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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Thursday • April 25, 2013 • Vol XII, Edition 215
UNDER CRITICISM
NATION PAGE 8
DONS STUN
PANTHERS
SPORTS PAGE 11
NATURE FULL OF
GARDEN HELPERS
SUBURBAN LIVING PAGE 25
HOUSE REPUBLICANS PUTS OFF ITS HEALTH CARE BILL
Gold,
Jewelry,
Diamonds
Sliver & Coins
WE BUY
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Lawmakers will hear today how the
California Public Utilities Commission has
failed the public “with its fundamental lack of
leadership,” its neglect to force utilities to
comply with safety requirements, significant
weaknesses in how it handles its budget and
for approving major energy projects without
legislative approval.
Several reports will be
discussed in today’s
Senate Budget and Fiscal
Review Subcommittee
chaired by state Sen. Jim
Beall, D-San Jose, that
contain some stinging
rebukes against the CPUC,
including that it has not
put a priority on safety,
budget and basic ratemak-
ing. CPUC commissioners
regulate how much a utili-
ty can charge ratepayers
for electricity and gas.
CPUC President
Michael Peevey was urged
to attend today’s meeting
by state Sen. Jerry Hill,
D-San Mateo, who has crafted several pieces
of legislation related to CPUC after the San
Bruno gas pipeline explosion and fire that
killed eight and destroyed nearly 40 homes in
September 2010.
Hill wants lawmakers to have a chance to at
least question Peevey in a formal setting about
the agency’s “culture of complacency” when
it comes to safety and for other shortcomings.
Utility watchdog under fire
San Bruno files legal motion to block CPUC president from attending safety event
Urgency zoning
limits to expire
San Carlos City Council worried about
unintended impacts to other businesses
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The San Carlos City Council paved the
way potentially for a large-scale fitness
center at the city’s gateway by not extend-
ing an emergency zoning ordinance put in
place to temporarily protect property it
prefers to keep for a hotel.
The council voted 3-2 Monday, with
councilmembers Karen Clapper and Mark
Olbert dissenting, against continuing
another 120 days the requirement that
developers in the industrial area apply for
a conditional permit for any proposed new
or different uses. The original 45-day ordi-
nance will run its course but, after that
point, the land owner will not need further
city review for permitted uses such as a
recreation facility greater than 5,000
square feet.
The council imposed the ordinance in
San Bruno City Council
approves new gun rules
City also discusses changes to
massage licensing, oversight
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Businesses hoping to sell firearms in San Bruno will be fac-
ing new rules in 30 days.
On Tuesday, the City Council approved a second reading
finalizing the details to create a new permit system for busi-
nesses that plan to sell firearms to meet state standards.
Among the new requirements are that the business must
keep firearms secure and offer a number of additional safety
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Ever try a Silicon Blonde?
How about a Lager Diabla?
Beer lovers will likely recognize the
names of two of Devil’s Canyon Brewing
Company’s core products, handcrafted right
here in a little patch of land between
Belmont and San Carlos that the beer mak-
ers have outgrown after more than 10 years.
The company has already moved some of
its giant stainless steel beer vats to a facility
at 925 Washington St. in San Carlos as it
prepares to move the massive grain silo that
sits outside of its current warehouse on
Industrial Road in the Harbor Industrial
Area.
The company plans to be in its new digs
by June 30, owner Chris Garrett told the
Daily Journal.
“We’ve totally outgrown this place,” he
said.
Devil’s Canyon grows
Brew company finds new digs in San Carlos
BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL
Joe O’Brien pours a Silicon Blonde, one of Devil’s Canyon Brewing Company’s core beers
at its current facility in Belmont. It will move to San Carlos in a couple of months.
Michael Peevey Jerry Hill
Bob Grassilli
Matt Grocott
See ZONING, Page 26
See RULES, Page 34
See CPUC, Page 34
See BREWING, Page 26
Paltrow named People’s
Most Beautiful Woman
NEW YORK — People magazine has
named Gwyneth Paltrow as the World’s
Most Beautiful
Woman for 2013.
The 40-year-old
actress tops the mag-
azine’s annual list of
the “World’s Most
B e a u t i f u l , ”
a n n o u n c e d
Wednesday.
Commenting on
her selection,
Paltrow says:
“Around the house, I’m in jeans and a T-
shirt. I don’t really wear makeup.”
She credits her workout routine for
keeping her looking young and feeling
strong.
Paltrow is married to Coldplay rocker
Chris Martin. They have two children,
Apple, 8, and Moses, 7.
Affleck to get honorary
degree at Brown graduation
PROVIDENCE, R.I. — Academy
Award-winning actor and director Ben
Affleck is among six artists, writers, sci-
entists and educators selected to receive
honorary degrees from Brown University
during graduation ceremonies next
month.
The Ivy League school says Affleck
will receive a doctor of fine arts during
commencement exercises on May 26.
The Massachusetts
native directed, pro-
duced and starred in
“Argo,” which won
this year’s Oscar for
Best Picture.
Others getting hon-
orary doctorates are
author and MIT
Professor Junot Diaz;
retired Stanford
University bacteriol-
ogist Stanley Falkow; Tougaloo College
President Beverly Wade Hogan; physi-
cian and Robert Wood Johnson
Foundation President Risa Lavizzo-
Mourey; and Miami Dade College
President Eduardo Padron.
By custom, the undergraduate com-
mencement will feature speakers who are
members of the graduating class.
‘Zombies’ invade University
of Michigan campus
ANN ARBOR, Mich. — You can learn
a lot from a zombie.
At least that’s what a University of
Michigan professor hopes her 31 gradu-
ate students took away from Tuesday’s
bizarre, albeit bloody, “zombie apoca-
lypse.” The classroom exercise was
designed to get School of Public Health
students thinking about what the appro-
priate response should be during a disas-
ter.
Four times as many students who typi-
cally attend Epidemiology 651,
“Epidemiology and Public Health
Management of Disasters,” were on hand
Tuesday to welcome — or become — the
undead. The zombie exercise was mod-
eled after a curriculum designed by the
Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention, and a handful of CDC
staffers also participated.
“’Zombie apocalypse’ sounds a bit
silly, but the point of this is to show that
if we’re prepared for any hazard, even the
unimaginable hazards, like zombies —
because we know they don’t exist — we
are capable of preparing ourselves for
perhaps anything that might occur,” said
Dr. Eden Wells, the epidemiology profes-
sor who teaches the course and serves as
the brains behind the exercise.
Wells initially wasn’t sure she’d be
able to persuade enough students to dress
up as the undead. But by Tuesday, 120
“zombies” and other participants were on
hand to take part in the exercise. As the
doors to the lecture hall on the Ann Arbor
campus flung open, an army of the
undead unexpectedly lurched in, their
arms stretched forward and their faces
painted with faux blood as they aimless-
ly staggered among the smiling students.
TaNisha Roby, a second-year graduate
student at the School of Public Health
who also became zombified, said the
undead scenario reinforced a very impor-
tant overall point.
“People tend to think of public health
as something they might see on
‘Contagion’ or ‘Outbreak’ — these
Hollywood depictions of what we do —
but a key part of public health is emer-
gency preparedness,” she said.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Thursday • April 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
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information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
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Actor Hank Azaria
is 49.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1983
Ten-year-old Samantha Smith of
Manchester, Maine, received a reply
from Soviet leader Yuri V. Andropov to
a letter she’d written expressing con-
cern about possible nuclear war;
Andropov reassured Samantha that the
Soviet Union did not want war, and he
invited her to visit his country, a trip
Samantha made the following July.
“There are two great rules of life,the one general and
the other particular.The first is that everyone can,in
the end,get what he wants if he only tries.This is the
general rule.The particular rule is that every individual
is more or less an exception to the general rule.”
— Samuel Butler, English author (1835-1902)
Actor Al Pacino is
73.
Actress Renee
Zellweger is 44.
Birthdays
REUTERS
Members of British dance company Candoco perform ‘Set and Reset/Reset’during the Fifth Annual Amman Contemporary
Dance Festival at the Royal Cultural Centre in Amman, Jordan
Thursday: Mostly cloudy. Patchy fog in
the morning. Highs in the upper 50s. South
winds 10 to 20 mph.
Thursday night: Mostly cloudy. Patchy
fog after midnight. Lows in the upper 40s.
Southwest winds 5 to 10 mph.
Friday: Cloudy in the morning then
becoming partly cloudy. Highs in the upper
50s. West winds around 5 mph.
Friday night: Partly cloudy in the evening then becoming
cloudy. Lows in the upper 40s. Northwest winds 5 to 15 mph.
Saturday: Cloudy in the morning then becoming sunny. Highs
in the lower 60s.
Saturday night through Sunday night: Partly cloudy. Lows
in the upper 40s. Highs in the lower 60s.
Monday through Wednesday: Mostly clear.
Local Weather Forecast
(Answers tomorrow)
VAULT CLERK LESSON CANDID
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: The food was pretty good at the skunk
restaurant, but the — SERVICE STUNK
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
UBOTA
LEEUD
GLLAEE
DOLBIY
©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
F
in
d

u
s

o
n

F
a
c
e
b
o
o
k

h
t
t
p
:
/
/
w
w
w
.
f
a
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b
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o
k
.
c
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/
ju
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” “
-
Print answer here:
In 1507, a world map produced by German cartographer
Martin Waldseemueller contained the first recorded use of the
term “America,” in honor of Italian navigator Amerigo
Vespucci.
In 1792, highwayman Nicolas Jacques Pelletier became the
first person under French law to be executed by the guillotine.
In 1859, ground was broken for the Suez Canal.
In 1862, during the Civil War, a Union fleet commanded by
Flag Officer David G. Farragut captured the city of New
Orleans.
In 1898, the United States formally declared war on Spain.
In 1901, New York Gov. Benjamin Barker Odell Jr. signed an
automobile registration bill which imposed a 15 mph speed
limit on highways.
In 1915, during World War I, Allied soldiers invaded the
Gallipoli Peninsula in an unsuccessful attempt to take the
Ottoman Empire out of the war.
In 1944, the United Negro College Fund was founded.
In 1945, during World War II, U.S. and Soviet forces linked up
on the Elbe River, a meeting that dramatized the collapse of
Nazi Germany’s defenses. Delegates from some 50 countries
met in San Francisco to organize the United Nations.
In 1959, the St. Lawrence Seaway opened to shipping.
In 1972, Polaroid Corp. introduced its SX-70 folding camera,
which ejected self-developing photographs.
Movie director-writer Paul Mazursky is 83. Ballroom dance
judge Len Goodman (TV: “Dancing with the Stars”) is 69. Rock
musician Stu Cook (Creedence Clearwater Revival) is 68. Singer
Bjorn Ulvaeus (ABBA) is 68. Actress Talia Shire is 67. Actor
Jeffrey DeMunn is 66. Rock musician Michael Brown (The Left
Banke) is 64. Rock musician Steve Ferrone (Tom Petty & the
Heartbreakers) is 63. Country singer-songwriter Rob Crosby is
59. Rock singer Andy Bell (Erasure) is 49. Rock musician Eric
Avery (Jane’s Addiction) is 48. Country musician Rory Feek
(Joey + Rory) is 48. TV personality Jane Clayson is 46. Actress
Gina Torres is 44. Actor Jason Lee is 43. Actor Jason Wiles is 43.
In other news ...
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Lucky Charms,
No. 12, in first place; Gorgeous George, No. 8, in
second place;and Lucky Star,No.2,in third place.
The race time was clocked at 1:42.54.
7 0 5
9 21 22 32 50 10
Mega number
April 23 Mega Millions
9 19 31 56 59 2
Powerball
April 24 Powerball
12 19 30 34 36
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
9 8 1 2
Daily Four
9 7 9
Daily three evening
5 25 32 33 46 26
Mega number
April 24 Super Lotto Plus
Gwyneth
Paltrow
Ben Affleck
3
Thursday • April 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
We Buy Gold, Jewelry,
Diamonds, Silver & Coins
Serving The Peninsula
for over 25years
SAN CARLOS
Attempted theft. A Hayward man was arrested
for attempted grand theft on the 600 block of
Laurel Street before 7:22 p.m. Monday, April
22.
Arrest. A man was arrested for being in pos-
session of a controlled substance on the first
block of Circle Star Way before 4:40 p.m.
Sunday, April 21.
Arrest. A woman was arrested for being in pos-
session of a controlled substance and illegal use
of a credit card on Broadway and Woodside
Road before 11:43 p.m. Saturday, April 20.
Disturbance. A burglary was attempted on the
700 block of Best Court before 11:52 p.m.
Friday, April 19.
Arrest. A man was arrested for petty theft on
the 1100 block of Old County Road before 6:50
p.m. Friday, April 19.
MENLO PARK
Arrest. A man was arrested for drugs on the
1100 block of Windermere Avenue before 9:32
p.m. Tuesday, April 23.
Citation. A man was cited for driving with a
suspended license on the 1100 block of Willow
Road before 7:56 p.m. Tuesday, April 23.
Burglary. A residence was broken into on the
1200 block of Madera Avenue before 11:22
a.m. Tuesday, April 23.
Fraud. A person’s credit card was used to make
fraudulent purchases on the 800 block of
Sharon Park Drive before 10:40 a.m. Tuesday,
April 23.
Police reports
Looking for treasure
Two people were seen dumpster diving on
Oyster Point Boulevard in South San
Francisco before 5:21 p.m. Sunday, April
21.
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
County jail inmates spent more than $2.1
million on phone calls and at the commissary
but revenue continues to drop over previous
years because of changes in inmate spending
habits and fluctuations in population, accord-
ing to San Mateo County Sheriff Greg Munks.
Gross sales figures declined by 1 percent
over last year which itself was down 8.76 per-
cent over the prior balance, according to
Munks’ annual report on the inmate welfare
trust fund.
The fund, which is money from commissary
sales and telephone commissions from the
service provider, is used for inmate services
like education, drug and alcohol treatment,
library and accounting. The Sheriff’s Office
also uses the fund to buy recreation items like
televisions and stand-alone computers located
in day rooms and housing units of the primary
Maguire Correctional Facility in downtown
Redwood City and other correctional facili-
ties.
Exactly why spending habits are changing
is unclear but, after last year’s larger drop was
reported, Assistant Sheriff Trisha Sanchez the-
orized that the economy led family and
friends placing less money on the books for
inmates to spend at the commissary.
The ups and downs of the inmate population
is also cited as a factor in Munks’ report. The
average daily population to date is 1,020 but
was 982 in 2012. In 2011, the population aver-
aged 979, down from 1,038 in 2010.
The total gross revenue in fiscal year 2011-
12 was $2,116,739 which includes $1.3 mil-
lion from commissary sales and prepaid call-
ing cards and $774,293 from telephone com-
mission and other sources. Although the sales
were down, the net profit was actually up
nearly $76,000 because of salary and benefit
savings due to a vacant storekeeping supervi-
sor position.
During the same period, the fund spent
$1,983,061 which includes $608,914 for the
goods sold and $391,091 in operating expens-
es. The remaining $983,056 was disbursed
largely to contracted services like the Choices
rehabilitation program, Project Read, mental
health, county schools and the Service
League.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102.
Inmate spending down
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A couple who used a stolen credit card to
book a room at the Ritz-Carlton hotel in Half
Moon Bay and was later found in possession
of identifying information for dozens of peo-
ple pleaded no contest to three felonies.
Paige Arial Boswell, 21, and Robert
William Spiva, 29, both took deals on counts
of possessing stolen property, identity theft
and possession of methamphetamine. They
were immediately sentenced, Boswell to a
year in jail which is modifiable to residential
treatment and Spiva to 18
months incarceration.
The two were arrested
Jan. 25 after Boswell, of
Redding, and Spiva, of
Walnut Creek, checked
into the swanky hotel
using a stolen credit card
and non-matching stolen
identification. The clerk,
who was suspicious but
allowed them the room, contacted the
Sheriff’s Office. Responding deputies found
them in the room with
credit cards, checks and
mail in the names of 17
different people. Boswell
was also under the influ-
ence of drugs. A search of
their vehicle also turned up
identification and credit
cards for 26 other individ-
uals.
Both remain in custody
on $100,000 bail each pending a June 12 resti-
tution hearing.
Two admit stealing credit cards for Ritz stay
Robert Spiva Paige Boswell
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Thursday • April 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Absolutely. When you prepay, your funds are kept in an
account you can access from anywhere at your time of
need. The funds are protected and availability is
assured.We gladly honor arrangements made at other
funeral homes.
Please contact us if we can be of
assistance to you.
Bertha Marie Bolger
Bertha Marie Bolger, born in Baker City,
Ore. June 7, 1927, died comfortably on April
8, 2013, surrounded by her family in Santa
Rosa.
Marie graduated from City College of San
Francisco and trained as a dental assistant in
1945. She met her husband Bruce while vaca-
tioning on the Russian River and was married
July 21, 1946. She had career as a dental assis-
tant and in retail account management. She
has two sons Michael and Bradford. She was
a terrific mother and mentored her boys in
scholastic and sports activities. She volun-
teered with Cub and Boy Scouts and served as
president of the PTA in San Bruno.
Marie is survived by her son Michael
Bolger (Penelope), son
Bradford Bolger (Sharon),
grandchildren Ryan Bolger
(Erika), Jessica Bolger
Voytek (Bradley), and
Sydney Bolger, and great-
grandsons Jack Ryan
Bolger, Wesley Robert
Bolger and Gavin
Alexander Voytek.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to
your favorite charity in her memory. A private
memorial celebration of Marie’s life is being
planned by the family for the spring of 2013.
“Wise keen intellect. Love for family and
friends. Busy in heaven.”
Obituary
Man in disguise tries to rob bank
A man wearing a wig of dreadlocks under a
beanie and with a fake mustache and sun-
glasses demanded money in a threatening let-
ter to a teller at a Burlingame bank early yes-
terday afternoon, according to police.
He also had a gun in his waistband but did
not pull it out or touch it when he tried to rob
the Bank of America at 400 El Camino Real at
about 1:30 p.m.
The suspect fled the bank without getting
any cash, however, according to police.
He fled on foot and was last seen on Chapin
Avenue. He is described as a white male,
about 6 feet tall, according to police. Anyone
with information on the incident is encour-
aged to call Burlingame police at 777-4100.
Distracted driver
busted with lots of marijuana
A man who was pulled over in Millbrae
Monday afternoon for talking on his cell-
phone while driving got into a lot more
trouble when police discovered a pound of
marijuana in his car.
The suspect, 20-year-old San Bruno resi-
dent Carey Stynes, was also found with
$8,800 on him, according to the San Mateo
County Sheriff’s Office.
The San Mateo County Narcotics Task
Force was called out to assist with the investi-
gation and secured a search warrant for the
suspect’s residence on the 400 block of San
Anselmo Avenue.
Police located another pound of marijuana,
3.6 grams of cocaine, 33 illicit prescription
pills including Xanex, Codeine and Narcos, a
Mac 90-AK 47 type assault rifle, two shot-
guns, one .22 caliber rifle and one loaded
revolver, according to the Sheriff’s Office.
Also located in the residence was Rebecca
Flores, 21, who was found to be in possession
of 173 assorted illicit prescription pills includ-
ing Xanex, Vicodin and Narcos, according to
the Sheriff’s Office.
Both were arrested and booked into county
jail.
Local briefs
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A Chechnyan man arrested on suspicion of
burglarizing a Portola Valley vehicle and
assaulting a 13-year-old boy who tried stopping
him told arresting officers “This has nothing to
do with Boston,” according to prosecutors.
Alexander Dombrovic, 21, was taken into
custody late Sunday night after sheriff’s
deputies were alerted by the teen who report-
edly found him rummaging through the fami-
ly’s Range Rover parked in the driveway.
Dombrovic, who speaks with an accent, spon-
taneously alluded to the Boston marathon
bombing after his arrest, said District Attorney
Steve Wagstaffe. The string of events began at
10:10 a.m. Sunday when a 13-year-old boy
reading in his bedroom heard a car pull down
his driveway and went out to investigate. He
spotted a man later identified as Dombrovic
looking through his father’s vehicle and asked
him what he was doing, Wagstaffe said.
Dombrovic allegedly yelled something inco-
herent and charged at the
boy with an aluminum bat,
swinging it tomahawk-style
on his shoulder, before
hopping into his own SUV
and fleeing. The boy was
bruised but otherwise unin-
jured.
Deputies in the area for
other reasons responded to
the call and saw
Dombrovic driving on the
wrong side of the road with
his lights off, causing them to swerve.
Inside the vehicle, deputies reported finding
129 pieces of mail from 18 different victims
and said five locked mailboxes in the area had
been smashed open.
On Wednesday, Dombrovic appeared in
court on charges of robbery, assault, vandalism,
burglary and reckless driving. He pleaded not
guilty and asked for a court-appointed attorney.
Bail was set at $50,000 and he returns to
court May 7 for a preliminary hearing.
DA: Chechnyan burglar says ‘this
has nothing to do with Boston’
Alexander
Dombrovic
5
Thursday • April 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
1101234.1
CALTRANS
The 32 bolts that failed were among a group of 96 from 2008. Hyrdrogen
embrittlement, at least in part due to moisture and water from the foggy
environment enveloping the bridge,was to blame for their failure,California
Department of Transportation Director Malcolm Dougherty said Wednesday.
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Former Burlingame city manag-
er Jim Nantell may temporarily
head the county’s newly formed
Parks Department while recruit-
ment is underway for a permanent
director.
County Manager John Maltbie
tapped Nantell, who must still be
approved by the Board of
Supervisors at its May 7 meeting.
The terms of his contract are still
being worked out but Nantell is
already meeting with parks staff. If
approved, he
starts immedi-
ately.
Nantell retired
as Burlingame
city manager in
2012 after 12
years in that
position and 40
years of public
service. Nantell
holds a master’s of science in parks
and recreation administration from
San Francisco State University.
The county job wouldn’t be his
first interim gig; while deputy city
manager of San Mateo in 1995,
Nantell served for more than a year
as the interim fire chief.
The Board of Supervisors
Tuesday agreed to re-establish the
Parks Department which had been
folded into Public Works in 2011
as a cost savings and efficiency
measure.
Funding from the Measure A
half-cent sales tax revenue won’t
be approved until the fall but
supervisors wanted to recruit for a
director immediately.
Former city manager tapped to
head county Parks Department
Jim Nantell
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A Redwood City taekwondo
instructor accused of groping a 9-
year-old student during a lesson and
possessing child pornography found
after the child’s father called police
will stand trial.
Ralph Eugene Todd III, 32, has
pleaded not guilty to charges of child
molestation, misdemeanor child
annoyance and one count of possess-
ing child pornography. After a pre-
liminary hearing
We d n e s d a y ,
Todd was held to
answer on all
charges in both
cases. He returns
to Superior Court
May 10 to enter a
plea and possibly
set a trial date.
Pr os ecut or s
say on Dec. 17, the crying boy told
his father who had come to pick him
up at Kim’s TaeKwonDo Academy
in Woodside Plaza, that Todd said he
was not doing his moves properly
and squeezed his genitals while cor-
recting his form. Later inside an
office, he allegedly pulled down the
boy’s pants and fondled him again.
The father contacted police who
arrested Todd Dec. 19 and seized his
computer. Police reported finding
child pornography on the computer.
Todd is free from custody on
$100,000 bail.
Taekwondo instructor to
trial for molesting student
Ralph Todd
By Garance Burke
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — Long seismic
safety bolts on the new eastern span
of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay
Bridge that haven’t failed may have
to be replaced nonetheless, a region-
al transportation official said
Wednesday.
Local officials were looking into
that possibility and will announce a
final decision in two weeks about
whether the bolts should be taken
out or retrofitted, Metropolitan
Transportation Commission
Executive Director Steve Heminger
told commissioners of the Bay
Area Toll Authority.
Officials have previously said even
a fix for the 32 bolts that failed when
they were tightened last month could
take months, threatening to push
back the scheduled Labor Day open-
ing of the new $6.3 billion span.
“We need full confidence in all of
the materials on this bridge because
we’re talking about a bridge that
needs to last not only through a big
earthquake, but for 100 years or
more,” Heminger said, adding that
the bridge oversight committee he
chairs would have a final determina-
tion about the bridge’s opening date
when he presents an update to the
authority on May 8.
Bolts on Bay Bridge that
have not failed may go
6
Thursday • April 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
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ever expanding inventory of community
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Family Resource Fair, Job Fairs, and
more. You will also be part of the project
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This is one of the fastest areas of the
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TELEMARKETING/INSIDE SALES
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preferred. Must have superior verbal,
phone and written communication skills.
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intelligence also a must.
To apply for either position,
please send info to
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DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Millbrae’s El Camino Real corri-
dor could include a new stoplight by
the end of next year — a change that
requires a cooperative agreement
with Caltrans that the City Council
approved Tuesday.
Along with moving forward with
the agreement, the council also
approved amending its budget to
include $203,400, according to a
staff report by Interim Public Works
Director Cyrus Kianpour. The
money would be the city’s share of
installing a light at the intersection
of El Camino Real and Millwood
Drive by the end of 2014. Putting a
light at the intersection often used
by Capuchino High School students
has been a topic of conversation
since 2007. Initially, the plan was to
have a light up by 2016 or 2017.
Now, the two sides are working to
have one in place by the end of
2014.
To move forward, the City
Council needed to approve a coop-
erative agreement for the $833,700
project, Kianpour wrote. Under the
agreement, Caltrans would be the
project lead sponsor and prepare the
project plans and specifications as
well as the construction contract, he
wrote. The city is required to reim-
burse Caltrans $203,400 for the
project, which will come from the
city’s Proposition 42 funds.
Proposition 42 is a state transporta-
tion tax fund.
This will be the second new light
to be added to the corridor.
A new traffic light at the intersec-
tion of Victoria Avenue and El
Camino Real has been installed but
awaiting final approval before being
turned on. Getting electrical service
to the lights caused a four-week
delay. With access to electricity, the
city is now estimating that the traf-
fic light will be in operation early
next month.
Millbrae approves new stoplight on El Camino
By Judy Lin
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — Standing
with school leaders from San
Diego County to Shasta County,
Gov. Jerry Brown on Wednesday
called his education funding plan a
civil rights “cause for the children
of California” as he tries to per-
suade reluctant members of his
own party to include his proposal
in the upcoming state budget.
The Democratic governor wants
to give school districts more con-
trol of the money they receive from
the state and provide poorer dis-
tricts with a larger share of state
aid.
Brown is running into resistance
from his own party, including law-
makers who represent affluent
areas that would not gain as much
under his plan.
Democrats in the state Senate
plan to propose an alternative that
does not include extra money for
districts where more than half of
students are low-income.
“This is a matter of equity and
civil rights,” Brown said at a news
conference. “If people want to fight
it, they’re going to get the battle of
their lives because I’m not going to
give up until the last hour.”
Brown is expected to update his
budget proposal in mid-May and
lawmakers have until June 15 to
adopt a balanced budget.
Assemblywoman Joan
Buchanan, D-Alamo, said she
agrees with the governor’s aims to
provide more local control and
more financial aid to English lan-
guage learners, students from poor
families and foster children. But
the lawmaker, who represents pros-
perous San Francisco Bay area
communities such as Walnut Creek
and Orinda, said the governor is
wrong to pit rich suburbs against
poor communities.
She said she would like to raise
the base grant amount to every
school district for essential items
such as textbooks and maintain
some existing funding rules.
“It looks like the governor is tak-
ing the gloves off, and we’re still
here working on a solution,” she
said.
Brown’s budget plan includes an
increase of $2.7 billion for elemen-
tary and secondary education and
community colleges for the fiscal
year starting July 1.
Spending on K-12 and two-year
colleges would total $56.2 billion
for 2013-14 — a figure that would
return the state to near-prereces-
sion levels.
Brown’s proposal retains the cur-
rent system of awarding money
based on attendance, but it could
add up to 35 percent more funding
for a district based on the propor-
tion of English learners, foster chil-
dren and low-income students.
Brown rallies support for school funding
Assembly speaker picks
new state coastal member
LOS ANGELES — A new mem-
ber has been appointed to the
California Coastal Commission fol-
lowing the resignation of a long-
timer.
California Assembly Speaker John
Perez said Wednesday he has chosen
Mark Vargas to serve on the panel,
which regulates coastal develop-
ment. Vargas heads a management
firm that has worked on environmen-
tal projects.
Vargas replaces William A. Burke,
who resigned earlier this month after
two state lawmakers questioned his
dual roles on the Coastal
Commission and the South Coast Air
Quality Management District.
The two agencies have disagreed
on the fate of fire pits on some
Southern California beaches. Coastal
Commission staff recommends
keeping them to allow families to
enjoy the coast. But the air district is
considering banning fire rings in Los
Angeles and Orange counties
because of smoke from bonfires.
Fire at farm kills 100K chicks
SAN JACINTO — Officials say a
fire at a Southern California chicken
farm left 100,000 chicks burned to
death.
Riverside County fire spokes-
woman Melody Hendrickson says
firefighters arrived at Moark Farms
in San Jacinto before dawn
Wednesday to find a huge chicken
coop engulfed in flames.
Around the state
“This is a matter of equity and civil rights.
...If people want to fight it, they’re going
to get the battle of their lives because I’m
not going to give up until the last hour.”
— Gov. Jerry Brown
NATION 7
Thursday • April 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Paul Larson
MILLBRAE – Our
country’s economic
roller-coaster ride
has been interesting
and historic for
sure, but also very
troubling for many
families who’ve not
been as financially stable as others.
Recently though I’ve been observing a
phenomenon with those we serve at the
CHAPEL OF THE HIGHLANDS. It may
be too early to confirm, but it appears that
there is a general state of confidence with
many families, along with the decisions and
choices they make during funeral
arrangements. Yes, I know you are thinking
that “confidence” is not a term you would
use to coincide with “funeral arrangements”,
but it appears to me that people I see are
tending to be more financially assured than
during the deepest years of “The Great
Recession”.
They say that the two things you can’t
avoid are “death and taxes”. With that in
mind, during the economic downturn I saw a
very noticeable sense of “thrift” and
“prudence” with a lot of families who
experienced a death during that period.
Still, those who tended to “cost shop” at
various funeral homes selected CHAPEL
OF THE HIGHLANDS to handle funeral or
cremation arrangements. These families
found comfort with our service, and notably
with our more economic cost structure.
Now, lately the trend with families and
their funeral choices reminds me of the days
way before the recession hit. It’s not that
people are utilizing their funds differently,
spending more or spending less, but that
they are more assertive and confident when
using their wallet. Seeing this over and over
gives me a good indication that something in
the economic climate is changing compared
to not that long ago.
Even though many of our honorable
elected officials in Sacramento and
Washington D.C. appear to be as inflexible
with economic issues as always, the air of
confidence with the families I’ve been
dealing with means to me that these people
are feeling less pressured financially.
It is well known that when businesses do
well they hire more employees, and when
those employees are confident they will
spend their money on goods and services.
In turn, the companies that provide goods
and services will need competent employees
to create more goods, give more services,
and so on…making a positive circle for a
healthy economy. In relation to that, after a
long period of U.S. manufacturing jobs
being sent over-seas there is news of a
growing number of companies bringing this
work back to the United States. Real Estate
values on the Peninsula remained in a good
state during the recession, but houses here
are now in demand more than ever.
“Encouraging” “Hopeful” and “Positive”
are words to describe the optimistic
vibrations that people are giving off. If the
community is becoming more comfortable
with spending, that indicates good health for
business and the enrichment of our
economic atmosphere. I hope I’m right, so
let’s all keep our fingers crossed.
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
planning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:
www.chapelofthehighlands.com.
Funeral Trends Indicate
Upswing in the Economy
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Small Business Owners
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Join us for a free business resource event to help you thrive in 2013
Small Business
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ATTENTION:
Tuesday, April 30
9am to 1pm
FOR COMPLETE SEMINAR INFORMATION
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Continental breakfast will be provided
Oshman Family JCC
3921 Fabian Way, Palo Alto
By Josh Lederman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Frustrated at
being left out of an immigration
overhaul, gay rights groups are
pushing to adjust a bipartisan
Senate bill to include gay couples.
But Democrats are treading careful-
ly, wary of adding another divisive
issue that could lose Republican
support and jeopardize the entire
bill.
Both parties want the bill to suc-
ceed. Merely getting to agreement
on the basic framework for the
immigration overhaul, which would
create a long and costly path to citi-
zenship for the estimated 11 million
people in the U.S. illegally, was no
small feat for senators. And getting
it through a divided Congress is still
far from a done deal.
Even so, gay rights groups, their
lobbyists and grass-roots supporters
are insisting the deal shouldn’t
exclude bi-national, same-sex cou-
ples — about 28,500 of them,
according to a 2011 study from the
Williams Institute at UCLA Law.
They’re ramping up a campaign to
change the bill to allow gay
Americans to sponsor their partners
for green cards, the same way
straight Americans can. Supporters
trekked to the Capitol to make their
case at senators’ offices on
Wednesday.
“Opponents will be proposing
amendments that, if passed, could
collapse this very fragile coalition
that we’ve been able to achieve,”
Sen. John McCain, an Arizona
Republican, said last week at the
unveiling of the bill. He said the
eight senators from both parties
who crafted the legislation are com-
mitted to voting against changes
that could kill it.
For Democrats, it’s a precarious
position to be in. Democratic sena-
tors overwhelmingly support gay
marriage — all but three are now on
the record voicing their support —
and two dozen of them this year
backed a separate bill called the
Uniting American Families Act to
let gays sponsor their partners inde-
pendent of a comprehensive immi-
gration overhaul.
But the party’s senators are still
bruised from an agonizing defeat on
gun control this month. And few
seem eager to inject divisive issues
that might sink their best prospects
for a major legislative victory this
year and a potential keystone of
President Barack Obama’s legacy.
A risk including gay partners in immigration bill?
By David Klepper
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PROVIDENCE, R.I. — Rhode
Island is on a path to becoming the
10th state to allow gay and lesbian
couples to marry after a landmark
vote in the state’s Senate on
Wednesday.
The Senate passed gay marriage
legislation by a comfortable 26-12
margin, following a House vote of
approval in January. The bill must
now return to the House for a large-
ly procedural vote, likely next
week, but the celebration began
Wednesday.
Hundreds of people filled the
Statehouse with cheers following
the vote.
“I grew up in Rhode Island and
I’d like to retire in Rhode Island,”
said Annie Silvia, 61, who now
lives with her partner of 30 years
just across the border in North
Attleboro, Mass.
“No. 10 is a nice round number,
but I’d like it to be bigger. Fifty
sounds good to me.”
Heavily Catholic Rhode Island is
the last remaining New England
state without gay marriage.
Marriage legislation has been
introduced in the state for nearly
two decades, only to languish on
the legislative agenda.
Rhode Island on way to be 10th
state to allow same-sex marriage
REUTERS FILE PHOTO
Protestors hold signs and flags as they rally against the Defense of
Marriage Act in front of the U.S. Supreme Court.
“Opponents will be proposing
amendments that, if passed, could
collapse this very fragile coalition
that we’ve been able to achieve.”
— Sen. John McCain
By David Crary
and Rodrique Ngowi
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — New infor-
mation emerged Wednesday from
U.S. officials that the name of one of
the Boston Marathon bombing sus-
pects had been added to a U.S. gov-
ernment terrorist database long
before the explosions. At the
Massachusetts Institute of
Technology, more than 4,000
mourners paid tribute to a campus
police officer who authorities say
was gunned down by the suspects.
Among the speakers at the memo-
rial service in Cambridge, just out-
side Boston, was Vice President Joe
Biden, who condemned the bomb-
ing suspects as “two twisted, per-
verted, cowardly, knockoff jihadis.”
In a striking new development,
U.S. officials said the name of the
dead suspect, Tamerlan Tsarnaev,
was added by the CIA to a terrorist
database 18 months ago. The offi-
cials spoke to the Associated press
on the condition of anonymity
because they were not authorized to
speak publicly about the ongoing
case.
The disclosure was significant
because officials have been saying
the U.S. intelligence community
had no relevant information leading
up to the April 15 bombings, which
killed three people and injured more
than 260 others.
Boston bomb investigation extends to Russia
NATION/WORLD 8
Thursday • April 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Ryan Lucas
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEIRUT — The 11th-century minaret
of a famed mosque that towered over the
narrow stone alleyways of Aleppo’s old
quarter collapsed Wednesday as rebels
and government troops fought pitched
battles in the streets around it, depriving
the ancient Syrian city of one of its most
important landmarks.
President Bashar Assad’s government
and the rebels trying to overthrow him
traded blame over the destruction to the
Umayyad Mosque, a UNESCO world
heritage site and centerpiece of Aleppo’s
walled Old City. “This is like blowing up
the Taj Mahal or destroying the Acropolis
in Athens. This mosque is a living sanctu-
ary,” said Helga Seeden, a professor of
archaeology at the American University of
Beirut. “This is a disaster. In terms of her-
itage, this is the worst I’ve seen in Syria.
I’m horrified.”
Aleppo, Syria’s largest city and a com-
mercial hub, emerged as a key battle-
ground in the nation’s civil war after
rebels launched an offensive there last
summer. Since then, the fighting has
carved the city into rebel- and regime-held
zones, killed thousands of people, forced
thousands more to flee their homes and
laid waste to entire neighborhoods.
Minaret of famed mosque in Syria destroyed
By Jim Abrams
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — An effort by House
Republicans to highlight problems with
President Barack Obama’s health care law by
bailing out a program for people with pre-
existing medical conditions appeared to back-
fire Wednesday.
GOP leaders postponed a scheduled vote
after the measure met strong opposition from
two directions: from conservative groups
resistant to any federal role in health care and
from Democrats who objected that the
Republicans planned to pay for the high-risk
patient program by raiding a disease preven-
tion provision the administration says is
essential to the overhaul.
The legislation, a departure from the usual
GOP efforts to kill the Affordable Health Care
Act outright, also faced a White House veto
threat.
Erica Elliott, spokeswoman for Republican
Whip Kevin McCarthy of California, said in a
statement, “We had good conversations with
our members and made a lot of solid
progress” on the bill. But she said there was
“still work to do,” and with members leaving
for the Bush Presidential Library dedication,
“we’ll continue the conversations” when the
House returns in May after a recess next
week.
The GOP bill would provide up to $3.6 bil-
lion to shore up the Pre-existing Condition
Insurance Plan, or PCIP, which is intended to
be a stopgap measure for uninsured high-risk
patients until the end of this year, when full
consumer protections under the health care
act go into effect.
Under the plan, those who have been unin-
sured for six months would be subsidized so
they could buy insurance at average rates. The
original goal was for the plan to reach more
than 300,000 before it disappeared at the end
of this year, but the program’s costs were
higher than anticipated and it enrolled slight-
ly more than 100,000 before the administra-
tion announced in February that it would stop
taking new applications.
Republicans, who in the past session of
Congress tried several dozen times to disman-
tle what they call Obamacare, sought to use
their new “Helping Sick Americans Now Act”
to point out defects in the pre-existing condi-
tions program.
Their bill, said Rep. Michael Burgess, R-
Texas, is a “needed piece of relief for the hun-
dreds of thousands of Americans who were
promised by their president that they would
be covered under the Affordable Care Act’s
Pre-existing Condition Insurance Plan and
then were told as of Feb. 1 of this year, ‘Sorry,
we’re closed.”’
The money for the plan would come from
the Prevention and Public Health Fund, a pro-
vision of the health care law that Republicans
have assailed as a slush fund for Health and
Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius.
Republicans are also critical of the use of
some $300 million from that fund to publicize
the new health insurance markets coming this
fall under the health care law.
“We want to stop Obamacare and that’s
why we’re going to the fund, the slush fund,
that Secretary Sebelius is using for the imple-
mentation of the bill,” House Majority Leader
Eric Cantor, R-Va., said.
The White House, in its veto threat, said the
legislation would effectively eliminate fund-
ing for three years for a program that “sup-
ports critical investments such as tobacco use
reduction and programs to reduce health-care-
associated infections and the national burden
of chronic disease.”
Under criticism, GOP puts off its health care bill
By Mike Baker
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OLYMPIA, Wash. — In a quest to save
money, political leaders in Washington state
are exploring a proposal that would shift
some government workers out of their cur-
rent health plans and onto the insurance
exchange developed under President Barack
Obama’s health care law.
Lawmakers believe the change, which
could affect thousands of part-time state
employees and education workers, would
save the state $120 million over the next two
years. It would consequently push more
health care costs onto the federal government
because many of the low-income workers
would likely qualify for federal subsidies.
Washington state appears to be the first
major government to seriously explore the
possibility of pushing public employees into
the exchange, but it probably won’t be the
last. Rick Johnson, who advises state and
local governments on health care policy at
the New York-based consulting firm Segal
Company, said he expects it will be an option
some state and local governments will
explore in the years to come.
Political leaders may push
workers to health exchange
REUTERS
Barack Obama winks while in the Oval Office of the White House .
“We want to stop Obamacare
and that’s why we’re going to
the fund, the slush fund, that
Secretary Sebelius is using for
the implementation of the bill.”
— House Majority Leader Eric Cantor
OPINION 9
Thursday • April 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Caltrain’s alcohol policy
Editor,
I am appalled at the increased use of
alcohol on Caltrain, particularly dur-
ing Giants games. The current policy
of Caltrain is to prohibit open contain-
ers beginning at 9 p.m. on game
nights. The trains leaving San
Francisco after a night game are in
effect rolling drunk tanks. Of course, I
would rather have these drunks on the
train rather than in a car.
My real concern is with the day
games. Today, I had the misfortune to
board the regularly scheduled train in
the morning. It was brimming with
Giants fans and a lot of alcohol. Fans
were boarding the train with open con-
tainers. Someone next to me opened a
can of beer that sprayed all over my
face and clothing. I found this
extremely offensive, not only to
myself but to my religion. Apparently,
to avoid the high cost of beer at AT&T
Park, fans start their drinking on the
trains to save some money. I did not
see any security on the train, and the
conductors are too busy to handle this
problem.
Clearly, Caltrain is increasing their
ridership by allowing drinking on
trains and I do not see them changing
that policy.
However, is it possible to allocate at
least one train car as an alcohol-free
zone? Some families don’t want their
children exposed to alcohol.
I’m sure that Caltrain would respond
by saying that I don’t have to ride the
train. However, I rely on public trans-
portation. I think that Caltrain should
look into its alcohol policy and con-
sider having at least one train car that
is alcohol free.
Emitt Wallace
San Mateo
Taxing for roads
Editor,
Regarding the story “Belmont roads
get low rank” in the April 23 edition
of the Daily Journal, if my expenses
go up the banks don’t turn around and
say here’s a raise. You can’t afford
your house, no problem, here is a raise
to cover maintenance and operations.
It’s really convenient for the
Metropolitan Transportation
Commission to fund the connector
roads, then put a Pavement Condition
Index and expect everyone to tax
themselves. Who deals with the other
problems like runoff, asthma, crashes,
safety, toxic fish, heart disease, deer
kills, vehicles causing more wear and
tear by weight, etc.? Belmont is 4.6
square miles, little more than two
miles on a side. With 70 miles of road.
What percentage of these roads does
Councilwoman Coralin Feierbach feel
safe walking at 9 p.m.? Wouldn’t that
be a more relevant index?
There is a lot more to roads that just
the surface condition — more seniors
and children get run over in some
cities like Millbrae and San Mateo. So
Belmont’s PCI index is off; thank god
for small blessings.
Gladwyn d’Souza
Belmont
Too late
Editor,
Mr. Conway’s thoughtful comments
in his guest perspective, “County
under siege: A conservative’s last
stand” in the April 22 edition of the
Daily Journal, came too late. The
clubby Democratic Party, of which I
am a member, seems to control every-
thing in the city and county of San
Mateo. Every other voice has been
shut out, and the labor unions and
developers who pay for Democrats’
campaigns — and, in turn, benefit
from Democrats’ votes — will fight to
maintain the status quo.
I realize the good the Democratic
Party does, but there is a serious and
expensive downside to this oligarchy.
Donna Bischoff
San Mateo
Letters to the editor
The Stockton Record
H
ere’s the view of the executive
director of the California
Public Utilities Commission:
• There has been significant progress
on the commission’s oversight of safe-
ty.
• It will take years longer to change
the culture at the PUC from one of
holding costs in check to one of making
sure utilities are operated safely.
• PUC officials are not in bed with
those they regulate.
OK, nobody said they were in bed
with anyone. But a highly critical third
party review of PUC practices in the
wake of the 2010 San Bruno natural
gas pipeline explosion found an “anti-
safety” attitude by the executive direc-
tor, Paul Clanon, including “resistance
to challenging utilities” and “resistance
to leveling fines.”
Oh, and for the record, the PUC pres-
ident, Michael Peevey, is a former pres-
ident of Southern California Edison and
the commission’s general counsel was
formerly counsel for the Pacific Gas
and Electric Co. So cozy might be a
better way to describe the PUC’s rela-
tionship with those it’s supposed to reg-
ulate.
All this came spilling out last week
when Clanon was grilled by members
of the Assembly Budget Subcommittee
3 on Resources and Transportation.
They wanted answers to the serious
questions raised by a report completed
for the PUC by Folsom-based Business
Advantage Consulting.
That report found leadership lacking
and safety a less-than-high priority.
“How can you look at this report, this
internal report, and say there has been
progress?” Assemblyman Bob
Blumenfield, D-Woodland Hills, want-
ed to know. “I look at it and I don’t see
one iota of evidence of any progress on
safety. I look at this and I see abject
failure in the movement to change the
safety culture.”
“I have to move hearts and minds,”
Clanon said, likening the commission
to a “big ship” that takes time to turn.
“It’s a human business. It’s a messy
business.”
But it’s been three years since the
San Bruno blast that killed eight people
and leveled 38 homes. Even the Titanic
would have avoided the iceberg given
that much time. And Clanon is paid —
he made $134,562.80 last year — to
steer the PUC in a safer direction.
But even without San Bruno and a
flood of evidence that PG&E was tak-
ing a somewhat cavalier attitude toward
maintenance, shouldn’t we expect safe-
ty would always be a top priority for
state utility regulators?
Unfortunately the answer is no. Not
as long as its top executives are utility
clones and former utility executives.
Not as long as those regulated are
essentially regulating themselves. Not
as long as Sacramento lawmakers only
huff and puff about this after a tragedy
like San Bruno.
It’s a messy business indeed.
‘Messy business’ The tweet heard
‘round the world
T
his week, a tweet from the Associated Press that
there were two explosions at the White House and
that the president was injured sent the stock market
down 143 points before it became clear the AP Twitter
account was hacked and it was erroneous information. The
stock market recovered within a
minute.
Last week, during the Boston
Marathon bombing investigation,
there were Associated Press
reports that a suspect was in cus-
tody. Not a Tweet, but an actual
news story. But it was tweeted
around the world.
In January 2011, there was a
report that U.S. Rep. Gabrielle
Giffords was shot at a “Congress
on your Corner” event in
Arizona. While other news out-
lets reported she was killed, the
Associated Press waited on the
story until the facts of the event were clear. She was serious-
ly injured, but not dead. The Associated Press story was
right, and the news agency was right in waiting.
Is there something that changed in the past two years that
led to the erroneous report that the Boston Marathon bomb-
ing suspect was in custody? Is the Associated Press feeling
pressure from other media, including the 24/7 cable news
networks and social media? Maybe, but I’d say no since this
was a one-time occurrence. Getting a story wrong is a night-
mare scenario for any editor, and the AP has many editors
who have likely taken measures to prevent another embar-
rassment. The AP is relied upon by news agencies around
the world and its reputation is the only thing that maintains
that reliance.
And the hacked tweet shows just how vulnerable we all
are. According to the Associated Press itself, the hacking
originated from a phishing scheme on its corporate network.
It was corrected almost instantly in many different ways and
its account was suspended. But judging from the comments
on the tweet before it was corrected, there was a large
amount of skepticism — particularly because no one else
corroborated the story.
Still, it was enough to cause a temporary market tumble,
but nowhere near the Flash Crash of 2010 when the Dow
Jones Industrial Average plummeted about 600 points in
minutes, then quickly recovered. The reason for the 2010
crash is not known, though there are many theories — high
frequency trading, computer trading, algorithms and overall
skittishness were likely culprits. “Circuit breakers” for large
crashes were installed, and would have likely been employed
if Tuesday’s crash had been deeper.
The market is fueled by rumor, news, emotion and some-
times fundamentals and it is easy to see why it reacted to the
hacked tweet. Add to the mix traders looking for any reason
to take profits off the table and get out of the market and you
have a lot of itchy trigger fingers. But does it mean we have
to do something about it? Probably not.
Twitter has become a go-to source for information when
news breaks since one can follow a large amount of people
and organizations that follow an exponential number of oth-
ers that provide additional information. Some of it gets taken
with a grain of salt but, since hitting the retweet button is
incredibly easy, it sometimes travels incredibly quickly. So
either people will become more cautious and Twitter will
employ more stringent sign-in protocol, or the platform will
be less relied upon and people will go elsewhere. I think the
former will be true.
***
Joe Ross, trustee on the San Mateo County Board of
Education, announced this week the launch of a new initia-
tive in tandem with a White House effort to further empha-
size science and technology education. Ross will be working
pro bono on US2020, which aims to engage 20 percent of
the science, technology, engineering and math (STEM)
workforce in at least 20 hours per year of mentorship or
teaching by the year 2020. Cisco Systems and SanDisk are
among the first in Silicon Valley to make the commitment.
Getting chief executives on board is key, Ross said,
whether it be the president of the United States or CEOs of
high-tech companies. Oftentimes, workers don’t realize that
mentoring young folks is an option as part of their work.
“US2020 is intended to get people’s attention and create a
culture shift,” Ross said, adding that, in other professions
such as law, there is no question there will be some pro bono
work.
Ross will now assist in finding locations for the mentoring,
whether it be in schools or in nonprofits such as the Boys
and Girls Club. STEM, and project-based learning in gener-
al, is becoming more prevalent in education — especially
around here. This effort might be the incubator that gets it to
expand in other parts of the nation. Having the White House
on board doesn’t hurt either.
Jon Mays is the editor in chief of the Daily Journal. He can be
reached at jon@smdailyjournal.com. Follow Jon on Twitter
@jonmays.
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BUSINESS 10
Thursday • April 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 14,676.30 -0.29% 10-Yr Bond 1.698 0.00%
Nasdaq3,269.65 -0.01% Oil (per barrel) 91.49
S&P 500 1,579.79 +0.00% Gold 1,427.50
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Wednesday on the
New York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
The Boeing Co., up $2.65 at $90.83
The aircraft maker said that it aims to start delivering 787s again in early
May. The plane has been grounded since January because of a battery
problem.
Lumber Liquidators Holdings Inc., up $8.19 at $78.68
The hardwood flooring retailer’s first-quarter net income nearly doubled
as sales rose at the start of spring home repair season.
General Dynamics Corp., up $4.63 at $71.73
The aerospace and defense company said that its first-quarter net income
edged up about 1 percent on lower operating costs.
Corning Inc., up 72 cents at $13.85
The glass maker’s first-quarter net income rose 4 percent as declines in
the price of its liquid crystal display glass moderated.
WellPoint Inc., up $4 at $73.33
The health insurer said that its first-quarter earnings rose about 3 percent,
beating Wall Street analysts’ expectations.
Whirlpool Corp., down $2.75 at $119.25
The home appliance maker’s first-quarter net income more than doubled,
but U.S. sales were flat and sales in Latin America fell.
Ethan Allen Interiors Inc., down $1.74 at $30.12
The furniture seller posted disappointing earnings and sales for its fiscal
third quarter, with a lower backlog of orders.
Nasdaq
iRobot Corp., up $3.38 at $28.04
The maker of robot vacuum cleaners said that its first-quarter results
beat Wall Street expectations amid tighter cost controls.
Big movers
By Steve Rothwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — The stock market fin-
ished pretty much where it started
Wednesday as a mixed bag of earnings
from big-name American companies left
investors uninspired.
The Dow closed down 43.16 points, or
0.3 percent, at 14,676.30. The Standard
& Poor’s 500 index — the market’s most
widely used barometer —was flat at
1,578.79.
In other markets, the price of oil
soared, posting its biggest gain this year.
The price of gold and the yield on the
benchmark 10-year Treasury rose.
The Dow was held back by big drops
in Procter & Gamble and AT&T. P&G
issued a weak quarterly profit forecast
and AT&T lost subscribers from its con-
tract-based plans for the first time.
But other companies impressed
investors and boosted their stock prices
with strong quarterly earnings: Defense
contractor General Dynamics and air-
plane maker Boeing easily beat expecta-
tions from financial analysts.
While the majority of corporations
have delivered profits that were better
than expected in the first quarter, their
revenue hasn’t been as impressive, sug-
gesting they are struggling to grow.
“Overall, the earnings environment is
very lackluster, for want of a better
word,” said Robbert van Batenburg,
director of market strategy at Newedge.
P&G, the maker of Tide detergent and
Gillette razors, dropped $4.82, or 5.1
percent, to $77.12 after its forecast came
in below what financial analysts were
expecting. P&G was hurt by uneven
demand for new products.
AT&T dropped $1.96, or 5.2 percent,
to $37.04 after it lost phone subscribers
from its contract-based plans in its latest
quarter. It’s a sign that industry growth is
slowing now that most American have
smartphones.
General Dynamics, the aerospace and
defense company, jumped $4.62, or 6.9
percent, to $71.73. CEO Phebe
Novakovic called the quarter’s results a
“strong start” to achieving the compa-
ny’s goals this year, saying they reflect-
ed its focus on cuttings costs and gener-
ating cash.
Boeing climbed $2.65, or 3 percent, to
$90.83 after the airplane maker said its
first-quarter net income rose 20 percent
despite problems with the 787
Dreamliner. The company said it would
meet its financial and airplane delivery
goals this year.
So far, 175 of the companies in the
S&P 500, or 35 percent, have reported
quarterly earnings and two-thirds of the
Dow’s 30 members have reported.
Sixty-nine percent of companies in the
S&P 500 have beaten profit expecta-
tions, better than the 10-year average of
62 percent, according to S&P Capital
IQ. However, only 39 percent have beat-
en revenue forecasts.
Looking ahead, the outlook dims. Of
the 35 companies that have given earn-
ings forecasts for the second quarter, 28
have been “negative,” according to S&P
Capital IQ, with only four “positive” and
three “in-line.”
“We think that most managements are
appropriately cautious in their outlooks,
because it’s very possible that the sec-
ond-quarter will continue to slow,” said
Jim Russell, a regional investment direc-
tor at U.S. Bank. “We’re watching with
cautious optimism that this is a second-
quarter-only soft patch in the economic
data.”
A report Wednesday that orders for
long-lasting U.S. factory goods fell more
than economists expected added to con-
cerns that global growth is slowing.
The Commerce Department said
orders for durable goods declined 5.7
percent in March following a 4.3 percent
gain the previous month. February’s fig-
ure was also revised lower.
Stocks little changed after mixed earnings
“Overall, the earnings environment
is very lackluster, for want of a better word.”
— Robbert van Batenburg, director of market strategy at Newedge
Boeing sees early-May restart of 787 deliveries
Boeing is aiming to begin delivering 787s again in early
May.
The 787 has been grounded since mid-January because of
smoldering batteries. Federal authorities have approved
Boeing’s redesigned battery system.
The new battery setup has been installed on 10 787s that
belong to airlines, and on nine more that have been built but
not delivered, said Boeing Co. Chairman and CEO Jim
McNerney on Wednesday.
He said “the bulk” of 787s already in the airlines’ posses-
sion will get the battery fix by mid-May. Boeing has said
each installation will take about five days.
Boeing kept producing the 787 even though it was ground-
ed. But it can only collect the cash from airlines when it
delivers the planes — so restarting deliveries is important.
The fix should keep any battery problems “from affecting
the airplane or even being noticed by passengers,” McNerney
said on the company’s quarterly earnings conference call.
White House says it’s open to fix on FAA furloughs
WASHINGTON — Under growing pressure, the Obama
administration signaled Wednesday it might accept legisla-
tion eliminating Federal Aviation Administration furloughs
blamed for lengthy delays affecting airline passengers, while
leaving the rest of $85 billion in across-the-board spending
cuts in place.
The disclosure came as sentiment grew among Senate
Democrats as well as Republicans for legislation to ease the
impact of the cuts on the FAA, and Transportation Secretary
Ray LaHood held talks with key senators.
“I think there was a meeting of the minds” on steps to rem-
edy the situation, Sen. Jay Rockefeller, D-W.Va., said after
the meeting. He said he hoped for a resolution before the
Senate begins a scheduled weeklong vacation at week’s end.
Ryland Group moves to 1Q profit, revenue soars
LOS ANGELES — Ryland Group Inc. returned to a prof-
it in the first quarter, as the homebuilder sold more homes
and benefited from higher sale prices.
The performance exceeded Wall Street’s expectations,
sending shares in the Westlake Village, Calif., company up
more than 3 percent in after-market trading on Wednesday.
Ryland, which builds homes in 14 states, said completed
sales jumped 60.4 percent in the first three months of the
year, compared with the same period a year ago. New home
orders rose 54.4 percent from a year earlier.
Zynga reports lower 1Q revenue, shares fall
NEW YORK — Zynga Inc.’s surprise profit in the first
three months of the year got overshadowed by a revenue
decline, a drop in the number of users and a lower-than-
expected second-quarter forecast.
The online game maker’s stock fell more than 10 percent
in extended trading Wednesday after the first-quarter results
came out.
Business briefs
By Matthew Daly
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The Energy
Department did not realize for four
months that troubled automaker Fisker
Automotive Inc. had missed a crucial
production target that was required as
part of a half-billion dollar government
loan, documents released Wednesday
show.
The mistake allowed Fisker to obtain
an additional $32 million in government
funding before the loan was suspended
in June 2011.
The Obama administration did not
make the suspension of the $529 million
loan public until early last year, nearly
eight months after it stopped making
payments to Fisker and long after the
Energy Department first warned that
Fisker was not meeting milestones to
protect taxpayers.
The administration’s actions — or
failure to act — came under sharp criti-
cism from Republicans Wednesday at a
hearing before the House Oversight and
Government Reform Committee. GOP
lawmakers accused the Obama adminis-
tration of negligence and worse while
Democrats dismissed the hearing as a
“show trial” intended to embarrass the
president.
“The committee’s efforts to stoke false
controversy by selectively leaking a few
out-of-context documents just do not
stand up to scrutiny,” White House
spokesman Jay Carney told reporters
Wednesday.
Obama administration missed clues on Fisker
<< Crawford on fire but Giants lose, page 12
• Boston takes series from A’s, page 13
Thursday, April 25, 2013
PLAYOFF HANGOVER: A NIGHT AFTER CLINCHING A POSTSEASON BERTH, SHARKS LOSE TO PHOENIX>>> PAGE 14
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Aragon centerfielder Josh Ehrlich makes a diving catch to rob Burlingame’s Phil Caulfield of a hit in the Dons’ 10-inning, 5-4 win Wednesday.
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
As Aragon leftfielder Andre Perkins came
to the plate in the bottom of the 10th inning of
a 4-4 game against visiting Burlingame, the
last thing the Aragon coaching staff told him
was to just get a base hit.
Did he ever. On a 1-1 count, Perkins
launched a towering drive toward right field
that carried over the fence to give the Dons a
5-4, walk-off win over the Panthers.
“That was my first one (walkoff home run).
That was my first (home run) in high school. I
was just hoping the wind would carry it out. I
put a good swing on it,” Perkins said. “It was
a fastball. I was trying to go opposite field.
“Wow. That was crazy. It was a huge battle
for us. It was just awesome.”
Perkins’ drive put an end to a game that lasted
just shy of three hours and had a little bit of
everything: strong pitching performances,
some crisp and not-so-crisp defense, a suicide
squeeze bunt and a Burlingame hitter who
drove in a pair of runs without getting a hit.
“It was exciting. It was fun,” said Aragon
manager Lenny Souza. “The last couple of
weeks we’ve turned the corner.”
Aragon (4-5 PAL Bay, 10-8 overall) won
despite committing seven errors, but the
Dons’ pitching staff — starter Aldo Severson
and reliever Brandon Carey, who earned the
win with three innings of relief — kept wrig-
gling out of trouble.
Severson pitched the first seven innings,
allowing three runs on six hits, striking out
eight. Carey came in to start the eighth. He
gave up the go-ahead run in the eighth, but the
Dons rallied to tie the game in the bottom of
the frame. He then escaped a bases-loaded
jam in the top of the 10th without giving up a
run, allowing Perkins’ homer to end it.
Burlingame starter Tommy Caulfield might
have been even better. He also went seven
innings, giving up three runs on six hits, strik-
ing out 11 along the way. Vince Arobio came
in to pitch the eighth and served up the fateful
pitch to Perkins.
“The pitching was the story of the game,”
Souza said.
Aragon put the pressure on Burlingame (5-
4, 13-6) right away, scoring three runs in the
bottom of the first inning. Perkins led off the
game with a double and went to third on a
Josh Ehrlich single. Severson walked to load
the bases and Connor Ching came through
with a two-run double, with Severson moving
to third. After a Casey Cheng popup that fell
in for an infield hit in the swirling winds at
Aragon, Kevin Hahn came to the plate. As
Caulfield went into his windup, Severson
broke for home and Hahn put down a bunt to
perfectly execute a suicide squeeze to give the
Dons a 3-0 lead after one inning.
“We wanted to make sure we got more than
two runs (in that inning),” Souza said,
explaining why he called for one of the gutsi-
est calls in baseball.
Unfortunately for the Dons, that would be
all the offense they would get for a long time.
Dons walk off with win
By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
The big question following Capuchino’s 7-1
upset over first-place Carlmont was cause for
a little controversy. Was a Carlmont fifth-
inning swing of the bat a hit or an error?
Most everyone in attendance — from
Capuchino’s fans to the Carlmont scorekeeper
— saw an attempt at a basket catch that
glanced off the glove of Capuchino left fielder
Tony Pellegrini, and judged it as a fielding
error. However, the official book in the
Capuchino dugout initially scored it as a hit.
Ultimately, the call was changed to an error.
It was a significant scoring decision, in that it
justly credited Capuchino starter Eddie Cecchi
with six no-hit innings to earn his second win
of the year. The senior right-hander gave way
to reliever Rory McDaid in the seventh, who
surrendered the only Carlmont hit of the after-
noon — a clean, one-out single to left off the
bat of senior Tanner Westmoreland.
“I knew [Cecchi] was getting a little bit
tired,” said Capuchino manager Matt Wilson.
“He was getting up there with the pitch count.
… and he missed a start last week because of
arm problems and I didn’t want to push it.”
Against Carlmont (6-3 Bay Division, 16-5
overall) yesterday, Cecchi showed no signs of
injury. Sure he was erratic, surrendering five
walks and a hit batsman. In fact, he allowed a
base runner in every inning. But he was near-
ly impossible to square up, as Cecchi fired his
Capuchino
handcuffs
Carlmont
T
he Woodside softball team is on a
mission this season. Over the last
several years, the Wildcats have
been one of the most consistently good
teams in the Peninsula Athletic League’s
Ocean Division.
But they have never been quite good
enough. Over the last
five years alone
they’ve finished in
second place in the
standings. A noble
feat, sure, but when
the ultimate goal is to
win league champi-
onships — and the
Central Coast Section
playoff berth that
comes with it — the
Wildcats have been
perennial brides-
maids.
This season, it appears Woodside will
finally capture that elusive division title and
go to CCS for the first time since 1999.
Wednesday, the Wildcats scored an
emphatic victory over their closest pursuer,
Woodside
closing in
on elusive
Ocean title
See LOUNGE, Page 14
By Antonio Gonzalez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — Sleep deprived but back in
the Bay Area, the Golden State Warriors
returned to work Wednesday calm and confi-
dent that their Mile High City masterpiece
will be no fluke.
The Warriors wrestled away home-court
advantage with a 131-117 domination of
Denver on Tuesday night, evening the best-of-
seven series at a game apiece. They shot near-
ly 65 percent, made 14 of 25 3-point attempts
and had four players score at least 20 points in
one of the most efficient performances in
NBA playoff history.
For coaches and players on both sides, those
staggering numbers offered both comfort and
concern as the series shifts to Oakland for
Game 3 on Friday night.
“We can’t get trapped into the mindset that
because we’re home everything is going to be
fine,” Warriors coach Mark Jackson said dur-
ing the off day at team headquarters. “I under-
stand the crowd is going to be off the charts
and it’s going to be a lot of fun. But at the
same time, we are dealing
with a team that is the No.
3 seed. They are going to
come prepared, and we’ve
got to be ready for them.”
Golden State’s offensive
outpouring flipped a criti-
cal part of this matchup:
home court.
For all the talk about
Denver’s NBA-best 38-3
home record entering the playoffs, the
Nuggets struggled on the road all season.
Denver finished 19-22 away from the Pepsi
Center, by far the biggest home-road win dis-
parity in the league.
The Warriors went 28-13 at home and have
sold out 32 straight games at Oracle Arena,
where fan support is strong even when the
team is terrible. Now that Golden State is
preparing to host its first playoff game since
2007 — when the team upset top-seeded
Dallas in the first round — and only the sec-
ond time in 19 years, popularity is at a fever
pitch.
Blue-and-gold lights decorate the streets
and buses in both San Francisco and Oakland
are driving around with electronic banners
that read: “Go Warriors.”
“We’re looking forward to playing at home,
but there’s a lot left to do,” guard Jarrett Jack
said. “We didn’t come here just to win one
game and celebrate. There’s still a lot of busi-
ness left.”
With the way Stephen Curry and Klay
Thompson are suddenly shooting, Golden
State’s raucous crowd will hardly be Denver’s
only obstacle.
The Nuggets are coming off their worst
defensive showing of the season. The best
anybody had shot against Denver was 54 per-
cent by the Los Angeles Lakers all the way
back on Nov. 30, and the most points the
Nuggets had allowed was 126 at San Antonio
on Nov. 17. Both were losses.
The Warriors’ 64.6 shooting percentage also
was the highest in the playoffs since Utah’s
65.1 percent in a 129-90 win over Phoenix on
April 25, 1991.
Warriors look to stay hot at home against Denver
See ARAGON, Page 14
See CAP, Page 13
Mark Jackson
See WARRIORS, Page 13
SPORTS 12
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DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
The Peninsula Athletic League
tennis championship finals are set
and there are no big surprises.
In the singles title match,
Carlmont’s Corey Pang, the tourna-
ment’s top seed, will face off against
No. 3 seed Scott Taggart of
Burlingame. In the third-place
match, Menlo-Atherton’s Reed
Fratt, the No. 2 seed, will face team-
mate Richie Sarwal.
On the doubles side, top-seeded
Ben Knoot and Vrain Ahuja of
Carlmont will play for the champi-
onship against Woodside’s Jorge
and Jose Lopez. The third-place
match features the Woodside tan-
dem of Hal Tuttle and Joel Martinez
against San Mateo’s Danny Pantuso
and Phalgun Krishna.
Pang has had little trouble in
advancing to the singles champi-
onship match. He crushed Aragon’s
Devon Hughes 6-1, 6-0 in the quar-
terfinals and then blasted Sarwal by
the same score in the semifinals.
He’ll face in a Taggart a player he
has already beaten twice this sea-
son.
But Taggart could be a player of
destiny. After all, anything is possi-
ble after he upset No. 2 seed Reed
Fratt of Menlo-Atherton in the
semifinals. After dispatching Mills’
James Tanjuatco 6-1, 6-2 in the
quarterfinals, Taggart faced Fratt for
the third time this season. After
dropping two matches to the M-A
freshman during the regular season,
Taggart played the match of his high
school career in routing Fratt in the
semifinals, 6-1, 6-0.
In doubles, Knoot and Ahuja have
only played a couple of matches
together, but they appear to be
gelling seamlessly. They had to
work to win their quarterfinal match
7-5, 7-5, but had an easier time in
dispatching Martinez and Tuttle in
the semifinals, 6-3, 6-1.
The Lopez brothers may have
their work cut out for them in the
doubles finals. If nothing else, they
could be out of gas. After winning
their first-round match in straight
sets, they’ve played three straight
three-set matches. In their second-
round and semifinal matches, they
dropped the first set but rallied to
win the final two to advance to the
finals.
The championship and third-place
matches begin at 4 p.m. today at
Burlingame High.
College softball
The College of San Mateo softball
team finished the regular season with
an five-inning, 8-0 mercy-rule win
over City College of San Francisco
Wednesday afternoon.
The win equaled the Bulldogs’
2012 record of 36-4 and gives the
nine sophomores on the team a 72-8
record over their two-year career at
CSM.
CSM’s 36 wins leads the state as
the Bulldogs recorded 23 shutouts.
They finish the Coast Conference
season with a 15-3 record and fin-
ished four games ahead of runner-
up De Anza.
Wednesday, the Bulldogs wasted
little time in jumping on the Rams,
scoring three runs in the first inning.
They added two more in the fourth
and ended the game with a three-run
fifth, giving pitcher Michele Pilster
her state-leading 27th win of the sea-
son. She allowed only one hit against
San Francisco.
Selina Rodriguez paced the offense
with two hits, two RBIs and two runs
scored. Mikayla Conlin also drove in
a pair of runs, while Jamie Navarro
went 2 for 2.
The Bulldogs, which are ranked
No.1 in the state along with Riverside,
should be the top seed in the Northern
California regional and will host a
team to be determined during the first
weekend of the playoffs May 3 and 4.
PAL tennis championship matches set
CSM softball ends regular season with 23rd shutout, 34th win, waits for playoff opponent
By Rick Eymer
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Brandon
Crawford saved the day twice with
late-inning offensive heroics. He
never got a third chance, resting in
the on-deck circle when the final out
was recorded.
Pinch hitter Will Nieves delivered
a sacrifice fly in the 10th inning to
lift the Arizona Diamondbacks to a
3-2 victory over the San Francisco
Giants on Wednesday.
Crawford broke up a pitcher’s
duel between Arizona’s Ian
Kennedy and Giants’ Madison
Bumgarner when he doubled home
the first run of the game in the sev-
enth.
After the Diamondbacks respond-
ed with runs in the eighth and ninth,
Crawford hit a one-out home run in
the bottom of the ninth to keep the
Giants’ hopes alive.
“It’s always a good feeling to help
the team win,”
Crawford said.
“That’s the goal.
We all know we
can come back.
We’ve been
doing that since
last year. This
time we just
couldn’t hold
them.”
Cr a wf or d’s
recent 2-for-17 slide whittled his
batting average to .296. With three
hits on the day, he jumped back up
to .320.
“Here’s a kid who keeps getting
better and better,” Giants manager
Bruce Bochy said. “The confidence
has grown with him. I like the way
he’s using the whole field and driv-
ing the ball. He’s a talented kid who
works hard and wants to get better.”
Gerardo Parra and A.J. Pollock
also drove in a run for the
Diamondbacks, who beat the Giants
in 11 innings on Tuesday night. Didi
Gregorius had two doubles.
Pinch-hitter Eric Hinske was
awarded a ground-rule double when
Giants reliever Santiago Casilla,
warming up in the bullpen, gloved
his sharp liner down the third-base
line. Parra then ran for Hinske and
scored on Pollock’s single to center.
“I don’t know what Casilla was
thinking,” Bochy said. “I guess he
thought the ball was foul.”
Arizona led 2-1 before Crawford
hit a tying homer off David
Hernandez (1-0) with one out in the
ninth.
“My swing doesn’t change,”
Crawford said. “Before I might
shorten up. Not now. My approach
may change depending on the situa-
tion, but I’m still thinking up the
middle.”
Matt Reynolds got three outs for
his second save in as many days.
Reynolds, who had 22 holds and
two blown saves before Tuesday
night, has yet to allow a run in 11 1-
3 innings.
“It’s fun, the adrenaline gets
going and the heart is pounding,”
Reynolds said. “Being here too,
with the crowd they have and the
atmosphere, it makes it a lot of fun.”
Chad Gaudin (0-1) got the loss as
San Francisco dropped consecutive
home games after winning seven in
a row at its waterfront ballpark.
“It’s been crazy all these extra-
inning games,” Arizona outfielder
Cody Ross said. “Tough games as
well. But it feels good to win two
out of three from these guys.”
Kennedy was charged with a run
and four hits in six-plus innings. He
struck out four and walked two.
Bumgarner struck out seven in 7
1-3 innings, yielding one run and
five hits. He retired 18 of 19 batters
before Hinske’s double.
“I thought I made a pretty decent
pitch on the outside corner,”
Bumgarner said. “He may have
been looking for it because he
reached across the plate and wristed
it out there.”
NOTES: Giants C Guillermo
Quiroz drew his first start of the
year, with reigning NL MVP and
batting champion Buster Posey rest-
ing for the afternoon contest after a
long night game. ... Kennedy’s 2.33
ERA against the Giants is third-best
among active pitchers with a mini-
mum of 10 starts behind Los
Angeles Dodgers ace Clayton
Kershaw (1.28) and Cincinnati’s
Mat Latos (2.19). ... RHP Tim
Lincecum (2-0, 3.97) starts for the
Giants in San Diego on Friday
night. He’s 11-5 against them in 23
starts. ... RHP Trevor Cahill (0-3,
3.60) goes for the Diamondbacks
against the Colorado Rockies on
Thursday night. He’s 1-4 in seven
starts against them. ... Bumgarner
had an eye infection after not feel-
ing well during his last outing. ...
The teams combined to strand 20
runners, 10 apiece.
Crawford hot, Giants not in loss to D’backs
D’backs 3, Giants 2
Brandon
Crawford
SPORTS 13
Thursday • April 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 14 7 .667 —
Baltimore 12 9 .571 2
New York 11 9 .550 2 1/2
Tampa Bay 10 11 .476 4
Toronto 9 13 .409 5 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Kansas City 10 8 .556 —
Minnesota 9 8 .529 1/2
Detroit 10 9 .526 1/2
Cleveland 8 11 .421 2 1/2
Chicago 8 12 .400 3
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 13 7 .650 —
Oakland 13 9 .591 1
Los Angeles 8 11 .421 4 1/2
Seattle 8 15 .348 6 1/2
Houston 7 14 .333 6 1/2
Wednesday’sGames
Toronto 6, Baltimore 5, 11 innings
Chicago White Sox 3, Cleveland 2
Houston 10, Seattle 3
Boston 6, Oakland 5
Detroit 7, Kansas City 5
Tampa Bay 3, N.Y.Yankees 0
Texas at L.A. Angels, late
Thursday’sGames
Kansas City (Shields 1-2) at Detroit (Verlander 2-2),
10:05 a.m.
Houston (Humber 0-4) at Boston (Buchholz 4-0),
3:35 p.m.
Toronto (Buehrle 1-0) at N.Y.Yankees (Kuroda 2-1),
4:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Hellickson 1-1) at Chicago White Sox
(Sale 1-2), 5:10 p.m.
Texas (Tepesch 1-1) at Minnesota (Worley 0-2),5:10
p.m.
Baltimore (Hammel 2-1) at Oakland (Parker 0-3),
7:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Richards 1-0) at Seattle (Maurer 1-3),
7:10 p.m.
Friday’sGames
Atlanta at Detroit, 4:05 p.m.
Toronto at N.Y.Yankees, 4:05 p.m.
Houston at Boston, 4:10 p.m.
Cleveland at Kansas City, 5:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Chicago White Sox, 5:10 p.m.
Texas at Minnesota, 5:10 p.m.
Baltimore at Oakland, 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Seattle, 7:10 p.m.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 15 6 .714 —
New York 10 9 .526 4
Washington 10 11 .476 5
Philadelphia 9 13 .409 6 1/2
Miami 5 16 .238 10
Central Division
W L Pct GB
St. Louis 13 8 .619 —
Cincinnati 13 9 .591 1/2
Milwaukee 11 8 .579 1
Pittsburgh 12 9 .571 1
Chicago 6 14 .300 6 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Colorado 14 7 .667 —
San Francisco 13 9 .591 1 1/2
Arizona 12 9 .571 2
Los Angeles 9 11 .450 4 1/2
San Diego 5 15 .250 8 1/2
———
Wednesday’s Games
Cincinnati 1, Chicago Cubs 0
St. Louis 4, Washington 2
Colorado 6, Atlanta 5, 12 innings
Arizona 3, San Francisco 2, 10 innings
Pittsburgh 5, Philadelphia 3
N.Y. Mets 7, L.A. Dodgers 3, 10 innings
Milwaukee at San Diego, late
Thursday’s Games
Pittsburgh (Ja.McDonald 2-2) at Philadelphia
(Lee 2-1), 10:05 a.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Ryu 2-1) at N.Y. Mets (Hefner 0-2),
10:10 a.m.
Cincinnati (Arroyo 2-1) at Washington
(G.Gonzalez 1-1), 4:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (E.Jackson 0-3) at Miami (Slowey
0-2), 4:10 p.m.
Colorado (J.De La Rosa 2-1) at Arizona (Cahill 0-
3), 6:40 p.m.
Friday’s Games
Atlanta at Detroit, 4:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at Washington, 4:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Miami, 4:10 p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y. Mets, 4:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at St. Louis, 5:15 p.m.
Colorado at Arizona, 6:40 p.m.
Milwaukee at L.A. Dodgers, 7:10 p.m.
San Francisco at San Diego, 7:10 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GPW L OT Pts GF GA
z-Pittsburgh 46 35 11 0 70 155 113
x-N.Y. Islanders 46 24 16 6 54 137 135
N.Y. Rangers 46 24 18 4 52 122 109
New Jersey 46 18 18 10 46 109 123
Philadelphia 46 21 22 3 45 129 139
Northeast Division
GPW L OT Pts GF GA
x-Boston 45 27 13 5 59 125 102
x-Montreal 46 27 14 5 59 141 123
x-Toronto 46 25 16 5 55 140 129
Ottawa 45 23 16 6 52 109 99
Buffalo 47 20 21 6 46 123 142
Southeast Division
GPW L OT Pts GF GA
y-Washington 46 26 18 2 54 145 126
Winnipeg 47 24 20 3 51 126 140
Carolina 46 19 24 3 41 122 148
Tampa Bay 46 18 24 4 40 145 143
Florida 46 14 26 6 34 107 164
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GPW L OT Pts GF GA
z-Chicago 46 35 6 5 75 151 98
x-St. Louis 46 27 17 2 56 122 113
Detroit 46 22 16 8 52 116 113
Columbus 46 22 17 7 51 114 117
Nashville 46 16 21 9 41 108 131
Northwest Division
GPW L OT Pts GF GA
y-Vancouver 46 26 13 7 59 124 111
Minnesota 46 25 18 3 53 118 120
Calgary 46 19 23 4 42 126 153
Edmonton 46 17 22 7 41 112 131
Colorado 46 15 24 7 37 110 145
PacificDivision
GPW L OT Pts GF GA
y-Anaheim 46 29 11 6 64 134 112
x-Los Angeles 47 26 16 5 57 130 116
x-San Jose 47 25 15 7 57 122 113
Dallas 46 22 20 4 48 129 136
Phoenix 46 20 18 8 48 116 123
NOTE:Two points for a win,one point for overtime
loss.
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
z-clinched conference
Wednesday’sGames
Tampa Bay 5,Toronto 2
Detroit 3, Los Angeles 1
Chicago 4, Edmonton 1
Phoenix 2, San Jose 1
NHL GLANCE
@Denver
TBA
if necessary
vs. Stars
7 p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/23
Endof
Regular
Season
at Coyotes
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/24
at Kings
7:30 p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/27
vs. Denver
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
vs. Denver
6:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
D-backs
12:45p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/24
at RedSox
1:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/24
Orioles
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/25
D-backs
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/23
at Padres
5:40p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/27
at Padres
7:10p.m.
NBC
4/26
at D-backs
6:40p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/29
at Padres
1:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/28
at D-backs
6:40p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/30
Orioles
1:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/27
Orioles
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/26
Angels
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/29
Orioles
1:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/28
at RedSox
3:35p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/23
@ChivasUSA
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/27
vs. Montreal
1p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/4
vs. Toronto
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/8
@Seattle
1p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/11
vs. Colorado
7:30p.m.
CSN-PLUS
5/18
4/26
4/28 4/30
vs. Denver
TBA
if necessary
5/2
@Denver
TBA
if necessary
5/4
@Dallas
5:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/25
@RSL
6:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/1
THURSDAY
SOFTBALL
Notre Dame-Belmont at Mitty,3:30 p.m.; Aragon at
Capuchino,Burlingame at Half Moon Bay,Hillsdale
at Carlmont,Terra Nova at Sequoia, 4 p.m.
BASEBALL
Sequoiaat El Camino,Jeffersonat SanMateo,Wood-
side at Mills, South City at Westmoor, 4 p.m.
BOYS’TENNIS
PAL individual tournament, championship and
third-place matches at Burlingame, 4 p.m.
BADMINTON
Carlmont at Aragon,El CaminoatWestmoor,Menlo-
Atherton at South City,Mills at Sequoia,San Mateo
at Capuchino, Hillsdale at Burlingame, Jefferson at
Crystal Springs,Terra Nova at Woodside, 4 p.m.
SWIMMING
St.Francis at Serra,3 p.m.;Carlmont at Aragon,Terra
Nova at Sequoia, Burlingame at Menlo-Atherton,
Westmoor at Half Moon Bay, San Mateo at Hills-
dale, Jefferson at Woodside, El Camino at South
City, 4 p.m.
FRIDAY
BASEBALL
Menlo School at Priory, Pinewood at Sacred Heart
Prep, Serra at St. Francis, Capuchino at Carlmont,
Half Moon Bay at Menlo-Atherton,Hillsdale at Terra
Nova, 4 p.m.; Aragon at Burlingame, 7 p.m.
SOFTBALL
El Camino at Jefferson, Mills at South City, Menlo-
AthertonatWoodside,Harker at Mercy-Burlingame,
Menlo School at Castilleja,Crystal Springs at Priory,
4 p.m.
WHAT’S ON TAP
most impressive game of the season. With the
win, his record improves to 2-6.
“He’s been struggling a little bit this year
and I’m super proud of him,” Wilson said. “I
couldn’t be more proud of the kid. He knew
how big of a game this was for us as a whole
to even stay in contention. And he stepped up
big time and performed. What he has num-
bers-wise definitely doesn’t speak of what
kind of kid this kid is. He’s got a huge heart.
He’s a competitor.”
Cecchi may be the embodiment of
Capuchino baseball this season. The senior
stands only 5-5, though when he steps on the
mound, the gutsy and cocksure competitor
seems a whole lot taller. And while it’s true he
has underachieved this season, yesterday’s
win over first-place Carlmont proves he has
the ability to rise to the occasion.
Just don’t expect him to brag about it.
Cecchi is a kid of few words. When asked
how he felt throughout his stellar perform-
ance, he was surprised to learn he didn’t give
up a hit. Yet he still managed to respond com-
pletely even-keel.
“[I felt] pretty good,” Cecchi said. “I mean,
it felt good for me.”
Capuchino was dealt a blow on April 5
when senior catcher Christian Bautista suf-
fered a knee injury, causing the Mustangs to
have to dip into the frosh-soph ranks to fill the
void. Sophomore Felix Aberouette has han-
dled the transition, passing his biggest test
yesterday in his first time catching Cecchi.
“They just couldn’t hit his fastball,”
Aberouette said.
The sophomore said all three of Cecchi’s
pitches were effective, though he relied heav-
ily on the heat. Aberouette said Cecchi threw
approximately 75 percent fastballs on the
afternoon.
The feel-good vibe reverberated throughout
Capuchino’s lineup. The seven-run output is
the team’s best in Bay Division play this sea-
son. Despite hitting .305 as a team, clutch hit-
ting has been non-existent for the Mustangs
(3-6 , 9-11 overall). They broke out yesterday
though, scoring runs in all but one inning,
including a three-spot in the second.
“The situational hitting was great,” Wilson
said. “We’ve been talking about it all week.
We know we have to be really prepared to
play a team like Carlmont, because they’re a
fantastic ballclub — well coached. They’re in
first place for a reason. So we were prepared
and we did our job.”
The Mustangs got on the board in the first
inning before they even had a hit on the board.
Carlmont starter Greg Hubbell walked four
batters in the inning, culminating in a base-
loaded walk to Cecchi to score Davaughn
Foster-Lorenzini, staking Cap to a 1-0 lead.
In the second, Capuchino ran wild, stealing
four bases in the inning. Pellegrini sparked a
rally with a one-out single. After stealing sec-
ond and advancing to third on a wild pitch, he
scored on an RBI by Kyle Patterson, who
reached on an infield error. Patterson later
scored on a two-out single by Jake
Steenvoorde, who then stole second and
scored on a two-out single by D.J. Hernandez,
giving the Mustangs a 4-0 lead.
Cap added single runs in each of its final
three at bats. In the fourth, Patterson led off
with a single, then scored on a two-out infield
single by Hernandez. In the fifth, McDaid led
off with a single and scored on an RBI knock
by Joe Galea. In the sixth, Foster-Lorenzi led
off with a walk, stole second, and scored on a
throwing error, upping Cap’s lead to 7-0.
Carlmont scratched out its only run off the
Capuchino bullpen in the seventh. Matt
Seubert led off with a walk, and later scored
on an error when Cap’s outfield misplayed
Westmoreland’s single.
Capuchino and Carlmont rematch today.
The game was originally scheduled for tomor-
row, but was rescheduled due to Carlmont’s
senior prom. First pitch at Carlmont is slated
for 4 p.m.
Continued from page 11
CAP
“I told the team I thought we played a regu-
lar-season game in a playoff intensity,”
Nuggets coach George Karl said after the
team’s practice in Denver on Wednesday.
“We’ll learn that desperate teams are danger-
ous. Desperate teams that shoot the heck out
of the ball are really dangerous. We’re OK.
We’re fine. I never thought this wasn’t going
to be anything except a close series.”
Besides the shooting percentages, the
biggest change from Game 1 to Game 2 was
the lineup.
Golden State lost All-Star forward David
Lee to a torn right hip flexor in the opener.
Instead of starting Carl Landry in Lee’s place,
Jackson played three guards — Curry, Jack
and Thompson — and shifted Harrison
Barnes from small forward to power forward
with Andrew Bogut at center.
The small lineup gave Denver fits and min-
imized top rebounder and energizer Kenneth
Faried, who had two points and four rebounds
off the bench after missing Game 1 with a
sprained ankle. Faried is likely to resume his
starting role in Game 3, Karl said, and the
Nuggets need him at his best.
The Warriors have outrebounded Denver 91
to 71 in the first two games.
“I take a lot of the blame, trying to get back
into the rotation,” Faried said. “I wasn’t aware
of how fast the game was this time around,
because last year I was able to come off the
season and still keep my pace. This year, com-
ing off the injury and in the playoffs right
away, I believe it messed the speed of the
game for our team.”
While the Warriors have been a better home
team (and also went 19-22 on the road this
season), the two meetings against the Nuggets
in Oakland have been anything but runaways.
Denver won 107-101 in double overtime
Nov. 10, and Golden State held on for a wild
106-105 victory on Nov. 29 after Andre
Iguodala’s 3-pointer at the buzzer sounded
was waived off.
With a franchise-best home winning streak
of 24 games gone, the Nuggets know how
quickly things can change again.
“I don’t recall many series where there isn’t
as least one blowout game,” Karl said.
“Unfortunately, we’d like to be on the giving
rather than the taking.”
Continued from page 11
WARRIORS
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BOSTON — Stephen Drew hit a two-run
triple, David Ortiz had two hits and drove in a run
and the Boston Red Sox beat the Oakland
Athletics 6-5 on Wednesday afternoon to take a
three-game series.
It was Boston’s ninth win in 12 games and
came after a 13-0 loss to Oakland a night earlier.
Chris Young had a three-run homer and a solo
shot for the Athletics, who finished a six-game
road trip 1-5. They were swept at the Tampa Bay
Rays over the weekend.
Ortiz is 8 for 16 since returning to the lineup on
Saturday for the first time since last August. He
missed 71 of the final 72 games last season and
all of spring training’s with an Achilles tendon
injury.
Jon Lester (4-0) got the win despite walking a
season-high six and lasting just 5 2-3 innings. He
allowed three runs on six hits, striking out five
and walking two more than he had in his previ-
ous four starts.
Andrew Bailey struck out all three batters in
the ninth for his fifth save.
It was Lester’s 89th career win, matching Babe
Ruth for fifth in club history for left-handers.
Brett Anderson (1-4) was hit hard for the third
straight start, giving up six runs on eight hits in
four-plus innings. In the last three, he’s been
tagged for 17 runs in 10 2-3 innings.
The Red Sox broke a 3-all tie and chased
Anderson with a three-run fifth. Jacoby Ellsbury
opened the inning with an infield hit and scored
on Shane Victorino’s double. Dustin Pedroia
reached on an infield hit and Ortiz followed with
an RBI single. Chris Resop relieved and hit Mike
Napoli with the first pitch before Daniel Nava
had a pinch-hit single. After Will Middlebrooks
flied out, Jerry Blevins entered and retired the
final two batters, leaving the bases loaded.
Drew, Ortiz carry Red Sox past Oakland
Red Sox 6, A’s 5
SPORTS 14
Thursday • April 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
After a mound meeting with his manager
Shawn Scott, Caulfield settled down and was
masterful the rest of the way. He limited
Aragon to just one base runner over the next
three innings and, after giving up four hits in
the first inning, did not allow another one until
an Ehrlich single with two outs in the fifth
inning.
Meanwhile, the Burlingame offense started
chipping away at its deficit. The Panthers plat-
ed their first run in the top of the second. With
one out, Jonathan Engelmann was hit by a
pitch, stole second and came home on an
Andrew Kennedy double to the right-center
field gap.
The Panthers added a second run in the third
inning on a bizarre play. With Arobio at third,
Grant Goodman on first and John Lee at the
plate, Goodman broke for second. As the
Aragon catcher threw down to second, the
shortstop stepped in front of the bag, antici-
pating Arobio breaking for home. He couldn’t
handle the throw, however and, when the ball
rolled away from him, Arobio did head for
home, scoring without a throw.
Burlingame then tied the game in the top of
the sixth. Engelmann singled, stole second
and went to third on a Kennedy sacrifice bunt,
to bring up pinch hitter Keone Keahi, who
would strike out.
The Aragon catcher, however, could not
hold on to the ball and Keahi broke for first.
The catcher could not apply the tag and was
forced to throw to first. When he did,
Engelmann broke for the plate. The throw
back home beat him, but he dislodged the ball
on his slide and was safe, tying the game at 3.
The Panthers then took a 4-3 lead in the top
of the eighth when Keahi hit a sacrifice fly to
left to drive in Lee, who had reached base on
an error. But the Dons came back with a Steve
Hughes sacrifice fly in the bottom of the frame
to plate Ehrlich and extend the game.
“I knew three runs wasn’t enough [to beat]
Burlingame,” Souza said. “I’ve had so much
fun in the last two games (including a 7-6 win
over Terra Nova last Friday) than I had in the
previous seven games.”
Continued from page 11
ARAGON
a 12-2 win over Mills to keep the Wildcats
undefeated in Ocean Division play at 8-0,
with a two-game lead over Mills and just
four games left to play.
“I think we should be able to do it (win-
ning the division championship),” said
Woodside coach Mike King, who is in his
10th season with the Wildcats. “This is, quite
honestly, the best team I’ve ever had. They’re
gamers. They love to play the game. From
pitching, to hitting, to fielding, they’re a solid
team.
“Our goal was to win the Ocean Division
and move up to the Bay (Division). The
focus of the girls has been that and it hasn’t
stopped. They’re a focused group. It’s neat.”
King is especially happy the only two sen-
iors on the squad — Keshaila Chang and
Rebecca Pilakowski — are around to experi-
ence this run. Pilakowski, a three-year varsity
player, has been a part of two second-place
finishes, while Chang was on last season’s
runner-up squad.
“The two seniors on the team want to cata-
pult the team to the next level,” King said.
This season, the Wildcats have put it all
together. They are batting .335 as a team and
have been nearly perfect in the field. Junior
pitcher Christina Patton is having a whale of
a year — both in the pitcher’s circle and at
the plate. While she was a good pitcher last
season, her offense was lagging as she batted
under .200. This year, however, she has been
dominant in the circle, going 15-4 with a
1.16 ERA, 16 complete games and nine
shutouts.
More importantly, her offense has ramped
up big time. She is batting .355 this season
— and she isn’t even the best hitter on the
team. That title probably belongs to junior
Madison Diamos, who is hitting .394 but
more importantly, leads the team in RBIs
with 27.
Ali McBride has also been a beast at the
plate, batting a robust .481.
“A lot of these girls are playing club ball,”
King said, which wasn’t the case only a few
years ago. “They’ve hit 150 to 200 balls a
day since January. It’s bound to make them
better hitters. They work hard. Every single
one of these girls works hard. I think their
goals are higher this year than last year. They
want to get to that next level. They have a
high goal and they’re going for it.”
***
The Sequoia baseball team will be holding
its second annual SEQ Baseball Scramble
fundraiser golf tournament May 10 at Poplar
Creek Golf Course. Cost is $150 and
includes greens fees, driving range balls, golf
cart and a fully catered dinner following the
round. Tournament sponsors are also being
sought. For more information and to register
go to www.sequoiabaseball.com.
Nathan Mollat can be reached by email:
nathan@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: 344-
5200 ext. 117. He can also be followed on Twitter
@CheckkThissOutt.
Continued from page 11
LOUNGE
By John Marshall
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
GLENDALE, Ariz. — Mike Smith stopped
33 shots, and the Phoenix Coyotes prevented
San Jose from moving up in the Western
Conference standings with a 2-1 win over the
Sharks on Wednesday night.
San Jose had a chance to pass Los Angeles
for fourth in the West, but the Coyotes played
more like the team still in the playoff hunt.
Phoenix beat Thomas Greiss for two goals
in the first period and played the tight-check-
ing style that had been so successful the pre-
vious three seasons. That left the Sharks tied
with the Kings at 57 points.
Michael Stone and Keith Yandle both
scored, and Shane Doan had a pair of assists
for Phoenix.
Brent Burns scored and Greiss stopped 30
shots in his first start since March 6 for the
Sharks, who will close the season against the
defending Stanley Cup champion Kings in
Los Angeles on Saturday.
San Jose has closed the season strong and
finished off its final home game on Tuesday in
perfect fashion, scoring two goals 30 seconds
apart in the third period to beat Dallas 3-2.
That clinched the Sharks’ ninth straight
playoff appearance and gave them a chance to
earn home-ice advantage in the first round.
Unlike past seasons, when they made a late-
season push to reach the playoffs, the Coyotes
faded down the stretch.
Phoenix stumbled with a franchise-record
goal-less streak of 245 minutes, 32 seconds —
133 straight shots without a goal — in mid-
March to fall out of the top 10 in the Western
Conference and never fully recovered.
The Coyotes’ slim playoff chances took a
huge hit on Monday, when they were shut out
for the eighth time this season in a lackluster
4-0 road loss to Detroit.
They officially had a run of playoff appear-
ances end at three straight seasons with
Minnesota’s win over the Kings.
The Coyotes looked more like the playoff
team in the first period, generating some good
chances and a pair of goals.
Stone scored midway through the period
when he was left open as all the other players
from both teams crammed near the left
boards. Taking a pass from Radim Vrbata,
Stone sent a slap shot from the right circle
under Greiss’ stick arm for his fifth of the sea-
son.
Yandle made it 2-0 with his 10th of the sea-
son from nearly the same spot, one-timing a
pass from Oliver Ekman-Larsson on a shot
that skipped past Greiss after appearing to hit
a Sharks player in front.
Sharks miss out on No. 4 seed with loss to Phoenix
Coyotes 2, Sharks 1
ACS Courier • Home Care
Assistance • Peninsula Executives
Association • Retirement Administration,
Inc. • Technology Credit Union •
LegalShield • Ambassador Services•
Three Sixty HR, Inc. • TeamLogic IT
Small Business Owners
Self-Employed Professionals
Join us for a free business resource event to help you thrive in 2013
Small Business
Resource Fair
ATTENTION:
Tuesday, April 30
9am to 1pm
FOR COMPLETE SEMINAR INFORMATION
PLEASE VIEW THIS CODE OR VISIT:
SmallBusinessResourceFair.eventbrite.com
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If you would like to be a presenter or vendor at this event,
please call 650-344-5200 x 121 or email info@smdailyjournal.com
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REGISTER TODAY AT:
smallbusinessresourcefair.eventbrite.com
Or call 650-344-5200 x 121
for more information
Continental breakfast will be provided
Oshman Family JCC
3921 Fabian Way, Palo Alto
2 Small BuSineSS Resource Fair April 2013
ScheDuLe:
9:00 am Arrival, Continental Breakfast, Networking
10:00 am Welcome & Introduction by Jerry Lee, Daily Journal and Michael Ross,
Oshman Family JCC
10:10 am Seminar: How Online Backup Can Save Your Business
10:30 am Seminar: Navigating the Insurance Challenges for Today's Small Businesses
10:50 am Seminar: From Boxers to the Boardroom – Upgrade Your Business Image
11:10 am Break, Networking
11:40 am Seminar: Practical Social Media for the Small Business
12:00 pm Seminar: Credit Unions for Business Banking
12:20 pm Seminar: Guerrilla Marketing Strategies for the Small Business
12:50 pm Door prizes awarded, must be present to win
1:00 pm Event concludes
SeMiNaRS:

how Online Backup can Save your Business
Presented by Backblaze
70% of organizations that experience a major loss of data go out of business. So with 60% of data residing
on laptops and desktops, backing them up makes good sense. But backing up laptops and desktops has to be
easy, user-proof and well, cheap or it gets forgotten. Take a few minutes and join us and we’ll show you how
businesses, schools and even non-profits are backing up their laptops and desktops automatically, continuously
and securely at a cost they can all afford.

Navigating the insurance challenges for
today's Small Businesses
Presented by Nadler Insurance

from Boxers to the Boardroom – upgrade your business image
Presented by Pacific Business Centers
Join us as we take a light-hearted look at some home office solutions and why they fail. Then learn how an
affordable Virtual Office Solution can make your small business look big business, provide a convenient place to
meet clients, and help you increase sales!

Practical Social Media for the Small Business
Presented by Tom Treanor, Right Mix Marketing
Social Media platforms like Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Pinterest can be both a great tool and a burden. Many
business owners are challenged with understanding how Social Media fits into the overall marketing mix and how
to manage it effectively while staying focused on the day-to-day business. Take notes while we go through several
practical ways your company can use Social Media to support your business goals!
credit unions for Business Banking
Presented by San Mateo Credit Union
Dispelling the notion that credit unions are only for private parties. On the contrary, credit unions are the perfect
solution for business banking. Find out why!

Guerrilla Marketing Strategies for the Small Business
Presented by Michael Neuendorf, Guerilla Marketing Coach
Sure the economy's getting better, but that doesn't mean that today's small business still isn't challenged to get
the most out of each dollar put towards marketing. In this fast-paced session your presenter, an experienced
marketer for businesses large and small will take you through some suggested strategies you can follow to get
marketing results without big investments of money. That's Guerrilla Marketing and it works! He'll share with you
exactly what he does to get consistent leads with a very modest budget.
Small Business
RESOURCE FAIR
APRIL 30, 2013
PALO ALTO
April 2013 Small BuSineSS Resource Fair 3
PReSeNtiNG SPONSORS
DaiLy JOuRNaL
Kerry McArdle, Marketing & Events
800 S. Claremont St. Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
Phone: (650)344-5200
Fax: (650)344-5290
Website: www.smdailyjournal.com
Email: kerry@smdailyjournal.com
The Daily Journal is the only locally-owned daily newspaper on the peninsula. We are proud
to provide leading local news coverage. Pick up the Daily Journal or read online at www.
smdailyjournal.com. Follow us on Facebook or twitter.
Our readers support our advertisers. We welcome you to join the many other businesses that use
The Daily Journal to fulfill their marketing needs on The Peninsula. For advertising inquiries please
call 650-344-5200 x121.
OShMaN faMiLy JeWiSh cOMMuNity ceNteR
Michael Ross, Facility Sales Manager
3921 Fabian Way, Palo Alto CA 94303
Phone: (650)223-8612
Fax: (650)852-3609
www.paloaltojcc.org
Email: mross@paloaltojcc.org
The Oshman Family JCC (OFJCC) provides educational, social, cultural, fitness, and enrichment
programs in the South Peninsula. Rated “Best Gym” by Palo Alto Weekly, the OFJCC offers the
latest fitness equipment, 100+ exercise classes weekly, indoor/outdoor pools, a double-court
gymnasium and more. Programs include performances, day camps, afterschool classes, an award-
winning preschool and an array of stimulating classes and lectures. The OFJCC’s performance hall,
conference center and other campus spaces are available to rent.
Wellness has become the catchphrase for describing a healthy
lifestyle. At the Oshman Family JCC (OFJCC), wellness means
more than just a fit body. It means living a fully engaged life. In
addition to providing one of the largest fitness facilities in the
South Peninsula, we also encourage our members to explore
new interests, strengthen family bonds and create meaningful
new relationships. We are dedicated to celebrating our lives in
a community that is supportive and welcoming.
The OFJCC’s state-of-the-art fitness center, swimming pools,
performance hall, preschool, day camp, classes, lectures and
celebrations provide countless opportunities to live life to the
fullest. Start a new fitness routine, learn a new skill or discover
shared interests. From active pursuits to private passions, the
OFJCC offers a world of activities and ideas to help you live
richer, more engaged and rewarding lives.

Join us. Live Fully®

www.paloaltojcc.org | info@paloaltojcc.org
(650) 223-8700 | 3921 Fabian Way, Palo Alto
4 Small BuSineSS Resource Fair April 2013
GOLD SPONSORS
BackBLaze ONLiNe
BackuP
Andrew Klein, Director of Marketing
500 Ben Franklin Ct., San Mateo, CA 94401
Phone: (415)606-7628
Fax: (650)472-8095
www.backblaze.com
Email: andy@backblaze.com

Backblaze for Business online backup automatically,
continuously and safely backs up the documents,
spreadsheets, presentations and other valuable files
from your laptop or desktop to the cloud, ensuring they
are easily recoverable when faced with data loss or
computer theft.
Pacific BuSiNeSS ceNteRS
Laurent Dhollande, Chief Executive Officer
Becky Simi, Managing Partner
Keith Warner, Managing Partner
2225 E. Bayshore Road, Suite 200,
Palo Alto, CA
Phone: (650)320-7600
Fax: (650)320-7601
www.PBCoffices.com
Email: keith@pbcoffices.com

Pacifc Business Centers is a Workplace-as-a-Service™
provider that helps small businesses establish a strong
business identity with access to furnished offces, conference
rooms, and business services in a shared environment at a
fraction of the price of traditional offce space.
PauL R. NaDLeR iNSuRaNce
& aSSOciateS
1560 Laurel Street, Suite 200, San Carlos, CA
Phone: (650)508-8000
Fax: (650)508-8006
www.nadlerinsurance.com

Nadler Insurance has been the San Francisco Bay Area
Insurance generalists for over 80 years. Everything from
Auto & Home Insurance to Business Insurance, Workers
Compensation, Umbrella Insurance to Directors & Officers
Liability, we’ve practically seen (and insured!) it all. 
For only $50/year per PC or Mac, Backblaze
for Business automatically, continuously
and safely backs up the documents, spread-
sheets, presentations and other valuable files
from your laptop or desktop to the cloud.
You can back up an unlimited amount of
data and restore a file, a folder or all your
data any time you need. With the Backblaze
Mobile app you can access the files you have
backed up with Backblaze from your
iPhone. Try Backblaze online backup for
free today at www.backblaze.com - there is
no obligation and no credit card required for
the trial.
backblaze.com 415.606.7628
Great communication is present in all
successful business relationships. Our
goal with our clients is to help them
become great communicators in print,
in person, and online. Our services
comprise training and consulting in
Guerrilla Marketing, Online Market-
ing and Public Speaking. If you would
like to raise the level of your commu-
nications in these areas, then we
should talk!
nadlerinsurance.com | 650.508-8000
April 2013 Small BuSineSS Resource Fair 5
RiGht Mix MaRketiNG
Tom Treanor, President
1534 Plaza Lane #318,
Burlingame, CA 94010
Phone: (800) 483-0288
Fax: (650) 697-0338
www.RightMixMarketing.com
Email: tom@rightmixmarketing.com
Right Mix Marketing helps companies succeed through the
effective use of Social Media, Search Engine Optimization
(SEO) and Business Blogging. Contact us to learn about
consulting, training and outsourcing options.
SaN MateO cReDit uNiON
Michael Stremme, Branch Director
616 Ramona St., Suite 3,
Palo Alto, CA 94301
www.smcu.org
Phone: (650) 817-1901
Email: mstremme@smcu.org
San Mateo Credit Union (SMCU) is a member-owned
financial institution that currently serves more than 71,000
members who count on SMCU for savings and checking
accounts, low-interest car loans and home mortgages,
investment services and more. Membership is open to
anyone who lives, works, worships or attends school in San
Mateo County, the city of Palo Alto or certain areas of San
Francisco. Simply visit smcu.org or stop by our downtown
Palo Alto branch or any one of our branch locations for
more information.
SPeak WeLL aND SeLL
Michael Neuendorfff
533 Airport Blvd. Suite 400,
Burlingame, CA 94010
Phone: (650)373-2122
Fax: (888) 290-5377
www.speakwellandsell.com
Email: Michael@speakwellandsell.com
Speak Well and Sell helps companies and people sell
themselves, their products and ideas through coaching
in Public Speaking and consulting in Guerrilla Marketing,
Email Marketing and Social Media. We partner with
Constant Contact, HootSuite and Google AdWords. 
GOLD SPONSORS
Right Mix Marketing is a Burlingame-
based company that helps companies
succeed through the effective use of Social
Media, Search Engine Optimization
(SEO), Business Blogging, and other
Online Marketing strategies. Tom Treanor,
the Founder and President, has an MBA
from the Wharton School of Business, is
the author of the SEO Boot Camp, and was
an instructor for SFSU’s Social Media
Certificate program.
Contact Right Mix Marketing to learn
about consulting, outsourcing and training
options, or to have Tom speak to your
company or organization.
RightMixMarketing.com 800.483.0288
speakwellandsell.com 650.373.2122
Great communication is present in all
successful business relationships. Our
goal with our clients is to help them
become great communicators in print,
in person, and online. Our services
comprise training and consulting in
Guerrilla Marketing, Online Market-
ing and Public Speaking. If you would
like to raise the level of your commu-
nications in these areas, then we
should talk!
San Mateo Credit Union (SMCU) is a
member-owned financial institution that
currently serves more than 71,000 members
who count on SMCU for savings and check-
ing accounts, low-interest car loans and home
mortgages, investment services, retirement
planning and more. With eight convenient
branch locations, SMCU works hard to meet
its members' complete financial needs. Mem-
bership is open to anyone who lives, works,
worships or attends school in San Mateo
County, the city of Palo Alto or certain areas
of San Francisco. Simply visit smcu.org or
stop by our downtown Palo Alto branch or
any one of our branch locations for more
information.
smcu.org 650.817.1901
Struggle less, get more results…
Trying to keep up with
Social Media? SEO?
• Social Media set-up and training
• SEO assessment and implementation
• Business blog strategy and training
• Facebook marketing and ads
• Complete Social Media outsourcing
Contact us for a free consultation:
800-483-0288
www.SocialMighty.com
Tom Treanor
6 Small BuSineSS Resource Fair April 2013
acS cOuRieR
Jose Maciel, Owner
460 Miller Ave., So. San Francisco, CA 94080
Phone: (650)834-1651
Email: mambocumbia@gmail.com
ACS Courier is the local courier alternative that saves you
money & time. We offer same day delivery. Our couriers are
extensions of your company.
aMBaSSaDOR SeRviceS
Albert Ong
170 Glenn Way #2, San Carlos, CA 94070
Phone: (650)593-6192
Fax: (650)593-6458
www.abrash.com
Email: mastertextilecleaner@gmail.com
Ambassador Services offers professional commercial &
residential cleaning services throughout The Peninsula.
We have been cleaning Peninsula businesses & homes
since 1980. Our goal is 100% Satisfaction.
hOMe caRe aSSiStaNce
Lena Vyrva, Client Care Manager
148 Hawthorne Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94301
Phone: (650)462-6900
Fax: (650)462-6907
www.homecareassistance.com
Email: lvyrva@homecareassistance.com
We provide older adults with quality care that enables
them to live happier, healthier lives at home. 
JB BeLL BuSiNeSS &
iNveStMeNt cONSuLtiNG
JB Bell, Business Consultant
477 James Rd., Palo Alto, CA 94306
Phone: (650)326-5773
www.jbbizwiz.com
Email: jb@jbbizwiz.com
Experience increased business performance, productivity
and profitability with JB Bell Business and Investment
Consulting providing customized solutions to small,
medium size businesses, government and nonprofits.
SiLveR SPONSORS
Ambassador Services have been cleaning Penin-
sula businesses and homes since 1980. Of course of
we offer expert commercial janitorial service; uphol-
stery cleaning; carpet cleaning; drapery cleaning and
tile and grout cleaning. But, our list of services does
not end there.
We also provide expert water damage restoration
and professional natural stone cleaning and sealing;
wood cleansing and refinishing and leather cleaning
and reconditioning. Our goal is 100% customer
satisfaction. Monthly commercial rates are available.
abrash.com 650.593.6192
Home Care Assistance provides older adults with
quality care that enables them to live happier,
healthier lives at home. Our services are distin-
guished by the caliber of our caregivers, the respon-
siveness of our staff and our expertise in Live-In
care. We embrace a positive, balanced approach to
aging centered on the evolving needs of older adults.
Our mission at Home Care Assistance is to change
the way the world ages.
homecareassistance.com 650.462.6900
Does your company suffer from:
• Broken communications?
• Procedure, process and productivity gaps?
• Too many customer complaints?
JB Bell’s Business Consulting is the solution:
• Fix the communication process across all levels
• Increase your company’s B2C and B2B visibility
• Improve business flow and capacity
• Improve customer service and productivity
JB Bell Business Consulting
650.326.5773
jbbizwiz.com jbbizwiz.com 650.326.5773
JB Bell Business & Investment Consulting, Int'l is
committed to growing your business. We will
partner with you to strengthen your 21st century
brand, while increasing your business's productiv-
ity & efficiency. JB Bell emphasizes aligning and
integrating the most important aspects of your
business. We improve the communication
process & business flow across all levels. We
optimize your company's B2C & B2B visibility.
The results are improved performance, customer
service, and profitability.
ACS Couriers can greatly reduce your shipping costs.
We are the Peninsula’s local courier alternative that offers
the same services as the larger couriers but while saving
you time and money. We offer same day and next day
delivery along with rush pick-up and delivery.
Our dedicated fleet of clean vehicles with courteous
drivers is avail able 24/7 for all your shipping needs. We
offer free accounts to companies, subject to acceptance.
Our couriers are extensions of your companies.
650-834-1651
April 2013 Small BuSineSS Resource Fair 7
SiLveR SPONSORS
LeGaL ShieLD
Worry Less, Live More
Laura & Jeff Marley, Independent Assoc.
2209 Hastings Dr., Unit 54
Belmont, CA 94002
Phone: (650)520-8000
www.lauramarley.com
Email: lmarley@legalshield.com
What is LegalShield? If you could speak to an attorney
on ANY issue and not receive a bill, would you?
With LegalShield, that's a reality!
PeNiNSuLa executiveS
aSSOciatiON
Neal Coogler, Executive Director
1433 Vallejo Dr., San Jose, CA 95130
Phpne; (408)799-7235
www.executives.org
Emai: peaworks@yahoo.com
The Peninsula Executives Association is an active referral
network of San Francisco Peninsula business professionals
committed to building a trustworthy network of local
businesses.
RetiReMeNt
aDMiNiStRatiON
Dan Harding, Vice President
4966 El Camino Real #213,
Los Altos, CA 94022
Phone: (650)961-5500
Fax: (650)961-8495
www.RetirementAdmin.com
Email: Dan@RetirementAdmin.com
Retirement Administration, Inc. is a leading provider of
third party administration services, excelling in compliance,
customer service and consulting. Our service model
emphasizes unparalleled personal service and state-of-the-
art technology that compliments our business partners.
teaMLOGic it
Adrienne Wong, Business Development
2483 Old Middlefield Way #120,
Mountain View, CA 94043
Phone: (650)204-3150
Fax: (650)332-3001
www.teamlogicit.com/mountainviewca
Email: awong@teamlogicit.com
Los Altos residents Jon Simms and Adrienne Wong own and
operate TeamLogic IT of Mountain View and TeamLogic IT of
Sunnyvale. They take great pride in helping local businesses
with managing their IT, getting to know their clients, and
building a strong team. Jon and Adrienne network with and
patronize many small businesses in the area.
Concerned about your cri t i cal busi ness t echnol ogy? TeamLogi c I T
of f ers comprehensi ve comput er servi ces f or smal l t o medi um si ze
busi nesses. We ensure t hat our cust omers’ busi ness t echnol ogy i s
runni ng ef f i ci ent l y t hrough our proact i ve approach and hi ghl y
t rai ned f i el d engi neers.
Local l y owned and operat ed by Jon Si mms and
Adri enne Wong. Cont act us t o di scuss your busi ness
and recei ve a compl i ment ary syst ems assessment .
Vi si t : www. t eaml ogi ci t . com/ mount ai nvi ewca
Emai l : mount ai nvi ewca@t eaml ogi ci t . com
Phone: 650-204-3150
lauramarley.com 650.520.8000
LegalShield allows you talk to an attorney on any
legal matter for one low monthly fee. It helps small
businesses and individuals to have access to their
legal rights while eliminating the pressure of finding
an attorney at a moment’s notice. Trivial matter or
traumatic issue, it doesn’t matter; LegalShield can
help without worrying about high hourly costs!
LegalShield also has the BEST Identity Theft protec-
tion on the planet via our exclusive partnership with
Kroll Advisory Solutions.
Peninsula Executives Association: an active referral
network of San Francisco Peninsula business professionals
committed to providing the best services to our local commu-
nities.
We meet nearly every Thursday morning to share
information about our businesses so we are ready when our
friends, customers and clients need a reliable source for
anything from hardware to automotive repair to retirement
planning to a great haircut.
We are proud of having been meeting for over 30 years
and of the care and support we provide.
We are PEA.
executives.org 408.799.7235
Retirement Administration, Inc. is a leading provider of
third party administration services, excelling in compli-
ance, customer service and consulting. Our service model
emphasizes unparalleled personal service and state-of-the-
art technology that compliments our business partners.
When you choose TRA as your retirement administra-
tion partner, you are joining forces with one of the
industry’s leading experts in retirement plans.
Our success is based on your plan's performance!
TRA develops retirement plan solutions that are effective in
maximizing your benefit as a business owner at an afford-
able cost.
TRA believes in creating long-term relationships with
our clients, contributing to our combined success.
RetirementAdmin.com 650.961-5500
At TeamLogic IT, we provide comprehensive computer
services along with premier customer support. We take the
worry out of your technology by providing the knowledge and
skills to keep your operations running smoothly, and we do it
on your schedule. We answer the phone promptly, show up on
time and make sure the job is complete before we leave.
We don’t just fix things, we evaluate your current and
future needs and deliver the best solution for your business
processes and objectives.
Advanced technology supported by our nationwide buying
power gives you more cost-effective solutions than anywhere
else. Let us become your IT Partner, allowing you to focus on
your business, not your IT.
teamlogicit.com/mountainviewca 650.204.3150
8 Small BuSineSS Resource Fair April 2013
techNOLOGy
cReDit uNiON
Albert Lee, Area Manager/
Business Development
490 S. California Ave. Suite 110,
Palo Alto, CA 94306
Phone: (650)847-0478
www.techcu.com
Email: alee@techcu.com

Technology Credit Union offers savings, wealth
management, mortgage, and auto loan products and
services to both consumers and local businesses in the
Silicon Valley.
thRee Sixty hR, iNc.
Maureen Clark, President
356 Hedge Rd., Menlo Park, CA 94025
Phone: (650)328-1165
Fax: (650)328-1166
www.threesixtyhr.com
Email: Maureen@threesixtyhr.com

Three Sixty HR provides comprehensive Human Resource
consulting for small businesses. Our specialties: employee
handbooks, terminations, wage and hour compliance, leaves
of absence, and expert witness testimony.
yOuR techNOLOGy SuPPORt
Making ALL technology easier for you!
Phone: (415)670-9769
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enlist participants at the Daily Journal’s
ever expanding inventory of community
events such as the Senior Showcase,
Family Resource Fair, Job Fairs, and
more. You will also be part of the project
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SUBURBAN LIVING 23
Thursday • April 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Dean Fosdick
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Sometimes the best view isn’t what
you see through a window but what
catches your eye underneath it.
Window boxes deliver color, edibles
and fragrance. They’re practical, too, as
raised-bed gardens that elevate their
contents to within easy reach.
“Window boxes are convenient con-
tainers,” said David Trinklein, a horticul-
turist with University of Missouri
Extension. “Plant them with herbs, for
example, and you won’t have to go out-
side to bring in the harvest.”
If you have room for a window box,
you have room for a garden. Window
boxes are ideal for small, shallow-rooted
plants like radishes, lettuce, marigolds,
impatiens, pansies, begonias, parsley,
basil, sage and thyme.
“Mix and match flowers with vegeta-
bles,” said Rhonda Ferree, an extension
educator with the University of Illinois.
“They need the same soil types and have
the same water preferences. Plant flow-
ers toward the front for curb appeal;
position vegetables toward the back for
easier access.”
The location of the window box usual-
ly dictates what you can grow, Trinklein
said. “Window boxes that get a blister-
ing afternoon sun require one thing.
Window boxes in shade require another.”
Fern Richardson, author of “Small
Space Container Gardens” (Timber
Press, 2012) describes herself as “a big
believer in creative window boxing.”
“There’s nothing stopping window
box gardeners from adding garden orna-
ments to their boxes,” Richardson said.
“Small gazing balls tucked between the
plants can add a little sparkle to a shady
area. Gardeners can even use short shep-
herd’s hooks to plant a hummingbird
feeder in a window box.”
Window boxes work especially well:
• As theme gardens. Find flowers that
display your school colors, patriotic
mixtures that show the flag or plants that
complement the paint on your house.
• At delivering fragrances. Fill win-
dow boxes outside bedrooms with
evening primrose, four o’clocks
(Mirabilis) and moonflowers for per-
fume-like scents on still summer nights.
• For four-season gardening. Grow
daffodils, grape hyacinth and tulips in
spring; ornamental edibles like peppers,
strawberries and chives in summer;
flowering kale and pansies for color
through fall and winter.
• To showcase houseplants. Display
your favorite potted plants in empty win-
dow boxes during the summer growing
season. That will free up some shelf
space indoors while enhancing things
outdoors.
“If there is no room in the budget for a
high-style window box, thrifty gardeners
can use spray paint and even stencils to
upgrade inexpensive plastic window
boxes into something that is one-of-a-
kind,” Richardson said.
Window boxes is raised-bed gardening
If you have room for a window box, you have room for a garden.
SUBURBAN LIVING
24
Thursday • April 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Sean Conway
TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES
After a slow start, spring is now com-
ing on like a freight train. Every day new
plants are pushing up out of the ground
in my garden, tree buds are swelling and
the race toward a leafy-green landscape
has begun.
Over the next several weeks, my gar-
den to-do list will grow longer with each
passing day. From trial and error over
many years, I have learned that the
secret to maintaining a good garden is
timing.
Here are a few jobs that, if done now,
will save you time later.
• Apply dormant oil to tree buds.
Soon, dormant tree buds will soon
give way to flowers and leaves. Before
that process takes place is the time to
spray your apple trees with dormant oil
— assuming, of course, that you want to
harvest apples from your tree.
Dormant oil, sometimes referred to as
horticultural oil, is a highly refined,
lightweight oil made from either a plant
or petroleum base. Thin enough to mix
with an emulsifier like water, it controls
insect pests before they have a chance to
wreak havoc on newly developing
leaves, flowers and fruit.
Horticultural oils work by coating
insect eggs, adults or larvae, blocking air
passages and essentially suffocating all
stages of insect growth. Many insect
pests overwinter as eggs on the buds of
trees and coincide their hatching with
the spring growth of the tree.
Horticultural oils are effective against
many forms of mites, scale and caterpil-
lars. I spray my trees once before they
leaf out and once again when the apples
about the diameter of a quarter. I harvest
an abundance of apples every fall, and
while not every apple is perfect, a large
number are, and without the use of
heavy pesticides.
• Apply fertilizer to perennial gar-
dens.
Do this just as the plants begin emerg-
ing from their winter dormancy. Adding
a narrow band of granular fertilizer
around each plant provides robust
growth throughout the season. I have
noticed better results from taking the
time to apply a small amount to each
plant rather than generally broadcasting
across the whole garden. I use an organ-
ic fish-based fertilizer, but almost any
well balanced granular such as 10-10-10
will do. Just be sure to follow directions
and don't add more than the recommend-
ed amount.
Applying when plants are just emerg-
ing from the ground makes it easier to
place the fertilizer where it is needed
without the added step of having to
move leaves out of the way. It also
makes it possible to see which plants
were fed and which weren’t. Granular
fertilizers take a little time to dissolve
into the soil, but that usually happens
just about the time the plant is in active
growth and needs a good meal.
This same timing holds true for any
beds that need mulching. I prefer to
mulch shortly after my perennials have
broken dormancy so I can see where the
plants are, but not too long after so I
don't have to worry about damaging new
leaves or stems.
• Relocate any plants that need it.
Most garden plants transplant reason-
ably well provided they are not in active
growth. When a plant has leaves, or is
actively producing new growth, disturb-
ing its roots causes a much greater shock
to the plant.
Once relocated, many plants will
channel their energy toward establishing
new roots, limiting the amount of vege-
tative growth they produce the first year
in their new location. The following year
they will leaf out without any noticeable
change.
Some plants, such as perennials, may
never skip a beat if moved during or
shortly after they break dormancy.
I also like to plant any new additions
to my garden as early as possible, espe-
cially those I receive from mail-order
sources. I have had much better success
planting perennials, trees and shrubs
early in the growing season.
Transplanting into cool, moist soil helps
reduce transplant shock for many plants.
Keeping up with spring garden chores
isn’t always easy, but prioritizing which
ones to do first will save you time later.
Getting ahead on spring garden to-do list
Keeping up with spring garden chores isn’t always easy, but
prioritizing which ones to do first will save you time later.
SUBURBAN LIVING 25
Thursday • April 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Looking for some help in the garden? Many
of nature’s most useful critters lie literally at
our feet, underappreciated and ignored despite
their ability to eliminate insects, condition soils
and pollinate plants.
Turtles, moths, moles, dragonflies, snakes,
toads and spiders are among the many wild
things that can help maintain a landscape. The
payback is minimal — food, water, shelter, and
easing off on harsh lawn and garden chemicals.
“I believe in teamwork, using all the crea-
tures that live in your garden,” said Sharon
Lovejoy, author of “Trowel and Error”
(Workman Publishing, 2003). “Start from the
ground up with night crawlers as part of your
workforce.”
Add to the earthworms already in your plant
beds with commercially available red worms.
“Build a worm bin or a place where they
can’t get out,” Lovejoy said. “Use all of your
leftovers — your kitchen compost. Worms can
process up to 6 pounds of garbage in a week.”
“Grow an assortment of native plants, which
will draw a great many bird species,” Lovejoy
said. “Add plant hosts as food for butterfly and
moth larvae.”
That list would include milkweed (monarch
butterflies), borage (green lacewings), sunflow-
ers (ladybugs) and yarrow (hoverflies). Many
insects in the larval stage are voracious preda-
tors. Green lacewings as juveniles are aptly
named “aphid lions” because of their appetite
for the sap-sucking pests.
“I would certainly place spiders near the top
of underappreciated life in the garden,” said
Whitney Cranshaw, an extension entomologist
with Colorado State University. “Although
sometimes I think it is less that they are not
appreciated but rather people don’t want to
think of them.”
Spiders are credited for as much as 80 per-
cent of all predator control in the garden.
Jumping spiders, wolf spiders, lynx spiders and
crab spiders are the standouts, Cranshaw said.
Also great garden helpers are:
• Toads. “Harmful insects make up 62 per-
cent of a toad’s daily food supply,” said
Lovejoy, who stacks rocks and wood in seclud-
ed spots to shelter toads, frogs, turtles, sala-
manders and lizards.
• Dragonflies that can capture over 400 mos-
quitoes a day.
• Moles. “They eat their body weight in
insects, slugs and grubs while aerating the soil,”
Lovejoy said.
• Sphinx wasps that can pollinate 200 flowers
in less than seven minutes, Lovejoy said.
• Snakes. “Most snakes — about 99 percent
of those found in gardens — are harmless
helpers, and eat rodents and insect pests,”
Lovejoy said. Garter and gopher snakes top her
“beneficial” list.
• Box turtles that feast on slugs, snails,
insects, larvae and grubs. “They’re slow but
sure,” Lovejoy said.
• Bats. These nocturnal aerialists pollinate
flowers, spread seeds and devour upwards of
600 mosquitoes an hour.
Most predatory insects aren’t selective,
though, feeding on anything that comes within
reach. “Praying mantises are generalists,” said
James Dill, a pest management specialist with
University of Maine Extension. “So are many
spiders. They’re very efficient but don’t dis-
criminate in what they eat. They’d just as soon
grab a honeybee if it happens by.”
Maintain a healthy garden with ample spac-
ing if you hope to attract beneficial insects, Dill
said.
Nature’s full of garden helpers
Harmful insects make up 62 percent of a toad’s daily food supply.
DATEBOOK 26
Thursday • April 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THURSDAY, APRIL 25
Film Noir Movie Series: ‘White
Heat.’ 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. San Mateo
Senior Center, 2645 Alameda de las
Pulgas, San Mateo. Free. For more
information call 522-7490.
PoetrySlam. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. Free. For more information
call 591-8286.
North Fair Oaks Community
Council Meeting. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Fair
Oaks Community Center, 2500
Middlefield Road, Redwood City.
North Fair Oaks Community Council
provides recommendations to the
San Mateo County Board of
Supervisors on matters of health,
safety, welfare, public works and
planning issues for the North Fair
Oaks geographic area. For more
information call 363-4570.
San Mateo High School Performing
Arts presents ‘The Foreigner.’ 7:30
p.m. Burlingame High School Theater,
1 Mangini Way, Burlingame. $15
adults, $10 for students and seniors.
For more information or to purchase
tickets go to www.smhsdrama.org.
Knights Moves XV: A Dance
Concert presented by the Hillsdale
High School Dance Ensemble. 7:30
p.m. Hillsdale High School Little
Theater, 31st Avenue, San Mateo. $10
for students and seniors, $12 for
general admission and free for
children 6 and under. For more
information call 558-2623.
FRIDAY, APRIL 26
Free Blood Pressure and Glucose
Screening. 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. San
Bruno Senior Center, 1555 Crystal
Springs Road, San Bruno. Free. For
more information call 616-7150.
Hillsborough Antique Show. 11 a.m.
to 8 p.m. San Mateo Event Center,
1346 Saratoga Drive, San Mateo.
Admission is $10 for adults and $8 for
seniors. Parking is $10 per vehicle. For
more information go to
www.hillsboroughantiqueshow.com/
index.html.
Affordable Books at the Book
Nook. Noon to 4 p.m. 1 Cottage Lane,
Twin Pines Park, Belmont. $1
paperbacks, $2 and up for hardbacks
and 25 cents for children’s books. All
proceeds benefit the Belmont Library.
For more information call 593-5650.
Happy Hour: Dinner, Drinks and
Dancing with the ‘Swing Shift’
Band. 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. The San Bruno
Senior Center, 1555 Crystal Springs
Road, San Bruno. Tickets available. For
more information call 616-7150.
Community Action Agency Public
Hearing. 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Half
Moon Village — Robin Hood Lodge,
9 Bloom Lane, Half Moon Bay. Public
comment will be heard on the
Community Agency’s proposed
Community Action Plan.
Refreshments will be served and a
raffle will be held. Include any needs
in the special accommodations
request. Free. For more information
and to RSVP call 802-5083 or contact
smc-caa@co.sanmateo.ca.us.
Reel to Real Film Nights: ‘Mon
Oncle.’ 7 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. Free.
For more information call 591-8286.
San Carlos Kiwanis Club Variety
Show. 7 p.m. Central Middle School
Auditorium, 828 Chestnut St., San
Carlos. There will also be a pre-show
at 6:40 p.m. with Arthur Murray. The
show will be a musical journey from
the ’30s up to Lady Gaga. Tickets will
be available online or an hour before
performance time at the auditorium.
$25 for balcony and $20 for orchestra.
$10 for students. For more
information call 590-4440 or go to
www.sancarloskiwanis.org.
Open House for Bay Area Dance
Week. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. 2862
Middlefield, Redwood City. Free. This
event is family friendly and open to
the public. There will be tours of the
two studios, live demonstrations of
pole fitness and aerial arts. For more
information go to
www.poletential.com.
San Mateo High School Performing
Arts presents ‘The Foreigner.’ 7:30
p.m. Burlingame High School Theater,
1 Mangini Way, Burlingame. $15
adults, $10 for students and seniors.
For more information or to purchase
tickets go to www.smhsdrama.org.
Knights Moves XV: A Dance
Concert presented by the Hillsdale
High School Dance Ensemble. 7:30
p.m. Hillsdale High School Little
Theater, 31st Avenue, San Mateo. $10
for students and seniors, $12 for
general admission and free for
children 6 years old and under. For
more information call 558-2623.
Dance at the Veterans Memorial
Senior Center. 7:30 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Veterans Memorial Senior Center,
1455 Madison Ave., Redwood City.
Live music provided by The Fun After
50 10-Piece Band. Waltz, Polka, Tango,
Charleston and more. $5 per person.
$7 for non-members. Free
refreshments, water and coffee. For
more information call 747-0264.
A Touch From God: A Holy Spirit
and Power Special Weekend
Conference with Ed Rocha. 7:30
p.m. Victory International Church,
1730 S. Amphlett Blvd., San Mateo.
Free. For more information call 655-
4748 or go to victoryic.org.
Menlo Park Spring Concert. 7:30
p.m. to 9 p.m. Trinity Episcopal
Church, 330 Ravenswood Ave., Menlo
Park. Menlo Park Chorus ranges from
Broadway ballads and film tunes to
traditional spirituals. $15 general, $12
seniors and students, 12 and under
are free. For more information call
(510) 504-4784.
SATURDAY, APRIL 27
Drug Take Back Event. 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. San Carlos Library Parking Lot,
610 Elm St., San Carlos. Free. The San
Carlos Police Bureau will allow the
public to rid their homes of
potentially dangerous expired,
unused and unwanted prescription
drugs. For more information call 802-
4223.
Paradise Valley Pocket Park
Dedication. 11 a.m. Paradise Valley
Pocket Park, 400 block of Hillside
Boulevard at Claremont Avenue,
South San Francisco. Grand Opening
of the newly renovated park. Free. For
more information contact
greg.mediati@ssf.net.
English Language Institute Hosts
ESL Registration Event. 9 a.m.
Skyline College, 3300 College Drive,
San Bruno. Free. This event is
designed to save students time and
money. For more information call
783-7089.
Hillsborough Antique Show. 11 a.m.
to 7 p.m. San Mateo Event Center,
1346 Saratoga Drive, San Mateo.
Admission is $10 for adults and $8 for
seniors. Parking is $10 per vehicle. For
more information go to
www.hillsboroughantiqueshow.com/
index.html.
Happy Seventh Birthday Belmont
Library Open House. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas.
Blowout book sale, jazz concert at 3
p.m. and refreshments served all day.
For more information call 591-8286.
San Bruno American Legion Post
No. 409 Community Breakfast. 8:30
a.m. to 11 a.m. The American Legion
San Bruno Post No. 409, 757 San
Mateo Ave., San Bruno. Scrambled
eggs, pancakes, bacon, ham or
sausage and French toast will be
served. There will also be juice, coffee
or tea. $8 for adults and $5 for
children under 10. For more
information call 583-1740.
Founder’s Hike. 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
44 Visitacion Ave., Suite 206, Brisbane.
Free. This hike is offered every month
on the fourth Saturday of the month.
Space is limited to 10 participants,
and it is required that participants
sign up in advance. For more
information and to sign up call (415)
467-6631.
Pacific Coast Dream Machines
Show. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Half Moon Bay
Airport, on Highway 1 five miles north
of State Route 92. Showcase of
motorized mechanical marvels from
throughout the 20th and 21st
centuries. Includes Demolition Derby
Championship, Unimotorcycle
Racing, monster truck rides, go-kart
rides, kid’s amusements, food and live
music to benefit the Coastside Adult
Day Health Center. Continues
through April 28 during same time.
$20 ($30 for two-day pass) adults, $10
($15 for two-day pass) ages 11 to 17
and 65 and up. Free for kids ages 10
and under. For more information call
726-2328.
Seams Boutique Grand Opening. 2
p.m. to 6 p.m. 1114 Burlingame Ave.,
Burlingame. Free. Join for
champagne, cupcakes, discounts and
gifts with purchase. For more
information call 704-0513.
School of Rock San Mateo presents
aTribute to Ozzy/Dio. 4 p.m. 711 S. B
St., San Mateo. School of Rock San
Mateo offers performance-based
music programs and camps for kids
ages 7 to 18. Students of the School of
Rock will perform. $8 at the door. For
more information call 347-3474.
Zoom Room Belmont Grand
Opening Party. 4 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Zoom Room Belmont, 1412 El
Camino Real, Belmont. Free. For each
person who RSVPs and attends the
event. a $10 donation will be made
to PHS/SPCA. Join for refreshments,
photo booth, raffles, caricatures, treat
tasting and the Doggy Disco. For
more information go to
www.zoomroom.me/427.
On Paper opening reception. 5 p.m.
to 7 p.m. Gallerie Citi, 1115 Howard
Ave., Burlingame. On Paper is a group
exhibition focused on paper-based
mixed media and works on paper.
Free. For more information call 577-
3799 or go to www.gallerieciti.com.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
March as a way to stave off a large-scale
fitness center whose representatives
expressed interest in building on three of
the five parcels at the corner of Industrial
Road and Holly Street which the city
considers the “landmark hotel site.” But
business owners told the council that the
sweeping ban is scaring away potential
buyers and tenants and the council
majority worried about infringing on pri-
vate property rights.
Instead, spurred by Councilman Matt
Grocott’s motion, the council asked city
staff to work collaboratively with all the
property owners to potentially change
the zoning law and encourage them not
to give the property for uses that might
impede the desired hotel.
“I don’t think any of these guys mean
to hurt the city with what they want to do
with their properties,” Grocott said.
Community Development Director Al
Savay told the council a large-scale fit-
ness center would be an “immediate
threat” to the site because a hotel would
likely not come to town if a business of
that size is on the parcels or nearby. The
impact would be “irreversible,” Savay
said.
The city has spent substantial time try-
ing to get the parcels together for a hotel
and not requiring extra approval is a
potential threat to the long-term vision,
said City Manager Jeff Maltbie.
“We could lose the last 12 years that
have been invested by the community,”
he said.
But property owners say they are the
ones threatened and potential business is
already running the other way rather
than face the lengthy city approval
process of paperwork and public hear-
ings.
“Time delays are deal killers and this
adds up to six weeks,” said attorney Ted
Hannig, who spoke on behalf of Black
Mountain Properties.
Mayor Bob Grassilli also wrestled
with the potential cloud the interim ordi-
nance could cast over economic activity.
“Markets don’t like uncertainty,” he
said.
Savay countered that city staff were
actually trying to help the market by
moving quickly with a zoning “tune-up”
to prevent an irreversible change with
long-reaching implications.
City Attorney Greg Rubens said the
city can’t simply enact the ordinance on
the five parcels and leave the others as-is
because that would be considered spot
zoning.
Despite the council’s desire for a
hotel, commercial Realtor William
Steele said the reality of that happening
might be off.
“Market forces do dictate develop-
ment ... and I’m not seeing the economy
supporting a hotel development here,” he
said.
In 2007, the City Council unanimous-
ly voted to change its downtown zoning
laws in large part to prevent a 99-cent
store from occupying the spot now filled
by Bianchini’s market. Any businesses
wanting to occupy a space larger than
2,500 square feet must obtain a condi-
tional use permit.
Grassilli said that ordinance is differ-
ent than an urgency ordinance because it
is crafted for properties over a specific
size instead of every businesses in a spe-
cific district.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102.
Continued from page 1
ZONING
In the meantime, Devil’s Canyon will
host its Beer Friday event April 26 when
it opens up its facility to the public for its
annual monthly party with music, food
and its California Sunshine IPA or
Deadicated Amber Ale. It also brews its
own root beer that it distributes broadly.
Devil’s Canyon plans to have more
and bigger events at its new facility, Joe
O’Brien, events director, told the Daily
Journal.
Live bands, food trucks and plenty of
beer at the once-a-month events have
helped make Devil’s Canyon a local
favorite but the company has now found
a worldwide audience as its beers are
distributed in Japan and Canada. It is
also being newly distributed in
Pennsylvania and Delaware, Garrett
said.
It will also continue to fill growlers
from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Fridays at its new
facility, O’Brien said.
The company had actually worked
with Belmont officials for about two
years to find a suitable location in that
city. Although it sits in unincorporated
county lands, its mailing address cur-
rently says Belmont.
“We looked everywhere,” Garrett said
about finding a new home in Belmont.
He’s happy to be moving to San
Carlos, however.
“The city gets it. They welcomed us
with open arms and have been awesome
and supportive,” Garrett said about San
Carlos officials.
The company even offers a beer
school and will rent outs its facility for
private events.
Garrett was not always a beer maker,
he started in the tech industry and
worked once for Disney.
“I woke up one day and said ‘I want to
make beer,’” he told the Daily Journal.
His wife’s family happened to be
brewers in the Czech Republic and fully
supported the idea, he said.
Now, Devil’s Canyon brews about
10,000 barrels a year and hopes to brew
even more as it grows over the next few
years.
It is also a sustainable company, recy-
cling pretty much every thing on site and
repurposing items such as old shipping
tankers into a mobile bar.
For more information go to www.dev-
ilscanyonbrewery.com.
silverfarb@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 1
BREWING
By Mesfin Fekadu
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Ke$ha Kardashian?
Not quite.
The wild and playful pop star is a
huge fan of the swarm of Kardashian
reality shows, but says her new series is
far from what you see on the small
screen from Kim, Kourtney and Khloe.
“I have a love for the Kardashians,
I’m not going to lie to you,” the 26-year-
old said in a recent interview. “I love
that show, but it’s very different. I do not
look as pretty as they do — like at all.
During my show, there’s a lot of
moments with no makeup at all, like I’m
in a T-shirt running around in my under-
wear.”
Six 30-minute episodes make up
“Ke$ha: My Crazy Beautiful Life,”
which debuted Tuesday on MTV. Her
brother, Lagan Sebert, filmed the singer
over two years while she toured and
recorded music. The show includes silly
moments backstage, clips of Ke$ha
making out with boys, as well as inter-
actions with her fans, friends and moth-
er Pebe Sebert, who co-wrote songs on
each of Ke$ha’s albums.
In one episode, Ke$ha stalks her ex-
boyfriend, who was the subject of her
2010 tune “The Harold Song.”
“I bumped into him recently and I was
kind of like, ‘Sorry about that,”’ she
said.
Ke$ha, who has a party-girl vibe, said
some members of her team worried
about what she would air on the show.
“I’m pretty game for most things,
honestly,” she said of what viewers will
see. “There are issues that my record
label has and my publicist, they don’t
want me to do lots of things, but ... I feel
like the message has to be genuine for
me. That’s why I am showing all the
imperfections.”
Ke$ha Kardashian? Pop singer heads to reality land
COMICS/GAMES
4-25-13
Wenesday’s PUZZLe sOLVed
PreViOUs
sUdOkU
ansWers
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
kids across/Parents down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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1 Reclusive actress Greta
6 Early New Zealander
11 Dorm coverers
12 Limerick writer Nash
13 Almost
15 Grasslands
16 Complained
18 After taxes
19 Hosp. section
21 Decked
22 Zounds!
23 Getz or Kenton
25 Cunning
28 Pond growth
30 Hgt.
31 Promise to pay
32 Unhatched fsh
33 Holman of basketball
35 Treat with respect
37 Doze (off)
38 Lose a toehold
40 Smallest pup
41 Wow!
42 Dangerous curve
43 Egg producer
46 Kind of fork
48 Happy
50 Former gasoline choice
54 Kitchen gadget
55 Accustom
56 -- Lama
57 Mine fnds
dOWn
1 Whitney invention
2 Gladiator’s hello
3 Narrow inlet
4 -- Triangle
5 Peace Prize city
6 Penicillin source
7 Ottoman offcial
8 Valhalla host
9 Actress Russo
10 Technical sch.
14 Ties up the phone
15 Bicycle part
17 Memo
19 Domed residence
20 Confned
22 Yield, as interest
24 Utmost degree
25 Nasal passage
26 Diving birds
27 Mongol dwelling
29 Coast Guard off.
34 Audibly
36 Spaghetti sauce herb
39 Donahue or McGraw
43 Rustler’s target
44 Charles Lamb
45 Table salt in the lab
46 Garr of “Tootsie”
47 Diamond or Armstrong
49 Herbal soother
51 Flop
52 Sooner than anon
53 -- Plaines, Ill.
diLBerT® CrOssWOrd PUZZLe
fUTUre sHOCk®
PearLs BefOre sWine®
GeT fUZZy®
THUrsday, aPriL 25, 2013
TaUrUs (April 20-May 20) -- Strive to be
cooperative when you fnd yourself dealing with a
group of friends. If you’re self-serving, others will
follow suit and no one will beneft.
GeMini (May 21-June 20) -- You have the ability
to achieve some important objectives, as long as
you don’t spread yourself too thin. Trying to juggle
several projects may not be the best idea.
CanCer (June 21-July 22) -- When talking with
friends about something political, you should be
extra careful. If you fnd that you’re endorsing a
position that differs from theirs, walk away fast.
LeO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Getting along with people
from all walks of life is one of your better assets.
Be careful, however, because this wonderful ability
might not apply when dealing with authority fgures.
VirGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Methods that work well
for you might not do so for others. Don’t try to force
your way of doing things on an unbeliever.
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- There is nothing wrong
with your earning potential, but you might not be too
adept at keeping what you make. Don’t allow what
you worked so hard for to slip through your fngers.
sCOrPiO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Although taking
charge comes naturally to you, don’t ruffe the
feathers of those who want to express themselves
differently. There’s room for every sort of viewpoint.
saGiTTariUs (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Friends will help
you to a limited degree, but don’t ask them to take
care of things that you should be handling yourself.
You wouldn’t like the answers you got.
CaPriCOrn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- You won’t be
disappointed if you build your hopes on a realistic
basis. The opposite will be true, however, if your
expectations are predicated upon receiving a free ride.
aQUariUs (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Certain conditions
that have an infuence on your fnances and/or career
could become quite complex. Handle your affairs
with extreme care and delicate attention to detail.
PisCes (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Provided no one
challenges you, you will be a most delightful
companion. Those who dare to do so, however,
could see a totally different side of your personality.
aries (March 21-April 19) -- Walk away from any
kind of joint venture the moment you see that not
everyone has anted up equally, especially if you’re
one of those asked to pony up the most.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Thursday • Apr. 25, 2013 27
THE DAILY JOURNAL
28
Thursday • Apr. 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
HELP WANTED: FOSTER CITY REC-
REATION FACILITY - part-time staff po-
sition open. Evening and weekend shifts
required. Must live locally. For a full job
description, please email:
Rob@themanorassn.com
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
LEAD COOK, CASHIERS, Avanti Pizza.
Menlo Park. (650)854-1222.
110 Employment
MARKET RESEARCH company seeks
individuals to evaluate service at local
establishments in Burlingame and the
surrounding area. Apply FREE:
www.bestmark.com or call
1-800-969-8477
SOFTWARE QUALITY Assurance Engi-
neer. MS & 1 yr; or BS & 5 yr exp reqd.
Redwood City, CA job. Send resume to
Endurance Intl Group-West, 8100 NE
Parkway Dr, #300, Vancouver, WA
98662.
SOFTWARE ENGINEER. MS & 1 yr; or
BS & 5 yr exp reqd. Redwood City, CA
job. Resume to Endurance Intl Group-
West, 8100 NE Parkway Dr, #300, Van-
couver, WA 98662
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
PRINCIPAL -
(Silver Lake Kraftwerk Mgmt Co., San
Carlos, CA): Assess potential invest-
ment opps in energy & resource or tech
sectors; Conduct bus & fin due diligence;
Conduct industry & co research; Create
& oversee investment return modeling;
Oversee discrete fin analysis, incl creat-
ing summary fins, comparable co analy-
sis, comparable acquisition analysis, dis-
counted cash flow analysis, & investment
return analysis; Create investment
memos & presentations; Assist w/negoti-
ating legal docs; Assist w/presentation of
analyses &findings to deal teams & part-
nership; Assist w/recruit & training of jr
prof; Provide overall support to sr prof &
deal teams. REQS: Bach. in Bus Admin,
Fin, or its foreign equiv; Prior exp must
incl: 4 yrs exp in conducting bus & fin
due diligence on cos in energy & re-
source or tech sectors; in conducting en-
ergy & resource or tech industry res
studying mkt size, mkt growth rates, &
competitive landscape & mkt share using
res tools & services such as GLG, Gart-
ner, and IDC or equiv; in conducting en-
ergy & resource or tech industry co res
studying co fin, capitalization, & valuation
using res tools & services such as Capi-
talIQ, FactSet, Bloomberg, & EDGAR; in
creating & overseeing invest return mod-
eling for majority or min invest w/ or w/o
the use of leverage; in overseeing dis-
crete fin analysis, incl creating summary
fin, comparable co analysis, comparable
acquisition analysis, discounted cash
flow analysis, & invest return analysis; in
the recruit & training of jr fin, banking, or
private equity prof; in prov overall sup-
port to sr invest banking or private equity
prof & deal teams through co & industry
res, fin modeling & analysis, & exec sum-
maries; in MS Excel, MS PowerPoint, &
MS Word software prog; 2 yrs exp. in
working as an analyst at a top tier invest-
ment bank in a group focused on the en-
ergy & resource or tech sectors; in work-
110 Employment
ing at a top tier private equity firm as an
assoc assessing potential invest opps in
the energy & resource or tech sectors; in
creating invest memos & presentations
for the partnership & investment commit-
tee to help inform investment decisions;
and in the presentation of fin analyses &
findings to deal teams & partnership.
Apply to: Katie Morin, katie.morin@sil-
verlake.com
120 Child Care Services
AGAPE VILLAGES
Foster Family Agency
Become a Foster Parent!
We Need Loving Homes for
Disadvantaged Children
Entrusted to Our Care.
Monthly Compensation Provided.
Call 1-800-566-2225
Lic #397001741
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254755
The following person is doing business
as: Small Boat Seafood, 563 Isabella,
HALF MOON BAY, CA 94019 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Re-
becca Barger, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 01/23/2013.
/s/ Rebecca Barger /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/06/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/04/13, 04/11/13, 04/18/13, 04/25/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255304
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Handyman Hauler, 11971 San
Mateo Rd., Ste. 3A, HALF MOON BAY,
CA 94019 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owners: Douglas Adams, 11971
San Mateo Rd., Ste. 3A, HALF MOON
BAY, CA 94019 and Dave C. Andrews,
PO Box 1027, El Granada, CA 94018.
The business is conducted by a General
Partnership. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
N/A.
/s/ Douglas Adams /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/04/13, 04/11/13, 04/18/13, 04/25/13).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 520182
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Kenneth Martin Palter
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Kenneth Martin Palter filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Kenneth Martin Palter,
aka Kenneth M. Palter
Proposed name: Kenneth Edward Ta-
foya
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on May 21,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J , at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 03/04/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 03/27/13
(Published, 04/11/13, 04/18/13, 4/25/13,
05/02/13)
CASE# CIV 520229
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
David Garcia
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, David Garcia filed a petition
with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
Present name: David Garcia
Proposed name: David Garcia-Solorzano
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on May 23,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J , at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 03/29/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 3/27/13
(Published, 04/04/13, 04/11/13, 4/18/13,
04/25/13)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255414
The following person is doing business
as: Z.O.Y. Fitness Studio, 415 Grand
Ave 3rd Flr., SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080 is hereby registered by the
following owner: Oneyda Torrez Mantilla,
855 Commercial Ave., #3 South San
Francisco, CA 94080 and Marlene Palo-
mino Chaffo, 332 Second Ln., South San
Francisco, CA 94080. The business is
conducted by a General Partnership. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ Oneyda Mantilla /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/10/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/11/13, 04/18/13, 04/25/13, 05/02/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254738
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Eden Restored 4 U, 247 Do-
lores St., EL GRANADA, CA 94018 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Pamela L. Fastabend, same address
and Edgardo Diaz, 1328 Carlton Ave.,
Menlo Park, CA 94025. The business is
conducted by a Joint Venture. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Pamela L. Fastabend /
/s/ Edgardo Diaz /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/04/13, 04/11/13, 04/18/13, 04/25/13).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 520340
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Laurel Narvios Palileo
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Laurel Narvios Palileo filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Laurel Narvios Palileo
Proposed name: Juan Laurel Narvios
Palileo
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on June 7, 2013
at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J , at 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 04/09/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 04/09/13
(Published, 04/11/13, 04/18/13, 4/25/13,
05/02/13)
CASE# CIV 520921
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Cindy Lin Anderson
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Cindy Lin Anderson and Dan-
iel Anderson filed a petition with this
court for a decree changing name as fol-
lows:
Present name: Caleb Ming-Rui Lin An-
derson
Proposed name: Caleb Ming-Rui Ander-
son
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on June 5, 2013
at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J , at 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 04/23/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 04/22/13
(Published, 04/25/13, 05/02/13,
05/09/13, 05/16/13)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255223
The following person is doing business
as: Smart Sports Massage and Rehabili-
tation Therapy, 629 Prospect Row, SAN
MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Mary Anne Pat-
ton, same address. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s/ Mary Anne Patton /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/29/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/04/13, 04/11/13, 04/18/13, 04/25/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255233
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Cafe On Primrose, 321 Prim-
rose Rd., BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Joseph Eadeh and Jacqueline Ea-
deh, 1669 Old Bayshore Hwy., Burlin-
game, CA 94010. The business is con-
ducted by a Married Couple. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Joseph Eadeh /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/29/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/04/13, 04/11/13, 04/18/13, 04/25/13).
29 Thursday • Apr. 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255226
The following person is doing business
as: Seecom, 834 Rigel Ln., FOSTER
CITY, CA 94404 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Sustainable Enviro-
mental Engineering Consulting & Man-
agement, Inc., CA The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 03/18/2013.
/s/ Nicholas Haddad /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/29/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/04/13, 04/11/13, 04/18/13, 04/25/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254806
The following person is doing business
as: Pacifica Martial Arts Club, 830 Rosita
Rd., #11B, PACIFICA, CA 94044 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Robert Stuckey, 788 Oddstad Blvd., PA-
CIFICA, CA 94044 The business is con-
ducted by an Unincorporated Associates.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 03/03/2013.
/s/ Robert Stuckey /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/04/13, 04/11/13, 04/18/13, 04/25/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255260
The following person is doing business
as: Max Management Group, 969G
Edgewater Blvd., #168, FOSTER CITY,
CA is hereby registered by the following
owner: Arthur C. Wu, 1 Williams Ln.,
FOSTER CITY, CA 94404. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Arthur Wu /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/01/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/04/13, 04/11/13, 04/18/13, 04/25/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255308
The following person is doing business
as: Mr. C. Towing, 1850 Industrial Way,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Cos-
tantin J. Swies, 434 Florence St., Sunny-
vale, CA 94086. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 01959633
/s/ Costantin Swies /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/04/13, 04/11/13, 04/18/13, 04/25/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255303
The following person is doing business
as: Andrews Disaster Recovery, 1161
Tamarind St., MONTARA, CA 94037 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Isbjorn, Inc., CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Dave C. Andrews /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/04/13, 04/11/13, 04/18/13, 04/25/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254821
The following person is doing business
as: ACS Courier, 460 Miller Ave.,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Jose Antonio Maciel, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 03/01/2013.
/s/ Jose Antonio Maciel /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/04/13, 04/11/13, 04/18/13, 04/25/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255219
The following person is doing business
as: Student Career Coaching, 310 Vir-
gina Ave., SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Deborah Charlip Briant, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on .
/s/ Deborah Charlip Briant /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/29/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/04/13, 04/11/13, 04/18/13, 04/25/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255357
The following person is doing business
as: Quantisci, 1011 Muir Way, BEL-
MONT, CA 94002 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Paul Beroza,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 04/08/2013.
/s/ Paul Beroza /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/11/13, 04/18/13, 04/25/13, 05/02/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255354
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Mynerals, 3773 Jefferson Ave.,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94062 is hereby
registered by the following owners: Gigi
Carunungan, same address and Kevin
Acken, 679 Rustic Ln., Mountain View,
CA 94040. The business is conducted by
a General Partnership. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Kevin Acken /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/11/13, 04/18/13, 04/25/13, 05/02/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255368
The following person is doing business
as: College Shell Auto Care, 1400 W.
Hillsdale Blvd., SAN MATEO, CA 94403
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Cano Alfredo, 525 Fiesta Dr., San
Mateo, CA 94403. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Cano Alfredo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/11/13, 04/18/13, 04/25/13, 05/02/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254918
The following person is doing business
as: Luna’s Cafe, 1720 El Camino Real,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Platters
Catering, Inc, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Samer Kiresh /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/14/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/11/13, 04/18/13, 04/25/13, 05/02/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255345
The following person is doing business
as: Coldwell Banker Optima Realty, 1435
Huntington Ave., #300, SOUTH SAN
FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: BEZ Finan-
cial Group, Inc, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Edward C. Wong /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/11/13, 04/18/13, 04/25/13, 05/02/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255297
The following person is doing business
as: Pen and Ink Calligraphy, 700 Prom-
ontory Point Lane Unit 1307, FOSTER
CITY, CA 94404 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Sophia Victoria Hut-
son, same address. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Sophia Victoria Hutson /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/11/13, 04/18/13, 04/25/13, 05/02/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255409
The following person is doing business
as: Room to Be, 348 N. El Camino Real,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Allyssa
Glatt, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Allyssa Glatt /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/09/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/11/13, 04/18/13, 04/25/13, 05/02/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255321
The following person is doing business
as: Juan Godoy Toba, 11-50 E. Santa In-
ez, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Juan
Godoy Tobar, 337 Grand Blvd., Apt #4,
San Mateo CA 94401. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Juan Godoy Tobar /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/11/13, 04/18/13, 04/25/13, 05/02/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255275
The following person is doing business
as: Color Me Mine of Daly City, 445
Westlake Shopping Center, DALY CITY,
CA 94015 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Michael Berkowitz and
Joey Cardenas, 940 Magnolia Dr., Ala-
meda, CA 94502. The business is con-
ducted by a Married Couple. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Michael Berkowitz /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/02/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/11/13, 04/18/13, 04/25/13, 05/02/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255505
The following person is doing business
as: Friends Market, 200 San Felipe Ave.,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Ravi Kant Dhingra, 2002 Dolphin Ct.,
San Leandro, CA 94579. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Ravi Kant Dhingra /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/16/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/18/13, 04/25/13, 05/02/13, 05/09/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255478
The following person is doing business
as: Warfighter Brewing Company, 360
Industrial Road, Unit E, SAN CARLOS,
CA 94070 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Warfighter Brewing Com-
pany, CA. The business is conducted by
a Corporation. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 01/01/2013.
/s/ Jon Barton /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/18/13, 04/25/13, 05/02/13, 05/09/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255492
The following person is doing business
as: Taqueria Celaya, 608 Linden Ave,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Maria I. Hernandez De Gamino, 648 3rd
Ave., San Bruno, CA 94066. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ Maria I. Hernandez De Gamino /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/18/13, 04/25/13, 05/02/13, 05/09/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255391
The following person is doing business
as: Reflection, 115 Serramonte Center,
DALY CITY, CA 94015 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Charina
Pedron, 401 Concord St., Vallejo, CA
94591. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Charina Pedron /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/09/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/18/13, 04/25/13, 05/02/13, 05/09/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255280
The following person is doing business
as: Dragon Benefit Advisors, 1700 S. El
Camino Real, #501. SAN MATEO, CA
94402 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Dragon Financial & Invest-
ment Group, Inc, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 01/01/2013.
/s/ Walter Chao /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/02/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/18/13, 04/25/13, 05/02/13, 05/09/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255276
The following person is doing business
as: Hotel Focus SFO, 111 Mitchell Ave.,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Tiburon Hospitality, LLC, CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Limited Liability
Company. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
02/01/2013.
/s/ William R. Dixon /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/02/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/18/13, 04/25/13, 05/02/13, 05/09/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255604
The following person is doing business
as: Elite Performance, 1362 N. Carolan
Ave., BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is here-
by registered by the following owner: Lin
& Yeung Group, Inc., CA. The business
is conducted by a Corporation. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Gary Yeung /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/23/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/25/13, 05/02/13, 05/09/13, 05/16/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255559
The following person is doing business
as: International Rug Gallery - FBN, 32
E. 4th Avenue, SAN MATEO, CA 94401
is hereby registered by the following
owner: International Rug Gallery Corp.,
CA. The business is conducted by a Cor-
poration. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Farooq Bhat /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/25/13, 05/02/13, 05/09/13, 05/16/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255516
The following person is doing business
as: Winesavage.com, 440 Talbert St.
DALY CITY, CA 94014 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Wine Sav-
age, LLC, NV. The business is conduct-
ed by a Limited Liability Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ David Shefferman /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/17/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/25/13, 05/02/13, 05/09/13, 05/16/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255523
The following person is doing business
as: PawCrush Doggy Daycare, 36 N.
Claremont St. #3, SAN MATEO, CA
94401 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Lisa Candelario, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Lisa Candelario /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/17/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/25/13, 05/02/13, 05/09/13, 05/16/13).
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #236702
The following person has abandoned the
use of the fictitious business name:
Chef’s Choice Catering, 393 Barbara Ln.,
DALY CITY, CA 94015 The fictitious
business name referred to above was
filed in County on 01/04/2010. The busi-
ness was conducted by: Carolina Bilbae-
no, same address and Rosemarie Rodri-
guez, 143 Fawcett, Hercules, CA 94547
/s/ Carolina Bilbaeno /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 03/26/2013. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 04/18/13,
04/25/13, 05/02/13, 05/09/13).
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #M-253384
The following person has abandoned the
use of the fictitious business name: Int’l.
Rug Gallery, 32 E. 4th Avenue, SAN MA-
TEO, CA 94401 The fictitious business
name referred to above was filed in
County on 11/28/2012. The business
was conducted by: Farooq Bhat, 210 Es-
tates Dr., San Bruno, CA 94066 and
Khalid Farooq, 2363 Bermuda Lane,
Hayward, CA 94545.
/s/ Farooq Bhat /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 04/22/2013. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 04/25/13,
05/02/13, 05/09/13, 05/16/13).
SUMMONS
(CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER: CIVBS1300025
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (Aviso Al De-
mandado): Karen M. Rothgery, an indi-
vidual; All Persons Unknown, Claming
Any Legal, or Equitable Right, Title, Es-
tate, Lien, or Interest in the Property De-
scribed in the Complaint Adverse to
Plaintiff’s Title, or Any Cloud on Plaintiff’s
Title Thereto; and Does 1-20 inclusive
You are being sued by plaintiff: (Lo esta
demandando el demandante): Nipa
Rothgery, an Individual, and as PER-
SONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE
ESTATE OF FRANK A. ROTHGERY.
NOTICE! You have been sued. The court
may decide against you without your be-
ing heard unless you respond within 30
days. Read the information below.
You have 30 calendar days after this
summons and legal papers are served
on you to file a written response at the
court and have a copy served on the
plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not pro-
tect you. Your written response must be
in proper legal form if you want the court
to hear your case. There may be a court
form that you can use for your response.
You can find these court forms and more
information at the California Courts On-
line Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your
county law library, or the courthouse
nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing
fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver
form. If you do not file your response on
time, you may lose the case by default,
and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning
from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You
may want to call an attorney right away.
If you do not know an attorney, you may
want to call an attorney referral service.
If you cannot afford an attorney, you may
be eligible for free legal services from a
nonprofit legal services program. You
can locate these nonprofit groups at the
California Legal Services Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Califor-
nia Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by
contacting your local court or county bar
association. NOTE: The court has a stat-
utory lien for waived fees and costs on
any settlement or arbitration award of
$10,000 or more in a civil case. The
court’s lien must be paid before the court
will dismiss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demando. Si no re-
sponde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede
decidir en su contra sin escuchar su ver-
sion. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de
que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles
legales para presentar una respuesta por
escrito en esta corte y hacer que se en-
203 Public Notices
tregue ena copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro-
tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene
que estar en formato legal correcto si de-
sea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que
usted pueda usar para su respuesta.
Puede encontrar estos formularios de la
corte y mas informacion en el Centro de
Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/),
en la biblio teca de leyes de su condado
o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si
no puede pagar la cuota de presenta-
cion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de
cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a
tiempo, puede perder el caso por incum-
plimiento y la corte le podra quitar su su-
eldo, dinero y bienes sin mas adverten-
cia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es re-
comendable que llame a un abogado in-
mediatamente. Si no conoce a un abo-
dado, puede llamar a de servicio de re-
mision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a
un abogado, es posible que cumpia con
los requisitos para obtener servicios le-
gales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede
encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro
en el sitio web de California Legal Serv-
ices Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro
de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/)
o poniendose en contacto con la corte o
el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar
las cuotas y costos exentos por imponer
un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera-
cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida
mediante un acuerdo o una concesion
de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil.
Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte
antes de que la corte pueda desechar el
caso.
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccion de la corte es):
Barstow Courthouse
235 East Moutain View St.
SAME
Barstow, CA 92311
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff
without an attorney, is: (El nombre, direc-
cion y numero de telefono del abogado
del demandante, o del demandante que
no tiene abogado, es):
RIckey Ivie, Esq. (SBN# 76864)
Benjamin A. Davis, Esq. (SBN# 255375)
Ivie, McNeill & Wyatt
444 S. Flower St., Ste 1800
LOS ANGELES, CA 90071
(213)489-0028 (213)489-0552
Date: (Fecha) Jan. 14, 2013
Glenda Ford, Clerk
(Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
April 18, 25, May 2, 9, 2013.
210 Lost & Found
FOUND YOUNG female Rottweiler 85lbs
ish on Skyline Blvd in Woodside call
(813)418-2884
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
30
Thursday • Apr. 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
294 Baby Stuff
SOLID OAK CRIB - Excellent condition
with Simmons mattress, $90.,
(650)610-9765
296 Appliances
5’ AMERICAN STANDARD JACUZZI
TUB - drop-in, $100., SOLD!
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC LG WASHER & DRYER -
white, used once, front load, SOLD!
GE PROFILE WASHER & DRYER -
New, originally $1600., moving, must
sell, $850., (650)697-2883
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
JENN-AIR 30” downdraft slide-in range.
JES9800AAS, $875., never used, still in
the crate. Cost $2200 new.
(650)207-4664
KENMORE ELECTRIC OVEN & MICRO
COMBO - built in, $100., SOLD!
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
PORTABLE HEATER - one year old,
FREE, SOLD!
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor, (650)726-
1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SMALL REFRIGERATOR w/freezer
great for college dorm, $25 obo SOLD!
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
16 OLD glass telephone line insulators.
$60 San Mateo (650)341-8342
1940 VINTAGE telephone guaranty
bench Salem hardrock maple excellent
condition $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
67 USED United States (50) and Europe-
an (17) Postage Stamps. Most issued
before World War II. All different and de-
tached from envelopes. All for $4.00,
(650)787-8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MENORAH - Antique Jewish tree of life,
10”W x 30”H, $100., (650)348-6428
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
NASCAR DIE CAST COLLECTIBLE
CARS. Total 23, Including #3 Dale Earn-
hardt’s car.Good condition. $150 for the
lot. Or willing to sell separately. Call for
details, (650)619-8182.
NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE – unop-
ened 20 boxes of famous hockey stars
sealed boxes, $5.00 per box, great gift,
(650)578-9208
PRISMS 9 in a box $99 obo
(650)363-0360
STAINED GLASS WINDOW - 30” x 18”,
diamond pattern, multi-colored, $95.,
(650)375-8021
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
298 Collectibles
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria 650-873-
8167
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE STOVE, Brown brand, 30",
perfect condition, $75, (650)834-6075
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
TWO WORLD Globes, Replogle Plati-
num Classic Legend, USA Made. $34 ea
obo SOLD!
VINTAGE THOMASVILLE wingback
chair $50 firm, SSF (650)583-8069
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $20 each or both for $35 nice set.
SSF (650)583-8069
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HP PRINTER - Model DJ1000, new, in
box, $38. obo, (650)995-0012
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
PS3 BLACK wireless headset $20
(650)771-0351
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
WESTINGHOUSE 32" Flat Screen TV
$90 SOLD!
304 Furniture
1940’S MAPLE dressing table with Mir-
ror & Stool. Needs loving and refinishing
to be beautiful again. Best Offer.
Burlingame (650)697-1160
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SEEN painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
ANTIQUE BANKER'S floor lamp Adj.
Height with angled shade: anodyzed
bronze $75 (415)585-3622
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BASE CABINET for TV or Books, etc;
mahogany, double doors, divided
storage, excellent condition, 24"D,
14"Hx36"W, on casters $20
(650)342-7933
BEAUTIFUL WOOD PATIO TABLE with
glass inset and 6 matching chairs with
arms. Excellent condition. Kahoka
wood. $500.00 cash, Call leave mes-
sage and phone number, (650)851-1045
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
CABINET BLOND Wood, 6 drawers, 31”
Tall, 61” wide, 18” deep, $45
(650)592-2648
CHAIR (2), with arms, Italian 1988 Cha-
teau D'Ax, solid, perfect condition. $50
each or $85 for both. (650)591-0063
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
COPENHAGEN TEAK dining table with
dual 20" Dutch leaves extensions. 48/88"
long x 32" wide x 30" high. $95.00
(650)637-0930
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
304 Furniture
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DRESSER & CABINET - Good condi-
tion, clean, 7 drawers, horizontal, 3 lay-
ers, FREE! (650)312-8188
DRESSER, FOR SALE all wood excel-
lent condition $50 obo (650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8’ x 30”, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
FOLDING TABLE- 5’x2’ $10
(650)341-2397
GRANDMA ROCKING chair beautiful
white with gold trim $100 (650)755-9833
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
INDOOR OR OUTSIDE ROUND TABLE
- off white, 40”, $20.obo, (650)571-5790
KING PLATFORM BED WITH TWO
BOX SPRINGS - no mattresses, like
new, Foster City, $100., (954)907-0100
LIGHT WOOD Rocking Chair & Has-
sock, gold cushions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RECLINER - Leather, beige chair with
ottoman, excellent condition, $50.,
(954)940-0277 Foster City
RECTANGULAR MIRROR with gold
trim, 42”H, 27” W, $30., (650)593-0893
ROCKING CHAIR - Beautiful light wood
rocking chair, very good condition, $65.,
OBO, (650)952-3063
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
SOFA TABLE good condition top 42"/36"
15" deep 30" tall $60 (650)393-5711
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TALL OUTSIDE BISTRO TABLE -
glass top with 2 chairs $45 (firm)
(650)871-7200
TEAK TV stand, wheels, rotational, glass
doors, drawer, 5 shelves. 31" wide x 26"
high X 18" deep. $75.00 (650)637-0930
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
WICKER DRESSER, white, good condi-
tion, ht 50", with 30", deep 20". carry it
away for $75 (650)393-5711
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 (650)755-9833
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
BREVILLE JUICER - Like new, $99.,
(650)375-8021
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good con-
dition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 (650)755-9833
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
308 Tools
BLACK & Decker Electric hedge trimmer
SOLD!
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 6 Gal. Wet/Dry Shop Vac,
$25 (650)341-2397
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
NEW DRILL DRIVER - 18V + battery &
charger, $30., (650)595-3933
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
SANDER, MAKITA finishing sander, 4.5
x 4.5"' used once. Complete with dust
bag and hard shell case. $35.00
(650)591-0063
SKIL 18 VOLT CORDLESS DRILL with
two batteries, 1 hour charger, with hard
shell case and instruction booklet. Used
once. Perfect condition. $60., (650)591-
0063
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
TOOL BOX - custom made for long
saws, $75., (650)375-8021
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $65 (650)341-8342
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
2 MATCHING LIGHT SCONES - style
wall mount, plug in, bronze finish, 12” L x
5”W , good working condition, $12. both,
(650)347-5104
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History and
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
6 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $9. for all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42” X 18” X 6”, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
ADULT VIDEOS variety 8 for $50
(650)871-7200
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99., (650)580-
3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99., (650)580-
3316
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BATHROOM VANITY light fixture - 2
frosted glass shades, brass finish, 14”W
x 8.75”H x 8.75”D, wall mount, excellent
condition, $43., (650)347-5104
BELL COLLECTION 50 plus asking $50
for entire collection (650)574-4439
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY Jake AB Scissor Exercise Ma-
chine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
310 Misc. For Sale
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
CLEAN CAR SYSTEM - unopened
sealed box, interior/exterior/chrome solu-
tions, cloths, chamois, great gift, $20.,
SOLD!
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., SOLD!
EVERY DAY'S A PARTY - up-opened,
Emeril Lagasse book of party ideas, cel-
ebrations, recipes, great gift, $10.,
SOLD!
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
HABACHI BBQ Grill heavy iron 22" high
15" wide $25 (650)593-8880
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JAMES PATTERSON books 2 Hard
backs at $3 ea. (650)341-1861
JAMES PATTERSON books 5 paper
backs at $1 ea. (650)341-1861
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX 55, repels and kills fleas
and ticks. 9 months worth, $60
(650)343-4461
KING SIZE BEDSPREAD - floral, beauti-
ful, like new, $30., (954)940-0277 Foster
City
KIRBY COMBO Shampooer/ Vacuum/
attachments. "Ultimate G Diamond
Model", $250., (650)637-0930
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $10., (650)347-5104
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LED MOTION security light (brand new
still in box) $40 SOLD!
LUGGAGE - Carry-on with wheels,
brand new, Kensington, $30., (954)940-
0277 Foster City
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW COWBOY BOOTS - 9D, Unworn,
black, fancy, only $85., (650)595-3933
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
PANAMA HAT; Tequilla Reed (Ecuador)
superb. Traditlional, New. Was $250
asking $25 (415)585-3622
PET COVERS- Protect your car seat
from your dog. 2, new $15 ea.
(650)343-4461
PRINCESS CRYSTAL galsswear set
$50 (650)342-8436
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
ROLLER SKATES - Barely used, mens
size 13, boots attached to 8 wheels,
$100. obo, (650)223-7187
SET OF Blue stemwear glasses $25
(650)342-8436
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOP LIGHT FIXTURE - unused, flores-
cent, brand Mark Finelite, 48” x 9” x 3”,
white finish, two working bulbs, 14’ cord,
excellent condition, $47., (650)347-5104
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. White Rotary
sewing machine similar age, cabinet
style. $85 both. (650)574-4439
SOLID METAL STAND - 3 tiers, strong,
non skid support, 20” x 30” x 36” tall, has
potential for many uses, $17., (650)347-
5104
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
310 Misc. For Sale
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TRIPLE X videos - and accessories,
$99., (650)589-8097
TYPEWRITER IBM Selectric II with 15”
Carrige. $99 obo (650)363-0360
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VIDEO POKER MACHINE - from Las
Vegas, $450., (650)592-3545
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WAHL HAIR trimmer cutting shears
(heavy duty) $25., (650)871-7200
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
WOOD PLANTATION SHUTTERS -
Like new, (6) 31” x 70” and (1) 29” x 69”,
$25. each, SOLD!
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 (650)341-8342
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted, SOLD!
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
1 MENS golf shirt XX large red $18
(650)871-7200
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
DINGO WESTERN BOOTS - (like new)
$60., (408)764-6142
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
FOX FUR Scarf 3 Piece $99 obo
(650)363-0360
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
LADIES CLOTHES - Tops & pants (20)
Size S-M, each under $10., (954)940-
0277 Foster City
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
LEVIS JACKET - size XXL, Beautiful
cond., med., $35., (650)595-3933
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
NEW! OLD NAVY Coat: Boy/Gril, fleece-
lined, hooded $15 (415)585-3622
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
31 Thursday • Apr. 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Dot-__ printer
7 Hash house sign
11 Org. that financed
many public
murals
14 Brand with a
Justice For
Potatoes League
15 Inside
information?
16 Ancient pillager
17 Pop
20 Air France-__:
European flier
21 Cathedral areas
22 Place in a 1969
Western
23 Tech staff
member
24 Camel hair colors
26 Pop
32 Bat mitzvah
locale
33 Bands from
Japan
34 Gp. concerned
with dropout
prevention
35 Run smoothly
36 Condor’s booster
39 Ruckus
40 “__ you sure?”
41 Charcutier
offering
42 2010 Angelina
Jolie spy film
43 Pop
48 “Sooey!” reply
49 “Goodness
gracious!”
50 Kitty’s sunny
sleeping spot
52 TV and radio
53 Toulouse : oeil ::
Toledo : __
56 Pop
60 An official lang. of
Kenya
61 The “a” in “a = lw”
62 First word of
Longfellow’s
“Paul Revere’s
Ride”
63 Technique
64 Chews the fat
65 First step toward
nirvana
DOWN
1 Poke fun at
2 Shrinking sea
3 Duration
4 Poke fun at
5 Defensive denial
6 Second word of
Coleridge’s
“Kubla Khan”
7 Outdoor security
options
8 Battling god
9 Itty bit
10 Pink Floyd’s
Barrett
11 Pentecost
12 Flat-bottomed
boat
13 “Put Your Head
on My Shoulder”
singer
18 Claim with
conviction
19 Truckee River
city
23 II into D
24 “Yay, the
weekend!”
25 Short right hand?
26 “Balderdash!”
27 Chekov
bridgemate
28 Quantitative
“science”?
29 Bulls’ org.
30 “Jurassic Park”
co-star
31 Father of modern
Italian, per
linguists
36 Very soon after
37 President between
Tyler and Taylor
38 No and Who:
Abbr.
42 Messy room
44 Excalibur part
45 Change the
colors of, say
46 Wavy lines, in
music
47 Justice who’s the
son of an Italian
immigrant
50 Get into a lather
51 New Rochelle
college
52 Overly
submissive
53 “The Simpsons”
bus driver
54 Poke fun (at)
55 Intro to science?
57 Put into words
58 It’s usually FDIC-
insured
59 Bassoon end?
By Jeffrey Wechsler
(c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
04/25/13
04/25/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
316 Clothes
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, beauitful color, megenta, with
shawl like new $40 obo (650)349-6059
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
brand new, never worn for $25
(650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, $30.
each, (808)271-3183
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all, (650)851-
0878
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
STEEL MORTAR BOX - 3 x 6, used for
hand mixing concrete or cement, $35.,
(650)368-0748
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
4 TENNIS RACKETS- and 2 racketball
rackets(head).$25.(650)368-0748.
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
318 Sports Equipment
AIR RIFLE, Crossman, 2200 Magnum,
vintage perfect condition. Must be 18 or
over to purchase. $65.00 SOLD!
CROSMAN PELLET/BB rifle - 2100
Classic, .177 caliber, excellent condition,
rare, $50.obo, SOLD!
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees good condition $19
(650)365-1797
GOLF CLUBS -2 woods, 9 irons, a put-
ter, and a bag with pull cart, $50.,
(650)952-0620
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
MEN'S PEUGOT 10 speed bike; Good
Condition. $70.00 OBO call:
(650)342-8510
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call SOLD!
ROWING MACHINE. $30.00
(650)637-0930
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
VOLKI SNOW SKIS - $40., (408)764-
6142
319 Firewood
MIXED FIREWOOD, ALL FIREPLACE
SIZE- 5’ high by 10’ long . SOLD!
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
381 Homes for Sale
SUPER PARKSIDE
SAN MATEO
Coming Soon!
3 bedroom, 1 bath
All remodeled with large dining room
addition. Home in beautiful condition.
Enclosed front yard. Clean in and out.
Under $600K. (650)888-9906
VOLUNTEER WITH
Habitat for Humanity and help us
build homes and communities in
East Palo Alto.
Volunteers welcome
Wed-Sat from 8:30-4pm.
415-625-1022
www.habitatgsf.org
435 Rental Needed
SEEKING:
Granny Unit /
Guest House /
Studio
Harvard Masters Degree
Graduate
CEO of a Local Start-Up
Responsible, Healthy, Single,
Pet Free, Non-Smoker looking
for a Granny Unit / Guest Home
in San Mateo/Burlingame.
Ready to move in 01 July
2013.
Please e-mail or call me at:
oliverpmj@gmail.com
Phone: 408.234.1572.
Excellent References
available upon request.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. 650 591-4046
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
ROOM FOR RENT in sunny San Mateo
duplex. Rent is $940 plus utilities. Lots of
patio space, garage space for storage
and bonus office room. Close to down-
town and easy access to Highway 101
for quick trip to San Francisco or Silicon
Valley. Share with one other professional
middle-aged male. One cat lives in
house now and a second will be wel-
comed. RENTED!
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
1998 CHEV. Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$5,000, Call Glen @ (650) 583-1242
Ext. # 2
‘93 FLEETWOOD $ 2,000
Good Condition (650)481-5296
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
CHEVY 1963 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop,
390 engine, Leather Interior. Will consid-
er $2,500 Bid (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
DODGE ‘06 DAKOTA SLT model, Quad
Cab, V-8, 63K miles, Excellent Condtion.
$8500, OBO, Daly City. (650)755-5018
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
need some brake work. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,800.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAG with
brackets $35., (650)670-2888
NEW MOTORCYCLE HELMET - Modu-
lar, dual visor, $69., (650)595-3933
645 Boats
‘72 18’ RAYSON V Drive flat boat, 468
Chevy motor with wing custom trailer,
$20,000 obo, (650)851-0878
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
650 RVs
‘73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Service
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 1976 Nova rims with tires 2057514
leave message $80 for both
(650)588-7005
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
JEEP TJ 2004-2006 (1) ALUMINUM
WHEEL & TIRE, brand new condition,
$90., (650)200-9665
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
MECHANIC'S CREEPER - vintage,
Comet model SP, all wood with
pillow,four swivel wheels, great shape.
$40.00 (650)591-0063
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TIRES (2) - 33 x 12.5 x 15, $99.,
(650)589-8097
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
32
Thursday • Apr. 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Building/Remodeling
CONSIDERING A
HOME REMODEL
OR ADDITION?
Call (650)343-4340
for Drafting Services at
Reasonable Rates
Cabinetry
Cleaning
Concrete
POLY-AM
CONSTRUCTION
General Contractor
Free Estimate
Specializing in
Concrete • Brickwork • Stonewall
Interlocking Pavers • Landscaping
Tile • Retaining Wall
Bonded & Insured Lic. #685214
Ben: (650)375-1573
Cell: (650) 280-8617
Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
ART'S MARTIN DOORS
Sales Installation Service
Call (650) 878 1555
for all your garage door
needs.
BEST PRICE GUARANTEE:
$100 off
any other company's
written proposal on a
garage door-and-opener
package. Bring this ad to
our showroom and get $50
more on the above offer!
1000 King Drive, Suite 200
Daly City, CA 94015
BBB Rating: A+
www.arts-martindoors.com
State License #436114
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
Electricians
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Housecleaning
FAMILY HOUSE SERVICE
Green products
Residential & Commerical
Monthly, Weekly, Bi-Weekly
Free Estimates
(650)315-6681
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
AL’S HOME
SERVICES
Build it, Fix it, Paint it
Projects, Bathrooms,
Remodels, Repairs
(408)515-8907
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof Re-
pair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
•Carpet Installation
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
Hauling
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
HAULING
Low Rates
Residential and Commercial
Free Estimates,
General Clean-Ups, Garage
Clean-Outs, Construction Clean-Ups
& Gardening Services
Call (650)630-0116
or (650)636-6016
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$40& UP HAUL
Since 1988 • Licensed/Insured
Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating
(650)341-7482
Landscaping
ASP LANDSCAPING
• All kinds of Concrete • Stamp
• Retaining Wall • Tree Service
• Brick • Roofing • Fencing
• New Lawns
Free Estimates
(650)544-1435
(650)834-4495
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
Painting
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plaster/Stucco
PLASTERING & STUCCO
Interior & Exterior,
Dry Rot Repair
Free Estimates
Lic.# 632990
Call Ray (650)994-7451
(415)740-5570
Plumbing
DRAIN & SEWER
CLEANING
PLUMBING/ RE-PIPING
VIDEO SEWER
INSPECTIONS
TRENCHLESS PIPE
INSTALLATIONS
EMERGENCY HELP
15% SENIOR DISCOUNT
Free estimates
(408)347-0000
Lic #933572
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
Solar Power
GO SOLAR
with
SOLEENIC
• $0 Down
• Excellent Financing
• Free LED Lighting retrofit for your
bedrooms/bathrooms
Call us for free estimates
(415)601-8454
www.soleenic.com
Licensed and Bonded Lic. #964006
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Window Coverings
RUDOLPH’S INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)685-1250
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame • 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos • 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates • Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
33 Thursday • Apr. 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAY’S
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
DR INSIYA SABOOWALA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
TACO DEL MAR
NOW OPEN
856 N. Delaware St.
San Mateo, CA 94401
(650)348-3680
Food
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WALLBEDS
AND MORE!
$400 off Any Wallbed
www.wallbedsnmore.com
248 Primrose Rd.,
BURLINGAME
(650)888-8131
Health & Medical
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. JENNIFER LEE, DDS
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
Special Combination Pricing:
Facials, Microdermabrasion,
Waxing , Body Scrubs, Acu-
puncture , Foot & Body Massage
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
www.LeJuinDaySpa.com
(650) 347-6668
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
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HEALTH INSURANCE
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34 Thursday • April 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Please join the City of Millbrae
for a celebration of
Arbor & Earth Day!
Saturday, April 27, 2013
10 am – 12 Noon at
Central Park (on Palm Avenue)
Activities include planting trees and flowers,
picking up litter, and helping with other park
improvements.
For more information, please call 259.2339.
www.ci.millbrae.ca.us/sustainablemillbrae
D-San Mateo, who has crafted several pieces of
legislation related to CPUC after the San Bruno
gas pipeline explosion and fire that killed eight
and destroyed nearly 40 homes in September
2010.
Hill wants lawmakers to have a chance to at
least question Peevey in a formal setting about
the agency’s “culture of complacency” when it
comes to safety and for other shortcomings.
CPUC officials told the Daily Journal yester-
day, however, that Peevey will not attend
today’s subcommittee hearing.
While Hill would have liked to have seen
Peevey at today’s hearing on commission mat-
ters, officials with San Bruno actually filed a
legal motion yesterday demanding that Peevey
and CPUC Commissioner Mike Florio not
show up to an upcoming safety event featuring
Pacific Gas and Electric executives scheduled
for May 7-8 in San Francisco.
“This is like the defendant in a criminal case
taking the judge to play golf together before the
judge rules on his case and his penalty,” attor-
ney Steven Meyers, representing San Bruno,
wrote in a statement.
The legal filing cites the symposium for being
an illegal “ex-parte” contact between the regu-
lator, CPUC and defendant, PG&E, at a critical
time in the commission’s hearing process in the
San Bruno explosion and fire case.
The filing says “the participation of the defen-
dant and the judges ... (is) a violation of the law”
and calls it “unethical and inappropriate.”
The safety symposium is “nothing but a
forum for PG&E to put on a dog and pony show
in front of two out of the five commission deci-
sion-makers charged with determining the fines
and penalties warranted by PG&E’s past mis-
conduct,” according to San Bruno’s legal filing.
Hill has put the spotlight on the CPUC’s fail-
ings since the San Bruno tragedy and has even
called Peevey a “dictator” who should be fired.
Only Gov. Jerry Brown can remove Peevey
from office although the Legislature can with a
two-thirds vote.
Hill wants Peevey to justify his “continued
appointment as president” of the CPUC,
according to a letter he sent him last week.
Peevey was appointed to be president of the
CPUC by then governor Gray Davis in 2002
and reappointed to a six-year term in 2008 by
then governor Arnold Schwarzenegger.
New bills
Hill blames the CPUC’s leadership for its
failings and has crafted several pieces of legis-
lation that are now law related to the San Bruno
incident, PG&E and the CPUC. He also has
three new bills in the works this year that
address reform at the CPUC including Senate
bills 48, 291 and 611.
SB 48, according to Hill’s office, enhances
the commission’s financial accountability and
policy oversight by requiring that all ratepayer-
funded energy research proposals be considered
in a single proceeding.
SB 291 requires the CPUC to strengthen its
enforcement posture by giving safety staff the
ability to cite and fine utilities for electric safe-
ty violations. Following National
Transportation Safety Board and Independent
Review Panel recommendations, the CPUC
allowed staff to cite utilities for gas safety vio-
lations. SB 291 requires the CPUC to extend the
authority to electric safety violations.
SB 611 reforms the governance of the CPUC
by more equally spreading staff resources
among the five commissioners and requiring the
CPUC leadership to respect due process by pro-
hibiting staff from serving as both prosecutors
and advisers to decision makers in an adjudica-
tory proceeding. The bill also strengthens the
CPUC’s Division of Ratepayer Advocates by
giving it more control of their operations and
closes loopholes that have allowed the CPUC to
empire-build by creating its own nonprofits,
according to Hill’s Office.
“The CPUC has run amok, diverting the
attention of top staff away from the CPUC’s
core responsibilities of ensuring safe delivery of
energy and managing the public’s money,”
according to a statement from Hill’s office.
History of legislation
Hill’s first piece of San Bruno-related legisla-
tion was authored when he was still in the
Assembly. The San Bruno Gas Pipeline Safety
Reforms, Assembly Bill 56, requires remote-
controlled shutoff valves in high-population
areas and the comprehensive testing and record-
keeping of gas transmission lines. It also pro-
hibits utilities from using ratepayer money to
pay penalties for safety violations assessed by
the CPUC and requires natural gas corporations
to meet annually with local fire departments to
review emergency response plans.
“The CPUC [is] proceeding to set new rules
for the safe and reliable operation of natural gas
pipelines in California. [That] is expected to
address this bill,” an official with the agency,
Christopher Chow, wrote in an email to the
Daily Journal yesterday.
Last year, Hill had AB 1456 signed into law
by Brown. It requires the CPUC to adopt per-
formance metrics for pipeline safety and evalu-
ate the state’s gas utilities against those metrics.
The commission may levy penalties on the util-
ity for poor performance with this legislation.
CPUC’s Chow wrote that the agency’s new
rules should address the requirements of this
legislation as well.
Meanwhile, San Bruno officials want CPUC
proceedings with PG&E to be transparent when
it comes to punishing or fining the utility for its
part in the gas pipeline explosion and fire that
destroyed a significant portion of the Glenview
neighborhood.
“San Bruno has participated in these proceed-
ings in good faith for over two years in reliance
on the belief that a just, transparent, reasonable
outcome which is in the public interest can be
achieved. San Bruno cannot achieve this out-
come when the very decision makers that are
determining PG&E’s fate will be in the same
room with PG&E discussing natural gas safety
in a forum other than the courtroom,” according
to the legal motion filed with the CPUC yester-
day.
Hill agrees with San Bruno that Peevey
should not attend the safety symposium.
“That’s the culture that will not change until
Peevey is replaced. The relationships are too
cozy,” Hill told the Daily Journal yesterday.
San Bruno’s request becomes part of the
CPUC’s legal process so its own legal team will
decide whether Peevey and Florio attending the
safety symposium with PG&E executives is
against state law.
The CPUC has a budget of $1.4 billion and
1,053 employees.
Continued from page 1
CPUC
measures like alarms, security cameras and
reinforced doors and windows. The rules also
set restrictions on how close gun shops can be
to homes, schools, day-care centers, parks,
other firearms dealers, card rooms, massage
establishments and adult businesses. The permit
would be annual and the rules also set up an
appeal process.
At the same meeting, the council discussed
making changes to the rules governing massage
establishments — a move many have made to
prevent prostitution and human trafficking oper-
ating under the guise of legitimate businesses.
San Bruno has 10 known massage establish-
ments but the rules in the city do not require
consistent licensing. Tuesday’s discussion was
about revising the rules to be more aligned with
the state. In addition, San Bruno would create a
system of issuing certificates of registration to
those who comply with state law, according to a
staff report by City Attorney Marc Zafferano. It
was only a discussion item Tuesday and will
come back at a future meeting for possible
approval.
In 2008, the state passed a law governing
massage establishments and giving voluntary
oversight to the nonprofit California Massage
Therapy Council. The change was meant to free
practitioners from background checks and
license fees in any and all cities where they
worked. San Bruno’s rules were adopted in
2009, shortly after the state rules originally
went into effect, according to a staff report.
Under the new ordinance, the city would
require all massage practitioners to have state
certification, register with the city and that
massage parlors can only employ state-certified
employees. The ordinance also spells out other
requirements such as clean linens, sanitized
equipment and no closed shades or curtains on
front windows and doors during business hours
of 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. It would also provide the
city the right to enter during business hours to
conduct reasonable inspections related to
building, health and other code requirements.
Continued from page 1
RULES
35 Thursday • April 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WORLD
By Rob Gilles
and Charmaine Noronha
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TORONTO — One of two men
accused of plotting with al-Qaida
members in Iran to derail a train in
Canada became radicalized to the
point that his father reached out to a
Muslim support group for help and
advice, a local religious leader said
Wednesday.
Muhammad Robert Heft, presi-
dent of the Paradise Forever
Support Group Inc., a non-profit
organization that provides support
to Muslims in Canada, said
Mohammad Jaser came to him sev-
eral times citing concerns about the
radicalization of his son.
“He came to me about his son
saying he how concerned he was
getting about the rigidness of his
son and his interpretation of Islam.
He was becoming self-righteous,
becoming pushy, pushing his views
on how much they (his family)
should be practicing as a Muslim,”
said Heft.
Jaser’s son, Raed, 35, has been
charged along with Chiheb
Esseghaier, 30 with conspiring to
carry out an attack and murder peo-
ple in association with a terrorist
group in their plot to derail a train
that runs between New York City
and Montreal.
Canadian investigators say the
men received guidance from mem-
bers of al-Qaida in Iran. Iranian
government officials have said the
government had nothing to do with
the plot.
“His son was becoming overzeal-
ous and intolerant in his understand-
ing of the religion,” Heft said.
“Those are the telltale signs that can
lead into the radicalization process.”
The discussions took place
between 2010 and 2011, while the
father was renting a basement apart-
ment in Heft’s home in Markham,
Ontario.
On Wednesday, the other suspect
appeared briefly in court where he
made a statement suggesting he did
not recognize the court’s jurisdiction.
“This criminal code is not a holy
book,” Esseghaier said at the hear-
ing. “We cannot rely on the conclu-
sions taken out from these judg-
ments.”
At the hearing Esseghaier reject-
ed the allegations against him and
declined to be represented by a
court-appointed lawyer.
Canada terror suspect grew more radical
REUTERS
Raed Jaser,left,and lawyer John Norris are pictured in a courtroom sketch
during a first appearance at Old City Hall Court in Toronto,Ontario,Canada.
36 Thursday • April 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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