school
principal Janet Donovan.
The board opted 6-3 to re-
frain from naming her the act-
ing assistant superintendent
and director of curriculum.
Directors Kent Bratlee, John
Donahue, Anthony Guariglia,
Bruce Knick, Marilyn Starna
and Charles Sciandra voted
against the move, citing their
preferences to act on the mat-
ter after next years budget is in
place.
Joseph Kelly, Robert Linskey
and Richard Gorzkowski voted
in favor.
Kelly repeated his comments
from the March regular school
board meeting that Donovan is
sorely needed to aid Superin-
tendent Michael Garzella. Kelly
dismissed allegations from
Guariglia that he had a person-
al interest in the matter and
argued the district has missed
out on grant opportunities.
Garzella, when pressed, said
the grant funding that the dis-
trict has applied for over the
course of the school year has
been minimized.
Kelly also said he believes
Donovans aid will be essential
as the district grapples with
the lling of several upcoming
administrative vacancies and
the possible closure of the Ben-
jamin Franklin Kindergarten
Center in Dupont.
With regard to that facility,
the board heard from Dupont
Borough Council President
Stanley Knick Jr. and Mayor
Daniel Nello, who hope that
the borough will have the rst
option to obtain the property
and facility if the district opts
to close the school.
Dupont previously owned
the property but transferred
it to the Greater Pittston Area
School District in 1983 when
Dupont schools were absorbed
into the district. The property
was sold to the district, as a
point of formality, for $2. Du-
pont ofcials jokingly stated
that they were willing to dou-
ble that amount.
The land transfer agreement
also included a stipulation that
the borough be given rst con-
sideration should the land be-
come unneeded by the district.
District ofcials probably
will not make a decision before
July but they pledged to keep
Dupont ofcials informed.
If the school is closed, Du-
pont hopes to possibly convert
the facility into senior citizen
housing.
The school boards next meet-
ing has been rescheduled from
Tuesday May 21, to Thursday
May 23, to avoid having a meet-
ing fall on an election day. The
budget for the new school year
is the likely topic.
Pittston Area rejects superintendent backup
Minority of school directors
wanted to promote principal
Janet Donovan.
By B. GARRET ROGAN
Times Leader Correspondent
Wyoming Area ponders
requests for facilities use
Several groups are seeking
waivers for fees called for in
district policy.
By SUSAN DENNEY
Times Leader Correspondent
Courtdale decides not to use
Larksville for police services
By GERI GIBBONS
Times Leader Correspondent
LARKSVILLE Council an-
nounced Tuesday that it would
consider a $27,000 proposal by
Borton-Lawson Engineering to
complete a report updating the
boroughs Act 537 sewage man-
agement plan.
Councilman Robert Altavilla
said former borough engineer
Michael J. Pasonick has already
completed about 90 percent
of the report at a total cost of
$30,000.
So whats happening is that if
we agree to this proposal, well
have to pay you an additional
$27,000 to nish the nal 10
percent of the report that weve
already paid Pasonick $30,000
for, correct? asked Altavilla.
Representatives from Borton-
Lawson stated that in order for
them to complete the report,
they would be required to vouch
for the accuracy of the report in
its entirety, which would entail
reviewing and/or revising the
entire plan.
The report must be led with
the states Department of En-
vironmental Protection for the
borough to qualify for grant
money to complete any pro-
posed sewer project.
Council Chairman Joe Ro-
manoskey said the borough
plans to contact Pasonick to see
if perhaps it will complete the
plan and save the borough con-
siderable tax dollars.
In other business:
Borough resident and Wyo-
ming Valley West School Board
Member Jim Fender suggested
to council that it form a joint
committee with the school
board to explore various op-
tions to sell a 50-acre parcel
along Route 11 in the borough
currently owned by the school
district.
Fender said the land, which
had previously been slated as
the spot for the districts new
high school, would be prime
real estate to attract a major
retailer such as Walmart, We-
gmans or Home Depot which
would generate much-needed
tax revenue and employment
for the community.
Larksville considers ways to update its sewer plan
By STEVEN FONDO
Times Leader Correspondent
U p n E X T
Regular board meeting 7 p.m.
April 23.
Harveys Lake council hears oating islands project update
HARVEYS LAKE Dr. Fred
Lubnow of Princeton Hydro
on Tuesday updated borough
council on the oating wetland
islands project.
Lubnow said he will be able
to provide a map displaying the
location of the islands, once the
borough completes securing the
permit for the project.
He said the islands will be
placed close to the shoreline,
and he wants to see everyone
in the community comfortable
(regarding the locations). The
project is being funded by a 319
Grant from the state Depart-
ment of Environmental Protec-
tion.
Megan Sgarlat Prynn, vice
chairperson of the Harveys Lake
Environmental Advisory Coun-
cil, announced details for the
2013 Harveys Lake Earth Day
Cleanup project. The project
will take place noon to 4 p.m.
Sunday, April 21.
Participants will gather and
sign in at the Lake-Noxen Ele-
mentary School, 135 Westpoint
Ave. The event, which will be
held rain or shine, has been or-
ganized in cooperation with the
Great American Cleanup of PA.
Anyone interested in the
cleanup may contact Megan at
570-814-9230 to register for the
event or for further information.
The planning commission
meeting scheduled for today
has been postponed until April
29 at 7 p.m. Plans for the cell-
phone tower at Cliff Street will
be discussed during the meet-
ing.
Mayor Clarence Hogan said
residents should remove inop-
erable vehicles and all rubbish
from their properties. He said
residents may call the police de-
partment or visit the boroughs
website for details on the bor-
oughs regulations regarding
this matter.
By SUSAN BETTINGER
Times Leader Correspondent
T
he steeple of St. Joseph Church, Duryea, teeters at the hand of an excavator. The
steeple was one of the last pieces to fall as demolition crews worked Tuesday
afternoon to bring down the former church at Lackawanna Avenue and River Street.
U p n E X T
Borough Council will next meet at
7 p.m. May 21.
LUZERNE Police charged a
man they allege sold counterfeit bars
and coins of gold and silver, receiv-
ing $12,655 from two buyers for the
bogus metals.
David Steele, 42, of Charles Street,
was found hiding with 15 heroin
packets in a large cabinet inside his
residence on Friday, police said.
Steele was taken to the Luzerne
County Correction-
al Facility, where
police allege $330
was found hidden
in his rectum.
Police charged
Steele with two
counts of theft and
one count each of
resisting arrest, possession of a con-
trolled substance and possession of
drug paraphernalia. He is scheduled
to be arraigned on April 25.
According to the criminal com-
plaint and search warrant:
Johnathan Luckenbaugh and his
brother, Justin, contacted police on
Friday, saying they purchased more
than $12,000 worth of gold and sil-
ver coins and bars from Steele from
January to April 11. The rst pur-
chase was made through a Craigs
List advertisement with the remain-
ing purchases conducted at Steeles
residence.
Luckenbaugh and his brother be-
came concerned when they noticed
no serial numbers on the gold and
silver bars.
Police served a search warrant at
Steeles residence Friday night.
Steele was seen looking out a
WILKES-BARRE After
just under 10 minutes of
deliberations Tuesday, a Lu-
zerne County jury convicted
a man who failed to appear
for his trial on sexual assault
charges.
Clyde Tonkin, 30, of Main
Street, Jenkins Township, was
found guilty of seven charges
relating to the sexual assault
of a now-14-year-old girl in
2011, including involuntary
deviate sexual intercourse
and statutory sexual assault.
Im so relieved its over for
my daughter and our family,
the teens
mother, Jodi
Miller, 38,
said. We
look forward
to when they
haul him in
and he gets
sentenced.
Tonkin will be sentenced on
July 16 on the assault charges
and other unrelated charges.
He faces a maximum of 20
years in prison on the statu-
tory sexual assault charge and
10 years maximum on several
of the other charges.
Tonkin was scheduled to
stand trial Monday, but failed
to appear at the Luzerne
County Courthouse. Investi-
gators say Tonkin cut off an
ankle bracelet he was required
to wear as part of his bail con-
ditions and ed the area.
Assistant District Attorney
Nancy Violi asked that the
trial be held in Tonkins ab-
sence, a request Judge Joseph
Sklarosky Jr. granted.
A jury was selected and
testimony began and con-
cluded Tuesday. Tonkin was
represented by attorney John
Sobota.
(Cases like this) are never
easy, Exeter Sgt. Len Galli
said. The evidence against
(Tonkin) was overwhelming
and the jury was in and out.
Galli said investigators
have been tracking Tonkin
over the past few days and he
is condent Tonkin will be ap-
prehended.
In a phone interview Tues-
day, Tonkins mother, Chris-
tine Uslin, of Ohio, said her
son is innocent of the charges
and that if he were guilty of
rape she would not be stand-
ing up for him.
Im going to hire an attor-
ney and le an appeal, Uslin
said. Imnot going to lose my
son over someone who goes
into court and lies.
Uslin said there is more to
the story than prosecutors
say. She said she does not
know where her son is.
The 14-year-old testied
Tuesday she trusted Tonkin
and even regarded him as a
father-gure in her life until,
she said, he began sexually as-
saulting her, even to the point
where she became pregnant
and gave birth to a baby girl.
He rapedme, the girl testi-
ed in the rst day of Tonkins
trial while holding a stuffed
bear. Eventually, I stopped
ghting him. I thought I was
in love with him, but I was
also still scared of him.
The girl was the rst to
testify at Tonkins trial, even
though Tonkin was not pres-
ent Tuesday. He had been re-
leased from prison on bail in
January.
The girl said that in Novem-
ber 2011, she discovered she
was 28 weeks pregnant. She
told Tonkin of the pregnancy,
she testied, and Tonkin said
the two would go away.
Tonkin instructed the teen
in February 2012 to write a
letter that she was going to
her fathers home in Louisi-
ana. She took her mothers
bank card and the two drove
WILKES-BARRE Taxpayers
might have to foot more of the bill to
monitor the citywide camera system
due an anticipated reduction in hours
given to a private security rm, which
means police ofcers would have to be
assigned more frequently to staff the
monitoring station.
Trent Miller, president of Legion
Security Services, said he expects the
companys contract will be signicant-
ly reduced starting next month due to
a funding crunch caused by the Wilkes-
Barre School Districts decision to nix
a three-year, $270,000 contract with
with Hawkeye Security Solutions, the
nonprot organization that oversees
the camera operation.
That will leave Hawkeye with two
options: end around-the-clock moni-
toring of the cameras, or staff the cen-
ter with more police ofcers, Miller
said.
Greg Barrouk, vice president of
Hawkeyes board, said Hawkeye re-
mains committed to providing con-
tinuous monitoring. The loss of the
school district contract reduced the
monitoring budget from $15,000 to
about $7,500 a month, so it will have
no choice but to reduce Legions
hours, he said.
Currently the command center
is staffed by combination of Legion
guards and light-duty police ofcers
who are recovering from work-related
injuries. The goal has been to have one
ofcer and one security guard on at all
times. The funding problems mean
the Legion guards will be removed
from duty whenever a police ofcer is
present, Barrouk said.
We are gong to have to stagger Le-
gion around our light-duty police of-
cers, he said.
That also means the funding burden
will shift from Hawkeye, which pays
Legion through revenues it gets from
the Wilkes-Barre Parking Authority
and, previously, the school district, to
the city, which pays ofcers from its
general fund, Miller said.
As the cost to Hawkeye goes down,
the cost to the city goes up, Miller
said.
How big of an impact that would
have on city nances is not imme-
diately clear. The city is required to
pay light-duty ofcers, regardless of
whether theyre monitoring the cam-
eras or performing some other func-
tion.
The situation becomes stickier if no
ofcers are on light duty. Police would
have to decide whether to take an of-
cer off the street in order to monitor
the cameras if Hawkeye is not able to
fund Legion guards.
Under a settlement of a unfair labor
practice grievance, the city is obli-
gated to reserve two light-duty spots
for ofcers to monitor the cameras
whenever scheduling permits for that.
There are often times when no ofcers
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com WEDnESDAy, ApRIL 17, 2013
timesleader.com
pAGE 3A
LOCAL
WILKES-BARRE
Arson trial gets started
Testimony in the arson trial of a Ber-
wick woman charged with setting re
to a Conyngham business and apart-
ment complex in September 2010 began
Tuesday and included the testimony of
two elderly women who were home at
the time of the blaze.
Gail Schneider, 44, is charged with
six counts of arson and one count of
criminal mischief relating to the re at
the Lantern Lane Complex along South
Main Street in the borough.
Assistant District Attorney Shannon
Crake called Nellie Stratts, then 92, and
Barbara Reese to testify Tuesday morn-
ing. Stratts escaped the building and
then was assisted by neighbors while
Reese, then 92, climbed out a window
and onto a neighboring roof where she
was rescued by reghters.
Prosecutors say the blaze cost $1.5
million in property damage. Testimony
will continue this morning.
PLAINS TWP.
ADL to honor 2 at dinner
The Anti-Defamation League will
honor the Rev. Thomas OHara and
Rabbi Larry Kaplan at its Distinguished
Community Service Award dinner on
Sunday at the Woodlands.
The award recognizes individuals
who share the leagues values and distin-
guish themselves by their contributions
and leadership in their communities.
OHara served as the
eighth president and
rst alumnus president
of Kings College from
1999 to 2011.
Kaplan serves as the
spiritual leader of Tem-
ple Israel. He came to
the Wyoming Valley in
1988 from Miami, Fla.
The guest speaker
will be Joseph P. Sul-
livan, chief inspector
and a 28-year veteran
of the Philadelphia Po-
lice Department, for
which he also serves
as the commanding of-
cer of homeland security and counter
terrorism.
The dinner is open to the public and
reservations can be made by calling Ste-
ven Roth at 826-5694.
PITTSTON
Blogfest set for Friday
Northeastern Pennsylvania Bloggers
will be hosting the 7th semi-annual Blog-
fest starting at 6 p.m. Friday at Rooneys
Irish Pub, 67 S. Main St., Pittston. There
is no charge for admission for this in-
formal gathering of bloggers, political
candidates, elected ofcials and anyone
interested in politics or blogging.
For more information, visit www.
gort42.blogspot.com, www.nepablogs.
org or www.pittstonpolitics.com. Or
you can call 823-4508.
WILKES-BARRE
2 words: Spring cleanup
Wilkes-Barres annual spring cleanup
will begin 9 a.m. Saturday in locations
across the city, which is participating in
PennDOTs Great American Cleanup
of PA.
Interested volunteer groups or in-
dividuals are asked to contact the De-
partment of Public Works at 208-4313
to register. Only registered groups and
individuals will be entitled to supplies,
which include trash bags and gloves.
The rain date is April 27.
I N B R I E F
Steele
Tonkin
OHara
Kaplan
M
cCambridge Dowd-Whipple and Eric Wunch, actors from The Bloomsburg Theatre Ensemble,
play a scene in Patchworks; Life and Legends of the Coal Towns for the students at Wyoming
Valley Montessori School in Kingston on Tuesday morning. The traveling program a collection of
songs, stories and rst-person narratives continues its regional tour through May 31. For informa-
tion, visit www.bte.org.
studENts dIggIN coal hIstoRy
CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER
Wholl be watching city security cameras?
See CAMERA, Page 4A
County
on hunt
for levee
engineer
Monitoring of Hawkeye system and
cost to W-B taxpayers becomes
uncertain.
By TERRIE MORGAN-BESECKER
tmorgan@timesleader.com
Flood protection Authority ofcials
also seek to remove $3.1 million in
funds from FnCB.
By JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES
jandes@timesleader.com
The Luzerne County Flood Protec-
tion Authority will be meeting soon
to discuss the hiring of an engineer
to oversee the Wyoming Valley Levee,
authority Chairman Stephen A. Urban
said after Tuesdays authority meeting.
Urban said the authority has saved
money by relying on county Chief En-
gineer Joe Gibbons since engineer Jim
Brozena retired as authority executive
director in January, but the authority
must act on a replacement now that
Gibbons has accepted employment out-
side the region.
Authority members praised Gibbons
on Tuesday for lling in for Brozena
and helping to monitor the levee dur-
ing past Susquehanna River ooding,
including the record ood in Septem-
ber 2011.
Its a sad day again for the county,
said authority member Kevin OBrien,
who previously worked in the county
Emergency Management Agency. I
wish you much success in your new en-
deavor. Im going to miss you.
Gibbons, who will wrap up his coun-
ty employment May 3, told the author-
ity his work on the levee system during
ooding was one of the most important
aspects of his 12-year county career.
Its near and dear to my heart, and I
really think we have a great system,
Gibbons said, referring to the levee.
The county is fortunate to have em-
Area man absent from trial convicted of sexual assault
Clyde Tonkin, 30, found
guilty in sexual assault of a
now-14-year-old girl in 2011.
By SHEENA DELAZIO
sdelazio@timesleader.com
See LEVEE, Page 4A See BOGUS, Page 4A
Mans gold, silver bogus, police say
David Steele, 42, allegedly sold
fake bars and coins and was
found hiding with heroin packets.
By EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
Ready for Healthy Kids Day
Pictured touting Healthy Kids Day
activities planned for April 27 at the
Wilkes-Barre Family YMCA are (back
row, from left): Jennifer Deemer, grant
and program specialist, Blue Cross
of Northeastern Pennsylvania, and
Wilkes-Barre Family YMCA representa-
tives Linda Reilly, wellness director,
Kate Rogers, marketing director, and
Jim Thomas, executive director, along
with children from the YMCAs After-
School Program.
See TRIAL, Page 4A
WILKES-BARRE A few
dozen people on Tuesday
gathered to help organize and
volunteer for the rst commu-
nitywide get-together spurred
by community reaction to a
14-year-olds shooting death
last April.
But many more volunteers
are needed to make the Com-
munity Callout that the Build-
ing Bridges group is organiz-
ing for May 4 at Kirby Park a
success, said Building Bridges
co-founder the Rev. Shawn
Walker.
Walker, pastor of First Bap-
tist Church in Wilkes-Barre,
said its hard to believe its been
a year since Tyler Winsteads
untimely death. Building
Bridges was formed when the
public still believed Winsteads
death was a random act of vio-
lence in a drive-by shooting.
Investigators announced four
months later that Winstead
instead had accidentally been
shot in the chest by his friend.
In the Building Bridges ini-
tiative, hundreds of commu-
nity members met in groups
over several months with
the aim of reducing violence
among youth in Wilkes-Barre.
They sought to identify the
problems that lead to violence
and the causes of those prob-
lems, then brainstormed for
solutions.
There would be no Build-
ing Bridges had there been no
death of Tyler Winstead. It was
the catalyst that caused this
community to sort of cry out
and reach out, said Walker.
We said that we couldnt
necessarily respond with just a
march and vigil but that we
had to try to build something
sustainable and impactful.
The meeting attendees came
together Tuesday to take the
rst step, Walker said.
On May 4, we are having an
event at Kirby Park to address
one of the things we learned,
which is we need an opportu-
nity to connect, he said. We
heard it over and over and
over again last year: We dont
know each other, I dont know
my neighbor, we dont have op-
portunities to connect. What
we thought is, that might be a
good starting place.
Volunteers arent naive
enough to believe the event
will eradicate complex issues
faced in the community, Walk-
er said. But it certainly can
provide us, as community, an
opportunity for each other and
our families to connect, and to
provide something of value to
our area, he said.
Walker said he had asked
community activist Darlene
Duggins to organize the Com-
munity Callout because of her
eight years experience organiz-
ing similar activities, such as
community block parties that
eventually grew and moved to
Public Square in Wilkes-Barre.
Duggins went over a long
list of areas in which volun-
teers would be needed. The
event will feature activities for
children of all ages, including a
dunk tank, tug-of-war, dodge-
ball, kickball and more orga-
nized sports. There will be free
food and refreshments.
Price Chopper employee
Connie George attended the
meeting with store manager
Robert Buraczewski and said
many store employees are in-
terested in volunteering. De-
nise Thomas, an employee at
GAR High School, said at least
50 students and 20 to 40 facul-
ty members are committed to
pitching in as well.
Anyone who is interested in
volunteering should attend a
meeting at First Baptist Church
next Thursday to sign up, or, if
they cant make the meeting,
call the church to learn more
and/or volunteer, Walker said.
Shivaun ODonnell, fundrais-
ing coordinator for Building
Bridges, told the group that its
difcult for community groups
to make a meaningful impact
and accomplish change with-
out money. For that reason,
Building Bridges is planning a
fundraiser in August a golf
tournament at Blue Ridge Trail
Golf Course.
Details on the tournament
are pending, but ODonnell
said community-oriented
businesses that want to make
a difference will be needed as
sponsors.
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ployees, leaders and volunteers
who unite and coordinate their
response when the river rises
something that doesnt exist
in some other ood-prone parts
of the country, he said. It just
makes you very proud to know
that we have that kind of team-
work here, Gibbons said.
In other business Tuesday:
The authority agreed to
seek proposals from nancial
institutions. Authority board
member Douglas Ayers said
he is not comfortable keeping
$3.1 million in authority funds
at the Dunmore-based First Na-
tional Community Bank due to
adverse publicity about some of
its business practices. His au-
thority colleagues agreed.
Authority member Adrian
Merolli said the Mill Creek
ood control project in Duryea
and Moosic is ready to proceed.
The project will prevent ood-
ing in Avoca by creating a larger
ponding area to hold water run-
off, Urban said.
A solicitation for a levee
fee collector also was discussed.
The county is seeking propos-
als from entities to handle this
work, and OBrien said all pro-
posal responders should be
asked to send representatives
to authority meetings to answer
questions.
Representatives of the county
treasurers ofce complained
last year that the head of North-
east Revenue Services, the cho-
sen company, was permitted
to elaborate on the companys
qualications at an authority
meeting. The treasurers ofce
also had submitted a proposal.
Continued from Page 3A
LEVEE
to Ohio, where a car Tonkin
purchased had broken down.
The girl said the two checked
into a hotel and she began to
have stomach pains. Thinking
she was in labor or that there
was a problem with the baby,
Tonkin drove her to an Ohio
hospital.
After she was released from
the hospital a short time later,
police arrived at the hotel room
where the couple was staying,
and the girl was eventually re-
turned to her mother in Penn-
sylvania. The teen gave birth to
her daughter a few days later.
Galli testied he interviewed
Tonkin shortly before Tonkin
was arrested in June 2012 and
that at rst he denied having
any inappropriate contact with
the girl.
Upon further discussion, Gal-
li testied, Tonkin said it was
the girls idea to go to Louisi-
ana. Galli said Tonkin told him
he did have sexual contact with
her, but that it was never rape.
Tonkin allegedly told Galli
that he and the girl never did
anything she didnt want to do
and that he never forced her to
have sex.
The rst time they had an en-
counter, Tonkin allegedly told
Galli, Tonkin was drunk and the
girl initiated the sexual contact.
Continued from Page 3A
TRIAL
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013 N E W S PAGE 4A
window and turned out all the
lights. Police entered his resi-
dence and found him hiding in
a large cabinet with 15 heroin
packets, the complaint says.
Police said they recovered
counterfeit gold and silver bars
and coins and drug parapher-
nalia inside the residence.
Asearch warrant receipt says
police seized folders and les
listing information for custom-
ers who had purchased coun-
terfeit metals from Steeles
residence.
A receipt with Lucken-
baughs name was found on a
computer inside the residence,
police said.
Court records say Steele was
sentenced on April 20, 2012,
to a combined one year proba-
tion on charges he trespassed
on a neighbors property and
attempted to cash a fraudu-
lent check using another mans
name.
Continued from Page 3A
BOGUS
Building Bridges prepares for callout event
By STEVE MOCARSKY
smocarsky@timesleader.com
G E T I N V O LV E D
To learn more and/or volunteer
to help at the Community Call-
out, which begins at noon May
4 at Kirby Park, Wilkes-Barre,
attend the next Building Bridges
volunteer meeting at 7 p.m. April
25 at First Baptist Church, 48 S.
River St., Wilkes-Barre. If unable
to attend, call Angela at 822-
7482 for more information on
volunteer opportunities.
are present, Miller said.
Barrouk said Hawkeye of-
cials plan to speak with the
city and Legion ofcials about
the situation to determine how
best to structure coverage.
Drew McLaughlin, adminis-
trative coordinator for the city,
said city ofcials are open to
discussion.
We are aware of the impact
upon Hawkeye by the decrease
in operational funds, he said.
At this time it is primarily a
Hawkeye issue; however, the
city remains committed to en-
suring the operational effec-
tiveness of the camera system
is not impaired. We will deter-
mine the best course of action
in due time.
Continued from Page 3A
CAMERA
WASHINGTON Republican op-
position is growing to a bipartisan
Senate plan for expanding background
checks for rearms buyers, enough
to put the proposals fate in jeopardy.
But the measure might change as both
sides compete for support in one of the
pivotal ghts in the battle over curbing
guns.
The Senate continued debating a
wide-ranging gun control bill Tuesday,
with the focus on a background check
compromise struck last week between
Sens. Patrick Toomey, R-Pa., and Joe
Manchin, D-W.Va. Manchin said the
vote on that amendment was likely to
be delayed to late in the week, a move
that would give both sides more time
to win over supporters.
The two senators met Tuesday with
wounded former Rep. Gabrielle Gif-
fords and her husband, former astro-
naut Mark Kelly, who have worked in
recent months to bolster the gun con-
trol drive and are trying to line up Sen-
ate support for the effort.
Theyre helping immensely just
by being here and talking to our col-
leagues, Manchin said after their
meeting. Were close but we sure need
their help.
President Barack Obama, in an inter-
view with NBCs Today show, urged
lawmakers to pay attention to public
support for expanding background
checks and remember the slayings of
26 schoolchildren and staff at Sandy
Hook Elementary School in Newtown,
Conn.
Underscoring the bargaining under-
way, the two sponsors seemed willing
to consider a change to their deal that
would exempt gun buyers from back-
ground checks if they live hundreds of
miles from licensed rearms dealers,
said Senate aides and a lobbyist.
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013 N A T I O N & W O R L D PAGE 5A
CARACAS, VENEZUELA
Election protest turns violent
A
march to demand a recount in
Venezuelas contested presidential
election turned violent Tuesday in the
home state of the late President Hugo
Chavez as the government blamed
the opposition candidate for violent
disturbances it said had claimed
seven lives and left 61 people injured.
In a televised broadcast, Justice
Minister Nestor Reverol accused the
candidate, Henrique Capriles, of nu-
merous crimes including insurrection
and civil disobedience.
Government ofcials have been
alleging since Monday that Capriles
is plotting a coup, and President-elect
Nicolas Maduro announced that he
was prohibiting an opposition march
scheduled for today in the capital.
PITTSBURGH
Addiction coverage on way
Thousands of state residents with
drug and alcohol problems will be-
come eligible for insurance coverage
next year under the new health care
overhaul, and experts say that will
present opportunities and challenges.
About 101,000 Pennsylvania
residents receive treatment, and
about 96,000 more are projected to be
eligible next year, according to an As-
sociated Press analysis of government
data. As many as 873,000 people in
the state need treatment for substance
abuse.
But the 5,381 beds at treatment fa-
cilities are full, and that means newly
eligible patients could have trouble
getting treatment.
HARRISBURG
PSU suit to go forward
A whistleblower and defamation
lawsuit against Penn State will go
forward, a judge ruled Tuesday, deny-
ing the universitys request to have it
dismissed.
Former assistant football coach
Mike McQueary sued the school in
October, claiming he was portrayed
as untruthful in statements made in
2011 by the universitys president after
Jerry Sanduskys arrest.
Judge Thomas Gavin said Mc-
Quearys lawsuit makes sufcient
claims of outrageous conduct on
the part of the school to keep the case
alive.
He gave the school 20 days to re-
spond to the lawsuit led in October.
WASHINGTON
Obama, Mideast leaders meet
President Barack Obama has held
the rst in a series of White House
meetings with Mideast leaders.
The White House says Obama
and the crown prince of the Emirati
capital of Abu Dhabi, Mohammed bin
Zayed Al Nahyan, discussed a range
of regional issues during their private
talks Tuesday. Among the issues
discussed were Irans disputed nuclear
program, the deadly civil war in Syria,
and the continued threat of violent
extremism.
The United Arab Emirates is a
major U.S. ally in the Persian Gulf and
an important oil producer.
Obama will meet next week with
the leaders of Qatar and Jordan. The
two countries, along with the UAE,
are believed to be arming or training
the rebel forces that are seeking to
overthrow the Syrian government.
I N B R I E F
AP PHOTO
Burning old man winter in efgy
The Boeoegg, a symbol of winter,
burns on a meadow in Zurich, Swit-
zerland, on Monday. The Sechse-
laeuten ringing of the six oclock
bells is a traditional end of winter
festival featuring the burning of the
Boeoegg. The faster the Boeoegg
burns, the hotter the summer will
be, according to tradition.
GOP digs in on gun bill
Opponents seek to defeat a plan for
expanding background checks for
buyers of rearms.
By ALAN FRAM
Associated Press
Senate
plan offers
citizenship
in 13 years
WASHINGTON The U.S.
immigration system would un-
dergo dramatic changes under a
bipartisan Senate bill that puts a
new focus on prospective immi-
grants merit and employment
potential, while seeking to end
illegal immigration once and for
all by creating legal avenues for
workers to come here.
The bill would put the 11 mil-
lion immigrants in the country
illegally on a 13-year path to U.S.
citizenship that would cost each
$2,000 in nes plus additional
fees, and would begin only after
steps have been taken to secure
the border, according to an out-
line of the measure.
The sweeping legislation also
would remake the nations inef-
cient legal immigration system,
creating new immigration op-
portunities for tens of thousands
of high- and low-skilled workers,
as well as a new merit visa
aimed at bringing people with
talents to the United States.
Senators planned to formally
introduce the bill Tuesday, but
a planned press event including
immigration advocates, busi-
ness groups, religious leaders
and others was delayed until
later in the week because of the
tragedy at the Boston Marathon.
Employers would face tough
new requirements to check
the legal status of all work-
ers. Billions of dollars would
be poured into border security,
and millions of people whove
been waiting overseas for years,
sometimes decades, in legal im-
migration backlogs would see
their cases speeded up.
Overall, the changes represent
the most dramatic overhaul to
U.S. immigration law in more
than a quarter-century, and Con-
gress rst major attempt to con-
front the polarizing issue since
bipartisan legislation in 2007
collapsed on the Senate oor.
The status quo is unsustain-
able. The nations failure to x
its broken immigration system
has created what is, in reality,
de facto amnesty, Sens. Chuck
Schumer, D-New York, and
John McCain, R-Ariz., leaders of
the effort, wrote in an opinion
piece in the Wall Street Journal
Tuesday. Our bill would estab-
lish a tough but fair system for
millions of people living in the
shadows to come forward and
settle their debt to society by ful-
lling reasonable requirements
to become law-abiding citizens.
Schumer and McCain were
to meet with President Barack
Obama on Tuesday to brief him
on the legislation.
Its a top second-term priority
for the president.
Measure would overhaul the
countrys current system in
favor of merit-focused ideals.
By ERICA WERNER
Associated Press
GOTHIC SETTING FOR THATCHERS GOODBYE
Two brothers who co-owned a west-
ern Pennsylvania high-tech defense
contracting rm championed by the
late U.S. Rep John Murtha pleaded
guilty to major fraud against the feder-
al government and conspiring to avoid
paying income taxes.
William Kuchera, 58, and Ronald
Kuchera, 51, each face 30 to 37 months
in federal prison when theyre sen-
tenced Oct. 7. Each will also wind up
paying more than $1.5 million in nes,
restitution and forfeitures stemming
from the scheme involving Kuchera
Defense Systems Inc. of Windber.
Their company was paid $650,000 to
produce high-tech defense components
for an unmanned Humvee project
meant to help groundtroops coordinate
air cover and eliminate friendly-re ca-
sualties. Instead, the Kuchera brothers
kept the money but produced nothing,
while kicking back more than $200,000
to prime contractor, Coherent Systems
International Inc. Coherents founder,
Richard Ianieri, is serving ve years
probation for the scheme involving
an $8.2 million contract obtained by a
Murtha earmark.
Murtha died of complications from
gallbladder surgery in February 2010,
15 days before Ianieri pleaded guilty,
was sentenced and agreed to cooperate
in the Kuchera investigation.
Federal prosecutors in Florida said
Ianieri got the earmarked contract
after hiring a lobbying rm that em-
ployed Murthas brother. FedSpending.
org, a website that tracks government
money, reported that Kuchera De-
fense Systems and Coherent had been
awarded more than $50 million apiece
in defense work since 2000. Murtha, in
an April 2006 news release, said Coher-
ent and Kuchera Defense Systems were
working virtually as one company
on $30 million worth of contracts he
helped them land.
Defense attorneys Stanton Levenson
and J. Alan Johnson said theyll ask for
less than the prison sentence spelled
out by federal guidelines, because they
contend the Kucheras did a lot of good
and are paying, nancially, for their
crimes.
AP PHOTO
T
he cofn of former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher rests Tuesday in the Crypt Chapel of St. Mary
Undercroft beneath the Houses of Parliament in central London. Thatchers funeral will be held today at St
Pauls Cathedral. A bold leader in the waning years of the Cold War, she died last week after suffering a stroke.
Murtha-linked Pa. brothers plead guilty to fraud
The pair owned a defense rm
business that beneted from the late
congressmans earmarks.
By JOE MANDAK
Associated Press
Dozens killed when quake hits near Iran-Pakistan border
TEHRAN, Iran An earth-
quake toppled homes and
shops on both sides of the
Iran-Pakistan border Tuesday,
killing dozens of people and
causing skyscrapers to sway
in Dubai. It also forced Irani-
an ofcials for the second
time in less than a week to
issue assurances that its main
nuclear reactor wasnt dam-
aged.
At least 34 people were
killed in a single village in
Pakistan, a military ofcial
said. But the overall death toll
became clouded after conict-
ing reports from Iran.
At rst, Irans state-in Press
TV said at least 40 people
died which would push the
two-nation tally to 74. But it
later retreated from its ac-
count, and other Iranian out-
lets stepped in with a far less
dire picture.
Despite the conicting
reports on the Iranian side,
a Pakistani military ofcial
said at least 34 were killed on
his side of the border and 80
were injured. Up to 1,000 mud
homes were damaged, Paki-
stan Television added. The
military spoke on condition of
anonymity in line with Paki-
stan military policy.
A Pakistani policeman,
Azmatullah Regi, said nearly
three dozen homes and shops
collapsed in one village in the
Mashkel area, which was the
hardest hit by the quake. Res-
cue workers pulled the bodies
of a couple and their three
children, ages 5 to 15, from
the rubble of one house, he
said.
The Pakistani army ordered
paramilitary troops to assist
with rescue operations and
provide medical treatment.
Additional troops are being
moved to the area, and army
helicopters were mobilized to
carry medical staff, tents, med-
icine and other relief items.
The discrepancies and ap-
parent backtracking in the
Iranian reports could not be
immediately reconciled, but
it was the second quake to hit
Iran in less than week and au-
thorities could be seeking to
downplay casualties.
Iranian ofcials assure that
nations main nuclear
reactor wasnt damaged.
The Associated Press
AP PHOTO
People evacuate buildings and call their relatives after a
tremor of an earthquake was felt Tuesday in Karachi, Pakistan.
AP PHOTO
Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., left, and
Sen. Patrick Toomey, R-Pa. aim to
expand background checks to more
gun buyers.
IMMIGRATION
raise funds. Each new campaign
cycle brings more and more ex-
pense.
The Pittsburgh event was
postponed because a main orga-
nizer had a death in the family,
he said. It is expected to be re-
scheduled for later this spring.
Yudichak said he has about
$200,000 in his campaign war
chest. To run for the state Sen-
ate seat in 2010, the total cost
for the primary and general elec-
tion was between $300,000 and
$400,000, he said. Yudichak eas-
ily defeated Wilkes-Barre Mayor
Tom Leighton in the primary
and cruised to victory in the
general election over Republican
Stephen A. Urban and Libertar-
ian Betsy Summers.
Yudichak said a fundraiser is
being planned for the Philadel-
phia area and another for Centre
County. There were several fun-
draising events held outside the
14th District when he ran for his
rst term in 2010, he said.
In the Senate, we deal with
issues that have statewide im-
pact, he said. Ultimately, we
represent all of Pennsylvania in
addition to our individual dis-
tricts.
Asked who would attend a
fundraiser for him in Pittsburgh,
Yudichak said, Democratic
stalwarts who want to see the
Democratic caucus in Harris-
burg continue to do well.
Its a natural thing to do, he
said. This is not out of the or-
dinary.
The other fundraisers an-
nounced by the SDCC were for
state Sens. Vincent Hughes of
Philadelphia, John Wozniak of
Johnstown and Anthony H. Wil-
liams of Philadelphia.
Yudichak said he has received
great support from the labor
unions, noting they are located
throughout the state.
Steve Donaldson of Keystone
Strategies, representing Yudi-
chak, said the senator was sched-
uled to be in Pittsburgh the day
of the fundraiser and he was ap-
proached by a donor in the area
to see if he was willing to have a
fundraiser before heading back.
The senator accepted the of-
fer, Donaldson said in an e-mail.
The fundraiser was postponed
due to an unexpected schedul-
ing conict fromone of the hosts
of the fundraiser.
Yudichaks campaign is
always looking for ways to
broaden the base of supporters
throughout the state, Donald-
son said. The Citizens for John
Yudichak campaign is actively
planning fundraisers and engag-
ing potential supporters for his
upcoming election cycle next
year, he said.
Continued from Page 1A
YUDICHAK
G enettis
AfterFu nera lLu ncheons
Sta rting a t$7.95 p erp erson
H otelBerea vem entRa tes
825.6477
Happy 26th Birthday
In Heaven
JOHN RICHARD
BLANNARD
4/15/87 ~ 12/12/07
As heartbroken as we are to have
lost you, we realize how lucky we
are to have had you in our lives.
You were...are...and always will be
a special light that exists in us all.
We love you and miss you terribly.
Happy Birthday my precious son.
Sadly Missed And Forever Loved!
Mom, Dad, Brothers Lee, Adam
and Corey, Family And Friends
Estate & Medicaid Planning; Wills; Revocable and Irrevocable Trusts: Estate
Probate and Administration; Guardianships; and Special Needs Trusts.
ATTORNEY DAVID R. LIPKA
Certied As an Elder Law Attorney by the National Elder Law Foundation
50 East Main Street, Plymouth, PA (570) 779-5353
IF NURSING HOME PLACEMENT BECOMES
NECESSARY DONT PRESUME ALL IS LOST!
Even under current law, there ARE still ways to legally protect your home and
other hard-earned assets from being spent down on long term care when you, your
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ST.M ARYS
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The Times Leader publishes
free obituaries, which have a
27-line limit, and paid obituar-
ies, which can run with a photo-
graph. A funeral home repre-
sentative can call the obituary
desk at (570) 829-7224, send a
fax to (570) 829-5537 or e-mail
to tlobits@timesleader.com. If
you fax or e-mail, please call
to conrm. Obituaries must be
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through Thursday and 7:30 p.m.
Friday and Saturday. Obituaries
must be sent by a funeral home
or crematory, or must name
who is handling arrangements,
with address and phone num-
ber. We discourage handwritten
notices; they incur a $15 typing
fee.
O B I T U A R Y P O L I C Y
ASHBRIDGE - Ernest, friends may
call 6 to 8 p.m. Friday at the Rich-
ard H. Disque Funeral Home Inc.,
2940 Memorial Hwy., Dallas.
CROSS - Elias, funeral 8:45 a.m.
Thursday at Mamary-Durkin
Funeral Service, 59 Parrish St.,
Wilkes-Barre. Mass of Christian
Burial 9:30 a.m. in Ss. Peter & Paul
Church, Plains Township. Friends
may call 4 to 7 p.m. today at the
funeral home.
HOWELL - Sarah, funeral 10
a.m. Friday at Sheldon-Kukuchka
Funeral Home, 73 W. Tioga St.,
Tunkhannock. Friends may call 6
to 8 p.m. Thursday.
KIESINGER - Harold, funeral 11
a.m. today in Bethel United Meth-
odist Church, 532 Main St., Avoca.
KWAK - Joseph, funeral 10 a.m. to-
day at Nat & Gawlas Funeral Home,
89 Park Ave., Wilkes-Barre. Mass
of Christian Burial 10:30 a.m. in St.
Nicholas Church, 226 S. Washing-
ton St., Wilkes-Barre.
MANGANIELLO - Robert, Mass
of Christian Burial 10 a.m. today
in St. Cecelias Church, Wyoming
Avenue, Exeter.
MCDOWELL - Eileen, funeral 11
a.m. Saturday in St. Theresas
Church, Shavertown. Friends may
call 10 a.m. until services.
OWENS - Thomas, funeral and vet-
erans services 2 p.m. Saturday at
Sheldon-Kukuchka Funeral Home,
73 W. Tioga St., Tunkhannock.
Friends may call 4 to 6 p.m. Friday
and 1 p.m. until time of services
Saturday. Masonic services 6 p.m.
Friday.
PAPPAS - Mary, friends may call
10 a.m. to noon today at Corcoran
Funeral Home Inc., 20 S. Main St.,
Plains Township. Funeral imme-
diately afterwards at the funeral
home.
ROZELLE - Shirley, funeral 11 a.m.
today at Metcalfe-Shaver-Kopcza
Funeral Home Inc., 504 Wyoming
Ave., Wyoming.
STORM- Mary Ann, funeral 10
a.m. today at Mamary-Durkin
Funeral Service, 59 Parrish St.,
Wilkes-Barre.
TIMEK - John, memorial service
9:30 a.m. today in Ss. Peter & Paul
Church, Plains Township.
WILDES - Robert, funeral 1:30 p.m.
today in St. Jude Parish, Mountain
Top.
WYSOWSKI - Eleanore, funeral
9:30 a.m. today at the Earl W.
Lohman Funeral Home Inc., 14
W. Green St., Nanticoke. Mass
of Christian Burial 10 a.m. in St.
Faustina of Kowalska Parish at St.
Marys Church, Nanticoke.
FUNERALS
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013 O B I T U A R I E S PAGE 6A
JOHNKOUKOLTSIOS, 83, of
Wyoming, passed away at Wilkes-
Barre General Hospital on Tues-
day, surrounded by his loving
family.
Arrangements are pend-
ing and entrusted to Kniffen
OMalley Funeral Home Inc., 465
S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre. A full
obituary will appear in Thurs-
days paper.
Edward Buratti
April 15, 2013
E
dward Buratti, 74, of Wilkes-
Barre, passed away unex-
pectedly Monday morning while
driving his wife to a doctors ap-
pointment on Interstate 81.
He was born on Nov. 22, 1938
in Wilkes-Barre, a son of the late
James and Ida Menichini Buratti.
Ed was a graduate of GAR Memo-
rial High School, Class of 1956.
Prior to his retirement in 2001,
he was employed for many years
at the Penn Refrigeration Corp.
in Hanover Township. Ed was a
member of St. Andrews Parish,
Parrish Street, Wilkes-Barre.
He was an outstanding baseball
player, playing catcher. Ed played
for several local teams, including
Mayower and the locally famous
Ashley As, who had the oppor-
tunity to play in a championship
game in Wichita, Kan. Recently,
this team had a very memorable
reunion.
Ed was an avid sherman, hav-
ing caught many sh, but always
threw them back to the delight
of his wife. He had many good
friends, notably the Donut Shop
Gang, as well as shing buddies.
He always had a smile and a good
joke for his family and friends.
Ed and his wife, Patricia Men-
geringhausen Buratti, celebrated
their 50th wedding anniversary
on Feb., 23, 2013.
In addition to his wife, he is
also survived by his children,
Edward J. Buratti and his wife,
Deborah, Hanover Township, Su-
san Chapman and her husband,
Neil, Douglasville, Ga., and Sha-
ron Buratti and her partner, Fred
Hopersberger, Mountain Top;
grandchildren, Ryan and Jeff Bu-
ratti, Lauren, Kendra and Dylan
Chapman and Freddy Hopers-
berger; brother, James Buratti,
and his wife, Sandra, Springeld,
Va.; aunt, Helen Menichini, New
Jersey; nieces and nephews.
Eds family thanks the Good Sa-
maritans who helped Ed in front
of his house as well as those that
stopped and helped both Ed and
Patricia on Interstate 81. Thanks
are also given to the Ashley emer-
gency responders and the Penn-
sylvania State Police.
Funeral services will be held
on Friday at 9:15 a.m. from the
Nat & Gawlas Funeral Home, 89
Park Ave., Wilkes-Barre, with a
Mass of Christian Burial to follow
at 10 a.m. in St. Andrews Parish,
316 Parrish St., Wilkes-Barre.
Friends may call on Thursday
from 5 to 8 p.m. at the funeral
home.
Online condolences may be
sent by visiting Edwards obitu-
ary at www.natandgawlasfuneral-
home.com.
JUDITH F. FINKELSTEIN,
of Clarks Summit, died Tues-
day, April 16, 2013, in Geisinger
Community Medical Center,
Scranton. Born in Wilkes-Barre,
daughter of the late Maynard and
Helen Dymond Finkelstein, she
was a graduate of Kingston High
School and Stayer University.
Judy was a member of Temple Is-
rael Synagogue, Wilkes-Barre. In
addition to her parents, she was
preceded in death by her brother,
Max Fine. Surviving are brothers,
Jay Finkelstein and wife, Doro-
thy, Kingston, Mark Finkelstein
and wife, Janet, Kingston; nieces
and nephews.
Graveside funeral service 10
a.m. Thursday in Temple Israel
Cemetery, Swoyersville. Rabbi
Larry Kaplan will ofciate. Ar-
rangements by Rosenberg Funer-
al Chapel Inc., 348 S. River St.,
Wilkes-Barre. For information,
visit www.rosenbergfuneralcha-
pel.com.
FREDA T. POPKY, 105,
of Wilkes-Barre, died Tuesday
morning in St. Lukes Villa, Wil-
kes-Barre.
Funeral arrangements are
being nalized by the Rosenberg
Funeral Chapel Inc., 348 S. River
St., Wilkes-Barre. For more infor-
mation, visit the funeral homes
website at www.rosenbergfuner-
alchapel.com.
Grace Mary DeAngelo
February 1, 2013
G
race Mary DeAngelo, 93, of
Fayetteville, N.C., passed
away on Friday, Feb. 1, 2013, in
the Carrol S. Roberson Hospice
Center, Fayetteville.
She was born in Pittston on
Jan. 25, 1920, daughter of the
late Cataldo and Antonina Ciali
Guiliano.
She was preceded in death by
her husband, Charles DeAngelo;
sisters, Lucy Capitano and Rose
Patrick; brother, Charles Guilia-
no; great-grandson, Konner Keat-
ing.
She is survived by her son, Dr.
Anthony B. DeAngelo, Durham,
N.C.; two daughters, Margaret
Keating, Lancaster, S.C., and
Nina Sutton and husband, Danny,
Fayetteville; sister, Mary Kukla,
Timonium, Md.; two brothers,
Bernard Guiliano, Arlington, Va.,
and Joseph Guiliano, Leesburg,
Va.; four grandchildren; and seven
great-grandchildren.
Viewing hours will be held on
Friday from 5 to 8 p.m. at Gra-
ziano Funeral Home Inc., Pittston
Township. Funeral services will
begin at the funeral home on Sat-
urday at 9 a.m. A Mass of Chris-
tian Burial will be held in St.
Joseph Marello Parish, William
Street, Pittston, at 9:30 a.m. Inter-
ment will take place in St. Roc-
cos Roman Catholic Cemetery,
Pittston Township.
For further information or to
express condolences to Graces
family, please visit www.graziano-
funeralhome.com.
Elias Eli Cross
April 13, 2013
E
lias Eli Cross, of Slope
Street, Plains Township,
passed away Saturday, April 13,
2013 in Hospice Community Care
Unit of Geisinger South Wilkes-
Barre.
Born Aug. 1, 1918 in Wilkes-
Barre, he was a son of the late
Anthony and Catherine Kattouf-
Cross. He graduated from GAR
High School and was a veteran of
World War II, serving in the U.S.
Army Air Force in China with the
Flying Tigers.
He was formerly employed by
Okonite, Kannarr, Certainteed
and Owens-Illinois before retir-
ing from Metropolitan Wire. Eli
also owned and operated Plains
Vending and Cross Hoagies. He
was a former member of Sacred
Heart Church, Plains Township,
and a current member of Ss. Pe-
ter & Paul Parish, Plains Town-
ship. He was a charter member
of the Metro-Wire Federal Credit
Union, and proudly held account
no. 1 and continued working as
the treasurer and an ofcer until
2011. He was an avid bowler in
many leagues throughout Wyo-
ming Valley, mostly recently the
Monday night mens league at
Stanton Lanes, Wilkes-Barre.
He and his wife, the former
Clementine Barbacci, would have
celebrated their 67th wedding an-
niversary on June 22, 2013.
He was preceded in death by
his sisters, Adla Leons, Hannah
Mamary, Helen Wright, Em-
ily Sod and Louise Borzone; and
brothers, Theodore (Pat) and
James Cross.
In addition to his wife, he is
survived by children, Anthony
Cross, Germany, Gerald and wife,
Rita Cross, Plains Township, and
Michelle and husband, Jeff Say-
ers, Austin, Texas; grandchildren,
Elias, Matthew, Alexander, Mi-
cah, Geralyn and Anthony Cross
and Jay and Jeffery Sayers; sister,
Rita Caffrey; sisters-in-law, Lou-
ise Yanoshak, Mary, Patricia and
Alda Barbacci and Joan Cross;
brothers-in-law, John and Orlando
Barbacci; numerous nieces and
nephews.
The family wants to acknowl-
edge the caregivers at Riverview
Ridge, Riverside Manor, Hospice
Community Care and Drs. Saw-
yer, Mariner, Yanoshak and Pen-
sieri.
Funeral will be held
Thursday at 8:45 a.m.
from Mamary-Durkin Fu-
neral Service, 59 Parrish
St., Wilkes-Barre, with a Mass of
Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m. in
Ss. Peter & Paul Church, Plains
Township. Interment will be in
the Italian Independent Cem-
etery, Wyoming. Friends may call
at the funeral home from 4 to 7
p.m. today.
Those who desire can give me-
morial contributions to the Cen-
tral Pennsylvania chapter of the
National Multiple Sclerosis Soci-
ety, 2040 Linglestown Road, Suite
104, Harrisburg, PA 17110.
Nancy M.
Garrahan
April 14, 2013
N
ancy M. Garrahan, of Waller
Street, Wilkes-Barre, passed
away Sunday in Wilkes-Barre
General Hospital.
Born Oct. 16, 1930 in Wilkes-
Barre, she was a daughter of the
late Oscar and Mildred Hedden
Nygren.
She attended Meyers High
School. Nancy formerly worked
in the Boston Store in Wilkes-
Barre for more then 26 years in
its shoe department.
She was a member of St. Rob-
ert Bellermine Parish, Wilkes-
Barre.
She was preceded in death by
her husband, Edward J. Garra-
han; and brother, Robert Nygren.
She is survived by her chil-
dren, Kathleen and husband,
John Youells, West Wyoming,
and Edward Garrahan, with
whom she resided; grandchil-
dren, Sarah Swiderski and Aaly-
sa Youells; and great-grandchil-
dren, Sophie, Jack and Ava.
The family thanks the staff of
Timber Ridge Health Care Cen-
ter.
A Mass of Christian Burial
will be held at 10 a.m. Friday
in St. Aloysius Church, Wilkes-
Barre. Interment will be in Sa-
cred Heart Cemetery, Plains
Township. There will be no call-
ing hours.
Arrangements provided by
Mamary-Durkin Funeral Servic-
es, 59 Parrish St., Wilkes-Barre.
SAMUEL DELLARTE, 87, of
Wyoming, passed away Friday in
Sacred Heart Hospital, Pensaco-
la, Fla.
Arrangements are pending
from the Metcalfe-Shaver-Kopcza
Funeral Home Inc., 504 Wyoming
Ave., Wyoming.
RICHARD BOBACK, 60, of
Wilkes-Barre, passed away peace-
fully at home on Tuesday sur-
rounded by his loved ones.
Funeral arrangements are
pending from the Simon S. Rus-
sin Funeral Home, 136 Maffett
St., Plains Township.
Leo Sawicki
April 15, 2013
L
eo Sawicki, 94, of Hunlock
Creek, passed away April 15,
2013 at the Wilkes-Barre General
Hospital.
Born in Korn Krest on Dec.
10, 1918, he was a son of the late
Edward and Bridget Dorzinsky
Sawicki.
He was a U.S. Army veteran of
World War II, having served in
the 35th Army Artillery.
Leo was a life member of the
Disabled American Veterans, in
which he was a Bronze Leader
in recognition of his outstanding
devotion toward disabled vet-
erans, as well as the American
Legion Post No. 350, Nanticoke.
Prior to his retirement, he was
employed by Sikorsky Aircraft in
Connecticut. He also belonged
to the Golden Wing Club and
Grange No. 194.
He was preceded in death
by brothers, Walter and Char-
lie; sister, Eleanor; brothers-in-
law, Charles, Harry, Albert and
Thomas; and sisters-in-law, Eliz-
abeth, Edith, Mabel, Catherine
and Lillian.
Leo is survived by his wife
of 71 years, the former Eleanor
Scholl, as well as several nieces
and nephews.
Funeral services will
be held Thursday at 9:15
a.m. from the Earl W.
Lohman Funeral Home Inc., 14
W. Green St., Nanticoke, with
a Mass of Christian Burial at
10 a.m. in Our Lady of Mount
Carmel Church, Lake Silkworth.
Interment with military honors
will be in Chapel Lawn Burial
Park, Dallas. Friends may call 4
to 7 p.m. today.
HEDY LAZAR, 63, a guest at
Timber Ridge Health Care Cen-
ter, Plains Township, died Mon-
day.
Funeral arrangements are
pending from the Yeosock Funer-
al Home, 40 S. Main St., Plains
Township.
Jacqueline A. Bertrand
April 15, 2013
J
acqueline A. Bertrand, 66, of
Nanticoke, passed away April
15, 2013 in Wilkes-Barre General
Hospital.
Born March 9, 1947 in Brooklyn,
she was a daughter of Fred and El-
eanor Lashinski Nethercott.
She was a member of Holy Spirit
Parish; past president of the United
States Bowling Congress, now the
Wyoming Valley Bowling Associa-
tion; Realtors Association; Bowling
Hall of Fame; and president of the
Classy Lassies Bowling League.
Jacqueline and her daughter are
the only mother and daughter to
be enshrined in the Bowling Hall
of Fame.
She had many bowling accom-
plishments and enjoyed numerous
tournaments with her friend, Barb
Pasimus. She was employed as a su-
pervisor at Diversied Information
Technologies.
Jacqueline is preceded in death
by her husband, Dennis; son,
James; brother, Brady.
Surviving are daughter, Denise
Wrubel and husband, Thomas,
Glen Lyon; loving grandson, D.J.;
brother, Fred, Glen Lyon; nieces
and nephews; sister-in-law, Sharon
Antonik; and brother-in-law, Joseph
Antonik.
Funeral services will be held
Friday at 9:15 a.m. from the Earl W.
Lohman Funeral Home Inc., 14 W.
Green St., Nanticoke, with a Mass
of Christian Burial at 10 a.m. in
Holy Spirit Parish/St. Adalberts
Church, Glen Lyon. Interment will
be in St. Adalberts Cemetery, Glen
Lyon. Friends may call Thursday
from 4 to 7 p.m.
In lieu of owers, memorial do-
nations, if desired, may be made to
the family.
Teen wins open-records request for school data
CHAMBERSBURGA13-year-
old girl has won an open records
battle with Chambersburg Area
School District, where ofcials
questioned whether she was old
enough to le a Right-to-KnowLaw
request.
The state Ofce of Open Records
overruled the district Monday and
upheld Savannah Gibsons request
for nancial information involving
its former after-school dance pro-
gram.
The program was run by a man
who operates a similar program
in which Gibson participates at
Susquenita Middle School, which
is in a separate district near Har-
risburg, the Public Opinion news-
paper reported.
It was worth all the stressful
thinking and guring out what to
say, Gibson told the Chambers-
burg newspaper, referring to her
two-month ght to obtain the re-
cords. It was worth it in the end.
Im glad I can get the paperwork.
The Chambersburg district re-
jected Gibsons request on grounds
that it was unreasonably burden-
somebecauseit duplicatedrequests
by numerous other supporters of
the dance instructor, who has sued
the district in federal court alleging
breach of contract, trademark in-
fringement and other issues.
In rejecting the request, the dis-
trict noted that Gibson is a minor
and reserved the right to make
the case that she was too young to
request public records a point
the open-records ofce explicitly
rejected.
It said the law denes a request-
er only as a resident of the United
States who les a request under the
law.
Age is not a barrier to ling a
request, J. Chadwick Schnee, the
agencys assistant chief counsel,
said in his ruling.
Assistant Superintendent Eric
Michael said Tuesday that the
school districts lawyers raised the
issue to nd out whether theres an
age limit.
We wanted to know what the
parameters are, he said.
Schnee said his ofce encour-
ages government agencies and re-
questers to resolve their differences
amicably instead of invoking the
formal process established by the
Right-to-Know Law.
The Associated Press
Pennsylvania has leapfrogged
New Jersey, Connecticut, West
Virginia, Delaware and New
York, all Northeastern states
that had some form of casino
gaming before the opening of
the Mohegan Sun Casino at Po-
cono Downs in Plains Township
as Pennsylvanias rst casino
in 2006. But investments in fa-
cilities in some states have been
made, and other nearby states,
including Maryland, Massachu-
setts and Ohio, have taken a seat
at the poker table.
Bill Ryan, chairman of the
Pennsylvania Gaming Control
Board, said all of those states
want the same thing. Keep
their own residents from leav-
ing the state.
He said residents from neigh-
boring states crossing borders
to gamble have aided Pennsylva-
nias casinos. But as those neigh-
boring states have begun legal-
izing casinos, the border bleed
has been stemmed somewhat.
An example mentioned by mul-
tiple panelists throughout the
days event referenced Presque
Isle Downs Casino near Erie as
a prime example.
Presque Isle Downs Casino,
according to the latest revenue
gures from March, continued
to show declines as it faces new
competition fromjust across the
state line in Cleveland, Ohio,
which saw a casino open last
May. The Erie casino generated
$1.3 million in gross revenue
from table games last month,
down 38 percent from $2.1 mil-
lion during the same period
the year before just prior to the
Cleveland casinos opening.
But its not just Presque Isle
that has or will see height-
ened competition: * Located
in Hanover, Md., the Maryland
Live Casino introduced dealer-
staffed table games earlier this
month. One of three operating
casinos in Maryland, the hotel/
casino reported $45 million in
gross slots revenue in March.
That ranks as the top casino in
the entire Mid-Atlantic, more
than $9 million higher than
Pennsylvanias top casino, Parx
in Bucks County. Another pair
of casinos is set to open over the
next year in Maryland.
* In Ohio, four casinos are
operating in the states largest
cities: Toledo, Cleveland, Cin-
cinnati and Columbus. Each has
opened since Ohio voters chose
to legalize casinos in 2009.
* Delaware, which is likely
to be hurt the most by the one-
two punch that Pennsylvania
and Maryland have dealt it, has
three racinos, meaning casinos
operating at racetracks. There
is also a poker room in Wilm-
ington.
* Massachusetts Gov. Deval
Patrick signed legislation in
2011 that authorizes three casi-
nos and a slots parlor. Hearings
among the nearly one dozen ap-
plicants have been ongoing and
no licenses have been awarded
to date.
Some border casinos, such as
Harrahs in Chester, The Mead-
ows near Pittsburgh, Presque
Isle and The Rivers in Pitts-
burgh, have seen revenues dip
or become at, and its these
casinos that could be most af-
fected by casino openings in
Ohio and Maryland.
Mike Bean, the president and
general manager of Mohegan
Sun at Pocono Downs, said he
believes some casinos, includ-
ing his, should be insulated
from major revenue decreases
because of casinos in other
states. For a place like Mohegan
Sun at Pocono Downs, he said
the main drawing area is North-
eastern Pennsylvania, so the
aim has been to market the ca-
sino locally and keep the areas
residents close to home.
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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013 N E W S PAGE 7A
Continued from Page 1A
GAMING
tivals, concerts, horse races or
autograph sessions with celebri-
ties also keep people com-
ing to the casino, he said.
Sean Sullivan, general man-
ager at The Meadows Casino
near Pittsburgh, already has a
bowling alley and said the ca-
sino is constructing a hotel and
event center to help draw more
guests. The Meadows, he said,
wants to keep customers from
going to other casinos in west-
ern Pennsylvania or crossing
over state lines into Ohio, West
Virginia or even Maryland.
When Mount Airy Casino
Resort opened near Mount
Pocono, it had a hotel and golf
course in place. Sands Casino
Resort in Bethlehem construct-
ed a hotel and convention cen-
ter. And Valley Forge Casino
Resort and the soon-to-open
Lady Luck Casino at Nemaco-
lin Woodlands Resort in south-
western Pennsylvania also have
hotels.
Geller said though he and his
family dont gamble, they enjoy
going to Las Vegas because of
the attractions, including res-
taurants, shows and other ame-
nities.
You want the convention
business, you want the tourism
business, he said.
Matthew B. Levinson, the
chairman of the New Jersey
Casino Control Commission,
said a key to seeing growth in
revenues for casinos is on the
amenity side. Its a trend thats
been realized in Nevada and
New Jersey, he said, and he
expects that Pennsylvania will
follow suit.
One problem Geller and
Levinson noted that Pennsyl-
vania might have with contin-
ued amenity investments is the
high slot machine tax rate of 45
percent. Geller said casino op-
erators might put more money
into casinos in states with low-
er tax rates New Jersey for
example has an eight percent
tax rate because the return
on investment could be higher.
Forty-ve percent is one
of the highest in the nation,
Geller said. That has to impact
the amount people are willing
to invest in the state.
Pennsylvania is the second-
highest grossing gaming state
in the nation trailing only Ne-
vada. But other states are get-
ting into the casino game and
seeing huge revenues, includ-
ing Maryland, Ohio and New
York.
Because of more attractive
tax rates in other states, Geller
cautioned that Pennsylvania
will have trouble staying num-
ber two.
Mentioning the grandeur
of Caesars Palace, Geller said
something like that could not
exist with a 45 percent tax
rate.
Continued from Page 1A
CASINOS
ANDREW M. SEDER / THE TIMES LEADER
Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs President Mike Bean, left,
discusses gaming issues with Joe Weinert, vice president of
the Spectrum Gaming Group, during Tuesdays eighth annual
Pennsylvania Gaming Congress.
U
.S. Navy veteran William Simon, a member of the Jewish War Veterans Post 112,
prepares to raise the Israeli ag over the Luzerne County Courthouse on Tuesday
morning with Rose Hanovice, who served as a lieutenant in the Israeli Medical Corps
in 1952. The two participated in a ceremony sponsored by the Jewish Community
Center marking 65 years since the United Nations declared Israel an
independent state.
NATION OF ISRAEL
CELEBRATES 65 YEARS
AMANDA HRYCYNA/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
WILKES-BARRE City po-
lice on Tuesday charged a man
with throwing a rock through
the windshield of a womans car,
the same woman who accused
him of raping her in 2011.
A Luzerne County jury last
June cleared Luis Perez, 30, of
raping the woman inside her
Sturdevent Street apartment.
He was convicted of terroris-
tic threats and simple assault
for slamming her head off a
oor and holding a knife to her
throat, court
records state.
The woman
obtained a pro-
tection- from-
abuse order
against Perez
after the 2011
assault, prohib-
iting him from
having any contact with her.
Perez was sentenced by Judge
Tina Polachek Gartley in July to
three years probation upon the
conviction of the lesser charges
and ordered to stay away from
the woman.
According to the most recent
criminal complaint:
The woman told police Perez
was seen running from her vehi-
cle on Sturdevent Street on Jan.
26. When she went outside, she
noticed the smashed windshield
on her car and a rock inside.
A replacement windshield
cost $314, the complaint states.
Perez, last known address
as Nicoholson Street, Wilkes-
Barre, was arraigned by Dis-
trict Judge Thomas Sharkey on
charges of retaliation against a
victim, criminal mischief and
violating a court order. He re-
mained jailed at the county pris-
on for lack of $2,000 bail.
A preliminary hearing is
scheduled on April 23 before
District Judge Rick Cronauer. A
hearing on the allege PFA viola-
tion is scheduled on April 25 in
county court.
Retaliation charge led against W-B man
Perez
Luis Perez, 30, accused of
damaging vehicle of woman
he previously assaulted.
By EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
Pa. highway plan calls for higher fuel tax
HARRISBURGSpending
on Pennsylvanias highways,
bridges and mass transit sys-
tems would get a big shot of
new funding under a Senate
plan unveiled Tuesday that
would raise the money by in-
creasing motorist fees and
wholesale gas taxes bump-
ing prices at the pump as
much as a quarter a gallon.
The $2.5 billion plan by Sen-
ate Transportation Commit-
tee Chairman John Rafferty,
R-Montgomery, is more ambi-
tious and expensive than the
proposal Gov. Tom Corbett
advanced in January.
The increase is nearly 50
percent of the $5.3 billion that
the Pennsylvania Department
of Transportation currently
spends on highways, bridges
and transit.
Transportation Secretary
Barry Schoch estimated that
Raffertys plan would cost the
average motorist who drives
12,000 miles a year about
$2.50 per week, or about $130
per year.
Rafferty warned that the
states bridges and highways
are in dire need of repair, and
contended that the plan would
simply update taxes and fees
to reect ination after go-
ing unchanged since at least
the 1990s while giving the
states economy a big boost.
This is a sustainable fund-
ing plan, Rafferty told report-
ers at a news conference where
he was backed by dozens of
supportive lawmakers and rep-
resentatives of transportation-
minded groups. This is not a
one-shot deal. This is a signi-
cant piece of change that will
move Pennsylvania forward.
Business groups, engineer-
ing rms, highway construc-
tion companies, mass transit
agencies and labor unions
support it and key Senate
Democrats support it, as well.
However, it could face rough
sledding in the more conserva-
tive House of Representatives.
One supporter, Sen. John
Wozniak, D-Cambria, warned
that the political will of law-
makers to increase taxes and
fees will disappear once the
Legislature recesses for the
summer and election-year pol-
itics begin to set in.
After June 30, not gonna
happen, Wozniak said.
Schoch, who stood next to
Rafferty at the news confer-
ence, said he had just begun to
look at the plan and could not
say whether he or the gover-
nor would endorse it.
The overall cost would be
about $600 million more per
year than the governors plan.
About $1.9 billion a year
would go toward highways and
bridges. Another $500 million
a year would go toward mass
transit systems and about
$115 million a year would be
divvied up among airports,
ports, rail freight and walking
and biking routes.
Proposal estimated to cost
average motorist about $2.50
per week, or $130 per year.
By MARC LEVY
Associated Press
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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013 N E W S PAGE 8A
Momwas right after all
WILKES-BARRE About
75 Wilkes University students
learned Tuesday that its OK to
cut your cucumbers and stab
your cherry tomatoes as long
as your bread is on the left and
drinks are on the right.
And never risk eating cooked
spinach because nothing could
do more harm to a good job
interview than green spinach
stuck in your otherwise glisten-
ing smile. And never slurp.
The students mostly se-
niors and some juniors gath-
ered for a learning luncheon at
the Marts Center on campus.
Janine Becker, executive direc-
tor of student services, gave a
presentation on how to prepare
and act at a job interview over
lunch or dinner.
The students learned how to
behave, how to dress, how to
converse and how to pass the
salad dressing always to your
right and never help yourself
rst.
Ill still be nervous when I
go to an interview, Jasmine
Edwards, 24, a senior business
administration major from
Philadelphia, said. But I will be
much more condent. I learned
how to eat correctly and its al-
ways good to know proper eti-
quette.
Becker told the students that
its never too early to learn
good etiquette. The things your
mom told you growing up, well,
she was right, Becker said.
Students were told to intro-
duce themselves when arriving
at the table for lunch or dinner
and use a rm handshake.
No wimpy handshakes, she
said. No dead sh.
And use good eye contact,
stand when a woman approach-
es the table and use real words,
no slang.
Yo is not a real word unless
youre a pirate, Becker said.Si-
lence and conceal cellphones,
place your napkin on your lap
and avoid topics such as poli-
tics, religion and family drama,
she said.
Becker said dont be the rst
to ask about salary, days off or
vacations that information
will come later. Interviewers
want to know about the inter-
viewees.
Youre always being inter-
viewed, Becker said. Dont
shove food in your mouth.
There are often several more
than qualied applicants for a
job, she said. How do we de-
cide who to hire? she asked. It
often comes down to subjective
things.
The dress code is always busi-
ness professional and, Becker
said, some personal things may
not play well with the interview-
er. Lets just say extensive pierc-
ings arent your friends when
looking for a job, she said.
Michael Tedeschi, 21, a senior
computer information systems
major from Long Island, N.Y.,
said he wasnt familiar with
many of the table procedures he
learned today.
I always thought you passed
everything to the left, he said.
Im prepared now, as long as I
remember all this stuff.
Dominic Manzione, 21, a ju-
nior entrepreneurship major
from Honesdale, said he wants
to open his own environmental
business. Hes not sure if he will
ever have to utilize the etiquette
he learned Tuesday.
But the plan is to cut my hair
before I graduate, he said. Ill
donate it to charity. If I ever in-
terview in the corporate world,
this information will help.
Kaitlyn Bevans, 22, a senior
from Hazleton, wants to be
a math teacher. She said she
learned the proper way to carry
herself at an interview.
I now know what to do and
what not to do, she said.
And keep those elbows off the
table.
Etiquette tips
are dispensed
at Wilkes U.
By BILL OBOYLE
boboyle@timesleader.com
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Junior pharmacy major Danielle Koch of Reading cuts her dinner entree at her table during the
Dine and Look Fine - Etiquette Luncheon on campus Tuesday afternoon.
E T I Q U E T T E T I P S
Dont begin eating until all are
served at your table.
Place napkin on your lap and
keep it there.
Dont reach across the table; ask
someone to pass the item.
All items are passed to the right;
dont help yourself rst.
Bread is on the left; drinks on
the right.
Introduce yourself with a rm
handshake
Always thank your host.
Arrive 10-15 minutes early for
interviews.
Make a good rst impression.
Wear proper attire and be well-
groomed.
Make eye contact.
Listen intently and take time
answering questions.
For more information, call Wilkes
University Career Services at
408-4060; e-mail at careers@
wilkes.edu.
POLICE BLOTTER
HAZLETON City police
reported the following:
A blue Schwinn bicycle with
a tan seat was stolen from a resi-
dence in the 200 block of South
Pine Street on Monday.
Copper pipes were dis-
covered stolen Tuesday from a
residence at 118 E. Second St.
Offcer Walter Mazur was
taken to a hospital after he
crashed a cruiser into a utility
pole at Maple Street and Sherman
Court on April 13. Mazur was
responding to a domestic distur-
bance at the time of the crash.
A gasoline generator was
found in the area of 15th and
Grant streets on Monday.
Police said they arrested
Candice Lindemuth, 27, of
Hazleton, after allegedly stabbing
her husband in the arm during a
domestic dispute in the 600 block
of West 20th Street just before
3 a.m. Tuesday. Lindemuth was
charged with aggravated assault,
simple assault, reckless endanger-
ment and harassment. She was
jailed at the county prison for lack
of $15,000 bail.
WILKES-BARRE City
police reported the following:
State police Vice and Narcot-
ics Unit said they arrested Darryl
Robinson, 22, of Hanover Town-
ship, on charges he sold cocaine
in the area of Blackman and
Loomis streets on Monday.
Robinson was charged with two
counts of possession with intent
to deliver a controlled substance
and a single count of possession
of a controlled substance. He was
jailed at the county prison for lack
of $25,000 bail.
WILKES-BARRE TWP.
Township police reported the
following:
The manager at Wine and
Spirits, Wilkes-Barre Township
Marketplace, reported an un-
known man passed a counterfeit
$100 bill on Friday.
Security at Walmart, Wilkes-
Barre Township Marketplace,
reported an unknown man and
woman stole $169 worth of
merchandise and drove away
in a brown Subaru Legacy on
Saturday.
A 13 and 14-year-old girl
were cited with retail theft after
they allegedly stole $25 worth of
merchandise from FYE, Wyoming
Valley Mall, on Saturday.
PLAINS TWP. Township
police reported the following:
Leonard Tokash Jr., 33, of
Pittston, was cited with public
drunkenness after he was found
intoxicated and sleeping along
North River Street at 11:48 p.m.
on Sunday.
William Laird, 47, of Wyo-
ming, was cited with harassment
after investigating a domestic
disturbance at 47 E. Saylor Ave.
on Monday.
Feds raid headquarters
of Pilot Flying J chain
NASHVILLE, Tenn.
Cleveland Browns owner
Jimmy Haslam said Tuesday
the federal government has
launched a criminal investiga-
tion into rebates offered by the
truck stop chain owned by his
family, including his brother,
Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam.
Agents from the FBI and In-
ternal Revenue Service raided
the Pilot Flying J headquarters
in Knoxville on Monday.
Jimmy Haslam, who is the
CEO of Pilot Flying J, held a
news conference in Knoxville
to conrm the investigation is
criminal, rather than civil, in
nature.
We dont know a lot. It ap-
pears to be centered on a very
insufcient number of cus-
tomers and the application of
rebates, that rebates that were
owed to the customers were
not paid. We of course disagree
with that, the CEO said.
Haslam said subpoenas had
been issued to several mem-
bers of his 23-person sales
force, though he said he was
unable to identify any speci-
cally. Haslam said he had not
been subpoenaed, and no one
has been arrested.
Bill Killian, the U.S. attorney
in Knoxville, told The Associ-
ated Press that four search war-
rants have been served on Pi-
lot, but the reasons have been
sealed by a federal court.
FBI and IRS agents locked
down the Pilot Flying J head-
quarters Monday afternoon
and ordered most employees
out of the building as they con-
ducted their search well past
midnight.
Haslam said essential per-
sonnel were allowed to remain
in the building to ensure the
companys nearly 500 truck
stops had sufcient fuel sup-
plies. It was unclear why the
IRS was involved in the raid,
he said.
It does not involve, as best
we can tell and Im pretty
sure were right any type of
tax issue, he said. So theres
no evasion of tax or federal
taxes, which candidly is what
your suppliers, particularly fuel
suppliers, worry about.
Haslam said that the com-
pany is launching an internal
investigation, and that his re-
sponsibilities as owner of the
Browns wont be affected. He
plans to travel to Cleveland this
week and next as the team pre-
pares for the NFL draft, he said.
First of all, I apologize, be-
cause the last thing we ever
want to do is put any kind of
blemish on the city of Cleve-
land which weve grown to
love or the Browns, he said.
So I personally feel bad about
that, even though I dont think
weve done anything wrong.
Earlier Tuesday, the Repub-
lican governor made an im-
promptu visit to the press suite
in the legislative ofce com-
plex in Nashville to discuss the
raid. He said that he had not
been contacted by federal au-
thorities and that he was going
to concentrate on being gov-
ernor and doing things I can
control.
Bill Haslam said he has not
had an active day-to-day man-
agement role in the company
in 15 years. He defended keep-
ing his unspecied holdings in
the privately owned company
outside of a blind trust he es-
tablished for his other invest-
ments after he was elected
governor in 2010.
N
PROPOSED 42" FRANKLIN LOOP
PROPOSED 42" DORRANCE LOOP
LUZERNE COUNTY
CARBON COUNTY
MONROE COUNTY
LACKAWANNA
COUNTY
Proposed loops
Existing Transco pipelines
County lines
LEGEND
PROPOSED 42 DORRANCE & FRANKLIN LOOP
Dorrance, Slocum, Tunkhannock, Tobyhanna & Buck Townships
Luzerne & Monroe Counties, Pennsylvania
Leidy Southeast Project Location Map
Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Company, LLC
Scale in miles
0 2 4 6 8
WILLIAMS Informational Open House Event
Williams operates the Transco natural gas pipeline, delivering much of the
natural gas consumed in this region.
Williams is evaluating expanding a segment of the Transco natural gas pipeline in
Luzerne / Monroe counties, PA. The company is studying expanding facilities along
its pipeline right-of-way in Tobyhanna, Tunkhannock and Buck townships and also in
Dorrance and Slocum townships, in addition to making modications at its existing
compressor facility in Bear Creek, PA.
The proposal is currently in the planning phase. Williams is seeking early input from
citizens, government entities and other interested parties to identify and address potential
siting issues. You are invited to the public workshop to learn more about the proposal and
the federal regulatory process, review maps and provide feedback. Williams anticipates
nalizing a project proposal and ling a formal application with the Federal Energy
Regulatory Commission (FERC) in the fall of 2013. A representative from FERC will be
in attendance at the meeting.
(800) WILLIAMS | williams.com
2013 The Williams Companies, Inc.
Join us for an informational open house Tuesday, April 16,
from 6:30 8:30 pm at the Poconos Inn: Poconos One Manor Drive,
Pocono Manor, PA, and Wednesday, April 17, 6:30 8:30 pm at
the Woodlands Inn: 1073 Highway 315, Wilkes-Barre, PA.
We make energy happen.
For more information, call:
866-455-9103
www.williams.com/leidysoutheast
Browns owner who is rms
CEO conrms investigation
criminal in nature.
By ERIK SCHELZIG
and ADRIAN SAINZ
Associated Press
EDITORIAL
Wyoming Area taxpayer
urges support for Stofko
I
n response to the letter to the editor
from the Bonin political group, Id like to
say thank you for pointing things out to
our Wyoming Area taxpayers.
Thank you for pointing out the folly of
the past elections where people formed
a political group before the election was
even held. Thank you for pointing out the
necessity of electing an independent, no-
political-history candidate.
Most important, thank you for all but
endorsing the candidacy of Jerry Stofko
who ts your exact formula for an excel-
lent member of the Wyoming Area Board
of Education.
No taxpayer can ignore the war record
of Jerry and how he set aside his well be-
ing to do the job America expected, and
now supports him to do the job Wyoming
Area taxpayers expects of him. After
graduating from Wyoming Area, Jerry
Stofko established a proven record of de-
fending our country and is now stepping
up to heed the call of our children.
As a homeowner who believed that
Wyoming Area had many excellent direc-
tors over the districts history, I cant
understand why a newly formed political
group would refuse to be afiated with
any of them.
I understand the majority of the Bonin
Political Group did not attend Wyoming
Area; therefore, I can see how they
missed many successful businessman,
college professors, rst- class educators
and board members with great common
sense who helped make Wyoming Area
one of the best school districts in North-
eastern Pennsylvania.
I ask veterans, taxpayers and friends to
give their votes and voice to Jerry Stofko
in his bid for a seat on the Wyoming Area
Board of Education.
Vincent J. Holland
Wyoming High School Graduate
U.S. Army veteran and homeowner
Writer says bill needed
to keep religious freedom
S
upport H.R. 268 and use it to counter
the God haters desperate attempts
to defeat this critical bill that ofcially
recognizes the importance of God in
America. We, the people, support arch-
bishop Nedd in his efforts to defeat the
international cabal of atheists that will be
traveling to Washington, D.C. to defeat
this bill. We, the people, must preserve
Americas religious heritage.
The United States of America was
founded by enlightened individuals
who believed in God. Faith has played a
critical and positive role in our nations
growth and development, especially
within the U.S. military.
A vocal minority of bigoted and radical
atheists wishes to deny the important
role God plays in lives of our people by
preventing military chaplains from pray-
ing as they see t.
It is important to stand up for our
brave men and women in uniform and
allow them their right to worship God.
U.S. Representative Walter B. Jones
introduced House Resolution 268 in the
11th Congress, which explicitly allows
military chaplains the freedom to pray in
a public in a manner consistent with their
own religious beliefs.
Support the reintroduction of House
Resolution 268 in the 113th Congress
and to sign on as an ofcial co-sponsor of
this resolution in order to stop the radical
atheist lobby from robbing members of
the armed services of their God-given
rights. Deliver your support of H.R. 268
to U.S. Rep. Lou Barletta.
Norma Johnson
Nanticoke
Reader is solidly behind
the right to bear arms
S
ince the dawn of man, there have been
evil people who just seem to want to
cause death and destruction.
Maybe they suffer from mental illness,
maybe they werent told often enough
that they were loved while they were
growing up or maybe they are just plain
evil.
Most people have heard of the state-
ment ghting re with re.
It is a right vs. wrong world out there.
Too many good people have come face to
face with these not so good people and
have had to protect themselves and/or
family from them.
When it all started, these good people
may have only had to sticks or rocks to
protect against sticks or rocks.
As time progressed, it became spears,
knifes, swords, etc
You see where Im going with this.
When guns were invented, evil people
denitely used them and the good needed
to be on an even keel to protect them-
selves.
As laws increasingly regulated guns,
the law-abiding citizen had to jump
through more hoops just to defend them-
selves. And with some of the unconstitu-
tional laws being proposed these days, it
will become more and more difcult to
protect ourselves from the evil people on
even ground.
Now, I know the criminal element have
to go through the same checks to get
the guns they carry Oh wait, no they
dont. they actually get a gun illegally,
possibly through some other bonehead
who should have had the gun locked up
and known better, or just out and out buy
it illegally on the street.
The Declaration of Independence states
(in small part):
We hold these truths to be self-evident,
that all men are created equal, that they
are endowed by their Creator with certain
unalienable Rights that among these are
Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happi-
ness. That to secure these rights,
Governments are instituted among
Men, deriving their just powers from the
consent of the governed, That when-
ever any Form of Government becomes
destructive of these ends, it is the Right
of the People to alter or to abolish it,
and to institute new Government, laying
its foundation on such principles and
organizing its powers in such form, as to
them shall seem most likely to effect their
Safety and Happiness.
This portion may not reference speci-
cally about the right to bear arms, but
is does say that if government becomes
destructive to what is guaranteed; that
is safety and happiness among others,
Americans have the right to remove it
and institute a new one.
The Second Amendment to the Consti-
tution guarantees that the right to bear
arms shall not be infringed.
If free Americans choose to protect
themselves, no one can take away that
God-given right.
Dave Yurko
Wilkes-Barre
Handling of towing issue
shames valley resident
I
used to be in the business years ago. If
anyone wants to put someone down go
to PennDOT and get all the qualications
needed to apply for licenses and what is
needed to stay legal.
Anything from towing to dealer to
needed bonding to many other things
needed to be in a legitimate business. I
wouldnt get involved but the elderly lady
situation bothers me.
Also the mayor bothers me on how he
is handling this situation. Initially he said
he was concerned about the other towing
contract and how the city was sued.
In my opinion, when this is all said and
done, the other lawsuit is going to look
like a ea on a dog. I think the eas are
totally infested on the mange.
This is so ridiculous that this being
allowed that I am totally ashamed to live
in this valley.
Tom Yancy
Forty Fort
Reader is all in favor
of ve-day mail delivery
C
ongress, for whatever reason shot down
the proposed ve-day postal delivery.
All you hear is talk about Saturday deliv-
eries.
Who said it has to be Saturday as the
day when mail isnt delivered? Five-day
delivery could mean any two days out of
the week.
Personally, Sunday would be one of
them. And how about a Wednesday?
Besides saving the USPS service a lot
of money, it will save many gallons of
gasoline.
I suppose they had their reasons
against Saturdays, but the carriers prob-
ably wouldve liked it.
John Mihalchik Sr.
Ashley
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013 PAgE 9A TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com S E RV I NG T HE P UB L I C T RUS T S I NC E 1 8 8 1
OUR OPINION: ONE VERY OLD OaK
Let trees majesty
outweigh money
S
AVE THE TREE.
In a world where, by
some estimates, an acre
of rain forest is lost every
second, this seems staggeringly
simple. Its win-win. Pardon the
pun, but knowing the facts, who
wouldnt root for the tree?
As staffer Mary Therese Bieb-
el reported in Saturdays edition
of The Times Leader, a 75-foot-
tall swamp white oak in Swoy-
ersville is a healthy and rare bit
of living history, surely born
when Swoyersville was naught
but swamp, and likely before
Billy Penn showed up in 1682
to name a commonwealth after
himself and, not incidentally,
after all the trees he saw.
Yet this majestic survivor of
some 300 years is threatened not
by disease, disaster or disinter-
est. It is threatened by a nearby
house.
An insurance company has
deemed the mighty oak too seri-
ous a risk to the house it shades.
One branch in particular looms
over the humble home, almost
certainly constructed with wood
from trees much younger and
much inferior to the swamp oak
itself.
But the offending branch
could be removed with the tree
preserved, or other measures
could surely be taken to keep
both house and historic tree ful-
ly intact. A tree expert has vol-
unteered services; shame on the
insurance company if it does not
take advantage of such an offer.
Indeed, it should compensate
the man for his effort at reduc-
ing insurance risk.
This isnt an act of epic or
monumental importance. The
rain forests will likely continue
to be razed at an alarming rate
regardles of this oaks fate. But
we dont need to see the forest
for the trees here, we just need
to see the tree for what it is.
If this tree could talk, it would
need no intercession; the world
would listen with rapt interest at
what it witnessed and endured.
But of course, it cannot speak.
So it falls to all of us to, as Dr.
Seusss Lorax said, to speak for
the tree (just the one, this time,
though it is quite real and not
merely a metaphor).
And the message is superbly
simple, reminiscent of a certain
sneaker company:
Just save it.
MaLLaRD FILLMORE DOONESBURY
PRASHANT SHITUT
President and CEO
JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ
Vice President/Executive Editor
Editorial Board
Tragedy, terror
at the finish line
T
HE BOSTON Mara-
thon is a rite of spring
in NewEngland, one of
the great festive days of
the year. Manys the time weve
gone up early for the Red Sox
game and then walked over to
Kenmore Square to watch the
runners scoot or struggle past.
The city is jammed with millions
of happy people.
That someone would wreak
death on this event stretches the
bounds of sick behavior yet
again.
Witnesses inside the Fairmont
Copley Plaza Hotel heard booms
that sounded like thunder near
the nish line. Crying, bleed-
ing people ed the scene while
emergency crews tended to vic-
tims. There was blood on the
ground near the nish line.
At this writing, three people
are dead and more than 140 in-
jured including some with
lost limbs after two bombs
went off near the nish line. The
ordnance suggests a possible
terrorist attack. Who would do
such a thing and why is
still a mystery.
We dont know if the perpe-
trators are foreign or domestic,
but it is nonetheless hard not
to think this country does need
a higher level of mental health
screening. Just four months af-
ter the massacre of 20 children
and six educators at a school in
our state, it is sad and frustrat-
ing to see another senseless at-
tack in a neighboring state, at an
event that draws countless Con-
necticut runners and spectators.
Now is the time to get en-
gaged, as the people for whom
Patriots Day is named did, and
focus on security, on commu-
nity and on individual freedom.
Enough.
The Hartford Courant
MaIL BaG | LETTERS FROM REaDERS
OTHER OPINION: MaRaTHON BOMBING
qUOTE OF THE DaY
This is something Ive never seen in my 25 years
here this amount of carnage in the civilian popu-
lation. This is what we expect from war.
Dr. Alasdair Conn
Chief of emergency services at Massachusetts General Hospital, after bomb-
ings at the Boston Marathon killed at three people and injured more than 140.
CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMESLEADER
Joe Weidlich of Weidlich
Brothers Tree Service stands
near a 300-plus-year-old
White Oak tree that an insur-
ance company wants cut
down because it is so close
to the house at 170 Owen St.
in Swoyersville. Joe said he
would trim the tree to try and
save it.
8
1
0
2
7
7
(570) 825-8508
Rain outside got you looking at snow inside?
Switch to Service Electric Cable TV
for a consistent crystal clear picture.
www.sectv.com
Sponsored By:
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106/68
Chihuahua
84/44
Los Angeles
74/54
Washington
76/60
New York
68/50
Miami
85/74
Atlanta
82/63
Detroit
54/48
Houston
82/72
Kansas City
60/47
Chicago
52/51
Minneapolis
38/34
El Paso
82/51
Denver
32/18
Billings
38/19
San Francisco
66/48
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57/44
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56/42
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54/36
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SEVEN-DAY FORECAST
HIGH
LOW
TEMPERATURES
ALMANAC NATIONAL FORECAST
PRECIPITATION
Lehigh
Delaware
Sunrise Sunset
Moonrise Moonset
Today Today
Today Today
Susquehanna Stage Chg Fld Stg
RIVER LEVELS
ACROSS THE REGION TODAY
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation today. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Shown is
todays weather.
Temperatures are
todays highs and
tonights lows.
SUN & MOON
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy,
c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
Wilkes-Barre
Scranton
Philadelphia
Reading
Pottsville
Allentown
Harrisburg
State College
Williamsport
Towanda
Binghamton
Syracuse
Albany
Poughkeepsie
New York
PHILADELPHIA
THE JERSEY SHORE
THU SAT
SUN MON
FRI
TUE
TODAY
64
48
Mainly
cloudy
66 56
Clouds
breaking;
cooler
57 33
Mostly
sunny
57 34
Mostly
sunny
61 41
A shower
possible
72 44
Partly
sunny
59 36
Clouds
giving
way to
some sun
HEATING DEGREE DAYS
Degree days are an indicator of energy needs. The more the
total degree days, the more energy is necessary to heat.
Yesterday 7
Month to date 275
Season to date 5424
Last season to date 4606
Normal season to date 5767
Anchorage 38/23/pc 41/26/s
Baltimore 72/54/t 72/58/c
Boston 62/44/pc 56/50/c
Buffalo 56/46/pc 74/60/t
Charlotte 81/60/pc 80/62/pc
Chicago 52/51/r 68/44/r
Cleveland 60/52/c 78/59/t
Dallas 82/67/t 70/40/t
Denver 32/18/sn 39/24/pc
Honolulu 85/72/s 84/71/s
Indianapolis 74/63/t 78/50/t
Las Vegas 66/51/s 70/52/s
Milwaukee 44/44/r 63/41/r
New Orleans 85/70/pc 82/59/c
Norfolk 75/58/t 74/61/pc
Okla. City 74/48/t 55/31/pc
Orlando 87/66/t 85/68/pc
Phoenix 75/55/s 76/57/s
Pittsburgh 68/57/pc 82/63/t
Portland, ME 60/35/s 52/43/pc
St. Louis 79/68/t 77/42/t
San Francisco 66/48/s 68/49/s
Seattle 57/44/c 55/48/r
Wash., DC 76/60/t 77/62/c
Bethlehem 2.35 -0.03 16
Wilkes-Barre 9.73 -1.42 22
Towanda 6.08 -1.26 16
Port Jervis 3.81 -0.26 18
In feet as of 7 a.m. Tuesday.
Today Thu Today Thu Today Thu
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. 2013
Apr 18 Apr 25
May 2
First Full
Last New
May 9
6:21 a.m.
11:32 a.m.
7:46 p.m.
1:25 a.m.
THE POCONOS
Highs: 57-63. Lows: 39-45. Clouds yielding to some sun today.
Increasing clouds tonight with a stray shower.
Highs: 62-68. Lows: 49-55. A shower or thunderstorm in the morning;
otherwise, clouds breaking today. Plenty of clouds tonight.
THE FINGER LAKES
Highs: 55-61. Lows: 38-44. Partly sunny today. Increasing cloudiness
tonight with a shower in spots.
NEW YORK CITY
High: 68. Low: 50. A passing shower in the morning; otherwise, clouds
breaking and mild today.
High: 70. Low: 52. A shower in the morning; otherwise, clouds giving
way to some sun today.
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton International Airport
through 7 p.m. Tuesday
High/low 64/51
Normal high/low 59/39
Record high 88 (2012)
Record low 20 (1943)
24 hrs ending 7 p.m. Trace
Month to date 0.73"
Normal m-t-d 1.77"
Year to date 5.70"
Normal y-t-d 8.72"
64/48
63/46
70/52
68/49
66/49
67/48
68/53
63/52
66/50
62/42
56/45
58/41
62/40
64/42
68/50
Summary: Snow will extend from Colorado to Minnesota today. Showers and
a few thunderstorms will reach from the central Plains to the Ohio Valley and
South. Severe storms will occur from central Texas to Missouri.
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013 N E W S PAGE 10A
Letter containing deadly ricin sent to Miss. senator
WASHINGTON An enve-
lope addressed to Sen. Roger
Wicker of Mississippi tested
positive Tuesday for ricin, a po-
tentially fatal poison, congres-
sional ofcials said, heightening
concerns about terrorism a day
after a bombing killed three and
left more than 170 injured at the
Boston Marathon.
One senator, Claire McCaskill
of Missouri,
said authori-
ties have a sus-
pect in the fast-
moving case,
but she did not
say if an ar-
rest had been
made. She
added the let-
ter was from an individual who
frequently writes lawmakers.
The FBI and U.S. Capitol Po-
lice are both investigating.
Terrance W. Gainer, the Sen-
ate sergeant-at-arms, said in an
emailed message to Senate of-
ces that the envelope to Wick-
er had no obviously suspicious
outside markings, bore a post-
mark of Memphis, Tenn., and
lacked a return address.
He added there was no indica-
tion that there are other suspect
mailings, but urged caution.
The letter was discovered at a
mail processing plant in Prince
Georges County in suburban
Maryland, said Sen. Dick Durbin,
D-Ill.
Wickers ofce issued a state-
ment saying any inquiries re-
garding member security must
be directed to the United States
Capitol Police.
Capitol Police had no immedi-
ate comment.
But Majority Leader Harry
Reid told reporters of the letter,
and other lawmakers said they
had been provided information
by the ofce of the Senate ser-
geant-at-arms.
Milt Leitenberg, a University
of Maryland bioterrorism expert,
said ricin is a poison derived
from the same bean that makes
castor oil. He said it must be in-
gested to be fatal.
Luckily, this was discovered
at the processing center off
premises, Durbin said. He said
all mail to senators is roasted,
toasted, sliced and opened be-
fore it ever gets to them.
One law enforcement ofcial
said evidence of ricin appeared
on preliminary eld tests of the
letter, although such results are
not deemed conclusive without
further testing. The ofcial spoke
on condition of anonymity be-
cause the investigation remains
active.
The discovery evoked memo-
ries of the days after the terrorist
attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, when
mail laced with anthrax began
appearing in post ofces, news-
rooms and congressional ofces.
That included letters sent to
Sen. Tom Daschle, D-S.D., who
was Senate majority leader, and
Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt. Two
Senate ofce buildings were
closed during that investigation.
Overall, ve people died and
17 others became ill. The FBI at-
tributed the attack to a govern-
ment scientist who committed
suicide in 2008.
More immediately, though,
the discovery came as lawmakers
were demanding answers to the
attacks in Boston a day earlier.
There was no evidence of a
connection between the bomb-
ings and the letter addressed to
Wicker, a Mississippi Republi-
can.
Extra security planned
at Harveys Lake race
HARVEYS LAKE The
run will go on.
A eld of 500 runners with
500 to 600 spectators are ex-
pected at Saturdays Wilkes-
Barre Racing Glen Summit
Spring Water Run at Harveys
Lake.
Despite the horric bomb
blasts near the nish line
of the Boston Marathon on
Monday, there were no plans
to cancel the Harveys Lake
race, Wilkes-Barre Racing
Executive Director Rich Pais
said Tuesday.
One thing runners and
spectators will see is a height-
ened police presence around
the 8.2-mile course.
I have contacted the state
police for assistance, and (po-
lice) departments in the Back
Mountain will be here to step
up security, said Harveys
Lake Police Chief Charles
Musial.
Police canine units and
paramedics also will be on
hand.
Weve never had any prob-
lems at any of our races, Pais
said.
You worry about a copy-
cat trying to do something
goofy. We want to do every-
thing we can to make sure
our runners, athletes and
their families are safe. This is
what we have to do. You can
never overreach when plan-
ning security.
Musial and Pais are asking
spectators to keep their bags
and other personal belong-
ings secured in their vehicles.
Other races and outdoor
events are being held with
more security. According to
The Associated Press:
Penn States police chief
says his department is evalu-
ating plans for Saturdays
spring football game and
will improve security where
needed.
Chief Tyrone Parham
on Tuesday didnt divulge
specic security measures
related to the Blue-White
intrasquad scrimmage at
Beaver Stadium that cul-
minates Penn State spring
practice and other sporting
events on campus, includ-
ing the NCAA mens gym-
nastics championship Friday
through Sunday.
Patrice Matamoros, ex-
ecutive director of the Dicks
Sporting Goods Pittsburgh
Marathon on May 5, said
the marathon already was
planning very tight security
efforts, including periodic
bomb sweeps, security of-
cers along the entire route
and strict control over the
start and nish lines.
Organizers have been cog-
nizant of security since it had
its own bomb scare in 2010
when an unattended device
that turned out to be a micro-
wave was found near the n-
ish line.
Personnel throughout the
marathon route have been
trained to get people to one
of about 100 evacuation cen-
ters if something should oc-
cur, she said.
Elsewhere, the Pennsylva-
nia Emergency Management
Agency did not increase its
terrorism alert status on
Tuesday, and state police
have no plans to increase
patrols at the Wilkes-Barre/
Scranton International Air-
port in Pittston Township or
at the Susquehanna Steam
Electric Station in Salem
Township in the wake of the
Boston explosions.
Patrols were heightened at
the airport and nuclear facil-
ity after the terrorists attacks
on Sept. 11, 2001.
President Barack Obama
ordered all U.S. ags to be
lowered at all government
buildings out of respect for
the victims.
Gov. Tom Corbett on Tues-
day followed by asking that
Pennsylvania ags be low-
ered to half-staff at all state
facilities.
Police canine units are
among the precautions for
Saturdays 8.2-mile run.
By EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
wounds and abdominal lacera-
tions. On Tuesday night, CNN
was reporting on its website
that the third fatality was a Chi-
nese national Boston University
grad student.
Jeff Bauman Jr., a man pic-
tured in an Associated Press
photo being rushed from the
scene Monday in a wheelchair,
lost both legs. Rescuers took the
27-year-old to Boston Medical
Center, where doctors had to
amputate because of extensive
vascular and bone damage.
Unfortunately my son was
just in the wrong place at the
wrong time, his father, Jeff
Bauman Sr., wrote in a Face-
book post.
The younger Bauman, who
had been at the race to cheer on
his girlfriend, had to have fur-
ther surgery because of uid in
his abdomen.
I just cant explain whats
wrong with people today, to do
this to people, the father wrote
of the darkness that stained the
race on Patriots Day. Im re-
ally starting to lose faith in our
country.
While mourning the dead
Tuesday, friends and neighbors
tried to focus on positive memo-
ries of cherished ones whose
deaths still seemed unreal to
them.
I just cant get a handle on
it, Jack Cunningham, a long-
time friend of little Martin and
his family, said. In an instant,
life changes.
Cunningham recalled how,
as a pint-sized preschooler, the
boy had insisted on getting out
of his stroller during a 5K race
in South Boston. As soon as his
momlet himout to run with the
rest of the family, Martin took
off along the rainy race course.
He was just having a ball,
splashing in every puddle, Cun-
ningham said.
The boys father, Bill Richard,
released a statement thanking
friends, family and strangers
for their support after his sons
death.
Richards wife, Denise, and
the couples 6-year-old daughter,
Jane, suffered serious injuries in
the blasts. Their older son, Hen-
ry, wasnt hurt. Two neighbors
said Jane lost one of her legs in
the attack.
My dear son, Martin, has
died from injuries sustained in
the attack on Boston, Richard
said. My wife and daughter are
both recovering from serious
injuries. We thank our family
and friends, those we know and
those we have never met, for
their thoughts and prayers. I ask
that you continue to pray for my
family as we remember Martin.
U.S. Rep. Stephen Lynch, a
family friend, said Martin and
his family were trying to get
over the race barriers and into
the street after the rst blast,
when the second bomb struck.
They were looking in the
crowd as the runners were com-
ing to see if they could identify
some of their friends when the
bomb hit, said Lynch, who has
known the Richards for 25 years.
Bill Richard, a runner and cy-
cling enthusiast who had stayed
out of the race because of an
injury, had to have several ball
bearings removed from his leg,
Lynch said.
On Tuesday, a candle burned
on the stoop of the familys
single-family home in the citys
Dorchester section, and the
word Peace was written in
chalk on the front walkway. A
childs bicycle helmet lay over-
turned near the front lawn.
Wicker
Discovery brings back
memories of tainted letters
received in the wake of 9/11.
By DONNA CASSATA
Associated Press
Continued from Page 1A
VICTIMS
toring landmarks, government
buildings, transit hubs and
sporting events. Security was
especially tight in Boston, with
bomb-snifng dogs checking
Amtrak passengers luggage at
South Station and transit police
patrolling with ries.
They can give me a cavity
search right now and Id be per-
fectly happy, said Daniel Wood,
a video producer fromNewYork
City who was waiting for a train.
Homeland Security Secretary
Janet Napolitano said there was
no evidence the bombings were
part of a wider plot. But she
said security was stepped up as
a precaution.
Similar pressure-cooker ex-
plosives have been used in Af-
ghanistan, India, Nepal and Pak-
istan, according to a July 2010
intelligence report by the FBI
and Homeland Security. Also,
one of the three devices used in
the May 2010 Times Square at-
tempted bombing was a pressure
cooker, the report said.
Placed carefully, such devices
provide little or no indication of
an impending attack, the report
said.
The Pakistani Taliban, which
claimed responsibility for the
2010 attempt in Times Square,
has denied any role in the Bos-
ton Marathon attack.
The two bombs blew up about
10 seconds and around 100 yards
apart Monday near the nish
line of the 26.2-mile race, tearing
off limbs, knocking people off
their feet and leaving the streets
stained with blood and strewn
with broken glass. The dead in-
cluded an 8-year-old boy.
We started grabbing tourni-
quets and started tying legs. A
lot of people amputated, said
Roupen Bastajian, a state troop-
er from Smitheld, R.I., who had
just nished the race when he
heard the explosions.
Gov. Deval Patrick said that
contrary to earlier reports, no
unexploded bombs were found.
Federal investigators said no
one had claimed responsibility
for the bombings, which took
place at the worlds best-known
distance race, held every year on
one of Bostons biggest holidays,
Patriots Day.
We will go to the ends of the
Earth to identify the subject or
subjects who are responsible
for this despicable crime, and
we will do everything we can to
bring them to justice, said Rich-
ard DesLauriers, FBI agent in
charge in Boston.
He said investigators had re-
ceived voluminous tips and
were interviewing witnesses and
analyzing the crime scene.
Boston police and reghter
unions announced a $50,000 re-
ward for information leading to
arrests in the bombing.
At a news conference, police
and federal agents repeatedly ap-
pealed for any video, audio and
photos taken by marathon spec-
tators, even images that people
might not think are signicant.
There has to be hundreds,
if not thousands, of photos and
videos that might help investi-
gators, state police Col. Timothy
Alben said.
Boston Police Commissioner
Edward Davis said investigators
also gathered a large number
of surveillance tapes from busi-
nesses in the area and intend to
go through the videos frame by
frame.
This is probably one of the
most photographed areas in the
country yesterday, he said.
FBI agents searched an apart-
ment in the Boston suburb of
Revere overnight, and investi-
gators were seen leaving with
brown paper bags, plastic trash
bags and a duffel bag. But it was
unclear whether the tenant had
anything to do with the attack.
Continued from Page 1A
MARATHON
AP PHOTO
Flowers sit at a police barrier Tuesday near the nish line of the
Boston Marathon, memorializing the three people killed there.
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THE TIMES LEADER WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013 timesleader.com
PAT SUMMERALL 1930-2013
Super voice gone at 82
Former NFL
player
remembered
as John
Maddens
play-by-play
partner for 21
years.
DALLAS Pat Summerall, the
deep-voiced NFL player-turned-
broadcaster who spent half of his
four decades calling sports famously
paired with John Madden, died Tues-
day. He was 82.
Susie Wiles, Summeralls daughter,
said her father died in Dallas.
He was an extraordinary man and
a wonderful father, Wiles said. I
know he will be greatly missed.
Summerall was part of network
television broadcasts for 16 Super
Bowls. His last championship game
was for Fox on Feb. 3, 2002, also his
last game with longtime partner Mad-
den. The popular duo worked togeth-
er for 21 years, moving to Fox in 1994
after years as the lead team for CBS.
At the end of their final broadcast
together, Madden described Sum-
merall as a treasure and the spirit
of the National Football League in
a tribute to the partner that comple-
mented the former coach so well.
You are what the NFL is all about,
what pro football is all about, and
more important, what a man is all
about and what a gentleman is all
about, Madden said.
As former teammate and broadcast-
er Frank Gifford put it in an accompa-
nying video tribute: America is very
comfortable with Pat Summerall.
Summerall played 10 NFL seasons
By STEPHEN HAWKINS
AP Sports Writer
See SUMMERALL, Page 7B
AP FILE PHOTO
Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones, left, talks with CBS com-
mentator Pat Summerall in Irving, Texas in 1994. Summerall,
the NFL player-turned-broadcaster whose deep, resonant voice
called games for more than 40 years, has died at the age of 82.
A H L
Kolarik
has shot
at being
top scorer
Chad Kolarik has a chance to
do something no other Wilkes-
Barre/Scranton Penguin has
ever done.
With two games left in the
regular season,
Kolarik is just
three points
away from be-
ing the AHLs
leading scorer,
trailing Rock-
fords Brandon
Pirri and Her-
sheys Jeff Taffe, who are both
tied at 70. Kolariks 31 goals
are two behind Syracuses Tyler
Johnson and Matt Fraser of Tex-
as for the league lead.
No Penguin has ever led the
AHL in scoring. The closest was
Janne Pesonen, who finished
fourth with 82 points in 2008-
2009.
But now that the Penguins
have locked up a playoff spot and
the fifth seed is pretty much a
given, there isnt a whole lot to
play for when the season winds
down this weekend.
But that doesnt mean that
Kolarik wont get the ice time he
needs to have a chance at lock-
ing up the scoring title.
When you coach players with
that type of talent you want to
see them rewarded for their
hard work, said head coach
John Hynes about how much ice
time Kolarik will get this week-
end. Its definitely something
you take into consideration as a
coach. Its great for him and our
organization if he has the oppor-
tunity to win it, and it would be
special in his career, so well defi-
nitely keep it in mind.
If some of the Penguins regu-
lars do sit a bit this weekend, its
not because Hynes is worried
about keeping them healthy. He
said its more important to make
sure theyre sharp and game-
ready when the playoffs roll
around and that will determine
how much ice time each player
receives this weekend.
For some that might be two
games, and some it just might be
how we practice. Its not about
Penguin could be first player
in team history to win league
scoring title.
By TOMVENESKY
tvenesky@timesleader.com
See PENS, Page 7B
Kolarik
A marathon course runs 26.2 miles
along an open road. Much tougher to se-
cure than an arena with doors and walls.
Yet across the U.S. and around the
world, from West Bend, Wis., and Lon-
don this weekend, to Nashville, Tenn.,
next week and Copenhagen next month,
organizers of road races are trying to
figure out how to improve security after
the Boston Marathon bombings.
Paris Marathon director Joel Laine,
whose race was held earlier this month,
put it this way Tuesday: There will be a
before and after-Boston from now on.
Still, with thousands and some-
times hundreds of thousands of spec-
tators and entrants scattered along the
route, there are limits to how much can
be done to protect everyone, marathon
officials, experts and runners cautioned.
They spoke in dozens of interviews with
the AP a day after a pair of bombs went
off seconds apart near the finish line in
Boston, killing three people, including
an 8-year-old boy, and injuring more
than 170 others.
Two men in
hazardous ma-
terials suits put
numbers on the
shattered glass
and debris as
they investigate
the scene at
the first bomb-
ing on Boylston
Street in Boston
Tuesday near
the finish line of
the 2013 Boston
Marathon, a day
after two blasts
killed three and
injured over 170
people.
AP PHOTO
B O S T O N M A R AT H O N B O M B I N G S
Officials know better security difficult
By HOWARD FENDRICH
AP Sports Writer
See MARATHON, Page 7B
NATI ONAL FOOTBAL L L EAGUE
AP PHOTO
Philadelphia Eagles coach Chip Kelly speaks during a news conference at the teams training facility on Tuesday in Philadelphia.
PHILADELPHIA Chip
Kelly has three starting quarter-
backs if his first practice was an
indication.
Michael Vick, Nick Foles and
Dennis Dixon each took reps
with the starting unit when the
Philadelphia Eagles took the
field Tuesday for the first time
since Kelly replaced Andy Reid
as the head coach.
Which quarterback will line
up under center when the
Eagles play their first regular-
season game in September? No
one knows, including Kelly.
There wasnt one set guy
that just went with the ones
the entire day, Kelly said. All
those guys got an opportunity
to roll through.
Its April 16, so were not
playing until next September.
Were going to use the full avail-
able time for us to make a full
evaluation of what it is. I think
it fosters competition. I think
those guys love competition.
Thats why theyre in that posi-
tion, and they know it.
The former Oregon coach
compared his depth chart to a
seating chart. He said its way
too early to determine starters
at several positions and this
pre-draft camp is all about get-
ting players familiar with his
system.
I think our guys really un-
derstand and I think everybody
right now knows where they
stand, and thats a big thing
for us, he said. Theres not a
lot of gray area. Its everybody
knows were all going to get a
lot of reps. We want to get film
on tape so we can teach. Really
Kelly era starts in Philly
Eagles on field for first time under ex-Oregon boss
Its April 16, so were not playing until next
September. Were going to use the full available
time for us to make a full evaluation of what it is.
I think it fosters competition. I think those guys
love competition. Thats why theyre in that
position, and they know it.
Chip Kelly
See EAGLES, Page 5B
P S U F O O T B A L L
New-look
O-line
will debut
Saturday
By DEREK LEVARSE
dlevarse@timesleader.com
John Urschel, taking a break
from football practice and teach-
ing math at Penn State, had a dif-
ferent lesson to give to reporters.
The most recognizable mem-
ber of the Nittany Lions offen-
sive line wanted to shed some
light on his teammates. Return-
ing starters like Donovan Smith
and Miles Dieffenbach. Seniors
stepping into starting roles like
Ty Howle and Adam Gress. And
more candidates like Eric Shrive
and Angelo Mangiro.
Theres a difference between
being on the inside of the foot-
ball team as one of the players
and being on the outside cov-
ering it, Urschel said in his
usual polite and deliberate tone.
Theres a big information gap.
Id say this is one of the things.
What others might see as an
issue having to replace cen-
ter Matt Stankiewitch and right
tackle Mike Farrell Urschel
sees as a strength of the team
headed into Saturdays Blue-
White Game.
Barring any lingering injuries,
the Lions first-team line will fea-
ture, from left to right, Smith,
Dieffenbach, Howle, Urschel and
Gress.
Urschel spoke at length about
his admiration for Howle, a fifth-
year senior stepping in for an
Nittany Lions will conclude
spring practice with
Saturdays Blue-White Game.
See PSU, Page 5B
By ROB MAADDI
AP Pro Football Writer
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER PAGE 2B WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013 S P O R T S
ON THE MARK
By MARK DUDEK
For The Times Leader
Its yet another big 16-race slate this evening at The Mohegan
Sun at Pocono Downs, with two divisions of the Bobby Weiss Series
once again on the card. Tonight its the 3-year-old colt and gelding
trotters the star attraction.
BEST BET: DEFIANT DONATO (15TH)
VALUE PLAY: DILIGENT PROSPECT (1ST)
POST TIME 6:30 p.m.
All races one mile
First-$13,000 Cond.Pace;n/w 2 pm races life
3 Diligent Prospect A.McCarthy 3-2-3 Time to break the ice 4-1
4 Sapere Hanover J.Pavia 1-2-3 Certainly a major player 6-1
5 Lights Go Out J.Morrill 6-1-4 Very competitive opener 7-2
1 Paints Hall M.Kakaley 7-2-7 First start for Fraley 3-1
2 Beat The Beat G.Napolitano 4-2-1 Yonkers invader 9-2
8 Spotlight On J.Bartlett 1-8-5 Won here last Wed 8-1
6 Misssomebeach Blue T.Buter 4-2-3 Cash burner 10-1
7 Meet Gisele M.Miller 3-3-2 First timer 20-1
9 Icommandmyspirit M.Simons 2-4-5 Hopeless from here 15-1
Second-$6,000 Clm.Pace;clm.price $7,500
8 Make A Bundle N E.Carlson 6-2-2 Comes from a hot barn 3-1
4 Final Executive T.Buter 5-1-1 Had win streak snapped 7-2
1 Bathing Beauty A.Siegelman 4-7-6 Benefts from rail 6-1
9 Belluga Babe M.Kakaley 2-7-5 Solid, but stuck outside 4-1
2 Jacks Magic Jewel B.Simpson 9-4-9 10yr old still going 15-1
7 Another Dawn T.Jackson 8-3-4 Little since the claim 8-1
3 Dysnomia Blue Chip M.Simons 7-5-3 Drops, but way off 9-2
5 JK RU Bettor Yet J.Morrill 7-6-4 Not yet 10-1
6 Party At Joyces J.Kakaley 6-8-8 The party is long over 20-1
Third-$8,500 Clm.Pace;clm.price $10,000
6 Jimmy The Terror G.Napolitano 2-7-2 Time to make amends 3-1
1 Hally T.Buter 2-5-6 Raced well in the mud 9-2
2 Skyway Hanover A.Siegelman 1-4-2 Pure grinder 7-2
8 Shes An American J.Morrill 3-1-1 A factor if fnds early spot 8-1
7 Sha Delight A.McCarthy 2-1-5 Nap opted off 4-1
9 Snatch The Fortune T.Jackson 3-3-8 Dover invader 10-1
3 You Little Rascal M.Kakaley 3-7-8 Small indeed 6-1
4 Little Maeve M.Miller 5-6-6 Behind the other little 15-1
5 Nifty Ace J.Pavia 6-8-4 Void of pace 20-1
Fourth-$13,000 Cond.Pace;n/w 2 pm races life
7 Amelia Bluedelia E.Carlson 6-2-5 Been facing better, ready 7-2
2 Stunning Lady J.Pavia 6-4-1 Pavia trains and drives 3-1
6 Art Frenzy M.Romano 3-3-4 Another third in store 4-1
3 Dropping Star M.Simons 1-6-6 Prepped well for comeback 6-1
1 Traveling Jeanie A.McCarthy 2-7-9 Another off a layoff 8-1
9 True Refection G.Napolitano 5-8-3 NJ Stakes flly 15-1
5 Mcarma M.Kakaley 9-4-6 Still very green 9-2
4 Scirocco Caliegirl T.Buter 7-9-5 In tough 10-1
8 Tiger Boudoir B.Simpson 7-7-8 Walloped 20-1
Fifth-$4,500 Clm.Pace;clm.price $5,000
6 Passion Starlet G.Napolitano 1-1-5 Loves to win 5-2
4 Pembroke Lil J.Stratton 4-2-3 Jordan again in for drive 4-1
1 Lepatata A.McCarthy 3-9-2 Again draws the wood 7-2
5 Bond Blue Chip M.Kakaley 4-5-5 Looks for another check 6-1
7 PW Ivory Grin M.Simons 3-2-8 Fast of the wings 5-1
8 Blissfull Dreamer B.Simpson 5-6-7 Sent by team Simpson 8-1
2 Hana Bluegrass J.Morrill 4-7-3 Missed a month 12-1
3 Sammys Magic Day M.Romano 8-6-9 No tricks here 15-1
9 Sand Montana M.Miller 6-5-6 Stuck in reverse 20-1
Sixth-$8,500 Clm.Pace;clm.price $10,000
6 Carnivalocity M.Kakaley 3-1-3 Has all the answers 4-1
3 Sequoia Seelster G.Napolitano 1-2-4 Been solid since purchase 3-1
1 Woes Jet Filly A.Siegelman 1-7-9 A hot commodity 7-2
8 Mrs Battin J.Lynch 3-4-6 Jason just 24yrs of age 8-1
4 Market Dynamics M.Romano 1-6-6 Won last wk at 89-1!! 6-1
5 Smokin N Grinin T.Buter 4-6-3 Marks 2nd start for Buter 9-2
2 Mcace Of Arts A.Napolitano 4-3-3 Makes seasonal debut 20-1
7 Macs Journey M.Simons 7-7-9 Well beaten last several 10-1
9 Twin B Passion J.Morrill 8-1-5 Cant keep up with these 15-1
Seventh-$17,000 Cond.Pace;n/w 6 pm races life
4 Fox Valley Hermia M.Miller 2-2-3 Wont be 1-9 tonight 3-1
3 All Star Player A.McCarthy 3-1-2 Andy doing super so far 7-2
7 We Adore Thee G.Napolitano 4-7-8 Chased favorite last Wed 8-1
6 Aint Got A Home J.Bartlett 1-3-4 In from the Bronx 9-2
2 Bestest Hanover E.Carlson 6-6-5 One better than sixth 4-1
5 We Be American J.Morrill 8-1-6 Hard one to fgure out 6-1
8 Apach Of Luck M.Kakaley 5-8-1 Raced better at Yonkers 10-1
9 Terror To Cam T.Buter 7-2-2 No one is fearing 20-1
1 Fiftyoneffty T.Wing 3-5-3 Dusted 15-1
Eighth-$15,000 Bobby Weiss Series
9 Boy Of Mine H.Parker 2-9-2 Overcomes all obstacles 7-2
1 Wild Smile J.Marshall III 3-3-6 Draws inside main rival 9-2
5 Corleone Hall A.McCarthy 2-7-2 Daley doing well at PD 3-1
3 Marvenue M.Kakaley 4-6-7 Note the driver change 10-1
2 Mr Paige J.Bartlett 3-8-7 Purdy a winless trainer 6-1
8 Kegler Hanover J.Takter Jr 7-4-3 Maiden in tough 4-1
6 MMs Rosebud T.Jackson 3-6-8 Yet to blossom 8-1
7 Team Zordin G.Napolitano 4-2-5 Stays near the rear 15-1
4 Cashco M.Simons 5-7-5 Last of them all 20-1
Ninth-$12,000 Clm.Pace;clm.price $15,000
5 All Day Ray M.Kakaley 7-2-2 Drop in class the difference 3-1
1 Redneck Fortune E.Carlson 5-5-2 Merits a strong look 7-2
3 Nabber Again M.Simons 7-7-5 Carlson opted off 4-1
8 Well Done Hanover G.Napolitano 8-8-8 Lou Pena on comeback 6-1
6 Fanelli Royal T.Jackson 2-4-4 Mickey off to tough start 9-2
2 All Blues D.Miller 8-9-1 Dave Miller catch drives 15-1
4 Nip Pan Tuck W.Mann 1-4-7 Mann with rare visit 8-1
7 Homestake M.Miller 5-4-6 Slow in fnal quarter 10-1
9 Last Chance T A.Siegelman 3-4-6 ..next race please 20-1
Tenth-$19,000 Cond.Trot;n/w $16,000 last 5
4 Magic Tonight A.McCarthy 1-3-1 Comes right back 5-2
2 Zuerest G.Napolitano 1-6-6 Looked solid with Nap up 3-1
8 Spice It Up Lindy T.Jackson 2-2-3 Great late trot 5-1
3 As Yall Like It T.Buter 5-2-1 Just claimed by Buter 4-1
9 Defnitely Mamie J.Morrill 3-4-1 Again draws outside 15-1
6 Keepin The Chips M.Kakaley 3-3-1 Back from Philly 10-1
1 Mr Orlando A.Napolitano 3-1-5 In with toughies 12-1
5 Macs Bad Boy M.Simons 4-3-3 Hugs the pylons 6-1
7 Over and Out J.Bartlett 2-5-1 Out indeed 20-1
Eleventh-$15,000 Cond.Pace;n/w $13,750 last 5
5 Naughtytiltheend M.Miller 1-2-7 Sharp mare 7-2
2 Ole Miss A.Napolitano 3-6-4 Been racing top co. at Meadows 3-1
1 Up Front Kellie Jo G.Napolitano 7-3-1 Right behind brother Anthony 9-2
7 Pearl Handlepistol J.Morrill 4-5-2 New to the Mohegan 5-1
4 Alibi Hanover E.Carlson 6-6-7 Lacks that early foot 4-1
6 Love You Always A.McCarthy 4-1-3 Quality group of mares 8-1
3 Ace Of Pace M.Kakaley 1-1-7 Gunning for 3 straight 10-1
8 Bling D.Miller 8-4-4 Lacks any shine 12-1
Twelfth-$15,000 Bobby Weiss Series
7 Panamanian Hanover J.Morrill 2-1-2 Gets his revenge 3-1
4 Rossini H.Parker 1-2-5 Beat the pick last out 5-2
8 Match Play D.Miller 3-5-6 In good hands 6-1
3 Cocotier T.Buter 7-5-4 Yet to show his best 12-1
6 Maximum Credit G.Napolitano 3-1-1 Hit a brick wall 4-1
5 Atlas Peak J.Takter Jr 3-3-4 PASS colt 5-1
9 Robin Would A.McCarthy 8-2-3 Made miscue in most recent 10-1
2 Mustodian M.Kakaley 4-5-4 Out to dry 20-1
1 Shimmering Crown M.Simons 5-4-1 Stumbles 15-1
Thirteenth-$14,000 Clm.Hndcp Pace;clm.price $15-20,000
6 Star Keeper J.Morrill 1-1-3 Lives up to name 3-1
9 Diamond Tiara G.Napolitano 5-1-8 Fits well with these 7-2
1 For All We Know M.Kakaley 6-1-6 From potent Burke barn 9-2
2 Thats Mara B.Simpson 2-2-5 Shermans newest mare 8-1
4 Liqueur M.Miller 4-3-6 Tends to get away slow 6-1
3 Kissmatt A.McCarthy 2-2-5 Speed been folding 4-1
7 Sandy Absolut T.Jackson 6-5-1 Little since that score 10-1
8 Friskie Flicker T.Buter 6-6-4 Flicks off 15-1
5 Dinah Ross A.Siegelman 9-4-5 Its her loss 20-1
Fourteenth-$13,000 Cond.Pace;n/w $8,000 last 5
9 Shady Breeze J.Roberts 1-2-7 Super talented 4yr old 3-1
1 Morgan Shark M.Kakaley 2-7-5 There if top choice falters 5-2
5 Lean On You E.Carlson 1-7-7 Solid off live cover 4-1
2 Mojo Terror J.Morrill 3-8-1 Does retain Morrill in bike 5-1
6 Sand Summerfeld B.Simpson 6-9-1 Should grab a share of it 6-1
8 Very Upset Richie D.Miller 2-3-7 Fraleys had nice 2013 10-1
7 Art Of Temptation T.Buter 7-7-1 Stay away 12-1
3 Fool Of Ideas A.Napolitano 2-8-9 Off since Feb 15-1
4 Kiowa Creek Rocket M.Miller 5-1-4 Blasted 20-1
Fifteenth-$13,000 Cond.Trot;n/w 2 pm races life
9 Defant Donato D.Miller 1-1-x The best bet 3-1
6 Dream in Chocolate D.Ackerman 2-x-2 Race is for place 4-1
8 Beautiful Windsong A.Siegelman 1-3-1 Just won at Saratoga 7-2
7 Electra De Vie M.Kakaley 5-5-6 Big driver switch 8-1
1 Runaway Beauty M.Simons 3-6-6 Looking to stay close 9-2
2 Crazelyn A.McCarthy 6-x-x Marks her debut 10-1
5 Dixie Glide J.Morrill 5-7-5 Note the barn change 5-1
3 Casting Couch R.Schnittker 6-4-6 Ray owns-trains-steers 6-1
4 Marion Mon Ami W.Long 2-2-6 One more race to go 20-1
Sixteenth-$15,000 Cond.Trot;n/w 4 pm races life
9 Simone Hall D.Miller 1-1-2 Its a Miller late double 3-1
4 Muscial Prince G.Napolitano 3-2-5 Failed as the 2-5 chalk 9-2
8 Frisky Strike A.Napolitano 4-3-4 Salerno doing well early season 6-1
6 Epic Tale R.Schnittker 2-2-x Donato Hanover 4yr old 7-2
5 Celebrity Lovin T.Jackson 8-2-4 Meadowlands import 4-1
1 Flashbacks D.Chellis 6-6-8 Looking to stay on stride 15-1
2 Only In My Dreams M.Simons 5-2-3 Remains a nightmare 8-1
3 My Love Bi M.Kakaley 8-6-5 Auto toss 20-1
7 Clete Hanover M.Romano 3-4-8 See you on Sat 10-1
TODAYS EVENTS
HIGH SCHOOL BASEBALL
Wyoming Seminary at MMI Prep, 4:15 p.m.
Northwest at Meyers, 4:15 p.m.
GAR at Hanover Area, 4:15 p.m.
HIGH SCHOOL SOFTBALL
Coughlin at Wyoming Area, 4:15 p.m.
Crestwood at Dallas, 4:15 p.m.
GAR at Northwest, 4:15 p.m.
Hazleton Area at Lake-Lehman, 4:15 p.m.
MMI Prep at Meyers, 4:15 p.m.
Pittston Area at Tunkhannock, 4:15 p.m.
Wyo. Seminary at Holy Redeemer, 4:15 p.m.
Wyoming Valley West at Berwick, 4:15 p.m.
Northwest at Lake-Lehman, 4:15 p.m.
HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS LACROSSE
Coughlin at Dallas, 4:15 p.m.
Lake-Lehman at Delaware Valley, 4:15 p.m.
Crestwood at Wyoming Seminary, 4:15 p.m.
HIGH SCHOOL BOYS TENNIS
Berwick at MMI Prep, 4 p.m.
Coughlin at Crestwood, 4 p.m.
Pittston Area at Holy Redeemer, 4 p.m.
Tunkhannock at Hazleton Area, 4 p.m.
Wyoming Valley West at Dallas, 4 p.m.
HIGH SCHOOL TRACK AND FIELD
Dallas at Coughlin, 4:15 p.m.
Hazleton Area at Pittston Area, 4:15 p.m.
Nanticoke at Wyoming Area, 4:15 p.m.
Tunkhannock at Berwick, 4:15 p.m.
Wyoming Valley West at Crestwood, 4:15 p.m.
HIGH SCHOOL BOYS VOLLEYBALL
Lake-Lehman at Tunkhannock
Nanticoke at Hazleton Area
COLLEGE GOLF
Misericordia at DeSales, noon
Scranton, Wm. Paterson, Wilkes, 12:30 p.m.
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
Kings at Ithaca, DH, 3 p.m.
Baptist Bible at Wilkes, DH, 6 p.m.
MENS COLLEGE LACROSSE
Misericordia at DeSales, 4 p.m.
WOMENS COLLEGE LACROSSE
Wilkes at Misericordia, 4:30 p.m.
MENS COLLEGE TENNIS
Wilkes at Misericordia, 3:30 p.m.
WOMENS COLLEGE TENNIS
Misericordia at Scranton, 3:30 p.m.
THURSDAY, APRIL 18
HIGH SCHOOL BASEBALL
(4:15 p.m.)
Dallas at Wyoming Valley West
Lake-Lehman at Coughlin
Hazleton Area at Holy Redeemer
Crestwood at Wyoming Area
Berwick at Tunkhannock
HIGH SCHOOL SOFTBALL
(4:15 p.m.)
Holy Redeemer at Northwest
Wyoming Area at Lake-Lehman
HIGH SCHOOL BOYS VOLLEYBALL
Coughlin at Crestwood
Dallas at Hanover Area
Holy Redeemer at Berwick
Wyoming Valley West at Delaware Valley
COLLEGE BASEBALL
PSU Brandywine at PSU Wilkes-Barre, DH, 2
p.m.
LCCC at Northampton CC, 3:30 p.m.
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
Misericordia at Neumann, DH, 3 p.m.
PSU Hazleton at Scranton, DH, 5 p.m.
WOMENS COLLEGE LACROSSE
Gwynedd-Mercy at Kings, 7 p.m.
L AT E S T L I N E
L O C A L C A L E N D A R
W H AT S O N T V
H O C k E Y
T R A N S A C T I O N S
B A S E B A L L
B A S k E T B A L L
B u L L E T I N B O A R D
MAjOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG
National League
St. Louis -120/+110 at Pittsburgh
at Cincinnati -140/+130 Philadelphia
Washington -155/+145 at Miami
at Milwaukee -120/+110 San Francisco
at Colorado -130/+120 New York
at Los Angeles -260/+230 San Diego
American League
at Oakland -170/+160 Houston
at Cleveland -140/+130 Boston
Tampa Bay -120/+110 at Baltimore
at Toronto -135/+125 Chicago
Los Angeles -135/+125 at Minnesota
at Seattle -130/+120 Detroit
Interleague
at Atlanta -155/+145 Kansas City
at New York (A)-145/+135 Arizona
Texas -110/+100 at Chicago (N)
NBA
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG
at Indiana 6 Philadelphia
at Miami 8 Orlando
at Toronto 5 Boston
at Chicago 6 Washington
at Oklahoma City 7 Milwaukee
at New York 5 Atlanta
at Brooklyn 7 Detroit
at Charlotte 3 Cleveland
at Dallas 7 New Orleans
at San Antonio 9 Minnesota
at Memphis 7 Utah
at Denver 13 Phoenix
L.A. Clippers 8 at Sacramento
Golden State 4 at Portland
at L.A. Lakers 2 Houston
NHL
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG
at Pittsburgh -135/+115 Montreal
at Boston -230/+190 Buffalo
Detroit -160/+140 at Calgary
at Anaheim -160/+140 Columbus
GOLF
6:30 p.m.
TGC LPGA, LOTTE Championship, frst
round, at Kapolei, Hawaii
MLB
Noon
MLB Kansas City at Atlanta
7 p.m.
ESPN2 Philadelphia at Cincinnati
WQMY, WWOR Arizona at N.Y. Yankees
8 p.m.
WGN Texas at Chicago Cubs
8:30 p.m.
SNY N.Y. Mets at Colorado
NBA
8 p.m.
CSN Philadelphia at Indiana
ESPN Utah at Memphis
MSG Atlanta at New York
YES Detroit at Brooklyn
10:30 p.m.
ESPN Houston at L.A. Lakers
NHL
7 p.m.
ROOT Montreal at Pittsburgh
7:30 p.m.
NBCSN Buffalo at Boston
SOCCER
2:30 p.m.
ESPN2 Premier League, Manchester United
at West Ham
11 p.m.
ESPN2 Mens national teams, exhibition,
Mexico vs. Peru, at San Francisco
International League
North Division
W L Pct. GB
Pawtucket (Red Sox) 9 3 .750
Syracuse (Nationals) 6 4 .600 2
Buffalo (Blue Jays) 5 4 .556 2
Lehigh Valley (Phillies) 6 5 .545 2
RAILRIDERS (Yanks) 4 6 .400 4
Rochester (Twins) 2 10 .167 7
South Division
W L Pct. GB
Durham (Rays) 8 5 .615
Norfolk (Orioles) 7 6 .538 1
Gwinnett (Braves) 6 7 .462 2
Charlotte (White Sox) 5 8 .385 3
West Division
W L Pct. GB
Indianapolis (Pirates) 9 4 .692
Columbus (Indians) 7 5 .583 1
Louisville (Reds) 6 6 .500 2
Toledo (Tigers) 3 10 .231 6
Mondays Games
Buffalo 6, Syracuse 1
Gwinnett 5, Norfolk 4, 11 innings
Lehigh Valley 8, Pawtucket 3
Indianapolis 5, Toledo 4
Columbus 4, Louisville 1
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre 10, Rochester 1
Durham 6, Charlotte 3
Tuesdays Games
Charlotte 2, Durham 1
Lehigh Valley 8, Pawtucket 6
Buffalo at Syracuse, ppd., rain
Norfolk 4, Gwinnett 3
Indianapolis 4, Toledo 2
Louisville at Columbus, ppd., rain
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre 1, Rochester 0
Wednesdays Games
Louisville at Columbus, 11:35 a.m.
Buffalo at Syracuse, 4:05 p.m., 1st game
Norfolk at Gwinnett, 6:05 p.m.
Lehigh Valley at Pawtucket, 6:15 p.m.
Indianapolis at Toledo, 6:30 p.m.
Buffalo at Syracuse, 6:35 p.m., 2nd game
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre at Rochester, 7:05 p.m.
Charlotte at Durham, 7:05 p.m.
Thursdays Games
Charlotte at Durham, 11:05 a.m.
Buffalo at Syracuse, 12 p.m.
Lehigh Valley at Pawtucket, 12:05 p.m.
Norfolk at Gwinnett, 6:05 p.m.
Columbus at Toledo, 6:30 p.m.
Indianapolis at Louisville, 6:35 p.m.
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre at Rochester, 7:05 p.m.
MONDAYS BOxSCORE
RailRiders 10, Red Wings 1
RailRiders Rochester
ab r hbi ab r hbi
Joseph 2b 5 2 3 2 Thomas cf 5 0 1 0
Adams 3b 5 2 2 0 Hermann c 5 0 1 0
Almonte cf 4 2 4 3 Colabello 1b 4 0 0 0
DJohnsn 1b 4 1 1 2 Clement dh 3 0 1 0
Romine c 3 0 3 0 Benson rf 4 1 3 0
Wilson c 1 0 0 1 Dnklman lf 3 0 1 0
CJohnsn dh 5 0 1 1 Soblwski 3b 4 0 0 0
Mesa rf 5 1 1 1 Farris 2b 4 0 2 0
Neal lf 5 1 1 0 Olmedo ss 4 0 1 0
Maruszak ss 3 1 1 1
Totals 40101710Totals 36 110 2
RailRiders 103 000 123 -- 10
Rochester 000 001 000 -- 1
E Wilson (1). LOBSWB 7, ROC 10. TEAM
RISP SWB 4-for-11, ROC 1-for-13. 2BJoseph
(1), HRAlmonte (1). SB Benson (1), Farris (2).
SF D. Johnson, Wilson; GIDP SWB 1, ROC 2.
Outfeld Assists Thomas.
IP H R ER BB SO
RailRiders
Nuno (W,1-0) 6 4 0 0 1 8
Demel .1 3 1 1 0 1
Cedeno (H,2) 1 1 0 0 0 1
Claiborne 1.2 2 0 0 1 0
Rochester
Walters(L, 0-2) 6 13 5 5 1 5
OConnor 1 0 0 0 0 1
Pugh 1 3 4 4 1 0
Turpen 1 1 1 1 0 1
Walters pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.
Pugh pitched to 2 batters in the 9th
BalkPugh, Turpen.
Umpires--Home, Ian Fazio; First, Brad Myers;
Third, Seth Buckminster
T--3:06. A3,119.
CAMPS/CLINICS
Dallas High School Softball Team
will be holding their second soft-
ball development clinic for girls
ages 7-14 on Sunday, April 21 at the
Back Mountain Little League Field
from noon to 2 p.m. This clinic
will have a brief review of clinic
one, go over base running, proper
infield and outfield positioning,
and offensive execution drills. An
application is available at bmtll.
com, under clinics. For more infor-
mation, email dallashighsoftball@
gmail.com, or call Brent Berger
793-1126, or Bill Kern 498-5991. In
case of rain, the clinic will be held
at the Dallas High School gym.
Dallas Mountaineer Aquatic Club
is hosting a Fitter and Faster Clinic
with Peter Vanderkaay on Satur-
day, May 11, at the Dallas Middle
School natatorium. Vanderkaay is
a three-time Olympian and was the
2012 Olympic swim team captain.
For more information, visit www.
dmacswimming.org or call Beth
Redington at 239-3575.
Misericordia University Summer
Baseball Camp is open for regis-
tration. The camp runs July 8-12
and is open to players age 7-12. For
mor information, visit athletics.
misericordia.edu or call 674-1868.
LEAGUES
Forty Fort Soccer Club will have
fall sign-ups on April 21 and May
5 from noon to 3 p.m. in the base-
ment of the Forty Fort borough
building. For more information,
visit www.fortyfortpioneers.org or
call Brian at 592-7148.
Monday Night Lehman Ladies
League will begin play Monday,
May 6, at 5 p.m. An informational
meeting will be held Monday, April
22, at 7 p.m. For those who cannot
attend the meeting, call the pro
shop at 675-1686. New members
are welcome.
NE Retirees Golf Program at
Emanon Golf Course in Falls starts
a new season April 17. The league
still needs to fill a few more three-
man teams. There are 26 weeks of
play starting today at 9:30 a.m. If
you are 55 years or older, you can
join the league. For more informa-
tion, call Phil Amico at 362-1567 or
Greg Berkawski at 383-1513.
MEETINGS
GAR Memorial High School
Football Booster Club will meet
Thursday, April 18, at 7 p.m. in the
choral room at the high school.
Hollenback Friday Golf League
will have an organizational meet-
ing Friday, April 19, at 5 p.m. at
the clubhouse. New members are
welcome. For more information,
call Jerry at 824-4246.
Sand Springs Monday Morn-
ing League will have a meeting
Monday, April 22, at 9 a.m. in the
clubhouse restaurant. For more
information, call 788-5845, ext. 1.
REGISTRATIONS/TRYOUTS
Bear Creek Bobcats Youth Soc-
cer registration for the fall will be
held Sunday, April 21, and Sunday,
April 28, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
at the Bear Creek Community
Charter School. Players must be at
least 4 years old by July 31 of this
year, and born on or after Aug. 1,
1995. Players do not need to reside
in Bear Creek Twp. If you have
any questions, email Billie Jo at
bmondulick@gmail.com or John at
jjkozerski@gmail.com.
Ed-Lark Hurricanes Football and
Cheer signups are on the follow-
ing dates: Saturday, April 20, from
4-7 p.m.; Sunday, April 28, from
12:30-3 p.m.; Monday, May 6, from
5-7 p.m. Signups will be at the
Edwardsville Borough building. The
cost is $40 for the first child and
$5 for each additional child.
NBA
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
y-New York 53 28 .654
x-Brooklyn 48 33 .593 5
x-Boston 41 39 .513 11
Philadelphia 33 48 .407 20
Toronto 33 48 .407 20
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
z-Miami 65 16 .802
x-Atlanta 44 37 .543 21
Washington 29 52 .358 36
Charlotte 20 61 .247 45
Orlando 20 61 .247 45
Central Division
W L Pct GB
y-Indiana 49 31 .613
x-Chicago 44 37 .543 5
x-Milwaukee 37 44 .457 12
Detroit 29 52 .358 20
Cleveland 24 57 .296 25
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
y-San Antonio 58 23 .716
x-Memphis 55 26 .679 3
x-Houston 45 36 .556 13
Dallas 40 41 .494 18
New Orleans 27 54 .333 31
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
z-Oklahoma City 60 21 .741
x-Denver 56 25 .691 4
Utah 43 38 .531 17
Portland 33 47 .413 26
Minnesota 30 51 .370 30
Pacifc Division
W L Pct GB
y-L.A. Clippers 54 26 .675
x-Golden State 46 35 .568 8
L.A. Lakers 44 37 .543 10
Sacramento 28 53 .346 26
Phoenix 25 56 .309 29
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
z-clinched conference
Mondays Games
Miami 96, Cleveland 95
Charlotte 106, New York 95
Chicago 102, Orlando 84
Brooklyn 106, Washington 101
Detroit 109, Philadelphia 101
Memphis 103, Dallas 97
Utah 96, Minnesota 80
Oklahoma City 104, Sacramento 95
Denver 112, Milwaukee 111
Phoenix 119, Houston 112
Golden State 116, San Antonio 106
Tuesdays Games
Toronto 113, Atlanta 96
Indiana at Boston, Cancelled
Portland at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
Wednesdays Games
Phoenix at Denver, 8 p.m.
New Orleans at Dallas, 8 p.m.
Washington at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Utah at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at San Antonio, 8 p.m.
Milwaukee at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Atlanta at New York, 8 p.m.
Detroit at Brooklyn, 8 p.m.
Cleveland at Charlotte, 8 p.m.
Boston at Toronto, 8 p.m.
Orlando at Miami, 8 p.m.
Philadelphia at Indiana, 8 p.m.
Houston at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
Golden State at Portland, 10:30 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Sacramento, 10:30 p.m.
Eastern League
Eastern Division
W L Pct. GB
Trenton (Yankees) 8 4 .667
Binghamton (Mets) 7 5 .583 1
New Britain (Twins) 7 5 .583 1
Reading (Phillies) 7 5 .583 1
New Hampshire (Jays) 6 7 .462 2
Portland (Red Sox) 5 6 .455 2
Western Division
W L Pct. GB
Bowie (Orioles) 7 5 .583
Harrisburg (Nationals) 7 6 .538
Richmond (Giants) 5 7 .417 2
Erie (Tigers) 4 6 .400 2
Altoona (Pirates) 4 7 .364 2
Akron (Indians) 4 8 .333 3
Tuesdays Games
Richmond at Altoona, (n)
Binghamton 7, Portland 3
Reading 4, Harrisburg 3, 10 innings
New Britain 7, New Hampshire 6
Akron 5, Trenton 1
Erie at Bowie, (n)
Wednesdays Games
Richmond at Altoona, 10:30 a.m.
Akron at Trenton, 10:35 a.m.
New Hampshire at New Britain, 10:35 a.m.
Erie at Bowie, 11:05 a.m.
Portland at Binghamton, 6:35 p.m.
Thursdays Games
New Britain at Portland, 6 p.m.
Binghamton at New Hampshire, 6:35 p.m.
Bowie at Akron, 6:35 p.m.
Reading at Richmond, 6:35 p.m.
Trenton at Erie, 6:35 p.m.
Altoona at Harrisburg, 7 p.m.
AHL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W LOL SL Pts GF GA
y-Providence 73 47 21 0 5 99 210 177
Portland 73 39 29 3 2 83 221 227
Manchester 73 35 31 3 4 77 212 203
Worcester 73 30 33 4 6 70 181 218
St. Johns 73 31 35 3 4 69 187 226
East Division
GP W LOL SL Pts GF GA
x-Syracuse 73 41 21 6 5 93 236 192
x-Binghamton 73 42 23 1 7 92 217 183
x-PENGUINS 74 42 28 2 2 88 182 171
Norfolk 73 37 31 4 1 79 184 195
Hershey 73 34 30 3 6 77 196 189
Northeast Division
GP W LOL SL Pts GF GA
y-Springfeld 73 43 21 5 4 95 225 176
Connecticut 74 35 30 6 3 79 210 214
Bridgeport 73 31 30 7 5 74 213 235
Albany 73 29 31 1 12 71 186 219
Adirondack 73 30 36 3 4 67 180 216
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Midwest Division
GP W LOL SL Pts GF GA
x-Grand Rapids 73 40 25 4 4 88 228 202
Milwaukee 73 38 28 4 3 83 186 196
Rockford 74 40 31 2 1 83 232 218
Chicago 73 36 28 5 4 81 198 200
Peoria 73 33 32 5 3 74 182 207
North Division
GP W LOL SL Pts GF GA
x-Toronto 73 41 23 3 6 91 226 191
Rochester 73 41 28 3 1 86 224 203
Abbotsford 74 34 30 4 6 78 168 190
Lake Erie 74 34 30 3 7 78 208 215
Hamilton 73 28 39 1 5 62 153 218
South Division
GP W LOL SL Pts GF GA
y-Texas 73 42 20 5 6 95 226 190
x-Charlotte 74 41 25 4 4 90 217 196
Houston 73 38 25 5 5 86 203 191
Oklahoma City 73 37 25 2 9 85 229 225
San Antonio 73 29 36 2 6 66 187 224
x-Clinched Playoff Berth
y-Clinched Divisional Title
NOTE: Two points are awarded for a win, one point
for an overtime or shootout loss.
Tuesdays Games
Toronto 2, Oklahoma City 1
Portland 5, Bridgeport 4, OT
Milwaukee 3, Chicago 2
Charlotte 4, Peoria 3, OT
Texas at San Antonio, (n)
RailRiders 1, Red Wings 0
RailRiders Rochester
ab r hbi ab r hbi
Joseph 2b 4 1 1 0 Farris 2b 3 0 1 0
Mesa cf 4 0 2 0 Arcia rf 4 0 1 0
Almonte lf 2 0 0 0 Colabello dh 4 0 0 0
DJohnsn 1b 4 0 0 0 Clement 1b 3 0 0 0
Murton dh 4 0 1 0 Benson cf 4 0 0 0
Neal rf 4 0 2 0 Boggs lf 2 0 1 0
Maruszak 3b 3 0 0 0 Dinklmn 3b 3 0 0 0
Wilson c 4 0 0 0 Fryer c 3 0 2 0
Velazquez ss 3 0 1 0 Hermann ph 1 0 0 0
Maruszak ss 3 1 1 1 Bernier ss 2 0 0 0
Thomas ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 32 1 7 0 Totals 30 0 5 0
RailRiders 100 000 000 -- 1
Rochester 000 000 000 -- 0
LOBSWB 7, ROC 9. TEAM RISP SWB
0-for-4, ROC 0-for-12. 2BNeal (2), Farris (1). 3B
Mesa (1). SB Arcia (2). GIDP SWB 1, ROC0.
SAC Bernier, Dinkelman. PB Fryer (2), Pickoffs
Gibson (Almonte at frst).
IP H R ER BB SO
RailRiders
Bootcheck (W,1-0) 6 3 0 0 3 5
Montgomery (H,1) 2 1 0 0 0 3
Eppley (S, 1) 1 1 0 0 0 2
Rochester
Gibson(L, 0-2) 6 4 1 1 2 5
Thielbar 2.2 3 0 0 0 1
Perdoma .1 0 0 0 1 0
Balk: Bootcheck.
HBP: Boggs (by Bootcheck)
Ejections: SWB manager Dave Miley by home
plate umpire Brad Myers. Rochester manager
Gene Glynn by Myers. Rochester hitting coach
Tim Doherty by Myers.
Umpires--Home, Brad Myers; First, Seth Buck-
minster; Third, Ian Fazio
T2:46 (19 minute delay). A2,498.
BASEBALL
American League
BOSTON RED SOXPlaced RHP Joel Hanra-
han on the 15-day DL. Recalled up RHP Steven
Wright from Pawtucket (IL).
CLEVELAND INDIANSSent C Lou Marson
to Columbus (IL) for rehab assignments. Recalled
INF Cord Phelps fromColumbus. Optioned COmir
Santos to Columbus.
MINNESOTA TWINSReinstated OF Wilkin
Ramirez from the paternity list. Optioned OF Os-
waldo Arcia to Rochester (IL).
OAKLAND ATHLETICSPlaced 1B Brandon
Moss on the paternity list. Recalled OF Shane Pe-
terson from Sacramento (PCL).
TEXAS RANGERSTraded LHP Jeff Beliveau
to Tampa Bay for cash considerations.
TORONTO BLUE JAYSPlaced RHP Sergio
Santos on the 15-day DL, retroactive to April 14.
Reinstated 3B Brett Lawrie from the 15-day DL.
National League
ARIZONADIAMONDBACKSPlaced 2BAaron
Hill on the 15-day DL. Activated INF Didi Gregorius
from the 15-day DL.
ATLANTA BRAVESSent SS Paul Janish to
Gwinnett (IL) for a rehab assignment.
CHICAGO CUBSOptioned RHP Rafael Dolis
to Iowa (PCL). Reinstated INF Darwin Barney from
the 15-day DL. Added RHP Kameron Loe to the
25-man roster. Selected the contract of RHP Kevin
Gregg from Iowa. Designated LHP Hisanori Taka-
hashi and Brent Lillibridge for assignment. Claimed
INF Cody Ransom off waivers from San Diego.
PITTSBURGH PIRATESSent LHP Francisco
Liriano to Bradenton (FSL) for a rehab assignment.
Optioned RHP Bryan Morris to Indianapolis (IL).
Selected the contract of RHP Vin Mazzaro from
Indianapolis.
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTSReinstated 1B
Brett Pill from the 15-day DL and optioned him to
Fresno (PCL).
American Association
AMARILLO SOXSigned RHP Jason Hirsh.
EL PASO DIABLOSTraded RHP Shawn
Blackwell to Washington for RHP Chandler Bar-
nard and C Pat Trettel.
GRAND PRAIRIE AIR HOGSReleased RHP
Brad Furnish.
Can-Am League
NEWARK BEARSSigned RHP Jorge L.
Vasquez and INF Ernie Banks Jr.
NEW JERSEY JACKALSSigned RHP Keith
Cantwell. Released C Jeff Lanning.
QUEBEC CAPITALESSigned INF Carlos Wil-
loughby.
ROCKLAND BOULDERSSigned RHP Dan
Sausville.
TROIS-RIVIERES AIGLESSigned RHP Jeff
Shields.
Frontier League
LAKE ERIE CRUSHERSSigned OF Gauntlett
Eldemire.
NORMAL CORNBELTERSTraded OF Sam
Judah to Sioux City (AA) for a player to be named.
TRAVERSE CITY BEACH BUMSReleased
INF Kyle Eveland.
Midwest League
QUAD CITIES RIVER BANDITSTransferred
2B Carlos Perdomo to Lancaster (Cal) and LHP
Joe Bircher to extended spring training. Trans-
ferred INF Austin Elkins from extended spring
training.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
NEW YORK KNICKSSigned G/F Quentin
Richardson for the remainder of the season.
SAN ANTONIO SPURSSigned F Tracy Mc-
Grady.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
BALTIMORE RAVENSSigned QB Caleb
Hanie to a one-year contract.
CHICAGO BEARSsigned G-T Eben Britton to
a one-year contract.
CINCINNATI BENGALSSigned TE Alex
Smith.
GREEN BAY PACKERSSigned WR Sederrik
Cunningham.
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTSRe-signed TE
Michael Hoomanawanui.
SEATTLE SEAHAWKSWaived DE Dexter
Davis.
Arena Football League
SAN JOSE SABERCATSTraded OL Terrence
Campbell and DL Mike Landry to Orlando for DL
Terrance Carter. Activated FB Brian Folkerts from
recallable reassignment.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
ANAHEIM DUCKSRecalled D Sami Vatanen
and D Jordan Hendry from Norfolk (AHL).
BOSTON BRUINSAssigned RW Jordan
Caron to Providence (AHL).
DALLAS STARSAssigned G Cristopher
Nilstorp to Texas (AHL). Recalled F Reilly Smith
from Texas.
DETROIT RED WINGSAgreed to terms with
G Jimmy Howard on a six-year contract. Reas-
signed RWTeemu Pulkkinen fromJokerit (Finland)
to Grand Rapids (AHL) and C Calle Jarnkrok from
Grand Rapids to Brynas (Sweden).
MINNESOTA WILDAssigned G Josh Harding
NHL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
y-Pittsburgh 42 32 10 0 64 141 102
N.Y. Islanders 43 22 16 5 49 124 124
N.Y. Rangers 42 21 17 4 46 102 100
Philadelphia 43 19 21 3 41 119 131
New Jersey 42 15 17 10 40 96 115
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
x-Montreal 42 26 11 5 57 131 107
Boston 41 26 11 4 56 116 91
Toronto 43 24 14 5 53 131 118
Ottawa 42 22 14 6 50 104 91
Buffalo 43 18 19 6 42 111 128
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Washington 43 24 17 2 50 134 119
Winnipeg 43 22 19 2 46 113 126
Tampa Bay 43 17 22 4 38 136 135
Carolina 42 17 23 2 36 109 134
Florida 42 13 23 6 32 101 147
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
y-Chicago 42 33 5 4 70 139 87
St. Louis 42 24 16 2 50 112 105
Detroit 42 20 15 7 47 106 107
Columbus 43 20 16 7 47 106 110
Nashville 44 15 21 8 38 100 123
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Vancouver 43 24 12 7 55 118 104
Minnesota 42 23 16 3 49 109 106
Edmonton 41 16 18 7 39 103 115
Calgary 42 16 22 4 36 113 145
Colorado 43 14 22 7 35 103 135
Pacifc Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
x-Anaheim 42 27 10 5 59 125 105
Los Angeles 42 24 14 4 52 120 104
San Jose 42 22 13 7 51 106 102
Dallas 42 21 18 3 45 118 126
Phoenix 42 18 17 7 43 110 114
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
Mondays Games
Toronto 2, New Jersey 0
Philadelphia 7, Montreal 3
Chicago 5, Dallas 2
Vancouver 5, Nashville 2
Columbus 4, Colorado 3, OT
Minnesota 4, Calgary 3
San Jose 4, Phoenix 0
Ottawa at Boston, ppd.
Tuesdays Games
Winnipeg 4, Tampa Bay 3, SO
St. Louis 2, Vancouver 1, SO
N.Y. Islanders 5, Florida 2
Washington 5, Toronto 1
Ottawa 3, Carolina 2
Philadelphia 4, N.Y. Rangers 2
Minnesota at Edmonton, (n)
Los Angeles at San Jose, (n)
Wednesdays Games
Montreal at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit at Calgary, 9:30 p.m.
Columbus at Anaheim, 10 p.m.
Thursdays Games
N.Y. Islanders at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Florida at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
New Jersey at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
Carolina at Winnipeg, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Vancouver at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Columbus at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Minnesota at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Wednesdays Games
Springfeld at Worcester, 7 p.m.
Thursdays Games
No games scheduled
Fridays Games
Peoria at Grand Rapids, 7 p.m.
Connecticut at Albany, 7 p.m.
Hershey at Adirondack, 7 p.m.
Bridgeport at Portland, 7 p.m.
Manchester at Binghamton, 7:05 p.m.
Worcester at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton, 7:05 p.m.
Toronto at Rochester, 7:05 p.m.
Springfeld at Providence, 7:05 p.m.
Norfolk at Syracuse, 7:30 p.m.
St. Johns at Hamilton, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago at Lake Erie, 7:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Abbotsford at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Houston at Texas, 8:30 p.m.
Rockford at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
to Houston (AHL) for a conditioning assignment.
NASHVILLE PREDATORSReassigned F
Daniel Bang, F Austin Watson and D Mattias
Ekholm to Milwaukee (AHL).
NEW JERSEY DEVILSReturned G Keith
Kinkaid to Albany (AHL).
NEW YORK ISLANDERSReassigned D
Marc Cantin from Las Vegas (ECHL) to Bridgeport
(AHL).
WINNIPEG JETSAgreed to terms with F
Adam Lowry.
American Hockey League
BRIDGEPORT SOUND TIGERSAnnounced
D Marc Cantin was reassigned to the team from
Las Vegas (ECHL).
TORONTO MARLIESSigned F Joshua Leivo
to an amateur tryout contract.
SOCCER
Major League Soccer
MLSSuspended San Jose F Alan Gordon
three games and fned him an undisclosed amount
for using unacceptable and offensive language to-
ward an opponent.
COLLEGE
ECAC DIVISION III EAST WOMENS ICE
HOCKEY CONFERENCEAnnounced the addi-
tion of Franklin Pierce and U. of New England to
the conference beginning in the 2014-2015 aca-
demic year.
SKYLINE CONFERENCEAnnounced Sarah
Lawrence College has accepted an invitation for
membership beginning with the 2014-15 academic
year.
ARKANSASDismissed RHP Thomas Alti-
mount from the baseball team. Sophomore mens
basketball F Hunter Mickelson will transfer.
GEORGE MASONNamed Nyla Milleson
womens basketball coach.
LOYOLA (MD.)Named Keith Booth mens as-
sistant basketball coach.
MARQUETTEAnnounced G Vander Blue will
enter the NBA draft.
NORTH CAROLINAAnnounced G Reggie
Bullock will enter the NBA draft.
OHIO STATENamed Kevin McGuff womens
basketball coach.
SOUTH ALABAMANamed Ronald Nored
mens assistant basketball coach.
UCLAAnnounced G Shabazz Muhammad will
enter the NBA draft.
CLEVELAND Mike Napoli
hit a three-run double in Bos-
tons seven-run second inning
and the Red Sox, playing with
heavy hearts one day after the
deadly bombings back home,
beat the Cleveland Indians 7-2
on Tuesday night.
Bostons players were already
en route to Cleveland when they
learned of the explosions near
the Boston Marathons finish
line that killed three and injured
more than 170. The Red Sox
were hoping to bring some relief
to those affected by the tragedy,
and they may have while win-
ning their fourth straight.
The series opener was also In-
dians manager Terry Franconas
first game against the Red Sox,
the teamhe led to two World Se-
ries titles during eight seasons
in Boston.
Helped by five walks, the Red
Sox scored seven runs in the
second off Ubaldo Jimenez (0-2)
and gave Felix Doubront (1-0)
all the support he needed.
Mondays tragic events in
Boston brought a somber tone
to Franconas reunion as well
as to the Red Sox. Before the
game, in a clubhouse devoid of
its usual pregame sound and
bustle, several players spoke of
how a memorable Patriots Day
win over Tampa Bay turned hor-
rific.
Orioles 5, Rays 4
BALTIMORE Matt Wiet-
ers homered, Nate McLouth
scored twice, and the Baltimore
Orioles beat the struggling
Tampa Bay Rays despite allow-
ing three home runs.
Desmond Jennings homered
on the games first pitch for
Tampa Bay, and Kelly Johnson
and Evan Longoria connected
off Pedro Strop in the eighth.
But the Rays could muster only
six hits against Jake Arrieta (1-
2) and five relievers.
White Sox 4, Blue Jays 3
TORONTO Dayan Viciedo
doubled home the go-ahead run
in the ninth inning and the Chi-
cago White Sox rallied to beat
the Toronto Blue Jays.
INTERLEAGUE
Yankees 4, Diamondbacks 2
NEW YORK Robinson
Cano paid tribute to Jackie Rob-
inson in fitting fashion by hit-
ting a three-run homer, and the
New York Yankees beat the Ari-
zona Diamondbacks on a night
devoted to honoring victims of
the Boston Marathon bombings.
Cano, whose big league fa-
ther Jose named him for Robin-
son, connected on the day when
all players, managers, coaches
and umpires at Yankee Sta-
dium wore No. 42 to salute the
late Brooklyn Dodgers Hall of
Famer. Major League Baseball
held Jackie Robinson Day on
Monday, the anniversary of the
date he broke the color barrier
in 1947. The Yankees and Dia-
mondbacks were off Monday.
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013 PAgE 3B TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com B A S E B A L L
M L B S TA N D I N g S S TAT S
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Boston 9 4 .692 7-3 W-4 4-2 5-2
New York 7 5 .583 1 7-3 W-2 4-3 3-2
Baltimore 7 6 .538 2 5-5 W-1 2-2 5-4
Toronto 6 8 .429 3 2 5-5 L-1 3-5 3-3
Tampa Bay 4 9 .308 5 3 3-7 L-4 3-3 1-6
Central Division W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Detroit 7 5 .583 6-4 W-2 4-2 3-3
Kansas City 7 6 .538 6-4 L-1 4-2 3-4
Chicago 6 8 .429 2 2 4-6 W-1 4-2 2-6
Cleveland 5 7 .417 2 2 3-7 L-2 2-4 3-3
Minnesota 5 7 .417 2 2 4-6 W-1 3-3 2-4
West Division W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Oakland 10 4 .714 8-2 W-1 4-4 6-0
Texas 9 5 .643 1 6-4 W-1 4-2 5-3
Seattle 6 8 .429 4 2 4-6 W-1 3-4 3-4
Houston 4 9 .308 5 3 3-7 L-3 1-5 3-4
Los Angeles 4 9 .308 5 3 3-7 L-1 2-4 2-5
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Atlanta 12 1 .923 10-0 W-10 6-1 6-0
New York 7 5 .583 4 5-5 L-1 4-2 3-3
Washington 8 6 .571 4 5-5 L-1 6-3 2-3
Philadelphia 6 7 .462 6 2 5-5 L-1 3-3 3-4
Miami 3 11 .214 9 5 2-8 W-1 2-6 1-5
Central Division W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
St. Louis 8 5 .615 7-3 W-1 4-2 4-3
Cincinnati 6 7 .462 2 2 4-6 W-1 5-2 1-5
Pittsburgh 6 7 .462 2 2 5-5 L-1 4-3 2-4
Chicago 4 9 .308 4 4 2-8 L-3 2-5 2-4
Milwaukee 3 8 .273 4 4 2-8 W-1 1-5 2-3
West Division W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Colorado 9 4 .692 7-3 W-4 4-0 5-4
San Francisco 9 4 .692 7-3 W-2 4-2 5-2
Arizona 8 5 .615 1 6-4 L-1 5-4 3-1
Los Angeles 7 6 .538 2 1 6-4 L-2 4-3 3-3
San Diego 3 10 .231 6 5 2-8 W-1 1-5 2-5
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Mondays Games
Boston 3, Tampa Bay 2
Toronto 4, Chicago White Sox 3
Minnesota 8, L.A. Angels 2
Oakland 11, Houston 2
Tuesdays Games
N.Y. Yankees 4, Arizona 2
Boston 7, Cleveland 2
Baltimore 5, Tampa Bay 4
Chicago White Sox 4, Toronto 3
Atlanta 6, Kansas City 3
Texas 4, Chicago Cubs 2
L.A. Angels at Minnesota, (n)
Houston at Oakland, (n)
Detroit at Seattle, (n)
Wednesdays Games
Kansas City (W.Davis 1-0) at Atlanta (Minor
2-0), 12:10 p.m.
Houston (B.Norris 2-1) at Oakland (Colon 1-0),
3:35 p.m.
Arizona (Miley 2-0) at N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia
2-1), 7:05 p.m.
Boston (Aceves 0-0) at Cleveland (Masterson
3-0), 7:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (M.Moore 2-0) at Baltimore (Till-
man 0-0), 7:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Quintana 0-0) at Toronto
(Happ 2-0), 7:07 p.m.
Texas (Grimm 0-0) at Chicago Cubs (Villan-
ueva 0-0), 8:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Hanson 1-1) at Minnesota (Wor-
ley 0-2), 8:10 p.m.
Detroit (Scherzer 1-0) at Seattle (F.Hernandez
1-2), 10:10 p.m.
Thursdays Games
Texas at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
Detroit at Seattle, 3:40 p.m.
Arizona at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Boston at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Mondays Games
St. Louis 10, Pittsburgh 6
Cincinnati 4, Philadelphia 2
Washington 10, Miami 3
N.Y. Mets at Colorado, ppd., snow
San Diego 6, L.A. Dodgers 3
Tuesdays Games
Colorado 8, N.Y. Mets 4, 1st game
N.Y. Yankees 4, Arizona 2
St. Louis at Pittsburgh, ppd., rain
Atlanta 6, Kansas City 3
Miami 8, Washington 2
Philadelphia at Cincinnati, (n)
Texas 4, Chicago Cubs 2
San Francisco at Milwaukee, (n)
N.Y. Mets at Colorado, (n), 2nd game
San Diego at L.A. Dodgers, (n)
Wednesdays Games
Kansas City (W.Davis 1-0) at Atlanta (Minor
2-0), 12:10 p.m.
Arizona (Miley 2-0) at N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia
2-1), 7:05 p.m.
St. Louis (S.Miller 2-0) at Pittsburgh (A.Burnett
0-2), 7:05 p.m.
Philadelphia (Lannan 0-0) at Cincinnati (Leake
0-0), 7:10 p.m.
Washington (Detwiler 0-0) at Miami (Nolasco
0-1), 7:10 p.m.
Texas (Grimm 0-0) at Chicago Cubs (Villan-
ueva 0-0), 8:05 p.m.
San Francisco (Vogelsong 1-1) at Milwaukee
(Lohse 0-1), 8:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Hefner 0-2) at Colorado (Garland
1-0), 8:40 p.m.
San Diego (T.Ross 0-1) at L.A. Dodgers (Ker-
shaw 2-1), 10:10 p.m.
Thursdays Games
San Francisco at Milwaukee, 1:10 p.m.
Texas at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Colorado, 3:10 p.m.
Arizona at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
St. Louis at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Miami at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
Padres 6, Dodgers 3
San Diego Los Angeles
ab r hbi ab r hbi
EvCarr ss 3 1 1 0 Crwfrd lf 5 1 3 1
Venale rf 2 0 0 0 M.Ellis 2b-3b-2b50 2 0
Denorf ph-rf 1 0 1 1 Kemp cf 5 1 2 0
Alonso 1b 4 0 1 0 AdGnzl 1b 4 0 1 1
Blanks lf 4 0 1 1 A.Ellis c 3 0 2 1
Gyorko 3b 4 0 1 0 Ethier rf 3 0 0 0
Amarst 2b 2 1 1 0 L.Cruz 3b-ss 3 1 1 0
JoBakr c 3 0 0 0 Sellers ss 3 0 0 0
Maybin cf 3 2 1 0 Schmkr ph-2b 1 0 0 0
Stults p 2 1 1 3 Wall p 0 0 0 0
Guzmn ph 1 1 1 0 Blngsly p 1 0 0 0
Brach p 0 0 0 0 Punto ph 1 0 0 0
Grgrsn p 0 0 0 0 Belisari p 0 0 0 0
Kotsay ph 1 0 0 0 PRdrgz p 0 0 0 0
Street p 0 0 0 0 Guerrir p 0 0 0 0
Howell p 0 0 0 0
HrstnJr 3b 1 0 1 0
Totals 30 6 9 5 Totals 35 312 3
San Diego 030 000 201 6
Los Angeles 001 110 000 3
EKemp (1). DPSan Diego 2, Los Angeles
3. LOBSan Diego 8, Los Angeles 9. 2BAlonso
(2), Kemp (4), Ad.Gonzalez (4). HRStults (1).
SVenable, Amarista, L.Cruz, Billingsley. SF
Blanks.
IP H R ER BB SO
San Diego
Stults W,2-1 6 9 3 3 1 4
Brach H,2 1 1 0 0 0 1
Gregerson H,2 1 1 0 0 1 0
Street S,2-2 1 1 0 0 0 0
Los Angeles
Billingsley 6 7 3 3 2 3
Belisario L,0-2 0 1 2 2 2 0
P.Rodriguez 2-3 0 0 0 1 0
Guerrier 2-3 0 0 0 1 0
Howell 1 0 1 1 1 1
Wall 2-3 1 0 0 1 0
Belisario pitched to 3 batters in the 7th.
BalkStults.
UmpiresHome, Paul Schrieber; First, Chad
Fairchild; Second, Jeff Kellogg; Third, Eric Cooper.
T3:29. A52,136 (56,000).
Athletics 11, Astros 2
Houston Oakland
ab r hbi ab r hbi
Altuve 2b 4 0 1 1 Crisp cf 3 1 1 0
Maxwll cf 4 0 1 0 S.Smith pr-lf 0 1 0 0
JCastro c 4 1 1 0 DNorrs c 3 3 1 0
Carter dh 3 0 0 0 CYoung rf-cf 4 2 1 0
JMrtnz lf 4 0 1 0 Lowrie ss 4 1 2 4
C.Pena 1b 4 0 2 1 Dnldsn 3b 4 1 1 0
Dmngz 3b 4 0 0 0 Moss 1b 4 1 2 3
RCeden ss 4 1 1 0 Freimn dh 4 1 1 3
Barnes rf 4 0 1 0 MTaylr lf-rf 4 0 0 0
Parrino 2b 3 0 0 0
Totals 35 2 8 2 Totals 3311 910
Houston 000 100 100 2
Oakland 600 000 32x 11
LOBHouston 7, Oakland 6. 2BMaxwell
(3), Crisp (6), D.Norris (4), C.Young (4), Moss (1).
HRFreiman (1).
IP H R ER BB SO
Houston
Bedard L,0-1 1-3 2 6 6 4 1
Clemens 5 1-3 1 0 0 2 3
X.Cedeno 2-3 4 3 3 1 0
Ambriz 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
W.Wright 1 2 2 2 1 1
Oakland
Milone W,3-0 6 2-3 8 2 2 0 6
Doolittle H,2 2-3 0 0 0 1 1
Neshek 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Balfour 1 0 0 0 0 1
WPBedard.
UmpiresHome, Paul Emmel; First, Bruce
Dreckman; Second, Clint Fagan; Third, Gary Dar-
ling.
T3:26. A10,689 (35,067).
MONDAYS LATE BOXES
Twins 8, Angels 2
Los Angeles Minnesota
ab r hbi ab r hbi
Bourjos cf 4 1 1 1 Mstrnn cf-lf 5 1 1 0
Trout lf 4 0 2 0 Mauer c 5 2 4 3
Pujols 1b 4 0 1 0 Mornea 1b 5 0 1 1
Hamltn rf 4 0 0 0 Doumit dh 5 0 1 1
Trumo dh 4 0 2 0 Parmel rf 3 0 0 0
HKndrc 2b 4 0 0 0 Plouffe 3b 4 1 2 1
Iannett c 3 0 0 0 Arcia lf 3 0 1 0
BHarrs ss 4 1 1 1 Hicks cf 0 1 0 0
LJimnz 3b 3 0 2 0 Dozier 2b 2 2 0 0
Flormn ss 3 1 2 2
Totals 34 2 9 2 Totals 35 812 8
Los Angeles 101 000 000 2
Minnesota 101 111 03x 8
EHamilton (2), Arcia (1). DPMinnesota 2.
LOBLos Angeles 6, Minnesota 8. 2BTrout (5),
Trumbo (6), Mauer (5), Morneau (4), Plouffe (3),
Florimon (2). HRBourjos (2), B.Harris (1), Mauer
(2), Plouffe (2). SBMastroianni (1), Hicks (1).
CSL.Jimenez (1). SFlorimon.
IP H R ER BB SO
Los Angeles
Blanton L,0-3 4 2-3 9 4 4 1 4
Roth 2 1 1 1 1 2
M.Lowe 1-3 1 3 3 2 1
D.De La Rosa 1 1 0 0 0 1
Minnesota
Correia W,1-1 7 8 2 2 1 5
Burton H,3 1 1 0 0 0 1
Fien 1 0 0 0 0 0
M.Lowe pitched to 3 batters in the 8th.
WPRoth, M.Lowe.
UmpiresHome, Chris Conroy; First, Paul Nau-
ert; Second, Andy Fletcher; Third, Sam Holbrook.
T2:49. A23,535 (39,021).
Yankees 4, Diamondbacks 2
Arizona New York
ab r hbi ab r hbi
GParra cf 5 1 1 0 Gardnr cf 5 0 1 0
Prado 2b 3 1 1 0 Cano 2b 4 1 2 3
Gldsch 1b 4 0 1 0 Youkils 3b 4 1 2 0
MMntr c 2 0 1 1 Hafner dh 4 0 2 0
C.Ross rf 4 0 2 1 V.Wells lf 3 0 0 0
ErChvz 3b 4 0 0 0 ISuzuki rf 3 0 1 0
Hinske dh 4 0 0 0 Nunez ss 3 0 1 1
Pollock lf 4 0 2 0 Overay 1b 4 1 1 0
Pnngtn ss 3 0 0 0 CStwrt c 4 1 2 0
Totals 33 2 8 2 Totals 34 412 4
Arizona 002 000 000 2
New York 000 300 10x 4
DPArizona 1. LOBArizona 8, New York
10. 2BPollock 2 (6), Gardner (3), Hafner 2 (2).
HRCano (4). SBG.Parra (3). SPennington.
SFM.Montero, Nunez.
IP H R ER BB SO
Arizona
McCarthy L,0-2 4 9 3 3 2 4
Mat.Reynolds 2 1 0 0 0 2
Ziegler 1 2 1 1 1 0
Bell 1 0 0 0 0 3
New York
Nova W,1-1 5 7 2 2 2 6
Logan H,1 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 2
Chamberlain H,1 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
D.Robertson H,1 1 1 0 0 0 0
Rivera S,3-3 1 0 0 0 0 1
UmpiresHome, Tom Hallion; First, Phil Cuzzi;
Second, Ron Kulpa; Third, Chris Guccione.
T3:02. A34,107 (50,291).
Marlins 8, Nationals 2
Washington Miami
ab r hbi ab r hbi
Werth rf 4 0 2 0 Coghln rf 4 0 0 0
Berndn cf 4 0 0 0 Pierre lf 4 2 3 0
Zmrmn 3b 3 0 1 0 Polanc 3b 4 2 1 0
LaRoch 1b 3 1 1 0 Dobbs 1b 3 1 2 2
Dsmnd ss 4 0 1 0 Ruggin cf 4 1 2 3
TMoore lf 4 1 1 1 Brantly c 4 0 1 0
Lmrdzz 2b 4 0 2 1 Hchvrr ss 4 1 1 3
KSuzuk c 3 0 0 0 DSolan 2b 4 0 0 0
Haren p 2 0 0 0 Sanaia p 2 1 1 0
Stmmn p 0 0 0 0 Kearns ph 1 0 0 0
Tracy ph 1 0 0 0 ARams p 0 0 0 0
HRdrgz p 0 0 0 0 Skpwrt ph 1 0 0 0
Matths p 0 0 0 0 MDunn p 0 0 0 0
JSolano ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 33 2 8 2 Totals 35 811 8
Washington 000 002 000 2
Miami 000 430 10x 8
EZimmerman (4). DPWashington 1, Miami
2. LOBWashington 7, Miami 4. 2BLaRoche
(1), Desmond (7), T.Moore (2), Lombardozzi (3),
Ruggiano (4). HRHechavarria (1). SBPierre
2 (3).
IP H R ER BB SO
Washington
Haren L,1-2 4 1-3 7 7 3 1 2
Stammen 1 2-3 2 0 0 0 1
H.Rodriguez 1 2 1 1 0 0
Mattheus 1 0 0 0 0 0
Miami
Sanabia W,2-1 6 6 2 2 3 3
A.Ramos 2 1 0 0 0 1
M.Dunn 1 1 0 0 0 0
UmpiresHome, Jerry Layne; First, Greg Gib-
son; Second, Mike Estabrook; Third, Alan Porter.
T2:44. A16,200 (37,442).
White Sox 4, Blue Jays 3
Chicago Toronto
ab r hbi ab r hbi
De Aza cf-lf 5 0 0 0 Bonifac rf-cf 4 0 0 0
Kppngr 2b-1b 4 0 0 0 MeCarr lf 4 0 1 0
Rios rf 4 0 1 0 Arencii c 4 1 2 1
A.Dunn 1b 3 0 0 0 Encrnc dh 4 1 2 0
Wise pr-cf 0 1 0 0 Lind 1b 4 0 2 0
Konerk dh 3 3 2 1 Lawrie 3b 3 0 0 1
Gillaspi 3b 3 0 0 0 Rasms cf 2 1 2 1
Viciedo lf 4 0 1 1 RDavis ph-rf 2 0 0 0
Greene pr-2b 0 0 0 0 MIzturs 2b 4 0 0 0
AlRmrz ss 2 0 1 0 Kawsk ss 2 0 0 0
Gimenz c 3 0 0 1
Totals 31 4 5 3 Totals 33 3 9 3
Chicago 010 000 102 4
Toronto 010 001 001 3
DPChicago 1. LOBChicago 6, Toronto 5.
2BRios (4), Viciedo (2). HRKonerko (3), Aren-
cibia (5), Rasmus (4). CSKawasaki (1). SF
Gimenez, Lawrie.
IP H R ER BB SO
Chicago
Axelrod 6 7 2 2 1 4
H.Santiago 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
Lindstrom W,1-0 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
A.Reed S,5-5 1 2 1 1 0 0
Toronto
Jo.Johnson 7 4 2 2 2 8
Delabar L,1-1 1 1-3 1 2 2 3 2
Oliver 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
WPJo.Johnson.
UmpiresHome, Larry Vanover; First, Jeff Nel-
son; Second, Manny Gonzalez; Third, Tony Ran-
dazzo.
T2:42. A16,131 (49,282).
First game
Rockies 8, Mets 4
New York Colorado
ab r hbi ab r hbi
Vldspn rf 5 0 0 0 EYong cf 5 2 3 2
DnMrp 2b 3 1 0 0 JHerrr 2b 5 0 1 1
DWrght 3b 4 2 3 3 CGnzlz lf 4 2 2 1
I.Davis 1b 4 0 0 0 Tlwtzk ss 4 1 0 0
Buck c 4 1 2 0 Cuddyr rf 2 1 1 1
Duda lf 3 0 1 0 Helton 1b 3 0 1 2
Niwnhs cf 3 0 0 0 Rosario c 4 0 1 1
Rice p 0 0 0 0 Nelson 3b 4 1 2 0
Hwkns p 0 0 0 0 Nicasio p 1 0 0 0
Baxter ph 1 0 0 0 Rutledg ph 1 0 0 0
Burke p 0 0 0 0 Escaln p 0 0 0 0
RTejad ss 4 0 1 1 WLopez p 0 0 0 0
Gee p 1 0 1 0 Pachec ph 1 1 1 0
Lyon p 0 0 0 0 RBtncr p 0 0 0 0
Cowgill cf 2 0 0 0
Totals 34 4 8 4 Totals 34 812 8
New York 200 110 000 4
Colorado 011 031 02x 8
DPNew York 1. LOBNew York 6, Colorado
8. 2BCuddyer (2), Nelson (1). 3BE.Young (1),
C.Gonzalez (1). HRD.Wright 2 (2), C.Gonzalez
(4). SBE.Young (1). SGee, Escalona.
IP H R ER BB SO
New York
Gee L,0-3 4 2-3 7 5 5 2 2
Lyon 2-3 2 1 1 0 0
Rice 1 1-3 0 0 0 2 0
Hawkins 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Burke 1 3 2 2 0 0
Colorado
Nicasio W,2-0 5 6 4 4 2 5
Escalona H,2 2 0 0 0 0 1
W.Lopez H,2 1 2 0 0 0 0
R.Betancourt 1 0 0 0 0 0
HBPby Gee (Tulowitzki). WPGee.
UmpiresHome, Mike DiMuro; First, Lance
Barrett; Second, Ted Barrett; Third, Alfonso Mar-
quez.
T2:59. A21,510 (50,398).
AP PHOTO
A sign that reads United We Stand between logos for the New York Yankees and the Boston Red
Sox appears at the top of Yankee Stadium before a baseball game in New York on Tuesday. The
message was displayed in the wake of the Boston Marathon explosions.
AP PHOTO
Andrew Tollerud from Lakewood, Colo., sits in the stands with a
snowman during the sixth inning in the first game of a double-
header against the New York Mets on Tuesday in Denver.
Red Sox 7, Indians 2
Boston Cleveland
ab r hbi ab r hbi
Ellsury cf 5 1 1 1 Stubbs cf 3 0 1 0
Victorn rf 3 1 0 0 ACarer ss 5 0 1 0
Pedroia 2b 4 1 1 1 CSantn c 4 0 0 0
Napoli 1b 5 1 2 3 Swisher 1b 3 1 1 0
Mdlrks 3b 4 1 0 0 MrRynl dh 2 0 0 0
Nava lf 4 0 0 0 Brantly lf 4 0 2 0
Carp ph 1 0 0 0 Aviles 2b 3 0 0 1
BrdlyJr lf 0 0 0 0 Chsnhll 3b 4 0 0 0
JGoms dh 1 1 1 0 Raburn rf 2 1 1 0
D.Ross c 3 1 1 1 CPhlps ph 1 0 0 0
Ciriaco ss 2 0 0 1
Totals 32 7 6 7 Totals 31 2 6 1
Boston 070 000 000 7
Cleveland 010 010 000 2
DPBoston 1. LOBBoston 8, Cleveland 9.
2BNapoli 2 (6). SBEllsbury (6). SFCiriaco,
Aviles.
IP H R ER BB SO
Boston
Doubront W,1-0 5 4 2 2 4 7
Mortensen 2 1 0 0 1 1
A.Wilson 2 1 0 0 1 1
Cleveland
U.Jimenez L,0-2 1 2-3 2 7 7 5 1
Allen 3 4 0 0 1 6
Hagadone 2 0 0 0 2 3
R.Hill 1 0 0 0 1 2
Shaw 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 4
WPHagadone, R.Hill. PBD.Ross.
UmpiresHome, Laz Diaz; First, Tim Timmons;
Second, Mike Winters; Third, Mark Wegner.
T3:30. A9,143 (42,241).
Orioles 5, Rays 4
Tampa Bay Baltimore
ab r hbi ab r hbi
Jnnngs cf 5 1 1 1 McLoth lf 3 2 1 0
KJhnsn dh 3 1 1 1 Machd 3b 4 0 1 1
Zobrist 2b 2 1 0 0 Markks rf 3 1 2 1
Longori 3b 3 1 1 2 A.Jones cf 4 1 1 0
Joyce rf 4 0 2 0 C.Davis 1b 2 0 0 0
YEscor ss 4 0 0 0 Wieters c 3 1 1 1
Loney 1b 1 0 0 0 Hardy ss 4 0 0 0
Duncan ph-1b 2 0 1 0 Flahrty 2b 4 0 0 1
Loaton c 3 0 0 0 ACasill 2b 0 0 0 0
RRorts ph 1 0 0 0 Reimld dh 3 0 0 0
JMolin c 0 0 0 0
Fuld lf 2 0 0 0
SRdrgz ph-lf 2 0 0 0
Totals 32 4 6 4 Totals 30 5 6 4
Tampa Bay 100 000 030 4
Baltimore 111 002 00x 5
ELongoria (1). LOBTampa Bay 7, Balti-
more 6. 2BJoyce (1), McLouth (4), Machado
(3), A.Jones (6). HRJennings (1), K.Johnson (2),
Longoria (2), Wieters (2). SBMcLouth (3). CS
Joyce (1). SWieters.
IP H R ER BB SO
Tampa Bay
Ro.Hernandez L,0-3 5 1-3 5 5 3 3 7
J.Wright 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 1
C.Ramos 0 0 0 0 1 0
B.Gomes 1 0 0 0 0 0
Baltimore
Arrieta W,1-0 5 3 1 1 5 7
Patton H,1 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Strop 2-3 2 3 3 1 1
Matusz H,2 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
ODay H,4 2-3 1 0 0 0 1
Ji.Johnson S,6-6 1 0 0 0 0 0
Arrieta pitched to 1 batter in the 6th.
Strop pitched to 3 batters in the 8th.
C.Ramos pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
PBLobaton.
UmpiresHome, Gerry Davis; First, Mark Carl-
son; Second, Mike Muchlinski; Third, Brian Knight.
T3:21. A14,670 (45,971).
Braves 6, Royals 3
Kansas City Atlanta
ab r hbi ab r hbi
Gordon lf 5 0 2 1 BUpton cf 3 0 0 0
AEscor ss 5 0 0 0 Heywrd rf 4 1 1 1
Hosmer 1b 4 0 0 0 J.Upton lf 4 1 1 1
S.Perez c 4 1 0 0 Gattis c 4 0 0 0
L.Cain cf 4 0 2 0 Uggla 2b 4 1 1 1
Mostks 3b 4 0 1 0 JFrncs 3b 3 2 2 2
Francr rf 4 0 2 1 JSchafr pr 0 1 0 0
Getz 2b 4 2 1 1 Avilan p 0 0 0 0
Guthrie p 2 0 1 0 Kimrel p 0 0 0 0
KHerrr p 0 0 0 0 CJhnsn 1b 4 0 2 1
Crow p 0 0 0 0 Smmns ss 4 0 1 0
Butler ph 1 0 0 0 Medlen p 2 0 0 0
DeWitt ph 1 0 1 0
OFlhrt p 0 0 0 0
R.Pena 3b 0 0 0 0
Totals 37 3 9 3 Totals 33 6 9 6
Kansas City 001 100 001 3
Atlanta 010 000 14x 6
EA.Escobar (2), Uggla (4), J.Francisco (3),
Gattis (2). DPAtlanta 1. LOBKansas City 8,
Atlanta 5. 2BC.Johnson (2), DeWitt (1). HR
Getz (1), Heyward (2), J.Upton (8), Uggla (3),
J.Francisco 2 (3). SBJ.Schafer (2).
IP H R ER BB SO
Kansas City
Guthrie 7 5 2 2 1 6
K.Herrera L,1-1 2-3 3 4 4 1 0
Crow 1-3 1 0 0 0 0
Atlanta
Medlen 7 6 2 1 0 5
OFlaherty W,3-0 1 1 0 0 0 2
Avilan 1-3 1 1 1 0 0
Kimbrel 2-3 1 0 0 0 1
WPGuthrie, Avilan. BalkAvilan.
UmpiresHome, Angel Hernandez; First, Doug
Eddings; Second, John Tumpane; Third, Dana
DeMuth.
T2:36. A26,400 (49,586).
Rangers 4, Cubs 2
Texas Chicago
ab r hbi ab r hbi
Kinsler 2b 3 1 1 0 Sappelt cf 4 0 0 0
Andrus ss 4 1 2 0 SCastro ss 4 1 1 0
Beltre 3b 4 2 2 2 Rizzo 1b 3 1 1 0
N.Cruz rf 4 0 0 0 ASorin lf 4 0 2 0
Przyns c 4 0 0 0 Hairstn rf 3 0 0 0
JeBakr lf 4 0 2 1 Schrhlt ph 1 0 1 2
Morlnd 1b 4 0 0 0 Castillo c 3 0 1 0
Gentry cf 3 0 1 0 Barney 2b 4 0 0 0
DHllnd p 0 0 0 0 AlGnzlz 3b 3 0 0 0
LGarci ph 1 0 0 0 TrWood p 2 0 0 0
Schprs p 0 0 0 0 Camp p 0 0 0 0
LMartn ph 1 0 1 0 Russell p 0 0 0 0
Kirkmn p 0 0 0 0 Loe p 0 0 0 0
Nathan p 0 0 0 0 DNavrr ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 32 4 9 3 Totals 32 2 6 2
Texas 000 100 030 4
Chicago 000 000 002 2
ECamp (1). DPTexas 1, Chicago 2. LOB
Texas 5, Chicago 5. 2BBeltre (3), Je.Baker (1),
Gentry (2), A.Soriano (3), Schierholtz (5). HR
Beltre (2). SD.Holland.
IP H R ER BB SO
Texas
D.Holland W,1-1 7 2 0 0 0 6
Scheppers 1 1 0 0 0 0
Kirkman 2-3 1 2 2 1 0
Nathan S,5-5 1-3 2 0 0 0 0
Chicago
Tr.Wood L,1-1 7 1-3 5 2 2 3 3
Camp 1-3 2 2 2 0 0
Russell 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Loe 1 2 0 0 0 0
HBPby Nathan (Castillo). WPD.Holland.
PBCastillo.
UmpiresHome, Dale Scott; First, Bill Miller;
Second, CB Bucknor; Third, Todd Tichenor.
T2:47. A29,344 (41,019).
N AT I o N A L L E A g u E R o u N D u P
A M E R I c A N L E A g u E R o u N D u P
Seven-run second inning
powers Red Sox to victory
The Associated Press
The Associated Press
Weary Mets falter
in Colorado snow
DENVER Carlos Gonzalez
homered and tripled, Todd Hel-
ton hit a go-ahead single and the
Colorado Rockies beat the New
York Mets 8-4 in the opening
game of a doubleheader Tues-
day that was delayed 2 hours as
8 inches of snow was cleared off
the field.
One day after a spring storm
postponed the first game of the
series, the teams were sched-
uled to play two in frigid condi-
tions. The temperature at first
pitch was 39 degrees and was
expected to dip even lower for
the nightcap maybe even
with more snow.
David Wright homered twice
for the Mets, finally back on the
field after cold weather post-
poned two straight games. Win-
try conditions in Minneapolis
on Sunday prompted their game
against the Twins to be called
off and rescheduled in August.
Marlins 8, Nationals 2
MIAMI Adeiny Hechavar-
ria ended the Marlins nine-
game home run drought with a
three-run shot, and Miami beat
the Washington Nationals.
A throwing error by Nationals
third baseman Ryan Zimmer-
man his fourth in five games
preceded the homer and led
to four unearned runs.
The Marlins (3-11) began the
game with the worst record in
the majors but broke out of an
offensive slump in the fourth in-
ning with four runs, more than
they had scored in all but one
game.
Hechavarria sent the Mar-
lins Park home run sculpture
swinging into action for the first
time this season and ended a
homer drought that had tied the
20-year-old franchise record.
INTERLEAGUE
Braves 6, Royals 3
ATLANTAJason Heyward,
Justin Upton and Dan Uggla
homered in the eighth inning,
and Juan Francisco hit a pair of
solo shots earlier in the game
to help the Atlanta Braves win
their 10th straight with a victory
over the Kansas City Royals.
Atlantas 10-game winning
streak is its longest since the
club won 15 straight from April
15-May 2, 2000. The Braves are
12-1 and off to their best start
since they began the 1994 sea-
son 13-1.
Eric OFlaherty (3-0) allowed
one hit and struck out two in a
scoreless eighth for the win in
relief.
Heywards second homer, Up-
tons eighth and Ugglas third
were solo shots off Kelvin Herre-
ra (1-1), who gave up three hits,
four runs and one walk in two-
thirds of an inning. The Braves
have outhomered opponents
25-7 and outscored opponents
68-25 for the best run differen-
tial in the majors.
Rangers 4, Cubs 2
CHICAGO Derek Holland
pitched seven shutout innings,
Adrian Beltre hit a two-run
home run, and Craig Gentry
made a diving catch in the ninth
to preserve the Texas Rangers
win over the Chicago Cubs at a
cold Wrigley Field.
Holland (1-1) at one point
retired nine straight against
the Cubs, who have lost three
straight games. The Rangers
left-hander struck out six and al-
lowed two hits.
Beltres home run off Cubs
reliever Shawn Camp was his
second of the year and gave the
Rangers a 4-0 lead in the eighth.
Chicago starter Travis Wood (1-
1) walked Ian Kinsler and was
then relieved by Camp, who al-
lowed Elvis Andrus to single to
right before throwing a pickoff
attempt away, allowing Kinsler
to score and make it 2-0.
NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS
BATTING--Segura, Milwaukee, .417; CJohn-
son, Atlanta, .415; CCrawford, Los Angeles, .396;
AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, .396; SMarte, Pitts-
burgh, .370; Schierholtz, Chicago, .361; DanMur-
phy, New York, .356; MYoung, Philadelphia, .356.
RUNS--Carpenter, St. Louis, 14; CGonzalez,
Colorado, 14; Jay, St. Louis, 13; JUpton, Atlanta,
13; CCrawford, Los Angeles, 12; Prado, Arizona,
12; Choo, Cincinnati, 11; DanMurphy, New York,
11; Phillips, Cincinnati, 11.
RBI--Buck, New York, 19; Phillips, Cincinnati,
16; JUpton, Atlanta, 12; Utley, Philadelphia, 12;
DWright, New York, 12; 9 tied at 11.
HITS--SMarte, Pittsburgh, 20; CCrawford, Los
Angeles, 19; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 19; SCas-
tro, Chicago, 18; Choo, Cincinnati, 18; Phillips,
Cincinnati, 18; 6 tied at 17.
DOUBLES--Desmond, Washington, 7; Carpen-
ter, St. Louis, 6; Pollock, Arizona, 6; 10 tied at 5.
TRIPLES--Utley, Philadelphia, 2; 23 tied at 1.
HOME RUNS--JUpton, Atlanta, 8; Buck, New
York, 6; Fowler, Colorado, 6; Harper, Washing-
ton, 5; Gattis, Atlanta, 4; CGonzalez, Colorado,
4; Pence, San Francisco, 4; Phillips, Cincinnati, 4;
Rosario, Colorado, 4
AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS
BATTING--Fielder, Detroit, .429; TorHunter,
Detroit, .407; AJones, Baltimore, .400; Berkman,
Texas, .389; AJackson, Detroit, .386; Lowrie, Oak-
land, .385; Gordon, Kansas City, .375.
RUNS--AJackson, Detroit, 17; Crisp, Oakland,
15; AJones, Baltimore, 13; Lowrie, Oakland, 13;
MiCabrera, Detroit, 12; Jennings, Tampa Bay, 11;
5 tied at 10.
RBI--CDavis, Baltimore, 19; Fielder, Detroit, 19;
Napoli, Boston, 14; MiCabrera, Detroit, 13; Moss,
Oakland, 13; MarReynolds, Cleveland, 13; Lowrie,
Oakland, 12.
HITS--TorHunter, Detroit, 22; AJackson, De-
troit, 22; AJones, Baltimore, 22; Gordon, Kansas
City, 21; Lowrie, Oakland, 20; Rios, Chicago, 19;
Altuve, Houston, 18; Fielder, Detroit, 18; Mauer,
Minnesota, 18.
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER PAGE 4B WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013 S P O R T S
HI GH SCHOOL L ACROSSE PREVI EW
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Alysa Adams (13) of Lake Lehman scores a goal on Dallas goalie Allison Rismondo (29) while
Deidre DeLuca (32) of Dallas looks on during Tuesdays girls lacrosse game.
Lacrosse growing in WVC, region
Russ Kile never loses his pas-
sion. The energy and sheer ex-
citement could be detected in
just a brief phone conversation.
The Crestwood girls la-
crosse head coach understands
the situation, and thats all
right with him.
We are going to take some
lumps, said Kile, who directs
the lacrosse program thats in
its first season. I want to see
the girls have fun. Thats the
most important part. Its going
to take time. Lets be honest,
most of these girls have never
even picked up a lacrosse stick.
But you can see the excite-
ment. Were in a unique situa-
tion where we are a first-year
program. Thats pretty neat in
itself.
Just one look around the Wy-
oming Valley Conference, and
you can see the growth.
Each division, boys and girls,
has seven teams enough to
warrant an automatic berth to
the PIAA state bracket.
Numbers seem to be good
and on the upswing.
Its going to keep growing
as long as we can keep grow-
ing the interest, Lake-Lehman
boys head coach T.J. LaBar
said. Its amazing to see how
far weve come in just one year.
You know the road in the state
bracket is tough because teams
like Lewisburg and Danville
in District 4 have outstand-
ing programs. But its great to
see how far weve come as a
league.
That seems to be the consen-
sus among each coach.
Growth. Positivity. An eye on
the future.
And first-year programs
throughout the league are
proof positive of that theory.
Kile is more than a first-year
coach. Hes a proud father as
his daughter, Morgan, was one
of the people who spearheaded
the start of girls lacrosse as
part of her senior program.
Other programs, you hear
similar stories.
Take North Pocono.
Its hard being a first-year
program, but you take pride
when you see little things
come together, head coach
Robert Lamanna said. La-
crosse is a sport where you
need good stick skills, and in
our case, we have 44 kids that
have little or no experience. We
have three players that played
in the Scranton Youth Lacrosse
Association, but we are so
young. And the schools in the
league understand. They say
that theyve been in our situa-
tion and keep telling us to hold
our head high. I try my best to
play everyone in every game
because we want everyone to
enjoy the experience.
There are rumors of the fu-
ture.
Rumors of howother schools
could be joining in the near fu-
ture.
But for real growth, sus-
tained numbers, Dallas boys
head coach Rich Cohen points
to one detail.
Youth programs, he said.
We need to continue to grow
our youth programs. Dont get
me wrong, its great to see how
far weve come with the new
programs. The automatic berth
is great, and its nice to have
that. Because we are so new,
though, we are still struggling
at that state level. But we need
to grow the sport below in
those youth levels. You need to
generate that buzz and excite-
ment there, so you can develop
those high school programs.
Like other feeder programs,
you want to see these kids con-
tinue to come through the sys-
tem. We, the coaches and the
parents, have to be involved in
the entire process.
The ultimate goal?
You would love to see every
team in the conference field la-
crosse teams, Dallas girls head
coach Mary Beth Zardus said.
I dont know if thats going to
happen, but I hope to see that
someday. A lot of the programs
are self-funded, so that aspect is
tough. Its something thats new.
Lacrosse is new to our area. I
played for Kings when I was in
college, and it was just starting
to break into the college scene.
Its great to see how far weve
come at the high school level,
but we still have a long way to
go. We still have to form that
sense of identity.
The Wyoming Seminary
girls squad and Delaware Val-
ley boys team are the two-time
defending district champs.
By TOMFOX
For The Times Leader
BOYS
CreStwOOd
Last years record: 6-9
Years school has supported lacrosse: 4
Key returners: Steve Roberts, Brian Collins,
Jay Popson, Robert Coslett, Ray Walton
Key newcomers: Jimmy Martino, Ryan Ma-
gin, Kyle Morris, Bailey Bauman
Key losses: James McClean, Danny Distasio
Season Outlook: With a lot of youth, we are
young and eager to match and improve on last
years record, head coach Shaun Rohland said.
Good senior leadership should help the youth
develop and lead to some wins this year.
daLLaS
Last years record: 11-4
Years has school has supported lacrosse:
5
Key returners: George Peiffer, Ray Schultz,
Casey McAndrew, Josh Weaver
Key newcomers: Corey Metz, Matt Ross,
Connor Motley
Season Outlook: We lost almost our entire
offense, head coach Rich Cohen said. We are
going to see a lot of growth this year. There is
no doubt that our defense is going to be our
strength.
deLaware VaLLeY
Last years record: 13-6
Years school has supported lacrosse: 6
Key returners: Gianni Gelormino, Sean Burk-
ert, Garret Midlarsky, Lucas Markowitz
Key newcomers: Erik Landaas, Connor Lam-
berton, Steve Everson
Key losses: Bobby Morley, Karl Haass, Phil
Wright, Tyler Quick
Season Outlook: We have a veteran group
returning, trying to defend our back-to-back Dis-
trict 2 championships, head coach Jeff Krasulski
said. Our defense has been our strength early
on, and we have the most depth since we started
the program.
LaKe-Lehman
Last years record: n/a
Years school has supported lacrosse: 3
Key returners: Brandon Kelly, Griar Rasten,
Jake Yaple
Key newcomers: Nick Radel, John Ellen-
berger
Key losses: John Butchko, Louis Hackling
Season Outlook: I think we have the poten-
tial to be a good team, and can be a good team,
as long as everyone continues to be as one,
head coach T.J. LaBar said. When we play as a
team, we can be pretty competitive.
nOrth POCOnO
Last years record: 0-0
Years school has supported lacrosse: 1
Key newcomers: Jason Lamanna, Matt Kelly,
Chris LaRosa
Season Outlook: We had three kids that
played in youth leagues, and we have 44 kids
that have no experience, coach Robert Laman-
na said. I think the kids are hungry to improve
and get better each day. Its going to take some
time because you need to have good stick skills
to be successful. Its nice to see that we have
good numbers and its a pretty diverse group of
athletes.
SCrantOn PreP
Last years record: 0-0
Years school has supported lacrosse: 1
Key newcomers: PJ Zaccagnino, Tyler Tra-
ma, Chris OBrien
Season Outlook: Its exciting to see lacrosse
grow in the area, head coach Jon Knowles said.
Making it a legitmate varsity sport is a perfect
idea as lacrosse is a perfect game for this re-
gion. We at Prep couldnt be more excited to
be involved in developing lacrosse in Northeast
Pennsylvania.
tunKhannOCK
Last years record: 0-14
Years school has supported lacrosse: 5
Key returners: Joe Cordaro, Jensen Healey,
Liam McClurg
Key newcomers: Sean Andres
Key losses: Tyler MacNamara, Luke Seaberg
Season Outlook: We have a nice mix of se-
niors and freshman, head coach Eric Janisze-
wski said. Its nice to see the young guys joining
in on the offense, and the older guys holding up
the defense. We just need to work as a team and
keep growing with each day.
wYOming SeminarY
Last years record: 6-9
Years school has supported lacrosse: 32
Key returners: Tom Rundell, Dylan Bassham,
Brad Sedor, Frank Henry, Cody Stemrich, David
Fox
Key newcomers: Griffn Hayes
Season Outlook: We are looking to compete
every time we step on the feld, head coach Tim
Goggins said. We have a balanced line-up with
a lot of experience in our junior and senior class-
es. The juniors in particular have made up the
nucleus of the program since they were fresh-
men and I believe their experience will pay off.
We like to play an up tempo style, but our primary
focus is on being a fundamentally sound and dis-
ciplined program. I have been really happy with
the energy and enthusiasm that the boys bring
to the feld every day and I am looking for that
to continue as we head into the hardest part of
our schedule.
girLS LaCrOSSe
COughLin
Last years record:0-0
Years school has supported lacrosse: 1
Key newcomers: Kyra Castano, Kelsey Ga-
briele, Paige Tedik, Caitlin Wood, Brigid Wood
Season Outlook: In the programs frst sea-
son, the Crusaders are looking to start the foun-
dation. Athletic talent certainly isnt a problem
as coach Colleen Wood can draw on players
from her highly successful feld hockey team. It
will take some time to transition to lacrosse, of
course, but the path could be smoother com-
pared to some other new teams because of the
experience of both coach and players.
CreStwOOd
Last years record: 0-0
Years school has supported lacrosse: 1
Key newcomers: Morgan Kile, Danielle Cal-
laghan, Lizzy Dessoye, Steph Distasio, Sarah
Wodarczyk
Season Outlook: We arent looking at the
scores, head coach Russ Kile said. We under-
stand what we are going against. We just want to
put the time in, and work on the fundamentals.
Thats the biggest thing for us right now. We want
everyone to have fun. Thats what the world of
sports is all about.
daLLaS
Key returners: Cara Pricher, Madeline Mul-
hern, Diedre DeLuca
Key newcomers: Katie Snedeker
Season Outlook: Everyone is working hard
to improve with each game, but it is going to take
some time, head coach Mary Beth Zardus said.
Our goal is to work and develop throughout the
season.
deLaware VaLLeY
Last years record: 7-12
Years school has supported lacrosse: 8
Key returners: Grace Cadigan, Erin Corry,
Liz Caldwell, Emily McKinney, Carla Centanni,
Jamie McElnea
Key newcomers: Marisa Balcarcel, Kierstin
Nelson, Sarah Negron
Key losses: Faith Torkildsen, Jenna Peters,
Lauren Grady
Season Outlook: We are young and un-
tested in many areas and I am looking forward
to seeing the team build chemistry and continue
to improve each and every game, head coach
Bernadine Salak said. We have a very experi-
enced goal keeper in Carla Centanni and senior
midfelder Grace Cadigan is one of the most
competitive student athletes I have ever met. Our
other seniors are really stepping up to leadership
roles and elevating their teammates. I am look-
ing forward to a great year of District 2 lacrosse.
LaKe-Lehman
Last years record: 7-13
Years school has supported lacrosse: 2
(varsity)
Key returners: Amelia Jenkins, Alysa Adams,
Mallory Wilson
Key newcomers: Hannah Stull
Key losses: Sam Headley
Season Outlook: We are a young group,
starting a total of 10 sophomores, head coach
Alex Wilson said. But Im encouraged by the
work ethic and the way we compete.
PittStOn area
Last years record: 0-0
Years school has supported lacrosse: 1
Key newcomers/seniors: Jordan Cumbo,
Carmella Gagliardi, Liz Mikitish, Rachel Siman-
sky, Kaalyn Girman
Season Outlook: Like many frst-year
schools, the Patriots are going to have to learn
on the fy against some experienced schools that
have felded teams for almost fve years now.
Sara Ruby, a junior, did score the teams frst
goal in a loss to Delaware Valley.
wYOming SeminarY
Years school has supported lacrosse: 11
Key returners: Kristen Mericle, Amanda
Schwartz, Marra Wagner, Cat Corcoran, Maegan
Coulter, Hannah Dressler, Emily Granger
Key newcomer: Kelley Gavin
Season Outlook: We have younger play-
ers who are stepping into key roles this year at
both the JV and varsity level, head coach Catie
Kersey said. Its exciting watching our younger
players develop. Our goalie is only a sophomore
and has stepped up big time for us.
TEAM- BY-TEAM CAPSUL ES
H I G H S C H O O L B A S E B A L L
Warriors triumph
in Ashby Game
The Times Leader staff
HUGHESTOWN Wyoming
Areas Jake Granteed went the
distance on the mound and was
named MVP of the annual Andy
Ashby Game as the Warriors
defeated rival Pittston Area 3-2
on Tuesday.
Granteed struck out five with-
out issuing a walk for the win
while adding a hit at the plate.
Bart Chupka and Trent Grove
both came through with an RBI
single in the top of the sixth to
put the Warriors (2-2) in front.
Michael Schwab also threw a
complete game for the Patriots
(1-4), finishing with five strike-
outs. Felix Mascelli went 2-for-3
to lead the offense.
wyoming area aB r h Bi 2B 3B hr
Nick OBrien cf 4 1 2 0 0 0 0
Mike Carey 2b 4 1 0 0 0 0 0
Bryant Clark pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Bart Chupka 1b 4 1 2 1 0 0 0
Trent Grove c 3 0 1 1 0 0 0
Jake Granteed p 3 0 1 0 0 0 0
Erik Walkowiak lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 0
Jordan Zezza 3b 3 0 1 0 0 0 0
Tino Romanelli ss 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
Joe Gavenonis ph 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
Tyler Wrubel rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Zach Lopatka dh 3 0 0 0 0 0 0
totals 29 3 7 3 0 0 0
Pittston area aB r h Bi 2B 3B hr
Josh Razvillas 1b 4 1 1 0 0 0 0
Jordan Houseman 2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 0
Pat McGinty c 3 0 1 0 0 0 0
Michael Carey lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
John Kielbasa dh 3 0 0 0 0 0 0
Michael Schwab p 3 0 0 0 0 0 0
Felix Mascelli ss 3 1 2 0 0 0 0
Cody Rowan rf 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
Justin Martinelli 3b 3 0 1 0 0 0 0
Michael Delaney cf 3 0 1 0 0 0 0
totals 27 2 6 0 0 0 0
wyoming area 000 003 0 3
Pittston area 000 011 0 2
wyoming area iP h r er BB SO
Granteed (W, 2-0) 7.0 6 2 0 0 5
Pittston area iP h r er BB SO
Schwab (L, 0-2) 7.0 7 3 1 1 5
Coughlin 4,
Holy Redeemer 3
Kyle Lupas second double of
the game came at just the right
time for Coughlin. The junior
gave the Crusaders (3-3) their
first lead of the game in the top
of the seventh, driving in the
winning run.
Eric Adamczyk helped rally
Coughlin from a 3-0 deficit in
the sixth with a two-run double
that tied the game. Team ace
Josh Featherman came on in
relief, pitching two scoreless
innings for the win.
Jeremy Worlinsky (double),
Tommy Cosgrove and Eric Kerr
(triple) all had two hits for the
Royals (1-3).
Coughlin aB r h Bi 2B 3B hr
Dave Parsnik 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 0
Dave Marriggi cf 3 1 0 0 0 0 0
Kyle Lupas 1b 3 1 2 1 2 0 0
Josh Featherman 3b-p 2 1 0 0 0 0 0
R.J. Kenzakoski rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Pat Hall dh 4 0 0 0 0 0 0
Eric Adamczyk c 4 1 1 2 1 0 0
Hunter Bednarczyk lf 2 0 1 0 0 0 0
SamAndrews p 3 0 2 1 0 0 0
Mike Wozniak ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 0
totals 28 4 6 4 3 0 0
holy redeemer aB r h Bi 2B 3B hr
Jeremy Worlinsky p-2b 4 0 2 1 1 0 0
Marty Cirelli 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Michael Kosik cf 3 0 1 1 0 0 0
Jim Strickland ss-p 3 0 0 0 0 0 0
Tommy Cosgrove rf 4 1 2 0 0 0 0
Eric Kerr lf 4 0 2 1 0 1 0
Nick Oley 3b-ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 0
Brian Leighton c 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Dan Seasock dh 1 1 0 0 0 0 0
Matt Dacey dh 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Vito Malacari 1b 1 1 0 0 0 0 0
Ian McGrane 1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
John Yurkoski 2b-3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
totals 27 3 8 3 1 1 0
Coughlin 000 003 1 4
holy redeemer 020 010 0 3
Coughlin iP h r er BB SO
Andrews 5.0 6 3 3 5 1
Featherman (W, 2-1) 2.0 2 0 0 0 3
holy redeemer iP h r er BB SO
Worlinsky 5.1 3 2 2 3 7
Strickland (L, 0-1) 1.2 3 2 1 2 1
Berwick 10, Lake-Lehman 0
Making his first varsity start
on the mound in a WVC game,
Berwick junior Alex Klinger
fired a one-hitter as the Bull-
dogs beat the Black Knights in
six innings.
Klinger struck out four in
his debut. Joey Favata and Kyle
Miller both went 2-for-3 with
two RBI to lead the offense for
Berwick (5-0).
Pete Borum had the lone hit
for the Knights (1-4).
Lake-Lehman aB r h Bi 2B 3B hr
Tyler Kolb lf-p 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
John Van Scoy cf 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
Cody Paraschak c 3 0 0 0 0 0 0
Tyler Long c 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Connor Balloun rf 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
Jeff Carter ss 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
Pete Borum 1b 2 0 1 0 0 0 0
Scott Bean p 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Tyler Harry p 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
A.J. Antonitis lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Justis Cole 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Zach Brucher dh 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
Josh Davenport 3b 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
totals 18 0 1 0 0 0 0
Berwick aB r h Bi 2B 3B hr
Anthony Melito ss 3 1 0 0 0 0 0
Will Morales cf 3 2 1 1 1 0 0
T.J. Lashock 3b 3 2 2 1 0 0 0
Kyle Miller 1b 3 1 2 2 0 0 0
Jordan Stout c 2 1 1 0 0 0 0
Eric May lf 4 0 1 1 0 0 0
Joey Favata rf 3 1 2 2 0 0 0
Alex Klinger p 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Clay DeNoia dh 2 0 1 1 0 0 0
Dylan Gearinger pr 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
Kevin Laubach 2b 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
Zach Kyttle ph 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
totals 25 10 10 8 1 0 0
Lake-Lehman 000 000 0
Berwick 000 316 10
Lake-Lehman iP h r er BB SO
Bean (L, 0-2) 4.1 6 4 4 3 3
Harry 0.2 3 6 6 3 1
Kolb 0.1 1 0 0 0 1
Berwick iP h r er BB SO
Klinger (W, 1-0) 6.0 1 0 0 3 4
Crestwood 3,
Tunkhannock 2
Tyler Sadvary went 3-for-4
with a double and an RBI as
the Comets held on for a win at
home.
Brian Markowski scattered
eight singles for the win while
Anthony Caladie got the final
four outs for the save. Crest-
wood (3-3) got two hits apiece
from Drew Munisteri, Eric
Rinehimer and Elliot Snyder.
Josh McClain and Race Sick
each had two hits to lead the
Tigers (2-2).
tunkhannock aB r h Bi 2B 3B hr
Lance Sherry cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 0
Cody Brown ss 4 1 1 0 0 0 0
Josh McClain p-3b 3 1 2 0 0 0 0
Jeremy Lee rf 2 0 1 1 0 0 0
Ty Weiss 3b-1b 3 0 1 0 0 0 0
Ben Spencer 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Aaron Holton p 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Race Sick dh 2 0 2 1 0 0 0
Si Bernosky c 3 0 0 0 0 0 0
Ryan Weiss lf 3 0 1 0 0 0 0
Jordan Faux 2b 3 0 1 0 0 0 0
totals 27 2 9 2 0 0 0
Crestwood aB r h Bi 2B 3B hr
Tyler Sadvary 4 1 3 1 1 0 0
Drew Munisteri cf 2 0 2 1 0 0 0
Anthony Caladie 3b-p 4 0 0 1 0 0 0
Abhay Metgud rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Justin Rinheimer dh 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Aaron Piavis dh 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Jon Wychock 1b 3 0 1 0 0 0 0
Ethan Markowski 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Brian Markowski p-lf 2 0 1 0 0 0 0
Eric Rinehimer lf-3b 3 0 2 0 0 0 0
Elliot Snyder ss 3 1 2 0 0 0 0
Curt Yenchik c 2 1 0 0 0 0 0
John Chupka ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
totals 26 3 11 3 1 0 0
tunkhannock 100 001 0 2
Crestwood 120 000 x 3
tunkhannock iP h r er BB SO
McClain (L, 1-2) 5.0 10 3 3 2 2
Holton 1.0 1 0 0 1 0
Crestwood iP h r er BB SO
B. Markowski (W, 2-1) 5.2 8 2 2 2 3
Caladie (S) 1.1 1 0 0 0 1
Hazleton Area 3, Dallas 2
The Cougars pulled out
another dramatic win as Robbie
John singled home Sal Biasi
with two strikes and two outs in
the bottom of the eighth.
Hazleton Area (4-2) had
picked up a run in the seventh
to send the game to extra in-
nings. Biasi earned the win in
relief of Tony Hernandez, who
struck out 10 in seven innings.
The duo combined to hold the
Mountaineers (3-1) to three
hits.
Dallas Brian Stepniak struck
out eight in a no-decision.
Nigel Stearns homered for the
Mounts, giving the team six in
four league games.
dallas aB r h Bi 2B 3B hr
Ryan Zapoticky rf-2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 0
Nigel Stearns cf-p 4 1 1 1 0 0 1
Greg Petorak ss 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
Brian Stepniak p 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
Brian Goode rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Bill Gately c 3 1 1 0 0 0 0
Domenic Oliveri lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 0
Jordan McCrumm 2b-p 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Eric Zawatski dh 2 0 1 1 1 0 0
Ben Narcum 3b 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
Jon Strausser 1b 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
Rory Mullin 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
John Murray ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
totals 25 2 3 2 1 0 1
hazleton area aB r h Bi 2B 3B hr
Dave Klein rf 4 0 1 0 0 0 0
Joe Baran cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 0
Sal Biasi ss-p 4 1 1 0 0 0 0
Tony Craig c 4 1 1 0 0 0 0
Tony Hernandez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Robbie John dh 4 0 1 1 0 0 0
Jordan Horwath lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Jonathan Sullivan 3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Mitch ODonnell pr 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
Jared Carelli 1b 1 0 1 0 0 0 0
Chris Panzarella 2b-ss 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
Kyle Rogers ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Kyle Klein lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 0
totals 28 3 6 1 0 0 0
dallas 010 001 00 2
hazleton area 001 001 01 3
dallas iP h r er BB SO
Stepniak 7.0 4 2 1 2 8
McCrumm (L, 0-1) 0.1 1 1 1 0 0
Stearns 0.1 1 0 0 0 1
hazleton area iP h r er BB SO
Hernandez 7.0 3 2 2 3 10
Biasi (W, 2-0) 1.0 0 0 0 0 1
ROCHESTER, N.Y. With
the bases loaded and no out
in the top of the first inning,
RailRiders first baseman Dan
Johnson grounded into a double
play.
More importantly, that
scored the games lone run as
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre won its
third straight game and fourth
in its last six in a 1-0 win over
Rochester on Tuesday night at
Frontier Field.
Chris Bootcheck (1-0) got
the start for SWB and pitched
a gem for the
second straight
time. He went
six scoreless in-
nings to extend
his scoreless
streak to begin
the season to
11 frames. His
last outing was
also against
Rochester, but
was a no-deci-
sion in SWBs
win. Bootcheck
struck out five
and walked
three on Tues-
day. He got in a
jam in the third
when the Red Wings loaded the
bases with two outs, but the
righty got out of it.
In the game that started 20
minutes late due to weather,
Mark Montgomery relieved
Bootcheck throwing two score-
less innings whiffing three and
only giving up a leadoff single
in the seventh. Cody Eppley
pitched the ninth for his first
save.
Melky Mesa and Thomas
Neal were each 2-for-4 for the
RailRiders. Mesa hit the first
triple in RailRider history when
he blasted a shot with two outs
in the top of the third.
Notes: Neither team had a hit
with runner in scoring position
going a combined 0-for-16 as
Rochester was 0-for-12Each
teams manager and Rochester
hitting coach Tim Doherty were
ejected by home plate umpire
Brad Myers SWB outfielder
Zoilo Almonte has his streak
of reaching base safely stopped
at 12 consecutive plate appear-
ances when he grounded out in
the third. He is still the Inter-
national League leader in walks
with 12.
Wang to start Friday
When the RailRiders return
home on Friday to take on the
Syracuse Chiefs after ending an
eight-day road trip, right-hander
Chien-Ming Wang will get the
ball for his first start of the sea-
son for Scranton/Wilkes-Barre.
Wang, 33, has gone 61-32 with
a 4.26 ERA over 130 big league
appearances 120 of them
starts with the Yankees and
Nationals . His best season came
with New York in 2006 when
he led the American League in
wins with a 19-6 record and a
3.63 ERA. Wang finished as the
runner-up to Johan Santana for
the Cy Young Award that year.
The Yankees will make a move
before Friday to create room for
Wang on the RailRiders 25-man
roster.
The rest of SWBs rotation
will get bumped back a day on
the weekend with Brett Mar-
shall throwing on Saturday and
Vidal Nuno going on Sunday.
Wang signed a minor league
deal with New York on March
22. He previously pitched for
the SWB franchise in 2009 when
he went 1-0 in two starts and
tossed 13 scoreless innings.
On TV
Fridays game will not only
feature Wang pitching and
postgame fireworks, it will be
the first television broadcast
by MyNetwork (WQMY). The
game begins at 7:05 p.m.
T R I P L E A B A S E B A L L
First-inning
run holds up
for Riders
The Times Leader staff
1
RAILRIDERS
0
RED WINGS
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre posts
third straight victory by
defeating Rochester.
N B A
The Associated Press
ATLANTA DeMar DeRo-
zan scored 30 points, Rudy Gay
added 22 and the Toronto Rap-
tors ran all over playoff-bound
Atlanta, routing the Hawks 113-
96 Tuesday night.
The Raptors made two-thirds
of their shots in the first half,
sprinting to a 68-51 lead as
DeRozan scored 19 points and
Gay chipped in with 17. Atlan-
ta went mostly with backups,
showing no sense of urgency to
claim the No. 5 seed in the East-
ern Conference.
Atlanta fell into a tie with
Chicago for the fifth spot. The
teams finish the regular season
on Wednesday, with the Hawks
traveling to New York to face the
Knicks, while the Bulls are home
against lowly Washington. Chi-
cago holds the tiebreaker.
Kyle Korver led the Hawks
with 13 points.
DeRozan, Gay lead Raptors
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013 PAgE 5B TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com S P O R T S
perienced and effective player
like Stankiewitch.
Howle was sidelined for the
first half of the 2012 season with
a torn pectoral but returned to
split time with Dieffenbach at
left guard. Urschel said Howles
limited time in the public eye
doesnt hint at what hes capable
of.
For lack of a better way to put
it, you guys have missed on this
guy, said Urschel, who came to
Penn State along with Howle in
the 2009 recruiting class. Hes
a good football player, and Ive
thought this since we got here.
Honestly, when I got here, I
thought Ty was the best offen-
sive lineman in our year of the
seven of us.
Hes a strong, tough football
player with good fundamentals
and plays on his feet. This is a
guy who isnt exactly blessed
with great intangibles, maybe,
like Donovan. Hes not a really
tall guy, but he gets the job done.
Hes a consistent player. You
dont see him missing a lot of
days with injuries. Hes a tough,
hard-working football player. Im
blessed to have him next to me.
Very strong praise, especially
from an All-Big Ten selection
like Urschel, who also called
Howle one of the most under-
rated players on the team.
Though he saw time at guard
last season, Howle has played
center for most of his life. So
there shouldnt be any issues
there.
I played center in high school
and the first four years I was
here, Howle said. And while I
was injured, I still went to all the
meetings, watched practice and
helped out as much as I could.
I was in a sling for about
a month and then I gradually
started with push-ups. Then the
incline and a little bit of weight.
Its been a gradual process.
Howle will be pushed by Man-
giro, who has worked at both
center and guard. Shrive has
worked predominately at tackle
this spring but has also spent
plenty of time at guard in the
past few seasons.
Shrive, a celebrated recruit
out of West Scranton who ar-
rived along with Urschel, Howle
and Gress, is hoping to push for
a starting job in his fifth and final
season for the Lions.
Im much stronger than Ive
ever been, and thats a credit to
(strength coach Craig Fitzger-
ald), Shrive said. Speaking for
myself, I feel a lot stronger out
there right now, and I think as
you feel stronger, you feel more
confident.
Ive just got to keep working
on technique and have a really
good summer. Try to contribute
any way possible.
PSU
Continued from Page 1B
sometimes the only way you can
teach somebody is theyve got to
make a mistake. You can coach
off of it. What did you see here?
What was going on in your mind
when you made this decision. Do
you understand we have to make
this decision, and our coverage
dictates us going one way as op-
posed to another way? You can
talk about that all you want, but
until they do it, that is the big-
gest thing for us.
Vick had a breakout year in
2010, started for the NFC in the
Pro Bowl, led the Eagles to an
NFC East title and was The As-
sociated Press Comeback Player
of the Year. But he has missed 11
games because of injuries over
the last three seasons, and is 10-
13 as a starter the last two years.
The Eagles made a surprising
decision to restructure Vicks
contract in February, and Kelly
is giving him an opportunity to
win the starting job.
Kellys up-tempo offense was
highly successful at Oregon and
would seem to be a fit for Vicks
running style. But Kelly has in-
sisted that hes impressed with
Foles skills, too. Foles is more of
a traditional pocket passer.
Dixon, who spent last season
with the Super Bowl-champion
Baltimore Ravens on their prac-
tice squad, signed a two-year
deal with the Eagles in February.
The 28-year-old Dixon had a
standout career at Oregon when
Kelly was the teams offensive
coordinator. A fifth-round pick
by Pittsburgh in 2008, Dixon has
only started three NFL games in
five seasons.
Well find a way no matter
who our quarterbacks are to put
a game plan in where they can be
successful, Kelly said. Some-
times theres a misconception of
what Im looking for in a quar-
terback. Im looking for a quar-
terback that can help us score
points and win games. If we have
to throw it 50 times, well throw
it 50 times.
Of course, the starting QB
might be a rookie that the Eagles
draft later this month. Philadel-
phia holds the No. 4 pick and
several draft experts predict
Geno Smith will be the teams
pick. Smith threw for 4,205
yards and led the nation with 42
touchdown passes last season at
West Virginia.
Florida States EJ Manuel and
Syracuses Ryan Nassib also are
possibilities outside the first
round.
EAGLES
Continued from Page 1B
The Times Leader staff
HAZLETON AREA- Berwick
swept its doubles matches to
secure a close 3-2 victory over
Hazleton Area on Tuesday in
boys tennis action.
Luke Whitenight won the
lone singles match for the
Bulldogs, while Nick Oliver and
Cole Gordner won a three-set
battle in their doubles match.
Wuster Yuhas and Anthony
Sidari won singles matches for
Hazleton Area in the loss.
Singles: Luke Whitenight (B) d. Donald Tedesco
6-2, 6-3; Wuster Yuhas (H) d. Dominic Schiccata-
no 6-1, 6-1; Anthony Sidari (H) d. Arlinson Reyes
6-3, 6-1; Doubles: Nick Oliver/Cole Gordner (B)
d. Adam Gralla/Austin Yevak 7-5, 4-6, 7-6; Blake
Whitemire/Giuseppe Baratta (B) d. Josh Provost/
Nico Makuta 6-3, 6-1.
H.S. GIRLS LACROSSE
Lake-Lehman 14, Dallas 7
Alyssa Adams scored six goals
and Mallory Wilson tallied four
goals as Lake-Lehman defeated
Dallas.
Amelia Jenkins added two
goals for Lake-Lehman, while
Emily Galasso and Rachel Pilch
chipped in a goal apiece.
Matty Mulhern and Katie
Snedeker each had three goals
apiece to lead Dallas.
Mackenzie Borum compiled
13 saves for Lake-Lehman.
H.S. BOYS LACROSSE
Dallas 8, Lake-Lehman 1
Omar Nijmeh and Logan
Brace recorded hat tricks to lead
Dallas to a victory over Lake-
Lehman.
Matt Ross and Jesse Goode
added a goal apiece, George
Pfeiffer stopped six shots in goal
for the Mountaineers.
The Dallas defense also held
Lake-Lehman to 10 shots.
H.S. SOFTBALL
Crestwood 9,
Pittston Area 0
Alyssa Davies pitched seven
shutout inning with 14 strike-
outs to lead Crestwood to the
victory.
Melanie Snyder and Juliet
Wotherspoon each added two
hits for Crestwood.
Mandina Lieback, Antoinette
Scialpi and Adison Hazlet tal-
lied the only hits for Pittston
Area.
Crestwood 104 001 3- 9
Pittston Area 000 000 0- 0
WP - Alyssa Davies, 7 IP, 0 R, 0 ER, 3 H, 14
K, 3 BB
LP - Taylor Bologa, 7 IP, 9 R, 3 ER, 8 H, 3 K, 2 BB
Top Hitters: CRE- Rachael Ritz, double; Mela-
nie Synder, double, single; Juliet Wotherspoon, 2
singles; Colleen Bourum, single; Ashlee Olenqin-
ski, single; Alyssa Davies, single. PITT- Mandina
Lieback, single; Antoinette Scialpi , single; Adison
Hazlet, single.
COLLEGE BASEBALL
Wilkes 13, PSU Berks 4
Tom Ring led Wilkes Univer-
sity with four hits and four RBI
as the Colonels defeated Penn
State Berks Tuesday.
Joe Dantas added three hits,
while Nick Craig, Scott Skam-
mer, Tyler Marino and Dan Pi-
sanchyn chipped in two apiece.
Marc Perry earned the victory
on the mound, recording five
strikeouts and allowing two
runs in three innings of work.
Ring pitched the final inning
and didnt allow a base runner.
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
Wilkes wins two
Alex Hoops went 5-for-8 with
three RBI to lead Wilkes in its
doubleheader sweep of Penn
State Hazleton with 7-5 and 9-7
victories.
The Lady Colonels jumped
out to a 6-0 lead in game one
and never relinquished it. Hoops
had two hits and two RBI in the
opener, while Jesalyn Paveletz
and Brooke Chapin each added
RBI hits.
Chapin also earned the vic-
tory pitching seven innings and
striking out three.
Emily McGrath also blasted
a three-run home run, while
Mandy Seccia and Kait Brown
recorded two hits apiece in
Game 2.
COLLEGE TENNIS
Wilkes 9,
Kings 0
Wilkes won via shutout in the
battle for sole possession of first
place in the Freedom Confer-
ence.
Melanie Nolt, Ally Kristofco,
Katie Lynn, Amanda Holyk and
Ana English each won in singles
and doubles matches for the
Lady Colonels.
With the win, Wilkes moved
to 12-1 overall and 5-0 in the
conference. Kings dropped to
4-8 on the season and 3-1 in the
conference.
Misericordia 6,
Keystone 3
Tony Goodall won his singles
match and teamed up with
Nick Hendry to win a doubles
match as the Cougars defeated
Keystone College.
Robert Knipper earned his
first collegiate singles victory
for Misericordia.
AJ Grasso and Shane Hall
earned an 8-6 win in their
doubles match, while Christian
Pugliese and Eric Correll each
chipped in singles victories for
the Cougars.
L O C A L R O U N D U P
Berwick sweeps doubles
en route to tennis victory
Cashman
helps Dawgs
top Hanover
The Times Leader staff
HANOVER TWP.- Matt Cash-
man recorded 11 kills, eight digs
and nine service points to lead
Berwick to a 3-1 victory over
Hanover Area in a boys volley-
ball match on Tuesday.
Dayton Broyan added eight
kills, four digs and six service
points for the Bulldogs.
Derek Brodginski led Hanover
Area with 19 digs, seven assists
and two kills.
Berwick 25 25 20 26
Hanover Area 18 13 25 24
BER: Matt Cashman 11 kills, 8 digs, 9 service
points; Dayton Broyan 8 kills, 4 digs, 6 service
points; Reece Murrelmen 5 kills, 3 digs, 12 service
points.
HAN: Derek Brodginski 19 digs, 7 assists, 2
kills; Jason Leiphart 5 kills, 6 blocks, 8 digs; Robert
Brenner 5 kills, 7 blocks, 4 service points.
Dallas 3, Crestwood 0
Bryce Mattson recorded 12
kills, three blocks and two aces
as Dallas defeated Crestwood in
straight sets.
Brian Reese added seven kills
and two blocks.
Nick Banos led Crestwood
with 13 kills and 11 assists.
Crestwood 21 22 15
Dallas 25 25 25
CRE: Nick Banos 13 kills, 11 assists; Kyle Price
12 assists, 12 digs.
DAL: Bryce Mattson 12 kills, 3 blocks, 2 aces;
Brian Reese 7 kills, 2 blocks; James DelPriore 19
assists, 5 service points.
North Pocono 3,
Lake-Lehman 0
Joe Wojcik recorded 21 assists
and two kills to lead Lake-Lehm-
an in its loss to North Pocono.
Kevin Masters added seven
kills and two blocks in the loss.
North Pocono 25 25 25
Lake-Lehman 18 20 21
NP: Billy Morrell 3 aces, 8 service points, 12 kills,
5 digs; Eric Kramer 6 service points, 8 kills, 15 digs.
LEH: Joe Wojcik 21 assists, 2 kills; Kevin Mas-
ters 7 kills, 2 blocks; Brian Devine 2 aces, 8 service
points, 6 kills.
Hes a consistent
player. You dont see
him missing a lot of
days with injuries. Hes
a tough, hard-working
football player. Im
blessed
to have him next to me.
John Urschel
On fellow offensive lineman Ty Howle
Sutphen leads Redeemer to boys victory
The Times Leader staff
WILKES-BARRE- Frazee
Sutphen recorded two indi-
vidual victories and raced on
a winning relay team to lead
Holy Redeemer to a 77.5-63.5
victory over Meyers Tuesday
in a boys high school track
and field meet.
Charles Ross added two
individual victories for the
Royals.
Meyers won two of three
relay events and Raheem
Twyman led Meyers with
three first-place finishes.
3200m Relay: 1. HR (Sutphen, Gill, Foust,
Amarando), 8:59.1; Triple Jump: 1. MEY Rob-
inson, 396; 2. HR Pahler; 3. HR West; 110/100
HH: 1. MEY Twyman, 15.6; 2. HR Kane; 3. HR
Mark; Shot Put: 1. MEY Urban, 407 1/2; 2.
MEY Havard; 3. HRAmbrulavage; 100m Dash:
1. HR Ross, 11.5; 2. MEY Adams; 1600m Run:
1. HR Sutphen, 4:40; 2. HR Ford; 3. MEY Sny-
der; Long Jump: 1. MEY Twyman, 197; 2.
HR Pahler; 3. HR Bond; 400m Relay: 1. MEY
(Edward, Adams, Twyman, Robinson), 46.8;
400m Dash: 1. MEY T. Snyder, 53.8; 2. MEY
Schlowitz; 3. HR Gavin; Discus: 1. HR McMa-
nus, 110.3; 2. HR Ambrulavage; 3. MEY Craig;
300m Hurdles: 1. MEY Twyman, 42.4; 2. HR
John Kane; 3. HR Andrew Mark; 800m Run: 1.
HR Sutphen, 2:10.3; 2. HR Foust; 3. MEY Sny-
der; 200m Dash: 1. HR Ross, 24.1; 2. MEY Co-
rey Adams; 3. HR Jeremy Heiser; High Jump:
1. MEY Robertson, 58; 2. MEY Bennet; 3. HR
West; 3200m Run: 1. HR Ford, 10:18.9; 2. HR
Gill; 3. HR Foust; Javelin: 1. HR Fahey, 119.9;
2. HR Villani; 3. HR Katulak; 1600m Relay: 1.
MEY (Robertson, Snyder, Schlowitz, Bennet),
3:42.2.
Northwest 95, GAR 52
Northwest Area won two of
three relay events in its vic-
tory over GAR.
Northwest added 11 first-
place finishes in individual
events to secure the win.
3200m Relay: 1. NW (Briggs, Piestrak, Stola,
Lewis), 9:41; Triple Jump: 1. GAR Merth, 377
1/4; 2. NW Politz; 3. GAR Crosby; 110/100
HH: 1. NW Burger, 15.8; 2. GAR Merth; 3. GAR
Welkey; Shot Put: 1. NW Sirak, 372; 2. GAR
Gresham; 3. GAR Easter; 100m Dash: 1. GAR
Maurent, 11.50; 2. NW Kennedy; 3. NW Politz;
Pole Vault: 1. NW Krouse, 106; 2. NWAdams;
1600m Run: 1. NW Lewis, 5:09; 2. GAR Old-
ziejewski; 3. GAR Tlantenchi; Long Jump: 1.
NW Burger, 1810 1/2; 2. NW Dillon; 3. GAR
Benton; 400mRelay: 1. GAR(Benton, Maurent,
Hernandez, Abdul-Gaiz), 47.0; 400m Dash: 1.
GAR Benton, 54.0; 2. GAR Merth; 3. NW Stola;
Discus: 1. NW Mazonkey, 1136; 2. GAR Eas-
ter; 3. NW Sirak; 300m Hurdles: 1. NW Burger,
43.6; 2. GAR Welkey; 3. NW LeFevre; 800m
Run: 1. NW Briggs, 2:16; 2. NW Piestrak; 3.
GAR Rivera; 200m Dash: 1. GAR Maurent,
24.3; 2. NW Kennedy; 3. NW Pegarella; High
Jump: 1. NWBurger, 62; 2. NWKissel; 3200m
Run: 1. NW Lewis, 11:32; 2. NW Oldziejcwski;
Javelin: 1. NW Mazonkey, 1372; 2. NW Sirak;
3. NW Pegarella; 1600m Relay: 1. NW (Briggs,
Stola, Kennedy, Piestrak), 3:56.
GIRLS
Holy Redeemer 87,
Meyers 54
Fallyn Boich won all three
throwing events to lead Holy
Redeemer to a win over Mey-
ers.
Alyssa Cruz added two indi-
vidual victories and raced on
two winning relay teams.
Riley Conahan won the
100m and 200m dash to lead
Meyers.
3200m Relay: 1. HR (Sominsky, Gill, Gre-
gorio, Cruz), 11:51; Triple Jump: 1. MEY Qui-
nones, 31.7; 2. MEY Mahalak; 3. HR Williams;
110/100 HH: 1. MEY Qt. Gross, 15.3; 2. HR
Warnagaris; 3. MEY Konopki; Shot Put: 1. HR
Boich, 315 1/2; 2. MEY Winder; 3. HR Hilenski;
100m Dash: 1. MEY Conahan, 12.9; 2. HR Mel.
Kusakavitch; 3. MEY Roberts; 1600m Run: 1.
HR Cruz, 5:28; 2. HR Gregorio; 3. HR Duraco;
Long Jump: 1. MEY Gross, 172; 2. HR Ku-
sakavitch; 3. MEY Mahalak; 400m Relay: 1.
HR, 54.1; 400m Dash: 1. HR Mel. Kusakavitch,
65.3; 2. HR Benas; 3. HR Jefferies; Discus:
1. HR Boich, 11511; 2. HR Turosky; 3. MEY
Winder; 300m Hurdles: 1. MEY Gross, 49.5; 2.
HR Warnagaris; 3. MEY Konopki; 800m Run:
1. HR Cruz, 2:34.4; 2. HR Gregorio; 3. MEY
Hernandez; 200m Dash: 1. MEY Conahan,
27.0; 2. HR Mal. Kusakavitch; 3. MEY Roberts;
High Jump: 1. MEY Gross, 50; 2. MEY Kelly
Mahalak; 3. HR Shandra; 3200m Run: 1. HR
Duraco, 13:03.1; 2. HR Gill; 3. HR Updike; Jav-
elin: 1. HR Boich, 1112; 2. MEY Winder; 3. HR
Noss; 1600m Relay: 1. HR (Cruz, Kusakavitch,
Benas, Jeffries), 4:38.
Northwest 124, GAR 21
Northwest Area won 16
events en route to a victory
over GAR.
Amanda Jimcosky and Han-
nah Retherford each recorded
three individual victories for
Northwest.
Nashae Caruso won the 400
to lead GAR.
3200m Relay: 1. NW (Retherford, H. Ever-
ett, Jones, M. Rupert), 12:16; Triple Jump:
1. NW Jimcosky, 309; 2. NW Rupert; 3. NW
Maclean; 110/100 HH: 1. NW Lencoski, 23.3;
2. GAR McCloe; Shot Put: 1. NW Womelsdorf,
291; 2. NW Walsh; 3. NW Ford; 100m Dash:
1. NW Gavin, 13.6; 2. GAR Taylor; 3. NW Mar-
vin; Pole Vault: 1. NW E. Everett, 80; 2. NW
Krolick; 1600m Run: 1. NW Retherford, 6:14;
2. NW Jones; Long Jump: 1. NW Jimcosky,
136; 2. NW Gavin; 3. NW Brubaker; 400m Re-
lay: 1. GAR (Taylor, McCloe, Rocha, Caruso),
57.9; 400m Dash: 1. GAR Caruso, 67.6; 2. NW
Brubaker; 3. NW H. Everett; Discus: 1. NW
Womelsdorf, 982; 2. NW Walsh; 3. NW Ford;
300m Hurdles: 1. NW M. Rupert, 56.9; 2. NW
Lencoski; 3. NW C. Rupert; 800m Run: 1. NW
E. Everett, 2:42; 2. GAR Oldziejewski; 3. NW H.
Everett; 200m Dash: 1. NW Gavin, 30.0; 2. NW
Brubaker; 3. GAR Taylor; High Jump: 1. NW
Jimcosky, 50; 2. NW C. Rupert; 3200m Run:
1. NWRetherford, 13:51; 2. NWJones; Javelin:
1. NW M. Rupert, 1024; 2. NW Womelsdorf; 3.
GAR Hartman; 1600m Relay: 1. NW (H. Ever-
ett, E. Everett, Krolick, Brubaker), 5:07.
H I g H S C H O O L T R A C K
H . S . V O L L E Y B A L L N H L R O U N D U P
AP PHOTO
The New York Islanders Colin McDonald, left, and Michael Grabner, right, celebrate Grabners
goal on Florida Panthers goalie Jacob Markstrom in the second period of an NHL game Tues-
day at Nassau Coliseum in Uniondale, N.Y.
Grabner scores 2 in Islanders win
UNIONDALE, N.Y. Mi-
chael Grabner scored twice
and Evgeni Nabokov made 26
saves as the New York Island-
ers moved closer to a playoff
berth with a 5-2 victory over
the Florida Panthers on Tues-
day night.
Playing before a boisterous
crowd at Nassau Coliseum, the
Islanders earned their ninth
time in 12 games while playing
their final regular-season home
game. The Islanders, 10-11-3
at home after starting 2-8-1,
will begin a season-ending,
five-game trip on Thursday in
Toronto.
With a 14-5-3 mark since
March 1, the Islanders hold
seventh place in the Eastern
Conference. New York, seeing
its first postseason appearance
since 2007, has allowed two
goals or fewer in nine straight
games.
Matt Moulson, Mark
Streit and Radek Martinek
also scored for the Islanders,
who bounced back from a 1-0
overtime loss to the New York
Rangers on Saturday.
Capitals 5, Maple Leafs 1
WASHINGTON Alex
Ovechkin scored his NHL-lead-
ing 28th goal, and the Wash-
ington Capitals enjoyed a rare
feeling of dominance outside
their division, winning their
eighth straight with a victory
over the Toronto Maple Leafs.
Jack Hillen, Martin Erat,
Troy Brouwer and Marcus
Johansson also scored, and
Braden Holtby made 29 saves
for the Southeast Division-
leading Capitals.
The Capitals have moved
into playoff position by feast-
ing on the weak Southeast,
going 14-3 within the division,
but they entered Tuesdays
game just 9-14-2 against the
rest of the Eastern Conference.
All but two of those nine wins
were by one goal.
So it was a major morale
boost that they were able to
manhandle Toronto, which is
closing in on the franchises
first playoff berth since 2004.
Flyers 4, Rangers 2
PHILADELPHIA Brayden
Schenn, Erik Gustafsson and
Kimmo Timonen scored to
give Philadelphias faint playoff
hopes a boost, and the Flyers
beat the New York Rangers for
their second win in two nights.
Mats Zuccarello and Derek
Stepan scored for the Rang-
ers, who have a tenuous hold
on the eighth and final playoff
spot in the Eastern Confer-
ence. The Rangers have 46
points, five more than the
Flyers. With five games left,
the Flyers have three teams to
pass to get above the postsea-
son cutoff.
Jakub Voracek added an
empty-net goal in the final
seconds to seal the victory for
Philadelphia.
New Yorks Henrik Lun-
dqvist was solid in net but two
goals off the post doomed the
Rangers.
Senators 3, Hurricanes 2
OTTAWA Craig Ander-
son made 32 saves to help
the Ottawa Senators beat the
Carolina Hurricanes for their
third straight win.
Mika Zibanejad, Cory
Conacher and Chris Neil all
scored as Ottawa remained
in sixth place in the Eastern
Conference, one point ahead of
the New York Islanders.
Justin Faulk and Eric Staal
scored for the Hurricanes,
who got 31 saves from Justin
Peters.
The Senators returned to
Ottawa from Boston amid
tightened security measures a
day after the bombings at the
Boston marathon. Their game
against the Bruins, postponed
Monday, was rescheduled for
April 28.
Ottawa defenseman Jared
Cowen played his first game
since undergoing hip surgery
in November that was expect-
ed to end his season.
Blues 2, Canucks 1
ST. LOUIS -- Jay Bouw-
meester tied the score midway
through the third period, and
Andy McDonald and Alex
Steen scored in the shootout
to lead the Blues to a win over
the Vancouver Canucks.
Brian Elliott made 21 saves
in regulation and stopped
Derek Roy and Alexandre
Burrows in the shootout,
solidifying the Blues chances
in a tight Western Conference
race. Bowmeesters goal was
his first since joining the Blues
in a trade-deadline deal.
Alexander Edler scored on a
power play late in the second
period for Vancouver. Cory
Schneider made 35 saves in
regulation but surrendered
two goals on three shootout
chances.
The Canucks played for the
third time in four nights, all on
the road.
The Associated Press
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www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER PAGE 6B WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013 S P O R T S
AP PHOTO
Arlo White, left, listens as Rebecca Lowe speaks during a joint
NBC and English Premier League (EPL) press conference on
Tuesday in New York. All 380 EPL games will be televised live by
NBC and its networks next season as part of a multiyear con-
tract. White will be the lead play-by-play voice during coverage
and Lowe will host the telecasts beginning Aug. 17.
S O C C E R
NEW YORK NBC is all
in with the English Premier
League.
The EPL feels the same way
about the U.S. broadcaster.
All 380 English Premier
League games will be televised
live by NBC and its networks
next season as part of a three-
year, $250 million contract.
The deal comes at a time
when Fox and ESPN also have
heavy involvement in soccer. But
the worlds most popular league
in the worlds most popular sport
will belong solely to NBC for the
next three years.
Nowhere do they consume
sports like they do here, Pre-
mier League CEO Richard Scu-
damore said Tuesday. We are
not unhappy with our current
broadcast partners (in the Unit-
ed States), but I can see we are
on the threshold of taking it to a
new level.
The telecasts begin Aug. 17
and will be carried on NBC, NBC
Sports Network, Telemundo,
Mun2, other NBCtelevision prop-
erties, and various digital outlets.
NBC is scheduled to air 20
games, with 154 on NBC Sports
Network; 76 of the telecasts will
be in Spanish on Telemundo or
Mun2; and 22 will be shown on
other NBC Sports Group chan-
nels.
Windows for the national
telecasts are 7 a.m. and 10 a.m.
ET Saturdays on NBCSN, and
12:30 p.m. on NBC; 8 a.m. Sun-
days on NBCSN and 11 a.m. on
that channel and Telemundo;
and 2:30 p.m. ET Mondays on
NBCSN.
In addition, NBC is making
available free to all carriers of
NBC Sports Network a pack-
age of every EPL game played
at 10 a.m. ET on Saturdays
the primary starting time in the
Premier League. Called Premier
League Extra Time, it is similar
to DirecTVs NFLSunday Ticket.
I cant wait for Aug. 17 to
come and we get started, NBC
Sports Group Chairman Mark
Lazarus said. Its about making
this one of the key pillars of our
landscape.
Arlo White, who currently
calls MLS games on NBCSN, will
handle play by play from Eng-
land. Former Premier League
players Lee Dixon and Graeme
Le Saux will handle analysis.
Former England national team
star Gary Lineker will be a spe-
cial contributor.
NBCSNplans 600 hours of orig-
inal and weekly studio program-
ming. Rebecca Lowe, a fixture on
European soccer coverage in Eu-
rope, will host a studio showfrom
NBCs international broadcast
center in Stamford, Conn. But
all game production will be done
on-site in England, with NBC us-
ing England-based announcers on
games White doesnt work.
Lowe recognizes the challenge
of appealing to not only the avid
soccer and EPL fans, but to the
casual viewers and even to
newcomers.
Its a difficult balance, she
said. We have been aware of
that from Day 1. Ive never really
had to do that.
But I think Premier League
fans in America are the most so-
phisticated of football fans. Un-
like back home, you have to seek
out the games here or you did
until now.
NBC networks to televise EPL next season
By BARRY WILNER
AP Sports Writer
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MIKE JOHNSON 970-1100
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WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013 PAgE 7B TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com S P O R T S
(1952-61) with the Chicago
Cardinals and NewYork Giants.
In his second career, he became
a voice so familiar to several
generations of sports fans, not
only those of the NFL.
He started doing NFL games
for CBS in 1964, and became a
play-by-play guy 10 years later.
He was also part of CBSs cover-
age of the PGA Tour, including
the Masters from 1968-94, and
the U.S. Open tennis tourna-
ment.
When CBS lost its NFL deal
after the 1993 season, Summer-
all switched to Fox to keep call-
ing NFL games with Madden.
He had hoped to keep working
with CBS for other events like
the Masters, but network exec-
utives saw it otherwise. At the
time, CBS Sports anchor Jim
Nantz said he was very sad-
dened that Summerall didnt
get to leave CBS under his own
terms.
He is CBS Sports. I always
thought he could work here un-
til he was 75 or 80 years old,
Nantz told The Philadelphia
Daily News then. Hes been a
much larger influence on my
career than I think he realizes.
There will be a piece of Pat
Summerall on the air as long as
I do golf for this network.
A recovering alcoholic, Sum-
merall had a liver transplant in
April 2004. The lifesaving sur-
gery was necessary even after
12 years of sobriety.
After an intervention involv-
ing, among others, former NFL
Commissioner Pete Rozelle,
former CBS Sports President Pe-
ter Lund and former PGA Tour
Commissioner Deane Beaman,
Summerall checked into the
Betty Ford Clinic in April 1992.
I had no intention of quit-
ting, I was having too good
a time, Summerall said in a
2000 Associated Press story.
The prescribed stay at Betty
Ford is 28 days. They kept me
33 because I was so angry at the
people who did the interven-
tion, the first five days didnt do
me any good.
Summerall received the liver
of a 13-year-old junior high foot-
ball player from Arkansas who
died unexpectedly from an an-
eurysm. Summerall had an emo-
tional meeting with the teen-
agers family the following year.
Summerall often shared his
testimony with Christian groups
and told his story when speak-
ing before other organizations.
In his 2006 book, Summerall:
On and Off The Air, he frankly
discussed his personal struggles
and professional successes.
Long before broadcasting Su-
per Bowl games, 16 for televi-
sion and 10 more for radio in
fact, before there was even a Su-
per Bowl Summerall played
a role in what is known in foot-
ball circles as The Greatest
Game Ever Played, the 1958
NFL championship.
SUMMERALL
Continued from Page 1B
g O L F N O T E S
AP PHOTO
Tiger Woods takes a drop on the 15th hole after his ball went
into the water during the second round of the Masters golf
tournament Friday in Augusta, Ga. Woods was assessed a two-
stroke penalty because of the drop.
AUGUSTA, Ga. Rules
officials from golf organiza-
tions around the world work
at the Masters, most of them
assigned various parts of the
golf course. But it remains the
only major championship that
doesnt have a rules official
walk with every group.
Even more peculiar is that
the Masters has the smallest
field. With only 93 players this
year, there were only 31 groups
all four days threesomes
Thursday and Friday, and two-
somes Saturday and Sunday
for the 61 players who made
the cut.
Could that change in light
of the ruling involving Tiger
Woods?
He took an incorrect drop
on the 15th hole after hitting
into the water in the second
round. Fred Ridley, chairman
of the competition committees,
responded to a TV viewer call-
ing in the violation and didnt
immediately recognize the mis-
take based on video evidence.
It was only after Woods said in
an interview he dropped it 2
yards farther back did Ridley
review the tape again. Woods
was given a two-shot penalty,
but not disqualified. Ridley
invoked Rule 33-7, which gives
the committee discretion not
to disqualify. In this case, he
felt Augusta erred by not pre-
senting the evidence to Woods
before he signed his card.
Ridley would not say if the
Masters would have officials
will each group next year. That
likely would be up to Masters
chairman Billy Payne.
If theres one thing about
the Masters tournament we
look at everything, Ridley
said. And do that with the
competition, so well be look-
ing at this situation. What
could we do in the future? Is
there any different processes
we could employ? We look at
the entire competition every
year and try to get better.
ROOKIE CHANGES: Mar-
tin Kaymer is no longer eligible
to win rookie of the year on the
PGA Tour.
The PGA Tour board voted
at its last meeting to change
the eligibility. Previously, a
players rookie season was the
year he became a member
(including special temporary
members) and played in at
least 10 tournaments as a
member. The new regulation
states that new members
such as Kaymer will not be
eligible for the rookie of the
year award if they had played
in more than seven PGA Tour
events as a pro in any previous
season.
There have been cases
throughout the years when a
highly ranked, veteran player
who has not been a PGA Tour
member previously has been
eligible for the award a situ-
ation that can be confusing for
fans and seems to go against
the spirit of the award, the
tour said in its newsletter to
players.
BEST WITHOUT A
MAJOR: Lee Westwood can
officially be considered the
best player to have never won
a major.
Sergio Garcia is right behind.
Westwood now has played
60 majors without winning, the
most of anyone among active
players. He has seven finishes
in the top 3, including runner-
up finishes in the Masters,
British Open. He also missed a
playoff by one shot in the 2008
U.S. Open and 2009 British
Open.
He tied for eighth in the
Masters this year.
Garcia has played in 58
majors without winning,
and he has the distinction of
the longest active streak of
consecutive majors played at
55. Garcia lost the 2007 British
Open in a playoff, and he was
runner-up twice in the PGA
Championship. He also tied
for eighth at Augusta, despite
a 66 in the first round for the
outright lead.
Both are closing in on Tom
Kite, who played 63 majors as
a pro before he won the 1992
U.S. Open at Pebble Beach
when he was 42.
USGA RETIREMENT: The
USGA is losing 50 years of
experience and passion when
Rhonda Glenn retires on May
9.
Glenns affiliation with the
USGA began in 1963 when she
played the U.S. Girls Junior
Amateur, the first of her 11
USGA events, which included
five U.S. Womens Amateurs.
Over the years, she has expand-
ed her role as a writer, broad-
caster and historian, and she
later became a fixture running
interviews at the U.S. Womens
Open.
Masters might consider
officials with every group
By DOUG FERGUSON
AP Golf Writer
health. You have to practice
hard and play hard, Hynes
said. The concern is making
sure were giving guys the right
amount of work level to be
sharp and ready when the play-
offs start.
Take it easy
After winning both games
in St. Johns last weekend and
clinching a playoff spot, Hynes
rewarded his players with a
day off on Tuesday. The team
will resume its regular practice
schedule today at Coal Street.
Depth at another level
During the preseason there
was a lot of talk centered
around the Penguins depth at
the defensive position. But now
the organization has stockpiled
depth at the goaltending posi-
tion as well, beginning in the
offseason when Jeff Zatkoff
was signed as a free agent and
Pittsburgh selected netmind-
ers Matthew Murray and Sean
Maguire in the 2012 draft. Over
the weekend they added stand-
out college goaltender Eric
Hartzell when they signed him
for the rest of the season.
Its a situation that has Hynes
excited.
I havent seen (Hartzell)
play, but his track record and
the success that hes had is
impressive, Hynes said. Its
encouraging. Its something we
talked about as an organization
over the last couple of years
and its good to see weve taken
some steps to strengthen those
areas. Its such an important po-
sition.
Defensive depth for the
playoffs
The Penguins signed D Peter
Merth to a PTO on Tuesday.
Merth recorded a goal, 16
assists and 75 penalty minutes
in 48 games with the Wheeling
Nailers this year. The 25-year
old also saw AHL action during
the 2012-13 season, signing a
PTO with the Hamilton Bull-
dogs on Mar. 15 and posting
an assist in seven appearances.
Now a third-year pro, Merth
played in 11 contests for Wil-
kes-Barre/Scranton last season,
contributing two assists and 22
minutes of penalties.
Hynes said he hoped to bring
Merth up this season but an
opening never presented itself.
We feel he can help our team
with depth and physicality for
the playoffs, Hynes said.
In other moves, Hynes said
W Chris Collins, who has been
playing on a PTO, will stay with
the team for the playoffs.
PENS
Continued from Page 1B
This is what everyone
thought might happen follow-
ing the 9/11 attacks, said Tom
Derderian, coach of the Greater
Boston Track Club and author of
a book about the Boston Mara-
thon.
This is a 26-mile foot race.
With both sides of the street,
thats 52 miles to secure, Derde-
rian said. How? You cant have
everyone go through metal de-
tectors.
Marathons arent just for elite
athletes: They have steadily in-
creased in popularity among
recreational runners and those
raising money for charity. In the
aftermath of Mondays attack,
which President Barack Obama
called an act of terrorism, some
marathons heard from run-
ners wondering whether races
would be canceled. Yet nearly
40 events, all over the globe, are
set for this weekend alone
including Hamburg, Belgrade,
Salt Lake City, Lansing, Mich.,
and the Jersey Shore. There was
no indication that any would be
called off.
Scott Dickey, CEO of Compet-
itor Group Inc., which manages
more than 35 marathons and half
marathons around the world,
said hes been in deep conversa-
tions already with the FBI and
government agencies to talk
about enhancing security pro-
tocol and personnel for the St.
Jude Country Music Marathon
and Half Marathon in Nashville
on April 27.
What were going to do with
yesterdays event is were going
to learn from it, and were going
to increase, certainly in the near
term and probably permanently,
the number of security person-
nel, both private and public, at
our start lines and finish lines,
Dickey said. Were going to
review the protocol and pro-
cedures that are in place and
enhance and improve them so
that were in a better position to
prevent these types of tragedies
from taking place.
Susie Smisek, director of Sep-
tembers Omaha Marathon, said
Boston does, indeed, change the
way race organizers go about
their job now.
Well make sure we have more
security available, that people
are more aware and are aware
of their surroundings, Smisek
said. Will it make us more vigi-
lant in what we do? You bet.
Rick Nealis, director of the
Marine Corps Marathon since
1993, pointed to factors that
make these races unique among
sports and, therefore, more of
a challenge to secure.
Its a participatory sport. At
any running event, especially
Boston, world champion and
Olympic athletes stand at the
start line, and at the same time,
theres someone from Boise,
Idaho, or Duluth, Minn., that did
the qualifying time and are in the
same field, on the same course,
in the same weather as these
champions, competing, Nealis
said.
In stadiums, turnstiles, hard-
ened buildings, you can control
whos going in, and do all the
safety checks and have a secure
event, added Nealis, whose race
course cuts through Virginia and
the nations capital, ending near
the Iwo Jima Memorial. On
roads, in an open venue, when
you take 26.2 miles of open
space, its the beauty of the sport
and at the same time, in this day
and age, part of the risk assess-
ment. Unless we decide were
going to run around a track in
quarter-mile loops hundreds of
times.
The New York City Mara-
thons finishers grew from nearly
28,000 in 1992 to more than
47,000 in 2011, and organizers
estimate theyve had as many
as roughly 2 million spectators
in a year. The race was not held
in 2012, after Superstorm Sandy
hit the area, but Mayor Michael
Bloomberg said Tuesday: Its
certainly our intention to have
the marathon this November.
A marathon is 26 miles long,
so, you know, there are points
of vulnerability by definition,
there are going to be, New York
City Police Commissioner Ray-
mond Kelly said, noting the races
security plans will be reevaluated.
According to Running USAs
website, a record 30 marathons
had more than 10,000 finishers
in 2012, led by Chicago with
more than 37,000, followed by
London with more than 36,000.
The Honolulu Marathon
ranked seventh on that list with
just over 24,000.
You cant plan to stop every-
thing, but certainly everyone
will look at tightening things
up, for sure. You have to strike
some balances between what
is feasible and what is possible
and what is necessary, said Jim
Barahal, president of Decem-
bers Honolulu race. Its going
to have effects outside the mara-
thon world, which in reality is a
pretty low-profile world. It can
happen anywhere, at any time.
Dorte Vibjerg, organizer of the
Copenhagen Marathon, said the
incident in Boston means we will
have more focus on security.
We can never prevent any-
thing from happening, she said,
but we can minimize and react
fast should anything happen.
MARATHON
Continued from Page 1B
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135 Legals/
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EXECUTORS
NOTICE
Estate of Charlotte
J. Foustner
20 Slope Street
Nanticoke,
PA 18634
Date of Death:
January 27, 2013
Notice is hereby
given that Letters
Testamentary in the
above named
estate have been
granted to the
undersigned, to
whom all persons
owing said estate
are requested to
make payment and
those having claims
or demands against
t make known
same without delay.
THOMAS A.
DEWALD
EXECUTOR
c/o Anthony J.
McDonald, Esquire
Law Offices of Bull,
Bull & McDonald,
LLP
106 Market St.
Berwick, PA 18603
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www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER PAGE 8B WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013 S P O R T S
AP FILE PHOTO
Denver Broncos cornerback Champ Bailey is not willing to con-
cede anything to age as he nears his 35th birthday and has no
plans to move to safety.
ENGLEWOOD, Colo.
Champ Bailey is cranky. Hes
also as confident as ever.
And no, hes not going to ad-
mit his body is creaking as he ap-
proaches his 35th birthday and
prepares to face rookie receiv-
ers who were just learning their
ABCs when he entered the NFL
in 1999.
Hes still irked by that loss to
Baltimore in the playoffs and the
way he got burned by Ravens re-
ceiver Torrey Smith. Hes heard
the whispers that he should
move to safety and how quarter-
backs now wont shy away from
him anymore.
With nearly three dozen can-
dles about to adorn his birthday
cake, Bailey insists hes not will-
ing to concede anything to age,
has no plans to switch positions
and welcomes any quarterback
or offensive coordinator who
wants to target him in 2013.
And if the Broncos want to se-
lect his heir apparent in the up-
coming draft, hes fine with that,
too.
Im blessed, trust me, Bailey
said this week as the Broncos re-
ported for the start of voluntary
offseason workouts. Everybody
back there would love to stand up
here and say, Im 35 years old. It
is what it is. When my time runs
out, Ill run away from it. But for
the time being, Im still here.
Bailey was among several
Broncos stars who had poor
performances in their early exit
from the playoffs three months
ago after theyd earned the AFCs
top seed with an 11-game win-
ning streak and seemed Super
Bowl-bound.
Smith got behind the 12-time
Pro Bowl cornerback for a 59-yard
touchdown and then beat him for
a 32-yard score, all part of an un-
characteristic day for the Bron-
cos, who lost that game in double
overtime, once again denying Bai-
ley a chance at a championship
that has always eluded him.
Dont get me wrong, but
even if wed won, Id look at it
the same way: What did I mess
up? What I couldve done better
going forward, little things like
that. Im always looking at tape
the same way, not hurting about
it, Bailey said. It does hurt that
you lose the last game, but you
cant let it affect you.
Bailey concedes the 59-yard
TD was entirely his fault but ar-
gues he was in position on the
32-yarder.
So, in his eyes, that bad af-
ternoon doesnt foreshadow an
abrupt drop in his game.
Just recognizing what he was
doing faster. A guy like that you
cant be a half-step behind, Bai-
ley said. He got me on that play.
The second TD he just made a
great play, caught me slipping.
But on that long touchdown play
early in the first half, he got away
from me. The guys fast. You
cant lose a half-step.
Bailey insists he hasnt done
that as he approaches his 15th
season in the NFL.
Its my responsibility. When
that guy runs down field, Ive got
to be on top of it, Bailey said.
Error on my part, and they took
advantage of it.
Baileys transgressions were
largely overlooked in the im-
mediate aftermath of that game
because safety Rahim Moore al-
lowed Jacoby Jones to score on
a 70-yard touchdown pass in the
waning seconds of regulation.
Bailey will try to help the
third-year safety overcome that
Bill Buckner-like ball-through-
the-legs moment and he said
Moore has the right frame of
mind to get over it.
Lets go try again, thats
pretty much his mentality, Bai-
ley said. I dont think it affected
himas much as people think. Be-
cause he got so much better last
year. I cant wait to see him im-
prove this year. People want to
talk about one play even with
myself, you cant define some-
body off one play.
Still, in the foggy hangover
of that loss, fans quickly began
grumbling about Bailey need-
ing to move to safety lest he face
many more afternoons like that
one.
Theyre going to do that ev-
ery play. I dont really care, Bai-
ley said. Its not just one or two
plays thats going to determine
how good you are its the
body of work. Those plays dont
define me.
Especially at 35.
Most cornerbacks blow out
35 candles on their cake about
the time theyre relaxing on the
beach or chipping out of sand
bunkers, not preparing for the
grind of another NFL season.
With Baileys advanced age
and with their other starting cor-
nerback, free agent Dominique
Rodgers-Cromartie, playing on a
one-year deal, the Broncos could
draft a cornerback high in next
weeks draft.
Thats fine, Bailey said. I
dont really look at that any kind
of way. I see what players they
draft, howcanthey helpus? Plain
and simple. Every guy is looking
to be replaced at some point. Ive
been looked at that way for the
past six or seven years.
Bailey is accustomed to the
ever-changing landscape of NFL
rosters.
The Broncos made two big
changes on his side of the ball
this offseason, losing pass-rush-
er Elvis Dumervil and signing
Rodgers-Cromartie.
By ARNIE STAPLETON
AP Pro Football Writer
Bailey brushes off age, talk of moving to safety
K
BUSINESS
SECTI ON B
IN BRIEF
New GM pickups to debut
General Motors plans to roll out a line
of completely revamped midsize pickup
trucks, with gas mileage and features
designed to take sales from Toyotas
market-leading Tacoma.
The trucks will replace the aging
Chevrolet Colorado and GMC Canyon.
Mark Reuss, GMs North American
president, said Tuesday the trucks will
be able to do 95 percent of the work that
a big truck can do.
Sales of midsize and small pickups
slumped after the recession as business-
es curtailed spending. Ford Motor Co.
stopped selling its Ranger small pickup
in the U.S. in December of 2011 to focus
on sales of its full-size F-150.
Now truck sales are recovering as
parts of the U.S. economy, particularly
the housing sector, recover.
Internet advertising up
U.S. Internet advertising revenue grew
15 percent to a record $36.6 billion in
2012, with mobile ad revenue growing
faster than other types, according to a
new report Tuesday.
The report from the Interactive Adver-
tising Bureau and PricewaterhouseCoo-
pers said that mobile ad revenue more
than doubled from the previous year to
$3.4 billion. It accounted for 9 percent
of total Internet ad revenue in 2012.
In 2011, the $1.6 billion in mobile ad
revenue made up 5 percent of the total.
Mobile ads represent an area of growth
for many companies, including Google
Inc. and Facebook Inc. Facebook started
showing mobile ads last year.
Research rm eMarketer, which
includes more types of mobile ads in
its calculations, expects U.S. mobile ad
spending to grow 77 percent in 2013 to
$7.29 billion from $4.11 billion last year.
Consumer prices down
U.S. consumer prices declined last
month as the cost of gas fell sharply and
food prices were unchanged. The tame
reading is the latest evidence that the
sluggish economy is keeping ination in
check.
The consumer price index declined a
seasonally adjusted 0.2 percent in March,
after jumping 0.7 percent in February,
the Labor Department said Tuesday. Gas
prices fell 4.4 percent, reversing part of
Februarys 9.1 percent gain.
The gures come a day after the prices
of many commodities, including copper
and oil, fell in response to a report of
slower than expected growth in China.
That suggests U.S. consumer prices will
likely stay low in the coming months.
THE TIMES LEADER WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013 timesleader.com
IntPap 47.47 +2.13 +19.2
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Davis
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Dodge & Cox
Bal 84.96 +.77 +9.4
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Dreyfus
TechGrA f 35.14 +.54 +1.9
Eaton Vance
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First Eagle
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CA TF A m 7.53 ... +1.2
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FrankTemp-Mutual
Discov Z 30.98 +.26 +8.2
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FrankTemp-Templeton
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INVESCO
ConstellB m 22.92 +.38 +8.0
GlobQuantvCoreA m12.76+.15 +12.1
PacGrowB m 21.46 +.30 +5.8
JPMorgan
CoreBondSelect12.07 -.01 +0.7
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
52-WEEK YTD
HIGH LOW NAME TKR DIV LAST CHG %CHG
52-WEEK YTD
HIGH LOW NAME TKR DIV LAST CHG %CHG
Combined Stocks
AFLAC 50.21 +1.24 -5.5
AT&T Inc 37.94 -.01 +12.5
AbtLab s 36.40 +.27 +16.1
AMD 2.44 +.04 +1.7
AlaskaAir 61.12 +4.49 +41.8
Alcoa 8.10 +.06 -6.7
Allstate 49.50 +.41 +23.2
Altria 35.38 +.57 +12.5
AEP 49.54 +.47 +16.1
AmExp 64.59 +.49 +12.8
AmIntlGrp 39.56 +.98 +12.1
Amgen 110.85 +2.37 +28.6
Anadarko 82.16 +2.69 +10.6
Annaly 15.86 +.30 +13.0
Apple Inc 426.24 +6.39 -19.9
AutoData 65.41 +.95 +14.9
AveryD 41.66 +.41 +19.3
Avnet 33.28 +.27 +8.7
Avon 21.25 +.33 +48.0
BP PLC 41.15 +.19 -1.2
BakrHu 45.00 +.79 +10.2
BallardPw .80 +.00 +31.1
BarnesNob 17.07 +.17 +13.1
Baxter 70.90 +.48 +6.4
Beam Inc 62.41 +1.67 +2.2
BerkH B 107.16 +2.64 +19.5
BlockHR 27.65 +.27 +48.9
Boeing 86.89 +.12 +15.3
BrMySq 41.06 +.31 +27.4
Brunswick 31.62 +.98 +8.7
Buckeye 61.24 +1.28 +34.9
CBS B 46.17 +1.21 +21.3
CMS Eng 28.69 +.40 +17.7
CSX 24.14 +.67 +22.4
CampSp 46.53 +1.27 +33.4
Carnival 33.31 +.14 -9.4
Caterpillar 82.61 +.34 -7.8
CenterPnt 23.85 +.34 +23.9
CntryLink 37.16 +.47 -5.0
Chevron 117.01 +.44 +8.2
Cisco 21.16 +.11 +7.7
Citigroup 46.66 +1.79 +17.9
Clorox 89.53 +1.92 +22.3
ColgPal 119.33 +2.46 +14.1
ConAgra 35.50 +.74 +20.3
ConocPhil s57.44 +.20 -.9
ConEd 61.53 +.26 +10.8
Corning 13.18 +.05 +4.4
CrownHold 41.00 +.98 +11.4
Cummins 111.32 +1.57 +2.7
DTE 71.36 +.97 +18.8
Deere 83.18 +.23 -3.7
Diebold 29.16 +.06 -4.7
Disney 60.75 +1.87 +22.0
DomRescs 59.82 +.55 +15.5
Dover 72.22 +1.75 +9.9
DowChm 30.27 +.09 -6.4
DryShips 1.83 +.01 +14.4
DuPont 49.60 +.82 +10.3
DukeEn rs 73.57 +1.28 +15.3
EMC Cp 23.08 +.30 -8.8
Eaton 59.05 +1.83 +9.0
EdisonInt 51.82 +.32 +14.7
EmersonEl 54.37 +.78 +2.7
EnbrdgEPt 29.78 +.52 +6.7
Energen 46.71 +.66 +3.6
Entergy 69.53 +.88 +9.1
EntPrPt 60.50 +1.12 +20.8
Ericsson 12.10 +.23 +19.8
Exelon 36.00 +.16 +21.0
ExxonMbl 86.61 +.12 +.1
FMC Cp s 58.21 +1.82 -.5
Fastenal 49.25 +1.18 +5.6
FedExCp 95.14 +.43 +3.7
Fifth&Pac 20.98 +.53 +68.5
FirstEngy 45.80 +.75 +9.7
Fonar 7.21 +.14 +66.5
FootLockr 33.31 -.16 +3.7
FordM 13.12 +.17 +1.3
Gannett 21.28 +.22 +18.2
Gap 37.78 +.85 +21.7
GenCorp 12.59 +.02 +37.6
GenDynam 68.39 +.20 -1.3
GenElec 23.10 +.29 +10.1
GenMills 49.86 +.80 +23.4
GileadSci s 52.01 +1.33 +41.6
GlaxoSKln 49.38 +.15 +13.6
Hallibrtn 39.69 +1.03 +14.4
HarleyD 51.63 +1.68 +5.7
HarrisCorp 42.36 -.44 -13.5
HartfdFn 27.37 +1.06 +22.0
HawaiiEl 26.79 +.11 +6.6
HeclaM 3.24 -.01 -44.4
Heico s 42.96 +.19 -4.0
Hess 68.79 +.82 +29.9
HewlettP 21.03 +.35 +47.6
HomeDp 72.46 +.23 +17.2
HonwllIntl 73.18 +.98 +15.3
Hormel 41.06 +.67 +31.6
Humana 76.25 +.31 +11.1
INTL FCSt 16.97 +.32 -2.5
ITT Corp 27.33 +.37 +16.5
ITW 62.76 +1.23 +3.2
IngerRd 54.96 +1.20 +14.6
IBM 212.00 +2.74 +10.7
Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD
Stocks of Local Interest
90.51 76.11 AirProd APD 2.84 86.50 +1.64 +3.0
42.53 32.75 AmWtrWks AWK 1.00 42.28 +1.05 +13.9
45.89 37.00 Amerigas APU 3.20 42.97 +.37 +10.9
32.86 21.57 AquaAm WTR .70 32.85 +.65 +29.2
34.28 24.38 ArchDan ADM .76 32.18 +.66 +17.5
402.09 341.98 AutoZone AZO ... 384.59 -.28 +8.5
12.94 6.72 BkofAm BAC .04 12.28 +.30 +5.8
29.13 19.30 BkNYMel BK .60 27.76 +.43 +8.0
14.99 3.50 BonTon BONT .20 13.29 +.16 +9.3
58.29 43.08 CVS Care CVS .90 57.63 +1.32 +19.2
66.94 39.01 Cigna CI .04 66.40 +1.23 +24.2
41.41 35.58 CocaCola s KO 1.12 42.37 +2.28 +16.9
42.61 28.09 Comcast CMCSA .78 41.41 +.26 +10.8
29.95 25.38 CmtyBkSy CBU 1.08 28.47 +.38 +4.1
48.59 20.71 CmtyHlt CYH .25 42.42 +.97 +38.0
53.65 34.78 CoreMark CORE .76 51.59 -.10 +9.0
58.67 43.59 EmersonEl EMR 1.64 54.37 +.78 +2.7
60.24 34.00 EngyTEq ETE 2.54 58.92 +.79 +29.6
8.42 4.74 Entercom ETM ... 7.81 +.26 +11.9
15.75 11.14 FairchldS FCS ... 14.15 +.41 -1.7
5.15 3.06 FrontierCm FTR .40 4.10 +.02 -4.2
18.80 13.06 Genpact G .18 18.13 +.27 +17.0
9.81 5.14 HarteHnk HHS .34 7.29 +.16 +23.6
72.70 51.91 Heinz HNZ 2.06 72.33 +.05 +25.4
87.62 61.61 Hershey HSY 1.68 89.18 +2.77 +23.5
39.98 24.76 Lowes LOW .64 37.99 +.08 +7.0
105.90 76.92 M&T Bk MTB 2.80 98.48 +.12 0.0
103.70 83.31 McDnlds MCD 3.08 103.04 +.89 +16.8
30.95 24.05 Mondelez MDLZ .52 30.63 +.44 +20.3
22.89 18.92 NBT Bcp NBTB .80 20.85 +.31 +2.9
22.41 6.00 NexstarB NXST .48 20.95 +.81 +97.8
67.89 53.36 PNC PNC 1.76 64.79 +1.04 +11.1
32.03 26.77 PPL Corp PPL 1.47 31.86 +.36 +11.3
19.86 11.81 PennaRE PEI .72 18.87 +.36 +7.0
80.48 65.13 PepsiCo PEP 2.15 80.00 +1.08 +16.9
96.60 81.10 PhilipMor PM 3.40 94.97 +.86 +13.5
80.84 59.07 ProctGam PG 2.41 80.10 +.45 +18.0
61.94 44.47 Prudentl PRU 1.60 56.72 +1.14 +6.4
2.44 .95 RiteAid RAD ... 2.25 +.02 +65.4
21.02 12.85 SLM Cp SLM .60 20.83 +.20 +21.6
62.97 42.35 SLM pfB SLMBP 2.07 60.94 +.69 +15.0
48.83 39.46 TJX TJX .58 47.72 +.17 +12.4
40.15 26.30 UGI Corp UGI 1.08 39.90 +.79 +22.0
51.06 37.21 VerizonCm VZ 2.06 50.46 -.18 +16.6
79.28 57.18 WalMart WMT 1.88 78.68 +.21 +15.3
45.96 37.65 WeisMk WMK 1.20 40.19 +.80 +2.6
38.20 29.80 WellsFargo WFC 1.00 37.06 +.49 +8.4
USD per British Pound 1.5370 +.0092 +.60% 1.6113 1.5905
Canadian Dollar 1.0214 -.0032 -.31% .9871 .9996
USD per Euro 1.3188 +.0152 +1.15% 1.3043 1.3134
Japanese Yen 97.44 +.26 +.27% 78.90 80.49
Mexican Peso 12.1438 -.0960 -.79% 12.8529 13.2070
6MO. 1YR.
CURRENCY CLOSE PVS. %CH. AGO AGO
Copper 3.31 3.28 +0.81 -10.83 -9.26
Gold 1386.80 1360.60 +1.93 -20.51 -15.97
Platinum 1450.00 1424.20 +1.81 -11.73 -8.26
Silver 23.62 23.36 +1.14 -28.25 -25.40
Palladium 677.05 665.85 +1.68 +5.91 +2.40
Foreign Exchange & Metals
John Hancock
LifBa1 b 14.21 +.12 +5.2
LifGr1 b 14.34 +.16 +6.5
RegBankA m 15.23 +.19 +7.1
SovInvA m 17.53 +.21 +9.7
TaxFBdA m 10.46 ... +1.0
Lazard
EmgMkEqtI d 19.26 +.26 -1.4
Loomis Sayles
BdInstl 15.46 +.06 +3.4
Lord Abbett
ShDurIncA m 4.65 ... +1.1
MFS
MAInvA m 23.69 +.35 +10.3
MAInvC m 22.85 +.34 +10.1
Merger
Merger b 15.87 +.03 +0.3
Metropolitan West
TotRetBdI 10.97 ... +1.7
TotRtBd b 10.97 -.01 +1.5
Mutual Series
Beacon Z 14.60 +.12 +9.3
Neuberger Berman
SmCpGrInv 20.73 +.43 +7.9
Oakmark
EqIncI 29.98 +.33 +5.2
Intl I 22.50 +.25 +7.5
Oppenheimer
CapApB m 45.48 +.70 +7.4
DevMktA m 35.05 +.57 -0.7
DevMktY 34.67 +.56 -0.6
PIMCO
AllAssetI 12.67 +.02 +1.6
AllAuthIn 11.01 -.03 +0.2
ComRlRStI 6.27 +.04 -5.1
HiYldIs 9.75 ... +2.9
LowDrIs 10.52 ... +0.7
TotRetA m 11.30 -.01 +1.2
TotRetAdm b 11.30 -.01 +1.2
TotRetC m 11.30 -.01 +1.0
TotRetIs 11.30 -.01 +1.3
TotRetrnD b 11.30 -.01 +1.2
TotlRetnP 11.30 -.01 +1.3
Permanent
Portfolio 47.13 +.41 -3.1
Principal
SAMConGrB m15.45+.18 +7.3
Prudential
JenMCGrA m 33.53 +.51 +7.4
Prudential Investmen
2020FocA m 17.12 +.24 +7.3
BlendA m 19.89 +.29 +7.9
EqOppA m 17.10 +.23 +7.8
HiYieldA m 5.79 ... +3.3
IntlEqtyA m 6.65 +.08 +5.9
IntlValA m 20.64 +.22 +3.6
JennGrA m 22.37 +.32 +7.1
NaturResA m 43.44 +.84 -3.7
SmallCoA m 24.47 +.37 +9.1
UtilityA m 13.55 +.21 +14.0
ValueA m 17.04 +.25 +9.2
Putnam
GrowIncB m 15.99 ... +9.6
IncomeA m 7.38 ... +2.3
Royce
LowStkSer m 13.24 +.16 -4.3
OpportInv d 13.02 +.20 +9.0
ValPlSvc m 14.76 +.29 +6.7
Schwab
S&P500Sel d 24.64 +.35 +11.0
Scout
Interntl d 34.41 +.41 +3.2
T Rowe Price
BlChpGr 49.46 +.82 +8.4
CapApprec 24.08 +.22 +8.2
DivGrow 29.12 +.36 +10.9
DivrSmCap d 19.17 +.31 +9.9
EmMktStk d 32.71 +.56 -4.0
EqIndex d 42.44 +.60 +11.0
EqtyInc 29.16 +.33 +10.7
FinSer 16.53 +.19 +10.6
GrowStk 40.80 +.68 +8.0
HealthSci 48.36 +.71 +17.3
HiYield d 7.17 ... +4.6
IntlDisc d 48.63 +.49 +5.5
IntlStk d 14.75 +.19 +2.4
IntlStkAd m 14.68 +.19 +2.3
LatinAm d 37.07 +.69 -2.5
MediaTele 58.47 +.72 +9.7
MidCpGr 62.30+1.00 +10.3
NewAmGro 38.80 +.61 +8.0
NewAsia d 16.48 +.22 -2.0
NewEra 42.43 +.75 +1.2
NewHoriz 37.12 +.59 +11.9
NewIncome 9.86 -.01 +0.9
Rtmt2020 18.90 +.19 +5.7
Rtmt2030 20.19 +.25 +6.7
ShTmBond 4.84 ... +0.3
SmCpVal d 41.98 +.74 +7.2
TaxFHiYld d 12.01 ... +2.0
Value 29.93 +.45 +13.5
ValueAd b 29.61 +.45 +13.4
Thornburg
IntlValI d 28.74 +.11 +2.7
Tweedy, Browne
GlobVal d 25.12 -.03 +8.1
Vanguard
500Adml 145.22+2.05 +11.1
500Inv 145.21+2.04 +11.0
CapOp 39.42 +.65 +17.3
CapVal 12.37 +.20 +11.5
Convrt 13.32 +.07 +5.7
DevMktIdx 10.38 +.15 +6.5
DivGr 18.71 +.22 +12.4
EnergyInv 60.06 +.72 +1.7
EurIdxAdm 62.29 +.92 +3.4
Explr 87.62+1.53 +10.3
GNMA 10.89 ... +0.5
GNMAAdml 10.89 ... +0.6
GlbEq 20.23 +.31 +8.4
GrowthEq 13.29 +.18 +8.2
HYCor 6.15 ... +2.4
HYCorAdml 6.15 ... +2.4
HltCrAdml 69.37 +.91 +17.7
HlthCare 164.41+2.14 +17.6
ITGradeAd 10.25 -.02 +1.1
InfPrtAdm 28.51 -.07 +0.3
InfPrtI 11.61 -.03 +0.3
InflaPro 14.51 -.04 +0.2
InstIdxI 144.29+2.03 +11.1
InstPlus 144.30+2.03 +11.1
InstTStPl 35.69 +.52 +11.1
IntlExpIn 15.64 +.17 +6.3
IntlStkIdxAdm 25.80 +.40 +3.3
IntlStkIdxIPls 103.19+1.59 +3.3
LTInvGr 10.90 -.07 +2.2
MidCapGr 22.28 +.37 +9.4
MidCp 25.19 +.43 +12.1
MidCpAdml 114.35+1.98 +12.2
MidCpIst 25.26 +.44 +12.2
MuIntAdml 14.40 -.01 +1.0
MuLtdAdml 11.17 ... +0.7
PrecMtls 12.08 +.14 -24.2
Prmcp 80.12+1.07 +15.3
PrmcpAdml 83.12+1.11 +15.3
PrmcpCorI 17.02 +.24 +14.0
REITIdx 24.45 +.40 +12.7
REITIdxAd 104.35+1.74 +12.8
STCor 10.81 -.01 +0.5
STGradeAd 10.81 -.01 +0.6
SelValu 23.39 +.33 +11.5
SmGthIdx 27.36 +.47 +9.3
SmGthIst 27.41 +.47 +9.3
StSmCpEq 23.97 +.41 +10.4
Star 21.99 +.18 +5.7
StratgcEq 23.97 +.42 +11.7
TgtRe2015 14.04 +.10 +4.9
TgtRe2020 25.18 +.22 +5.7
TgtRe2030 24.99 +.28 +6.9
TgtRe2035 15.14 +.18 +7.5
TgtRe2040 24.99 +.33 +7.8
Tgtet2025 14.44 +.14 +6.3
TotBdAdml 11.07 -.01 +0.7
TotBdInst 11.07 -.01 +0.7
TotBdMkInv 11.07 -.01 +0.6
TotBdMkSig 11.07 -.01 +0.7
TotIntl 15.43 +.24 +3.3
TotStIAdm 39.39 +.57 +11.0
TotStIIns 39.40 +.57 +11.0
TotStIdx 39.38 +.57 +11.0
TxMIntlAdm 11.93 +.17 +6.4
TxMSCAdm 33.85 +.55 +8.7
USGro 23.26 +.34 +9.4
USValue 13.42 +.20 +13.2
WellsI 25.14 +.08 +5.0
WellsIAdm 60.90 +.20 +5.0
Welltn 36.30 +.27 +7.9
WelltnAdm 62.69 +.46 +7.9
WndsIIAdm 57.55 +.73 +10.4
WndsrII 32.43 +.42 +10.4
Wells Fargo
DvrCpBldA f 7.70 +.11 +10.3
DOW
14,756.78
+157.58
NASDAQ
3,264.63
+48.14
S&P 500
1,574.57
+22.21
RUSSELL 2000
923.30
+16.12
6-MO T-BILLS
.09%
...
10-YR T-NOTE
1.72%
+.04
CRUDE OIL
$88.72
+.01
p p n n p p p p
p p p p p p p p
NATURAL GAS
$4.16
+.02
6MO. 1YR.
METALS CLOSE PVS. %CH. AGO AGO
GAS PRICES
YESTERDAY MONTH AGO YEAR AGO
Average price of a gallon of
regular unleaded gasoline:
RECORD
$3.50 $3.67 $3.95
$4.06
7/17/2008
Source: AAA report for the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre/Hazleton area
NEW YORK Dozens of people
were charged on Tuesday in what
investigators said was a Russian or-
ganized crime scheme that included
illegal, high-stakes poker games for
the rich and famous.
Federal authorities in New York
City werent naming names, but they
said the poker players included pro
athletes, Hollywood celebrities and
Wall Street executives. None of them
was facing charges.
The money-laundering investiga-
tion led to arrests Tuesday in New
York, Los Angeles, Miami and else-
where around the country. There
also were FBI raids at an apartment
in Trump Tower on Fifth Avenue and
a Madison Avenue art gallery owned
by two of the defendants.
Among those named in an indict-
ment led in federal court was a
wealthy Russian fugitive, Alimzhan
Tokhtakhounov.
He was already under indictment
in a separate U.S. case accusing him
of bribing Olympic gure skating
judges at the 2002 Winter Olympics
in Salt Lake City.
In a two-month period beginning in
late 2011, the money-laundering ring
paid Tokhtakhounov $20 million in
illegal proceeds, the indictment says.
Along with the illegal poker games,
the ring operated an international
gambling business that catered to oli-
garchs residing in the former Soviet
Union and throughout the world,
the indictment says.
Prosecutors allege proceeds were
laundered through shell companies
in Cyprus and in the United States.
Celebrity poker games linked to Russian mob
By TOMHAYS
Associated Press
WASHINGTON The International
Monetary Fund has lowered its outlook
for the world economy this year, predict-
ing that government spending cuts will
slow U.S. growth and keep the euro cur-
rency alliance in recession.
The global lending organization cut its
forecast for global growth to 3.3 percent
this year, down from its forecast in Janu-
ary of 3.5 percent. It didnt alter its predic-
tion of 4 percent global growth in 2014.
The IMF expects the U.S. economy to
expand 1.9 percent this year. Thats be-
low its January estimate of 2.1 percent
and last years U.S. growth of 2.2 percent.
Still, the IMF says the U.S. economy is
improving and should expand 3 percent
in 2014. U.S. job growth has accelerated,
the housing market is recovering and
banks are more willing to lend.
The IMF predicts that the 17-country
eurozone will shrink 0.3 percent in 2013
and grow only 1.1 percent in 2014.
The fund issued its latest World Eco-
nomic Outlook on Tuesday in advance
of the spring meetings of the IMF and
World Bank in Washington later this
week. Finance ministers from the G-20, a
group of developed and large developing
countries, will also meet.
On Monday, renewed worries about
the global economy contributed to a
plunge in the stock market. The Dow
Jones industrial average sank 265 points,
the biggest one-day decline since Nov. 7.
Mondays drop was triggered partly by
a report of slower growth in China, the
worlds second-largest economy after the
United States.
Christine Lagarde, the IMFs manag-
ing director, said in a speech last week
that the agenda for the meetings will in-
clude how to accelerate growth, create
jobs and reform banking regulations.
The impact of government spending
cuts and tax increases in the U.S. and
other countries will also likely be a topic
of this weeks talks in Washington begin-
ning Thursday. During a visit to Berlin
last week, U.S. Treasury Secretary Jack
Lew urged European ofcials to focus on
policies that would encourage economic
growth, rather than simply cutting de-
cits.
Developing countries may raise con-
cerns at the G-20 about efforts by the U.S.
Federal Reserve and Japans central bank
to stimulate their economies by buying
more government bonds and other as-
sets. Those moves can lower the value of
the dollar and yen, which can make U.S.
and Japanese exports cheaper overseas.
That prospect has raised fears that other
countries will take similar steps.
IMF cuts
its forecast
for global
economy
By CHRISTOPHER S. RUGABER
AP Economics Writer
Ap photo
Workers take advantage of the regions mild weather, as they prepare a house to be repainted near New Vernon, N.J.
WASHINGTON U.S. home-
builders broke the 1 million mark in
March for the rst time since June
2008. The gain signals continued
strength for the housing recovery at
the start of the spring buying season.
The overall pace of homes started
rose 7 percent from February to
March to a seasonally adjusted annu-
al rate of 1.04 million, the Commerce
Department said Tuesday.
Apartment construction, which
tends to uctuate sharply from
month to month, led the surge: It
jumped nearly 31 percent to an an-
nual rate of 417,000, the fastest pace
since January 2006.
By contrast, single-family home
building, which makes up nearly two-
thirds of the market, fell 4.8 percent
to an annual rate of 619,000. That
was down from Februarys pace of
650,000, the fastest since May 2008.
The government said Februarys pace
was a sharp 5.2 percent higher than it
had previously estimated.
Applications for building permits,
a gauge of future construction, de-
clined 3.9 percent to an annual rate of
902,000. It was down from Februarys
rate of 939,000, which was also nearly
a ve-year high.
Scott Laurie, president of Olson
Homes, said that last months falloff
in single-family starts is not repre-
sentative of whats happening in the
market.
A scarcity in ready-to-build land
has many builders working to get lo-
cal governments to approve new land
for construction, he said. The process
can take 12 to 18 months. A survey
of homebuilders released Monday
noted similar concerns.
Youll see starts will continue to
increase as the year goes on and new
projects start to open up, Laurie
said.
Lauries company builds homes in
Southern California priced roughly
from $325,000 to $750,000. He says
Olsons construction starts are on
pace to climb at least 40 percent this
year, as the builder moves to add as
many as eight new communities.
The market started showing im-
provement in the early part of 2012
and really hasnt slowed down since,
said Laurie. Right now, were very
bullish.
The jump in home building is ex-
pected to contribute to economic
growth in 2013 for a second straight
year a reversal from 2006 through
2011, when it held back the economy.
U.S. housing recovery building
By MARTIN CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer
Industry expected to aid economic
growth in 2013 for second year
in a row.
Taste
SECTI ON C
THE TIMES LEADER WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013 timesleader.com
CHEFS CORNER
RUTH CORCORAN
CORK BAR & RESTAURANT
Ah, avocados:
So good and
good for you
We all knoW
avocados are deli-
cious, but research
shows they also
are good for you.
Classied as a
fruit and often re-
ferred to as the al-
ligator pear, avocados are considered
a super food because of their many
health benets. They are a high-ber,
cholesterol-free food that provides
nearly 20 essential nutrients.
In addition to being an excellent
source of healthy fats, they have
many other benets. Their content
of many vitamins and minerals,
including vitamin B6 and folic acid,
can help us maintain a healthy heart.
They are an excellent source of po-
tassium, which helps in controlling
blood pressure, and they have been
proven to help lower cholesterol
levels and help protect against eye
disease and stroke.
When purchasing avocados, look
for fruit that is rm yet gives when
gently squeezed. If its still hard, its
not ready to be eaten. This recipe
is a great way to enjoy this healthy
food. Stop by Cork this week; well
be offering this tasty recipe as a
special.
CRAB, AVOCADO &
TOMATO STACK
Makes 6 servings
Stacks
2 medium avocados, diced
1 cup diced tomatoes
1/2 cup diced red onions
1 pound of lump crab meat
2 teaspoons minced garlic
1 tablespoon fresh cilantro,
minced
2 tablespoon fresh lime juice
Salt and freshly ground black
pepper
Cilantro sprigs for garnish
DRESSING
1/4 cup fresh lime juice
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1 tablespoon minced fresh
ginger
1 tablespoon sugar
salt and freshly ground black
pepper
Combine the tomatoes, onions,
garlic and minced cilantro. Season
with salt and pepper and set aside.
Put the cubed avocados in a bowl
with the lime juice and toss to coat
evenly. Season with salt and pepper
and set aside.
Place a 2-1/2- to 3-inch mold on
your serving plate. Lightly press in
1/6th of the avocado mixture for the
rst layer. Top with 1/6th of the to-
mato/onion mixture, pressing down
slightly to ll mold. Then add 1/6th
of the lump crab meat and press
gently. Carefully lift off the ring
mold. Repeat the process to make
all of your stacks.
Whisk together the dressing
ingredients. Immediately before
serving, drizzle a bit of ginger-lime
dressing over each stack and gar-
nish with fresh cilantro.
Editors note: If you are a chef who
would like to contribute a recipe to
Chefs Corner, please contact mbiebel@
timesleader.com or call 570-829-7283.
Ruth Corcoran stacked avocado,
crab and tomato in this dish, which
she prepared at Cork bar and res-
taurant in Wilkes-Barre.
Pesto meatloaf is an updated version
of one of americas best-loved foods.
This meatloaf takes only 15 minutes
to bake. The secret is to bake it on a
baking sheet, which allows hot air to
circulate all around the meat.
While the meatloaf is cooking,
you can whip up my tasty potatoes. I
cut the potatoes into small pieces for
quick cooking and use a waxy potato
like a yellow or red potato. They taste
creamy without the need for a lot of
cream. leave skin on for avor, texture
and color. Serve with sliced tomatoes
on the side.
Wine suggestion: This herbal meat
loaf would go well with an herbal white
sauvignon blanc.
This meal contains calories 573 per
serving with 33 percent of calories
from fat.
Helpful hints:
If white meat chicken is not avail-
able, use ground turkey breast instead.
The quickest way to chop chives is
to snip them with a scissors.
4 tablespoons dried chives can be
used instead of fresh.
Countdown:
Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
Place potatoes on to boil.
Make meat loaf and place in oven.
Finish potatoes.

PESTO MEATLOAF
Olive oil spray
1/2 cup frozen chopped or diced
onion, defrosted
1/4 cup prepared reduced-fat pes-
to sauce
1/4cup plain bread crumbs
3/4 pound ground white meat
chicken
1 egg white
Salt and freshly ground black pep-
per
Preheat oven to 400. Line a baking
sheet with foil and spray with olive oil
spray. Mix onion, pesto sauce, bread
crumbs, ground chicken and egg white
together. Add salt and pepper to taste.
Divide in two, place on baking tray and
shape into two loaves about 6 inches
by 3 inches. Bake 15 minutes. A meat
thermometer should read 165 de-
grees. Makes 2 servings.
Per serving: 398 calories (34 per-
cent from fat), 15.1 g fat ( .9 g satu-
rated, 6.9 g monounsaturated), 113
mg cholesterol, 43.7 g protein, 18.0 g
carbohydrates, 2.3 g ber, 578 mg so-
dium.
Pesto meatloaf is fresh, fun and quick
By LINDA GASSENHEIMER
McClatchy-Tribune News Service
An herbal pesto
meatloaf pairs
well with an herbal
white sauvignon
blanc and a pile of
skin-on mashed
potatoes.
See MEATLOAF, Page 3C
S
pring is salad season, a time when green is as desirable on the plate as
it is on the lawn. But ask several different people which kind of greens
they prefer, and what other colors and avors they like to add to dress
up those greens, and youll probably get several different answers.
and greens themselves are evolving, with toppings become ever trendier,
making an old-standby salad bar a fresh new experience these days.
RaisingthesaladbaR
By JOE SYLVESTER | jsylvester@timesleader.com
Greens have some colorful newcompanions these days
PETE G. WILCOX PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
The salad bar at the Hanover Township Gerritys is a study in color.
Herb and Tracey Spencer of
Swoyersville like the bar Weg-
mans has to offer. Tracey, 42,
especially likes the vegetarian
salad station at the Scranton
location. But some days, shell
try something different at the
Wilkes-Barre Township store,
which is where she was on Fri-
day, selecting some hot food
from the Homestyle bar near
the salad bar.
This is my cheat day, she
said as she selected meatballs
and other heated foods before
adding some salad items.
Herb, 47, said he fnds the
Homestyle bar, with its stuffed
shells, pierogies, fried chicken,
macaroni and cheese and vari-
ous pasta salads, more appeal-
ing than the adjacent asian
food bar.
He said it appeals to all na-
tionalities.
The United States is the
melting pot; Wegmans is the
melting pot of everybody,
Herb Spencer said. I could be
Polish and German with the
same container.
When it comes to actual
salad greens, though, the melt-
ing pot might get even more
interesting. arcadian harvest,
otherwise known as eld mix,
leafy Romaine and traditional,
crunchy iceberg lettuce join
cucumbers, cherry tomatoes,
cauliower and broccoli along-
side fresh fruit, such as canta-
loupe, honeydew, strawberries
and grapes. and cooked items,
such as chicken, hard-boiled
eggs, carrots, asparagus and
broccoli, also add to the ap-
peal.
There are 32 items 42
with the homestyle bar, said
Dennis Dorney, chef for Weg-
mans Market Cafe in the Wil-
kes-Barre Township store.
The most popular item, said
Ready-to-eat Caesar salad is a popular
choice at the salad bar at Gerritys in Hanover
Township. See BAR, Page 3C
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013 Page 3C TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com T A S T E

GOLDEN MASHED
POTATOES
3/4 pound yellow po-
tatoes (about 2 1/2 cups
cubed)
2 tablespoons heavy
whipping cream
1/2 cup snipped chives.
Salt and freshly ground
black pepper
Wash potatoes (do not
peel) and cut into 1-inch
pieces. Place in a saucepan
and cover with cold water.
Cover with a lid and bring
to a boil. Reduce heat to
medium and simmer 15
minutes. Reserve 3 table-
spoons cooking water and
drain potatoes. Pass them
through a potato ricer or
food mill. Whisk in the re-
served water, cream and
chives. If using a food pro-
cessor, process only until
just blended, about 5 sec-
onds. Remove from pro-
cessor to whisk in reserved
water, cream and chives.
Add salt and pepper to
taste. Makes 2 servings.
Per serving: 175 calories
(30 percent fromfat), 5.8 g
fat ( 3.5 g saturated, 1.6 g
monounsaturated), 20 mg
cholesterol, 3.9 g protein,
28.0 g carbohydrates, 3.3 g
ber, 36 mg sodium.
MEATLOAF
Continued from Page 1C
Michael Zorn, team leader for
prepared foods at the store, is
the cored iceberg lettuce with
toppings and dressing inside,
such as bacon bits and ranch
dressing.
There are other favorites.
Theyre the items in the bins
store employees have to rell
the most.
Aside from the lettuces, I
would say chicken, cantaloupe,
mixed fruit salad Zorn said.
And the fruit will become
even more popular as the weath-
er gets warmer.
But is it all healthy?
Zorn said most items on the
salad bar are, but the cheeses
and dressings contain the most
calories.
Choices, choices, choices
Gerritys Supermarkets, par-
ticularly the Hanover Township
location, are home to other high-
ly heralded salad bars, which
offer about 50 items, including
ready-to-eat Caesar salad and
separate containers of mixed
meat, cheese, salsa, lettuce, to-
matoes and taco shells.
They can even make their
own taco salad if they want,
store manager John Zionce said.
But this time of year, just like
elsewhere, another itemis about
to take center stage.
Now, obviously, were going
to go into the fresh-cut fruit.
Strawberries, cut pineapple
and grapes are about to come
out of hiding.
The Gerritys salad bar, which
already offers a variety of greens
and veggies, along with olives,
pickled eggs and even dill pick-
les sealed in plastic bags, also
will expand.
Have it out
But grocery stores, of course,
are not the only places to nd
fresh salads.
Mike McGinley of Kingston
is not a big salad eater, but he
is drawn to the salad bar at the
Bear Creek Inne, where he has
dinner four or ve times a year.
Was there for dinner last
night, and after I left and told
some people about dinner, they
said Do they STILL have that
same big salad bar? Free with
every meal and all different
stuff, McGinley wrote on The
Times Leader Features Face-
book page.
He said he loves the Bear
Creek Inne salad bar because he
can add pasta, cheese and olives
to his lettuce.
So its nice for someone like
me who isnt a real salad junkie,
because it has light green leaves,
the cold Italian pasta, squares
of cheese, croutons and black
olives, McGinley continued.
That, lathered in French dress-
ing, is my ideal salad. Although
I need to get more adventurous
and try the other toppings avail-
able sometime.
Lorraine Eddowes, Bear
Creek Inne manager, said the
salad bar, included with dinner,
comes with potato salad, cole-
slaw, red beets and plenty of
other extras.
I really dont think there too
many places with salad bars any-
more, she said.
Fire and Ice on Toby Creek, an
upscale Shavertown restaurant,
still has one, and its praised by Su-
san Nardone of Plains Township.
Their orange cognac salad
dressing is to die for, she wrote
on the newspapers features
Facebook page.
Molly Davis, a hostess at Fire
and Ice, backed that up, calling
the dressing hugely popular.
Also in demand are the fresh
baked breads, honey thyme but-
ter and soup such as butternut
squash soup, as well as a Guin-
ness chili, Davis said.
But for those who prefer to eat
from their own salad bar, at-
home, simple options are plenti-
ful as well.
Nardone likes to make a salad
consisting of nothing but good
olive oil, good balsamic vinegar,
garlic granules, salt and pepper
simple and delicious.
SUSAN NARDONES
SALAD RECIPE
Ingredients:
Lettuce of your choice
Vegetables and other top-
pings of choice
2 or 3 parts olive oil to one
part balsamic vinegar
Assemble lettuce and other
toppings. Pour oil and vinegar
on the salad individually. Add
salt, pepper and garlic gran-
ules to taste and toss.
PETE G. WILCOX PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
Head chef Dennis Dorney of Wegmans Market Cafe in the Wilkes-Barre Township store shows off
the stores popular salad bar.
BAR
Continued from Page 1C
Wegmans in Wilkes-Barre Township takes pride in the mix it of-
fers on its popular salad bar.
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www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER PAGE 4C WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013 c o m m u n i t y n e W S
HAPPY BIRTHDAY!
Alyssa A. Pugh
Alyssa Ann Pugh, daughter
of Gigi and William Pugh Jr.,
Nanticoke, celebrated her ninth
birthday April 13. Alyssa is a
granddaughter of Mary and
William Pugh Sr., Hanover Town-
ship; Ruth Rowles, Ashley; and
the late Robert Rowles. She has
two sisters, Samantha, 20, and
Paige, 5.
Spencer J. Martinez
Spencer James Martinez, son
of Alan and Dawn Martinez, Ha-
nover Township, is celebrating
his fth birthday today, April 17.
Spencer is a grandson of Ramon
and Camille Martinez, Hanover
Township, and Donald Stark and
Cynthia Stark, both of Plains
Township. He is a great-grand-
son of the late Anna Martinez;
Emily Chrzanowski, Hudson; and
the late Shirley Stark. Spencer
has three brothers, Darren, 12,
Dylan, 10, and Brett, 8.
Natalie A. Sorber
Natalie Ann Sorber, daughter
of Jessica Caines and Michael
Booth, Hanover Township,
and the late Ryan Sorber, is
celebrating her ninth birthday
today, April 17. Natalie is a
granddaughter of Gwendolyn
Blakeslee Caines, White Haven;
the late Charles Caines; Salva-
tore and Betsy Ferraro, Palm
Harbor, Fla.; and Gary and She-
lia Booth, Wilkes-Barre. She is a
great-granddaughter of Barbara
Ann Sorber, Hunlock Creek;
the late Robert Sorber; the late
Walter and Doris Caines; and
the late Clarence Jesse and
Lorella Blakeslee. Natalie has a
sister, Ariella, 11 months.
Daymond Kovaly
Daymond Kovaly, son of John
and Sandy Kovaly, Shavertown,
is celebrating his 11th birthday
today, April 17. Daymond has
two brothers, Tyler, 20, and
Carter, 9, and four sisters, Dani-
elle, 21, Marisa, 20, Alexa, 12,
and Kaylee, 6.
Brady H. Shea
Brady Hartman Shea, son of
Jamie and Amy Shea, New Co-
lumbus, is celebrating his sixth
birthday today, April 17. Brady
is a grandson of Garry and
Ann Hartman, New Columbus,
and Jim and Lois Shea, South
Gibson. He is a great-grandson
of Ben and Catherine Walker,
Plymouth, and Carl and Mar-
garetta Hartman, Muhlenburg.
Brady has two brothers, Bryce,
12, and Conner, 8.
Sydney A. Schraeder
Sydney Addison Schraeder,
daughter of Brian and Sara
Schraeder, Bloomsburg, is cele-
brating her seventh birthday to-
day, April 17. Sydney is a grand-
daughter of John and Roberta
Glynn and Judy Schraeder, all
of Hanover Township. She is a
great-granddaughter of Doris
Schraeder, Wilkes-Barre. Sydney
has a brother, Dylan, 2.
Editors note: Please send news
for this space by noon Friday to
people@timesleader.com or by
mail to Good Eats, The Times
Leader, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-
Barre, PA 18711. To ensure accu-
racy, information must be typed
or computer generated.
THIS WEEK:
April 17 to April 23
Spaghetti and Pasta Dinner
4-6:30 p.m. every Thursday at
St. Marys Antiochian Orthodox
Church, 905 S. Main St., Wilkes-
Barre. $7. Includes choice of ve
pastas and ve sauces, salad and
dessert. Take outs available. Call
824-1674 Thursdays.
Pierogie Sale, 2-5 p.m. April 23,
St. Michaels Church, church hall,
Church and Winter streets, Old
Forge. $6 per dozen. Orders due
by Friday. To order, call Sandra,
457-9280 or the church hall,
457-2875.
Breakfast, 7:30-10:30 a.m.
Saturday, Dallas Odd Fellows
Oneida Lodge 371 at St. Pauls
Lutheran Church, Dallas, Route
309 to Route 415. Donation of $7
is requested. The public is invited.
Family-Style Turkey Supper,
3-7 p.m. Saturday, Emmanuel
United Church of Christ, Blue
Ridge Trail and Alberdeen Road,
Dorrance Township, Mountain Top
(across from Andys Gulf Station).
Turkey, gravy, stufng, mashed
potatoes, corn, green beans,
cranberry sauce, homemade
pickled cabbage, bread, bever-
age and dessert. $10 adults; $4
children 6-11; free for children 5
and younger. Take out, $10. For
reservations call Doris, 379-3755,
or the church, 868-5675. Tickets
at the door.
Applebees Flapjack Fundrais-
er Breakfast, 8-10 a.m. Satur-
day, Applebees Neighborhood
Grill and Bar, 253 Wilkes-Barre
Township Blvd., Wilkes-Barre. To
support Presbyterian Church
of Mountain Top. $7 adults; $5
children 8 and younger. For more
information call the church ofce
at 474-9951 or Pam Zaprazny at
403-5367.
Dine and Donate, 11 a.m. - 10
p.m. Saturday, Lone Star Steak-
house, 805 Kidder St., Wilkes-
Barre. To support Resurrection of
the Lord Parish Polish National
Church. Present yer and 15
percent of full-priced menu items
will be donated to the church. Call
Richard Manta at 696-3668.
Breakfast, 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Sun-
day, St. Joseph Melkite Church,
130 N. St. Francis Cabrini Ave.,
West Scranton. $7.50 adults; $4
children 4-10; free for children 3
and younger. Eggs, ham, olives,
home fries, homemade pancakes,
bread, juice and hot beverages.
Take outs any time. St. Joseph
bread available in two-loaf pack-
ages. Tickets at the door. Contact
343-6092 or scrantonmelkite@
verizon.net or Betsy Zaydon at
383-9433 pr melkite.scranton@
gmail.com.
Breakfast Buffet, 8 a.m.-1 p.m.
Sunday, The Noxen Volunteer Fire
Company, re hall, Stull Road.
$8 adults; $4 children 12 and
younger.
All-You-Can-Eat Pancake and
Sausage Breakfast, 9 a.m.-1
p.m. Sunday, Dorrance Town-
ship Volunteer Fire Department.
$7 adults; $3.50 children 6-12;
free for children 5 and younger.
Tickets available from any re de-
partment member or at the door.
A bake sale will also be held. For
details or tickets call 868-6763 or
479-7033.
Free Dinner, 5-6:30 p.m.,
every Monday, for those in need,
Christian and Missionary Alliance
Church, 317 Luzerne Ave., West
Pittston.
FUTURE:
Paska Homemade Bread Sale,
10 a.m.-4 p.m. April 25, St. Johns,
706 Hill St., Mayeld. Raisin and
white bread. Paska size only. $7
each. Kolachi (nut, poppyseed,
lekvar & apricot), $10 each. Call
876-0730, 876-3372 or 876-0391.
Barbecue Dinner, noon-5 p.m.
April 27-28, Wilkes-Barre Boule-
vard and Hill Street. Dinners, $10;
sandwiches, $8; and racks of ribs,
$25 each.
All-You-Can-Eat Roast Beef
Dinner, 4-7 p.m. April 27, First
Congregational Church, 500
Luzerne Ave., West Pittston. $9
adults; $4 children.
Ice Cream Social, 4:30-6:30
p.m. April 27, Town Hill United
Methodist Church, 417 Town Hill
Road, Shickshinny. Ice cream,
pies, soups and sandwiches. Take
outs available.
Family-Style Beef Dinner,
4:30-6:30 p.m. April 27, The
Sweet Valley Volunteer Fire Com-
pany, 5383 Main Road. Take outs,
4 p.m. $9 adults; $5 children 6-11;
free for children younger than 6.
Old-Fashioned Ham and Egg
Breakfast, 7 a.m.-1 p.m. April
28, Hanover Fire Company, NFD
Engine 4, Transguration of
Our Lord Church Hall, Bliss and
Center streets, Hanover section,
Nanticoke. $8 adults; $4 children
younger than 12. Ham, eggs,
home fries, rolls, juice and coffee.
Benets Hanover Fire Company
Engine 4 of the Nanticoke Fire
Department.
Chicken Barbecue, 5-7 p.m.
May 3-4, Trucksville United Meth-
odist Church, 40 Knob Hill Road,
Trucksville. Half a chicken, baked
potato, all the xings, homemade
desserts and beverages. Take
outs, 4:30 p.m. $8 adults; $4
children. Reservations required.
Call 570-696-3897.
All-You-Can-Eat Breakfast
Buffet, 7 a.m.-1 p.m. May 5, Mo-
canaqua Volunteer Fire Company
at The Polish Falcons. Sausage,
scrambled eggs, ham, bacon,
sausage gravy and biscuits, home
fries, pancakes, toast, pastries,
coffee, tea and orange juice. $7
adults; $4 children 5-12; free for
children younger than 5. Take
outs available. Tickets at the door
or from any reghter.
Roast Chicken Dinner/Flea
Market, 7 a.m.-5 p.m. May 5, The
Sons of the American Legion
(SAL) Mountain Post 781, Church
Road, Mountain Top. Over 30
vendors. Tools, antiques, collect-
ables, crafts, jewelry, furniture,
computers, knives, and more. $8,
includes half roasted chicken,
baked potato, coleslaw, roll and
dessert. Serving noon to 5 p.m.
www.alpost781.org/SAL.html or
570-474-2161.
All-You-Can-Eat Breakfast, 8
a.m.-1 p.m. May 5, Kiwanis Club
of Mountain Top, Crestwood High
School cafeteria. Pancakes, sau-
sage and eggs. $7 adults; free for
children 12 and younger. Tickets
at the door.
Mothers Day Breakfast, 8
a.m.-noon May 12, The Mountain
Top Knights of Columbus 6440,
South Mountain Boulevard, Aber-
deen Road. Fresh oatmeal, juice,
grilled ham, hash browns, eggs,
pastries, corn bread, coffee, tea
and soda. $5. Free for children
younger than 6. All are welcome.
Call Frank, 474-2145, or Drew,
868-5568.
Northeast Pennsylvania Council of
the Boy Scouts honoring David J. Price
The Northeast Pennsylvania
Council of the Boy Scouts of
America is honoring David J.
Price, president and chief ex-
ecutive ofcer,
PDQ Print
Center, with
its Eminent
Eagle Award
at a dinner
on Friday at
Colarussos La
Palazzo, 4500
Birney Ave.,
Moosic. The award is given to
a community leader who has
a successful career and earned
the rank of Eagle Scout.
The cost of dinner and
sponsorship is $50 per person or
a table of 10 for $500. Sponsor-
ship only is available, ranging
from Sponsor an Eagle Scout for
$30 to Platinum Level at $750.
Price, a former 15-year UPS
executive, is the president of
PDQ Print Center and the
owner of a commercial real
estate business in Scranton.
PDQ has been regularly ranked
in the Top 100 quick printing
companies in the U.S. and its
production facility and direct
mail processing center are
based in Taylor.
Price has served on various
community service boards
and organizations throughout
Northeastern Pennsylvania. He
serves on the board of directors
of the Greater Scranton YMCA
and the Northeast Pennsylvania
Council Executive Board of the
Boy Scouts of America.
Price became an Eagle Scout
in 1972 and obtained the God
and Country Award, scout-
ings highest religious award
presented to a Boy Scout.
Price served as chairman of the
Councils Eagle Scout Board of
Review and serves on its execu-
tive board of directors. He is a
past three-year chairman of the
Councils Annual Distinguished
Citizen Award Dinner and
helped raise nearly $500,000
for scouting programs during
that period. He also holds the
highest award presented to
a volunteer, scoutings Silver
Beaver Award.
Price is a member of Trin-
ity Congregational Church,
West Scranton, and serves on
its board of trustees. He and
his wife, Lauren, reside in
Clarks Summit. He is the son
of Dorothy J. Price and the
late Llewellyn J. Price, West
Scranton.
For informationor reservations,
contact mcinquina@nepabsa.org
at the NortheasternPennsylvania
Council of Boys Scouts of America
at 207-1227 ext. 227.
GOOD EATS!
Price
Hazleton Chamber prepares for Great PA Cleanup
The Greater Hazleton Chamber of Commerce staff is pre-
paring for the Great PA Cleanup which will take place on
Saturday. This year marks the 31st year that the Chamber is
coordinating the effort for PennDOT in the Greater Hazleton
Area. PennDOT provides garbage bags, gloves and vests for
the 2,000 volunteers and many local businesses provide
coupons and goodies. Street departments of the Black Creek
Township, Butler Township, City of Hazleton, Hazle Town-
ship and West Hazleton Borough also assist by collecting the
hundreds of bags lled with litter and debris. If interested
in assisting in the cleanup effort, call the Chamber ofce
at 570-455-1509, or download a registration form from the
Chambers calendar of events at www.hazletonchamber.org.
Some of the participants, from left: Julie Ferry, Chamber; Joe
Clark, Leadership Hazleton; Nancy Zolota; Linda Mantush;
Judiann McGrogan; Leann Fallabel and son Frankie, Chamber
staff. Also participating is Donna Palermo, president, Cham-
ber.
Childrens birthdays (ages 1-16)
will be published free of charge.
Photographs and information
must be received two full weeks
before your childs birthday. Your
information must be typed or
computer-generated.
Email your birthday announce-
ment to people@timesleader.
com or send it to: Times Leader
Birthdays, 15 North Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250. You
also may use the form under the
People tab on www.timesleader.
com.
BIRTHDAY GUIDELINES
Today
Lake-Lehman High School
Class of 1960, 6 p.m., Grotto
Pizza, Harveys Lake. All
members are invited. Plans for
the reunion in August will be
discussed.
Lake-Noxen High School Class
of 1959, 6 p.m., Grotto Pizza,
Harveys Lake. All members
invited. Plans for the reunion in
August will be discussed.
MEETINGS
2014 KIASorentoLX
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$259
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Month*
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*
OR
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6 /irbags
Satllit Racio w. Plutooth
Kylss Entry
Cruis Control
/ntilock Praks
Traction Control
6 Spc /utomatic Transmission
FINANCING
FOR UP TO
60 MONTHS
0.9%
24
MPG
EPAHighway Estimate
WyomingValley Motors Kia
560 Pierce Street , Kingston, PA
570-714-9924
www.wyomingvalleykia.com
Th Kia C-yar/CC,CCC-mil warranty program inclucs various warrantis anc roacsic assistanc. Varrantis incluc powr train anc basic. /ll warrantis anc roacsic assistanc ar limitc. S rtailr or ctails or
go to kia.com. 24-hour Roacsic /ssistanc is a srvic plan provicc by Kia Motors /mrica, lnc. Plus tax anc tag. Pictur may not rprsnt xact trim lvl. Plus tax & tag, 2k mils pr yar with ,5CC cown anc
s cu at signing. Paymnts basc on a 36 month las with approvc crcit. Must b a cocumntc cal. Dalr rsrvs right to buy that vhicl.
8
1
1
3
6
5
DOG VACCINES: RABIES ($10), DISTEMPER ($15)
LYME & KENNEL COUGH ($24 EACH), INFLUENZA ($20)
CAT VACCINES: RABIES ($10), DISTEMPER ($15), FELINE LEUKEMIA ($20)
MICROCHIP LIFETIME ENROLLMENT INCL. ($45)
CAT & DOG
VACCINE CLINIC
SATURDAY, APRIL 27
10a.m - 2p.m. at
Nanticoke Tractor Supply Co.
2456 Sans Souci Parkway ph. 735-5080
CATS IN CARRIERS DOGS ON LEASHES PLEASE!
259 Wyoming Ave. Wyoming 693-5910
Tues. Wed. Thurs. - 9am - 5:30pm Fri. - 9am - 6pm Sat. - 10am - 3pm
We Carry A Complete Line Of
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d
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Jewelry, Coins, Bracelets, Earrings, Pendants, Rings, Anniversary Bands, Estate and Antique Jewelry, Sterling Silver Tea Sets and
Pitchers, all types of American and Foreign currency, Old Military Items, Collectibles,Trains, Musical Instruments, Paintings, Casino
Chips, Comic Books, Purses (Pre 1940s), and Much More! We guarantee highest prices for your old, broken jewelry. We buy jewelry in
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Friday, April 20th
10am-5pm
www.Cash4gold2013.com security on site certied scales fully licensed
NO APPOINTMENTS CALL 724-614-0001 FOR INFORMATION
RAMADA
20 Public Square
Wilkes-Barre, PA
(570) 824-7100
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WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013 Page 5C TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com c o m m u n i t y n e w s
FORTY FORT: PA AFSCME
8702 Luzerne County Retirees
will meet at 1 p.m. on Thursday
at the Luzerne County Recre-
ation Annex, 2009 Wyoming
Avenue, next to the Forty Fort
Airport hanger.
The meeting is open to all
retirees and homeowners who
are interested in the elimina-
tion of school property taxes.
Petitions will be collected from
those who attended last weeks
meeting.
All AFSCME retirees are
urged to attend to discuss
benets.
KINGSTON: The Wilkes-
Barre Chapter 342, National
Active and Retired Federal
Employees (NARFE) will meet
at 1 p.m on Friday at the Black
Diamond American Legion, 386
Wyoming Avenue.
Guest speaker is Antonette
Grella from the local ofce of
the Agency on Aging. All active
and retired federal employees
are welcome.
Pizza and light refreshments
will be served.
PITTSTON: A special
candlelight vigil service will
be conducted by the Greater
Wilkes-Barre Labor Council at
7 p.m. on Thursday at UFCW
Local 1776, 2007 Route 315,
next to Pazzos Restaurant.
The service and program is
being conducted in association
with national Workers Memo-
rial Day to recognize individu-
als, both union and non-union,
who have been killed or injured
on the job.
The labor council invites all
family members who have lost
a loved one over the years due
to a work-related accident or
incident.
Special recognition will
be provided to four Luzerne
County residents who lost their
lives over the past year: Charles
Kratz, Plymouth; Shaileshku-
mar Patel, Duryea; Michael
F. Martin, Hazleton; and Eric
Williams, Wapwallopen.
The regular monthly meeting
of the labor council will be held
immediately after the service
and all local unions are invited
to attend both the meeting and
the memorial service.
For more information, call
Kerri Gallagher, chairperson,
Community Services, at 961-
5394 ext. 13 or Walter Klepas-
ki, Community Services liaison,
AFL-CIO, at 270-9109.
IN BRIEF
8
1
0
5
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0
T
PRICES EFFECTIVE
APRIL 17
TH
THRU
APRIL 20
TH
PRICES EFFECTIVE WITH GOLD CARD ONLY
TO ASSURE SUFFICIENT SUPPLY OF SALE ITEMS, WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT THE PURCHASE OF SALE ITEMS. EXCEPT WHERE
OTHERWISE NOTED. NONE SOLD TO DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS, NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS.
*PURCHASE REQUIREMENTS ON GOLD CARD ITEMS DO NOT INCLUDE MILK, CIGARETTES OR PRICE OF THE GOLD CARD ITEM.
401 Kennedy Blvd., Pittston, PA 570-655-8000
DOUBLE COUPONS EVERYDAY TUESDAY SENIOR CITIZENS DISCOUNT
SUPERMARKETS
www.quinnsmarkets.com Like us on Facebook at quinns shursave markets
Artwork for display purposes only & thank you for your cooperation.
WITH GOLD CARD
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RUSSET
POTATOES
General Mills
CHEERIOS
Cut & Cleaned,
BABY
CARROTS
Weaver
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NUGGETS
Juicy
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2 lb. bag 3 lb. bag
Cut For Free
99

1 lb. bag
2
48
24 oz. Bag
YELLOW
COOKING
ONIONS
88

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Whole, Eastern
BEEF
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LB.
5
88
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ROAST
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88
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68

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WITH GOLD CARD
Shurne
PROVOLONE
CHEESE
3
88
LB.
18 oz. Box
Reg. Price $4.29
2
88
WITH GOLD CARD
8
1
2
3
7
4
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER PAGE 6C WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013 T E L E V I S I O N
6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
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Sanford &
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Family
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Family
Be a Mil-
lionaire
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Leave-
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From Yankee Stadium in the Bronx, N.Y. (N) (Live) (CC)
NUMB3RS End of
Watch (TVPG)
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X
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Frost holds a historic interview with Richard Nixon.
The
Siege
#
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From Yankee Stadium in the Bronx, N.Y. (N) (Live) (CC)
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Engage-
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Two and
Half Men
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1
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CSI: Miami On the
Hook (CC) (TV14)
CSI: Miami Happy
Birthday (TV14)
Liar Liar (PG-13, 97) Jim Carrey. A
fast-talking lawyer cannot tell a lie.
Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Fac-
tory (10:01) (G, 71) Gene Wilder. (CC)
AP
River Monsters:
Unhooked (TVPG)
River Monsters
(TVPG)
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Unhooked (TVPG)
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Duck
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The Car Chasers American Greed American Greed
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The Situation Room
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Net
Impact
Sixers
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Pregame
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From Bankers Life Fieldhouse in Indianapolis.
Sixers
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(CC)
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Classics:
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Good
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MLB Baseball Philadelphia Phillies at Cincinnati Reds. From
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Soccer Friendly:
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finds her niche at a neoburlesque club.
Step Up 3 (PG-13, 10) Rick Malam-
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Drive
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Unsolved Mysteries
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The Hunt for the I-5 Killer (11) John
Corbett, Sara Canning. (CC)
The Craigslist Killer (11) Jake McDor-
man, Billy Baldwin. (CC)
MTV
2013 MTV Movie Awards Macklemore and
Ryan Lewis. (TV14)
Awkward. (TV14) Teen Mom 2 (TVPG) The Real World (N)
(CC) (TV14)
True Life Im Dating
a Mamas Boy
NICK
Sponge-
Bob
Sponge-
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Full
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The
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(:33)
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OVAT
The Rolling Stones:
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SPIKE
Super Troopers (6:01) (R, 01) Jay
Chandrasekhar, Kevin Heffernan. (CC)
Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story
(8:05) (PG-13, 04) Vince Vaughn.
Super Troopers (10:07) (R, 01) Jay
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SYFY
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The Defi-
ance
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WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013 Page 7C TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com D I V E R S I O N S
UNIVERSAL SUDOKU
MINUTE MAZE
W I T H O M A R S H A R I F & T A N N A H H I R S C H
CRYPTOQUOTE
GOREN BRIDGE
B Y M I C H E A L A R G I R I O N & J E F F K N U R E K
JUMBLE
B Y H O L I D A Y M A T H I S
HOROSCOPE
CROSSWORD
PREVIOUS DAYS SOLUTION
HOW TO CONTACT:
Dear Abby: PO Box 69440, Los Ange-
les, CA 90069
For more Sudoku go to www.timesleader.com
O N T H E W E B
Dear Abby: My wife
and I have been mar-
ried 17 years. For
the most part, our
marriage has been
great, and I love her
very much. Lately,
though, I have felt
that our sexual and emotional inti-
macy has been lacking. I spoke to her
about it recently and tried to explain
how I feel. She has responded, and
things are improving.
Still, she spends most of her time
on her cellphone checking email,
Facebook, Pinterest and watching
Netflix. At bedtime, she stays on her
phone or laptop until after I have
gone to bed.
Has she fallen in love with her cell-
phone? Even if we dont have sex all
the time, I would just like to be able
to talk to her or hold her for a minute
before we go to sleep. Any sugges-
tions other than throwing her phone
out the window?
Abandoned Husband in Utah
Dear Abandoned: You say your wife
has responded and things are hopeful.
That means she is at least receptive
to working on your relationship.
The problems that cellphones
cause in relationships are something
I am hearing about with increasing
frequency. People have become so
dependent upon their digital compan-
ions that in some cases its impossible
to turn them off because people have
become literally addicted.
In cases like this, a licensed thera-
pist should be consulted. Of course,
like any addiction the sufferer must
be willing to admit there is a problem
and want to do something about it.
Dear Abby: Six months ago, I real-
ized I had a drinking problem and
decided to go through a chemical de-
pendence program as an outpatient.
Im sober now and attend meetings
a few times a week. My problem is
someone I was barely acquainted
with who was also in the same pro-
gram. I didnt regard it as a problem
at first, but now Im concerned.
At a meeting a few months ago, I
mentioned to the group that I also
attend a meeting in another town
closer to my home. Next thing I
know, this man is attending the same
meeting. He always makes a point of
telling me about whats going on with
the people we went through treat-
ment with.
I am active in service work and
plan to attend a regional meeting at
a resort over a weekend. Guess who
has suddenly decided to do the same?
Im nervous about being around
this man. I dont want to compromise
his sobriety, but I cant stand seeing
him at every meeting and event I at-
tend. My husband is also bothered
by it, and Im considering not at-
tending any meetings at all because
hes creeping me out. How should I
handle this?
Sober And Creeped Out
Dear Creeped Out: If there is a
group moderator or contact, discuss
this with that person. Look around
for another group. Even if you will
have to travel a bit farther, it will be
worth the effort.
If you do run into him in the future
and he tries to engage you in conver-
sation about other patients from your
program, cut the conversation short
by telling him you are not interested
in hearing about them. One of the
hallmarks of 12-step programs is ano-
nymity and it should be respected.
DEAR ABBY
A D V I C E
Womans affair with her cellphone leaves her husband feeling cheated
To receive a collection of Abbys most memo-
rable and most frequently requested po-
ems and essays, send a business-sized, self-
addressed envelope, plus check or money
order for $3.95 ($4.50 in Canada) to: Dear
Abbys Keepers, P.O. Box 447, Mount Mor-
ris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage is included.)
ARIES (March 21-April 19). You
would be wise to extend your
personal network, as there are
opportunities on the horizon for
you that will require you to have
a wider reach.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20). You
easily sense when people are
in need, but it will take more
concentration and talent to
accurately pinpoint the need and
know precisely how you might
help. Or, you could just ask!
GEMINI (May 21-June 21). Your
strong values are attractive,
especially to those around you
who could use more structure
in their lives. You communicate
powerfully by living your values.
CANCER (June 22-July 22). When
you notice that someone needs
assistance, you spring into
action. In fact, you cant under-
stand people who dont notice.
But it takes all types in the
world, and youll observe many
of those types in action today.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). Success in
one area of life wont necessarily
translate to success in another,
but the basic principles still
apply: You have to be willing to
learn what it takes to be
masterful.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). Taking
the point of view that you should
know something already will only
stop you from learning. Better
to admit what you dont know
and gather experience than to
stumble around in the dark.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). Your
direct and assured action will be
necessary. Hesitate, and youll
lose power. Wait, and it will only
get harder and harder to influ-
ence the situation. Act now.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). When
you really think about it and
you will today miracles abound.
You believe this because youve
seen the evidence, and you con-
tinue to produce more evidence
because you believe it.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21).
How would your life change if
you made happiness your No.
1 priority? The answer to that
question may inspire you to
change your schedule slightly.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). You
do trust the wisdom of the ages,
but even more beneficial is the
timely value you find in what
specific people tell you. Youll
take to heart the stories and
advice of friends and family.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). The
line between respect and attrac-
tion is easily blurred these days.
Youll avoid murky relationships
and messy situations when you
stay clear about your feelings.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). To
someone who doesnt know you
very well, it seems like you are
all smiles and acceptance. But
woe to the one who crosses
your lines. After all, what good
is a boundary that is not
enforced?
TODAYS BIRTHDAY (April 17).
You make a hobby of shocking
and impressing people this year.
Your ideas are bold. The execu-
tion of those ideas is sometimes
brilliant; other times, a brilliant
fail and a good story. May brings
strange luck. June brings the
chance to glue broken relation-
ships back together. July fea-
tures social and professional
growth. Your lucky numbers are:
30, 1, 33, 2 and 15.
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NCR-LA
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013 PAGE 1D
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Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF CIVIL ACTION_
COMPLAINT IN MORTGAGE
FORECLOSURE
IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS
OF LUZERNE COUNTY,
PENNSYLVANIA
No.2012-15692
EAGLE ROCK RESORT CO.,L.L.C.
Plaintiff
Vs.
JANETTE D. BONGON
Defendant
To: JANETTE D. BONGON
You are hereby notified that on November
9, 2012, Eagle Rock Resort Co., L.L.C.,
filed a Complaint in Mortgage Foreclosure
against the above Defendant at the above
number.
Property Subject to Mortgage Foreclo-
sure: U1/50th Undivided Interest in Lot 401
of the TW Subdivision located at Eagle
Rock Resort, Hazle Township, County of
Luzerne, Pennsylvania, 18202.
NOTICE
You have been sued in court. If you wish
to defend against the claims set forth in
the following pages, you must take action
within twenty (20) days after this Com-
plaint and Notice are served, by entering a
written appearance personally or by attor-
ney and filing in writing with the court your
defenses or objections to the claims set
forth against you. You are warned that if
you fail to do so the case may proceed
without you and a judgment may be
entered against you by the court without
further notice for any money claimed in the
Complaint or for any other claim or relief
requested by the Plaintiff. You may lose
money, or property or other rights impor-
tant to you.
YOU SHOULD TAKE THIS PAPER TO YOUR
LAWYER TO ONCE, IF YOU DO NOT HAVE
A LAWYER OR CANNOT AFFORD ONE, GO
TO OR TELEPHONE THE OFFICE SET
FORTH BELOW TO FIND OUT WHERE YOU
CAN GET LEGAL HELP.
PA Bar Association
Lawyer Referral Service
100 South Street
PO Box 186
Harrisburg, PA 17108-0186
(800) 692-7375
LORINE ANGELO OGURKIS, Esquire
Pa. I.D. #91337
Attorney for Plaintiff
EAGLE ROCK RESORT
1031 Valley of Lakes
Hazleton, PA 18201
(570) 384-1377
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF CIVIL ACTION_
COMPLAINT IN MORTGAGE
FORECLOSURE
IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS
OF LUZERNE COUNTY,
PENNSYLVANIA
No.2012-15687
EAGLE ROCK RESORT CO.,L.L.C.
Plaintiff
Vs.
JOE HAHM and INJA HAHM
Defendants
To: JOE HAHM and INJA HAHM
You are hereby notified that on November
9, 2012, Eagle Rock Resort Co., L.L.C.,
filed a Complaint in Mortgage Foreclosure
against the above Defendant at the above
number.
Property Subject to Mortgage Foreclo-
sure: Lot 473 of the TW Subdivision locat-
ed at Eagle Rock Resort, Hazle Township,
County of Luzerne, Pennsylvania, 18202.
NOTICE
You have been sued in court. If you wish
to defend against the claims set forth in
the following pages, you must take action
within twenty (20) days after this Com-
plaint and Notice are served, by entering a
written appearance personally or by attor-
ney and filing in writing with the court your
defenses or objections to the claims set
forth against you. You are warned that if
you fail to do so the case may proceed
without you and a judgment may be
entered against you by the court without
further notice for any money claimed in the
Complaint or for any other claim or relief
requested by the Plaintiff. You may lose
money, or property or other rights impor-
tant to you.
YOU SHOULD TAKE THIS PAPER TO YOUR
LAWYER TO ONCE, IF YOU DO NOT HAVE
A LAWYER OR CANNOT AFFORD ONE, GO
TO OR TELEPHONE THE OFFICE SET
FORTH BELOW TO FIND OUT WHERE YOU
CAN GET LEGAL HELP.
PA Bar Association
Lawyer Referral Service
100 South Street
PO Box 186
Harrisburg, PA 17108-0186
(800) 692-7375
LORINE ANGELO OGURKIS, Esquire
Pa. I.D. #91337
Attorney for Plaintiff
EAGLE ROCK RESORT
1031 Valley of Lakes
Hazleton, PA 18201
(570) 384-1377
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2007 Ford E350 Pass 56256.............. $13,999
2006 Ford F150 Crew XLT 72345 ... $17,999
2007 Ford F150 Crew58765 ............. $19,899
2005 Ford Mustang GT 28536.......... $17,999
2006 Ford Mustang Conv V6 110258 ...$9,376
2007 Ford Mustang GT 32569 .......... $18,498
2005 GMC Canyon SL Z85 70275 ... $13,999
2006 Honda CR-V SE 73435............... $13,990
2006 Hummer H3 Luxury 72123...... $17,453
2007 Hummer H3 Base 81999.......... $16,346
2007 Hyundai Santa Fe SE 80013.....$11,999
2006 Hyundai Sonata GLS 75432 ......$7,984
2006 Jeep Commander 4WD 68574 $14,599
2009 Jeep Wrangler X 35760............ $19,999
2012 Mazda3 i Sport 3963................. $17,789
2007 Mercedes-Benz Conv CLK550 45000$26,999
2006 Nissan Frontier SE 75941......... $14,999
2005 Nissan Xterra SE 86984 ........... $10,999
2003 Porsche Boxter S 26998........... $24,998
2009 Suzuki SX4 AWD 30482 ............ $12,999
2007 Toyota FJ 4WD 56884................ $21,756
2007 Volkswagen GTI 2.0T 52338 ... $14,999
2010 Volkswagen Tiguan AWD SE 22065. $17,999
NORTHEAST PA TOP JOBS
The following companies are hiring:
Your company name will be listed on the front page
of The Times Leader Classieds the rst day your ad
appears on timesleader.com Northeast PA Top Jobs.
For more information contact The Times Leader sales
consultant in your area at 570-829-7130.
100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
110 Lost
ALL JUNK
VEHICLES
WANTED!!
CALL ANYTIME
HONEST PRICES
FREE REMOVAL
CA$H PAID
ON THE SPOT
570.301.3602
110 Lost
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
LOST, deceased
husbands gold
wedding band.
Inscribed with wed-
ding date and initials
very sentimental.
570-654-3022
110 Lost
All
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
LOST. Cat, female
long haired Calico.
Near Chestnut St.,
S w o y e r s v i l l e .
Answers to Minnie.
REWARD!
570-332-1075
120 Found
FOUND: JEWELRY
FOUND ON Mont-
gomery Ave in West
Pittston last week.
Please call to identi-
fy (570) 290-4237
120 Found
LIKE
NEW
Used Tires
&
Batteries
for $20
& Up
VITOS
&
GINOS
949 Wyoming Ave.
Forty Fort
288-8995
135 Legals/
Public Notices
MEETING NOTICE
A Special Meeting
for General Pur-
poses of the Joint
Operating Comm-
ittee of the Wilkes-
Barre Area Career
& Technical Center
is scheduled for
Monday, April 29,
2013 at 6:00 p.m. at
the school on
Jumper Road in
Plains Township.
Gary Smith
Chairperson
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
ESTATE NOTICE
Robert Cronauer of
50 Longdale
Avenue, Shaver-
town, PA 18708,
died on December
20, 2012. Letters
of Administration
have been granted.
Administrator: Mr.
Kenneth Cronauer
c/o Bernard Walter,
Esq.
1674 Memorial
Highway
Shavertown, PA
18708
570-674-9000
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
DEADLINES
Saturday
12:30 on Friday
Sunday
4:00 pm on
Friday
Monday
4:30 pm on
Friday
Tuesday
4:00 pm on
Monday
Wednesday
4:00 pm on
Tuesday
Thursday
4:00 pm on
Wednesday
Friday
4:00 pm on
Thursday
Holidays
call for deadlines
You may email
your notices to
mpeznowski@
civitasmedia.com
or fax to
570-831-7312
or mail to
The Times Leader
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711
For additional
information or
questions regard-
ing legal notices
you may call
Marti Peznowski
at 570-970-7371
or 570-829-7130
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
STORE IT ALL. INC.
293 Schooley Ave.
Exeter, PA 18643
570-655-3225
Is selling the follow-
ing units to satisfy
owners lien
for rent due.
Saturday. April 27
at 10:00 a.m.
Sale is subject to
change without
notice. Starting at
the following
locations:
293 Schooley Ave,
Exeter, PA 18643
101 Glosin Korman
Chevy Truck
2GBHG31K
9P415181
203 McKenney
Saturn 1G8LH528
4Y2269152
Wieczorek Pontiac
Vin #1G2FW218
5JLZ59953
340 Slocum Ave.
Exeter, PA 18643
12 Foix 98 Gilmore
44 Foix 11 Williams
1100 S Twp. Blvd.
(Pittston By Pass
Jenkins Twp., PA
A96 Wrener
A45 Evans
A18 Oakley
A 184 Tekyan
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
ESTATE NOTICE
ESTATE OF
FRANCIS C. MILLER
Late of
Wilkes-Barre,
Pennsylvania
(Died July 28, 2012)
Letters Testamen-
tary having been
granted to Rita R.
Miller. All persons
having claims
against the Estate
or indebted to the
Estate shall make
payment or present
claims to Andrew J.
Katsock, III,
Esquire, Attorney
for the Estate,
15 Sunrise Drive
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18705.
Medical
Financial
Services
Find your next
vehicle online.
timesleaderautos.com
PAGE 2D WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
250 General Auction
150 Special Notices
250 General Auction
150 Special Notices
250 General Auction 250 General Auction
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
Octagon Family
Restaurant
375 W Main St, Plymouth, PA 18651
570-779-2288
.40 cent Wings
In House Only. Cannot be combined with
other offers. Minimum purchase of a dozen.
Home of the Original
O-Bar Pizza
FIREARMS
AUCTION
Saturday, April 27, 2013, 2013
8:30 AM
Location: Muncy Creek Volunteer
Fire Co. Social Hall, Clarkstown, PA.
along Rt. 442 between Muncy & Mil-
lville. If traveling I-180, take Rt.405 N.
exit, near Muncy & proceed approx.
mile to traffic light. Go straight
onto Rt.442 E. & proceed 2 miles
to Clarkstown. (Lycoming Co.)
350 Firearms & Sporting
Related Items
Visit our website at
www.kappsauction.com for numbered,
detailed list, pictures and terms. Starting
with Firearms at 8:30 A.M.
Over 600 Lots Being Sold.
Call 570-458-4384 to consign firearms for
our next upcoming firearms auction or email
george@kappsauction.com.
Kapps Auction Service,
Auctioneers:
George S. Kapp AU2174L
& Ben C. Kapp, AU3721L
MULTI-ESTATE
AUCTION
CHUCKS AUCTION SERVICE
Friday, April 19, 2013 @ 5:00PM
1144 Exeter Avenue, Exeter, Pa 18643
Quality furniture: Pier 1 table and chairs,
Bassett bedroom set, breakfront, hutch,
dressers, love seat, recliners, sofa, and more.
Refrigerators, washer, electric dryer.
Fenton, crystal, Depression, etc.
Heat Surge heater, house hold items, linens,
toys, dolls, lawn mowers, snow blower, tools,
much more.
See web sites for detailed list and pictures.
Information: 693-0372
chucksauction.com, auctionzip.com #4156
AU001433
HONDA 18003106062
FORD 18009241214
TOYOTA 18006899833
SCION 18006899833
AUTO
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
468 Auto Parts
VITO & GINOS
LIKE NEW
USED TIRES &
BATTERIES
$20 & UP
570-288-8995
Forty Fort
472 Auto Services
$ WANTED JUNK $
VEHICLES
LISPI TOWING
We pick up 822-0995
WANTED
Cars & Full Size
Trucks. For prices...
Lamoreaux Auto
Parts 477-2562
472 Auto Services
All
Junk
Cars
&
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
LAW
DIRECTORY
Call 829-7130
To Place Your Ad
Dont Keep Your
Practice a Secret!
310 Attorney
Services
BANKRUPTCY
FREE CONSULT
Guaranteed
Low Fees
Payment Plan!
Colleen Metroka
570-592-4796
Mention this ad
when you call!
DIVORCE No Fault
$295 divorce295.com
Atty. Kurlancheek
800-324-9748 W-B
310 Attorney
Services
FREE Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty. Sherry
Dalessandro
570-823-9006
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
135 Legals/
Public Notices
EXECUTORS
NOTICE
Estate of Charlotte
J. Foustner
20 Slope Street
Nanticoke,
PA 18634
Date of Death:
January 27, 2013
Notice is hereby
given that Letters
Testamentary in the
above named
estate have been
granted to the
undersigned, to
whom all persons
owing said estate
are requested to
make payment and
those having claims
or demands against
it make known
same without delay.
THOMAS A.
DEWALD
EXECUTOR
c/o Anthony J.
McDonald, Esquire
Law Offices of Bull,
Bull & McDonald,
LLP
106 Market St.
Berwick, PA 18603
LEGAL NOTICE
COMMONWEALTH
OF PA. BOARD
OF PARDONS
The following appli-
cation of the person
convicted in
Luzerne County will
be heard by the
Board of Pardons at
its regular session
on Friday, April 26,
2013 in the
Supreme Court
Courtroom, Room
437, Main Capitol
Building, Harris-
burg, PA, convening
at 9:30 a.m.
William R. Reese,
Jr.
Theft By Unlawful
Taking,
Criminal Conspiracy
Tracy A. Forray
Secretary
Board of Pardons
150 Special Notices
ADOPT
A loving couple
dreams of be-
coming a family.
A life filled with
love & opportuni-
ty awaits your
newborn.
Expenses paid.
Nadine & Jeff
1-866-936-7580
A D O P T I O N : A D O P T I O N :
A loving devoted
couple dreams of
adopting a baby.
Promises secure
endless love.
expenses Paid
Alana & Ed
1-888-456-6648
Having a formal
wedding?
Taupe, gray and
black are a
fabulous color
combination for
this
sophisticated
soiree!
bridezella.net
IF YOURE NOT
SELLING YOUR JUNK
VEHICLES TO
HAPPY HAPPY
TRAILS TRAILS
YOURE LOSING MONEY
570-760-2035
570-542-2277
Free Pickup!
To place your
ad call...829-7130
330 Child Care
DAYCARE
In my Kingston home.
Licensed.
Infant to 6 years.
570-283-0336
380 Travel
Black Lake, NY
Come relax & enjoy
great fishing &
tranquility at its finest.
Housekeeping
cottages on the water
with all the
amenities of home.
NEED A VACATION?
Call
Now!
(315) 375-8962
daveroll@black
lakemarine.com
www.blacklake4fish.com
MARTZ CURBSIDE
EXPRESS TO NYC
Only $25 round trip
from convenient
locations in the
Dallas & W-B area.
Direct to NYC!
Available every Sat-
urday & select Sun-
days & Wednes-
days through May.
Go to martztrail-
ways.com for full
details and to pur-
chase your
e-ticket.
380 Travel
BROADWAY
SHOW
BUS TRIPS
CINDERELLA
Sat. May 25th
$169
Orchestra Seats
MOTOWN ON
BROADWAY
Wed. Aug 7th
$159
Orchestra Seats
JERSEY BOYS
Wed. Aug. 7th
$129
(Front Mezz)
ALL SHOWS
INCLUDE BUS &
SHOW TICKETS
CALL ROSEANN
@ 655-4247
To Reserve
Your Seats
CAMEO
HOUSE
BUS TOURS
___________________
WERE
BAAACK!!
___________________
NYC
Sat. May 18
Kips Bay
Showhouse
Roosevelt Island
Via Tram/
FDR Memorial
NYC
June 9th
Sneaker Sunday
Brooklyn Flea
Ground Zero
Chelsea Market
NYC
Tues. July 16
High Tea & Tour of
Gracie Mansion
Morgan Library
COMING UP
Oct. 5 & 6
Frank Lloyd
Wrights
Falling Water/
Shanksville
9/11 Memorial

for more info


570-655-3420
FUN GETAWAYS!
SENECA LAKE
Wine & Cheese
Weekend
Apr. 27 & 28
YANKEES
vs. Orioles 4/14
vs Blue Jays 4/28
New Reduced
Price
Mention code
BASE for more
savings.
Peddlers
Village
Strawberry
Festival
May 4
Sight & Sound
Noah
Dinner @
Hershey Farm
May 18
Philadelphia
Sightseeing &
Eastern State
Penitentiary
Tour 5/18
Niagara Falls
June 7-9, includes
2 cruises, tours
and 5 meals
1-800-432-8069
NYC BUS $36
Wed. & Sat.
WICKED
4/17
Orch. $142
Only 8 open
JERSEY BOYS
April 17th
LION KING
May $139
MATILDA 6/29
ORCH. $155
RAINBOW
TOURS
570-489-4761
LEAVE FROM
PARK & RIDE
Rt. 309 or Rt.
315
ESCOR ESCORTED TED
GROUP GROUP CRUISE CRUISE
9/14-9/22/2013
Sat. to Sun.
Carnival Splendor
to Turks,
HalfMoonCay
and Nassau
Bus to NYC,
Baggage
Handling, All Taxes
Plus the
The Chatter
Band performs
From $959.
per person
ASK ABOUT THE NEW
DRINK PACKAGE
Space Limited
Call this week!
570-288-8747
1-800-545-7099
409 Autos under
$5000
SATURN `01
4 door, 4 cylinder,
auto. One owner.
Excellent gas
mileage. Cold A/C.
Good condition
$2,850
570-466-6368
570-825-8253
409 Autos under
$5000
2 SUZUKI 03
GRAND VITARAS 4X4
93,000 & 96,000
miles. Prices Too
Low to Print!
Let the Community
Know!
Place your Classified
Ad TODAY!
570-829-7130
CHEVY 00 BLAZER
4 door, 4 x4 LT
Power windows
& locks. Auto,
2 owners.
Not a Nicer One!
$3,995
CHRYSLER `96 LHS
Dark green/tan
leather. 107K miles.
Fair condition. In-
finity sound, factory
alloy wheels. New
front bearings,
rotors & brakes.
$1,400
570-287-8996
DODGE 94 GRAND
CARAVAN
One owner. Only
115,000 miles.
Immaculate
condition.
Where are you
going to find one
for only
$2,895?
DODGE 99
STRATUS
71,000 original
miles, 4 cylinder,
great on gas
$4,495
LEOS AUTO SALES
93 Butler Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
570-825-8253
Ford 00 Taurus
4 dr, auto, 6 cyl,
flex-fuel vehicle.
$1,850
Current Inspection
On All Vehicles
DEALER
PONTIAC `98 GRAND
AM GT
Excellent running
condition, mainte-
nance free. $2,700
(570) 779-3048
PONTIAC 06 G6
4 door sedan.
Hunter green
132,000 miles.
New inspection.
Save thousands.
$5,995
SUBARU `98 OUTBACK
LIMITED EDITION
4 cylinder, 2 sun-
roofs, leather interi-
or, garage kept, one
owner. $4,900.
(570)829-4776
TOYOTA 01 COROLLA
Reduced to
$2,900, OBO, Auto-
matic, 164,500
miles.
570-854-9122
412 Autos for Sale
BMW `97 Z3
1.9 ROADSTER
70,102 miles, Mon-
treal blue, new
tires, recently
serviced. $7,800.
(570)690-3339
BUICK `97 LESABRE
Excellent running
condition, mainte-
nance free. $3,200.
570-287-0600
CADILLAC 04 DEVILLE
DTS
Metallic green,
beige leather, moon
roof. 73K Warranty
$10,900.
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
412 Autos for Sale
ACME AUTO SALES
343-1959
1009 Penn Ave
Scranton 18509
Across from Scranton Prep
GOOD CREDIT, BAD
CREDIT, NO CREDIT
Call Our Auto Credit
Hot Line to get
Pre-approved for a
Car Loan!
800-825-1609
www.acmecarsales.net
11 AUDI S5 CONV.
Sprint blue, black
/ brown leather
int., navigation,
7 spd auto turbo,
AWD
10 CHEVY IMPALA LT
silver, V6, 50k miles
08 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX
blue, auto, V6
07 NISSAN SENTRA S
black, auto, 4 cyl..
07 BUICK LUCERNE
CXL, silver, grey
leather
06 AUDI A8L
grey, blue leather,
navigation AWD
05 AUDI A6
All Road. Green
2 tone, leather
AWD
05 VW JETTA GLS
grey, black leather,
sunroof, alloys
04 CHEVY MALIBU LT
Blue
04 NISSAN MAXIMA LS
silver, auto,
sunroof
03 SUZUKI AERO
Silver, 5 speed
73 PORSCHE 914
green & black, 5
spd, 62k miles.
SUVS, VANS,
TRUCKS, 4 X4s
08 JEEP PATRIOT
SPORT black, 4
cyl. 5 speed 4x4
07 GMC YUKON 4X4
DENALI black, 3rd
seat, Navigation
07 DODGE CARAVAN
SXT green,
4 door, 7 pass
mini van
06 PONTIAC
MONTANNA AWD
blue, entertain-
ment center 7 pas
senger mini van
06 HONDA PILOT EX
silver, 3rd seat,
4x4
06 CHEVY 1500
SILVERADO REG CAB
truck red, 4x4
06 NISSAN XTERRA
black, V6, 4x4
06 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO,
gold, V6 4x4
06 JEEP COMMANDER
black, 3rd seat,
entertainment
center, 4x4
06 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER
LS, gold,
3rd seat, 4x4
06 DODGE DAKOTA
QUAD CAB SLT
black, 4 door, V8,
4x4 truck
06 DODGE RAM 1500
QUAD CAB, Black,
V8, 4x4 truck
06 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER
LS, SILVER, 4X4
05 CHRYSLER TOWN &
COUNTRY TOURING,
blue, 7 passenger
mini van
05 MITSUBISHI
ENDEAVOR XLS
silver, V6, 4x4
05 MERCURY MARINER
PREMIUM. Seafoam
green, leather,
V6, FWD
05 MERCURY MARINER
PREMIER white, tan
leather, AWD
05 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
LX WHITE, V6, 4X4
05 FORD ESCAPE XLT
Red, V6 4x4
05 TOYOTA SIENNA LE
gold, 7 passenger
mini van
05 HYUNDAI TUSCON LX
green auto, AWD
04 FORD EXPLORER
XLT green 3rd seat
4x4
04 BUICK RNDEZVOUS
CXL black, 3rd
seat AWD
04 CHEVY AVALANCHE
LT green, grey
leather, 4 door
4x4 truck
03 CADILLAC ESCALADE
black, grey leather
3rd seat, 4x4
03 NISSAN XTERRA
silver, V6, 4x4
03 FORD F150 XLT
SUPERCREW 4x4
truck, gold
02 TOYOTA TUNDRA
SR5 XCAB TRUCK
white 4x4
01 FORD RANGER REG
CAB TRUCK white,
V6 2WD
01 DODGE RAM
1500 QUAD CAB
SLT 5.9 liter,
brown, 8 box 4x4
truck
00 JEEP WRANGLER
SPORT blue, 2
door, soft top,
4x4 5 speed
99 FORD F150 SUPER
CAB, silver 4x4
truck
DODGE `02
INTREPID
White, 4 door,
good condition.
151,000 miles.
Asking $3,300
570-954-7459
FORD `98 MUSTANG
Black, V6 auto,
82,000 miles, all
power, Good condi-
tion. $4,000.
570-868-6321
FORD 08 FOCUS SE
Silver, black interior.
4 door sedan.
Power windows
and locks, CD. 104k
highway miles.
Runs excellent.
$6800 negotiable.
570-578-9222
VW 04 JETTAS
CHOOSE FROM 2
Starting at $7,350.
Leather or cloth,
moonroof &
warranties
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
412 Autos for Sale
VITOS
&
GINOS
Auto Sales
949 Wyoming
Ave, Forty Fort
288-8995
93 UD Tow Truck
with wheel lift.
64k. $8,995
94 Jeep
Cherokee V8.
Runs great.
Power windows
& doors.
$2,995
96 F150 Pickup.
auto, runs good.
$2,495
96 Pontiac
Grand Prix.
White, air,
power windows
& brakes, 4
door, runs good,
106K. $2,995
01 Ford Taurus
SES
4 door, air, power
doors & win-
dows.
$2,995
99 Chevy S10
Blazer 4 door,
power windows,
doors & seats.
126,000 miles.
$3,995
03 Ford Wind-
star 4 door, all
power options.
96,000 miles.
$4,300
04 Nissan
Armada, 7 pass-
enger. 4wd.
Excellent condi-
tion. $10,900
09 Mercedes
GL450, 7 pass-
enger. Too many
options to list. 30K
miles. Garage
kept. Cream puff.
$42,500
Buying
Junk Cars
Used Cars
&Trucks
Highest Prices Paid
574 -1275
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H
PAID
570-301-3602
TOYOTA `00
CELICA GT
5 speed manual
transmission. 193k
miles. Runs well, as
is. Asking $1,700.
570-240-7539
Boat? Car? Truck?
Motorcycle? Air-
plane? Whatever it
is, sell it with a
Classified ad.
570-829-7130
TOYOTA 04 CELICA GT
112K miles. Blue,
5 speed. Air,
power
windows/locks,
CD/cassette, Key-
less entry, sun-
roof, new battery.
Car drives and
has current PA
inspection. Slight
rust on corner of
passenger door.
Clutch slips on
hard acceleration.
This is why its
thousands less
than Blue Book
value. $6,500
OBO. Make an
offer! Call
570-592-1629
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $7,995.
Call 570-237-5119
MERCEDES 88
BENZ 560SL
5.6L V8
72K original miles,
clean CarFax,
loaded-power
everything, new
tires, classic
plates. Smoke
Silver exterior,
Brazilian Wine
leather interior,
hard AND soft top.
Excellent condi-
tion, garage kept.
Receipts for
maintenance.
$17K. Serious
inquiries only. Call
570-359-3319
MERCEDES 91
380SL
Gold with Chocolate
soft top.
160K miles.
Texas car, never
seen snow.
$7800 OBO. Call
570-762-4471 or
biobob@me.com
421 Boats &
Marinas
BAYLINER 88 CAPRI
171/2 ft. with out-
board 85hp motor.
Bikini top, trailer
included. Runs ex-
cellent. $2,500,
OBO. 570-714-3300
570-675-8693
FISHING BOAT
Tri-Hull 15.5, fiber-
glass,cover, 9.9 hp
Marlin outboard,
40lb. electric motor,
extras, trailer. All
great shape $2500.
Moving. 290-4343,
brosellen@
yahoo.com
424 Boat Parts/
Supplies
BOAT SEATS. New
in box, Angler hi
back. 2 for $90
570-696-2433
427 Commercial
Trucks &
Equipment
TRAILER 09
FOOD CONCESSION
6 X 12, tow
behind. Turnkey
operation. $14,000.
570-899-8478
439 Motorcycles
HARLEY 06 SOFTAIL
Standard.UNDER
5K MILES. Chrome
engine, lower forks,
primary covers,
sprocket, matching
flame grips/pegs,
Sampson exhaust,
mini sissy bar,
power commander
/high flow air clean-
er, garage kept and
new rear tire, Chop-
per Blue paint. Ask-
ing $11,500 obo.
call Tony @
570-905-7066
HARLEY 92
DAVIDSON FAT
BOY 20,000 origi-
nal miles, some
extras. Must See!
Asking, $8,500.
570-542-4815
HARLEY-DAVIDSON 87
SOFTAIL
CUSTOM 1340 EVO.
11,000 original miles
excellent condition,
original owner,
garage kept.
$6500. call 570-
814-1449 anytime.
SUZUKI 01 VS 800
GL INTRUDER
Garage kept, no
rust, lots of
chrome, black with
teal green flake.
Includes storage
jack & 2 helmets.
$3600
570-410-1026
442 RVs & Campers
FOREST RIVER 08
FLAGSTAFF 5TH
WHEEL model#
8526RLS fireplace,
flat panel TV, 2
slides, heated
mattress, too many
extras to list. Moun-
tain Top, PA
$17,000.
570-868-6986
MONTANA 02
MOUNTAINEER
35, two slides.
Fully equipped,
excellent condition,
25 awning. Many
options. $15,500
570-430-4254
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
CHEVROLET `98
SILVERADO 1500
EXTENDED CAB LS
Runs great! 211,000
miles, 4x4, new
windshield, alter-
nator, front wheel
studs, spark plug
wires, ignition mod-
ule, brakes, throttle
body gasket, 3 oxy-
gen sensors, fuel
pump, tank, & filter.
New tires with alloy
rims. New transmis-
sion. $4,000, OBO.
570-793-5593
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
LINCOLN `11 NAVIGA-
TOR
10,000 miles. Sil-
ver/grey, all op-
tions available.
Excellent condition.
Selling for medical
reasons. Remaining
warranty of 22
months. Originally
$65,000, selling for.
$42,500
570-288-0182
MAZDA 08
TRIBUTE
Touring addition,
4X4, traction con-
trol, four cylinder, all
records, great con-
dition, remainder of
six year, 75,000 mile
dealership warranty.
New tires, 60,000
miles. Color, Tung-
sten Grey $13,000.
(570) 474-0723
MERCEDES 01 BENZ
CLK 320
Coupe. 1 Owner.
Extra clean $10,999
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
TOYOTA 07 TACOMA
Double Cab. 6
speed manual. 109K
original miles. A
Title, very clean and
well cared for.
Super white color.
New tires. $17,500.
570-956-3392
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
TOYOTA CAMRY
One owner, auto,
air. Warranty.
$6,900
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
VOLVO `08 XC90
Only 50,000 miles!
Garage kept. Non-
smoker, silver-beige
interior. Seven pas-
senger, all power
options, $19,900.
Trades welcome.
(570) 817-6000
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
All
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
503 Accounting/
Finance
MEDICAL BILLING
Position PT with FT
possibility.
Knowledge of CPT
and ICD9 a plus,
will train. Please
e-mail resume to:
arosengrant@
source1med.com
or fax to:
570.241.0112
508 Beauty/
Cosmetology
BARBER AND
COSMETOLOGIST
New business
looking for barber &
cosmologist. Must
be licensed and
proficient in mens
hair cutting &
styling. Please call
814-954-2278 or
pick up application
at 273 Airport
Road, Hazleton
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
CARPENTERS
Call office.
570-477-3827
527 Food Services/
Hospitality
LINE COOKS
SERVERS
DISHWASHERS
Red Rooster
Restaurant
Rte. 118 & 29
Sweet Valley
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
COON
INDUSTRIES,INC
Local concrete
company looking to
fill the following
positions
MECHANIC
Experienced in all
areas of truck
maintenance &
repair
DRIVER
Class B CDL
required
We offer competi-
tive wage, BC/BS,
paid holidays &
vacation,and
pension plan.
Apply in person at
117 Armstrong
Road
Pittston, PA 18640
570-654-0211
MAINTENANCE
Full time.
Knowledge of gen-
eral maintenance,
painting, plumbing,
and electrical. Must
have PA Operator
License. Apply at:
The Meadows
Manor
200 Lake Street
Dallas,Pa 18612
EOE
MECHANIC
TRAILER
Local trucking com-
pany seeking
mechanic to work
on Trailers with
truck work included.
Minimum one year
experience & own
hand tools. CDL
Class A or ability to
obtain. Normal
schedule Monday-
Friday 7:30 am -
4:00 pm Job
includes call-outs.
Competitive wages,
paid vacations, holi-
days, benefits, uni-
forms, 401 (k). Inter-
ested individuals
should contact
Human Resources
at 570-287-2266
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
538 Janitorial/
Cleaning
WINDOW CLEANERS
PA Drivers license
required, ability to
lift and climb ladders
and work on roofs.
Winters off.
570-288-6794
538 Janitorial/
Cleaning
HIRING THE FOLLOWING
PART TIME POSITIONS:
UNIFORMS AND MEALS
PROVIDED. WEEKENDS
AND HOLIDAYS A MUST.
APPLY IN PERSON.
NO PHONE CALLS.
OFF OF ROUTE 115
WILKES-BARRE
FRONT DESK AGENT
HOUSEKEEPERS
HOUSEPERSON/VAN
DRIVER
(Valid PA Driver's
License Required)
BEST WESTERN PLUS
EAST MOUNTAIN INN
Line up a place to live
in classified!
542 Logistics/
Transportation
CLASS B DRIVER
Municipal waste
hauling. Roll-off
experience
preferred. Call
570.868.6462
542 Logistics/
Transportation
AM CITY DISPATCHER
Must have knowl-
edge of local area,
DOT regulations,
computer skills.
Assist in planning &
scheduling pickups
& delivery routes.
Mon-Fri 2am-12pm
Send resume
and salary
requirements to:
Central Air Freight
PO Box 99
Hazleton, PA 18201
DRIVERS
Karchner Logistics
is now hiring
*Local & Jockey
Drivers
*Regional drivers
Must have Class A
CDL. We are
rapidly growing and
offer competitive
wages. Please call
570.579.0351
To place your
ad Call Toll Free
1-800-427-8649
TRI-AXLE DRIVER
3-4 years experi-
ence. Local work.
Start immediately.
Call 570-237-1734
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013 PAGE 3D
PAGE 4D WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
*
VISIT US AT WWW.COCCIACARS.COM
*As Traded vehicles are sold AS IS with no warranty. Tax and tags extra. Photos of vehicles are for illustration purposes only. Coccia Ford
is not responsible for any typographical errors. No Security Deposit Necessary. See dealer for details. Sale ends APRIL 30, 2013.
CALL NOW 823-8888 CALL NOW 823-8888
Overlooking Mohegan Sun Overlooking Mohegan Sun
577 East Main St., Plains 577 East Main St., Plains
Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B
$6,990 $7,990
$8,990
$13,990
$13,990
$13,990
08 CHEVY EQUINOX LTZ
$16,990
$12,990
$12,990
$11,990
$15,990
$15,990
AU3641, Power Drivers Seat,
Power Passenger Seat,
Keyless Entry
05 BUICK LACROSSE CXL
$11,990
05 NISSAN MURANO SL
$13,990
10 MITSUBISHI GALANT SE
$12,990
08 EXPLORER EDDIE BAUER
$16,990
$13,990
STARTING AT
TO CHOOSE FROM $12,990
STARTING AT
TO CHOOSE FROM TO CHOOSE FROM $25,990
STARTING AT
TO CHOOSE FROM $21,990
STARTING AT
$25,990
STARTING AT
TO CHOOSE FROM
1.9
%
$21,990
STARTING AT
TO CHOOSE FROM
AU3732, 4 Spd Automatic,
Cruise Control
07 CHEVY IMPALA LS SDN
$10,990
AU3440, Air Conditioning,
Anti-Lock Brakes,
Power Locks
06 MARINER CONVENIENCE SUV
$10,990
AU3786, Moonroof,
Keyless Entry
11 SCION tC HATCHBACK
$17,990
AU3718, 4WD, Leather,
Power Drivers Seat,
Keyless Entry
07 MERCURY MOUNTAINEER
$15,990
AU3661, Four Wheel Drive,
Leather, Moonroof,
Heated Seats
07 JEEP GR. CHEROKEE LAREDO
$13,990
09 MERCURY MOUNTAINEER PREMIER
$24,990
$8,990
2004 CADILLAC SRX SUV
AU3562, Air Conditioning,
Tilt Steering Wheel, Power
Windows, Power Locks
07 DODGE CALIBER SXT SDN
$10,990
08 FORD EXPLORER EDDIE BAUER EDITION SUV
$18,990
07 TOWNCAR SIGNATURE LMTD
$18,990
07 FORD EXPLORER SPORT TRAC LMTD
$18,990
13 DODGE DART LMTD
$21,990
$21,990
STARTING AT
TO CHOOSE
FROM
$19,990
STARTING AT
TO CHOOSE
FROM
1
.9%
AVAILABLE
FOR UP TO
APR60
*ON CERTIFIED VEHICLES ONLY
11 FORD RANGER XLT
$21,990
11 FORD MUSTANG COUPE V6
$19,990
11 HYUNDAI SONATA LIMITED SDN
$20,990
12 CHEVROLET EQUINOX LS SUV
$21,490
11 HONDA CR-V SE SUV
$21,990
$25,990
11 TOYOTA TACOMA DOUBLE CAB AWD SLT
$28,990
10 ACURA RDX
$26,990
07 EXPLORER SPORT TRAC LTD
MUST SEE!
09 FORD FLEX LTD 4X4
$25,990
AU3676, 4WD, Leather, Bedliner, Running
Boards, Moonroof, Heated Seats
10 FORD SUPER DUTY F250
FX4 LARIAT SUPER CAB
$32,990
09 LINCOLN MKS SEDAN
$27,990
11 FORD EXPLORER XLT SUV
$28,990
11 LINCOLN MKS SEDAN
$32,990
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013 PAGE 5D
503 Accounting/
Finance
503 Accounting/
Finance
503 Accounting/
Finance
542 Logistics/
Transportation
548 Medical/Health
542 Logistics/
Transportation
548 Medical/Health
542 Logistics/
Transportation
548 Medical/Health
CONSTRUCTION
ACCOUNTANT/CONTROLLER
American Asphalt Paving, a leading road, site and paving construction
company, and aggregate and asphalt producer in Northeastern PA is
seeking an experienced Construction Accountant Controller.
This position is for a Hands-On Controller with emphasis on job and
equipment costs, related overhead analysis, and managing in a fast-
paced environment.
The Controller will be responsible for managing and assisting with all
accounting functions for the company. This position will generate both
job and equipment cost reporting in formats that are useful to opera-
tions analysis. In addition, he/she will design and provide key finan-
cial and operational indicators to the President and COO to assist in the
decision making process to support continued growth. This includes
financial modeling, forecasting, operational analysis, and developing
and analyzing budgets in four divisions. The Controller manages a
staff of five individuals, and will recommend and implement effective
internal controls and procedures. Background to include financial
statement preparation, monthly close, account reconciliations, external
banking, insurance and CPArelationships, AP, AR, PR, job and equip-
ment costing, sales tax and payroll tax preparation and cash reporting.
The successful candidate will have a Bachelors Degree in Account-
ing; five or more years experience including a cost role in the Civil
Construction/Construction Materials industry; efficiency in mid-level
construction software, Excel, Word, excellent written and verbal com-
munications, analytical, reasoning and organizational skills; self-moti-
vated with am emphasis on attention to detail and process improve-
ment; and exceptional interpersonal skills with demonstrated ability to
develop and manage teams, and to deploy new accounting policies and
procedures as necessary.
Interested candidates should email their resume, salary history and
three professional references to:
Bernie.banks.jr@amerasphalt.com
or mail to: American Asphalt Paving Co.
500 Chase Road, Shavertown, PA 18708
8
1
1
6
9
6
Join our teamat Heinz Rehab
RegisteredNurse
Full-time &Part-time 3pm-11:30am.
Part-time 11pm-7:30am.
Sign-on bonus $5,000 for
Full-time, $2,500 for Part-time
CNA- Part-time 7am-3:30pm,
Full-time andPart-time 3pm-11:30pm
&Part-time 11pm-7:30am.
Must be PAState Certied
Unit Clerk - Full-time 3pm-11:30pm
We offer:
Competitive pay rates
commensurate with
experience.
Full benets
package including medical,
dental, andvision coverage,
tuition reimbursement,
401Kandmore.
Apply online at alliedservices.org
Bilingual individuals encouragedto apply.
AlliedServices is andEqual Opportunity Employer.
542 Logistics/
Transportation
WATER TANKER
DRIVER/
TRI-AXLE DRIVERS
Part time/full time
days & nights with
experience. Must
have clean MVR
and pass DOT
requirements. Pay
is based on experi-
ence. Full time days
for Tri Axle Drivers.
Call 570-825-2688
between
8am & 6pm.
545 Marketing/
Product
TECHNICAL
TRAINING
COORDINATOR
Local flooring
company is
seeking a
Technical Training
Coordinator to
join the growing
Technical Dept.
This position
requires excellent
written communi-
cation and admin-
istrative skills.
It will involve
managing training
sessions, handle
all aspects relat-
ing to this func-
tion of the dept.
Must know Word
and Excel. SAP a
plus. Competitive
starting salary
with excellent
benefits. If you
are looking to
be part of a
growing team in a
fast paced and
challenging envi-
ronment, Fax or
email resume to:
HR Department
Box 667
Hazleton, PA
18201
Fax:
570-450-0231
donna.reimold@
forbo.com
548 Medical/Health
DIRECT CARE WORKER
Allied Services
In-Home Services
division has hours
available in
Luzerne County.
PT days and
weekends, and FT
Evenings available.
Full benefits pack-
age offered for FT
position. Minimum
of one (1) year
home care experi-
ence and valid
drivers license
required. If
interested, please
apply online at:
www.alliedservices.org
or call Trish Tully at
(570) 348-2237.
Bilingual individuals
are encouraged
to apply.
ALLIED SERVICES IS AN
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY
EMPLOYER.
HIGHLAND MANOR
NURSING HOME
RN SUPERVISOR
POSITIONS
FULL TIME 3-11
PART TIME 3-11
AND 11-7
Seeking organized
and motivated
RNs to supervise
our nursing staff
to maintain the
highest level
of quality care
given to our
residents. LTC
and Supervisory
experience
required.
Also seeking,
LPN PT 11-7
CNAs FT/PT 3-11
750 Schooley Ave.
Exeter PA 18643
Ph 570-655-3791
Fax
570-655-4881
don-highland@
seniorsnorth.com
EOE
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
MAINTENANCE
AIDE
Part Time
Temporary
Maintenance Aide
245 Old Lake
Road
Dallas, PA 18612
(570) 639-1885
E.O.E.
RNS
LOCAL HOSPITAL.
ALL SHIFTS.
Up to $40 an hour.
570.233.4898
RSA, LPN, MEDTECH,
ACTIVITY AID,
HOUSEKEEPING.
Apply in Person
No Phone Calls
TIFFANY COURT
700 Northampton St
Kingston, PA
551 Other
FAMILIES
URGENTLY NEEDED
More children
than ever before
can no longer live
in their own
homes. You can
help by becoming
a foster parent.
Call FCCY at
1-800-747-3807
EOE
551 Other
HANDYPERSON/
MAINTENANCE
For interior/exterior
projects. Light car-
pentry, painting,
construction
repairs, landscape
maintenance. Jack
/Jill of All Trades. Full
time. Start immedi-
ately. Valid PA dri-
vers license.
Call 570-793-6294
To place your
ad call...829-7130
SEASONAL
PART TIME POSITIONS
The Plains Township
Board of Commis-
sioners is seeking
applicants for sea-
sonal part time posi-
tions in the depart-
ment of public
works. An applicant
with a CDL license is
a plus. Starting rate
of pay will be $8.00
per hour working
less than 40 hours
per week with no
benefits. Applica-
tions can be
obtained at the
Municipal Building
126 North Main
Street, Plains, Pa
18705 from the
hours of 8:00 a.m.
to 4:00 p.m. Mon-
day, Tuesday,
Thursday and Fri-
day. Wednesday
8:00 a.m. to 6:30
p.m. The board is an
equal opportunity
employer.
554 Production/
Operations
PRODUCTION/
MACHINE
OPERATORS
$10.50/hr
AEP Industries,
Inc., manufactur-
er of flexible
packaging films in
Mountaintop
hiring Starting at
$10.50/hr. PLUS
.50 /hr. for night
shift; 60-90 day
evaluation pro-
vides increase $$
based on YOUR
performance,
attendance etc.
Full-time 12 hours
shifts alternating /
3 & 4 day work
weeks (overtime
pay every other)
Every Other
Weekend A Must.
As a Machine
Operator you will
remove, inspect,
and pack finish
product to speci-
fications with
strong opportuni-
ty for promotion.
You must be able
to do some heavy
lifting, MUST
know how to use
a tape measure
and scale, and be
a TEAM PLAYER.
Previous mfg.
experience pre-
ferred. Benefit
Pkg. includes:
Medical, Dental,
Vision, Life Ins.,
Vacation, Holiday
pay.
Applications
accepted daily @
AEP INDUSTRIES,
INC. 8 am - 4 pm
20 Elmwood Ave
Crestwood
Industrial Park
Mountaintop, PA
18707
Email: grullony@
aepinc.com
EOE * A drug free
workplace
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
HVAC
SERVICE TECHNICIAN
Immediate opening
for a heating, air
conditioning, and
refrigeration service
technician with five
or more years
commercial experi-
ence. Applicant
must have experi-
ence with screw
chillers, DDC
controls and pneu-
matic temperature
controls. Hydronic
heating and com-
mercial boiler expe-
rience would be a
plus. The right can-
didate will also
have the ability
to supervise Instal-
lation projects. We
offer paid holidays,
paid sick days,
life insurance,
medical insurance
and 401K retire-
ment plan. Good
driving record
a must.
Call 825-2894
or fax resume to
825-7260.
Sales
ROUTE SALES
POSITIONS
Looking for aggres-
sive, ambitious,
reliable persons
to operate bread
route 5 days a
week. Routes
depart from
Pittston. Excellent
future growth and
earnings potential.
Retail and/or
vendor experience
preferred but not
required, we
will train. Pay is
$800 per week.
Must pass pre-
employment drug
screen and back-
ground check. For
additional informa-
tion, please email
info@route
relievers.com
EOE M/F/D/V
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
IF YOU ARE FROM
Hanover
Green
Buttonwood
Korn Krest
Nanticoke
Are at least
14 years old
Are dependable
Have a great
personality
Can work
evenings &
Saturdays
Would like to
have fun while
working with
other teenagers
Then call
Mr. John
@ 735-8708
leave message
SALES
Commission shed
sales in Scranton.
Our busy season is
here; need a
self-motivated
commission-driven
salesperson with
experience who is
local. Experience
preferred but will
train the right
person. Phone:
570-725-3439
Fax:
570-725-3309
or email
ekvs@pcfreemail.
com
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
573 Warehouse
AMAZON WAREHOUSE
Positions
Available!
Earn up to $13.50
an hour!
Integrity Staffing is
NOW HIRING
and looking for
energetic people to
fill picking, packing,
and shipping posi-
tions at Amazon.
This is a great
opportunity to
learn new skills,
help build your
resume, & have
fun. We offer
weekly paychecks,
benefits, and day &
evening schedules.
Positions fill quickly,
so apply today!
Please apply online
at
INTEGRITYHAZLETONJOB30.COM
and follow the
directions to
schedule an
interview.
*Please bring HS
diploma/GED and
identification
proving eligibility
to work in the USA
when applying.
600
FINANCIAL
610 Business
Opportunities
DRY CLEANI NG
BUSINESS. Fully
equipped, will lease
to own or sell equip-
ment outright. 6 N.
Broad St. W. Hazle-
ton 570-362-0845
VISUAL
COMMUNICATIONS
BIZ FOR SALE
B to B Services
Repeat Client
Base
Low Overhead
Great Location
High Net to Gross
No Experience
Necessary
Finance & Training
Available
1-800-796-3234
630 Money To Loan
We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED. Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say theyve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
Its a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
700
MERCHANDISE
702 Air
Conditioners
AIR CONDITIONER,
Haier 5000 BTU,
used April 2012-
October 2012.
Works great. $50.
570-331-2975
AIR CONDITIONER.
Kenmore, 12m000
BTU, new in box.
Sell for $300.
570-878-2849
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
$ ANTIQUES BUYING $
Old Toys, model kits,
Bikes, dolls, guns,
Mining Items, trains
&Musical Instruments,
Hess. 474-9544
ANTIQUES
One item or entire
contents of homes.
570-814-3371
570-328-4420
ATTENTION VENDORS
Accent items,
ceramics, baskets,
holiday items,
glasses, much
more. ALL EXCEL-
LENT PRICES AND
IN EXCELLENT
CONDITION.
570-675-5046
after 5:30 P.M.
BASEBALL CARDS,
1992 score baseball
(430) $10. Boston
Red Sox (63), $3.
N.Y. Mets, (50)
$2.50. Philadelphia
Phillies, (114) $6.
Pittsburgh Pirates,
(52) $2.50. Balti-
more Orioles (109)
$6. 570-313-5214
570-313-3859
PAINTINGS, Japan-
ese, on Rice paper,
Circa, 1952, 2 total,
$15 each firm. Rod-
ney & Friends, Burg-
er King, Rodney,
Randy, Rhonda,
Ramona with
records. $30 for all,
Neg. Hand Pup-
pets, Alf, Cooking,
Surfing, Melmac
Rock, $40. for all,
Neg. 570-779-3841
SEWING MACHINE,
very old, dome top,
Singer, needs
repair. $15.
(570)472-3615
STAR WARS FIG-
URES princess lei by
side show and oth-
ers $250. for all fig-
ures. 570-833-2598
YEARBOOKS.
Coughlin (30) 28-
2000. GAR -(18))
37-06, Meyers (15)
53-03, Pittston (6)
67-75, WVW (12),
1967-2000,Kingston
(11) 32-52, Hazle-
ton, (8) 40-61,
Plains, (3) 66-68,
Hanover 51-74.
Prices vary depend-
ing on condition.
$20-$40 each. Call
for further details &
additional school
editions. 570-825-
4721 arthurh302@
aol.com
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
710 Appliances
AIR CONDITIONER.
Whirlpool,10,000
BTU. Energy star.
$175. 210-316-8161
FREEZER good
working condition.
$100. 570-762-6321
FREEZER. stand up
Gibson Budget
Master 70x32 white
very good condition,
working. clean $150
OBO. 570-675-8129
JUICER, Omega
1000, works great.
$30. 570-740-1392
STOVE. GE electric.
40, has more sur-
face space. 3 draw-
ers for storage.
Older model, 60s,
very heavy but
works as if brand
new. $100 OBO
570-336-4419
STOVE/OVEN,
Whirlpool electric.
Almond, self clean-
ing, 220 plug. Good
condition. $75
570-675-3854
TOASTER, new in
the box, $10. COF-
FEE POT, 12 cups,
new, $10. CAN
OPENER, $2.
570-333-7065
VACUUMS, two, Bis-
sell, upright, less
than 2 years old.
Excellent condition.
12 amps with
onboard tools and
12 lighted glide
path. Uses #7 filtrete
bags. $40, OBO.
Royal Hand, like
new with onboard
tools. Bagless, pow-
erful suction. Needs
filter cover. $35,
OBO. 570-331-2975
712 Baby Items
CRADLE, swing,
aquarium, by Fisher
Price, $30,
570-406-1353
STROLLER double
baby stroller by
baby trend used in
great condition and
just serviced for
brake pads. $120
obo. 570-287-4999
STROLLER. Jogger,
very good condi-
tions. 3 wheels, all
terrain, brake pads,
straps. $79. 570-
829-3261 or 570-
817-2548.
716 Building
Materials
DOOR like new 6
panel steel entry
36, 2 side lights
pre-hung with dead
bolt & custom cur-
tains with rods.
$250.
570-817-5778
PANELS. Soffit, 41
pieces, 51 long 12
wide. Equals 14.5
12 pieces. VINYL,
Owens Corning T4
White in original
boxes. $125 both
570-735-7658
RAILING. Wrought
iron. 3 pieces, 92,
39, 42 Rail covers
6 steps. $275. For
details 881-3455
716 Building
Materials
WINDOWS (5)
36x60, new, never
used. White alu-
minum frames, dou-
ble pane. $30 each
or $120 for all.
570-301-8311
WINDOWS Re-
placement new 1-
16x27.5 & 1-
18x27 white vinyl
double hung insulat-
ed glass 1/2 screen
$5. each or 2 for
$100. (2) 16x16
concrete chimney
caps $10. each.570-
735-7658
726 Clothing
CLOTHING, 3 boys
blue blazers, $3
each. 2 Communion
suits, $5 each. 10
womens blouses
(size 8) $.50 each.
10 boys collared t-
shirts, $1 each.
570-822-5560
CLOTHING. Boys
14-16. Name brand
hoodies, gym pants,
shorts and jeans. All
for $25 Womens
tops, small and
med. $20 all.
570-709-9863
COAT. Mens Camel
Overcoat. Size 40,
$49. 570-283-2552
JACKET, Harley
Davidson, leather,
size XXL. Includes
vest. $100.
570-388-6521
JACKETS. (4)Ladies
size small Call for
detains. $75 all
570-417-3765
SUIT. Boys Commu-
nion. Navy blue,
worn once. Truly
like new. 12 Husky.
Inner seam. 24
$50 570-474-9866
WOMENS CLOTH-
ING, misses size 12,
capris, black,
salmon, blue and
white, shorts and
jeans, like new. $5
each. 570-779-3841
Leave a message.
728 Commercial/
Industrial
Equipment
BEAUTY SALON
EQUIPMENT. Chair,
hydraulic, $75. Chair
with dryer, $25.
Chair/shampoo,
$10. Table, mani-
cure, $20. Bowl,
shampoo, $25.
570-655-6764
VENDING MACHINES
Combination snack
and beverage, with
dollar bill changers.
Brand new. $1300
each. 570-690-9197
730 Computer
Equipment &
Software
COMPUTER, Gate-
way, desktop with
extras. Rarely used.
$660. 740-1392
LAPTOP, Asus, 8
months old, excel-
lent condition. $250.
570-288-1281
LAPTOP. GATEWAY
P4 XP with DVD
player. $139
570-283-2552
LAPTOPS! Refur-
bished off-lease
business Laptops:
Lenovo/IBM/Dell/HP
All Dual Core, all
windows 7, all
cdrw/dvd/dvdrw
drives, MS Office 10,
anti-virus and more.
ALL 200+GB New
hard drives, all wifi,
new batteries,
bags. $175- $200.
warranty + free
delivery.
570-862-2236
MONITOR. HP Flat
screen. Excellent
condition. $15
570-287-1311
PRINTER, A10 HP,
two years old, touch
screen, easy to
operate. Excellent
condition. $35.
570-779-2975
732 Exercise
Equipment
TREADMILL, Weslo.
Electronic space
saver. $25
570-779-4176
732 Exercise
Equipment
HARD CORE GYM,
Plate loaded cable
pulley machine; lat
pull down, chest
press, pec deck, leg
ext, lower pulley for
curling. $150.
570-868-6024
LEG EXTENSION
MACHINE Hammer
Strength ISO-Later-
al. 4 years old, plate
loaded, platinum
frame, navy uphol-
stery. New condi-
tion. $1000. SEATED
L E G C U R L
MACHINE, Ham-
mer Strength ISO-
Lateral. 4 years old,
plate loaded, plat-
inum frame, navy
upholstery, New
condition. $1000.
Call Jim
570-855-9172
TRAINER, Elliptical,
vision fitness, Excel-
lent condition.
Screen, exercise
programs, heart
rate monitor, 16
resistance levels.
Space Saver unit.
$600
570-814-9106
WEIGHT BAR. Vari-
ous bars. $50 OBO.
Call for details.
570-817-5621
742 Furnaces &
Heaters
AFFORDABLE,
clean, safe and effi-
cient wood heat.
Central Boiler OUT-
DOOR WOOD FUR-
NACE. Heats multi-
ple buildings. B & C
Wood Furnaces LLC
570-477-5692
FURNACE BURNER.
oil. $150 OBO.
TANKS, storage fur-
nace oil, FREE
570-262-6725
HEATER Hot Water
On Demand
portable outdoor
heater. Coleman
model #2300-700.
used only several
times, excellent
condition $100.
570-825-2961
744 Furniture &
Accessories
ANTIQUES: China
cupboard 2 piece,
cherry wood, two
glass doors with
metal inserts & light
$200. 4 flowered oil
paintings, 2 large &
2 small, old frames,
$100. 2 antique
tables, 1 round with
leather top, 1 square
card table with claw
feet $100 for both.
Porcelain praying
doll with natural hair
from the Hamilton
collection, original
box with number
$75. OBO.740-7446
AREA RUG, 8x10,
cranberry with
flower print, bound
on all sides. Excel-
lent condition, $65.
570-287-7379
BAKERS RACK
gray steel with glass
shelves & 4 stools.
$195. Leave mes-
sage for Florence.
570-474-5142
BEDROOM SUITE.
Beautiful brand
name queen size. 3
piece. Like new in
original wrapper
with warranty. $95.
Will deliver.
570-614-3877
CHAIR. Contempo-
rary stuffed. Arm-
less, dark wood
legs. Orange,Plum-
Sage combo. Never
used. $65
570-417-3765
CHAIRS, (2)
Genuine
leather, cus-
tom made
recliners.
Taupe color,
like new. $550
each.
570-675-5046
DINING ROOM SET.
Buffet server, hutch,
sofa table, table
with leaf and 6
chairs. $200
570-578-1581
DINING ROOM SET.
Table, cherry and 6
chairs, $250, CHINA
closet, cherry, $150
570-388-2179
744 Furniture &
Accessories
D R E S S E R S E T ,
matching, $100,
TABLE & CHAIRS,
TABLE, coffee, Oak,
$100, FUTON, Wick-
er with matching
cover and pillow
set, $200.
210-316-8161
END TABLES 2 pine
very good condition.
$50 for both.
570-696-4159
FRAME, King size,
next to new, $50.
BEDDING, King Size
$25. OBO
570-466-0827
FURNI SH FURNI SH
FOR LESS FOR LESS
* NELSON *
* FURNITURE *
* WAREHOUSE *
Recliners from $299
Lift Chairs from $699
New and Used
Living Room
Dinettes, Bedroom
210 Division St
Kingston
Call 570-288-3607
FURNITURE, 2 end
tables, coffee table,
sofa table or use as
TV stand for 50 TV
oval shape with
glass tops & bot-
tom, dark walnut, 1
yr old, excellent
condition $600.
Leather recliner
cabrinet color,
excellent condition,
less than 1 yr old
Paid $850 sell for
$400. 570-287-1150
or 570-709-8383
MATTRESS SALE
We Beat All
Competitors Prices!
Mattress Guy
Twin sets: $159
Full sets: $179
Queen sets: $239
All New
American Made
570-288-1898
PATIO FURNITURE.
Light gray alu-
minum, round glass
top table with
umbrella, 4 chairs,
chaise lounge. $100
570-991-5300
PITTSTON
LIQUIDATING SALE
MERCHANTS
VILLAGE
Booth 157
1201 Oak St
Everything must
go! Oriental furni-
ture. Living room
sets, sectionals,
recliners, bed-
room sets, china
cabinets, kitchen
sets, kids animal
chairs, lamps, lots
more! Priced to
sell.
RECLINER, over-
sized, works. Good
as cabin/porch
chair. FREE.
570-740-1392
RECLINERS. (2) 1
tan and 1 green.
$115 each. Great
buy. 570-457-7854
ROLLOUT SOFABED
with matching chair
& kitchen table.
Good condition.
FREE. 814-0843
SOFA, CHAIR,
OTTOMAN. Black
Leather.$150
570-468-2168
SOFA, La-Z-Boy,
has 2 recliners,
earth tones, excel-
lent, fabric like new.
$160, CHAIR, La-Z-
Boy, good condition,
mauve, $30. 570-
675-0026 after 2pm
SOFA. 78 Burgundy
Microfiber tradition-
al. 2 years old,
excellent condition.
No stains or tears,
pet free/smoke free
house. $400 OBO
570-885-4911
STAND, for a televi-
sion, 3 tier, smoked
glass. Holds up to
55. $300.
570-288-9940
TABLE and 4 chairs.
5 x 3 light oak with
hunter green legs.
Some assembly
required. $200.
Very good condition
570-885-4911
TABLES (2) 1960s
French Provincial
wood end. 2 lamps
included. $40
570-823-1784
744 Furniture &
Accessories
STOOLS, four, oak
framed, legs with
upholstered lift-up
seat, 3 deep, 18 H
by 15 seat. Neutral
upholstery. Recently
purchased, $125,
sell for $30 firm.
CARPET, crescent
shaped persian
look, black on beige.
36 by 24 at widest
point, new. $10.
FLOOR LAMP, Pot-
tery Barn, modern,
adjustable. Brushed
nickel finish on
steel. Very stable.
40 tall. $200 OBO.
570-331-2975
TABLE, kitchen,
homemade oak,
round, with antique
white base
pedestal. Built-in
leaf makes table
oval, seats 4-6. Two
antique white farm
chairs included.
$150. 430-2311
Looking for Work?
Tell Employers with
a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
WEDGEWOOD 8.5
diameter hexagonal
bowl & 7 tall
matching vase,
Kutani Crane pat-
tern, purchased in
England, mint condi-
tion. $90. for both.
OUTDOOR FURNI-
TURE Telescope
casual glass top
table, 36 diameter,
white aluminum
frame, 4 matching
chairs with grey
mesh seats &
backs, excellent
condition $100.
570-825-2961
DRUMS
10 Deer Run Road
(behind Econo-
Lodge)
Fri., Sat. & Sun., 8-5
EVERYTHING GOES!
HUNLOCK CREEK
173 Sorber Town
Hill Road
Friday, April 19
9am - 2 pm
LUZERNE
205 Main Street.
Red hot items,
jewelry, collectible,
antiques, linens
and vintage finds.
Weds. Thurs.& Fri.
11 a.m. until 5 p.m.
570-714-7477
PLAINS
INDOOR YARD SALE
UNITED UNITED
METHODIST METHODIST
CHURCH CHURCH
133 North Main St.
Sat, April 20st
8 am - 2 pm
Very nice household
items, jewelry, toys
and more. All priced
to sell. Home made
lunch items.
SHAVERTOWN
52 Perrin Ave.
Sat., Apr. 20th, 9-2
Household furnish-
ings including dining
room set & bed-
room set, 1960s
porch furniture,
upright Bose piano,
assorted household
items such as
lamps tools,
old 45s, etc.
No Early Birds!
WEST PITTSTON
30+ Family Sale
Saturday, May 4th
8 am to 3 pm
Trinity Church
220 Montgomery
Avenue.
More Vendors
Welcome. $10
Space. Must RSVP
570-654-3261
752 Landscaping &
Gardening
CUB CADET rider
2130 shaft driven
Kohler 12.5 hp.
excellent condition.
69 hours, fresh
tune-up. $650.
570-878-2849
LAWN MOWER,
Murray 5HP, 22
cut, front drive.
Runs great, like
new. $90 or best
offer. 570-825-3371
LAWN SWEEPER,
$90, lawn roller,
METAL DRUM, $45.
570-474-9017
LAWNMOWER
Poulan 20 Tecum-
seh with adjustable
wheels will not start
$10.
570-735-6638
754 Machinery &
Equipment
CEMENT MIXER. 3
cu. ft. New 1 hp
electric motor,
garage kept. $350
570-779-4948
754 Machinery &
Equipment
ENGINE Honda 5 HP
engine pressure
washer. $40 570-
407-0874
756 Medical
Equipment
BED, Hospital semi-
electric. Good con-
dition, works like
new. $250 OBO
Dave 570-991-2797
PATIENT
HYDRAULIC LIFT,
with polyester mesh
sling with commode
opening. New $499
570-474-6549
P O T T Y C H A I R ,
adult, $20, BENCH,
bath transfer, $50.
WHEELCHAIR,
transport, light
weight, $20
570-288-9180
WH E E L C H A I R .
Light weight trans-
port. Easy to carry
and use. $80
570-457-3486
758 Miscellaneous
FREE AD POLICY
The Times Leader
will accept ads for
used private
party merchan-
dise only for items
totaling $1,000 or
less. All items must
be priced and state
how many of each
item. Your name
address, email and
phone number must
be included. No
ads for ticket
sales accepted.
Pet ads accept-
ed if FREE ad
must state FREE.
You may place your
ad online at
timesleader.com,
or email to
classifieds@
timesleader.com or
fax to 570-831-7312
or mail to Classified
Free Ads: 15 N.
Main Street, Wilkes-
Barre, PA.
SORRY NO
PHONE CALLS.
FREE AD POLICY
The Times Leader
will accept ads for
used private
party merchan-
dise only for items
totaling $1,000 or
less. All items must
be priced and state
how many of each
item. Your name
address, email and
phone number must
be included. No
ads for ticket
sales accepted.
Pet ads accept-
ed if FREE ad
must state FREE.
You may place your
ad online at
timesleader.com,
or email to
classifieds@
timesleader.com or
fax to 570-831-7312
or mail to Classified
Free Ads: 15 N.
Main Street, Wilkes-
Barre, PA.
SORRY NO
PHONE CALLS.
DVDs The Big Bang
Theory comedy.
Seasons 1 and 4.
$15 each or 2 for
$25. 570-283-2552
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
PAGE 6D WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
290 M U N D Y S TR EET, W IL K ES - B AR R E AT TH E W YOM IN G VAL L EY M AL L CAL L 30 1- CAR S
*TAX & TAGS DOWN. 72 MONTHS - 2.74% THRU PRIMARY LENDER. ADDITIONAL TERMS AND RATES AVAILABLE.
P lu s Fin a n c in g Ava ila b le !
B a n k ru p t Cre d it P rob le m s D ivorc e d M e d ic a l B ills
N o Cre d it Ap p lic a tion R e fu s e d
M on d a y- Frid a y 9a m - 8 p m S a tu rd a y 9a m - 5p m
H U R R Y, H U R R Y,
S A L E EN D S S A L E EN D S
TH IS W EEK EN D ! TH IS W EEK EN D !
B U Y N ATIO N W ID E B U Y N ATIO N W ID E
A N D S AV E A N D S AV E
TH O U S A N D S ! TH O U S A N D S !
33
DAYS DAYS
O N LY! O N LY!
FREE FREE
W ith Every W ith Every
Car! Car!
7 To Choos e From
$17,98 0 or $269/m o
*
2 0 12 JEEP L IB ER TY S P OR T 4X 4 2 0 12
TH E W AIT IS
O VER
ITS BACK
O UR
AM ERICAS NEW CAR ALTERNATIVE AM ERICAS NEW CAR ALTERNATIVE
SU PER
SU PER
SALE
SALE SALE
AT
Thu rs -Fri-Sat Thu rs -Fri-Sat
APRIL APRIL
18,19 & 20 18,19 & 20
Thu rsday Thu rsday
&&
Friday Friday
9am -8pm 9am -8pm
Satu rday Satu rday
9am -6pm 9am -6pm
O N LY! O N LY!
CR EDIT
UN IO N
R EPS
O N SITE!
N O T
A
M EM BER
N O TA
PR O BLEM
TO P $$$ TO P $$$
FO R YO U R FO R YO U R
TRAD E! TRAD E!
SPECIAL SPECIAL
FIN AN CE FIN AN CE
RATES! RATES!
YOU R
VEH ICL E
AW AITS !
D ON T
M IS S
TH IS !
S P ECIAL FL EET P U R CH AS E, 10 To Choos e From
$12,98 9 or $195/m o
*
2 0 12 TOYOTA YAR IS S D N 2 0 12
On ly 8 L e ft, S om e w ith M oon roof!
S ta rtin g At
$13,995 or $211/m o
*
2 0 12 CH EVY IM P AL A LT 2 0 12
6 To Choos e From
$16,560 or $249/m o
*
2 0 12 VOL K S W AGEN P AS S AT 2 0 12
On ly 5 L e ft At This P ric e
$16,960 or $255/m o
*
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15 At This P ric e
$15,58 8 or $235/m o
*
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*
2 0 12 FOR D M U S TAN G 2 0 12
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013 PAGE 7D
551 Other
468 Auto Parts
551 Other
468 Auto Parts
551 Other 551 Other
566 Sales/Business
Development
542 Logistics/
Transportation
566 Sales/Business
Development
542 Logistics/
Transportation
566 Sales/Business
Development
542 Logistics/
Transportation
566 Sales/Business
Development
542 Logistics/
Transportation
566 Sales/Business
Development
542 Logistics/
Transportation
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
Would you like to deliver newspapers
as an Independent Contractor
under an agreement with
THE TIMES LEADER?
Operate your own business with potential profts of
up to _________ per month.
$900.00
Call Rosemary to make an appointment
at 570-829-7107
Routes Currently Available:
WILKES-BARRE NORTH
Coal St. Custer St. Hayes Lane
N. Meade St. NewMarket St.
170 Daily Papers 194 Sunday Papers
$735 Monthly Proft
WILKES-BARRE SOUTH
Academy St. Carey Ave. Edison St.
Elizabeth St. Orchard St. S. River St.
108 Daily Papers 141 Sunday Papers
$500 Monthly Proft
PITTSTON/PITTSTON TWP.
Broad St. Market St. Bryden St.
Norman St. Flag St. Ford St.
Parnell St. Sunrise Dr.
139 Daily Papers 140 Sunday Papers
149 Sunday Dispatch
$765 Monthly Proft
No telephone calls, please.
We are an equal opportunity employer, committed to diversity in the workplace.
As a company, we strive to be fair, accurate and informative. To our customers, we believe in delivering superior quality and service.
Most importantly, we believe in the power of teamwork.
Digital Sales Specialist
Immediate opening for a resourceful, highly motivated, experienced Sales Specialist.
If you are motivated by the ability to make more money by bringing in more sales, and have a
persistent, professional business attitude, this is the opportunity for you.
The ideal candidate will have a proven track record of selling and leading digital sales efforts.
This role will incorporate training and mentoring our existing sales staff in digital media solutions,
as well as meeting and exceeding revenue targets. It requires the ability to create comprehensive
marketing programs for clients, assist other reps with presentations, and identify and generate new
digital sales opportunities.
You are expected to be out in front of clients, closing sales.
This is a fast-paced, deadline-oriented environment.
If you are hungry for a challenge and the opportunity for success, send a cover letter, resume and
salary history to:
dsellers@civitasmedia.com Denise Sellers
VP/Chief Revenue Ofcer
The Times Leader
15 N. Main St.
Wilkes-Barre PA 18711
or
A Civitas Media Company
7
0
3
9
8
9
US. FOODS, a stable
and successful food
distribution organization,
is recruiting for
7
0
3
9
7
8
9
FOODSERVICE DELIVERY DRIVERS
Candidates will have a valid Class A CDL, 1 year truck driving experience and clean driving record or
6 months of food and beverage delivery experience also with clean driving record. Candidates must
provide a veriable and consistent work history, exemplary driving record, and submit to a
background screen.
This position involves delivering to multi-unit franchises throughout the Mid-Atlantic states. US.
Foods offers an excellent compensation and benets package including 401(k) with company match.
Interested candidates should apply online at
www.usfoods.com/careers
Reference Requisition # 13001933
You may also apply in person at
US. FOODS
13 Rutledge Drive, Pittston, PA
EEO/AA/M/F/D/V
AS ALWAYS ***HIGHEST PRICES***
PAID FOR YOUR UNWANTED
VEHICLES!!!
DRIVE IN PRICES
Call for Details (570) 459-9901
Vehicles must be COMPLETE!!
PLUS ENTER TO WIN $500 CASH!!
DRAWINGTO BE HELD LAST DAY
OF EACH MONTH
www.wegotused.com
758 Miscellaneous
All
Junk
Cars
&
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
BOOKS, (3) various
authors, best sellers
$10 each, Hockey
stick, Penguins
miniature, $10, Ice
Cream make, Deni,
$20, Emulsifier,
Montel Williams,
$75, Furby in box,
$20, Beads, Pando-
ra style, glass and
silver, $3 each.
570-675-0248
CAR SEAT, $15, TV,
small, $20, RECLIN-
ER, $35, STROLLER,
$10, BED, twin,
headboard and
footboard, $50,
STEREO, $25.
570-852-0675
CART, fold-up,
wheeled. Great for
groceries, laundro-
mat. 38 height.
$20. CHAIR, heavy
duty, steel, folds up.
Like new, $20 OBO.
570-331-2975
CHINA. Pfaltzgraff
Yorktowne pattern.
Setting for 5, plus 3
small fruit/dessert
bowls, salt and pep-
per shakers. Good
condition. Must pick
up, no shipping.
CASH ONLY $50
570-674-3338
DINING ROOM set,
6 chairs, $250, wal-
nut buffet $15.
SNOW BLOWER,
Yard Machine,
P ORCH S WI NG,
$100. TURKEY
FRYER, $30, PICNIC
TABLE, $50. FISH-
ING rods and tackle,
$20. TOOLS, vari-
ous, $25. BIKES,
mens and womens
Roadmaster, $100.
each, CHAIR, com-
puter, $50.
610-762-9404
HITCH. (1) large Agi
Plastics group calf
hitch. $300. Good
for housing calfs,
mini horses, goats,
sheep or poultry.
570-351-6145
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
LADDER, pool/deck
$25, GAME,
Odyssey 2 video
computer, 9 games,
$200, TAPES, music
30 new, $20,
AUDIO, old radio
shows, $20, CAM-
ERA, Nikon auto
35mm, $100.
570-299-5563
LUGGAGE, Pierre
Cardin, 2 piece,
$25, LUGGAGE, 3
piece, $35, DRESS-
ES, Prom & Party,
Teen, 2-4-5-6-$20
each. ARMOIRE,
solid wood, $375.
Details 288-8689
MERCHANTS
VILLAGE
merchants
village.com
(Former
Walmart Bldg)
Oak St. Pittston
GOING GOING
OUT OUT OF OF
BUSINESS BUSINESS
30% off
all inventory
owned by
Merchants
Village
(Booth 262)
Food, Home
Goods, Health
& Beauty Aids
& Lots More!
STOCK UP
NOW!
ON FRESH
INVENTORY
LAST
CHANCE
EVERYTHING
MUST GO!
570-891-1972
ROSARIES, 100
count, $3 each.
RECORDS from the
50s, 60s, & 70s,
LPs, 78s & 45, $1
each. 570-829-2411
758 Miscellaneous
SHAKES, Ensure
strawberry. 2
cases, 24 per case,
$30 for all. 570-
675-0026 after 2pm
SHED. 10x12 wood-
en barn shaped.
Dorrance Twp min-
utes from 81. Must
be moved. FREE
570-239-9633
SHEETS, two sets,
new, twin size, $10
each or both for
$16. 570-235-6056
SNOW BLOWER,
Yard Machine, $50,
SWING wooden
porch, $50, FRYER,
turkey, $30, GRILL,
outdoor, $25,
TABLE, Picnic, $50
BIKES, mens and
womens 26, $75
each. 388-2179
STOVE, Coal Burn-
ing, White Dickson.
$550. CANES &
WALKING sticks,
over 30, made from
slippery maple trees
$5 each. Christmas
& household items.
over 200 items,
Samsonite belt
massager, luggage
much more! all for
$60! Telephone,
used and working,
$10 each. 735-2081
TABLE, 4 Oak Cap-
tain Chairs, $250,
SPEAKER SYSTEM,
Fisher Pro-Logic,
$45, RECEIVER,
Technics, $85.
STOVE, Gas, GE self
cleaning, $185.
570-287-2760
TEXT BOOKS
school, hard and
soft cover. $200
OBO. 570-735-3404
TIRES (2) Winter-
force snow. 75/70R/
13, mounted on 92
Geo Prizm rims.
Like new, $100
570-825-8438
TIRES: 4 Goodyear
Eagle 20570R16,
only 750 miles.
$625. new. Sell for
$475. 570-814-3673
TONNEAU COVER
Lund tri fold Ton-
neau cover for full
size pickup truck
with 6 box. Good
condition. Paid
$350. sell for $150.
570-760-8495
VACUUM, Rotator,
with all the goods.
New. Paid $461,
selling for $250.
BATH CHAIR, in the
box, $25. LAMP, $2.
570-333-7065
WALKER, with tray
$15. MITER, large
tool. $12. 822-5560
WHEELS, Mercedes
Benz aluminum with
spare tire. $200.
WHEEL, aluminum,
$75 TIRE, Goodyear
225/50VR16, $100
OBO. 655-6764
762 Musical
Instruments
GUITAR. Fender
Squier Strat, great
starter, $125. AMP-
Crate 50 watt tube
combo, $375
570-283-2552
PIANO. Baldwin with
matching bench.
Console. Excellent,
Delivered & tuned.
$995.570-474-6362
766 Office
Equipment
FILING CABINET. 4
drawer metal. $50
210-316-8161
768 Personal
Electronics
PHONE. Uniden sin-
gle handset cord-
less. Almost new.
$25.570-472-2737
770 Photo
Equipment
CAMERA, Nikon
D3100. 2 cards and
case. Like new.
$400. 407-0874
776 Sporting Goods
BICYCLE
MURRAY DAZZLER
20 girls. Powder
blue with pink trim
accents & wheels,
white tires. Front &
rear brakes plus
coaster foot brake.
Good condition
$40. 570-814-9574
BIKES (2) Boys
Murray 12 speed
racer, Girls Kent
multi speed racers.
$35 each.
570-868-5450
BINOCULARS, (1)
PHOTO. Great for
bird watching and
hunting. Bushnell,
with built in digital
camera and SD
card. Carry Case
$59. (1) 7x50, $25
570-283-2552
GOLF CLUBS
Knight brand. Fair-
way woods, all iron,
putters,jumbo driv-
er, almost new bag.
$50. 570-655-9474
GOLF CLUBS, Mens
Pro select and
Ladies Full set. Call
for details. $50 each
570-747-9866
776 Sporting Goods
HUNTING CLOTH-
ING. Coveralls, head
cover, camo stool,
cap, gloves, pull
over head cover,
rain gear, poncho.
$75 all. OBO
570-675-8129
PULL CART, for golf-
ing. two $20 each.
570-472-3615
RODS & REELS
Spinning rods & reel
combos in good
condition, assorted
styles total of 10 at
$10. each.
570-735-6638
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
778 Stereos/
Accessories
SPEAKERS, stereo,
Infinity, RS5, floor
stereo speakers,
suitable for televi-
sion or stereo unit.
Excellent condition,
$175 for the pair.
Call: 570-690-2837
STEREO SYSTEM,
with speakers and
remote. AM/FM, 3
CD changer. $60.
570-740-1392
782 Tickets
FLEETWOOD MAC
Prudential Center,
Newark, Wed.,
4/24/13, 8 pm, Sec-
tion 133.
2 @ $90 each.
570-417-2126
784 Tools
FILTER. New
Wet/dry Shop Vac
Cartridge Filter. $5
570-406-1353
TRAILER DOLLY,
new in the box. Can
be used for a boat
or pick up, $40.
LADDER, extension
24, fiber glass, like
new. $100.
570-472-3615
786 Toys & Games
CHILDRENS TOYS,
Playschool musical
sit n spin, $10.
Home Depot work
bench with play
tools, $20. Little
tykes play grill with
utensils, $5. Crayola
easel, $15. Bike with
training wheels, $15.
Pack n Play, Winnie
the Pooh, $30.
570-287-0103
POOL TABLE, 4x8
slate, cues, balls
accessories $150.
Exercise Machine,
@25, Baseball
cards, $50.
570-868-5322
ROCK CLIMBING
WALL/STEPS for 4
to 5 foot platform
$120. Section 786
10 ft Yellow Wave
Slide $20.
570-283-3951
ROCKING HORSE
Hedstrom with
clicking horse
sounds. $50. Locat-
ed in Falls.
(570) 333-4325
790 Swimming
Pools/Hot Tubs
SWIMMING POOL.
Oval. 12x24x52.
Pump and filter
included. Must dis-
assemble. $175
570-606-3372
SWIMMING POOL.
Oval. 12x24x52.
Pump and filter
included. Must dis-
assemble. $175
570-606-3372
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
FIELD STONE. Free
for building walls.
Will haul away for
free. 570-735-4187
LOOKING TO BUY
Coleman Jon Boat
11.5 . Call Rich
570-822-2455
WANTED
JEWELRY
WILKES BARREGOLD
( 570) 48GOLD8
( 570) 484- 6538
Highest Cash Pay-
Outs Guaranteed
Open 6 Days
a Week
10am- 6pm
Cl osed Thursdays
1092 Highway 315 Blvd.
( Pl aza 315)
315N, 1/ 2 mi l e
bef ore Mohegan
Sun Casi no
We Pay At Least
80% of the London
Fix Market Price
for All Gold Jewelry
WilkesBarreGold.com
or email us at
wilkesbarregold@
yahoo.com
London PM
Gold Price
April 16 - $1,390.10
800
PETS & ANIMALS
810 Cats
CATS & KI TTENS
12 weeks & up.
All shots, neutered,
tested,microchipped
VALLEY CAT RESCUE
824-4172, 9-9 only
815 Dogs
ROTTIES HUSKIES
Yorkies, Chihuahuas
Labs & More
Bloomsburg
389-7877
Hazleton 453-6900
Hanover 829-1922
845 Pet Supplies
AQUARIUM, 15 gal-
lon, includes light,
cover, heater, ther-
mometer and
wrought iron metal
stand. $50
570-735-2304
CAGE, parrot, large
size. Like new. $250
570-288-9940
Birds? Cats? Dogs?
Skunks? Snakes?
Sell Your Animals
with a Classified Ad!
570-829-7130
CAGE. Ferret/Ham-
ster. Collapsible.
Water bottle, good
condition. $20
570-406-1353
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nations con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
ASHLEY
$42,000
68 N. Main St.
MLS: 12-3845:
Excellent invest-
ment property, 4
bedroom, large
kitchen, living room,
and dining room.
Great price!
Call Melissa
570-237-6384
AVOCA
$59,900
902 William St.
Corner lot in
Pittston Twp., 2
bedrooms, 1.5
baths, move in con-
dition. Newer gas
furnace and hot
water heater, new
w/w carpet in dining
room & living room.
Large yard.
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com
MLS 13-767
Tom Salvaggio
570-262-7716
BEAR CREEK
6650 Bear Creek
Blvd.
A well maintained
custom built two
story home, nestled
on two private
acres with a circu-
lar driveway. Three
bedrooms, large
kitchen with center
island, Master bed-
room with two walk
in closets, family
room with fireplace,
a formal dining
room.
$275,000
MLS#13-1063
Call Geri
570-862-7432
Lewith & Freeman
696-0888
DALLAS
4 bedroom
home, new
construction,
with deck &
patio. Public
water & sewer,
2 car garage.
$223,900
Lots Available
Build To Suit
Call 822-1139
or 829-0897
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
This 4 bedroom, 2
1/2 bath Cape Cod
style home has so
much to offer!
Plenty of room for
everyone. Master
bedroom with walk-
in closet and full
bath, family room
with fireplace, re-
creation room with
half bath in lower
level. Hardwood
floors on 1st floor,
new windows,
above ground pool.
MLS #13-1109
$184,900
Tracy Zarola
574-6465
696-0723
DALLAS
Nestled in the trees
on a 1.5 acre corner
lot. 4 bedroom, 2
bath home in Glen-
dalough.
MSL# 13-693
$249,900
JOSEPH P.
GILROY
REAL ESTATE
288-1444
Call Brenda at
570-760-7999
to schedule your
appointment
It's that time again!
Rent out your
apartment
with the Classifieds
570-829-7130
DALLAS
Priced to sell on
West Center Hill Rd.
3 bedroom, 2 bath
home with finished
basement.
MLS 13-770
$134,900
JOSEPH P.
GILROY
REAL ESTATE
288-1444
Call Brenda at
570-760-7999
to schedule your
appointment
DALLAS
133 Yeager Avenue,
3,800 sq. ft. on 1.3
acres overlooking
the woods. Beauti-
ful kitchen with open
floor plan. 9 ceilings
with crown mold-
ings, hardwood
floors, built-ins &
lots of windows
throughout home.
Master bedroom
with fireplace & sit-
ting area. Sunroom
& studio on lower
level that walks out
to yard.
$575,000
570-574-2455
DALLAS
3 Crestview Drive
Sprawling multi-
level, well-con-
structed and contin-
uously maintained.
5,428 sq. ft. of living
space. Living room
and formal dining
room with two-way
gas fireplace and
hardwood flooring.
Eat-in kitchen with
island. Florida room
with flagstone floor.
5 bedrooms, 4
baths, 2 half-baths.
Lower level rec-
room with fireplace
and wet bar leads to
heated, in-ground
pool. Beautifully
landscaped two-
acre lot. $525,000.
MLS#13-1309
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
DALLAS
Financing Available!
2,000 sq. ft. plus!
Totally remodeled
kitchen, ceramic
tile, back splash,
new appliances,
granite counters
new roof & porch
windows, finished
hardwoods.
$279,900
570-793-0140
DALLAS
FOR SALE
BY OWNER
9 Westminster Dr.
4 bedroom brick
ranch. 2,800 sq. ft.
Totally renovated. 2
1/2 car garage. Low
taxes, corner lot.
See ZILLOW for
details. $274,000.
Call 570-878-3150
DALLAS
NEW GOSS MANOR
28 Highland Drive
PRICE REDUCED
Beautiful brick
ranch. 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths,
family room,
multiple fireplaces,
Large eat-in
kitchen. $177,700.
(570) 590-4442
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
SALE BY OWNER
4 bedrooms, 2.5
baths. Completely
restored from
top to bottom.
Excellent location.
$235,000
570-829-2022
DALLAS
Newberry Estate -
The Greens
4,000 sq. ft. condo
with view of ponds
& golf course. Three
bedrooms on 2
floors. 5 1/2 baths, 2
car garage & more.
$425,000
MLS# 12-1480
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
DALLAS TWP.
REDUCED
2691 Carpenter Rd.
Magnificent raised
ranch on estate set-
ting. Total finished
four bedroom, 2
bath home. This
house features
hardwood floors
throughout. Finished
basement with
working fireplace.
Large deck with
swimming pool, two
car detached gar-
age set on 2.4
acres.
MLS# 12-3158
$277,900
Dave Rubbico, Jr.
885-2693
Rubbico Real
Estate, Inc.
826-1600
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
DURYEA
ENGLISH TUDOR
Totally renovated 3
bedroom, 3 bath. All
wood kitchen with
granite countertops.
Hardwood family
room with fireplace.
Hardwood dining
room. Huge living
room with window
seat. Vaulted, tile
foyer. Four season
sunroom. Gas hot
air with central air.
Central fire and bur-
glar alarm. New gas
hot water heater.
All new high efficien-
cy windows, paver
patio. $ 149,000.
570-237-2919
906 Homes for Sale
DURYEA
Own this cozy 1/2
double for less than
it costs to rent.
$49,900
Ed Appnel
570-817-2500
570-654-1490
Line up a place to live
in classified!
906 Homes for Sale
EXETER
NEW
CONSTRUCTION
4 bedroom, 2.5
baths, Colonial 2
story. Upper scale
neighborhood. 2
car garage, custom
oak cabinets, gran-
ite countertops,
Jacuzzi tub, 10x15
deck. Beautiful
stone fireplace.
$264,900
570-599-0825
906 Homes for Sale
MINERS MILLS
170 E. Thomas St.
Remodeled, 3 bed-
rooms 1 bath. Large
fenced in back yard.
$110,000.
(570) 239-8556
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
906 Homes for Sale
SWOYERSVILLE
OUT OF
FLOOD ZONE
Big corner lot, 3
bedroom ranch in a
desirable location.
1.5 baths, one car
attached garage. All
appliances included.
$130,000.
570-237-0184
Sell your own home!
Place an ad HERE
570-829-7130
Find homes for
your kittens!
Place an ad here!
570-829-7130
PAGE 8D WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
906 Homes for Sale
DRUMS
PRICE
REDUCTION!
BEECH MTN. LAKES
Charming 3 bed-
room, 2 bath 1,800
sq. ft. home with
lower level office,
family room & laun-
dry. Propane fire-
place, 2 car garage.
Quiet cul-de-sac,
right near lake.
MLS# 13-916
$167,500
Dana Distasio
570-715-9333
DUPONT
$84,895
137 Lidys Road
Large 4 bedroom, 2
story home with
new roof and chim-
ney liner in April
2013. Plenty of liv-
ing space for the
price. www. atlas-
realtyinc.com
MLS 13-215
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
DUPONT
REDUCED
$68,500
424 Simpson St.
Good condition
Cape Cod. 3 bed-
room, 1 full bath in
quiet neighborhood.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-4357
Brian
Harashinski
570-237-0689
DURYEA
$339,900
316 Raspberry
Rd.
Blueberry Hills
Like new 2 story
home with first
floor master
bedroom and
bath. Inground
pool on nice
corner lot with
fenced in yard.
Sunroom, hard-
wood floors, 2
car garage, full
unfinished
basement
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 13-610
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
DURYEA
$79,00
AFFORDABLE
RENOVATED
HOME! Youll
enjoy the space
of the living
room/dining
room open floor
plan with hard-
wood floors.
Large trendy
kitchen with
new appliances.
Spacious 2 bed-
rooms and bath
with tiled jetted
tub for relaxing.
Peace of mind
with new fur-
nace, hot water
heater & electri-
cal box. Plenty
of parking and
nice yard.
MLS 13-96
Michele
Hopkins
570-540-6046
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
KINGSTON
For Sale by Owner.
229 Pringle Street
Single home, 3 bed-
rooms. Remodeled,
Kitchen & bath,
concrete cellar,
huge walk up attic,
deck & new roof.
570-287-3927
906 Homes for Sale
DURYEA
534 Phoenix St.
Reduced to
$79,900
Newer Handicap
accessible one
story home in
great location. 2
bedrooms, 1
bath on double
lot. Off street
parking.
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-4490
Call Tom
570-262-7716
S
O
L
D
DURYEA
76 Main St.
$69,900
Newly remod-
eled two bed-
room home.
Kitchen is very
nice with granite
counters and tile
floor, bathroom
is modern with
tub surround,
tile floor and
granite vanity.
New vinyl win-
dows through-
out. Off street
parking for 2
cars. MLS #12-
3966 For more
information and
photos visit
www. atlasreal-
t y i n c . c o m .
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
570-829-6200
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
DURYEA
BLUEBERRY
HILLS
105 Blueberry Drive
Stunning 3 bed-
room, 2.5 bath
home in beautiful
Blueberry Hills.
Ultra modern
kitchen, granite in
all baths, bonus
room off of master
bedroom, master
bath has whirlpool
tub. Family room
with fireplace. Two
car garage, large
unfinished base-
ment. Composite
deck with hot tub,
and much more!
Directions: North on
Main St. Pittston to
Duryea. Right on
Phoenix, right into
Blueberry hills, take
right on Blackberry,
turn right on Blue-
berry, and the prop-
erty is on the right.
Asking: 314,900.
MLS# 13-483
Call Don Marsh at
814-5072
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-696-1195
DURYEA
REDUCED
$85,900
226 Church St.
Large 2 story with 3
bedrooms and 2 full
baths. Extra large
room sizes, stained
glass and natural
woodowork. Not
flooded in 2011.
MLS #13-190. For
more information
and photos visit
atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Charlie
829-6200
EDWARDSVILLE
Beautiful, Large
Brick Home with 5
bedrooms, 2 full
baths, 2 car gar-
age, large fenced-in
yard, sunporch.
Patio, lots of closets
& storage. Hard-
wood floors, large
kitchen with appli-
ances, 1st floor bed-
room suite. 2nd
kitchen in base-
ment. Was an old
rectory so has much
room to entertain.
Must see this home
to appreciate all it
has to offer. No
Water 2011 Flood.
MLS# 12-1536
$184,500
Linnea Holdren
570-371-1798
SELECT GROUP
570-455-8521
570-455-8521
906 Homes for Sale
EDWARDSVILLE
This home has been
totally renovated
throughout & fresh-
ly painted on the
outside! Move-
right-in to this cozy
home with 1 car
detached garage,
fenced yard & rear
deck. Gas heat.
Very nice.
MLS#13-1399
$85,000
Lynda Rowinski
570-696-5418
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-696-1195
EXETER
$69,900
1156 Wyoming Ave.
Large home with 4
bedrooms, yard
with detached 2 car
garage, private
yard. Home needs
a little updating but
a great place to
start! www.atlasre-
altyinc.com
MLS 13-865
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
EXETER
$89,900
19 Thomas St.
4 bedroom, 2 bath
with 2 car garage
on quiet street.
Super yard, home
needs TLC, being
sold AS IS.
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com.
MLS 13-317
Call Tom
570-262-7716
EXETER
362 Susquehanna
Avenue
Completely remod-
eled, spectacular,
2 story Victorian
home, with 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
new rear deck, full
front porch, tiled
baths & kitchen,
granite counter-
tops. All cherry
hardwood floors
throughout, all new
stainless steel
appliances & light-
ing. New oil fur-
nace, washer/dryer
in first floor bath.
Great neighbor-
hood, nice yard.
$174,900 (30 year
loan, $8,750 down,
$887/month, 30
years @ 4.5%)
NOT IN FLOOD
100% OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
EXETER TWP.
311 Lockville Road
Stately brick 2 story,
with in ground pool,
covered patio, fin-
ished basement,
fireplace & wood
stove, 3 car
attached garage
5 car detached
garage with
apartment above.
MLS# 11-1242 NEW
NEW PRICE
$549,000
Please call Donna
570-613-9080
HANOVER TWP.
209 Constitution
Avenue
Meticulously main-
tained 4 bedroom, 2
story, vinyl sided, 5
year old home situ-
ated on a generous
lot. Large, modern
kitchen, 3 baths, 1st
floor family room, 2
car garage, deck
and soooo much
more!
MLS #11-2429
$269,900
Call Florence
Keplinger @
715-7737
Smith Hourigan
Group
474-6307
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP.
SELLER SAYS
MAKE ME
AN OFFER
Come tour this well-
maintained 2-story
at 10 Rowe St. This
1 owner, brick &
vinyl home, in a
great neighborhood,
is in move-in condi-
tion. Large living
room, formal dining
room, large eat-in
kitchen with tile
floor, counter &
backsplash. 3 bed-
rooms & modern
bath with a tile tub/
shower. Finished
lower level 21 x 15
family room with
built-in storage, a
2nd full bath & laun-
dry area/utility
room. A B-Dry
System, freshly
painted & new car-
peting on 1st & 2nd
floors. Central air &
new electric serv-
ice. Attached 1 car
garage with work-
shop or storage.
Screened-in patio
overlooks a large,
level private back
yard. For more in-
formation & to view
photos online, go to:
www. pr udent i al
realestate.com &
enter PRU7W7A3 in
the Home Search.
PRICE REDUCED TO
$131,900.
MLS#12-3160.
Call Mary Ellen
Belchick 696-6566
or Walter Belchick
696-2600, Ext. 301
696-2600
HANOVER TWP.
Custom built colo-
nial two-story. 4
bedrooms, 4 baths,
two vehicle garage.
View of the Wyo-
ming Valley. Located
on a dead end, pri-
vate street, just
minutes from the
Wyoming Valley
Country Club, Han-
over Industrial Park,
& public transporta-
tion. Sun room, fam-
ily room with wood
burning fireplace,
hardwood floors on
1st & 2nd floors, 1st
floor laundry room &
bathroom. Central
cooling fan. Lower
level recreation
room with bar, lots
of closets & stor-
age, coal/wood
stove, office/5th
bedroom & bath.
MLS #12-4610
$280,000
Louise Laine
283-9100 x20
283-9100
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
HARDING
$224,900
605 Apple Tree Rd
Brick Ranch that
needs nothing,
located on over 1
acre lot with 2 car
attached garage
and 3 car
detached. Modern
kitchen with center
island and granite
countertops mod-
ern tile bath, gas
fireplace, central
air, full basement.
This home could
qualify for 100%
financing through a
rural housing mort-
gage. www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 12-3522.
Lu Ann
570-602-9280
HARDING
$249,900
1385 Mt. Zion Rd.
Great country set-
ting on 3.05 acres.
Move in condition
Ranch with 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths,
inground swimming
pool, hardwood
floors. Finished
basement with wet
bar. 2 car garage,
wrap around drive-
way. For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com
MLS 12-2270
Call Tom
570-262-7716
WARRIOR RUN
2 story, 2 bedroom
with fenced in yard,
great starter home.
$59,900
Call Ed Appnel
570-817-2500
906 Homes for Sale
HARDING
OPEN HOUSE
SAT. APRIL 6
1-3 PM
310 LOCKVILLE RD.
Restored 2 story
colonial on 2.23
acres. Open family
room to kitchen.
original hardwood,
bar, pool, new fur-
nace with central
air. Five car garage
and much more.
Perfect serene set-
ting on corner lot.
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS# 12-3496
A MUST SEE!
REDUCED
$259,900
Call Nancy Bohn
570-237-0752
HARDING
PRICE REDUCED
$69,900
2032 ROUTE 92
RIVER VIEWS PLUS
EXTRA LOT ON
RIVER. Just 1/4
miles from boat
launch, this great
ranch home is
perched high
enough to keep you
dry, but close
enough to watch
the river roll by.
Surrounded by
nature, this home
features large living
room and eat in
kitchen, 3 bed-
rooms, full unfin-
ished basement.
Ready to move
right in and enjoy
country living just
minutes from down-
town. For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-79
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
HARVEYS LAKE
22 Wood Street
Nice cottage with
lake rights, close
to the public boat
dock. New kitchen
& living room ceil-
ings & insulation
just completed.
Enjoy this place
during the Summer
months or year
round. Recently
updated with new
roof & floors.
MLS# 12-3820
$69,900
Pat Doty
394-6901
696-2468
HUGHESTOWN
$72,500
64 Center St.
Large 4 bedroom
with master bed-
room and bath on
1st floor. New gas
furnace and water
heater with updated
electrical panel.
Large lot with 1 car
garage, nice loca-
tion. www.atlasreal-
tyinc.com.
Must be sold to
settle estate
MLS 13-294
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
HUGHESTOWN
REDUCED
$189,900
184 Rock St.
Spacious brick
Ranch with 3 bed-
rooms, large living
room with fireplace.
3 baths, large Flori-
da room with AC.
Full finished base-
ment with 4th bed-
room, 3/4 bath,
large rec room with
wet bar. Also a
cedar closet and
walk up attic. www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 12-3626
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
906 Homes for Sale
JENKINS TWP
$89,900
40 Friend St.
MLS 12-3731
Well maintained 2-
story, 2 bedroom
home, taxes less
than $1,000 annual-
ly, large backyard,
rear parking from
access alley in
back, large deck,
modern kitchen.
Call Melissa
570-237-6384
JENKINS TWP.
$27,900
151 E. Saylor
Ave.
Fixer upper with
great potential
in quiet neigh-
borhood. 3 bed-
rooms, 1 bath
with off street
parking and nice
yard.
Directions: Rt
315, at light turn
onto Laflin Rd to
bottom of hill.
Turn right onto
E. Saylor.
atlasrealtyinc.co
m
MLS 12-3672
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
P
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D
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N
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KINGSTON
$139,900
129 S. Dawes Ave.
Three bedroom, 2
bath cape cod with
central air, new
windows, doors,
carpets and tile
floor. Full concrete
basement with 9'
ceilings. Walking
distance to Wilkes
Barre. Electric and
Oil heat. MLS #12-
3283. For more
information and
photos visit
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com.
Call Tom
570-262-7716
KINGSTON
Inviting 4 bedroom
home in great loca-
tion - Huge living
room with stone
fireplace & display
shelves leads to
elegant office with
handsome oak
built-ins - Kitchen &
family rooms share
a large granite
counter & open to a
bright eating area
with skylights.
Master has hard-
wood & huge walk-
in closet - Accent
lighting & great
details throughout -
Wonderful yard.
MLS #13-724
$325,000. Call
Rhea Simms
for details
570-696-6677
570-696-3801
KINGSTON
171 Third Avenue.
COMPARE WHAT
YOU GET FOR
YOUR MONEY!
Modern and meti-
ciously maintained
3 bedroom town
house with 2 1/2
baths (master
bath). Central air
conditioning, family
room, security sys-
tem. Very low gas
heating cost. Deck
and patio, fenced
yard, garage,
Extras!
MLS # 12-3011.
(PHFA financing:
$3,500 down, $557
month, 4.375%
interest, 30 years).
$115,000.
Ask for Bob Kopec
Humford Realty, Inc.
570-822-5126.
PLAINS
Nothing to do but
just move in!
23 Laurel Street
4 bedrooms, 2
bathrooms
Excellent condition!
Off street parking,
new roof,
and all new appli-
ances included.
Playground right
around the
corner.
$139,900
Call (570)690-2886
906 Homes for Sale
KINGSTON
171 Third Avenue.
COMPARE WHAT
YOU GET FOR
YOUR MONEY!
Modern and meti-
ciously maintained
3 bedroom town
house with 2 1/2
baths (master
bath). Central air
conditioning, family
room, security sys-
tem. Very low gas
heating cost. Deck
and patio, fenced
yard, garage,
Extras!
MLS # 12-3011.
(PHFA financing:
$3,500 down, $557
month, 4.375%
interest, 30 years).
$115,000.
Ask for Bob Kopec
Humford Realty, Inc.
570-822-5126.
LAFLIN
$109,000
147 Haverford Drive
Nicely kept 2 bed-
room, 1.5 bath
townhome in desir-
able neighborhood.
Great looking family
room in lower level.
Spacious rooms
with plenty of clos-
ets. Outdoor patio
with pavers and
trees for privacy.
Carpet, tiled kitchen
counter and AC unit
are ALL NEW! Move
in condition. www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-909
Call Terry
570-885-3041
LAFLIN
$254,900
24 Fordham Road
Great Split Level in
Oakwood Park,
Laflin. 13 rooms, 4
bedrooms, 2 1/2
baths. 2 car garage
and large corner
lot. Lots of space
for the large or
growing family.
www. atlasrealty-
inc.com
MLS 13-452
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
LAFLIN
46 Old Mill Road
Stunning English
Tudor in a desirable
neighborhood.
Modern kitchen
with cherry cabi-
nets, granite coun-
tertops, stainless
steel appliances,
island with Jenn air
and tile floor. Sepa-
rate glass sur-
rounded breakfast
room. Family room
with gas fireplace,
and hardwood
floors. Formal din-
ing room with bay
window. French
doors throughout.
Master bedroom
suite with master
bath, walk-in closet
and separate sitting
room. Lower level
rec-room and
office. Two car
garage.
MLS#13-1076
$325,000
Call
Sandra Gorman:
570-696-5408
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-696-1195
LAFLIN
7 CONCORD DRIVE
REDUCED PRICE!
$229,900
Two story, 1,900 sq.
ft., in Oakwood
Park. 8 rooms, eat
in kitchen, 3 bed-
rooms, 2.5 baths,
large living room,
family room with
fireplace, dining
room, sunroom with
hardwood floors.
Two car garage,
central air. Lot 100
x 125. Move in
Condition. Call Ed at
570-655-4294 for
appointment.
LARKSVILLE
For Sale by Owner
Must see, move in
condition 3 bed-
room ranch, nice
n e i g h b o r h o o d
behind State St.
Elementary Center.
All new carpet,
paint, interior doors,
new tile counter-
tops, tile floor, stain-
less steel appli-
ances, 3 season
patio, beautiful
16x34 in ground
pool. $144,900. Call
570-301-7291
More info & photos
on Zillow.com
906 Homes for Sale
LAFLIN
NEW LISTING
OAKWOOD PARK
If you like comfort &
charm, youll love
this sparkling 3,800
+ sq. ft. 5 bedroom,
4 bath two story tra-
ditional home in per-
fect condition in a
great neighborhood.
Nothing to do but
move right in. Off-
ers formal living &
dining rooms, 1st
floor family room
with fireplace, gran-
ite countertops in
kitchen & baths,
lower level recre-
ation room with fire-
place & wet bar.
MLS #13-549
Only $335,000
Call
Barbara Metcalf
570-696-0883
570-696-3801
LAFLIN
NEW PRICE
$124,900
111 Laflin Road
Nice 3 bedroom,
1.5 bath Split
Level home with
hardwood
floors, 1 car
garage, large
yard and cov-
ered patio in
very convenient
location. Great
curb appeal and
plenty of off
street parking.
Rt. 315 to light @
Laflin Rd. Turn
west onto Laflin
Rd. Home is on
left.
For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-2852
Keri Best
570-885-5082
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
LAFLIN
PRICE REDUCED
$360,000
10 Fairfield Drive
Exceptional & spa-
cious custom built
cedar home with
open floor plan and
all of the amenities
situated on 2 lots in
picturesque setting.
Create memories in
this 5 bedroom, 4
bath home with 18
ceiling in living
room, gas fireplace,
granite kitchen,
large 2 story foyer,
huge finished lower
level for entertain-
ing with bar/full
kitchen & wine cel-
lar. Inground pool &
hot tub. Directions:
Rt 315 to Laflin Rd.,
right onto Oakwood
Dr., right onto Ford-
ham Rd, left onto
Fairfield Dr., home
is on the right.
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-4063
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
LARKSVILLE
Immaculate home in
move-in condition
just waiting for a
new buyer. Over-
sized Bi-Level has
many perks i.e.,
new eat-in kitchen,
dining room with
French doors to 4
season sunroom.
Nice sized bed-
rooms. Lower level
hosts family room
with fireplace, den,
laundry room and 3
Season Sunroom.
Built-in 1 car garage
& attached 2 car
carport for extra
coverage, large
fenced yard.
MLS#13-1396
$190,000
Lynda Rowinski
570-696-5418
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-696-1195
PLAINS TWP.
HUDSON SECTION
Two bedroom, 1
bath, living & dining
rooms & pantry.
Gas heat & hot
water. Driveway &
garage. $54,000.
570-407-2703
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
3 Mercedes Dr.,
Barney Farms
Impressive 2-story
with a contempo-
rary interior. 9
rooms including a
large living room;
formal dining room;
family room (21 x
19) with marble fire-
place; modern
kitchen with dining
area; 3 bedrooms;
2 full and 2 half-
baths. Finished
lower level. Cov-
ered patio over-
looking in-ground
pool. Well-land-
scaped lot with
circular drive.
$293,500
MLS-13-899
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
MOOSIC
$92,900
R. 1104 Springbrook
Cape Cod home
with endless possi-
bilities. 3-4 bed-
room, 1 bath, cen-
tral air, plenty of
storage. Enclosed
porch, garage with
carport. Situated on
3 lots. Directions: 1-
81, Exit 180 Moosic
(Rt. 11) L. onto 502,
straight 1/2 mile.
Turn R onto 8th St.,
up hill, turn left,
house 3rd on right.
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com
MLS 13-607
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
MOUNTAINTOP
54 LOOP ROAD,
GLEN SUMMIT,
MOUNTAIN TOP
Sun., April 7, 12 - 2
Sun., April 28, 12-2
Beautifully appoint-
ed home on 2
acres. Community
amenities include
private lake with
sandy beach, tennis
courts, trails for hik-
ling & biking. This
home boasts per-
ennial gardens and
mature landscaping,
fenced rear yard
enclosing 20 x 40
heated in-ground
pool, raised garden,
custom dog house
and run. Entertain
and dine on the
wrap around porch
with mahogany
flooring and electric
hurricane shutters.
The residence fea-
tures hardwood
flooring, French
doors, cherry
kitchen, 3-4 bed-
rooms, updated
heating/air. Emery-
gency generator for
inclement weather.
DIR: Rt. 309 South
into MountainTop,
left at 1st light, at
the end of the road
make a right on Rt.
437, turn left into
Lake Road, right on
Loop.
MLS# 12-1647
PRICED TO SELL AT
$399,000
Maribeth Jones
696-6565
696-2600,
Ext. 210
MOUNTAIN TOP
Townhouse. Beauti-
ful! Approximately
4.5 years old, 3
bedrooms, 1.5
baths, neutral col-
ors throughout,
modern and move
in condition.
Includes appliances
and washer, dryer.
Best location in the
Village. Large, spa-
cious deck, backs
up to gorgeous pri-
vate, wooded coun-
try view, $126,900
570-261-5260
MOUNTAINTOP
316 Cedar Manor
Drive Bow Creek
Manor.
Meticulously main-
tained 4 bedroom,
3 1/2 bath, 2 story
on almost 1 acre.
Master bedroom
suite. Two family
rooms. Two fire-
places. Office/den.
Central vac., secu-
rity system. Many
extras. Large deck
overlooking a pri-
vate wooded yard.
3 car garage.
$355,000
MLS# 13-1360.
Ask for Bob Kopec
Humford Realty, Inc.
822-5126.
906 Homes for Sale
MOUNTAINTOP
Well maintained 3
bedroom, 1 bath,
with large deck,
above ground oval
swimming pool,
oversized 1 car
detached garage on
nearly 1 acre lot with
stream.
MLS #13-247
$112,000
Call Jim Banos
570-991-1883
for appointment
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real
Estate
570-474-2340
MOUNTAINTOP
Search No More!
This five-year old
home is totally
energy efficient &
exquisitely design-
ed. Every room has
gorgeous details &
lots of upgrades.
The landscape is
breathtaking & the
location could not
be better. This
home truly stands
out in every way!
MLS# 13-1359
$389,900
Robert Altmayer
570-793-7979
Rundle
Real Estate
570-474-2340
KINGSTON
849 Nandy Drive
Spacious four-bed-
room, 2 1/2 bath
home in popular
''Green Acres''.
Good floor plan. Liv-
ing room with bay
window; formal din-
ing room; kitchen
with breakfast
room. 2nd floor
laundry. Great clos-
ets. Covered rear
patio. 2 separate
heating systems,
each with central
ai r- condi t i oni ng.
$249,000
MLS-13-841
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
NANTICOKE
Lovely 1/2 double
sitting high on the
hill in the Honeypot
section of Nanti-
coke. Nice hard-
wood floors, original
woodwork, gener-
ous room sizes &
high ceilings make
this home feel
grand. Off street
parking for 2 cars in
front, & room for
additional parking or
garage in rear.
$40,000
Call Christine
332-8832
613-9080
NANTICOKE
PRICE REDUCED
1,460 sq. ft house.
2 or 3 bedrooms, 2
baths, gas heat.
Can convert to two
1 bedroom apart-
ments with sepa-
rate entrances.
MLS#13-472
$27,500
Call Dana Distasio
570-715-9333
NANTICOKE
25 W. Washington
Move right into this
very nice 3 bed-
room, 1 bath home.
Lots of natural
woodwork and a
beautiful stained
glass window.
Newer kitchen
appliances and w/w
carpeting. Supple-
ment your heating
with a recently
installed wood pel-
let stove. New roof
installed 11/17/12.
This home also has
a one car
detached garage.
MLS 12-2171
$76,000
John Polifka
570-704-6846
FIVE MOUNTAINS
REALTY
570-542-2141
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013 PAGE 9D
906 Homes for Sale
NANTICOKE
38 E. Union Street
Nice single, 3 bed-
rooms, gas heat,
large yard.
Central location.
Affordable @
$64,900
TOWNE &
COUNTRY
REAL ESTATE
Call
570-735-8932 or
570-542-5708
NANTICOKE
393 E. Noble St.
Check out this 4
bedroom, 1.5
bath home with
1 car detached
garage. This
home features a
Jacuzzi tub,
newer roof, fur-
nace, hot water
heater, replace-
ment windows,
fenced yard and
large
covered deck.
MLS 13-613
$77,900
Call John Polifka
570-704-7846
FIVE MOUN-
TAINS REALTY
570-542-2141
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
NANTICOKE
NEW LISTING
260-262
E. Green Street
Double Block
Plenty of parking
with paved back
alley. Close to
LCCC. New roof
installed in 2007
along with a kitchen
& bath update
in #260.
MLS #13-694
$65,900
Call Dana Distasio
570-715-9333
NANTICOKE
REDUCED
1457 S. Hanover St.
Beautiful Tudor
style split level
home. This home
features 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
recreation room
with a bar, wood
burning stove, 2 tier
patio, storage shed,
fenced yard and 1
car garage. Securi-
ty system and
more.
MLS 12-3292
$179,900
John Polifka
570-704-6846
Five Mountains
Realty
570-542-2141
NANTICOKE
1472 S. Hanover St.
Well maintained
bi-level house fea-
tures 2 bedrooms,
1 3/4 baths, recre-
ation room with
propane stove.
3 season porch.
Professionally land-
scaped yard. 1 car
garage, storage
shed, new appli-
ances, ceiling fans.
Close to LCCC.
$153,900.
Call 570-735-7594
or 570-477-2410
NEWPORT TWP.
565 Old Newport St
Unique, ''Deck
House'' contempo-
rary-styled home
with brick and red-
wood exterior.
5 bedrooms and 3
baths.
Features: living
room with fireplace
and vaulted ceiling
with exposed
beans. Modern
cherry kitchen.
Lower level family
room with kitch-
enette. Hardwood
floors. All on 1 acre
in Wanamie section.
$239,000
MLS#12-3588
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
To place your
ad call...829-7130
WILKES-BARRE
EAST END SECTION
Great starter
home, 3 bedrooms,
1 modern bath.
Updated kitchen,
new roof, windows
& furnace. Off
street parking,
fenced in back
yard. New back
porch. All appli-
ances included.
$42,500
570-235-1210 after
5:30 pm.
906 Homes for Sale
PITTSTON
$114,900
67 Carroll St.
The WOW factor!
Move right in and
enjoy this renovat-
ed home with no
worries! 3 bed-
rooms with lots of
closet space. 2 full
baths including a 4
piece master bath
with custom tile
work, open floor
plan with modern
kitchen with island,
corner lot with off
street parking and
nice yard. Come
and take a look!
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com
MLS 13-863
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PITTSTON
$119,900
25 Swallow St.
Grand 2 story home
with Victorial fea-
tures, large eat in
kitchen with laun-
dry, 3/4 bath on
first floor, 2nd bath
with claw foot tub,
lots of closet
space. Move in
ready, off street
parking in rear.
MLS 12-3926
Call Colleen
570-883-7594
PITTSTON
$134,900
15 High St.
Well kept newly
remodeled, 2 story
home, with modern
kitchen, central air,
new triple pane
replacement win-
dows and custom
made blinds for
each window.
Home is in move in
condition, with plas-
ter walls and design
ceilings, plus much,
much more. A
MUST SEE!
MLS 13-1088
Fred Mecadon
570-817-5792
PITTSTON
$89,900
57 Dewitt St.
Cute Cape Cod with
3 bedrooms, vinyl
replacement win-
dows, Pergo floor-
ing and walk up
attic. Put this one
on your list.
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 13-1038
CALL CHARLIE
570-829-6200
PITTSTON
Amazing Property!!!
Five bedrooms, 4
with private bath.
spectacular master
suite with sitting
room + 3 room clos-
et. Four fireplaces
All hardwood floors.
Gazebo style ceiling
in library. 3 car
garage. Resort-like
yard with in-ground
pool with cabana &
outside bath. Adult
amenities, full fin-
ished basement.
PREQUALIFIED
BUYERS ONLY
MLS# 12-1091
Call Nancy Answini
570-237-5999
Joseph P. Gilroy
Real Estate
570-288-1444
SHAVERTOWN
Nice building lot
centrally located in
the Back Mountain.
Has it's own well
and public sewer
already in place. All
set for you to start
building!
$47,000
Call Christine
332-8832
613-9080
906 Homes for Sale
PITTSTON
Room for all your
needs! 4 bedroom
home offers living
& dining rooms
AND an extra room
for whatever you
need. Separate
laundry room on 1st
floor, new carpeting
in 3 bedrooms, new
water heater in
2010, new Bath
Fitter tub/shower.
Recently re-grav-
eled driveway, nice
sized outdoor stor-
age shed & plenty of
off street parking.
MLS #13-360
$95,000
Call/text Donna at
947-3824 or
Tony at 855-2424
901-1020
PITTSTON
Double block in
good condition.
Four bedrooms on
one side 2 on other
family owned for
many years. Cur-
rent tenants are
family members
who pay all utilities.
Carport & off street
parking for 6+ vehi-
cle pavilion.
$67,000
Call Christine at
332-8832
613-9080
PITTSTON TWP.
REDUCED
$139,900
10 Norman St.
Very nice, classic
two story brick
home with large
rooms, 4 bed-
rooms, plenty of
baths, large base-
ment, open deck
and covered deck.
Large eat in
kitchen, plenty of
off street parking.
MLS #11-2887. For
more information
and photos visit
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com.
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PITTSTON
NEW PRICE
$64,900
9 rooms, aluminum
sided, new
windows & wrap
around porch.
Kitchen with all
appliances, w/w
carpet, laundry
room with washer
& dryer, nicely
painted. Gas heat,
walk up attic on
50 x 150 lot with
shed.
Call Joe, 613-9080
PLAINS TWP
$189,900
20 Nittany Lane
Affordable 3 level
townhome features
2 car garage, 3
bedrooms, 3.5
baths, lower level
patio and upper
level deck, gas fire-
place, central air
and vac and stereo
system www.atlas-
realtyinc.com
MLS 13-871
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PLAINS
REDUCED!
Great 3 bedroom, 1
bath with a large
eat in kitchen &
finished basement
with a dry bar.
Large fenced yard
& extra lot included
for additional park-
ing. With-in walking
distance of Wyo-
ming Valley Mall!
$129,000
MLS#12-2479
Dave Rubbico, Sr.
881-7877
Rubbico
Real Estate
826-1600
906 Homes for Sale
SHAVERTOWN
2 years old, open
floor plan, hard-
wood floors 1st &
2nd floors. 2 story
great room with
floor to ceiling fire-
place, 3 sides brick
exterior. Lower level
finished with French
doors out to patio,
breathtaking views,
upgraded landscap-
ing with 3 waterfalls.
MLS #12-4215
PRICE REDUCED
$585,000
Call Geri
570-862-7432
Lewith & Freeman
696-0888
SHAVERTOWN
561 Deer Hill Road
Extraordinary,
cedar and stone,
multi-level Contem-
porary home with
open-floor plan.
4 bedrooms; 3 1/2
baths, porcelain/tile
flooring, sunken
family room with
vaulted ceiling and
gas fire place, ultra
kitchen with granite
counters.
800 square foot
rec-room with gran-
ite wet bar and
fireplace; In-home
theater; lower level
gym. Decks with a
pond view. Includes
two separate heat-
ing and air condition
systems.
MOS# 12-2816
$425,000
Call (570)288-1401
SHAVERTOWN
NEW LISTING
Miss the old fash-
ioned front porch?
Yesterdays charm
with todays con-
venience can be
found in this 3 bed-
room, 1 bath tradi-
tional home on a
quiet street. Offers
formal living &
dining rooms,
kitchen & 1 car
detached garage.
MLS # 13-1111
$115,000
Barbara Metcalf
570-696-0883
570-696-3801
SHAVERTOWN
Newer 2 story with
large eat-in kitchen,
center island, hard-
wood floors, full
basement, central
air & maintenance
free deck.
$179,900
MLS#13-1232
Call Tony
474-6307 or
715-7734
Smith Hourigan
Group
SHICKSHINNY LAKE
Lake Front Property
at Shickshinny Lake!
4 Bedrooms, 2.75
baths, 2 kitchens,
living room, large
family room. 2 sun-
rooms, office &
laundry room. Two
car attached gar-
age with paved
driveway, above
ground pool, dock &
100' lake frontage.
$375,000
MLS #12-860
Kenneth Williams
570-542-2141
Five Mountains
Realty
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
SWOYERSVILLE
$124,900
115 Hemlock St.
Lots of updates in
this roomy Cape
Cod in a desirable
neighborhood.
Large eat in kitchen
with new flooring.
Finished basement
with theater/rec
room. Large level
yard. Priced to sell!
MLS 12-4231
Call Kevin Sobilo
570-817-0706
906 Homes for Sale
SWEET VALLEY
Inviting home with
90 of lakefront &
beautiful covered
dock. Huge great
room opens to kit-
chen & features
handsome stone
fireplace, custom
built-ins & long win-
dow seat offering
great views of the
lake. First floor mas-
ter walks out to
beautiful 3 season
porch which is also
lakefront. Two large
upstairs bedrooms
can hold a crowd.
Huge laundry/pantry
made for entertain-
ing.
MLS# 11-2958
$299,000
Rhea Simms
570-696-6677
570-696-3801
SWOYERSVILLE
187 Shoemaker St.
Totally Redone! This
cozy Cape Cod has
3 bedrooms, 1 bath.
Modern kitchen with
granite countertops,
ceramic tile back-
splash and floor, all
new hardwood
throughout, new
furnace, new wiring,
new windows, duct
work in place for
central air, much
more! Vinyl siding,
large unfinished
basement, deck,
Off street parking.
24 hour notice to
show.
Asking $135,000.
Call Don at
814-5072
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-696-1195
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
SWOYERSVILLE
STEEPLECHASE
50 Grandville Drive
Outstanding 3 bed-
room, 2 1/2 bath
townhouse out of
the flood zone.
Formal dining room,
family room, master
bedroom suite.
Central air & central
vacuum. Deck,
garage + many
extras. Freshly
painted and carpet-
ed, so move right in!
PHFA financing
$5,300 down,
monthly payment
$847. interest rate
of 4.375. $175,000.
MLS # 13-195.
Ask for Bob Kopec
Humford Realty Inc
570-822-5126
SWOYERSVILLE
STEEPLECHASE
50 Grandville Drive
Outstanding 3 bed-
room, 2 1/2 bath
townhouse out of
the flood zone.
Formal dining room,
family room, master
bedroom suite.
Central air & central
vacuum. Deck,
garage + many
extras. Freshly
painted and carpet-
ed, so move right in!
PHFA financing
$5,300 down,
monthly payment
$847. interest rate
of 4.375. $175,000.
MLS # 13-195.
Ask for Bob Kopec
Humford Realty Inc
570-822-5126
WEST PITTSTON
MULTI-FAMILY
Two houses for the
price of one! Two
story in front & dou-
ble-wide in rear.
Great for 2 families
or investor opportu-
nity. Off street
parking & NOT in
flood zone.
MLS #13-970
$148,000
Call Cindy King
Today!
570-690-2689
www.cindykingre.com
Signature Properties
570-675-5100
906 Homes for Sale
WAPWALLOPEN
359 Pond Hill
Mountain Road
4 bedroom home
features a great
yard with over 2
acres of property.
Situated across
from a playground.
Needs some TLC
but come take a
look, you wouldnt
want to miss out.
There is a pond at
the far end of the
property that is
used by all sur-
rounding neighbors.
This is an estate
and is being sold as
is. No sellers prop-
erty disclosure. Will
entertain offers in
order to settle
estate. MLS 11-962
$49,900
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
WEST PITTSTON
PRICE REDUCED!
Mt. Zion Road.
Single family two
story - a place for
kids! Four bed-
rooms & bath up-
stairs. 1st floor has
formal dining room,
living room, family
room & laundry
room. Master bed-
room & bath added
to the 1st floor.
Good sized kitchen.
2,126 sq. ft. total on
1 acre. Wyoming
Area School Dis-
trict.
MLS # 13-700
$119,900
Call Ruth K. Smith
570-696-5411
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-696-1195
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
WHITE HAVEN
Beautiful 3 bedroom
home tucked away
on your own 46 acre
retreat. This proper-
ty offers a pond,
stream, 2 decks & a
screened in porch.
Home offers 2 1/2
baths + 1st floor
master bed room
with deck. updated
kitchen & skylights.
Dont pass this
amazing opportunity
by. Call for your
showing today.
MLS#13-995
$299,900
Call/text Donna
947-3824 or
Tony at 855-2424
901-1020
WHITE-HAVEN
501 Birch Lane
Beautiful 4 bed-
room, 3 bath. Enjoy
the amenities of a
private lake, boat-
ing, basketball
courts, etc. The
home has wood
floors and carpeting
throughout. French
doors in the kitchen
that lead you out to
the large rear deck
for entertaining. The
backyard has 2 utili-
ty sheds for storage
MLS 12-1695
NEW PRICE
$174,900
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
WILKES BARRE
PRICE REDUCED
$42,000
70 N. Meade
3BR, 1 bath in move
in condition with
new electric box,
water heater, and
plumbing. Off
street parking in
rear for 3 cars,
good credit and
your house, taxes &
insurance would be
under $400/month.
MLS #12-3900. For
more information
and photos visit
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com.
Call Tom
570-262-7716
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES BARRE
PRICE REDUCED
$49,900
735 N. Washington
Street
Spacious 2 story, 3
bedrooms with 2 ca
detached garage,
good starter home,
needs TLC. MLS #12
3887. For more
information and pho
tos visit www.atlasre
altyinc.com.
Call Tom
570-262-7716
WILKES BARRE
REDUCED
$39,900
61 Puritan Lane
Are you spending
more than $400/mo
on rent?? Owning
this home could
cost you less! With
3 bedrooms and a
fenced in yard, this
home makes a per-
fect place to start
your homeowner-
ship experience.
Ask me how!
MLS #12-1823. For
more information
and photos visit
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com.
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
WILKES- BARRE
$112,000
43 Richmont Ave.
Worth more than
listed price, this 3
bedroom, 2 bath
Cape Cod home
has central air,
hardwood floors,
fenced yard, above
ground pool, mod-
ern kitchen and
baths. www.atlasre-
altyinc.com
MLS 13-789
Tom Salvaggio
570-262-7716
WILKES-BARRE
$72,900
35 Hillard St.
Hardwood floors,
fenced in yard,
large deck. Off
street parking. 3
bedroom home with
1st floor laundry.
Move in condition.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-1655
Colleen Turant
570-237-0415
WILKES-BARRE
$99,900
77 Schuler St.
NOTHING to do but
move right in! This
home has every-
thing you need...3
bedrooms, 2.5
baths, large fenced
in yard, screened in
porch, off street
parking, quiet
neighborhood.
Home recently
remodeled inside &
out. www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 13-467
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
WILKES-BARRE
68 Jones Street
This 2 story home
features 3 bed-
rooms, 1 & 1.5
baths, an attached
sunroom, private
back yard, large liv-
ing room all great
for entertaining.
Close to schools &
shopping.
$44,900.
MLS 12-3211
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
NEW LISTING!
Charming bungalow
style Cape Cod
home with a unique
layout & character
galore. Four bed-
rooms, two baths
and second floor
great room. Corner
lot, two-car garage,
nice South Wilkes-
Barre location.
MLS#13-1295
$99,900
Karen Ryan
283-9100, ext. 14
283-9100
WILKES-BARRE
159 Gardner Ave.
Big Family wanted!!
Great 5 Bedroom,
with 2.5 baths, very
well kept, move
right in. Outside was
total updated, New
furnace and hot
water heater too!!!
MLS #13-1342
$125,000
Call Dave, Sr.
881-7877
Rubbico
Real Estate
826-1600
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
WILKES-BARRE
PRICE REDUCED
Located on quiet
Westminster Street.
One story ranch
home in very good
condition with nice
yard & off street
parking. This 2 bed-
room, 1 bath home
features an eat-in
kitchen with new
appliances, which
are included, living
& dining rooms.
Roof is 2 years old &
new water heater
recently installed in
full, unfinished, dry,
concrete basement
with included wash-
er and dryer.
Virtually all furniture
is included, if de-
sired. Directions:
From S. Main to
Hanover St. to
Westminster.
MLS# 13-32
$59,000
Call Jim Banos
570-991-1883
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real
Estate
570-474-2340
WILKES-BARRE
REDUCED PRICE
$242,000
Beautifully kept split
level in desirable
Barney Farms. 3
car attached
garage, finished
basement & attic.
Landscaped lot,
covered deck with
custom pull down
shades. Hard-
wood living room,
formal dining room,
cathedral ceilings in
living room &
kitchen. Full wet
bar in finished
basement, walk out
patio for your
parties/cookouts.
MLS#12-1874
Ann Devereaux
570-212-2038
Classic
Properties
570-587-7000
790 Northern Blvd.
Clarks Summit,
PA 18411
WYOMING
575 Susquehanna
Avenue
FOR SALE BY
OWNER
NEVER
FLOODED
4 bedroom, 2 full
bath in a great
neighborhood.
New windows
entire home, fin-
ished lower level,
detached garage,
4 season sun-
room. Master
suite has new full
bath and large
walk in closet.
New above
ground pool with
deck. Must see!
PRICED TO
SELL $179,000
570-885-6848
906 Homes for Sale
YATESVILLE
$69,900
9 Pittston Ave
2 story home locat-
ed in a very privet
setting. 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths
and workshop
attached to living
space, great for
home business or
the hobbyist. Low
taxes, great com-
munity. Garage has
1 detached space
and 1 built in.
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 13-1009
CALL CHARLIE
570-829-6200
YATESVILLE
REDUCED
$169,900
603 Willowcrest Dr.
Super end unit
townhouse, no
fees. 2 bedrooms,
3 baths, central air,
electric heat, cathe-
dral ceiling with
skylights. Large
family room with
propane stove and
its own ductless
air. MLS 13-482
Call Tom
570-262-7716
Need to rent that
Vacation property?
Place an ad and
get started!
570-829-7130
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
BEAR CREEK
$149,900
1255 Laurel Run
Rd.
Bear Creek
Twp., large com-
mercial
garage/ware-
house on 1.214
acres with addi-
tional 2 acre
parcel. 2 water
wells. 2 newer
underground
fuel tanks. May
require zoning
approval. For
more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-208
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
Commercial
Building For Sale.
502 Market St,
Kingston. 2000 Sq
Ft $229,000 1-story,
PRIME LOCATION
with parking lot.
Take a look. If
interested, call
570-814-4940.
COMMERCIAL
PROPERTY
for lease. Units
ranging from 600-
2700 sq ft. prime
Mountaintop area,
great for busi-
ness!!! High traffic
area for retail or
office space.
Prices ranging
from $500.00/
month for smallest
off street unit to
$2700.00/month
for large 2700
square foot
building. call
Amanda Colonna
570-714-6115
CENTURY 21
SMITH HOURIGAN
GROUP
570-287-1196,
for details and to
view units.
DURYEA
$39,900
93 Main St.
Four units. 3 resi-
dential and one
storefront.Great
corner location,
flood damaged
home being sold as
is. For more info
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-1948
Call Tom
570-262-7716
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
EDWARDSVILLE
Landmark location
ready for new life.
Formerly used as a
restaurant, can be
converted into any-
thing! Full bar area,
& kitchen, multiple
cool storage areas.
Living & office
space also avail-
able. Parking lot
included.
MLS#13-874
$115,900
Call Dave, Jr.
885-2693
Rubbico
Real Estate
826-1600
HANOVER
Repossessed
Income Property
Out of flood area
5 apartments, 2
buildings on one lot
in excellent condi-
tion. Hardwood
floors. $95,000
570-822-9697
HUNTINGTON
MILLS
Great Old 80 Acre
Farm, Location Next
to Northwest High
School with approx.
35 acres of fields &
45 acres wooded.
Small pond, barn,
old farmhouse with
out buildings(in poor
condition - little or
no value) plenty of
road frontage.
MLS #13-807
$359,000
Call Richard Long
406-2438
570-675-4400
Line up a place to live
in classified!
KINGSTON
Great opportunity
for this 2,900 sq. ft.
professional office
building in high traf-
fic area. Last used
as a veterinary clin-
ic, but is easily
adapted for other
uses. See how this
space can be used
for you! Open
entry space, individ-
ual offices, full base-
ment for storage,
central air, and gas
heat. Parking for 12
cars.
MLS-12-416
$339,000
Call Rhea for
details
570-696-6677
KINGSTON
341 Wyoming Ave.
3 story Victorian
home located in a
high exposure area.
Has all the lovely
signature wood-
work of a grand
VIctorian of yester-
year! Can be
restored for use as
a residential home
or a landlord invest-
ment. Currently
subdivided into mul-
tiple office spaces
and 2 apartments.
MLS 12-617
$149,000
Jay A. Crossin
EXT. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
NANTICOKE
36-38 E. Ridge St.
Fully occupied com-
mercial brick build-
ing with 4 tenant
occupied apart-
ments, 1 commer-
cial space currently
rented as a beauty
salon, 3 car garage
and storage space
to rent. Apartments
are all modern and
remodeled with
new wiring, plumb-
ing, roof, separate
utilities. Great
income producing
property in high
traffic area.
MLS 12-2619
$239,000
ANTONIK &
ASSOCIATES,
INC.
570-735-7494
Patricia Lunski
NANTICOKE
Newly remodeled,
immaculate office
building. 1,600 sq.
ft, central air, plenty
of parking, abun-
dant storage areas,
h a n d i c a p p e d
accessible.
MLS #13-667
$79,900
Dana Distasio
570-9333 Purebred Animals?
Sell them here with a
classified ad!
570-829-7130
Motorcycle for sale?
Let them see it here
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
PAGE 10D WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
944 Commercial
Properties
944 Commercial
Properties
8
0
6
5
3
3
Professional Ofce Rentals
Full Service Leases Custom Design
Renovations Various Size Suites Available
Medical, Legal, Commercial
Utilities Parking Janitorial
Full Time Maintenance Staff Available
For Rental Information Call:
1-570-287-1161
New Bridge Center
480 Pierce Street
Ofcenter250
250 Pierce Street
Ofcenter270
270 Pierce Street
Park Ofce Building
400 Third Ave.
Ofcenter220
220 Pierce Street
KINGSTON OFFICENTERS
www.lippiproperties.com
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
NANTICOKE
R. 395
E. Washington St.
Nice double block.
Two bedrooms
each side. Sepa-
rate heat & electric.
Close to College.
Affordable @
$49,500
Towne & Country
R.E. Co.
735-8932
or 542-5708
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
PITTSTON
$115,000
142-144 Carroll St.
Well maintained,
fully rented 4 unit
investment property
in quiet neighbor-
hood. Owner took
good care of this
property. www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 12-4514
Call Terry
570-885-3041 or
Angie
570-885-4896
PITTSTON
$129,900
224 William St.
Are you a hair-
dresser or barber?
Need a space for
an in home busi-
ness? This might be
just what youre
looking for. Well
maintained 4 bed-
room home with
salon (previously a
barber shop for 60
years). Very well
established, high
visibility location
and additional home
with 3 bedrooms
currently rented to
a tenant. Must be
sold as one pack-
age. www.atlasreal-
tyinc.com
MLS 13-216
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
EXCITING
BUSINESS FOR
SALE!
Call if you have
money. Call if you
have experience in
the restaurant busi-
ness. This is one of
the areas most
attractive & suc-
cessful restaurant
businesses. Turn
key.
$319,000
Maribeth Jones
696-6565
696-2600,
ext. 210
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
PITTSTON
68 William St.
Great investment
property with 3
units and separate
utilities. Each unit
has 2 entrances
and washer hook
up. Roof is 5 years
old. For more info
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 12-1897
$69,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
PITTSTON AREA
$134,900
Well established
meat and deli store
with large variety of
specialty items for
sale. Homemade
sausage, porketta-
prosciutto, to men-
tion a few. Owners
will sty on to teach.
give recipes and
contacts. Also a
newly remodeled
apartment above
store and 4 car
garage to help pay
the mortgage.
MLS 13-535
For an appointment
call:
Fred Mecadon
570-817-5792
PLYMOUTH
$52,900
New Listing! Afford-
able for you!. Set
back off Main st.,
this double block
has had many
updates. Unit #1:
formal dining room
2 bedrooms, 1 bath
and deck. Unit #2:
spacious open floor
plan, large living
room, formal dining
room, genuine
hardwood floors, 4
bedrooms with new
carpeting, 1.5
baths, lots of closet
space and enclosed
balcony.
MLS 13-1176
Michele Hopkins
570-540-6046
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
SWEET VALLEY
3.8 acres, zoned B2
commercial with
home & pond.
Priced for quick
sale. High traffic
area Located at the
intersection of
Rt. 118 & Main Road.
$89,000
Call Richard Long
406-2438
675-4400
WILKES-BARRE
Owner Retiring
Turn Key Night
Club For Sale.
Two full bars,
game area.
Four restrooms.
Prime Location!!!
Creative financing
Available $80,000,
Dave Rubbico, Jr.
885-2693
Rubbico
Real Estate
826-1600
WEST NANTICOKE
$139,900
30 E. Poplar St.
Multi - Family
5 apartments and a
2 car garage, all
rented. Off street
parking for 8 cars.
Great investment.
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com
MLS 13-680
Tom Salvaggio
570-262-7716
WEST SIDE
Well established
Italian Restaurant
on the West Side
with seating for 75.
Business only
includes good will,
all furniture and fix-
tures, all kitchen
equipment and
delivery van for
$150,000. Building
sold separately.
Restaurant on 1st
floor and 2 bed-
room luxury apart-
ment on 2nd floor
for $250,000.
www.atlasrealty
inc.com
MLS 12-3433
Call Charlie
WILKES-BARRE
Everything is Ready!
Just bring your busi-
ness to this great
location with over
15,000 sq. ft. of
parking space. The
building is equipped
for fast food,
restaurant, pizza,
carry-out, etc. Will
rent with option to
buy. Excellent
opportunity for the
right party!
$269,000
Call Ruth
@ 570-696-1195
or 570-696-5411
Smith Hourigan
Group
912 Lots & Acreage
BEAR CREEK
Bear Creek Blvd.
Wonderful opportu-
nity! Beautiful 3.45
acre wooded build-
ing lot for your new
home. 200' front-
age.
MLS #13-157
$39,900
Mary Ann Desiderio
570-715-7733
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
DALLAS
2 acre property at
Goodleigh Manor.
$75,000. Call Natal-
ie
570-357-1138
DALLAS
GREENBRIAR RETIRE-
MENT COMMUNITY
Only eight lots
left. Custom
design you home
the way you want it.
Call 570-675-1300
DALLAS TOWNSHIP
63 acres with about
5,000 roadfront on
2 roads. All Wood-
ed. $385,000. Call
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
SWOYERSVILLE
100 x 150, cleared
and leveled building
lot. Utilities are
available.
Call: 570-288-4899
912 Lots & Acreage
DALLAS
Commercial -
Vacant Land
2.12 acres of
commercial land
in a prime Back
Mountain location.
Ideal spot to build
an office or profes-
sional building.
Corner wooded lot.
Water, electric &
gas available to be
run to site. Call
Rhea for details
MLS#12-4281
570-696-6677
$249,900
DALLAS SCHOOL DISTRICT
Scenic level 2 acre
building lot is perked
& surveyed & ready
for your dream
home! Owner is sell-
ing for $95,000 but
will discount to
$70,000 if you con-
sider building a
green energy effi-
cient type home on
lot. Privately owned
& located on Lake
Louise Rd within 1/2
mile of Twin Oaks
Golf Club. For more
info 570-288-9050
after 5 pm Serious
inquiries only.
EARTH CONSERVANCY
Land For Sale
61 +/- Acres
Nuangola $95,000
46 +/- Acres
Hanover Twp.
$79,000
Highway
Commercial KOZ
Hanover Twp. 3+/-
Acres 11 +/- Acres
Wilkes-Barre Twp.
Acreage Zoned
R-3
Sugar Notch Lot
$13,500
See Additional
Land for Sale at:
www.earth
conservancy.org
Call: 570-823-3445
HANOVER TWP
Slope St.
Nice building lot
with utilities avail-
able. Ideal home
site. Affordable at
$12,900
TOWNE &
COUNTRY RE CO
570-735-8932
570-542-5708
HARVEYS LAKE
Don't miss this one!
Partially cleared lot
ready for you to
build your home. It
has the sewer per-
mit already. Waiting
for you to add the
finishing touches to
it. Great price!!
MLS# 13-1291
$9,950
Call Pat Doty
394-6901
696-2468
LAFLIN
$32,900
Lot#9
Pinewood Dr
Build your new
home in a great
neighborhood. Con-
venient location
near highways, air-
port, casino and
shopping
156 X 110 X 150 X 45
DIRECTIONS Rt 315
to laflin Rd; make
left off Laflin Rd onto
Pinewood Dr. Lot is
on corner of
Pinewood Dr. and
Hickorywood Dr.
MLS 13-23
atlas realtyinc.com
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
LEHMAN
9 Acres on Lehman
Outlet Road. 470
front, over 1,000
deep. Wooded.
$125,000. Call
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
MOOSIC
BUILDING LOT
REDUCED
$28,500
Corner of Drake St.
& Catherine,
Moosic. 80x111
building lot with
sewer & water
available, in great
area with newer
homes. Corner lot.
For more details
visit www.atlasreal-
tyinc.com.
MLS #12-1148.
Call Charlie
MOUNTAIN TOP
VACANT LAND
27.5 Acres
Prime Location -
Access to 309
All Utilities
Available on 309.
MLS #13-744
Call George Sailus
570-407-4300
$490,000
570-901-1020
912 Lots & Acreage
NEWPORT TWP.
LOTS LOTS - - LOTS LOTS - - LOTS LOTS
1 mile south of
L.C.C.C.
Established
developement with
underground utili-
ties including gas.
Cleared lot. 100
frontage x 158.
$35,000.
Lot 210 frontage
158 deep on hill
with great view
$35,000.
Call 570-736-6881
PLAINS TWP.
VACANT LAND
KING OF THE
MOUNTAIN!
Truly a 360
degree view
from the highest
point of this
property. 48.49
acres to be sold
as one parcel.
Build your
dream house
here or buy and
sub-divide. Will
require well and
septic system.
Just minutes
from Highway
315, near the
Casino but very
private.
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-4142
Only $149,000
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
SHAVERTOWN
Beautiful 1 acre
building lot located
in established back
Mountain sub-divi-
sion. Buy now and
start building your
dream home in the
spring. Lot has
underground utili-
ties, public sewer
and private well.
MLS #13-137
$62,400
Christine Pieczynski
696-6569
696-2600
SHICKSHINNY
23+/- acres of
wooded land and
farmland with barn
in good condition
and a nice travel
trailer. Well on
property.
MLS#12-2572
$115,000
Ken Williams
542-8800
Five Mountains
Realty
542-2141
SHICKSHINNY
26 acres of mostly
open land for
a beautiful
homesite near
Shickshinny Lake.
MLS #12-3394
$130,000
Ken Williams
542-8800
Five Mountains
Realty
542-2141
SHICKSHINNY LAKE
Location, Location,
Location
A most unique &
desirable lakefront
property. This is an
opportunity to
purchase a
centrally situated
lot with an
unmatched view of
this beautiful lake.
If you are looking
for that special
building site, this is
it! MLS# 11-1269
$169,900
Call Dale Williams
Five Mountains
Realty
570-256-3343
WANAMIE - LAND
Center St.
1 plus acres. Wood-
ed lot for sale. Build
you home now!
Public water and
sewer available.
ANTONIK &
ASSOCIATES,
INC.
570-835-7494
Patricia Lunski
WANAMIE - LAND
Center St.
Lot 4. Great views
come with this
vacant land. Lot
measures 367x100.
Public water and
sewer available.
build your home
now!
ANTONIK &
ASSOCIATES,
INC.
570-735-7494
Patricia Lunski
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
WEST PITTSTON
Level building lot.
50 x 100. All public
utilities available.
Asking $24,500.
570-299-5415
915 Manufactured
Homes
HANOVER TWP.
2 bedrooms, 1 bath
mobile home locat-
ed in a park on a
rented lot along a
quiet, dead end
road. Covered car-
port and shed. In
good condition, but
needs updating
$6,500. OBO.
570-735-1376
570-994-6308
938 Apartments/
Furnished
HARVEYS LAKE
LAKE FRONT
Furnished, 2/2
Deck/dock and dish,
$1800 utilities includ-
ed, Short TermAvail-
able (minimum three
months.)
570-266-3223
WILKES STUDENT
Housing Available.
Fully furnished
move right in, all
utilities included.
3 BEDROOM
AVAILABLE $495
PER STUDENT
Safe, secure pre-
mesis in great
neighborhood. 3
minute walk to
classes.Conve-
nience and living at
its best! Parents
encouraged to visit
home. 1 year lease
beginning June 1st.
Security, refer-
ences and parental
co-signer required.
Call 570-592-3113
or email
colleen5@ptd.net
WILKES-BARRE
FULLY FURNISHED
1 BEDROOM
Short or long term
Excellent
Neighborhood
Private Tenant
Parking
$600 includes all
utilities. No pets.
570-822-9697
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
ASHLEY
1st floor apt, 4
rooms. Heat & hot
water & garbage
stickers included.
New rugs. No pets-
no smoking. Close
to bus stop. Off
street parking,
$550/per month +
security. Call
(570)814-4441
ASHLEY
AVAILABLE NOW
Modern 2 bedroom,
2nd floor. Off street
parking. Washer/
dryer hook-up in
basement. Appli-
ances. Bus stop at
the door. Water
Included. $575 +
utilities & security.
No pets.
TRADEMARK
REALTY GROUP
570-954-1992
BACK
MOUNTAIN
Large 1 bedroom,
living room, kitchen
with appliances,
tiled bath, deck.
No Pets. $425.
570-696-1866
DALLAS
17 Baldwin Street
1st floor, one bed-
room, off-street
parking. Living
room, eat in
kitchen, small office
space. $575/
month, water &
garbage included.
Tenant pays heat &
electric,
570-310-1821
DALLAS
Available May 1st. 3
bedroom, 2nd floor
of century home in
beautiful area. All
appliances, heat &
gas for dryer includ-
ed. Lease, security
& references re-
quired. No pets.
$800/month.
Call 570-675-2486
DALLAS
HI-MEADOWS
APARTMENTS
1075 Memorial Hwy.
Low & Moderate
Income Elderly
Rentals Include:
*Electric Range &
Refrigerator
*Off Street Parking
*Community Room
*Coin Operated
Laundry *Elevator.
*Video Surveilence
Applications
Accepted by
Appointment
570-675-5944
8a.m. - 4 p.m.
TDD Only,
1-800-654-5984
Voice Only,
1-800-654-5988
Handicap Accessi-
ble
Equal Housing
Opportunity
DALLAS
MEADOWS
APARTMENTS
220 Lake St.
Housing for the
elderly & mobility
impaired; all utilities
included. Federally
subsidized program.
Extremely low
income persons
encouraged to
apply. Income less
than $12,450.
570-675-6936,
TDD800-654-5984
8 am-4 pm, Mon-Fri.
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE
FORTY FORT
Large living room
and bedroom, sec-
ond floor apartment.
Off-street parking
for two cars. On
site washer and
dryer for tenants
use. Indoor cats
allowed, up to two
only. Available May
1. $585/per month
includes everything
except phone and
cable.
Call (570) 287-2765
PLYMOUTH
Cozy 3 bedroom on
2 floors. $650/mo.
570-760-0511
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
GLEN LYON
1 bedroom, 2nd
floor apt. Living
room, kitchen, full
bath, heat, hot
water & garbage
fee included. Tenant
pays electric. $575/
month + security.
Call or text
201-304-3469
GLEN LYON
1st floor, NEW
Appliances &
Floors. 4 room apt.
Electric & propane
gas heat. Off street
parking. Washer
/dryer hookup, ref-
rigerator, garbage
included. No dogs.
$400/month refer-
ences required, 1
year lease + 1 month
security.
570-714-1296
GLEN LYON
KEN POLLOCK
APARTMENTS
41 Depot Street
Low and Moderate
Income Elderly
Rentals Include:
* Electric Range &
Refrigerator
* Off Street Parking
* Community Room
* Coin Operated
Laundry
* Elevator
* Video Surveilance
Applications
Accepted by
Appointment
570-736-6965
8:00 a.m. - 4 p.m.
TDD Only,
1-800-654-5984
Voice Only,
1-800-654-5988
Handicap Accessi-
ble
Equal Housing
Opportunity
GLEN LYON
Newly remodeled 1
bedroom studio
apartment. New
kitchen & appli-
ances, air condi-
tioned. Garage
optional. $600 +
utilities & security.
Please call
570-881-0320
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
3029 South Main
1st floor, 3 bed-
rooms, wall to
wall carpeting
and freshly
painted, central
air, eat in kitchen
with appliances.
Off street park-
ing. Laundry
room with bonus
washer and
dryer. Heat &
cooking gas
included. Tenant
pays electric &
water. $640 +
security. No
Pets.
570-814-1356
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
West End Road
Clean & bright
3 bedroom apart-
ments. Heat, water,
garbage & sewer
included with appli-
ances. Off street
parking. No pets,
non smoking, not
section 8 approved.
References, securi-
ty, first and last
months rent.
$725/month
570-852-0252
HANOVER TWP.
3 bedrooms, 1.5
bath, no pets. $850
+ utilities, 1st month,
last month + securi-
ty deposit.
Call 570-417-3427
HARVEYS LAKE
2 bedroom , wall to
wall carpet, appli-
ances, Lake rights.
Off street parking.
No pets. Lease,
security and
references.
570-639-5920
KINGSTON
116 Main Street
Near Kingston Cor-
ners. 2nd floor,
totally remodeled.
4 rooms, bath, laun-
dry. Oak cabinets,
gas range, walk up
attic, ceiling fans, air
conditioners, park-
ing, water, sewer.
No pets. Non smok-
ing. $575 + utilities.
570-288-9843
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
KINGSTON
118 Main Street. 2nd
floor. 4 rooms, bath,
laundry room, attic,
water, sewer, park-
ing. No pets. No
smoking.$525 + util-
ities. 570-288-9843
KINGSTON
E. E. W Walnut alnut St. St.
2nd floor. Located in
quiet neighborhood.
Kitchen, living room,
dining room, sun-
room, bath, 3 bed-
rooms; 2 large & 1
small. Lots of clos-
ets, built-in linen
closet & hutch.
Hardwood & car-
peted floors. Fire-
place. Storage
room. Yard. Washer
/ dryer, stove /
fridge. Heat and hot
water included. 1
year lease + securi-
ty. $950
570-283-4370
KINGSTON
EATON TERRACE
317 N. Maple Ave.
2 story 2 bed-
room, 1.5 bath @
$850. + utilities.
Two story 3 bed-
room, 2.5 baths @
$1,110. + utilities.
Central heat & air,
washer/dryer in
unit, on site park-
ing. 1 mo. security
570-262-6947
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
KINGSTON
Architect Designed
Bright modern
apartment; 2nd
floor, galley
kitchen, dining area,
living room, 1 bed-
room & bath. Gas
heat, central air,
ample storage,
coin-op washer/
dryer on premises,
off-street parking.
Outside mainte-
nance provided.
Heat & utilities by
tenant. No Pets.
No Smoking.
1 month security, 1
year lease
ROSEWOOD REAL ROSEWOOD REALTY TY
570-287-6822
KINGSTON
E. WALNUT ST.
Light, bright, 3rd
floor, 2 bedrooms,
carpeted. Security
system, garage
Extra storage &
cable TV included.
Laundry facilities.
Heat & hot water
furnished. Fine
neighborhood.
Convenient to bus
& stores. No pets.
References.
Security. Lease.
No smokers
please. $730.
month. Call
570-287-0900
KINGSTON
First floor, one bed-
room, freshly paint-
ed, new washer and
dryer, off-street
parking, no smoking
or pets. $500+utili-
ties, lease, one
month security
and references.
Call (570) 332-3567
KINGSTON
Recently remodeled
1st floor apartment
with 1 bedroom, 1
bath & electric heat.
Off street parking.
No pets. Credit
check & security
deposit required.
$575/month. Call
Nicole Dominick
@570-715-7757
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
KINGSTON
Wyoming Avenue
2nd floor, 1 bed-
room, appliances,
laundry room. $425
+ electric. Security
& references.
No pets.
570-696-1600
Kingston & Area
AVAILABLE
RENTAL
UNITS
1 & 2 Bedroom
Apartments
1/2 Doubles
Security + 1st
months rent,
credit check,
lease required.
Utilities by tenant
Call
Tina Randazzo
570-899-3407
for Information
LAKE SILKWORTH
Newly remodeled, 1
bedroom, 2nd floor,
own deck, all utilities
included except
cooking gas. No
pets. Lake rights,
swimming & boat-
ing. $650/month.
570-477-5001
LARKSVILLE
178 Nesbitt Street
Newly remodeled,
2 bedroom, wash-
er/dryer/stove &
fridge included.
$500/ month+ secu-
rity. No pets. Utili-
ties by tenant. Must
be seen!
Call after 9:00 am
570-574-1909
LUZERNE
1 bedroom, wall to
wall, off-street
parking, coin laun-
dry, water, sewer &
garbage included.
$495/month +
security & lease.
HUD accepted.
570-687-6216 or
570-954-0727
LUZERNE
2nd floor 1 bed-
room, living room
& bath. Kitchen,
refrigerator,
range, washer,
dryer. Garbage &
sewer paid. Off
street parking, no
pets or smoking.
$450/month +
utilities, security
& references.
570-696-1763
LUZERNE
Efficiency, $350/per
month, plus securi-
ty. Includes water,
sewer and garbage.
Call (570) 690-4560
Let the Community
Know!
Place your Classified
Ad TODAY!
570-829-7130
MOOSIC
5 rooms, 2nd floor,
heat, water &
sewage furnished.
$725/month. Secu-
rity & references.
570-457-7854
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
MOUNTAIN TOP
1 Bedroom apart-
ments for elderly,
disabled. Rents
based on 30% of
ADJ gross income.
Handicap Accessi-
ble. Equal Housing
Opportunity. TTY711
or 570-474-5010
This institution is an
equal opportunity
provider &
employer.
MOUNTAIN TOP
WOODBRYN
1 & 2 Bedroom.
No pets. Rents
based on income
start at $405 &
$440. Handicap
Accessible.
Equal Housing
Opportunity. 570-
474-5010 TTY711
This institution is an
equal opportunity
provider and
employer.
NANTICOKE
1 bedroom, quiet
area, nice sized clos-
ets, living room &
kitchen. Water,
sewer & trash in-
cluded. Washer &
dryer. No pets/smok-
ing. $475 + electric.
570-262-5399
NANTICOKE
Heat & water
included. 1 bed
room, 2nd floor, off
street parking, coin-
op washer/dryer on
premises, no pets.
$475. Call
570-287-9631 or
570-417-4311
NANTICOKE
LEXINGTON LEXINGTON
VILLAGE VILLAGE
2 bedroom, 1
bath apartments.
Refrigerator,
stove,
dishwasher &
washer/dryer
provided.
Attached garage.
Pet friendly.
Water, sewer &
trash included.
59 Agostina Drive
570-735-3500
NANTICOKE
Nice 2 bedroom
Eat-in kitchen, living
room, full bath,
stove/fridge,
washer/dryer
hook-up.
$500 + utilities.
NO PETS.
Call:
570-760-3637 or
570-477-3839
NANTICOKE
Very clean, nice 1
bedroom. Heat, hot
water & garbage
fees included.
Washer/dryer avail-
able, stove, refrig-
erator, air condi-
tioning. No pets/no
smoking. $525 +
security.
Call 570-542-5610
PITTSTON
Modern 2 bedroom,
2nd floor. Includes
stove & refrigerator.
Laundry hook-up.
Heated garage, off
street parking.
Heat, sewer, water
& garbage included.
$695/month + sec-
urity & lease. No
smoking or pets.
570-430-0123
PLAINS
NEARBY NEARBY
WILKES-BARRE
PLAINS
VICTORIAN -
NEW - REMOD-
ELED DUPLEX.
1 bedrooms.
Maple kitchen,
built-in appli-
ances, some
aesthetic fire-
places (FIRST
FLOOR BAY
LIVING ROOM)
Parking, Porch-
es, Laundry.
MANAGED
SERVICES
AMERICA
REALTY
570-288-1422
NO PETS,
EMPLOYMENT
APPLICATION,
2 YEAR SAME
RENTS.
SHAVERTOWN
1 bedroom apart-
ment with living
room & kitchen.
Freshly painted &
ready for you to
move in. Utilities
included. One
month security
required. No
smoking or pets.
$750/month.
Call Jolyn @
570-696-1195 or
570-696-5425
Smith Hourigan
Group
SHAVERTOWN
One bedroom, living
room & kitchen
apartment. Security
required. No pets.
$500/month + util-
ities. Call
Jolyn Bartoli
570-696-5425
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-696-1195
WEST PITTSTON
2 bedroom. 2nd
floor, finished attic.
$550/mo. + utilities
570-299-5471
WEST PITTSTON
2nd floor, 2 bed-
room, washer/dryer,
fridge and stove,
dishwasher, central
air, electric heat, no
pets, $600 Call John
570-654-1909
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
SWOYERSVILLE
1st floor, 5 rooms +
basement cozy 1
bedroom, newly
remodeled eat in
kitchen, all appli-
ances shared wash-
er/dryer or hook up.
Very energy effi-
cient, Utilities by
tenant Safe location,
off street
parking. Non-smok-
ing, No pets. 1 year
lease/security. $500
(267) 872 4825
WILKES-BARRE
Clean & comfort-
able, front & back
duplex, in nice area.
Both units include
eat in kitchen,
refrigerator, stove,
dishwasher & shar-
ed storage shed.
PLENTY OF OFF
STREET PARKING.
One year lease &
security. $600/
month front unit
includes washer/
dryer hook up &
front porch. $700/
month back unit in-
cludes washer, dry-
er, deck, patio &
fenced yard.
Call Michael
570-760-4961
570-675-5100
WEST PITTSTON
2nd floor, 3 room
apartment with
screened in porch
Includes water &
sewer. $460/
month + gas hot
water, electric heat
& security. Private
entrance.
570-954-7849
WEST PITTSTON
2nd floor, very nice,
4 room apartment.
Private parking. No
pets. No smoking.
$550/month + utili-
ties, security &
references.
570-655-2386
570-885-7763
WEST PITTSTON
Charming, spacious
clean 1.5 bedroom.
Washer/dryer
hookup. Front
porch, off street
parking. Quiet
neighborhood.
No pets. $625/mo.
includes water.
570-693-2148 or
570-654-6537
WEST PITTSTON
GARDEN VILLAGE
APARTMENTS
221 Fremont St.
Housing for the
elderly & mobility
impaired; all utilities
included. Federally
subsidized
program. Extremely
low income persons
encouraged to
apply. Income less
than $12,450.
570-655-6555
TDD800-654-5984
8 am-4 pm
Monday-Friday.
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE
WEST WYOMING
Cozy first floor, 1
bedroom apart-
ment, includes
front porch. $475
per month +
utilities. No pets,
No smoking.
available May 1.
570-693-1000
WEST WYOMING
Large, modern 2nd
floor, 1 bedroom.
Quiet neighborhood,
eat in kitchen,
stove, refrigerator,
washer/dryer hook
up. Living & dining
room combo, large
bedroom, deck,
heat, water, sewer
& garbage included.
No pets. $675 +
security.
570-693-9339
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
1, 2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright
open floor plans
- All major
appliances included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term
leases available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflower
crossing.com
Certain Restrictions
Apply*
WILKES-BARRE /
KINGSTON
Efficiency 1 & 2
bedrooms. Includes
all utilities, parking,
laundry. No pets.
From $390 to $675.
Lease, security
& references.
570-970-0847
WILKES-BARRE
2 bedroom, 1 bath
apartment near
General Hospital.
No Pets. $525 +
utilities, first, last +
security deposit.
570-417-3427
WILKES-BARRE
PARK AVENUE
2nd floor, 1 bedroom.
Water included.
$500 + utilities,
security & lease. No
pets. 570-472-9494
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013 PAGE 11D
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
IN THE HEART OF WILKES-BARRE
1 BEDROOM
APARTMENTS AVAILABLE
MARTIN D. POPKY APARTMENTS
61 E. Northampton St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701
Affordable Senior Apartments
Income Eligibility Required
Utilities Included! Low cable rates;
New appliances; Laundry on site;
Activities! Curbside Public Transportation
Please call
570-825-8594
D/TTY 800-654-5984
EAST
MOUNTAIN
APARTMENTS
The good life...
close at hand
Regions Best
Address
1 & 2 Bedroom Apts.
822-4444
www.EastMountainApt.com
1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts.
288-6300
www.GatewayManorApt.com KINGSTON
SDK GREEN
ACRES HOMES
11 Holiday Drive
A Place To
Call Home
Spacious 1, 2 & 3
Bedroom Apts.
Gas heat included
FREE
24 hr. on-site Gym
Community Room
Swimming Pool
Maintenance FREE
Controlled Access
Patio/Balcony
and much more...
570-288-9019
www.sdkgreen
acres.com
Call today for
move-in
specials.
WILKES-BARRE
EXCELLENT
DOWNTOWN
LOCATION!!!
STUDIO, 1 & 2
BEDROOMS
Equipped Kitchen
Free Cable
Wall to Wall Carpeting
570-823-2776
Monday - Friday,
9 a.m. - 1 p.m.
1 & 2 BR
Apts
2 & 3 BR
Townhomes
Wilkeswood
Apartments
www.liveatwilkeswood.com
570-822-2711
CALL AN EXPERT
CALL AN EXPERT
Professional Services Directory
1015 Appliance
Service
A.R.T. APPLIANCE
REPAIR
We service
all major
brands.
570-639-3001
Why Spend
Hundreds on
New or Used
Appliances?
Most problems
with your appli-
ances are usually
simple and
inexpensive to fix!
Save your hard
earned money,
Let us take a look
at it first!
30 years in
the business.
East Main
Appliances
570-735-8271
Nanticoke
1024 Building &
Remodeling
1ST. QUALITY
CONSTRUCTION CO.
Roofing, siding,
gutters, insulation,
decks, additions,
windows, doors,
masonry &
concrete.
Insured & Bonded.
Senior Citizens Discount!
State Lic. # PA057320
570-606-8438
ALL OLDERHOMES
SPECIALIST
825-4268.
Remodel / Repair
Kitchens and
Baths
ASK HOW A
BUILDING
INDUSTRY
MEMBERSHIP
CAN BENEFIT
YOU.
CALL JANET
570-287-3331
FOR INFO
or go to
www.bianepa.com
CORNERSTONE
CONSTRUCTION
Roofing Siding
Carpentry
40 yrs experience
Licensed & Insured
PA026102
Call Dan
570-881-1131
www.davejohnson
remodeling.com
Baths/Kitchens
Carpentry A to Z
570-819-0681
FATHER & SON
CONSTRUCTION
Interior & Exterior
Remodeling
Jobs of All Sizes
570-814-4578
570-709-8826
GENERAL CONTRACTING
Roofing & siding.
Kitchens, bath-
rooms. Additions.
painting & drywall.
Insured. Free
Estimates
570-831-5510
NICHOLS CONSTRUCTION
All Types Of Work
New or Remodeling
Licensed & Insured
Now Offering
Plumbing,
Heating/AC
570-406-6044
Find homes for
your kittens!
Place an ad here!
570-829-7130
1024 Building &
Remodeling
HUGHES
Construction
NEED A NEW
KITCHEN OR
BATH????
Seasonal Rooms
Home Renovat-
ing. Siding and
More!
Licensed and
Insured.
FREE
ESTIMATES!!
570-237-7318
PA040387
Shedlarski Construction
HOME IMPROVEMENT
SPECIALIST
Licensed, insured &
PA registered.
Kitchens, baths,
vinyl siding & rail-
ings, replacement
windows & doors,
additions, garages,
all phases of home
renovations.
Free Estimates
570-287-4067
1039 Chimney
Service
A-1 ABLE
CHIMNEY
Rebuild & Repair
Chimneys. All
types of Masonry.
Liners Installed,
Brick & Block,
Roofs & Gutters.
Licensed &
Insured
570-735-2257
CHIMNEY REPAIRS
Parging. Stucco.
Stainless Liners.
Cleanings. Custom
Sheet Metal Shop.
570-383-0644
1-800-943-1515
Call Now!
CHRIS MOLESKY
CHIMNEY SPECIALIST
New, repair, rebuild,
liners installed.
Cleaning. Concrete
& metal caps.
Licensed & Insured
570-328-6257
1054 Concrete &
Masonry
DEMPSKI
MASONRY
& CONCRETE
Licensed & Insured
No job too small.
Free Estimates.
570-824-0130
DempskiMasonry.com
B.P. Home Repairs
570-825-4268
Brick, Block,
Concrete, Sidewalks,
Chimneys, Stucco.
New Installation &
Repairs
COVERT & SONS
CONCRETE CO.
All types concrete
and masonry
work, foundation
and chimney
repair specials.
Discounts for
Vets & Seniors
Give us a Call, Well
Beat Them All By
10% or More!
570-696-3488 or
570-239-2780
D. PUGH
CONCRETE
All phases of
masonry &
concrete. Small
jobs welcome.
Senior discount.
Free estimates.
Licensed & Insured
288-1701/655-3505
1054 Concrete &
Masonry
NEPA MASONRY, INC.
Stonework - stucco
- concrete - patios
- pavers - bricks -
blocks - chimneys
www.nepa
masonryinc.com
570-466-2916
570-954-8308
STESNEY
CONCRETE & MASONRY
Brick, block, walks,
drives, steps, stucco,
stone, foundations,
floors, etc. Lic. &
Ins. 570-283-1245 or
570-328-1830
WYOMING VALLEY
MASONRY
Concrete, stucco,
foundations,
pavers, retaining
wall systems,
flagstone, brick
work, chimneys
repaired. Senior
Citizens Discount
570-287-4144
or 570-760-0551
1057Construction &
Building
GARAGE
DOOR
Sales, service,
installation &
repair.
FULLY
INSURED
HIC# 065008
CALL JOE
570-735-8551
Cell 606-7489
1078 Dry Wall
MIRRA
DRYWALL
Hanging & Finishing
Textured Ceilings
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
570-675-3378
1084 Electrical
ECONOLECTRIC
No Job
Too Small.
Generator
Installs.
Residential &
Commercial
Free Estimates
Licensed-Insured
PA032422
(570) 602-7840
SLEBODA ELECTRIC
Master electrician
Licensed & Insured
Service Changes &
Replacements.
Generator Installs.
8 6 8 - 4 4 6 9
1093 Excavating
All Types Of
Excavating,
Demolition &
Concrete Work.
Lot clearing, pool
closing and
retaining
walls, etc.
Large & Small Jobs
FREE ESTIMATES
(570) 760-1497
1099 Fencing &
Decks
ACTION FENCE
SPRING SALE:
Discounts on wood,
vinyl, chain link,
aluminum and
more! Call today for
a FREE ESTIMATE!
570-602-0432
FREDERICK FENCE CO.
Locally Owned
Vinyl, Chain Link,
Aluminum, Wood.
570-709-3021
1129 Gutter
Repair & Cleaning
GUTTER CLEANING
Window Cleaning
Pressure washing
Insured
570-288-6794
1132 Handyman
Services
ALL PHASE HANDYMAN
SERVICE
You Name It,
We Can Do It!
Over 30 Years
Experience in
General
Construction
Licensed & Insured
570-825-2129
DO IT ALL HANDYMAN
Painting, drywall,
plumbing & all types
of interior & exterior
home repairs.
570-829-5318
EVANS HOME
IMPROVEMENTS
Lending a hand
since 1975.
570-824-6871
20 YEARS EXPERI ENCE
All types of home
repairs & alterations
Plumbing, Carpentry,
Electrical
No job too small.
Free Estimates.
570-256-3150
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
A.S.A.P Hauling
Estate Cleanouts,
Attics, Cellars,
Garages, were
cheaper than
dumpsters!.
Free Estimates,
Same Day!
570-855-4588
ALL KINDS OF
HAULING & JUNK
REMOVAL.
SPRING CLEAN UP!
TREE/SHRUB TREE/SHRUB
REMOV REMOVAL AL
DEMOLITION DEMOLITION
Estate Cleanout Estate Cleanout
Free Estimates
24 HOUR
SERVICE
SMALL AND
LARGE JOBS!
570-823-1811
570-239-0484
Mikes $5-Up
Hauling Junk &
Trash from Houses,
Garages, Yards, Etc
826-1883 472-4321
1162 Landscaping/
Garden
BAREFOOT
GROUNDS KEEPING
- Grass Cutting,
aerating, fertilizing,
mulching, weeding,
pruning, garden
tilling.
- Painting, fencing,
stonewalls,
power washing.
- Tree and snow
removal.
Fully insured
Credit cards
accepted
Commercial or
Residential
Please contact
Roger:
570-760-7249
email:
schichi@ptd.net
1162 Landscaping/
Garden
Brizzys
Arbor Care &
Landscaping
Tree trimming,
pruning & removal.
Stump grinding,
Cabling. Shrub &
hedge sculpting &
trimming. Spring
cleanup, retaining
walls and repair.
Free Estimates
Fully Insured
570-542-7265
FOLTZ LANDSCAPING
Skid-Steer
Mini Excavating
New Landscapes/
Lawns. Retaining
walls/patios.
Call: 570-760-4814
JAYS LAWN SERVICE
Spring clean-ups,
mowing,mulching,
power washing and
more!
Free Estimates
570-574-3406
KELLERS LAWN CARE
SPRING CLEANUP
Landscaping,
mowing, mulching,
trimming, planting.
Commercial
& Residential.
570-332-7016
NEED HELP NEED HELP
LAWN CUT?
LEAVES RAKED?
GENERAL YARD
WORK?
MULCHING?
Responsible Senior
student.
Mountain Top,
White Haven,
Drums &
Conygham area.
Call Justin
570-868-6134
SPRING CLEAN UPS
Lawn Cutting
Shrub Trimming,
Mulching
Landscaping
Services
25+ Years Exp.
PA Landscaping &
Lawn Service Inc.
570-287-4780
TOUGH BRUSH
& TALL GRASS
Mowing, edging,
mulching, shrubs &
hedge shaping.
Tree pruning. Gar-
den tilling. Spring
Clean Ups. Leaf
removal. Weekly &
bi-weekly lawn
care. Accepting
new customers.
Fully Ins.
Free Estimates
570-829-3261
1165 Lawn Care
AFFORDABLE
LAWN CARE
Complete Lawn
Care Service
FREE ESTIMATES
Mike 570-357-8074
Leave Message
AFFORDABLE
LAWN SERVICES
Greater Pittston
Area. Mowing,
Mulching, Tilling &
Deck Washing.
Call 570-885-5858
or 570-954-0438
for Free Estimate
COUNTRY GENTLEMAN
TOTAL YARD
CARE
Lawns - Shrubs
Tilling - Mulch
Senior Discount
Westside Specials
Family Owned
570-287-3852
GRASS CUTTING
Affordable, reliable,
meticulous. Rates
as low as $20.
Emerald Green
570-825-4963
1165 Lawn Care
LAWN CARE
NEAT, RELIABLE
SERVICE
FREE ESTIMATES
570-332-5610
LOW COST
LAWN CARE SERVICE
Specializing in
grass cutting
rates start at $20
Free Estimates
570-706-5035
1195 Movers
BestDarnMovers
Moving Helpers
Call for Free Quote.
We make moving easy.
BestDarnMovers.com
570-852-9243
1204 Painting &
Wallpaper
A & N PAINTING
SPRING SPECIAL
$100 + materials for
average size room.
18 years experience
Power washing,
sidewalks & decks,
deck staining.
570-820-7832
JACOBOSKY PAINTING
Need a new look,
or just want to
freshen up your
home or business?
Let us splash your
int./ext. walls with
some vibrant colors!
Reasonable prices
with hard workers.
FREE ESTIMATES!
570-328-5083
M. PARALI S PAI NTI NG
Int/ Ext. painting,
Power washing.
Professional work
at affordable rates.
Free estimates.
570-288-0733
MARTYS PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Top Quality Work
570-468-9079
Serra Painting
Book Now For
Spring & Save. All
Work Guaranteed
Satisfaction.
30 Yrs. Experience
Powerwash & Paint
Vinyl, Wood, Stucco
Aluminum.
Free Estimates
You Cant Lose!
570-822-3943
WITKOSKY PAINTING
Interior
Exterior,
Free estimates,
30 yrs experience
570-826-1719
OR
570-704-8530
1213 Paving &
Excavating
*DRIVEWAYS
*PARKING LOTS
*ROADWAYS
*HOT TAR & CHIP
*SEAL COATING
Licensed and
Insured. Call
Today For Your
Free Estimate
570-474-6329
Lic.# PA021520
L & F, INC.
Paving, Excavating,
Sealcoating & Con-
crete.
Fully Insured.
Free Estimates.
570-417-5835
1231 Pool & Spa
Repair/Services
RK POOLS & MORE
Pool openings, liner
changes, and
installations. Patios,
Decks and fencing.
Insured.
570-592-2321
1249 Remodeling &
Repairs
BK CONSTRUCTION
ROOFING
ALL TYPES OF
RESIDENTIAL
CONSTRUCTION
570-760-9065
1252 Roofing &
Siding
GILROY
Construction
Your Roofing
Specialist
Free Estimates
No Payment
til Job is
100% Complete
570-829-0239
J.R.V. ROOFING
570-824-6381
Roof Repairs & New
Roofs. Shingle, Slate,
Hot Built Up, Rubber,
Gutters & Chimney
Repairs. Year Round.
Licensed/Insured
FREE Estimates
*24 Hour
Emergency Calls*
Jim Harden
570-288-6709
New Roofs &
Repairs, Shingles,
Rubber, Slate,
Gutters, Chimney
Repairs. Credit
Cards Accepted
FREE ESTIMATES!
Licensed-Insured
EMERGENCIES
SPRING ROOFING
McManus
Construction
Licensed, Insured.
Everyday Low
Prices. 3,000
satisfied customers.
570-735-0846
SUMMIT PEAK
ROOFING, INC.
Toll Free:
(855)768-7325.
Shingled roofing,
Rubber roofing,
Gutters, Chimney
Repairs.
FREE ESTIMATES!
Licensed and Insured.
24 hour emergency
services.
Spring Special 5%!
www.summit-
peakroofing.com
PA#096716
1297 Tree Care
APEX TREE AND
EARTH
Tree removal
Pruning, Stump
Grinding, Hazard
Tree Removal,
Grading, Drainage,
Lot Clearing.Insured.
Reasonable Rates
apextreeandearth.com
Serving Wyoming Valley,
Back Mountain and
Surrounding areas.
570-550-4535
TREE SERVICE
Removal, Trimming,
Stump Grinding,
etc. PA098936
570-574-5018
1336 Window
Cleaning
PJs Window
Cleaning &
Janitorial
Services
Windows, Gutters,
Carpets, Power
washing and more.
INSURED/BONDED.
pjswindowcleaning.com
570-283-9840
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
264 Academy St.
1.5 bedrooms, new-
ly renovated build-
ing. Washer & dryer
available. $600/mo.
includes heat, hot
water & parking.
646-712-1286
570-855-4744
WILKES-BARRE
425 S. FRANKLIN ST.
APARTMENTS
FOR RENT!
For lease. Available
immediately, wash-
er/dryer on premis-
es, no pets. We
have studio, 1 & 2
bedroom apart-
ments. On site
parking. Fridge &
stove provided.
24/7 security cam-
era presence & all
doors electronically
locked.
1 bedroom - $450.
2 bedroom - $550.
Water & sewer paid
1 month security
deposit. Email
obscuroknows@
hotmail.com or Call
570-208-9301
after 9:00 a.m. to
schedule an
appointment
WILKES-BARRE
447 S. Franklin St.
1 bedroom with
study, off street
parking, laundry
facility. Includes
heat and hot
water, hardwood
floors, appliances,
Trash removal.
$580/mo Call
(570)821-5599
WILKES-BARRE
LAFAYETTE GARDENS
SAVE MONEY THIS YEAR!
113 Edison Street
Quiet neighborhood.
2 bedroom apart-
ments available for
immediate occu-
pancy. Heat & hot
water included.
1 Bedroom$550
2 Bedroom$650.
Call Jazmin
570-822-7944
Formerly The
Travel Lodge
497 Kidder St.,
Wilkes-Barre
Rooms Starting
at:
Daily $44.99 + tax
Weekly $189.99
+ tax
Microwave,
Refrigerator,
WiFi, HBO
570-823-8881
www.Wilkes
BarreLodge.com
WILKES-BARRE WILKES-BARRE
LODGE LODGE
WILKES-BARRE
PARRISH ST
Very Nice 2 bed-
room. 2nd Floor
$540 + utilities.
Security, Refer-
ences, Background
check.
570-332-8792
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
WILKES-BARRE SOUTH
SECURE BUILDINGS
1 & 2 bedroom
apartments.
Starting at $440
and up. References
required. Section 8 OK
570-357-0712
WILKES-BARRE/NORTH
By General Hospital
Large 1 bedroom,
hardwood floors,
appliances. Eat in
kitchen. Parking
space available.
$500/month +
utilities. No pets.
570-540-5312
570-793-9449
WYOMING
2nd floor efficiency,
1 room, kitchen,
bath, back porch,
attic storage. Land-
lord pays cable TV,
all utilities, but elec-
tric. $450 + security.
570-362-0055
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
1 bedroom
water included
2 bedroom
water included
3 bedroom
single
HANOVER
2 bedroom 1/2
double.
3 bedroom
single
4 bedroom
double
LUZERNE
2 bedroom,
water included.
PITTSTON
Large 1 bed
room water
included
McDermott &
McDermott
Real Estate
Inc. Property
Management
570-675-4025
(direct line)
Mon-Fri. 8-7pm
Sat. 8-noon
944 Commercial
Properties
COMMERCIAL RETAIL
PROPERTY FOR RENT:
900 Sq. Ft.
STORE RETAIL
SPACE
Will be vacant
as of
January 1, 2013
200 Spring St.
Wilkes-Barre
Great for a
Barber Shop!
Call Michael at
570-239-7213
DALLAS
OFFICE/RETAIL
SPACE.
Memorial Highway.
High visibility,
ample parking.
$500/month.
570-690-2570
DOLPHIN PLAZA
Rte. 315
2,400 Sq. Ft.
1,200 Sq. Ft.
Professional office
space. Will divide
office / retail
Call 570-829-1206
EXETER
OFFICE SPACE
Newly remodeled
120 sq. ft. All
utilities included,
except phone.
$250/month.
Lease. Call
570-602-1550
GLEN LYON GARAGE
3 bay garage, new
roof & new garage
doors. Over 1,200
sq. ft. $395/month.
Call 570-881-0320
KINGSTON
Wyoming Avenue,
Various sized
spaces available;
500 sq. ft. to
1,500. sq. ft.
570-696-1600
LAFLIN
GYM FOR RENT
Set up as a full
court basketball
court with hard-
wood floors, mens
& ladies room and
changing room.
Could be put to any
related use ie: fit-
ness gym, basket-
ball camp or any-
thing that requires a
large open space.
Lots of free parking,
heat and utilities
are included. Rent
is is $3,000 per
month
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
PITTSTON
108 S. Main Street
3,000 square feet.
Suitable for many
businesses. Plen-
ty of Parking
$600/month + secu-
rity. 570-540-0746.
315 PLAZA
1,750 SQ. FT. &
2,400 SQ.FT
OFFICE/RETAIL
2,000 FT.
Fully Furnished
With Cubicles.
570-829-1206
944 Commercial
Properties
PITTSTON
COOPERS CO-OP
Lease Space
Available, Light
manufacturing,
warehouse,
office, includes
all utilities with
free parking.
I will save
you money!
PITTSTON TWP.
$1,750/MONTH
3002 N. Twp Blvd.
Medical office for
rent on the Pittston
By-Pass. Highly vis-
ible location with
plenty of parking.
$1,800 sq. ft. of
beautifully finished
space can be used
for any type office
use. $1,750/ mo.
plus utilities.
MLS 13-098
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
SWOYERSVILLE
NEW LISTING
Busy, high visibility
location. Body
shop, garage, car
lot. Situated on
over 1 acre with
9,000 sq. ft. of
Commercial Space.
$389,900
Call Joe
613-9080
613-9080
WILKES-BARRE
WAREHOUSE/
OFFICE SPACE
5,000 sq. ft. with
parking lot. Office,
1,000 sq. ft.
Off I-81, EXIT 165
Call 570-823-1719
Mon. through Fri.
7 am to 3 pm.
WEST PITTSTON
FOR SALE SALE
BY OWNER
Garage. Out of
flood. Multi-pur-
pose. 3,400 sq. ft.
on .9 acres, 2 bays,
14 automatic doors
Recently renovated,
large parking lot.
$215,000
570-654-4112
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
WEST PITTSTON
OFFICE SPACE
Suitable for other
businesses. Utili-
ties included. 570-
430-3095
WILKES-BARRE
BEST $1 SQ. FT.
LEASES YOULL
EVER SEE!
Warehouse, light
manufacturing. Gas
heat, sprinklers,
overhead doors,
parking for 30 cars.
Yes, that $1
sq. ft. lease!
We have 9,000
sq.ft., 27,000 sq.ft.,
and 32,000 sq. ft.
Can combine.
There is nothing
this good!
Sale or Lease
Call Larry @
570-696-4000 or
570-430-1565
944 Commercial
Properties
WILKES-BARRE TWP.
Lease 20,000 sq. ft.
I-81 on Casey Ave.
Zoned M-3 for
manufacturing,
warehouse storage.
Electric, gas heat,
sprinkler. HE light-
ing, 21 ceilings,
1 drive in &
3 dock doors.
Can be subdivided.
Call Bob Post
570-270-9255
950 Half Doubles
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
2 bedroom, 6
rooms. Off street
parking. Stove,
fridge, washer &
dryer. All gas. Mod-
ernized. No dogs.
$600 + utilities.
570-417-5441
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
HALF-DOUBLE
6 rooms. Newer gas
stove and newer
refrigerator. All win-
dows are vinyl ther-
mal pane. Steel
insulated entry
doors with dead
bolts. Located on
small quiet lane. Off
street parking.
Lease. $525 month-
ly + utilities. Refer-
ences checked.
(570) 650-3803
PLYMOUTH
1/2 DOUBLE
3 bedroom, 1 bath
off street parking
420 West Main St.
$700 plus security
and utilites.
(570) 592-5030
950 Half Doubles
KINGSTON
3 bedroom, 1 bath
1/2 double. Living
room, dining room,
eat-kitchen off
street parking. No
smoking, no pets. 1
year lease. $750.
month + security.
Call Rae
570-714-9234
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
KINGSTON
Older charm, 1/2
double on residen-
tial street. 3 bed-
room, bath, living &
dining room combi-
nation. Updated
kitchen with appli-
ances (new gas
range & dishwash-
er.) 1st floor laundry
hookup. Gas heat.
Attic storage
space. Heat, utili-
ties & outside main-
tenance by tenant.
No pets. No smok-
ing. 1 month secu-
rity, 1 year lease.
ROSEWOOD REALTY
570-287-6822
950 Half Doubles
NANTICOKE
HALF-DOUBLE
Two bedrooms,
new paint. Stove,
refrigerator, wash-
er/dryer included.
NO Pets. $560
/month + security +
utilities. References
& credit check.
570-239-5322
PLAINS TWP.
(1.5 miles North
of Casino)
2 bedroom, 1/2
double, includes
modern kitchen,
bath and living
room. Plenty of off
street parking and
large yard.
$550/mo + utilities.
NO PETS. 1 year
lease & security
Call Charlie
570-829-1578
WEST PITTSTON
Century home,
great neighbor-
hood, recently ren-
ovated, 3 bed-
rooms, 1 bath,
refrigerator and
stove included. Off-
street parking,
$750+ utilities, one
year lease and
security. No Pets.
Call (570) 283-3086
953Houses for Rent
DALLAS
Modern, 2 bed-
room, 1 bath con-
temporary. $895 +
utilities, security &
lease. No smokers.
570-696-5417.
953Houses for Rent
DALLAS BOROUGH
Available immedi-
ately. Totally reno-
vated! Living room
with hardwood.
Oak kitchen with
granite tops & stain-
less steel appli-
ances. Deck over-
looking 150 rear
yard. Two baths, 3-
4 bedrooms & fami-
ly room. One car
garage. Rent,
$1,450/month +
utilities. No pets.
Call Kevin Smith
696-5420
Smith Hourigan
Group
696-1195
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
HANOVER TWP.
Two bedroom, 1
bath. New carpet,
stove & refrigerator
included. Washer
/dryer hook up,
yard patio & drive-
way. Trash &
sewer included.
$660/month + utili-
ties & security.
570-650-2494
953Houses for Rent
LARKSVILLE
PACE STREET
Single family home
with five rooms, 2+
bedrooms & 1 bath.
Dining room, deck &
yard. Pets allowed.
$760/month + utili-
ties. Call
Barbara Mark
696-5414
Smith Hourigan
Group
696-1195
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
LEHMAN
Delightful 3 bed-
room with unique
layout. 1 .5 baths,
dining room with
sliders overlooking
patio, living room
with wood fireplace.
Lower level rec.
room. Gas hot
water heat with
supplemental pellet
stove. Two car
garage. Handicapp-
ed accessible.
$1,100 + security &
credit check requir-
ed. Call Lynda
262-1196.
LUZERNE/KINGSTON
3 bedroom, gas
heat, stove and
washer included.
New rugs, yard, no
pets. $800 plus util-
ities and security
570-430-7901
953Houses for Rent
MOUNTAIN TOP
Recently remodeled
home with 3 bed-
rooms, 1 1/2 baths,
washer/dryer. Full
unfinished base-
ment with work-
shop. Gas heat. No
smoking. No pets.
Credit check &
security deposit
required. 1 year
lease. $1,150/
month. Call
Nicole Dominick
570-715-7757
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
NANTICOKE
Beautiful, spacious
1 family house, 3
large bedrooms +
additional room, 3
baths, large living
room, dining room,
eat-in kitchen. Pri-
vate parking.
$750/month +1
months security.
Available now. Call
609-356-8416
Land for sale?
Place an ad
and SELL
570-829-7130
SUGAR NOTCH
3 bedrooms, gas
heat, yard and
garage. Sewer &
trash included $650
mo. + security & util-
ities. 570-262-6725
953Houses for Rent
OLD FORGE
LUXURY
TOWNHOUSE
Built in 2003 this
luxurious 3 bed-
room townhome
features hard-
wood floors on
main floor, fin-
ished basement,
large master
suite, private out-
door deck and
back yard, off
street parking,
granite counter-
tops, stainless
steel appliances,
DirecTV, high-
speed internet,
garbage, sewer,
gas heat with
brand new fur-
nace, central air
conditioning with
brand new com-
pressor, brand
new carpeting on
2nd floor in all
bedrooms, extra
closet space,
large basement
storage room,
wood blinds in
aLL rooms, all
yard maintenance
and snow plowing
included. This is
an end unit with
only one other
unit attached.
Rent is $1,400.
per month &
requires $1,250.
security deposit.
Minimum one
year lease
required. Must fill
out credit applica-
tion.
NO PETS.
570-840-1960
Motorcycle for sale?
Let them see it here
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
PAGE 12D WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
953Houses for Rent
PLAINS
Warner Street
Near Cross Valley. 2
story, 2 bedroom, 1
bath, living room,
kitchen, 1st floor
laundry with wash-
er/dryer hook up.
Off street parking &
fenced in yard.
Stove, refrigerator &
sewer included.
$600/month + utili-
ties & security.
Sorry no smoking,
no pets.
570-362-4642
SHAVERTOWN
Good location,
excellent schools.
Modern, 4 bed-
rooms, office, 2 full
baths. Living, dining
rooms. Finished
family room, granite
kitchen with ceram-
ic tile. Large wrap
around deck, out
door Jacuzzi, in
ground heated pool.
Gas heat. Four car
off street parking.
$1,500/month +
utilities, security +
last month deposit.
Includes fridge,
stove, washer/dry-
er, sewer & trash.
Available June 1st.
Pictures available
through e-mail. Call
570-545-6057.
WEST PITTSTON
Attractive 2 bed-
room single in good
location. Includes
hardwood floors,
tile bath, family
room, enclosed
sunporch, heated
garage. $875/
month + utilities,
security & refer-
ences. No pets
or smoking.
570-655-4311
WILKES-BARRE
BROOKSIDE
SECTION
3 bedrooms, 1 bath,
refrigerator &
stove, washer/
dryer, fenced in
yard, no pets.
$750/month +
utilities & security
570-825-2118
WILKES-BARRE
Clean, 5 room
2 bedroom, car-
peting, hookups,
yard, electric heat.
$525 + utilities.
No pets. 868-4444
WILKES-BARRE
Safe
Neighborhood
Lovely 2 bedroom,
$600 Plus all utili-
ties, security &
background check.
No pets.
570-766-1881
959 Mobile Homes
JENKINS TOWNSHIP
Affordable New &
Used Homes For
Sale & Rental
Homes Available.
HEATHER HIGHLANDS
MHC 109 Main St
Inkerman, PA
570-655-9643
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
962 Rooms
KINGSTON HOUSE
Nice, clean
furnished room,
starting at $340.
Efficiency at $450
month furnished
with all utilities
included. Off
street parking.
570-718-0331
STILL WATER
Minutes from Shick-
shinny, a country
room for rent.
Private entrance.
$75/week. 313-7735
or 570-854-0984
965 Roommate
Wanted
NANTICOKE
2 males looking for
3rd roommate to
share 3 bedroom
apartment.
$85/week. Call
570-578-2644.
971 Vacation &
Resort Properties
PRIVATE COUNTRY
CAMPGROUND
Several sites avail-
able, and will be
accepting applica-
tions for member-
ship. Gated Premis-
es, adjoins public
gulf course, 35
acre natural lake for
fishing. Large shad-
ed sites, with water
and electric, show-
ers and flush toilets.
Nestled near
orchards and
produce farms in
the hills between
Dallas and Tunkhan-
nock. For informa-
tion and applica-
tions call:
Call (570)-371-9770
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
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