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Friday • April 26, 2013 • Vol XII, Edition 216
WITHOUT DELAY
NATION PAGE 7
LITTLE TO GAIN
IN FILM’S PAIN
WEEKEND JOURNAL PAGE 17
SENATE PASSES BILL TO EASE FAA FURLOUGHS
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
NOW OPEN!
856 North Delaware St.
San Mateo, CA 94401
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
School safety plans are required
by law but state funding to allow
districts to have up-to-date planning
and training opportunities may go
away.
Technically, it would be distrib-
uted in a different way. But some
think the change is one that should-
n’t happen. Under Gov. Jerry
Brown’s Local Control Funding
Formula for schools, many categor-
ical designations for money will be
done away with. Instead, the money
would be given to districts through a
per-pupil formula.
Assemblyman
Kevin Mullin,
D-South San
F r a n c i s c o ,
thinks this par-
ticular type of
funding — one
that funds the
S c h o o l
C o mmu n i t y
V i o l e n c e
Prevention Training Program —
should remain as a grant, distributed
the way it currently is. Mullin intro-
duced Assembly Bill 470 to keep
the funds in place as they are.
“In light of the Sandy Hook
shooting and other violent incidents
in California and the country, it is
imperative we do everything we can
to ensure our schools are prepared
for crisis situations,” Mullin said,
adding that the state cannot afford to
strip away resources that work and
are cost-effective.
These safety funds are actually
given to Kern County, which then
coordinates training opportunities
overseen by 11 people regionally. A
percentage of those regional coordi-
nators’ cost is paid for through the
funds. As proposed, the money
would be distributed as part of the
new per-pupil funding plan.
Assemblyman seeks to protect school safety funding
By Judy Lin
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — The
California Assembly passed a bill
on Thursday that would make the
state the first in the nation to allow
non-citizens who are in the country
legally to serve on jury duty.
Assemblyman Bob Wieckowski,
D-Fremont, said his bill, AB1401,
would help California widen the
pool of prospective
jurors and help
integrate immi-
grants into the
community.
It does not
change other crite-
ria for being eligible to serve on a
jury, such as being at least 18, living
in the county that is making the
Jury service
may include
non-citizens
State Assembly passes bill to
widen prospective juror pool
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A Woodside man facing financial
collapse shot his wife at least twice
in the head and staged her death to
look like a suicide the exact same
month more than $30 million in life
insurance policies taken in her name
were poised to end, a prosecutor
told jurors yesterday during opening
statements in his murder trial.
H a d
Po o r o u s h a s b
“ P e t e r ”
Parineh’s wife,
Parima, lived in
April 2010, he
would have still
owed $600,000
after paying off
millions of dol-
Trial begins in Woodside murder
Husband faces life for staging wife’s death as suicide
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Educators, parents, mental health
professionals, members of law
enforcement, elected officials and
community leaders will share their
knowledge and collectively explore
and implement strategies to create
safer schools, increase access to
mental health services and
strengthen ongoing community
collaboration and information shar-
ing at a summit
Monday.
The summit,
“ B e y o n d
Newtown: How
to Ensure Safe
Schools and
Communities”
was organized
by U.S. Rep.
Summit to focus on school
gun violence prevention
Kevin Mullin
Jackie Speier
BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL
San Mateo Mayor David Lim speaks with business leaders at a meet and greet hosted by the Economic
Development Growth Enterprise Thursday.
Peter Parineh
See PARINEH, Page 23
See JURY, Page 22
See page 6
Inside
Piece-by-piece
on immigration
in House
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
San Mateo City Manager Susan
Loftus is searching for an independ-
ent auditor to review the city’s
Community Development
Department after a number of “hic-
cups” it has had over the past sever-
al months, Mayor David Lim told a
group of business leaders Thursday.
Lim sat down with a slew of ten-
ants who call the Borel Estate
Building home including lawyers,
financiers and bankers in a meet and
greet hosted by Linda Asbury with
the Economic Development Growth
Enterprise, an initiative of the San
Mateo Area Chamber of Commerce.
Lim fielded questions about why
the city does not allow for beekeep-
ing, whether a public plaza should
be built downtown, what the
impacts of high-speed rail will be on
the city and what the status of some
of the city’s newest developments
are, including Bay Meadows and
Station Park Green, to be built on
the current site where Kmart sits on
Delaware Street.
A review of the Community
Development Department will be
undertaken because it oversees the
city’s planning and building divi-
sions and other city functions such
as code enforcement, Lim said.
Loftus should have an auditor
picked within two months, he said.
“We are doing more with less,”
Lim said about city staff.
The 7-Eleven situation on San
Mateo Drive is one of the hiccups to
which Lim was referring.
Mayor talks bees, rail and 7-Eleven
Lim sits down with business leaders,announces plans for independent audit
See LIM, Page 22
See MULLIN, Page 23
See SUMMIT, Page 23
SCOTS SWEEP UP
TOURNEY TITLES
SPORTS PAGE 11
Parking hours, fees simplified
A year after Redwood City took flak
for a new parking meter system touted
as high-tech but received by many as
user-unfriendly, the City Council was
poised the week of April 26, 2008 to
consider simplifying the process with
standard rates and consistent hours of
enforcement.
The new city plan would change the
enforcement period
from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.
to a consistent 10 a.m.
to 6 p.m. in all areas.
This change increased
the amount of free parking available
in the downtown core, according to a
city staff report.
The proposal also decreased the
hourly rate schedule from three rates to
two, replacing the 75-cent per hour rate
to 50 cents per hour on Broadway,
Theatre way, Redwood Creek crossing
and the City Hall lot.
The 40 high-tech pay stations handle
multiple spaces and were meant to make
parking more convenient in Redwood
City’s core downtown area which
includes the 20-screen theater/retail
complex and renovated Courthouse
Square. The solar-powered “smart
meters” accept bills, coins, credit cards
and pre-established accounts via cellular
phone. They also eliminated time limits,
leaving drivers to pay for as much time
as needed and even add extra minutes
from any of the new payment units.
The centralized system and staggered
prices, however, initially confused some
drivers and left merchants unhappy the
late enforcement cutoff might drive
away business.
Longtime city manager
announces retirement
Arne Croce, San Mateo’s 18-year city
manager, announced his
retirement the week of
April 26, 2008 effective
June 20 of that year — leav-
ing a legacy of effective city
governance, responsiveness and
quiet knowledgeable leadership, accord-
ing to those who worked closely with
him.
The announcement was not a surprise
to many. Croce spent the week alerting
former councilmembers of his decision.
Millbrae redevelopment
given one last gasp
Attempting to maintain the hope of
one day offering an area where com-
muters can leisurely exit Caltrain to grab
food, catch a movie or walk home, the
Millbrae City Council the week of April
26, 2008 extended land negotiating
rights around its BART station a sixth
time.
Little change had occurred since the
Millbrae City Council unanimously
agreed to allow Fancher Partners, an
Irvine, Calif.-based development
agency, to move forward on its 2006
proposal for the area around the
Millbrae Bay Area Rapid Transit Station
— known as Site One. Fancher pointed
to the declining credit market and pend-
ing eminent domain June ballot measure
putting a damper on the ability to secure
land.
San Mateo fire
displaces 16, kills two dogs
Sixteen people were displaced and
two dogs died in an early
morning electrical fire that
ripped through a Shoreview
home and scorched another the
week of April 26, 2008.
The San Mateo Fire Department
responded at 3:54 a.m. on Thursday of
that week to the fire at 1533 Lodi Ave.
The front end of the two-story house
was engulfed in flames and they sparked
a fire at a neighboring house at 1641
Lodi Ave., according to the San Mateo
Fire Department.
Firefighter efforts to extinguish the
fire were hampered by the layout of the
house, which had undergone numerous
additions that left gaps in walls and
roofs. The original flat roof was still
intact under a newer gable roof, creating
a large space where the fire could grow.
The American Red Cross helped find
housing for 13 of the 16 people dis-
placed. Three residents found their own
emergency housing, Borean said.
From the archives highlights stories original-
ly printed five years ago this week. It appears
in the Friday edition of the Daily Journal.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Thursday • April 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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Actor-comedian
Kevin James is 48.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1865
John Wilkes Booth, the assassin of
President Abraham Lincoln, was sur-
rounded by federal troops near Port
Royal, Va., and killed. (Just before
dying, Booth looked at his hands and
gasped, “Useless, useless.”)
“Friends may come and
go, but enemies accumulate.”
— Dr.Thomas F. Jones Jr., American (1916-1981)
Actor Jet Li is 50. Actor Channing
Tatum is 33.
Birthdays
REUTERS
Potbellied pig ‘Baby Banks’ demonstrates how to use a pet oxygen mask in San Diego.
Friday: Cloudy in the morning then
becoming partly cloudy. Patchy fog and
drizzle in the morning. Highs in the 50s.
Northwest winds 10 to 20 mph.
Friday night: Mostly cloudy. Patchy fog
and drizzle after midnight. Lows in the mid
40s. Northwest winds 10 to 20 mph...
Becoming 5 to 10 mph after midnight.
Saturday: Cloudy in the morning then becoming sunny.
Patchy fog and drizzle in the morning. Highs around 60. West
winds 5 to 10 mph.
Saturday night: Partly cloudy in the evening then becoming
mostly cloudy. Patchy fog after midnight. Lows in the upper
40s. Northwest winds 5 to 15 mph.
Sunday: Cloudy in the morning then becoming sunny. Patchy
fog. Highs in the lower 60s.
Local Weather Forecast
(Answers tomorrow)
VAULT CLERK LESSON CANDID
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: The food was pretty good at the skunk
restaurant, but the — SERVICE STUNK
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
UBOTA
LEEUD
GLLAEE
DOLBIY
©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
F
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n

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h
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:
/
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.
f
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” “
-
Print answer here:
In 1607, English colonists went ashore at present-day Cape
Henry, Va., on an expedition to establish the first permanent
English settlement in the Western Hemisphere.
In 1785, American naturalist, hunter and artist John James
Audubon was born in present-day Haiti.
In 1913, Mary Phagan, a 13-year-old worker at a Georgia pen-
cil factory, was strangled; Leo Frank, the factory superintend-
ent, was convicted of her murder and sentenced to death.
(Frank’s death sentence was commuted, but he was lynched by
an anti-Semitic mob in 1915.)
In 1923, Britain’s Prince Albert, Duke of York (the future King
George VI), married Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon at
Westminster Abbey.
In 1933, Nazi Germany’s infamous secret police, the Gestapo,
was created.
In 1937, German and Italian warplanes raided the Basque town
of Guernica during the Spanish Civil War; estimates of the
number of people killed vary from the hundreds to the thou-
sands.
In 1945, Marshal Henri Philippe Petain, the head of France’s
Vichy government during World War II, was arrested.
In 1952, the destroyer-minesweeper USS Hobson sank in the
central Atlantic after colliding with the aircraft carrier USS
Wasp with the loss of 176 crew members.
In 1968, the United States exploded beneath the Nevada desert
a 1.3 megaton nuclear device called “Boxcar.”
In 1973, the Chicago Board Options Exchange held its first
day of trading.
In 1986, a major nuclear accident occurred at the Chernobyl
plant in Ukraine (then part of the Soviet Union).
Movie composer Francis Lai (“Love Story”) is 81. Actress-
comedian Carol Burnett is 80. Rhythm-and-blues singer Maurice
Williams is 75. Songwriter-musician Duane Eddy is 75. Singer
Bobby Rydell is 71. Rock musician Gary Wright is 70. Actress
Nancy Lenehan is 60. Actor Giancarlo Esposito is 55. Rock
musician Roger Taylor (Duran Duran) is 53. Actress Joan Chen
is 52. Rock musician Chris Mars is 52. Actor-singer Michael
Damian is 51. Rock musician Jimmy Stafford (Train) is 49.
United States Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey is 47. Actress
Marianne Jean-Baptiste is 46. Country musician Joe Caverlee
(Yankee Grey) is 45. Rapper T-Boz (TLC) is 43.
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are No.03 Hot Shot
in first place; No.04 Big Ben in second place; and
No. 11 Money Bags in third place.The race time
was clocked at 1:44.72.
9 6 6
9 21 22 32 50 10
Mega number
April 23 Mega Millions
9 19 31 56 59 2
Powerball
April 24 Powerball
16 19 31 34 38
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
5 2 4 3
Daily Four
1 2 9
Daily three evening
5 25 32 33 46 26
Mega number
April 24 Super Lotto Plus
3
Friday • April 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO
Reckless driver. The driver of a sports car was seen doing
doughnuts in a park on Camaritas Avenue before 7:48 p.m.
Sunday, April 21.
Suspicious circumstances. An unattended package was seen
near an apartment mailbox on Stonegate Drive before 7:38
p.m. Sunday, April 21.
Police reports
Going green
A man was seen burning trash in his front yard on Maple
Avenue in South San Francisco before 4:29 p.m. Sunday,
April 21.
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
The Legal Aid Society of San Mateo
County is joining Redwood City in
fighting the state of California to keep
$10 million in affordable housing
funds despite the dismantling of the
city’s redevelopment agency.
The lawsuit filed March 27 echoes
that filed just days earlier by Redwood
City which seeks a court order prevent-
ing California from reclaiming the
money.
“Given the current state of the hous-
ing market in this county, it is vital that
we safeguard any and all resources for
affordable housing,” said Legal Aid
Executive Director Stacey Hawver in a
prepared statement.
In 1990, Legal Aid originally negoti-
ated the allocation of the money on
behalf of the county’s low-income res-
idents. Redwood City’s now-defunct
redevelopment agency had accumulat-
ed funds above and beyond the man-
dated 20 percent for low- and moder-
ate-income-level housing. But when
the state dismantled each of its redevel-
opment agencies, Redwood City was
told to turn over all the tax increment
revenue — including the money
exceeding the 20 percent set aside — to
the county controller.
The city told the California
Department of Finance it is entitled to
retain the housing funds and turning
them over to the state for non-housing
purposes would breach the agreement
with the Legal Aid Society. The depart-
ment denied the argument, leading
Redwood City to file a 208-page law-
suit March 22.
The city planned to use the money to
develop sites on Bradford and Heller
streets which it absorbed as the RDA’s
housing successor agency. The money
would also help with development of
other affordable housing projects.
Legal Aid joins city in suing for $10M in housing funds
Husband in murder/suicide dies
A Redwood City man who shot his
wife to death early Monday morning
before shooting himself in the head
has died from his injuries, according to
the San Mateo County Coroner’s
Office.
An autopsy on 69-year-old John
Padgett will be conducted today, accord-
ing to the office.
His wife, Sandra Schlick Padgett, 72,
was pronounced dead by the San Mateo
County Coroner’s Office Monday. Her
husband, however, survived an attempt
to kill himself and was taken to Stanford
Medical Center for treatment.
Sandra Padgett was the longtime
director of college counseling at The
Harker School in San Jose.
Local brief
Comment on
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com
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Friday • April 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACS Courier • Home Care
Assistance • Peninsula Executives
Association • Retirement Administration,
Inc. • Technology Credit Union •
LegalShield • Ambassador Services•
Three Sixty HR, Inc. • TeamLogic IT
Small Business Owners
Self-Employed Professionals
Join us for a free business resource event to help you thrive in 2013
Small Business
Resource Fair
ATTENTION:
Tuesday, April 30
9am to 1pm
FOR COMPLETE SEMINAR INFORMATION
PLEASE VIEW THIS CODE OR VISIT:
SmallBusinessResourceFair.eventbrite.com
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Continental breakfast will be provided
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Friday • April 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/NATION
Food, Children's Activities,
Fun, Vendors
1100 Middle Avenue
Menlo Park
www.firstbaptist.com
FREE ADMISSION
Community Disaster
Prepardness
Are YOU Ready? Let Us Help!
Saturday, April 27, 2013
10am to 2pm
Authorities chase stolen car
from Pescadero to Redwood City
A male and female suspect were detained yesterday
morning after a car chase that started in the Pescadero area
and ended near Redwood City, according to the CHP and
the San Mateo County Sheriff’s Office.
The chase began after the Sheriff’s Office received a
report of a reckless driver who was involved in a hit-and-run
accident in Santa Cruz County and was heading north on
state Highway 1 near Davenport, sheriff’s Deputy Rebecca
Rosenblatt said.
A deputy spotted the vehicle on the highway near
Pescadero.
California Highway Patrol spokesman Officer Art
Montiel said the deputy determined that the car had been
reported as stolen.
A lengthy pursuit ensued from Highway 1 onto state
Highway 84. At the spot where Highway 84 meets Interstate
280 near Woodside, the suspect vehicle crashed into two
other cars, Montiel said.
The CHP continued chasing the vehicle, and the pursuit
ended on northbound Interstate 280 just north of Edgewood
Road near Redwood City around 10:30 a.m., according to
Montiel.
The male driver and his female passenger were both
detained, he said.
Caltrain to host meeting on
San Mateo bridges replacement project
Caltrain is holding a community meeting Thursday about
its plans to remove four structurally unsound rail bridges in
North Central San Mateo and replace them with higher
clearances, the transit agency announced yesterday.
The four rail bridges at Tilton, Monte Diablo, Santa Inez
and Poplar avenues are 103 years old and their low heights
mean they are sometimes hit by tall vehicles beneath them.
New retaining walls and fencing will be constructed on the
Caltrain right of way and will require the removal of vege-
tation, including shrubs, weeds, bushes and trees.
The project will also ensure the bridges will accommo-
date new electrified rail service and improved traffic flow
on city streets, according to Caltrain.
The meeting will be 6 p.m.-8 p.m. Thursday, May 2 at the
King Center, 725 Monte Diablo Ave., San Mateo.
Bicyclist assaulted in South San Francisco
A bicyclist riding on the Centennial Trail in South San
Francisco early Thursday morning was assaulted by two
men, according to police.
The suspects knocked the victim off his bicycle, assault-
ed him and took his wallet, according to police.
The victim suffered minor injuries.
The first suspect is described as a black male adult, 25 to
30 years old, 6 feet tall, slender build with braids in his hair
or cornrows, wearing a black hoodie and black pants. The
second suspect is described as a black male adult, 25 to 30
years old, 6 feet tall, wearing a black hoodie and black
pants.
Anyone with information on the incident should call
police at 877-8900.
Local briefs
By Michelle R. Smith
and Jesse J. Holland
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PROVIDENCE, R.I. — Federal budg-
et cuts have caused delays in at least one
terror-related court case in New York
and prompted a federal judge in
Nebraska to say he is “seriously contem-
plating” dismissing some criminal cases.
The automatic cuts are also causing
concerns about funding for the
defense of the Boston Marathon
bombing suspect, who is being repre-
sented by a public defender’s office
that’s facing three weeks of unpaid
furloughs and whose defense costs
could run into millions of dollars.
Federal defenders’ offices have been
hit especially hard by the cuts, which
amount to about 10 percent of their
budgets for the fiscal year that ends Sept.
30. Some offices have laid off staffers.
The head public defender in Southern
Ohio even laid himself off as a way to
save money.
Much of the reductions are due to
automatic cuts known as the sequester,
and public defenders warn they could
face even more cuts next year.
Members of the Federal Bar
Association, including federal lawyers
and judges, were on Capitol Hill on
Thursday, meeting with members of the
House and Senate and their staffers and
appealing to them for adequate funding,
said Geoff Cheshire, an assistant federal
public defender from Arizona, who was
among them.
“The federal defenders are the front
bumper of this fiscal crunch, getting hit
first and hardest. But behind it is the
third branch of government as a whole.
The message is, this is having real
effects on the federal courts and the rule
of law,” Cheshire said.
He and others are pushing for
Congress to make an emergency appro-
priation for the judiciary that would mit-
igate some of the cuts to defenders and
the court system. Cheshire said $61 mil-
lion would be enough to eliminate the
furloughs.
Budget cuts cause delays, concern in federal court
REUTERS
Former presidents George H.W.Bush,second right,and George W.Bush,right,laugh at the dedication for the George W.Bush
Presidential Center on the campus of Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, while President Barack Obama, left,
and former first lady Barbara Bush watch.
GEORGE W. BUSH’S PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — A bill intended to
end a two-month backlog in processing
business filings in California was
approved by the state Senate on Thursday.
The Secretary of State’s Office
blamed state budget cuts for creating
the conditions that caused the backlog
of 122,000 applications. The office
must process the forms before business-
es can hire employees.
The $1.6 million granted through
AB113 would let the office hire temporary
employees and pay for overtime to
process thousands of business applica-
tions. Senators amended the bill to reduce
it from the $2 million that was originally
appropriated by the Assembly.
Senate Budget Committee Chairman
Mark Leno, D-San Francisco, said the bill
will reduce the 55 days it currently takes
to process the filings to less than 10 days
by November.
Senators sent the bill back the Assembly
on a 25-10 vote, over Republican objec-
tions.
Sen. Bill Emmerson, R-Redlands, the
budget committee’s vice chairman,
objected to majority Democrats’ use of a
budget bill to pass the measure with a sim-
ple majority instead of the two-thirds sup-
port that would usually be required.
Senators OK $1.6M to speed state business filings
6
Friday • April 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/NATION
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Woman missing
out of Burlingame hills
Police are on the lookout for a woman who
went missing Thursday from her home in the
Burlingame hills between
8 a.m. and 3 p.m.
The woman, identified
as Kilsun Hart, 80, has
moderate dementia and
cannot recall her address
or phone number. She is a
diet-controlled diabetic
and does not always need
medication. She has a
previous missing incident
and was found on El
Camino Real in Burlingame, according to the
Sheriff’s Office Millbrae Bureau.
She is further described as Korean, 5 feet,
90 pounds with dyed black hair. She is in
good shape for her age and is a strong walk-
er. She was last seen wearing black corduroy
leggings and camo pattern shoes. She has no
relatives in the area and no place she fre-
quents, according to police.
Anyone with any information is asked to
call the Sheriffs Office Millbrae Bureau at
259-2300.
Transit planner can
estimate crowds on trains
SAN FRANCISCO — Commuters might
be able to avoid crowded trains — or at least
find slightly less crowded ones — with a
glance at their smartphones.
Bay Area Rapid Transit has added a feature
to its online trip planner showing an icon that
represents estimated crowding on its trains.
Agency officials stressed the numbers are
just estimates based on historic patterns, not
real-time information, and are only available
for weekdays.
Local briefs
By Erica Werner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — House Republicans will
tackle the immigration issue in bite-size
pieces, shunning pressure to act quickly and
rejecting the comprehensive approach
embraced in the Senate and endorsed by
President Barack Obama, a key committee
chairman said Thursday.
House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob
Goodlatte, R-Va., declined to commit to fin-
ishing immigration legislation this year, as
Obama and a bipartisan group in the Senate
want to do. He said bills on an agriculture
worker program and workplace enforcement
would come first, and he said there’d been no
decision on how to deal with legalization or a
possible path to citizenship for the estimated
11 million immigrants living here illegally, a
centerpiece of a new bipartisan bill in the
Senate.
“It is not whether you do it fast or slow, it is
that you get it right that’s most important,”
Goodlatte said at a press conference to
announce the way forward on immigration in
the House.
He said that while he hopes to produce a bill
this year, “I’m going to be very cautious about
setting any kind of arbitrary limits on when
this has to be done.”
The approach Goodlatte sketched out was
not a surprise, but it was a sign of the obsta-
cles ahead of congressional passage of the
kind of far-reaching immigration legislation
sought by Obama and introduced last week in
the Senate by four Republican and four
Democratic lawmakers. Many in the conser-
vative-led House don’t have the appetite for a
single, big bill on immigration, especially not
one that contains a path to citizenship, still
viewed by some as amnesty. Instead they pre-
fer to coalesce around consensus issues like
border security, temporary workers and work-
place enforcement.
But if the Senate’s comprehensive approach
faces obstacles in the House, the House’s
piecemeal approach won’t fly in the Senate.
Two of the lead authors of the Senate bill,
Sens. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., and John
McCain, R-Ariz., rejected the piece-by-piece
approach at a breakfast meeting with reporters
Thursday hosted by the Christian Science
Monitor. Schumer and McCain said that any
time an immigration issue is advanced indi-
vidually, even something widely supported
like visas for high-tech workers or a citizen-
ship path for those brought as children, law-
makers and interest groups start pushing for
other issues to get dealt with at the same time.
“What we have found is, ironically, it may
be a little counterintuitive, that the best way to
pass immigration legislation is actually a
comprehensive bill, because that can achieve
more balance and everybody can get much but
not all of what they want,” Schumer said.
“And so I think the idea of doing separate bills
is just not going to work. It’s not worked in the
past, and it’s not going to work in the future.”
Piece-by-piece on immigration in House
“It is not whether you do it fast or slow,
it is that you get it right that’s most important.”
—House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte, R-Va.
By Brock Vergakis
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
HAMPTON, Va. — NASA researchers said
Thursday that test flights conducted in
California have shown a commercial jet could
fly safely with a blend of jet fuel that includes
a plant oil.
Scientists at NASA’s Langley Research cen-
ter in Hampton said there was no noticeable
difference in the engine performance of a DC-
8 aircraft flying as high as 39,000 feet on the
biofuel mix made from the camelina plant oil.
The researchers also said that under certain
conditions the biofuel mix produced 30 per-
cent fewer emissions than traditional aviation
fuel.
“In terms of these fuels being acceptable for
use in commercial aircraft, they’re quite
acceptable, but we’re still digging into the
data,” said Bruce Anderson, a senior research
scientist at Langley who worked on the proj-
ect.
NASA is one of several government agen-
cies examining the use of renewable biofuels
to reduce dependency on foreign oil while
reducing carbon emissions. Military officials
are also pursuing the use of biofuels, with the
Navy hoping to deploy a ‘Great Green Fleet’
of ships and aircraft run entirely on alternative
fuels in 2016.
Camelina, an oilseed crop that is native to
northeastern Europe, can be cultivated in the
U.S. and is considered well-suited to arid
Northern Plains states because it needs little
water and can handle low temperatures.
NASA measures effects of jet engine biofuel
Kilsun Hart
EVENT MARKETING SALES
Join the Daily Journal Event marketing
team as a Sales and Business Development
Specialist. Duties include sales and
customer service of event sponsorships,
partners, exhibitors and more. Interface
and interact with local businesses to
enlist participants at the Daily Journal’s
ever expanding inventory of community
events such as the Senior Showcase,
Family Resource Fair, Job Fairs, and
more. You will also be part of the project
management process. But first and
foremost, we will rely on you for sales
and business development.
This is one of the fastest areas of the
Daily Journal, and we are looking to grow
the team.
Must have a successful track record of
sales and business development.
TELEMARKETING/INSIDE SALES
We are looking for a telemarketing whiz,
who can cold call without hesitation and
close sales over the phone. Experience
preferred. Must have superior verbal,
phone and written communication skills.
Computer proficiency is also required.
Self-management and strong business
intelligence also a must.
To apply for either position,
please send info to
jerry@smdailyjournal.com or call
650-344-5200.
The Daily Journal seeks
two sales professionals
for the following positions:
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
HELP WANTED
SALES
LOCAL/NATION 7
Friday • April 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Mary “Connie” Malear
Connie’s beautiful, sweet life ended unexpectedly
on April 17, 2013. She was born to Arthur and
Gene Malear on January 17, 1951 in San Francisco.
Connie grew up in Palo Alto, graduated from
Gunn High School, and spent many years as an
administrative assistant in San Francisco, San
Mateo, and Belmont. She received her Associative
of Arts degree from the College of San Mateo in
horticulture and later in psychology from LaMesa
Junior College. She had recently become an in
home care provider and was in much demand for
her care and compassion. Connie loved animals,
especially her birds and beloved rescue dog, Abbey. She walked her daily with her friends.
She traveled to Mexico, Scotland, and England. She enjoyed music, the Sacramento Jazz
Festival with her family, eating out with friends, Disneyland with her sister and nephews,
and reading. Connie will be especially missed by her friends in San Mateo/Belmont who
cherished her spontaneous, cheerful, giving nature. She was always ready for a good walk
to listen to a friend.
Connie was preceded in death by her parents. She is survived by her sister, Martha Malear
Coe (Thomas) of Sacramento, her beloved nephew, Peter Morrison Coe (Sylvia) and great
nephew Theo of San Francisco, and beloved nephew Samuel Malear Coe of Sacramento, and
Aunt Jody Kelly (John) of Arlington, Texas. Our family has lost a cherished, loving member
who will always be remembered for her sense of humor and kindness. Her laughter could
cheer everyone. Our special thanks to her dear friend, Susan Burkett of San Mateo, for her
support during this difficult time. Services are through the Neptune Society of Sacramento.
A celebration of Connie’s life will be held later this summer in San Mateo. We know that
Connie would want any remembrances in her name sent to the Peninsula Humane Society.
Obituary
STATE GOVERNMENT
• On Thursday, the state Senate voted 34-0 to extend the “Green
Sticker” program, allowing the latest generation of low-emission
vehicles to access the High Occupancy Vehicle highway lanes.
Authored by state Sen. Leland Yee, D-San Francisco/San
Mateo, who created the Green Sticker program three years ago to
encourage Californians to switch to more environmentally conscious
vehicles, Senate Bill 286 extends the program an additional three
years. This will allow plug-in hybrids and hydrogen fuel cell cars to access the HOV lanes
until 2018. Yee’s bill would also extend the “White Sticker” program that allows access
for fully electric vehicles, according to Yee’s office.
The bill will next move on to the Assembly for consideration.
REUTERS
Long lines of passengers wait to enter the security checkpoint before boarding their aircraft
at Reagan National Airport.
By David Espo
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — With flight delays
mounting, the Senate approved hurry-up legis-
lation Thursday night to end air traffic con-
troller furloughs blamed for inconveniencing
large numbers of travelers.
A House vote on the measure was expected
as early as Friday, with lawmakers eager to
embark on a weeklong vacation.
Under the legislation, the Federal Aviation
Administration would gain authority to trans-
fer up to $253 million from accounts that are
flush into other programs, to “prevent reduced
operations and staffing” through the Sept. 30
end of the fiscal year.
In addition to restoring full staffing by con-
trollers, Senate officials said the available
funds should be ample enough to prevent the
closure of small airport towers around the
country. The FAA has said it will shut the
facilities as it makes its share of $85 billion in
across-the-board spending cuts that took
effect last month at numerous government
agencies.
The Senate acted as the FAA said there had
been at least 863 flights delayed on
Wednesday “attributable to staffing reductions
resulting from the furlough.”
There was no immediate reaction at the
White House, although administration offi-
cials participated in the negotiations that led to
the deal and evidently registered no objec-
tions.
Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, a key partici-
pant in the talks, said the legislation would
“prevent what otherwise would have been
intolerable delays in the air travel system,
inconveniencing travelers and hurting the
economy.”
Senate passes bill to
ease FAA furloughs
By Colleen Long and Jennifer Peltz
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — The Boston Marathon
bombers were headed for New York’s Times
Square to blow up the rest of their explosives,
authorities said Thursday, in what they por-
trayed as a chilling, spur-of-the-moment
scheme that fell apart when the brothers real-
ized the car they had hijacked was low on gas.
“New York City was next on their list of tar-
gets,” Mayor Michael Bloomberg said.
New York Police Commissioner Raymond
Kelly said Dzhokhar Tsarnaev told interroga-
tors from his hospital bed that he and his older
brother decided on the spot last Thursday night
to drive to New York and launch an attack. In
their stolen SUV they had five pipe bombs and
a pressure-cooker explosive like the ones that
blew up at the marathon, Kelly said.
But when the Tsarnaev brothers stopped at a
gas station on the outskirts of Boston, the car-
jacking victim they were holding hostage
escaped and called police,
Kelly said. Later that night,
police intercepted the
brothers in a blazing gun-
battle that left 26-year-old
Tamerlan Tsarnaev dead.
“We don’t know if we
would have been able to
stop the terrorists had they
arrived here from Boston,”
the mayor said. “We’re just
thankful that we didn’t
have to find out that
answer.”
The news caused New
Yorkers to shudder with the
thought that the city may
have narrowly escaped
another terrorist attack,
though whether the broth-
ers could have made it to
the city is an open ques-
tion.
Police say Boston suspects
planned to attack New York
Dzhokhar
Tsarnaev
Tamerlan
Tsarnaev
LOCAL 8
Friday • April 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Amy Brooks Colin Flynn Hal Coehlo
consultant
Al Stanley Jim Esenwen
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
T
he California Public Utilities
Commission has decided to post-
pone a Safety Symposium sched-
uled for May 7-8 to a future date after San
Bruno officials asked that its President
Michael Peevey and Commissioner Mike
Florio recuse themselves from the meeting.
“Although the symposium is a forward-look-
ing event and issues related to the CPUC’s
ongoing PG&E pipeline cases would not be
discussed, to eliminate any possible public
concern over the fairness of the CPUC’s
process the CPUC has decided to postpone
the symposium to a future date,” according
to a CPUC statement.
***
Interested in volunteering at Filoli? Filoli
will hold its semi-annual new volunteer
recruitment meeting at 9:30 a.m. Saturday,
May 18. Attendees will have the opportunity
to learn about the many, varied ways to vol-
unteer at Filoli in areas such as house and
garden self-guided docents, member servic-
es, visitor services, nature education docents,
the garden and gift shop, public relations and
the café. More than 1,300 volunteers present-
ly help sustain Filoli, a nonprofit organiza-
tion and historic site of The National Trust
for Historic Preservation. For more infor-
mation visit www.filoli.org. Attendees can
register by emailing volunteer@filoli.org by
4 p.m. May 10.
***
San Mateo-based app designers Duck
Duck Moose recently released More Trucks
— the company’s first ever sequel. The fol-
lowup was born out of a brainstorming ses-
sion on the possibilities of a newly integrated
physics engine that enables a level of inter-
activity and dynamism unavailable to Duck
Duck Moose when they created the first
trucks app.
***
Looking to get outside this weekend?
Head to South San Francisco where the city
will celebrate the grand opening of the reno-
vated Paradise Valley Pocket Park, located
at Hillside Boulevard and Claremont Avenue,
at 11 a.m. Saturday. Healthy refreshments,
park tours and a treasure hunt are a few of
the planned activities. For more information
visit www.ssf.net.
***
Disabled veterans and service members
will learn adaptive-sports techniques and
compete at events from June 11-13 at Leo J.
Ryan Park in Foster City, the College of
San Mateo and Candlestick Park.
Registration is now open for the event,
which provides lodging and meals at no
charge to the participants. Qualifying athletes
include veterans or active duty service mem-
bers from any era. Their physical disabilities
may fall into the following categories: ampu-
tation/limb loss; post-traumatic stress; spinal
cord injuries; stroke; traumatic brain injuries;
visual disabilities and any disability rating
from the U.S. Department of Veterans
Affairs.
For more information visit www.val-
orgamesfarwest.com.
***
Are you a small business owner or self-
employed professional looking for an edge?
Then get thee to the Small Business
Resource Fair Tuesday from 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. at the Oshman Family Jewish
Community Center, Cultural Arts Hall,
3921 Fabian Way in Palo Alto. Small busi-
ness owners and self-employed professionals
are welcome to a schedule of helpful,
informative business seminars on various
topics to help grow business. Network with
other business professionals. Continental
breakfast will be served. It’s sponsored by
the Daily Journal and it’s free. For more
information and to register visit
SmallBusinessResourceFair.eventbrite.com
or call 344-5200.
***
Those planning to attend the second annu-
al PlayGround Film Festival at the
Aquarius in Palo Alto will have the chance
to see Redwood City resident Jessi Hecker
in the short film “Miss Finkangle
Succumbs to Chaos.” For tickets and more
information please call (415) 992-6677 or
visit http://playground-sf.org/filmfest.
***
Redwood City Mayor Alicia Aguirre
honored Kaiser Permanente’s volunteerism,
working to improve and maintain the city’s
parks. Kaiser, Hands On Bay Area and
ACTERRA held a Martin Luther King
Day service project in January at Stulsaft
Park, planting native trees, removing inva-
sive species and posting interpretive signs.
Kaiser Permanente volunteer funds were also
used to put up a storage shed at Stulsaft for
local tools and park maintenance equipment.
Aguirre presented Kaiser’s Matt Jacobs and
the others with appreciation certificates at
Monday’s council meeting.
***
Go Shopping for a Change for Mother’s
Day, graduation and early Father’s Day
gifts from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Thursday, May 2
at Domenico Winery, Ladies Night Spring
Shopping Extravaganza, 1697 Industrial
Road in San Carlos. Shopping for a Change,
a web-based nonprofit organization in
Burlingame, is a fair trade marketplace
where artisans, predominantly women from
developing countries, sell their handmade
creations, enabling them to earn a sustainable
income and lift themselves from poverty. It
works with more than 20 countries and more
than 30 artisan groups.
The organization’s net proceeds subsidize
community improvement projects abroad as
well as help fund select U.S.-based charities.
In 201l, the nonprofit helped to bring clean
water to more than 400 people in Swaziland
Africa, and in 2012 it financed a teacher for
a year in another artisan community in
Kenya.
The reporters’ notebook is a weekly collection of
facts culled from the notebooks of the Daily
Journal staff. It appears in the Friday edition.
Reporters’ notebook
Emma ‘Nona’ Corden
Emma “Nona” Corden, 86, died peacefully
April 2, 2013 with family around her.
She married her hus-
band, William Corden, in
1948 in Italy and came to
the United States in 1953.
Emma became a U.S. citi-
zen in 1956 and settled in
San Bruno to raise her
family. She is survived by
her daughter Olivia Lusk;
son Gary Corden; grand-
children Doug, Dayna, Dustin Cecchi and
Jessica Lusk Grigg; great-grandchildren
Anthony, Alex, Andrew, Adom, Braxton,
Brittan Cecchi and Bella Grigg. She is prede-
ceased by her husband William Corden and
daughter Patricia (Corden) Cecchi.
Emma cherished her family and enjoyed
life. Her sense of humor and laughter put a
smile on your face. She loved playing bingo
and was an avid sports fan of the San
Francisco 49ers, San Francisco Giants and the
Oakland A’s. She had a heart of gold and a
kind generous soul. She was loved by all her
family and bingo friends, who meant the
world to her. Emma leaves behind wonderful
sweet memories. She touched the hearts of all
her family and friends and will be forever
missed.
A memorial mass will be held at 11 a.m.
Friday, May 3, 2013 at St. Bruno’s Catholic
Church, 555 W. San Bruno Ave., San Bruno.
As a public service, the Daily Journal prints
obituaries of approximately 200 words or less
with a photo one time on the date of the fami-
ly’s choosing. To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to
news@smdailyjournal.com. Free obituaries
are edited for style, clarity, length and gram-
mar. If you would like to have an obituary
printed more than once, longer than 200
words or without editing, please submit an
inquiry to our advertising department at
ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Obituary
OPINION 9
Friday • April 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Letters to the editor
By Gregory C. Lukaszewicz, M.D.
F
or years, elected officials and allied
professions in California have pro-
posed scope expansion as a solution
to the state’s physician shortage. The latest
incarnation of this effort is a trio of bills
introduced by state Sen. Ed Hernandez, D-
West Covina. These bills would allow allied
health professionals to provide primary care
services without the supervision of a physi-
cian. Not only is this legislation detrimental
to the quality of care and patient safety; it is
a thinly veiled power grab by these groups
seeking to benefit from health care reform.
That this legislation jeopardizes patient
well-being is plain to see. Nurse practition-
ers would no longer need to work pursuant
to standardized protocol or any supervising
physician. Optometrists would be allowed to
perform eye surgeries typically performed
by ophthalmologists, without any additional
training. Meanwhile, pharmacists would be
permitted to diagnose and treat patients with
serious conditions like diabetes.
Proponents of the bills claim that they
were introduced in response to the passage
and implementation of the Patient Protection
and Affordable Care Act. It is true that the
ACA will expand access to health care to an
estimated two million Californians. These
newly insured individuals will undoubtedly
put a strain on a health care system already
stretched thing. However, it is disingenuous
for supporters to claim that the bills were
solely a response to the ACA.
Scope expansion bills are nothing new; SB
492, which would expand the scope of prac-
tice for optometrists, is nearly identical to
SB 1406, which was
introduced in 2006 —
well before heath care
reform was implemented.
Both were authored by
Hernandez — an
optometrist himself.
Supporters claim that
expanding the scope of
practice for non-physician
specialists will increase primary care capaci-
ty in underserved areas. However, there is no
strong evidence to support this claim. A
number of states have already enacted
expanded scope of practice laws. Despite
that, there has been little or no reduction in
the underserved population in the majority
of those states.
It may seem counterintuitive, but the
explanation is simple. The majority of
California’s physicians are located in greater
Los Angeles, the Bay Area and the
Central/Sierra region. Most of the state’s
nurse practitioners and other medical profes-
sionals are located in those same regions.
Simply expanding the scope of practice for
non-physician specialists is not going to
impact areas lacking in physicians, because
those professionals are not located in those
areas.
It is highly unlikely that an optometrist or
pharmacist will relocate from a densely pop-
ulated region to a rural area, simply to pro-
vide primary care to underserved individu-
als. The fact that a good portion of the newly
insured will be Medi-Cal patients with low
reimbursement rates makes it even less like-
ly.
Why, then, are non-physician specialists
seeking to expand their scope of practice?
One possible answer is that scope expansion
is a windfall for medical specialists. If these
laws are passed, they will be able to perform
lucrative medical procedures — such as
administering Botox injections — even if
they are not trained to do so.
In fact, scope expansion actually under-
mines one of the primary intentions of the
ACA, which was to increase access to quali-
ty, team-based medical care. Currently, nurse
practitioners and other paraprofessionals
consult with physicians in solving complex
patient care problems. Allowing these pro-
fessionals to open and operate their own
medical practices without physician supervi-
sion erodes the collaborative nature of team-
based care.
Those newly insured under the ACA
include many individuals in poor health and
with complex medical issues. A physician,
rather than a nurse practitioner with a frac-
tion of the training and experience, would
best serve these individuals. While allied
health professionals play an important role
in health care delivery, acting as a primary
care physician is not that role.
Gregory C. Lukaszewicz, M.D. is a vascular
and general surgeon and the president of the
San Mateo County Medical Association.
Another boondoggle
Editor,
Why is the county re-establishing the Parks
Department when in 2011 the supervisors
wisely voted to fold the Parks Department
into Public Works? (“Board of Supervisors
wants new Parks Department, interim direc-
tor” in the April 24 edition of the Daily
Journal).
Have the county’s finances improved so
much that we can throw money away? This
is precisely the kind of wasteful ideas that
enraged the people of Half Moon Bay
enough to recall three members of the
Coastside Fire Protection District.
Measure A read “To ensure San Mateo
quality of life by retaining critical
facilities/services such as: child abuse pre-
vention, 911 dispatch, fire prevention, after-
school library reading/homework programs;
keeping parks open; maintaining seismically
safe hospital/emergency rooms which may
include substantial funding to replace Seton
Hospital/emergency room for low-income
children/seniors/disabled; and other county
services, shall San Mateo County levy a half-
cent sales tax for 10 years, which the state
cannot take away, with oversight/independent
audits?”
No parks were ever closed when the Parks
Department was folded into Public Works.
Furthermore, where is Mr. Nantell’s salary
going to come from while he is an interim
director? (“Former city manager tapped to
head county Parks Department” in the April
25 edition of the Daily Journal). Does the
county have some slush fund called “The
gravy train for out of work Dems?” He made
a staggering $213,996 plus $70,618 in bene-
fits in his last job. I can’t imagine he will
work for less in the future.
I urge all San Mateo county residents to
fight this appointment and put the money
toward better uses; like those that Measure A
intended!
Robert Baker
San Mateo
GOP proposal
Editor,
Today’s edition of the Daily Journal (April
25) reported, “Under criticism, GOP puts off
its health care bill.”
Republicans stated for the article that they
would provide money to “shore up the Pre-
existing Condition Insurance Plan (PCIP), by
providing $3.6 billion that would be taken
from the Prevention and Public Health Fund
(PPHF) which was “designed to fund a pro-
gram that supports critical investments such
as tobacco use reduction and reduce health-
care-associated infections and the national
burden of chronic disease,” according to the
White House. The proposal sounded pretty
reasonable. But then, in an inexplicably hon-
est statement, House Majority Leader Eric
Cantor, R-VA said, “We want to stop
Obamacare and that’s why we’re going to the
fund … that Secretary Sebelius is using for
implementation of the bill.” Criticism of the
proposal, the “Helping Sick Americans Now
Act” (HSNA) came from both Republicans
and Democrats, prompting the House
Republicans to retract the bill for “more
work” and to resubmit in May after their sup-
porters return from their junket to the George
W. Bush library inauguration and a recess.
When resubmitting the bill, it might be wise
to change its name to something more
descriptive of its intent: the “Securing Health
Access Measure” (SHAM).
Bob Stine
San Mateo
Patients deserve quality, not weakened, health care
Under pressure
T
here is nothing to fear but fear itself.
Well, that and pressure cookers. And
backpacks. And mail. And unidenti-
fied powders. And Zooey Deschanel.
The seconds and minutes and days and even
months after an unexpected tragedy are
always akin to, dare we say, a pressure cooker
environment. The sense
of anxiety and nerves
leads to knee-jerk reac-
tions for public safety
resulting in legislation,
accusations, arrests,
debate and a strong
dose of paranoia.
And so pressure
cookers, that longtime
kitchen staple of sped-
up cooking, are the
new powdered dough-
nut. After 9/11 and the rash of anthrax-laced
letters sent to tabloids and politicians, the pub-
lic and law enforcement was on high alert for
anything that might have been the deadly sub-
stance or similar biohazard threat. Someone
go a little heavy with the odor-busting baby
powder in their shoes? Call in the hazmat
team. A compact of pressed powder sacrificed
inside a dropped purse? Uh-oh. Sheetrock
crumble a bit from a county office ceiling or
school wall? Forget the age-old fears of
asbestos; anthrax was all the rage.
The fall of 2001 jammed the phone lines for
emergency response to false alarms of dust or
fire extinguisher spray. White powder was
found at the Colma BART station and a South
San Francisco shipping company. A call at a
San Bruno government building was ceiling
dust. Dry starch-based powder was reported in
both a Burlingame elevator and stairwell of a
medical office building. San Mateo firefighters
responding to word of a possible anthrax scare
found part of a package label that flaked off
when the shipping tape was removed.
Remnants of a powdered doughnut cleared out
the courthouse. As late as both 2004 and
2005, a letter with a white powder cleared out
Franklin Templeton in San Mateo. The threats
were false, the fear real.
Even without the color-coded risk system
still in place, the world is on high alert to the
point of phobia so it’s no wonder pressure
cookers are on the hot seat. A piece of the
cookware left unattended outside a grocery
store in Red Bluff, Calif. caused a frenzy
until the bomb squad used a robot to X-ray
its empty insides. A backpack tossed by a
motorcyclist near the U.S. post office on
Delaware Street in San Mateo this week led
to the building’s evacuation until the bag was
removed and determined harmless.
Meanwhile, specialty retailer Williams-
Sonoma is pulling pressure cookers off the
shelves because, of course, future religious
zealots prefer going gourmet for their
weapons of mass destruction.
Maybe stores should follow Williams-
Sonoma’s lead and shelve backpacks, too.
More than a little awareness of one’s sur-
roundings and a strong dose of suspicion is
fine — good even — as a matter of personal
security and common sense. Nobody wants
another 9/11, another Boston Marathon
bombing, another rash of shoe bombs or any-
thing frightening in between.
But common sense also dictates taking a
breath before publicly damning a poisoned
letter-sending suspect who reportedly told
authorities with bewilderment he doesn’t
even eat rice or declaring in a news crawl
that doe-eyed actress Zooey Deschanel was a
bombing suspect. Granted, that error was
probably the result of faulty spell check bam-
boozled by the real bombing suspects’ names
but still.
The world is more and more feeling like an
irrational place, with jeopardy around every
corner and hidden behind the smiles of even
the most benevolent-appearing folks.
Although far easier said than done, perhaps
the best individual response is maintaining
some semblance of rationality.
Either that, or we all just rely on crock pots.
Michelle Durand’s column “Off the Beat” runs
twice a week. She can be reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102. What do you think of
this column? Send a letter to the editor: let-
ters@smdailyjournal.com.
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BUSINESS 10
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Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Thursday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Revlon Inc., down $1.38 at $19.16
The cosmetics company reported a first-quarter loss, as the company
took a charge for refinancing some debt and revenue was flat.
Lear Corp., up $3.43 at $57.38
The auto-seat maker said that it entered an $800 million accelerated
stock buyback program, pushing its stock to a 52-week high.
Carter’s Inc., up $3.63 at $64.12
The children’s clothing company reported that its first-quarter net income
rose 28 percent as it expanded its overseas business.
Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd., up $1.78 at $36.07
The cruise line posted a 62 percent jump in first-quarter profit as ticket
revenue rose and passengers spent more on extras.
Harley-Davidson Inc., up $1.11 at $54.31
The motorcycle maker said that its first-quarter profit jumped 30 percent
as it shipped more motorcycles to dealerships worldwide.
Nasdaq
Dunkin’ Brands Group Inc., up $1.38 at $39
The parent company of Dunkin’Donuts said that its first-quarter earnings
fell 8 percent, but its adjusted results beat expectations.
JetBlue Airways Corp., down 33 cents at $6.85
The airline’s first-quarter profit fell 53 percent due to higher maintenance
costs and weak travel demand over a February holiday.
Biogen Idec Inc., up $9.82 at $216
The drugmaker said that its first-quarter net income rose 41 percent on
lower tax rates and improved sales of its multiple sclerosis drugs.
Big movers
By Christina Rexrode
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — The engines driving
the stock market were more tepid than
turbocharged Thursday, but they were
enough to help stocks rise for a fifth
straight day.
The three major U.S. stock indexes all
closed higher as good news on the job
market and healthy earnings from
name-brand companies like Royal
Caribbean and Harley-Davidson
encouraged investors.
The Standard & Poor’s 500 has risen
every day since Friday, a record not
matched since early March.
The forces driving the gains, howev-
er, were tenuous, market watchers said.
Hiring remains sluggish, even with the
drop in unemployment claims last
week. The S&P’s five-day winning
streak is hardly a blockbuster: on
Wednesday it rose just .01 point. And
while companies are turning in profits
that are beating the estimates of finan-
cial analysts, many are missing revenue
forecasts.
Some investors think the stock mar-
ket’s most recent gains have more to do
with the belief that central banks around
the world, including the Federal
Reserve, will continue to keep interest
rates low and buy bonds to encourage
borrowing and spending.
“Some of the earnings were OK, but
it’s more just stimulus, stimulus, stimu-
lus,” said Scott Freeze, president of
Street One Financial in Huntingdon
Valley, Pa. “As long as the world wants
to print (money) ... the fears of a global
slowdown are going to be muted.”
Joe Heider, principal at Rehmann
Group outside Cleveland, thought
stocks were up mostly because investors
can’t think of anywhere else to put their
money, given record-low interest rates.
“You can leave it in cash and make
nothing on it,” Heider said.
Heider said he thought the latest
report on jobless claims was consistent
with a “plodding” recovery: “Not boom-
ing, not exciting, but we just keep
marching forward.”
Weekly applications for unemploy-
ment benefits fell 16,000 to 339,000, the
second-lowest level in more than five
years, according to the Labor
Department.
The good news for the job market
comes after a series of setbacks. In
March, employers added only 88,000
jobs, down from an average of 220,000
for the previous four months. The
unemployment rate fell to 7.6 percent
from 7.7 percent, but only because more
people stopped looking for jobs.
The Dow Jones industrial average
rose as much as 91 points before giving
up most of that gain Thursday. Investors
were underwhelmed by what turned out
to be a mixed bag on earnings. The Dow
closed up 24.50 points, or 0.2 percent,
to 14,700.80.
The S&P 500 rose 6.37 points, or 0.4
percent, to 1,585.16. Nine of the S&P’s
10 industry groups rose, led by telecom-
munications. Verizon Communications,
the biggest component in S&P’s
telecommunications group, rose almost
3 percent to $53.22 following reports
that the company could offer $100 bil-
lion to buy out Vodafone’s interest in
their joint venture, Verizon Wireless.
The S&P 500’s last streak this long
was March 1 to 11, when it rose on
seven straight trading days.
The Nasdaq composite index rose
20.33, or 0.6 percent, to 3,289.99.
Thursday’s earnings offered a mixed
view of the economy, and mixed reac-
tions from investors. Many companies
have been reporting better first-quarter
results, though the gains have come
more from cost-cutting than from a
strong economy.
So far, 71 percent of S&P 500 compa-
nies have beaten analysts’ profit expec-
tations for the first quarter, according to
John Butters, senior earnings analyst at
FactSet. But only 44 percent have beat-
en estimates for revenue.
Dow Chemical, which reported
results, was one example. The company
managed to increase profit even as rev-
enue slipped because it cut costs and
paid down debt. The stock rose nearly 6
percent to $33.97.
Stocks edge higher as jobmarket improves
By Christina Rexrode
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Banks aren’t the big
jobs machines they used to be.
One after another, major financial
firms are trimming their payrolls. In
first-quarter earnings announcements
this month, Bank of America, Citigroup,
JPMorgan Chase, Goldman Sachs and
Morgan Stanley revealed that they have
slashed more than 31,000 jobs, or 3.5
percent of their combined workforce, in
the past year. For three of those banks, it
was the second straight year of cutbacks.
And the pattern is being repeated at
banks around the world.
Layoffs in the depths of the financial
crisis were to be expected. But four
years later, and at a time when many
banks are reporting higher or even
record earnings, the cuts are unsettling
to an entire industry.
The losses are an unwelcome
reminder of the meltdown and its linger-
ing effects. A slow, halting recovery has
kept loan demand in check. Low interest
rates are crimping profits from lending.
New regulations have extinguished old
sources of revenue, and compliance is
expensive. The cuts also reflect advances
in technology that have made bank
tellers more expendable.
Steven Mann, chairman of the finance
department at the University of South
Carolina’s Moore School of Business,
says many of his students have given up
on banking jobs.
“In 2005, 2006, 2007, I’d ask, ‘Do you
want to go work at a bank?’ and the
answer was always yes,” he says. “Now
the answer is no one. They want to be in
the treasury department of General
Electric.”
Chastened banks cuts tens of thousands of jobs
Safeway’s sales disappoint
amid rising competition
NEW YORK — Safeway Inc. reported revenue for the first
quarter that missed Wall Street expectations as the grocer
worked to hold down prices and stay competitive.
The company, which has more than 1,600 stores under
names including Safeway and Vons, has been focusing on
low prices as a way to fend off discounters such as big-box
retailers and dollar stores, which have been expanding their
grocery sections and picking off customers from traditional
supermarkets.
In particular, Safeway has been touting its relatively new
“Just For U” program, which offers personalized deals based
on a customer’s past purchases.
Business brief
<< Golden State’s hopes rest on an ankle, page 12
• Sequoia takes down El Camino, page 12
Friday, April 27, 2012
THE RELOAD BEGINS: 49ERS TRADE UP, GOES WITH SAFETY —RAIDERS GO WITH A DB >>> PAGE 13
JULIO LARA/DAILY JOURNAL
Corey Pang, Carlmont’s No. 1 singles player and the top seed in the PAL tournament, beat Burlingame’s Scott Taggart 6-2, 7-6(3) to claim his
second straight PAL singles championship.
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
It was deja vu all over again at the Peninsula
Athletic League individual tournament finals.
And once again, after all the sets were
played, Carlmont’s Corey Pang is still the
biggest fish in the PAL pond.
Pang completed his undefeated PAL season
with a 6-2, 7-6(7-3) win over Burlingame’s
Scott Taggart, in a repeat of last season’s final,
to win his second straight league singles title.
“No … it doesn’t get old, definitely not —
especially with Scott putting up a tough fight
today,” Pang said.
Taggart provided Pang his tougest test of the
entire tournament, taking advantage of some
uncharacteristic unforced errors by the Scot in
the second set to force a tiebreaker. But at the
end of the day, Pang was too strong, too good,
too experienced.
“It was a good match,” Taggart said. “Corey
played very well like he normally does. I
defended five, six match points, but he was the
better player today overall. And I felt that if I
just would have had a little longer shots, I
would have had a chance. But overall, he
played great.”
“He came up with big serves on the match
points I had before the tiebreaker,” Pang said.
“It kind of bugged me there a little bit, I want-
ed to finish it off there. But when we went to
the tiebreaker, definitely my serve was big to
get three points and I put the ball in play on
the returns to make him work a little bit.”
Pang’s serve made a huge difference in the
deciding third set that allowed him to jump
ahead of Taggart and then basically wait out
with a three-point lead in hand.
“I think Scott played some of the best tennis
I’ve seen him play,” said Carlmont head coach
Amina Doar Halsey. “That was a beautiful
match that he put together. But Corey pulled it
Pang goes back-to-back
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Some championship duos were just meant
to be.
And so, when it was announced that Ben
Knoot, one half of Carlmont’s dynamic No. 1
singles team, and Vrain Ahuja (and not
Knoot’s long-time partner Byron Wu) would
play together at the Peninsula Athletic League
doubles tournament, there was zero doubt the
tandem was championship caliber.
Thursday afternoon at the PAL finals
against the brothers Lopez of Woodside —
Jorge and Jose — Carlmont head coach
Amina Doar Halsey, Knoot and Ahuja saw
their intuition pay off by winning the doubles
side of the league tournament.
“Ben and Byron have been a great combina-
tion for three years,” Doar Halsey said, “but it
came down to consistency. We had to put forth
our absolute best team and just based on their
styles of play and everything, that was our
most powerful lineup.”
Combined with Knoot’s quickness and
agility at the net, Ahuja’s powerful serve made
all the difference Thursday as they took down
Jorge and Jose Lopez 6-4, 6-2.
“I never like winning on a double fault, it’s
an a little unfortunate,” Knoot said of his
championship moment. “But a win is a win. I
love it. I love being a champion. It’s a great
feeling.”
“Being a part of the team has been a good
experience and I’m glad I did it,” said Ahuja,
Doubles title
goes to Scots
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The Menlo School golf team’s 2013 season
didn’t get off to the start it wanted as the Knights
floundered in an early-season tournament, fin-
ishing in 15th place out of two dozen teams.
Menlo golf coach Dave Buchanan was taken
aback by the result.
“I was a little concerned. I was kind of sur-
prised how poorly we did,” Buchanan said.
“The guys have been playing well since.”
So well, in fact, the Knights celebrated their
third-straight West Bay Athletic League cham-
pionship by beating rival Sacred Heart Prep
198-201 at Palo Alto Golf Club Wednesday
afternoon. The Knights went undefeated in
2011 to capture the WBAL title and 9-1 last year
in sharing the crown with Sacred Heart Prep.
The win Wednesday capped Menlo’s second
undefeated season in three years and runs their
record to 29-1 in WBAL rounds over the last
three seasons.
“This is a total team effort,” Buchanan said.
“Most high school matches are won in the 4
through 6 spots. Each team usually has three
good guys.”
Not only did Menlo have a solid top of the
Menlo wins another WBAL golf crown
JULIO LARA/DAILY JOURNAL
Carlmont’s Vrain Ahuja, along with his part-
ner Ben Knoot,captured the PAL doubles title,
6-4, 6-2 over Woodside’s Lopez brothers.
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The Woodside-Mills baseball matchup
Thursday afternoon in Millbrae featured two of
the top pitchers in the Peninsula Athletic
League’s Ocean Division — Woodside fresh-
man Jamie Kruger and Mills junior lefty Kyle
Vallans.
On this day, it was experience over potential as
Vallans pitched a gem in a 4-2 Vikings’ victory.
“Early, he was kind of grooving balls,” said
Mills manager Tony Adornetto. “Once he started
locating balls, he started getting them to swing at
his pitch.”
With the win, Mills (10-0 PAL Ocean, 11-10
overall) remains undefeated in Ocean Division
play and all but ended Woodside’s (6-4, 9-13)
chances of challenging for the title.
Woodside exploited Vallans early on as he
searched for consistency to start the game. The
Wildcats touched him for two runs on three hits
in the first inning. After that, however, Vallans
held Woodside to just four hits the rest of the way
as he threw a complete game with five strikeouts
and no walks.
“[Vallans] settled down nicely. He was a little
shaky in the first,” said Woodside assistant coach
Tim Worthington. “It was a really good perform-
ance.”
Woodside had a number of loud hits and outs
Vikings overcome early deficit
See MILLS, Page 16
See GOLF, Page 16
See SINGLES, Page 16
See DOUBLES, Page 14
SPORTS 12
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Sequoia downs EC to reclaim second place
By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
The dogfight is taking shape in the
Peninsula Athletic League Ocean Division.
Sequoia (8-2 in Ocean Division, 12-10-1
overall) scored a big victory Thursday with a
7-4 win at El Camino. After El Camino (7-3,
10-12) won Tuesday’s series opener at
Sequoia, the two teams entered into play
Thursday deadlocked in the standings — two
games behind first-place Mills in the Ocean
Division. With the series split, Sequoia main-
tains sole possession of second place heading
into next week’s pivotal two-game showdown
with Mills.
And if Sequoia starting pitcher Kyle
Cambron throws the way he did Thursday, it’s
indeed going to make for an epic showdown.
The junior right-hander was untouchable early
on, cruising through three hitless innings. He
ultimately went 5 1/3 innings to earn the win,
improving to 3-3.
Not bad for a kid who hasn’t pitched in
nearly a month. Cambron was diagnosed with
whooping cough in early April, and missed
nearly two weeks of school. He missed three
starts prior to yesterday’s return to the mound.
“I didn’t feel very well (on the mound),”
Cambron said. “I couldn’t run at all. Any time
there was a ball hit to the first-base side I had
to kind of walk over there and see if I could
get any help.”
Case in point: El Camino’s first hit of the
afternoon. Cambron took a no-hitter into the
fourth, when Colts catcher Evan Giacomino
hit a bounding ball to deep first. Sequoia first
baseman Tyler Leary wrestled with the ball,
but by the time he looked to feed to the pitch-
er at first, Giacomino had beaten Cambron to
the bag by three steps.
Endurance also proved a factor for
Cambron, but you wouldn’t know it to look at
him. The kid is a bull on the mound at 6-3,
220 pounds. He utilized a fastball, curveball,
slider combination to perfection until he ran
out of gas in the sixth.
“We sucked every bit of energy in his body
and his soul out there,” Sequoia manager
Corey Uhalede said. “We were just going to
let him go. I think that he was a little bit
(tired). I mean, he’s gone deep into games
before [he got sick]. And we could see in that
fifth and sixth inning he started to lose the
command of the corners a little bit and forced
us to go to the bullpen.”
Uhalede turned to Sequoia right-hander
Jarrett Crowell, who delivered 1 2/3 innings to
close it out, earning his first save of the year.
Sequoia came out swinging, extending a 7-
0 lead before the Colts even got a hit out of the
infield. In the first, the Cherokees greeted El
Camino starter Josh Eclavea with a two-spot,
as Chris Ortiz and Leary scorched back-to-
back singles before an infield single by Liam
Clifford coupled with a throwing error plated
them both to stake Sequoia to a 2-0 lead.
In the Sequoia second, Drew Tweedy was
hit by a pitch and Crowell singled, before
Leary walked with two outs to load the bases.
Cleanup hitter Eli Dugan then walked to force
home Tweedy. Zane Gelphman followed with
a clutch single down the right-field line to
drive home Crowell and Leary, giving the
Cherokees a 5-0 lead.
“We talked about punching them in the
mouth first, and really drawing first blood,”
Uhalede said. “We were able to do that today.
I thought it was a great team effort up-and-
down the lineup.”
Sequoia added two more in the fifth, scoring
one on back-to-back doubles by Clifford and
Tommy Lopiparo, before Tweedy drove home
Lopiparo with a sacrifice fly. Each of
Sequoia’s starting nine reached base in the
game.
The Cherokees are fueled by a talented jun-
ior contingent. Five of yesterday’s starters are
part of a junior class, much of which has
played together since Redwood City Little
League.
“A lot of these guys and I have been playing
… since we were about 9 or 10,” Clifford said.
“We’ve been together for the All-Star teams,
even some tournament teams, and it’s been a
big help having the chemistry on the team.
Obviously it showed today.”
El Camino managed to make a game of it
though. The Colts scratched out their first run
in the fifth on an RBI single by Giacomino to
plate Nick Moisant. In the sixth, the Colts
finally knocked a fatigued Cambron out of the
game. Dom Giuliani led off the frame with the
first home run of his varsity career. Emiliano
Rios and Joe Dudley followed with back-to-
back singles, and each later scored on RBIs
from Harley Torres and Steve Pastora.
“Our hitting is contagious as a team,”
Giuliani said. “I think we work a lot better
once we see someone else do better. Even if
we did get a late start on it, we were able to
claw our way back a little bit. We just weren’t
able to finish it off.”
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — Stephen Curry sat on the
scorer’s table at Oracle Arena on Thursday,
gazed at the empty seats and tried to imagine
how he’d feel if he had to be a spectator for
the first home playoff game of his four-year
career.
“It would kill me,” Curry said.
Whether the pain in Curry’s sprained left
ankle will subside enough for him to be on the
court when the Golden State Warriors host the
Denver Nuggets for Game 3 on Friday night is
not something even the sharp-shooting point
guard could say for sure. Curry is confident
he’ll play, but he’s also unsure how sore his
ankle will be.
When the ball is tossed up and Golden
State’s 33rd straight sellout crowd roars to its
feet, about the only certainty is that almost
everybody in the building will be focusing on
Curry again. And how his ankle holds up will
go a long way in determining which way this
fast-paced, first-round series swings.
“I told our trainer Chad (Bergman) he could
be the MVP of this series,” Warriors coach
Mark Jackson quipped.
For better and for worse, Curry has con-
trolled the outcome in the first two games.
He struggled for most of Game 1, when he
scored 19 points and handed out nine assists
in Denver’s 97-95 win. Then he turned his left
ankle trying to stop and change directions
while dribbling in the third quarter of Game 2,
but he returned strong to finish with 30 points
and 13 assists in Golden State’s 131-117 vic-
tory.
“In Game 1, we did a very good job on
him,” Nuggets coach George Karl said. “He
started getting loose in the second half and
almost beat us. Game 2, he got loose and he
beat us.”
Getting loose is exactly what Curry is trying
to do now.
Curry said his left ankle swelled up after
Tuesday night’s win evened the best-of-seven
series. The team had Wednesday off and he sat
out practice Thursday, saying “I wouldn’t be
able to play right now if there was a game.”
Curry will continue treatment and remains
hopeful to hear his name called last during
pregame introductions, which usually leads to
the loudest roars. He also said he’ll consider a
pain-numbing injection, which is something
he never did when his twice surgically
repaired right ankle gave him problems in the
past.
But Curry also has never been to the play-
offs. And for a player dogged by ankle set-
backs throughout his career, sitting out his
first home postseason game would be an
equally painful scenario.
“Especially for it being an ankle kind of
deal. I’ve been through enough of that,” Curry
said.
The one upside from all the ankle injuries is
that Curry knows what his latest recovery
requires. He joked that team trainers “didn’t
have to go through the anatomy of the ankle
and all that stuff, because I’m pretty well-
versed in it by now.”
Curry, no longer sensitive to injury ques-
tions, even took to Twitter to ask fans for their
favorite ankle puns. One follower suggested
his theme song be “Twist and Shout” by The
Beatles. Another said his daytime soap opera
should be called “As the Ankle Turns.”
Warriors’ hopes hinge on Curry’s ankle
SPORTS 13
Friday • April 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA CLARA — The San Francisco
49ers have found their apparent replacement
for departed free safety Dashon Goldson, per-
haps the biggest need for the reigning NFC
champions.
San Francisco selected free safety Eric Reid
out of LSU with the 18th pick in the NFL
draft on Thursday night after trading up to get
the selection from the Dallas Cowboys.
Making the move shows just how much the
team believes it could have an immediate-
impact player for the 2013 season.
“Unanimous decision that Eric Reid was
our pick,” coach Jim Harbaugh said on the
team website.
Safety was considered a significant need by
general manager Trent Baalke for the 49ers,
who lost Goldson to Tampa Bay at the start of
the league’s free agency period in March.
Reid played three seasons for LSU and is
still considered a raw talent in pass coverage,
though he thrives in stopping the run. He
could make an immediate impact on kick cov-
erage.
In 39 career college games with 26 starts
over three seasons for the Tigers, the 6-foot-1,
213-pound Reid finished with 199 tackles, six
interceptions, two forced fumbles, two fumble
recoveries, 11 pass breakups and 4 1/2 tack-
les for loss. The speedy defender’s father, Eric
Sr., was a three-time All-American hurdler at
LSU and NCAA champion in the 110-meter
hurdles in 1987.
“It really stands out,” Harbaugh said. “He
believes that he’s a winner all the way and
champion kind of guy and football player. I
can’t wait to have him here in our home in
Santa Clara. I’m sure he’s excited to have the
process start and know the team that wanted
him the most.”
The two-time defending NFC West champi-
on Niners gave up their selection at 31st over-
all to the Cowboys as well as No. 74 in the
third round. San Francisco began the day with
13 picks.
As with any player in Harbaugh’s system,
Reid will have to win a starting job during
training camp.
“It’s a meritocracy,” Harbaugh said. “We
have excellent football players on our roster
that have been working extremely hard. But
there’s no question there’s quite a bit of com-
petition at the safety position.”
Harbaugh recruited Reid to Stanford before
taking the 49ers job in January 2011. The
coach said Reid would likely arrive at team
headquarters Saturday.
“According to his mother, who is a very
honest person, she said this is where she want-
ed to see Eric and this is where Eric wanted to
be,” Harbaugh said. “Wonderful, wonderful,
very happy about it.”
49ers CEO Jed York posted on Twitter the
news that his team had traded up by saying,
“On the clock.”
There will be many more chances to be on
the clock, too, as the 49ers work to build a ros-
ter they believe can return to the Super Bowl
and win it this time. San Francisco lost 34-31
to Harbaugh’s big brother, John, and the
Baltimore Ravens on Feb. 3 in New Orleans.
The Niners are expected to add depth to a
depleted defensive line after losing nose tack-
le Isaac Sopoaga and defensive tackle Ricky
Jean Francois in free agency.
“The excitement’s in the air. It has been all
day,” Harbaugh said. “A lot of the angst, if you
will, has not really been in here, in our build-
ing. It’s been an air of excitement. You watch
it unfold and you get one of the players that
you really wanted and excited to add more.”
Reid became just the second LSU safety to
be selected in the first round, joining LaRon
Landry, who was taken in the opening round
by Washington in 2007.
By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ALAMEDA — D.J. Hayden’s remarkable comeback from a
near-death experience has taken him to the first round of the
NFL draft.
The Oakland Raiders selected the former Houston corner-
back with the 12th overall pick after trading down nine spots to
get a second rounder from Miami on Thursday night.
Hayden was just moments from death last November after an
on-field collision with a teammate in practice tore a blood ves-
sel off the back of his heart. He was rushed into immediate sur-
gery for a tear of the inferior vena cava, the large vein that car-
ries blood from the lower half of the body to the heart.
The injury is 95 percent fatal in the field, according to doc-
tors, and is most commonly associated with high-speed motor
vehicle injuries.
“I was just wondering if I would walk straight again,”
Hayden said. “That’s what was on my mind, just walking
straight again. I wasn’t worried about life after football, life
after college, I was just worried about walking.”
But after a week of self-described depression, Hayden’s spir-
its were lifted when doctors told him he would have a chance
to play football again once his sternum and stitches healed.
Hayden did recover and was cleared by doctors before run-
ning a 4.4 40-yard dash at Houston’s pro day in March to help
cement his status as Oakland’s selection.
“Of course we researched the health issues. Now, everything
we got back from that standpoint was more than positive so it
became a non-issue for us in that regard,” general manager
Reggie McKenzie said. “He’s going to have to mentally go
through it now, that’s the only issue we had”.
Hayden said he is looking forward to getting back on the field
and hitting people again to show he is fully recovered.
McKenzie said Hayden will be ready to practice as soon as the
team’s rookie minicamp early next month.
“The doctors were amazed when I walked in the room and
they saw my scar, they were just amazed,” Hayden said. “I told
my story at least 300 times. The real, main concern was how
would I feel getting back out there. And I just told them I have
to get out there and shake the rust off myself. I can sit there and
tell them anything they want to hear but I have to actually go
out there and just do it myself and just play.”
49ers trade up, get their safety, Reid
Raiders select D.J. Hayden
with 12th pick in NFL draft
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — Nate McLouth reached base four times and
scored twice, Nick Markakis drove in two runs, and the
Baltimore Orioles opened their longest road trip of the season
by routing the Oakland Athletics 10-2 on Thursday night.
Chris Davis homered and had two RBIs, Adam Jones added
three hits and Jason Hammel pitched six strong innings to help
the Orioles win for just the fourth time in their last 20 games at
the Coliseum.
Baltimore had a season-high 15 hits, with all nine starters
getting at least one. Six players drove in runs.
Josh Donaldson doubled in two runs for the Athletics, who
have dropped six of seven.
McLouth singled, doubled, walked and reached on a fielder’s
choice in six at-bats. The Orioles leadoff hitter drove in two
runs and is batting .444 (8-for-18) over his past six games.
Baltimore’s offense helped overcome an uneven night by the
defense. The Orioles turned three double plays but also com-
mitted two errors which led to both of Oakland’s runs in the
first inning.
Baltimore downs A’s
SPORTS 14
Friday • April 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
a mid-season, out-of-state transfer.. “And I’m
glad I made a difference on the team. It’s very
exciting.”
Carlmont is sure glad Ahuja is as versatile as
he is. The Scot played the majority of his tennis
at the No. 2 singles position since his transfer
was cleared by the Central Coast Section. He’s
been a differece-maker alright — with him in
the lineup, the Scots finished second in the PAL
and runner-up in the league’s team tournament.
So for Doar Halsey, despite the lack of court
experience between Knoot and Ahuja, the com-
bination was obvious.
“They’re both good-natured guys,” Doar
Halsey said. “They have a lot of fun together.
They’re good friends and so that makes it a lot
easier when you have friendship behind your
doubles partnership.”
“The fact that Vrain’s got a great serve,” Knoot
said when asked why he felt he had a champi-
onship-caliber teammate in Ahuja. “It’s so var-
ied, and it’s so hard, not a lot people can return
it. He’s got a great ground-stroke game and I
dominate the net, or at least I try to. So I know
with net dominance, his serve and a great
ground-stroke game you can have a great dou-
bles team.”
“They obviously served well,” Doar Halsey
said. “They both served well througout the tour-
nament. But they also move well together, espe-
cially at the net, they’re able to anticipate a shot.”
“For the most part, Ben and I have a lot of stuff
in common,” Ahuja said of his on-court chem-
istry with Knoot. “We’re able to get along well.
We’re friends on and off the court, so it was pret-
ty easy. I wouldn’t say it was very hard for me.”
Jorge and Jose Lopez had a hard time handling
Ahuja’s serve the entire afternoon. And Knoot’s
net-savvy play forced a lot of errors by the broth-
ers.
“Doubles teams that are brothers always scare
me a little bit because they’re so in sync and
they’re so tight,” Knoot said. “I guess today was
just our day.”
Woodside’s team of Hal Tuttle and Joel
Martinez took third place.
Continued from page 11
DOUBLES
JULIO LARA/DAILY JOURNAL
Carlmont’s Ben Knoot slices a return during the PAL doubles championship match. He paired with Vrain Ahuja to beat Woodside’s Jorge and
Jose Lopez to win the title.
CSM track has solid first day at Coast
Conference track championships
The College of San Mateo enters the final
day of the Coast Conference track and field
championships at Chabot College in Hayward
Friday in second place in the men’s competi-
tion and with one winner already crowned.
Both the track and field competition gets
underway at 12:30 p.m.
San Mateo has 42 points, trailing leader
Hartnell by just three points. Hartnell also
leads the women's competition, with 61
points.
Defending state champion Laney College,
with many qualifiers in the sprint and hurdle
events, is currently third with 29 points.
CSM is in fourth with 19 points.
CSM dominated the men’s javelin competi-
tion on the first day, scoring 22 points.
Anthony Capitulo won with a throw of 184
feet, 1 inch, just ahead of teammate Scott
Chisea (170-10). Collin Luu of San Mateo fin-
ished fifth at 149-4.
Evan McDaniel, the national leader in the
men’s shot put, placed second in the ham-
mer throw for the Bulldogs at 160-7. He
will compete in the shot put and discus
throw on Friday.
Dijohn Williams was a surprise fifth place
finisher in the long jump (21-11) to qualify for
next week’s Northern California Prelims.
In the women’s throws, CSM’s Moreen
Pahulu placed second in the javelin at 101-0
and third in the hammer with a personal best
of 124-4 — to score 14 points for the
Bulldogs. Katy Ahao was sixth in the hammer
for CSM at 112-6, also a personal best.
Sports brief
SPORTS 15
Friday • April 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 15 7 .682 —
Baltimore 13 9 .591 2
New York 12 9 .571 2 1/2
Tampa Bay 10 12 .455 5
Toronto 9 14 .391 6 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Kansas City 11 8 .579 —
Detroit 10 10 .500 1 1/2
Minnesota 9 9 .500 1 1/2
Chicago 9 12 .429 3
Cleveland 8 11 .421 3
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 15 7 .682 —
Oakland 13 10 .565 2 1/2
Los Angeles 8 13 .381 6 1/2
Seattle 9 15 .375 7
Houston 7 15 .318 8
Wednesday’sGames
Toronto 6, Baltimore 5, 11 innings
Chicago White Sox 3, Cleveland 2
Houston 10, Seattle 3
Boston 6, Oakland 5
Detroit 7, Kansas City 5
Tampa Bay 3, N.Y.Yankees 0
Texas at L.A. Angels, late
Thursday’sGames
Kansas City 8, Detroit 3, 10 innings
Boston 7, Houston 2
N.Y.Yankees 5,Toronto 3
Chicago White Sox 5,Tampa Bay 2
Texas 2, Minnesota 1
Baltimore 10, Oakland 2
Seattle 6, L.A. Angels 0
Friday’sGames
Atlanta at Detroit, 4:05 p.m.
Toronto at N.Y.Yankees, 4:05 p.m.
Houston at Boston, 4:10 p.m.
Cleveland at Kansas City, 5:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Chicago White Sox, 5:10 p.m.
Texas at Minnesota, 5:10 p.m.
Baltimore at Oakland, 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Seattle, 7:10 p.m.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 15 6 .714 —
Washington 11 11 .500 4 1/2
New York 10 10 .500 4 1/2
Philadelphia 9 14 .391 7
Miami 5 17 .227 10 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
St. Louis 13 8 .619 —
Pittsburgh 13 9 .591 1/2
Cincinnati 13 10 .565 1
Milwaukee 11 9 .550 1 1/2
Chicago 7 14 .333 6
West Division
W L Pct GB
Colorado 14 8 .636 —
Arizona 13 9 .591 1
San Francisco 13 9 .591 1
Los Angeles 10 11 .476 3 1/2
San Diego 6 15 .286 7 1/2
———
Wednesday’s Games
Cincinnati 1, Chicago Cubs 0
St. Louis 4, Washington 2
Colorado 6, Atlanta 5, 12 innings
Arizona 3, San Francisco 2, 10 innings
Pittsburgh 5, Philadelphia 3
N.Y. Mets 7, L.A. Dodgers 3, 10 innings
Milwaukee at San Diego, late
Thursday’s Games
Pittsburgh 6, Philadelphia 4
L.A. Dodgers 3, N.Y. Mets 2
Washington 8, Cincinnati 1
Chicago Cubs 4, Miami 3
Arizona 3, Colorado 2
Friday’s Games
Atlanta at Detroit, 4:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at Washington, 4:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Miami, 4:10 p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y. Mets, 4:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at St. Louis, 5:15 p.m.
Colorado at Arizona, 6:40 p.m.
Milwaukee at L.A. Dodgers, 7:10 p.m.
San Francisco at San Diego, 7:10 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GPW L OT Pts GF GA
z-Pittsburgh 47 35 12 0 70 157 116
x-N.Y. Rangers 47 25 18 4 54 126 112
x-N.Y. Islanders 47 24 17 6 54 138 137
New Jersey 47 19 18 10 48 112 125
Philadelphia 47 22 22 3 47 131 140
Northeast Division
GPW L OT Pts GF GA
x-Boston 46 28 13 5 61 127 102
x-Montreal 47 28 14 5 61 145 125
x-Toronto 47 26 16 5 57 144 129
x-Ottawa 46 24 16 6 54 111 100
Buffalo 47 20 21 6 46 123 142
Southeast Division
GPW L OT Pts GF GA
y-Washington 47 26 18 3 55 146 128
Winnipeg 48 24 21 3 51 128 144
Carolina 47 19 24 4 42 125 152
Tampa Bay 47 18 25 4 40 145 145
Florida 47 14 27 6 34 107 168
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GPW L OT Pts GF GA
z-Chicago 46 35 6 5 75 151 98
x-St. Louis 47 28 17 2 58 126 114
Detroit 47 23 16 8 54 121 115
Columbus 47 23 17 7 53 117 118
Nashville 47 16 22 9 41 110 136
Northwest Division
GPW L OT Pts GF GA
y-Vancouver 47 26 14 7 59 125 114
Minnesota 46 25 18 3 53 118 120
Calgary 47 19 24 4 42 127 157
Edmonton 46 17 22 7 41 112 131
Colorado 46 15 24 7 37 110 145
PacificDivision
GPW L OT Pts GF GA
y-Anaheim 47 30 11 6 66 137 113
x-Los Angeles 47 26 16 5 57 130 116
x-San Jose 47 25 15 7 57 122 113
Phoenix 46 20 18 8 48 116 123
Dallas 47 22 21 4 48 130 139
NOTE:Two points for a win,one point for overtime
loss.
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
z-clinched conference
Thursday’sGames
Philadelphia 2, N.Y. Islanders 1
Ottawa 2,Washington 1, OT
N.Y. Rangers 4, Carolina 3, OT
New Jersey 3, Pittsburgh 2
NHL GLANCE
FRIDAY
BASEBALL
Menlo School at Priory, Pinewood at Sacred Heart
Prep, Serra at St. Francis, Capuchino at Carlmont,
Half Moon Bay at Menlo-Atherton,Hillsdale at Terra
Nova, 4 p.m.; Aragon at Burlingame, 7 p.m.
SOFTBALL
El Camino at Jefferson, Mills at South City, Menlo-
AthertonatWoodside,Harker at Mercy-Burlingame,
Menlo School at Castilleja,Crystal Springs at Priory,
4 p.m.
GIRLS’ LACROSSE
SacredHeart Prepat Menlo-Atherton,MenloSchool
at Burlingame, Harker at Woodside, Mercy-
Burlingame at Notre Dame-SJ, 4 p.m.
BOYS’ LACROSSE
Burlingame at Sacred Heart Prep, 4 p.m.
BOYS’VOLLEYBALL
Wilcox at Sacred Heart Prep, 6:45 p.m.
MONDAY
WHAT’S ON TAP
BASEBALL
Mills 4, Woodside2
Woodside2000000— 271
Mills 001120x— 442
WP — Vallans. LP — Kruger. 2B — Stafford 2,
Kruger 2 (W);Esponilla (M).Multiple hits — Kruger
2, Stafford 2 (W); Esponilla 2 (M). RBIs — Degnan,
Kruger (W); Esponilla 2, McWhirter, Lujan (M).
Records — Mills 10-0 PAL Ocean, 11-10 overall;
Woodside 6-4, 9-13.
SOFTBALL
Mitty10, NotreDame-Belmont 0
NotreDame00000— 000
Mitty3043x—1080
WP — Severance. LP — Mifsud. Multiple hits —
Callaway 2 (M). Multiple RBIs — M. Nordin 4 (M).
Records — Notre Dame-Belmont 3-7 WCAL, 12-
12 overall; Mitty 10-0, 21-0.
WEDNESDAY
BASEBALL
Aragon5, Burlingame410innings
Burlingame0110010100— 480
Aragon3000000101—589
No outs when winning run scored. WP — Carey.
LP— Mori.HR— Perkins(A).2B— Perkins,Ching
2 (A). Multiple hits — Brunicardi 2, Engelmann 2
(B);Ehrlich3,Perkins2,Ching2(A).RBIs— Kennedy,
Keahi (B); Ching 2, Hahn, Hughes, Perkins (A).
Records — Aragon 4-5 PAL Bay, 11-8 overall;
Burlingame 5-4.
Capuchino7, Carlmont 1
Carlmont 0000001—113
Capuchino130111x— 783
WP — Cecchi. LP — Hubbell (3-1, 5-2). Multiple
hits — Hernandez 2 (CAP); Multiple RBIs — Her-
nandez 2 (CAP). Records — Capuchino 3-6 PAL
Bay; Carlmont 6-3, 16-5.
MenloSchool 24, Harker 2
Menlo100328(10) — 24220
Harker 0000200— 223
WP — Atkeson (5-3). LP —Kumar. HR —
Diekroeger,Cozad,Marcus(MS);Cali (H).3B— Klein
2,Harris,Stratford,Pluchar,Crowder,Farnham (MS).
Multiple hits — Klein 3, Farnham 3, Baxter 3; Har-
ris 2,Greenstein 2,Stratford 2 (MS).Multiple RBIs —
Farnham 5, Cozad 4; Diekroeger 2, Harris 2, Marcus
2; Pluchar 2 (MS). Records — Menlo School 4-1
WBAL, 14-7 overall; Harker (1-4, 7-10-1).
SacredHeart Prep8, King’sAcademy4
KA0000220—470
SHP010403x— 8123
WP — VauDell (3-0, 5-1). LP — Hansen. 3B —
Hansen (KA). 2B — Myers (KA); Sinchek (SHP). Mul-
tiple hits — Svozil 2 (KA); Reilly 2, Sinchek 2 (SHP).
Multiple RBIs — Covell 2, Johnston 2 (SHP).
GIRLS’ SWIMMING
Sacred Heart Prep 110, King’s Academy 60
200 medley relay — SHP (HOwe, Sturzenegger,
Holman,Myers) 1:52.70; 200 free — Sturzenegger
(SHP) 1:59.63; 200 IM — Howe (SHP) 2:05.68; 50
free — Yramategui (KA) 25.88; 100 fly — Myers
(SHP) 1:06.99; 100 free — Sturzenegger (SHP)
54.92; 500 free — Rakow (SHP) 5:37.32; 200 free
relay — King’s Academy (Jiang, Spierling, Owens,
Yramategui) 1:46.67; 100 back — Howe (SHP)
56.83; 100 breast — Miller (KA) 1:10.15; 400 free
relay — SHP (Holman,Wong,Sturzenegger,Howe)
3:46.61.
BOYS’ SWIMMING
Sacred Heart Prep 116, King’s Academy 52
200 medley relay — King’s Academy (V.Chan,Luh,
J. Chan, Morrison) 1:45.33; 200 free — Jollymour
(SHP) 1:51.10; 200 IM — Luh (KA) 1:55.49; 50 free
— Churukian (SHP) 23.22; 100 fly — Oliver (SHP)
58.57; 100 free — Hinrichs (SHP) 49.70; 500 free —
M.Swart (SHP) 5:06.80; 200 free relay — SHP (Chu-
rukian, Lazar, Perla-Ward, Jollymour) 1:33.40; 100
back — Enright (SHP) 58.42; 100 breast — Luh
(KA) 57.94; 400 free relay — SHP (Lazar, A. Swart,
C. Hinrichs, Jollymour) 3:27.43.
LOCAL SCOREBOARD
16
Friday • April 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
We Buy Gold, Jewelry,
Diamonds, Silver & Coins
Serving The Peninsula
for over 25years
in the first inning. Jordan Benavides jumped on
the first pitch of the game and flared a single to
shallow center field. Shane Stafford followed and
crushed a double down the left-field line to put
runners on second and third. Brad Degnan —
who set a state record with three home runs in the
first inning in a 24-6 win over Westmoor last
Friday — came to the plate and drove home
Benavides with a groundout. Kruger, who also
serves as the Wildcats’ cleanup hitter, came
through with an RBI double to put Woodside up
2-0 and give the Vikings their first deficit of the
year in league play.
Not that Adonetto or the Vikings panicked.
“We still had seven at-bats to make something
happen,” Adornetto said.
Kruger got through the first two innings
unscathed, allowing a first-inning walk and hav-
ing Sean McHugh reach on an error in the sec-
ond.
In the third, however, Kruger appeared to lose
his command. While he wasn’t getting banged
around by the Vikings, he struggled to find the
strike zone and Mills took advantage. The
Vikings put together three walks and a Sereno
Esponilla RBI single to cut the Wildcats’ lead to
2-1.
The Vikings’chance to tie the game in the third
died at the plate when Derek Wong was tagged
out at home following a wild pitch from Kruger.
Woodside catcher Stafford pounced on it and fed
Kruger, who was covering home, slapping the
tag on Wong on a bang-bang play.
Mills then tied the game with a run in the
fourth. McHugh led off the inning with a single
to center and stole second base. Mitchell Wong
then walked and Paul Winakur legged out a bunt
for a hit to load the bases. Jason Lujan followed
and hit a slow roller to the Woodside second
baseman. The Wildcats got Winakur at second
but the throw back to first was late and Lujan had
an RBI to tie the game at 2.
The Vikings lost another run at the plate when
Mitchell Wong again thrown out following a
wild pitch.
“That’s the fourth and fifth time this week
we’ve run out innings,” Adornetto said. “You
have to know your limits.”
In the fifth, Mills took the lead with a pair of
runs. Aram Moshkounian led off the inning with
a walk and scampered home when Esponilla
crushed a one-hop double to the fence in left field
to give Mills a 3-2 lead. Esponilla would move to
third on a groundout and score on a Mike
McWhirter huge chopper groundout to put Mills
up 4-2.
After that, it was Vallans’ game. He wiggled
out of a jam in fifth inning, with the Wildcats get-
ting runners to second and third with only one
out, but could not cash in. The Wildcats’ last
good scoring chance came in the top of the sev-
enth, as they got a runner as far as third base, but
Vallans induced a groundout to end the game.
“Usually, it’s our No. 3, No. 4 guys hitting. But
the last few games, we’ve seen production from
other spots,” Adornetto said. “And we’re putting
the ball in play. If you put enough balls in play,
[the other team] is going to make errors.”
Worthington put it even more succinctly.
“[Mills] executed. We didn’t,” he said.
Continued from page 11
MILLS
order, it also has the league’s best player in sen-
ior Andrew Buchanan, the coach’s son.
Buchanan won or tied for lowest score honors in
every Menlo match.
“That’s hard to do,” coach Buchanan said.
Senior Max Garnick and sophomore Ethan
Wong give the Knights a potent 1-2 punch in the
two spots behind Buchanan. Wong played
behind Buchanan last season as a freshman,
while Garnick provides that senior leadership all
good teams need and have. Riley Burgess has
been solid in the No. 3 spot, while a pair of
freshmen in name only — Jeff Herr and
William Hsieh — give the Knights some poten-
cy in the No. 5 and No. 6 spots, respectively.
“They’re as good as any No. 5 or No. 6 [play-
er] in the league,” coach Buchanan said.
It also helps to have everyone on the team
with the ability to shoot scores in the 30s.
Buchanan said every one of his top six golfers
has shot a round in the 30s, which is something
not a lot of teams can claim.
“If you want to be good in high school golf,
any score that starts with a ‘3’ is the key,”
Buchanan said. “We call it ‘3x,’ a three and any
other number. The six guys who played
[Wednesday] have all shot 3xs this year. If six
guys put up a 3x score, you’re going to win by
10 strokes.”
Buchanan said the other key to putting togeth-
er a championship season is avoiding the big
score. Very rarely did any of the Menlo golfers
have an off day when they shot something in the
50s. If they did, it was limited to one golfer.
“We didn’t really have many blowups,”
Buchanan said. “Or have two blowups at the
same time. Anything over a 43 is unexpected for
us.”
Needless to say, there weren’t too many 43
this season for the Knights.
Continued from page 11
GOLF
out and I think a lot of that is his experience in
difference stages of the match and knowing
how to get yourself out of it. It takes a really
strong mental game.”
Pang hit a bit of lull in the second set after
he cruised through set one. 6-2. On more than
a handful of occasions, the now back-to-back
champion of the PAL had mini conversations
with himself, frustrated by his errors.
“Try to slow it down a little bit and take my
time and try to get into it mentally,” Pang said
when asked about his thought process in those
tough times. “Try to keep my returns down the
middle so I can take higher percentage shots.
Get my feel back for it a little bit. And also
come to the net.”
“He plays a lot,” Doar Halsey said. “He’s a
highly competitive player. So, he knows how
to handle the pressure and he’s really proven
that throughout the season.”
Taggart actually jumped out to a 4-3 lead in
the second set before Pang turned up the heat
a bit and took control of that crucial swings of
points. It was Taggert though, who down 6-5,
forced that tiebreaker.
But at the end, it was Pang’s title once
again.
“I think if I would have pushed him a little
longer, got the second set, then it would have
been a very close third set,” Taggert said.
“Everytime I’ve played him, whether I’ve won
or lost, you learn more from losing than I do
winning. So, I’ll take this match and put it to
good use for the future.”
“There’s a little pressure,” Pang said when
asked if he felt any at the start of the tourna-
ment with him being the No. 1 seed. “I defi-
nitely wanted to win this tournament. Scott’s
been playing really well and Reed (Fratt of
Menlo-Atherton), I was a little worried about
that. But, they were both on the same side of
the draw and I only had to play one of them.”
Pang and Taggart will both move on to play
in the Central Coast Section tournament.
“Definitely, this is good match practice for
CCS,” Pang said. “Nothing can really be the
same. Practice matches, you try to make them
the same but a real match, when you’re work-
ing hard and trying to win for your school, it
definitely gives me good practice.”
Continued from page 11
SINGLES
By David Germain
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
There’s a siege mentality
about Michael Bay’s movies,
as though viewers are the
enemy holed up in a bunker
and he’s the guy ordering
heavy-metal music around-
the-clock to wear down our
morale and force us to surren-
der.
Bay’s true-crime caper “Pain
& Gain” lacks the visual-
effects mayhem and sci-fi
cacophony of his
“Transformers” blockbusters,
yet the movie uses all the
shock and awe and noise and
bluster the director has in his
utterly unsubtle arsenal.
Unlike Bay’s usual action
nonsense, there’s a story,
screenplay, characters and wry
mix of suspense and pitiable
comedy to be had in the tale of
three Florida bodybuilders
who blunder through kidnap-
ping schemes like the Three
Stooges on steroids.
All but the faintest flashes of
humanity and pathos are flat-
tened by the cinematic
cyclone that is Michael Bay.
He drowns “Pain & Gain” in
gimmick and style which,
rather than gussying things up,
dresses them down to make
the movie even more ugly and
sordid than it is on paper.
That these three guys, played
by Mark Wahlberg, Dwayne
Johnson and Anthony Mackie,
are boobs and imbeciles, we
get it from their actions. That
what they do is reprehensible,
that’s clear to see. That the
world as they view it is twist-
ed and coarse, another given.
So why can’t Bay set aside a
few visual tricks and give us
an occasional breather from
the overload on screen? “Pain
& Gain” is a two-hour
onslaught of dizzy, drunken
cuts, hot bodies in empty pois-
es, shifting perspectives (with
a babble of alternating charac-
ter voice-overs to accompany)
and often sickening images.
Example: Bay puts all of his
technical know-how into a
remarkably constructed shot
Three Stooges on steroids
Michael Bay’s new flick is mostly pain with little gain
See PAIN, Page 22
18
Friday•April 26,2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By J udy Richter
DAILY J OURNAL CORRESPONDENT
“Pericles, Prince of Tyre” is one of
Shakespeare’s later plays and, according
to most scholars, probably wasn’t written
entirely by him.
Director Mark Wing-Davey goes a step
further by reconceiving this work, with
movement consultant Jim Calder, for
Berkeley Repertory Theatre.
Wing-Davey cuts text and characters to
clarify the story of Pericles (David
Barlow). This nobleman flees Antioch in
fear of his life after realizing that the king
and his daughter, whose hand Pericles
was pursuing, were involved in an inces-
tuous relationship.
Pericles’ travels take him through
stormy seas to far flung places such as
Pentapolis. There he wins the hand of
Thaïsa (Jessica Kitchens), daughter of the
king (James Carpenter). On their return
voyage to Tyre, Thaïsa dies while giving
birth to a daughter, Marina. Many more
adventures separately await father and
daughter, who has been given to the care
of the governor of Tarsus.
Ultimately, the distraught Pericles
believes that both his wife and his daugh-
ter are dead, but in true Shakespearean
fashion, they’re reunited by coincidence.
All this takes place on a two-level
industrial set created by Peter Ksander
and Douglas Stein. Three musicians,
including composer/music director Marc
Gwinn, sit on one side of the upper level.
Except for Barlow as Pericles and
Anita Carey as Gower, who serves as the
chorus and a lord of Tyre, everyone else
in the eight-member cast plays three or
more roles. Thanks to Meg Neville’s
often-ingenious costumes, the characters
are easy to identify.
Wing-Davey has come up with some
wildly theatrical stagings, but some seem
excessive and distracting. For example,
during the shipwreck scene, Carey’s
Gower soaks the actors with a steady
stream of water from a fire hose aimed
above them.
Despite fine acting, especially by
Barlow, Kitchens, Carpenter and Carey,
the production sometimes lags. Still, it’s a
notable attempt to make one of
Shakespeare’s lesser works more accessi-
ble and palatable. It runs about two hours
plus intermission.
“Pericles, Prince of Tyre,” will continue
through May 26 in Berkeley Repertory
Theatre’s Thrust Stage, 2025 Addison St.,
Berkeley. For tickets and information,
call (510) 647-2949 or go to www.berke-
leyrep.org.
Shakespeare reconceived
PHOTO COURTESY OF MELLOPIX.COM
From left,David Barlow and James Patrick Nelson bring the Bard back with a bang
in Mark Wing-Davey’s production of ‘Pericles,Prince of Tyre.’
Brooks Bahr
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of developing melanoma, the most deadly form of skin can-
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Brooks Bahr, MD, MBA, Clinic Chief of Medical
Dermatology for Stanford Medicine Outpatient Center in
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a.m. on May 7 at the San Carlos Adult Community Center,
601 Chestnut St. San Carlos. The Center can be reached by
bus or train via the San Carlos train station. From the train
station walk four blocks up San Carlos Avenue to Chestnut
Street. The Center is on the corner of San Carlos Avenue
and Chestnut Street. 902-4384.
WEEKEND JOURNAL 19
Friday • April 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Jake Coyle
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The flowing Iowa cornfields of
“At Any Price” have nothing on the
amber waves of Zac Efron’s hair.
In “At Any Price,” Ramin Bahrani
plants a sweeping Midwest tale of
fathers and sons, fields and seed.
His camera floats over cornfields
listening to the rustling of the stalks,
but the somewhat graceless stabs of
grandeur in “At Any Price” don’t
register in this uneven but
respectably ambitious heartland
drama.
Dennis Quaid stars as Henry
Whipple, an obsessively driven
Iowa seed salesman, a family busi-
ness he has inherited, along with
constant pressure, from his over-
bearing father (Red West). Efron
plays Henry’s rebellious, race car-
driving son Dean. (In the lengthy
history of James Dean odes and ref-
erences, this may well be the most
overt.)
Efron, a dashing screen presence
making interesting choices for a
heartthrob actor, attempts a classic
American icon: a sweaty, sandy-
haired, jean-wearing teenage trou-
ble-maker. But the rebel role does-
n’t suit Efron: He doesn’t have a
lick of danger about him.
In any case, this is Quaid’s movie.
He’s not your father’s farmer. His
thousands of acres aren’t pastoral,
so much as the backdrop to the
hulking modern machinery that
drives his small empire, one fed by
genetically modified seeds that he
aggressively sells to other farmers.
Early in the film, he and a reluc-
tant Dean try to purchase land at a
funeral. “Expand or die,” is Henry’s
manta.
But Henry is struggling to grow.
A rival seed salesman (an excellent,
easy Clancy Brown) is dwarfing his
business. He also finds himself
under investigation for selling used
seeds, the authorities tipped off
mysteriously.
His family life isn’t much better.
He’s cheating on his wife Irene
(Kim Dickens) with a younger
woman (Heather Graham). His
older, more loved son has aban-
doned him to travel in South
America. Dean has no interest in the
family business, though his girl-
friend (Maika Monroe) begins
accompanying him on visits to his
customers.
Checking up-to-the-minute corn
prices on his phone and glad-hand-
ing his customers with awkward
folksy cheer, Quaid’s Henry
Whipple is part businessman, part
politician and all huckster. He
papers over the less noble sides of
his life with forced smiles and
‘At Any Price’ doesn’t register
In ‘At Any Price,’ Ramin Bahrani plants a sweeping Midwest tale of fathers
and sons, fields and seed.
See PRICE, Page 22
WEEKENDJOURNAL 20
Friday•April 26,2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By David Germain
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — Hollywood is banking
on the future this summer — and not just a
future where Capt. Kirk orders warp speed or
Tony Stark builds a better Iron Man outfit.
Though some film franchises seem to live on
forever, most come with a shelf life, leaving
studios always hunting for new ones.
The new stuff this summer could be a sign
of what you’ll be seeing for years to come if
movies such as Brad Pitt’s zombie fest “World
War Z,” Guillermo del Toro’s robots-vs.-sea-
monsters tale “Pacific Rim” and Johnny
Depp’s buddy Western “The Lone Ranger”
connect with audiences. There’s also that
orphan from Krypton in the latest Superman
revival, “Man of Steel,” who seems ripe for a
new franchise in this age of superhero block-
busters.
“Introducing a new audience to a new idea
about Superman is great and fertile ground,
because there is so much to be explored,” said
Amy Adams, who plays Lois Lane opposite
Henry Cavill as Superman in director Zack
Snyder’s “Man of Steel.” “There’s such a rich
comic-book history and so many ideas that
have not been touched on over the years.”
“Man of Steel” distributor Warner Bros. has
had tremendous franchise success with “Harry
Potter,” “The Lord of the Rings” and “The
Hobbit,” “The Dark Knight” and “The
Hangover,” whose finale arrives this May.
The studio tried reviving the Krypton kid
with “Superman Returns” in 2006. The
movie’s nearly $400 million worldwide box-
office receipts were OK, but in an era of bil-
lion-dollar blockbusters, it didn’t warrant
more of the same with that cast and crew.
As Sony Pictures did with last summer’s
“The Amazing Spider-Man,” a fresh beginning
for that superhero after three smash films,
Warner started over on Superman, with no
guarantee “Man of Steel” will do franchise-
worthy business.
Superman at least has an audience and track
record. Hollywood’s bigger risks this summer
are costly action spectacles with little or no
big-screen history.
Warner’s “Pacific Rim” has a visionary cre-
ator in filmmaker del Toro (“Pan’s Labyrinth,”
“Hellboy”), but he has yet to deliver a monster
hit. “World War Z” has Pitt and is inspired by
the best-seller about a global zombie outbreak,
but Paramount had to delay it from last year
for a month of reshoots that included a new
ending. Clayton Moore’s “The Lone Ranger”
has lived on for half a century in TV reruns,
and the new film reunites the crew behind
“Pirates of the Caribbean”: Depp, Disney,
director Gore Verbinski and producer Jerry
Bruckheimer.
But the Wild West generally has been on the
outs for decades, while fans have to wonder if
Depp’s Tonto, opposite Armie Hammer’s
masked Lone Ranger, is just his latest exercise
in costumed weirdness. Audiences bought
Depp’s Jack Sparrow, Willy Wonka and Mad
Hatter; they didn’t buy his bizarre vampire in
last summer’s dud “Dark Shadows.”
“This has been a big, expensive Western,
and if it doesn’t do well, it’s probably going to
be one of the nails in the coffin of big, expen-
sive Westerns,” said Hammer, best known for
a dual role as the Winklevoss twins in “The
Social Network.” Yet Depp, Verbinski and
Bruckheimer are “like a franchise factory.
They know what sells popcorn. They know
how to put asses in the seats.”
The thing that’s always lacking with new
ideas, no matter how big the stars, is audience
goodwill for what came before. Robert
Downey Jr. was a huge question mark with
2008’s “Iron Man.” Now, next week’s “Iron
Man 3” is almost a guaranteed good time after
what he’s delivered before.
J.J. Abrams’ take on “Star Trek” was a gam-
ble in 2009. His sequel, “Star Trek Into
Darkness,” is hotly awaited after the first one
took off.
“Starting something new, you’re taking a
huge risk,” said “World War Z” director Marc
Forster. “When you have a built-in audience,
you can take bigger risks knowing it worked
before. That’s not a guarantee it’s going to
work again, but doing something more origi-
nal I find more exciting and interesting.”
To ‘3’or not to ‘3’:Hollywood’s franchise fever
Next week’s ‘Iron Man 3’is almost a guaranteed good time after what’s been delivered before.
WEEKEND JOURNAL 21
Friday • April 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
650-365-1668
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856 North Delaware St.
San Mateo, CA 94401
856 North Delaware St.
San Mateo, CA 94401
By Sara Moulton
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Starchy, crunchy and flavorful,
fried rice is a deeply satisfying dish
no matter what you add to it. And
you can add just about any veg-
etable or protein you care to name,
fresh or left over.
I love fried rice not only for its
taste and versatility, but also
because it’s so easy to make at the
last minute. I almost always have
most of the core ingredients stocked
in my pantry, refrigerator and freez-
er. If a carton of leftover take-out
restaurant rice suddenly appears on
a shelf next to the milk, I’m good to
go.
I’ve never been all that great at
cooking rice. I just can’t seem to get
the ratio and timing right, and I
always forget when you’re sup-
posed to leave it alone and when
you’re supposed to stir it. I finesse
this handicap by leaning on a little
trick I learned during my restaurant
days: boiling the rice in a big pot of
salted water as if it was pasta. That
way there’s no rice-to-water ratio to
worry about. For brown rice, 45
minutes does the trick.
And if you’re in a particular rush,
you can swap in instant brown rice,
which is almost as nutritious as reg-
ular brown rice and cooks up quick-
er, as advertised.
This being spring, I made sure
that the stars of the recipe were sea-
sonal ingredients, starting with
peas. Fresh peas are heavenly, of
course, but they start turning to
starch as soon as they’re harvested,
so be sure to cook them right away.
I also incorporated two other spring
vegetables — sugar snap peas and
radishes, though I left the radishes
raw. Saute a radish and this spicy,
crispy root vegetable becomes
sweet and tender.
But I like the kick of a raw radish,
so I simply shredded them, then
tossed them with a little seasoned
rice vinegar. Sprinkled on top of the
finished dish, these raw radishes are
similar to a pickle.
Protein-wise, this recipe calls for
shrimp, but you can use any protein
you choose, or toss in mushrooms
instead and call it a vegetarian’s
delight.
As is typical in Chinese cuisine,
this dish requires little cooking
time. But you must have all the
ingredients measured and chopped
before you toss them in the pan. If
you want to streamline the process
even further, you can leave out the
sauce, simply serving the finished
dish with soy sauce and hot sauce
on the side. For that matter, you
could lose the radish garnish,
though even suggesting such a thing
makes me sad.
In the end, I can pretty much
guarantee that if you try this recipe
even once, you’ll be inspired to
make it again and again, changing it
slightly every time to make room
for whichever delicious seasonal
ingredients happen to be at hand or
whichever leftovers are crying out
to be used up.
Shrimp Fried Rice
with Pickled Radishes
Start to finish: 40 minutes
Servings: 4
2 eggs
Kosher salt and ground black pep-
per
2 tablespoons vegetable or canola
oil, divided
1 cup finely chopped yellow
onion
1/2 pound peeled and deveined
raw shrimp
2 garlic cloves, minced
2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger
3 cups cooked brown rice
2 cups coarsely shredded radishes
(about 10 large radishes)
2 tablespoons seasoned rice vine-
gar
1 tablespoon low-sodium soy
sauce
2 tablespoons sake or dry sherry
2 teaspoons sesame oil
1 cup blanched fresh or thawed
frozen peas
1 cup blanched sugar snap peas,
cut into 1/2-inch pieces
Heat a large nonstick skillet over
medium-high. Coat the pan with
cooking spray.
In a small bowl, lightly beat the
eggs. Add a pinch of salt and some
pepper to the eggs, then add them to
the pan. Tilt the pan to spread the
egg all around to make a flat pan-
cake. Cook for 30 to 45 seconds, or
until almost set. Turn over the egg
(you can cut it in a few pieces to
make it easier, using the side of a
nonstick pan-safe spatula) and cook
for another 10 seconds. Transfer the
egg to a cutting board.
Add 1/2 tablespoon of the oil to
the pan. Once the oil is hot, add the
onion. Reduce the heat to medium
and cook, stirring occasionally, until
the onion is lightly golden, about 3
to 5 minutes. Add the shrimp and
cook, stirring, until almost cooked
through, about another 3 to 5 min-
utes. Add the garlic and ginger and
cook, stirring, for 1 minute. Transfer
the mixture to a bowl and return the
skillet to the heat.
Add the remaining 1 1/2 table-
spoons of oil to the skillet, then add
the rice, pressing it flat with the back
of the spatula. Cook until the rice is
slightly crispy, turning it over with
the spatula, about 8 to 10 minutes.
While the rice is cooking, in a
small bowl combine the radishes,
vinegar and salt to taste. In a small
bowl combine the soy sauce, sake
and sesame oil. Chop the egg and
add it along with the peas and sugar
snap peas to the bowl with the
shrimp.
When the rice is nicely crisped,
add the contents of the shrimp bowl
and the soy sauce mixture to the
skillet and cook, stirring, until the
mixture is heated through. Transfer
the fried rice to 4 bowls and top each
portion with some of the radishes.
Nutrition information per serving:
440 calories; 120 calories from fat
(27 percent of total calories); 14 g
fat (2 g saturated; 0 g trans fats);
175 mg cholesterol; 50 g carbohy-
drate; 7 g fiber; 9 g sugar; 22 g pro-
tein; 670 mg sodium.
Healthier take on take-out worthy fried rice
If you’re in a particular rush, you can swap in instant brown rice, which is almost as nutritious as regular brown
rice and cooks up quicker.
WEEKEND JOURNAL
22
Friday • April 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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of Tony Shalhoub, as the bodybuilders’ first
victim, spewing spit as he’s Tasered. It’s done
in agonizing slow-motion and extreme close-
up, huge bubbles of saliva erupting from
Shalhoub’s mouth.
An impressive bit of technical work that’s
just disgusting and unpleasant to watch.
Despite the sheen of Bay’s imagery, every-
thing about “Pain & Gain” looks filthy and dis-
eased.
Likewise Wahlberg, so boyishly charming as
another stunted man-child in last summer’s
“Ted,” shows nothing but grubbiness as Daniel
Lugo, the dimwitted mastermind of this plot
carried out around Miami in the mid-1990s.
An ignoramus awash in envy toward the rich
people he trains at a gym, Lugo enlists disciple
Adrian Doorbal (Mackie) and born-again ex-
con Paul Drake (Johnson) to kidnap self-made
millionaire Victor Kershaw (Shalhoub) and
torture him to extort everything he’s got.
The dumbfounding farce of how these
guys screw things up should be entertain-
ment enough all on its own. Some of that
still comes through in the screenplay by
Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely,
though most of the comedy is smothered by
the dazzle Bay can’t resist.
Johnson comes off best among the three bad
guys, clearly relishing his beta-stooge role as
Curly to Wahlberg’s Moe that frees him up for
some goofy, unmanly hijinks.
Shalhoub rises above the chaos with razor
ferocity to show yet again that he’s one of
Hollywood’s finest character actors. Ed Harris
adds the movie’s only notes of grace and class
as a detective on the case, while Rebel Wilson
has scene-stealing moments that feel wonder-
fully improvised as Doorbal’s kooky wife.
But those few highlights are incinerated in
the bonfires Bay sets on-screen.
You don’t expect a real-life story as nasty as
this to be a pretty fairy tale. The details are so
absurdly tragic, though, that “Pain & Gain”
could have been a very entertaining romp
through the American dream as reflected in a
funhouse mirror.
Instead, it’s a lesson in high-gloss odious-
ness refracted through the frenzied, look-
what-I-can-do lens of Michael Bay. Bring on
Wahlberg in the next “Transformers.”
There’s bound to be more gain and less pain
when Bay’s buffed-up behemoths are giant
robots.
“Pain & Gain,” a Paramount release, is
rated R for bloody violence, crude sexual
content, nudity, language throughout and
drug use. Running time: 129 minutes. One
and a half stars out of four.
Continued from page 17
PAIN
strong-willed evasion, but his eyes give away
his desperation. It’s a strong if sometimes
grating performance in need of less cliche-rid-
den dialogue.
Only after a flash of violence occurs (an
implausibly setup moment in the screenplay
co-written by Bahrani and Hallie Elizabeth
Newton) does Henry glimpses the price of his
relentless capitalism. (And, no, the metaphors
aren’t subtle.)
There’s much to admire about “At Any
Price,” with its seldom-seen portrait of men
under financial, moral and corporate pres-
sures. It can be applauded, too, for upending
quaint notions of farm life in favor of a more
realistic depiction of the modern agricultural
industry.
But Bahrani, in his largest scale film yet and
his first effort with big-name stars, seems to
be wrestling with the balance of a more siz-
able production. His earlier indie films, like
the simple but memorable “Man Push Car”
(about the life of a Pakistani food cart seller in
New York), show a depth of empathy.
When “At Any Price” draws to a crescendo,
Dickon Hinchliffe’s mournful score heavy-
handedly signals the disturbing truths behind
its characters’ Midwest smiles and bright pas-
tures. But the film hasn’t quite earned the grim
resonance it seeks. The harvest, begun with
obviously good intentions, has been spoiled.
“At Any Price,” a Sony Pictures Classics
release, is rated R for sexual content, graphic
nudity, violence, some grisly images, and lan-
guage. Running time: 101 minutes. Two stars
out of four.
Continued from page 19
PRICE
“The permits were issued in error. It was
glaring. There were two different planners and
no file,” he said.
Code enforcement also caused a stir for a
group of mechanics and auto body shops on
Claremont Street last year for being cited for
violations they were unaware of, Lim said.
The proposed fines for the violation were
exorbitant, Lim said.
He was also asked whether the city is “wel-
coming” the California High-Speed Rail
Authority project.
The already approved “blended system,”
Lim said, will electrify Caltrain and bring
other benefits to the area and be less intrusive
than the authority’s original proposals.
San Mateo will hopefully get a grade sepa-
ration at 25th Avenue out of the deal, he said.
“We got to get what we can get,” said Lim,
who is not convinced high-speed rail trains
will ever actually access the Caltrain corridor.
Lim told the group that he’s most proud of
his work on the council the past three years
for his advocacy for small business.
He helped Silver Lake Seafood restaurant
get a loading zone approved after it applied
for one two years before. The restaurant own-
ers called Lim who then found out that their
permit application had simply been misplaced
the whole time.
He also helped the owners of a building on
38th Avenue and El Camino Real where a
Starbucks is located find another tenant for the
two-storefront building after being told there
was not enough parking on the site to accom-
modate another tenant. City staff had simply
miscalculated the parking requirements, Lim
said. The Shred Center now occupies the other
storefront.
Moving forward, the mayor envisions mov-
ing the tennis courts at Central Park in favor
of building a community center on the site. He
looks to enhance downtown with more cultur-
al arts in the future, also.
Lim even fielded questions about bees,
which the city limits.
The Beekeepers Alliance of San Mateo
County approached the city recently about
allowing for keepers to keep more bees on
their properties.
The city limits one hive, or box per resident,
however, Lim said, and that will not change.
Some who attended the meet and greet
included Vince Cirigliano with Borel
Financial Inc., Kenyon Mark Lee with Lee
Law Offices, Timothy Martin with Martin
Family Law firm, Daniel J. O’Brien with
California Bank & Trust and Walter R. Chao
with Dragon Financial Group.
silverfarb@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 1
LIM
summons, and being proficient in English.
The bill passed 45-25 largely on a party-line
vote in the Democratic-controlled Assembly
and will move on to the Senate. One
Democrat — Assemblyman Adam Gray, of
Merced — voted no, while some other
Democrats did not vote.
Democratic lawmakers who voted for the
bill said there is no correlation between being
a citizen and a juror, and they noted that there
is no citizenship requirement to be an attorney
or a judge. Republican lawmakers who
opposed Wieckowski’s bill called it misguid-
ed and premature.
Assemblywoman Diane Harkey, R-Dana
Point, said there is no shortage of jurors.
“Jury selection is not the problem. The
problem is trial court funding,” Harkey said
before the vote. “I hope we can focus on that.
Let’s not break something; it’s not broken
now. Let’s not whittle away at what is
reserved for U.S. citizens. There’s a reason for
it.”
Wieckowski’s office said the bill is the first
of its kind in the nation and suggested that
courts regularly struggle to find enough
prospective jurors because jury duty is often
seen as an inconvenience, if not a burden. His
office did not cite any statistics but pointed to
a 2003 legislative report that said numerous
articles have noted high rates of non-partici-
pation.
A 2007 survey by the Center for Jury
Studies said 20 percent of courts across the
country reported a failure to respond or failure
to appear rate of 15 percent or higher. The
center is run by the National Center for State
Courts, a Virginia-based nonprofit dedicated
to improving court systems.
It’s not clear, however, if that rate translates
to a shortage of jurors in California.
Noting that women were once kept off
juries, Assembly Speaker John Perez, D-Los
Angeles, said the judicial system should be
changed to allow a person to be judged by
their peers.
“This isn’t about affording someone who
would come in as a juror something,” Perez
said. “But rather understanding that the
importance of the jury selection process of
affording justice to the person in that court-
room.”
An estimated 10 million Californians are
summoned for jury duty each year and about
4 million are eligible and available to serve,
according to the Judicial Council, which
administers the state’s court system. About 3.2
million complete the service, meaning they
waited in a courthouse assembly room or were
placed on call.
In 2010-2011, the most recent year avail-
able, only about 165,000 people were sworn
in as jurors.
Continued from page 1
JURY
WEEKEND JOURNAL 23
Friday • April 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
FRIDAY, APRIL 26
Free Blood Pressure and Glucose
Screening. 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. San
Bruno Senior Center, 1555 Crystal
Springs Road, San Bruno. Free. For
more information call 616-7150.
Hillsborough Antique Show. 11 a.m.
to 8 p.m. San Mateo Event Center, 1346
Saratoga Drive, San Mateo. Admission
is $10 for adults and $8 for seniors.
Parking is $10 per vehicle. For more
information go to
www.hillsboroughantiqueshow.com/i
ndex.html.
Affordable Books at the BookNook.
Noon to 4 p.m. 1 Cottage Lane, Twin
Pines Park, Belmont. $1 paperbacks, $2
and up for hardbacks and 25 cents for
children’s books. All proceeds benefit
the Belmont Library. For more
information call 593-5650.
Happy Hour: Dinner, Drinks and
Dancing with the ‘SwingShift’Band.
4 p.m. to 6 p.m. The San Bruno Senior
Center, 1555 Crystal Springs Road, San
Bruno. Tickets available. For more
information call 616-7150.
Community Action Agency Public
Hearing.6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Half Moon
Village — Robin Hood Lodge, 9 Bloom
Lane, Half Moon Bay. Public comment
will be heard on the Community
Agency’s proposed Community
Action Plan. Refreshments will be
served and a raffle will be held. Include
any needs in the special
accommodations request. Free. For
more information and to RSVP call
802-5083 or contact smc-
caa@co.sanmateo.ca.us.
Reel to Real Film Nights: ‘Mon
Oncle.’ 7 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. Free.
For more information call 591-8286.
San Carlos Kiwanis Club Variety
Show. 7 p.m. Central Middle School
Auditorium, 828 Chestnut St., San
Carlos. There will also be a pre-show
at 6:40 p.m. with Arthur Murray. The
show will be a musical journey from
the ’30s up to Lady Gaga. Tickets will
be available online or an hour before
performance time at the auditorium.
$25 for balcony and $20 for orchestra.
$10 for students. For more information
call 590-4440 or go to
www.sancarloskiwanis.org.
Open House for Bay Area Dance
Week. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. 2862
Middlefield, Redwood City. Free. This
event is family friendly and open to
the public. There will be tours of the
two studios, live demonstrations of
pole fitness and aerial arts. For more
information go to
www.poletential.com.
San Mateo High School Performing
Arts presents ‘The Foreigner.’ 7:30
p.m. Burlingame High School Theater,
1 Mangini Way, Burlingame. $15 adults,
$10 for students and seniors. For more
information or to purchase tickets go
to www.smhsdrama.org.
Knights Moves XV: ADanceConcert
presented by the Hillsdale High
School Dance Ensemble. 7:30 p.m.
Hillsdale High School Little Theater,
31st Avenue, San Mateo. $10 for
students and seniors, $12 for general
admission and free for children 6 years
old and under. For more information
call 558-2623.
Dance at the Veterans Memorial
Senior Center. 7:30 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Veterans Memorial Senior Center, 1455
Madison Ave., Redwood City. Live
music provided by The Fun After 50
10-Piece Band. Waltz, Polka, Tango,
Charleston and more. $5 per person.
$7 for non-members. Free
refreshments, water and coffee. For
more information call 747-0264.
ATouchFromGod: AHolySpirit and
Power Special WeekendConference
with Ed Rocha. 7:30 p.m. Victory
International Church, 1730 S. Amphlett
Blvd., San Mateo. Free. For more
information call 655-4748 or go to
victoryic.org.
Menlo Park Spring Concert. 7:30
p.m. to 9 p.m.Trinity Episcopal Church,
330 Ravenswood Ave., Menlo Park.
Menlo Park Chorus ranges from
Broadway ballads and film tunes to
traditional spirituals. $15 general, $12
seniors and students, 12 and under are
free. For more information call (510)
504-4784.
SATURDAY, APRIL 27
A Garden in Every School. 10 a.m. to
Noon. Redwood High School, 1968 Old
County Road, Redwood City.
Innovative school garden programs
will be honored at the second annual
San Mateo County School and
Afterschool Program Garden
Recognition Ceremony. Free. For more
information call (510) 495-4962.
Drug Take Back Event. 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. San Carlos Library Parking Lot,
610 Elm St., San Carlos. Free. The San
Carlos Police Bureau will allow the
public to rid their homes of potentially
dangerous expired, unused and
unwanted prescription drugs. For
more information call 802-4223.
Paradise Valley Pocket Park
Dedication. 11 a.m. Paradise Valley
Pocket Park, 400 block of Hillside
Boulevard at Claremont Avenue, South
San Francisco. Grand Opening of the
newly renovated park. Free. For more
information contact
greg.mediati@ssf.net.
English Language Institute Hosts
ESLRegistrationEvent. 9 a.m. Skyline
College, 3300 College Drive, San Bruno.
Free. This event is designed to save
students time and money. For more
information call 783-7089.
Hillsborough Antique Show. 11 a.m.
to 7 p.m. San Mateo Event Center, 1346
Saratoga Drive, San Mateo. Admission
is $10 for adults and $8 for seniors.
Parking is $10 per vehicle. For more
information go to
www.hillsboroughantiqueshow.com/i
ndex.html.
Happy Seventh Birthday Belmont
Library Open House. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas.
Blowout book sale, jazz concert at 3
p.m. and refreshments served all day.
For more information call 591-8286.
Founder’s Hike. 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
44 Visitacion Ave., Suite 206, Brisbane.
Free. This hike is offered every month
on the fourth Saturday of the month.
Space is limited to 10 participants, and
it is required that participants sign up
in advance. For more information and
to sign up call (415) 467-6631.
Pacific Coast Dream Machines
Show. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Half Moon Bay
Airport, on Highway 1 five miles north
of State Route 92. Showcase of
motorized mechanical marvels from
throughout the 20th and 21st
centuries. Includes Demolition Derby
Championship, Unimotorcycle Racing,
monster truck rides, go-kart rides, kid’s
amusements, food and live music to
benefit the Coastside Adult Day Health
Center. Continues through April 28
during same time. $20 ($30 for two-
day pass) adults, $10 ($15 for two-day
pass) ages 11 to 17 and 65 and up. Free
for kids ages 10 and under. For more
information call 726-2328.
Seams Boutique Grand Opening. 2
p.m. to 6 p.m. 1114 Burlingame Ave.,
Burlingame. Free. Join for champagne,
cupcakes, discounts and gifts with
purchase. For more information call
704-0513.
School of Rock San Mateo presents
aTribute to Ozzy/Dio. 4 p.m. 711 S. B
St., San Mateo. School of Rock San
Mateo offers performance-based
music programs and camps for kids
ages 7 to 18. Students of the School
of Rock will perform. $8 at the door.
For more information call 347-3474.
Zoom Room Belmont Grand
Opening Party. 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Zoom
Room Belmont, 1412 El Camino Real,
Belmont. Free. For each person who
RSVPs and attends the event. a $10
donation will be made to PHS/SPCA.
Join for refreshments, photo booth,
raffles, caricatures, treat tasting and
the Doggy Disco. For more
information go to
www.zoomroom.me/427.
On Paper opening reception. 5 p.m.
to 7 p.m. Gallerie Citi, 1115 Howard
Ave., Burlingame. On Paper is a group
exhibition focused on paper-based
mixed media and works on paper.
Free. For more information call 577-
3799 or go to www.gallerieciti.com.
San Carlos Kiwanis Club Variety
Show. 7 p.m. Central Middle School
Auditorium, 828 Chestnut St., San
Carlos. There will also be a pre-show
at 6:40 p.m. with Arthur Murray. The
show will be a musical journey from
the ’30s up to Lady Gaga. Tickets will
be available online or an hour before
performance time at the auditorium.
$25 for loge/balcony and $20 for
orchestra. $10 for students. For more
information call 590-4440 or go to
www.sancarloskiwanis.org.
San Mateo High School Performing
Arts presents ‘The Foreigner.’ 7:30
p.m. Burlingame High School Theater,
1 Mangini Way, Burlingame. $15 adults,
$10 for students and seniors. For more
information or to purchase tickets go
to www.smhsdrama.org.
Dirty Dancing Party. 7:30 p.m.
Imperial Dance Club, 822 Cassia St.,
Redwood City. 7:30 p.m. beginners
Merengue Lesson, 8:15 p.m.
intermediate Cha Cha lesson. 9 p.m. to
11:30 p.m. Dance Party.Top instructors
will perform Johnny’s Mambo. There
will be prize drawings, Dirty Dancing
Movie Trivia Game and ’60s-style Mixer
Dances. $17 advance registration. For
more information go to
www.boogiewoogieballroom.com.
Knights Moves XV: ADanceConcert
presented by the Hillsdale High
School Dance Ensemble. 7:30 p.m.
Hillsdale High School Little Theater,
31st Avenue, San Mateo. $10 for
students and seniors, $12 for general
admission and free for children 6 years
old and under. For more information
call 558-2623.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
lars in debt but instead he pocketed the
same amount, wiped away what he
owed and his three grown children
were left with a hefty inheritance from
which he repeatedly tried to borrow,
Deputy District Attorney Jeff Finigan
said.
Finigan also said in the days after his
wife’s death, Peter Parineh did not
attend her memorial service, inquired
repeatedly about how to claim the
insurance and spent time with a woman
with whom he’d once had an affair.
But defense attorney Dek Ketchum
countered that Parima Parineh’s death
was a financial help for the family and
that is what motivated her to kill her-
self.
“Everything was falling apart in their
lives financially” and this was what the
severely depressed artist gave her chil-
dren, Ketchum said.
If jurors believe Parineh, 67, did in
fact kill his wife for financial gain, he
faces life in prison without the possi-
bility of parole.
Finigan did not address the couple’s
personal relationship during his hour-
long opening remarks but instead laid
out matter-of-factly the nature of the
family’s financial calamities, the mil-
lions of dollars attached to Parima
Parineh’s death and what led experts to
conclude the 56-year-old woman did
not shoot herself or ask her husband to
finish a botched suicide attempt.
Parineh’s five properties were in
foreclosure, he had a $1.7 million judg-
ment, he’d borrowed hundreds of thou-
sands of dollars including some from
the former paramour, his wife’s life
insurance was set to expire in April
2010 and, in January 2010, lost the
office building which provided his sole
source of cash income.
Parineh called authorities at 4:15
p.m. on April 13, 2010 to report his
wife dead inside their Fox Hill Road
mansion and responding deputies
found the woman shot two times with
another bullet in the wall and a fourth
at the scene. Her hand was on a blood-
ied gun and the comforter was soaked
in blood — both inconsistent with a
self-inflicted wound, Finigan said a
crime scene reconstruction expert con-
cluded.
Just six weeks earlier, Parima
Parineh had overdosed on pills, leading
to her husband surrendering two of his
four registered handguns to deputies.
After the attempt, Peter Parineh told
the couple’s daughter it had been a
“suicide pact” and told his sons they
“lost [their] shot” for $30 million when
she lived, Finigan said.
Parima Parineh remained depressed
about the family’s finances but was
happy and looking forward some day
to grandchildren, Finigan said.
Ketchum, however, said the eldest
Parineh child misunderstood and there
was no suicide pact. He also disputed
her story to authorities that her father
claimed to have heard two shots while
in the bathroom and found his wound-
ed wife asking him to “help” her so he
finished the job.
Ketchum said the children quickly
went from defending their father to
turning cold and eventually filing four
lawsuits against him for their mother’s
death and his financial losses.
While Finigan’s opening statements
focused primarily on a laundry list of
financial challenges and payoffs,
Ketchum jumped right into scientific
and medical evidence about in what
order the four shots were fired.
Ketchum said defense experts will
prove that Parima Parineh’s first shot
did not disable her enough from firing
again and that while stereotypes and
common thinking would consider a
multi-shot death of a woman a murder,
statistics actually show that 30 percent
of all women who kill themselves use a
firearm and between 1.6 percent and 8
percent involved multiple shots.
Using graphic photos of the crime
scene, Ketchum also said the place-
ment of Parima Parineh’s body and the
gun is plausible if she used both hands
holding the weapon in front of her.
Ketchum told jurors his client has “a
pretty contested, emotional case” but
that at its close they will have reason-
able doubt enough to return a not guilty
verdict.
Parineh remains in custody without
bail. The prosecution begins its evi-
dence today.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102.
Continued from page 1
PARINEH
Janine Saunders, student wellness and
safety programs with the Alameda
County Office of Education, oversees
the region that includes San Mateo
County. Saunders generally supports the
new Local Control Funding Formula but
believes the safety money should be
removed from it.
“Diluting the funding in this way
makes it basically ineffective. The cur-
rent funding formula means greater
impact across the state,” said Saunders.
The amount of funding across the
entire state is less than $350,000 per
year, said Saunders. If distributed on a
per-pupil basis, that money would
amount to only 5 cents per student. In a
district the size of Redwood City
Elementary School District, that would
only equal about $460 to serve more
than 9,000 students.
Centralizing how the funds are used
also allows the coordinators to serve the
state at a small cost, she said.
According to a poll by the California
Endowment in January, 96 percent of
California voters supported “training
school staff in emergency response” as
an approach to address school violence.
Trainings help schools devise safety
plans, crisis response strategies and
combat bullying. Trainings offered are
developed by committees of experts over
several years and include changes to
education code as well as state law. As a
result, the trainings are standardized
throughout the state bringing together
education officials and law enforcement,
said Saunders.
heather@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105.
Continued from page 1
MULLIN
Jackie Speier, D-San Mateo, Supervisor
Adrienne Tissier, Board of Supervisors
President Don Horsley, Sheriff Greg
Munks, retired assemblyman Gene
Mullin and the San Mateo County Office
of Education. It will take place at the
Oracle Conference Center in Redwood
City.
“We must continue to be a country
where schools are safe havens for chil-
dren to learn, to be able to identify chil-
dren with emotional needs that go
untreated, and to have in place protocols
that allow schools, county services and
law enforcement to work together to pre-
vent tragedies,” Speier said.
The summit is not open to the public
because of space limitations.
Continued from page 1
SUMMIT
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10 Each and every
11 Moby Dick pursuer
13 Designer Wang
14 ER staffers
15 Nintendo rival
16 Levin and Gershwin
17 Symphony conductors
19 Fine sediment
20 CSA defender
21 Big bags
23 Pumice source
26 Justice Kagan
28 “— Buttermilk Sky”
29 RR terminal
30 Customary
34 Sister’s girl
36 Bad-mouth
38 SUV maker
39 Fencing needs
41 Like some horses
42 Sublets
44 Sault — Marie
46 Cheery tune
47 Jousts
52 Crowning point
53 Singer — Adams
54 Really tiny
55 “Believe” singer
56 Ms. Ferber
57 LAX posting
58 Constantly, to Poe
59 Mil. rank
60 Brink
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2 Arm bone
3 End of a threat
4 Put up wallpaper
5 Frozen dessert
6 Othello’s foe
7 Eagle’s nest
8 Where Asia begins
9 Eat no food
12 Stitch loosely
13 Panoramic views
18 Madrid Mrs.
22 Heavy burden
23 “Wolf Man” Chaney
24 Cassius Clay
25 Plunging neckline
27 Fill the hull
29 Equinox mo.
31 Nasty!
32 I love (Lat.)
33 Arith. term
35 Middle
37 Handing out
40 Ms. Lauder
41 D.C. fgure
42 Nouveau —
43 — Fudd of cartoons
45 Small pleasure
46 Spike
48 Chances
49 Big pitcher
50 Sherpa’s sighting
51 Coal deposit
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friday, aPriL 26, 2013
taurus (April 20-May 20)— If an agreement you
make is not constructed fairly, you will be forced
to make some adjustments later, which will prove
diffcult. Make sure things are equitable from the
get-go.
GEMini (May 21-June 20)—Before implementing
a new program, be sure everyone involved
understands exactly how it will work. It could quickly
fail if people are working at cross-purposes.
CanCEr (June 21-July 22)—Don’t attempt to turn a
serious meeting into a social event. Mixing business
with pleasure in this instance would only end badly.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)—Procedures shouldn’t be
altered if they have been producing good results.
Changing things for change’s sake would only make
things worse.
VirGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)—Focus and deep
concentration are essential to your success.
Whatever you do, don’t let your thoughts wander off
what’s important.
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)—If you have to deal with
someone whose ideals and standards aren’t on par
with yours, take things with a grain of salt. Check
out their information before you act on it.
sCOrPiO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)—Guard against
inclinations to do things the hard way. Remember,
just because something comes easily doesn’t
make it worthless. In fact, it could be quite
valuable.
saGittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21)—Even if you’re
willing to do more for your friends than they’ve
ever done for you, it doesn’t necessarily make
them self-serving. Keep your expectations
reasonable.
CaPriCOrn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)—Evaluate your
objectives as realistically as possible. If you don’t,
you might strive to achieve something that turns out
to be worthless.
aQuarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)—A good friendship
could be jeopardized if it becomes competitive
instead of compatible. Don’t be the one to introduce
such friction; instead be cooperative.
PisCEs (Feb. 20-March 20)—Examining your
alternatives from every angle is the smart thing
to do, but don’t overanalyze things to the point of
paralysis. First thought, best thought.
ariEs (March 21-April 19)—Don’t take offense if a
colleague is paying a lot of attention to a relatively
new acquaintance. Your pal is just trying to get to
know him or her better.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
24 Friday • April 26, 2013
THE DAILY JOURNAL
25 Friday • April 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY DRIVER
ALL ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide deliv-
ery of the Daily Journal six days per week, Mon-
day thru Saturday, early morning. Experience
with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be eli-
gible. Papers are available for pickup in San Ma-
teo at 3:00 a.m. or San Francisco earlier.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday only, 10am
to 4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
HELP WANTED: FOSTER CITY REC-
REATION FACILITY - part-time staff po-
sition open. Evening and weekend shifts
required. Must live locally. For a full job
description, please email:
Rob@themanorassn.com
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
SOFTWARE QUALITY Assurance Engi-
neer. MS & 1 yr; or BS & 5 yr exp reqd.
Redwood City, CA job. Send resume to
Endurance Intl Group-West, 8100 NE
Parkway Dr, #300, Vancouver, WA
98662.
LEAD COOK, CASHIERS, Avanti Pizza.
Menlo Park. (650)854-1222.
110 Employment
MARKET RESEARCH company seeks
individuals to evaluate service at local
establishments in Burlingame and the
surrounding area. Apply FREE:
www.bestmark.com or call
1-800-969-8477
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
SOFTWARE ENGINEER. MS & 1 yr; or
BS & 5 yr exp reqd. Redwood City, CA
job. Resume to Endurance Intl Group-
West, 8100 NE Parkway Dr, #300, Van-
couver, WA 98662
SUBWAY IS Hiring FT/PT in various
postions apply in person only at 969
Edgewater Blvd., #F, Foster City, 94404
Between 10:30 & 3:00
110 Employment
PRINCIPAL -
(Silver Lake Kraftwerk Mgmt Co., San
Carlos, CA): Assess potential invest-
ment opps in energy & resource or tech
sectors; Conduct bus & fin due diligence;
Conduct industry & co research; Create
& oversee investment return modeling;
Oversee discrete fin analysis, incl creat-
ing summary fins, comparable co analy-
sis, comparable acquisition analysis, dis-
counted cash flow analysis, & investment
return analysis; Create investment
memos & presentations; Assist w/negoti-
ating legal docs; Assist w/presentation of
analyses &findings to deal teams & part-
nership; Assist w/recruit & training of jr
prof; Provide overall support to sr prof &
deal teams. REQS: Bach. in Bus Admin,
Fin, or its foreign equiv; Prior exp must
incl: 4 yrs exp in conducting bus & fin
due diligence on cos in energy & re-
source or tech sectors; in conducting en-
ergy & resource or tech industry res
studying mkt size, mkt growth rates, &
competitive landscape & mkt share using
res tools & services such as GLG, Gart-
ner, and IDC or equiv; in conducting en-
ergy & resource or tech industry co res
studying co fin, capitalization, & valuation
using res tools & services such as Capi-
talIQ, FactSet, Bloomberg, & EDGAR; in
creating & overseeing invest return mod-
eling for majority or min invest w/ or w/o
the use of leverage; in overseeing dis-
crete fin analysis, incl creating summary
fin, comparable co analysis, comparable
acquisition analysis, discounted cash
flow analysis, & invest return analysis; in
the recruit & training of jr fin, banking, or
private equity prof; in prov overall sup-
port to sr invest banking or private equity
prof & deal teams through co & industry
res, fin modeling & analysis, & exec sum-
maries; in MS Excel, MS PowerPoint, &
MS Word software prog; 2 yrs exp. in
working as an analyst at a top tier invest-
ment bank in a group focused on the en-
ergy & resource or tech sectors; in work-
ing at a top tier private equity firm as an
assoc assessing potential invest opps in
the energy & resource or tech sectors; in
creating invest memos & presentations
for the partnership & investment commit-
tee to help inform investment decisions;
and in the presentation of fin analyses &
findings to deal teams & partnership.
Apply to: Katie Morin, katie.morin@sil-
verlake.com
120 Child Care Services
AGAPE VILLAGES
Foster Family Agency
Become a Foster Parent!
We Need Loving Homes for
Disadvantaged Children
Entrusted to Our Care.
Monthly Compensation Provided.
Call 1-800-566-2225
Lic #397001741
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 520928
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Vidit Martin Khilani
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Anil Khilani filed a petition with
this court for a decree changing name as
follows:
Present name: Vidit Martin Khilani
Proposed name: Marty Vidit Khilani
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on May 17,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J , at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 04/03/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 4/03/13
(Published, 04/05/13, 04/12/13, 4/19/13,
04/26/13)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255312
The following person is doing business
as: Sheehy Contractor Services, 456
Moana Way, PACIFICA, CA 94044 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Kyle James Sheehy, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Kyle Sheehy /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/05/13, 04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255135
The following person is doing business
as: LaMond Interiors, 122 Walnut St.,
MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Gabrielle
Marie LaMond, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 03/25/2013.
/s/ Gabrielle Marie LaMond/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/05/13, 04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254723
The following person is doing business
as: Niles College, 553 Pilgrim Dr., Ste B
FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Niles Col-
lege. LLC., CA. The business is conduct-
ed by a Limited Liability Company. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on .
/s/ FE B. Borrillo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/05/13, 04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255122
The following person is doing business
as: Bayshore Plumbers, 3158 Rolison
Rd., REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Miguel L. Moreno, 2224 Menalto Ave.,
East Palo Alto, CA 94303. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Miguel Moreno /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/05/13, 04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255091
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Magic Labyrinth, 724 Laurel
Ave., #401, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Bogdan Zayats and Ana Maria Gon-
zalez, same address. The business is
conducted by a General Partnership. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on .
/s/ Bogdan Zayats /
/s/ Ana Maria Gonzalez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/05/13, 04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255037
The following person is doing business
as: Ethelbop5016 230 San Antonio Ave.,
Apt. 2, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is here-
by registered by the following owner: Ma-
ria Alma O. Poblete, and Pepito Joves,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by a General Partnership. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 09/10/2012.
/s/ Maria Alma Poblete /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255428
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: New World Beauty Salon, 410
A-E 1st Ave., SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Susana Flores, and Cesar Brandan,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by a Married Couple. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Susana Flores /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/10/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255339
The following person is doing business
as: 002Design 2038 S. Delaware St.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Kurin Vi Tu,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 02/05/2009.
/s/ Kurin Vi Tu /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13).
26 Friday • April 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Department of Public
Works of the County of San Mateo, State of California, will re-
ceive sealed bids for the construction contract titled
Loop Road
Security Project
Youth Services Center
222 Paul Scannell Drive
San Mateo, CA 94402
PROJECT NO. P7T17
Bids shall be received in accordance with the Contract Docu-
ments. The Contract Documents may be examined at the De-
partment of Public Works, 555 County Center, 5th Floor,
Redwood City, California, 94063-1665. Contract Documents
may be obtained for a NON-REFUNDABLE FEE OF $75.00
PER SET
A mandatory pre-bid conference and site visit is scheduled
for May 7, 2013 at 9:00AM. The conference will meet at the
Youth Services Center Main Entrance.
Questions regarding this project should be directed to Mi-
chael Ramirez, Project Manager, Department of Public
Works, 555 County Center, 5th Floor, Redwood City, Califor-
nia, 94063, Phone (650) 312-8948
Bids shall be submitted using forms furnished and bound in
the Project Manual and in accordance with Instructions to
Bidders, and shall be accompanied by a Certified or Cash-
ier's Check or Bid Bond for ten percent (10%) of the bid
amount.
Bids shall be sealed and filed with the Clerk of the Board of
Supervisors of the County of San Mateo at the Hall of Justice
and Records, 400 County Center, (formerly 401 Marshall
Street) 1st Floor, Redwood City, California, on or before the
day of May 23, 2013, at 2:30 p.m. and will be opened in pub-
lic in the Chambers of said Board of Supervisors or at anoth-
er location as designated by Owner shortly thereafter.
The Board of Supervisors of the County of San Mateo, State
of California, reserves the right to reject any and all bids, al-
ternate bids, or unit prices and waive any irregularities in any
bid received.
No bidder may withdraw his bid for a period of ninety (90)
days after the date set for the opening thereof.
Pursuant to Labor Code Sections 1770, et seq., the Director
of the Department of Industrial Relations has determined the
general prevailing rate of wages in the County of San Mateo
for each craft, classification, or type of workman needed to
execute the contract. The prevailing rates so determined are
based on an 8-hour day, 40-hour week, except as otherwise
noted. Existing agreements between the Building Trades and
the Construction Industry groups relative to overtime, holi-
days and other special provisions shall be recognized. It shall
be mandatory upon the Contractor and upon any sub-con-
tractors under him, to pay not less than the said specific rates
to all laborers, workmen or mechanics employed by them in
the execution of this contract.
A bond will be required for the faithful performance of the
contract in amount of not less than one hundred percent
(100%) of the amount of the bid, and a bond will be required
to guarantee the payment of wages for services engaged and
for materials used in the performance of the contract in an
amount of not less than one hundred percent (100%) of the
bid.
The work to be done consists, in general, of providing all la-
bor, materials, tools, appurtenances, and equipment required
for perimeter security upgrades along Loop Road of the
Youth Services Center which will incorporate security fencing
and associated accessed control gates, vehicular turnaround
for vehicles denied entry, and an enhanced surveillance sys-
tem as well as any other items and details not mentioned
above but required by the Contract Documents and as direct-
ed by the Director of Public Works. The contract amount is
estimated between $625,000 and $631,000.
Contract time is specified at one hundred and twenty (120)
calendar days. Liquidated damages are $1,000 per calendar
day.
4/26, 4/29/13
CNS-2477220#
SAN MATEO DAILY JOURNAL
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255115
The following person is doing business
as: NK International Trading Company
USA, 37 Cymbidium Cir., SOUTH SAN
FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Jiun Zhou,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Jiun Zhou /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255412
The following person is doing business
as: Kristen Turner, 851 Old County Rd.,
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Kristen
Turner, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Kristen Turner /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/10/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255434
The following person is doing business
as: JF Consulting, 1035 Woodland Dr.,
HILLSBOROUGH, CA 94010 is hereby
registered by the following owner: BE
HATA YOGA, LLC, CA. The business is
conducted by a Limited Liability Compa-
ny. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on.
/s/ Jordan Funk /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/10/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255385
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Coastside Legal Research, 2)
DMV For You, 8231 Pescadero Creek
Rd., LOMA MAR, CA 94021 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Ria
Gomes, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 03/27/2013.
/s/ Ria Gomes /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255469
The following person is doing business
as: 24/7 Mobile Notaries, 955 Fremont
St., MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Laura
Hawkins, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Laura Hawkins /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13, 05/10/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255100
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Woodside Tree Service, 2) Hills-
borough Tree Service, 3) Portola Valley
Tree Service, 4) Redwood City Tree
Service, 5) Atherton Tree Service, 6)
Menlo Park Tree Service, 7) San Mateo
Tree Service, 8) Belmont Tree Service,
9) San Carlos Tree Service, 10) Burlin-
game Tree Service, 2995 Woodside Rd.,
Ste. 400, Woodside, CA 94062 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Golden State Tree Service, Inc, CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Mark Feathers /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13, 05/10/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255246
The following person is doing business
as: Sylvia’s Styling Salon, 18 24th Ave,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: MSJ 18 En-
terprise Corp, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 01/01/2013.
/s/ Maria S. Jacobo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/01/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13, 05/10/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255189
The following person is doing business
as: Travelers Inn, 100 Hickey Blvd.,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Travelers Inn, Inc., CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 01/01/1995.
/s/ Pankaj Patel /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/27/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13, 05/10/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255259
The following person is doing business
as: Jeminix Research, 923 Emerald Hill
Rd., REDWOOD CITY, CA 94061 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Julie Doostzadeh, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 03/27/2013.
/s/ Julie Doostzadeh /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/01/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13, 05/10/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255181
The following person is doing business
as: El Amanecer Envios, 1714 El Camino
Real, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Martha Gonzalez, 349 S. Mathilda Ave.,
Sunnyvale, CA 94086. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 03/27/2013.
/s/ Martha Gonzalez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/27/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13, 05/10/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255506
The following person is doing business
as: Bashamichi Steak & Seafood, Japa-
nese Bistro, 1390 El Camino Real MILL-
BRAE, CA 94030 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Mark Melnick, 795
Park Ave., Moss Beach, CA 94030. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 04/15/2013
/s/ Mark Melnick /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/16/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/26/13, 05/03/13, 05/10/13, 05/17/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255460
The following person is doing business
as: Rey Rey Limousine Service, 178
Crestwood Dr. Apt. 9, DALY CITY, CA
94015 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Rey P. Evangelista, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Rey P. Evangelista /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/12/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/26/13, 05/03/13, 05/10/13, 05/17/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255138
The following person is doing business
as: Synergy Health, 1965 Edinburgh St.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Kelly Clo-
hessy, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Kelly Clohessy /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/26/13, 05/03/13, 05/10/13, 05/17/13).
203 Public Notices
THE BOARD of Education
of the San Bruno Park
School District (“SBPSD” or
“District”) hereby issues a
Request for Bids to award a
Dairy contract, Miscellane-
ous Grocery contract, Sup-
plies contract and a Produce
contract for the 2013-2014
school year. This Request
for Bids aims to select ven-
dors that can deliver product
on requested day and pro-
vide products on proposal.
Vendors are to complete bid
proposal packet which can
be sent through mail, email
or faxed. Please contact
Alisia Muñoz Food Service
Supervisor at:
amunoz@sbpsd.k12.ca.us
or (650) 624-3127 to get
packet. Documents must be
received by May 17, 2013
by 2:00 P.M.
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Lois Loretta Burton
Case Number: PRO123215
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Lois Loretta Burton. A
Petition for Probate has been filed by Ri-
chard C. Harrington. in the Superior
Court of California, County of San Mateo.
The Petition for Probate requests that Ri-
chard C. Harrington be appointed as per-
sonal representative to administer the
estate of the decedent.
The petition requests that the decedent’s
will and codicils, if any, be admitted to
probate. The will and any codicils are
available for examination in the file kept
by the court.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
203 Public Notices
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: May 1, 2013 at
9:00 a.m., Dept. 28, Ctm 2F, Superior
Court of California, County of San Mateo,
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. If you object to the granting of
the petition, you should appear at the
hearing and state your objections or file
written objections with the court before
the hearing. Your appearance may be in
person or by your attorney. If you are a
creditor or a contingent creditor of the
decedent, you must file your claim with
the court and mail a copy to the personal
representative appointed by the court
within four months from the date of first
issuance of letters as provided in Pro-
bate Code section 9100. The time for fil-
ing claims will not expire before four
months from the hearing date noticed
above. You may examine the file kept by
the court. If you are a person interested
in the estate, you may file with the court
a Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Robert C. Borris Jr., Esq., 85415
21550 Foothill Blvd.,
HAYWARD, CA 94541
(510)581-7111
Dated: March 28, 2012
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on April 12, 19, 29, 2013.
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Sherley Stein, aka Bud S. Stein
Case Number: 123284
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Sherley Stein, aka Bus
S. Stein. A Petition for Probate has been
filed by Russ Benito. in the Superior
Court of California, County of San Mateo.
The Petition for Probate requests that
Russ Benito be appointed as personal
representative to administer the estate of
the decedent.
The petition requests that the decedent’s
will and codicils, if any, be admitted to
probate. The will and any codicils are
available for examination in the file kept
by the court.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: May 28, 2013 at
9:00 a.m., Dept. 28,, Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo, 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. If you object to the granting of
the petition, you should appear at the
hearing and state your objections or file
written objections with the court before
the hearing. Your appearance may be in
person or by your attorney. If you are a
creditor or a contingent creditor of the
decedent, you must file your claim with
the court and mail a copy to the personal
representative appointed by the court
within four months from the date of first
issuance of letters as provided in Pro-
bate Code section 9100. The time for fil-
ing claims will not expire before four
months from the hearing date noticed
above. You may examine the file kept by
the court. If you are a person interested
in the estate, you may file with the court
a Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
R. Hollis Elliott
27 Friday • April 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
203 Public Notices
Law Offices of R. Hollis Elliott
841 Menlo Ave.
MENLO PARK, CA 94025
(650)321-8460
Dated: April 23, 2012
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on April 26, May 3, 10, 2013.
210 Lost & Found
FOUND YOUNG female Rottweiler 85lbs
ish on Skyline Blvd in Woodside call
(813)418-2884
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
SOLID OAK CRIB - Excellent condition
with Simmons mattress, $90.,
(650)610-9765
296 Appliances
5’ AMERICAN STANDARD JACUZZI
TUB - drop-in, $100., SOLD!
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC LG WASHER & DRYER -
white, used once, front load, SOLD!
GE PROFILE WASHER & DRYER -
New, originally $1600., moving, must
sell, $850., (650)697-2883
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
JENN-AIR 30” downdraft slide-in range.
JES9800AAS, $875., never used, still in
the crate. Cost $2200 new.
(650)207-4664
KENMORE ELECTRIC OVEN & MICRO
COMBO - built in, $100., SOLD!
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
PORTABLE HEATER - one year old,
FREE, SOLD!
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor, (650)726-
1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SMALL REFRIGERATOR w/freezer
great for college dorm, $25 obo SOLD!
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
16 OLD glass telephone line insulators.
$60 San Mateo (650)341-8342
1940 VINTAGE telephone guaranty
bench Salem hardrock maple excellent
condition $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
298 Collectibles
67 USED United States (50) and Europe-
an (17) Postage Stamps. Most issued
before World War II. All different and de-
tached from envelopes. All for $4.00,
(650)787-8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MENORAH - Antique Jewish tree of life,
10”W x 30”H, $100., (650)348-6428
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
NASCAR DIE CAST COLLECTIBLE
CARS. Total 23, Including #3 Dale Earn-
hardt’s car.Good condition. $150 for the
lot. Or willing to sell separately. Call for
details, (650)619-8182.
NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE – unop-
ened 20 boxes of famous hockey stars
sealed boxes, $5.00 per box, great gift,
(650)578-9208
PRISMS 9 in a box $99 obo
(650)363-0360
STAINED GLASS WINDOW - 30” x 18”,
diamond pattern, multi-colored, $95.,
(650)375-8021
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria 650-873-
8167
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE STOVE, Brown brand, 30",
perfect condition, $75, (650)834-6075
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
TWO WORLD Globes, Replogle Plati-
num Classic Legend, USA Made. $34 ea
obo SOLD!
VINTAGE THOMASVILLE wingback
chair $50 firm, SSF (650)583-8069
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $20 each or both for $35 nice set.
SSF (650)583-8069
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HP PRINTER - Model DJ1000, new, in
box, $38. obo, (650)995-0012
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
PS3 BLACK wireless headset $20
(650)771-0351
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
WESTINGHOUSE 32" Flat Screen TV
$90 SOLD!
304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
304 Furniture
1940’S MAPLE dressing table with Mir-
ror & Stool. Needs loving and refinishing
to be beautiful again. Best Offer.
Burlingame (650)697-1160
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SEEN painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
ANTIQUE BANKER'S floor lamp Adj.
Height with angled shade: anodyzed
bronze $75 (415)585-3622
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BASE CABINET for TV or Books, etc;
mahogany, double doors, divided
storage, excellent condition, 24"D,
14"Hx36"W, on casters $20
(650)342-7933
BEAUTIFUL WOOD PATIO TABLE with
glass inset and 6 matching chairs with
arms. Excellent condition. Kahoka
wood. $500.00 cash, Call leave mes-
sage and phone number, (650)851-1045
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
CABINET BLOND Wood, 6 drawers, 31”
Tall, 61” wide, 18” deep, $45
(650)592-2648
CHAIR (2), with arms, Italian 1988 Cha-
teau D'Ax, solid, perfect condition. $50
each or $85 for both. (650)591-0063
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
COPENHAGEN TEAK dining table with
dual 20" Dutch leaves extensions. 48/88"
long x 32" wide x 30" high. $95.00
(650)637-0930
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER & CABINET - Good condi-
tion, clean, 7 drawers, horizontal, 3 lay-
ers, FREE! (650)312-8188
DRESSER, FOR SALE all wood excel-
lent condition $50 obo (650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8’ x 30”, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
FOLDING TABLE- 5’x2’ $10
(650)341-2397
GRANDMA ROCKING chair beautiful
white with gold trim $100 (650)755-9833
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
INDOOR OR OUTSIDE ROUND TABLE
- off white, 40”, $20.obo, (650)571-5790
KING PLATFORM BED WITH TWO
BOX SPRINGS - no mattresses, like
new, Foster City, $100., (954)907-0100
LIGHT WOOD Rocking Chair & Has-
sock, gold cushions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RECLINER - Leather, beige chair with
ottoman, excellent condition, $50.,
(954)940-0277 Foster City
RECTANGULAR MIRROR with gold
trim, 42”H, 27” W, $30., (650)593-0893
ROCKING CHAIR - Beautiful light wood
rocking chair, very good condition, $65.,
OBO, (650)952-3063
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
SOFA TABLE good condition top 42"/36"
15" deep 30" tall $60 (650)393-5711
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TALL OUTSIDE BISTRO TABLE -
glass top with 2 chairs $75 (firm)
(650)871-7200
TEAK TV stand, wheels, rotational, glass
doors, drawer, 5 shelves. 31" wide x 26"
high X 18" deep. $75.00 (650)637-0930
304 Furniture
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
WICKER DRESSER, white, good condi-
tion, ht 50", with 30", deep 20". carry it
away for $75 (650)393-5711
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 (650)755-9833
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
BREVILLE JUICER - Like new, $99.,
(650)375-8021
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good con-
dition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 (650)755-9833
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
308 Tools
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 6 Gal. Wet/Dry Shop Vac,
$25 (650)341-2397
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
NEW DRILL DRIVER - 18V + battery &
charger, $30., (650)595-3933
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
SANDER, MAKITA finishing sander, 4.5
x 4.5"' used once. Complete with dust
bag and hard shell case. $35.00
(650)591-0063
SKIL 18 VOLT CORDLESS DRILL with
two batteries, 1 hour charger, with hard
shell case and instruction booklet. Used
once. Perfect condition. $60., (650)591-
0063
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
TOOL BOX - custom made for long
saws, $75., (650)375-8021
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $65 (650)341-8342
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
2 MATCHING LIGHT SCONES - style
wall mount, plug in, bronze finish, 12” L x
5”W , good working condition, $12. both,
(650)347-5104
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History and
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
6 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $9. for all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42” X 18” X 6”, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
310 Misc. For Sale
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
ADULT VIDEOS variety 8 for $50
(650)871-7200
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99., (650)580-
3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99., (650)580-
3316
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BATHROOM VANITY light fixture - 2
frosted glass shades, brass finish, 14”W
x 8.75”H x 8.75”D, wall mount, excellent
condition, $43., (650)347-5104
BELL COLLECTION 50 plus asking $50
for entire collection (650)574-4439
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY Jake AB Scissor Exercise Ma-
chine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
CLEAN CAR SYSTEM - unopened
sealed box, interior/exterior/chrome solu-
tions, cloths, chamois, great gift, $20.,
SOLD!
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., SOLD!
EVERY DAY'S A PARTY - up-opened,
Emeril Lagasse book of party ideas, cel-
ebrations, recipes, great gift, $10.,
SOLD!
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
HABACHI BBQ Grill heavy iron 22" high
15" wide $25 (650)593-8880
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JAMES PATTERSON books 2 Hard
backs at $3 ea. (650)341-1861
JAMES PATTERSON books 5 paper
backs at $1 ea. (650)341-1861
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX 55, repels and kills fleas
and ticks. 9 months worth, $60
(650)343-4461
KING SIZE BEDSPREAD - floral, beauti-
ful, like new, $30., (954)940-0277 Foster
City
KIRBY COMBO Shampooer/ Vacuum/
attachments. "Ultimate G Diamond
Model", $250., (650)637-0930
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $10., (650)347-5104
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LUGGAGE - Carry-on with wheels,
brand new, Kensington, $30., (954)940-
0277 Foster City
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW COWBOY BOOTS - 9D, Unworn,
black, fancy, only $85., (650)595-3933
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
PANAMA HAT; Tequilla Reed (Ecuador)
superb. Traditlional, New. Was $250
asking $25 (415)585-3622
310 Misc. For Sale
PET COVERS- Protect your car seat
from your dog. 2, new $15 ea.
(650)343-4461
PRINCESS CRYSTAL galsswear set
$50 (650)342-8436
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
ROLLER SKATES - Barely used, mens
size 13, boots attached to 8 wheels,
$100. obo, (650)223-7187
SET OF Blue stemwear glasses $25
(650)342-8436
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOP LIGHT FIXTURE - unused, flores-
cent, brand Mark Finelite, 48” x 9” x 3”,
white finish, two working bulbs, 14’ cord,
excellent condition, $47., (650)347-5104
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. White Rotary
sewing machine similar age, cabinet
style. $85 both. (650)574-4439
SOLID METAL STAND - 3 tiers, strong,
non skid support, 20” x 30” x 36” tall, has
potential for many uses, $17., (650)347-
5104
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TRIPLE X videos - and accessories,
$99., (650)589-8097
TYPEWRITER IBM Selectric II with 15”
Carrige. $99 obo (650)363-0360
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VIDEO POKER MACHINE - from Las
Vegas, $450., (650)592-3545
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WAHL HAIR trimmer cutting shears
(heavy duty) $25., (650)871-7200
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
WOOD PLANTATION SHUTTERS -
Like new, (6) 31” x 70” and (1) 29” x 69”,
$25. each, SOLD!
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 (650)341-8342
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
1 MENS golf shirt XX large red $18
(650)871-7200
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
DINGO WESTERN BOOTS - (like new)
$60., (408)764-6142
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
FOX FUR Scarf 3 Piece $99 obo
(650)363-0360
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
28 Friday • April 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 __ squad
5 Sharp fasteners
10 Line of movement
14 In a while
15 Go back to the
beginning, in a
way
16 Spread unit
17 One lingering in
Edinburgh?
20 Hoglike mammals
21 “I could __ horse!”
22 Touch
23 Stravinsky’s “The
__ of Spring”
25 DX ÷ V
26 “__ a rip-off!”
27 Some Athenian
physicians?
32 Black gold
33 Big Bird buddy
34 DOD subdivision
35 Really feel the
heat
37 Plus
39 Carpenter’s tool
43 CD conclusion?
46 Charge carriers
49 Fury
50 Berlin sidewalk
writing?
54 Valiant son
55 Heavenly altar
56 Hockey Hall of
Famer Mikita
57 Sum (up)
58 Personal time?
60 Some govt.
investments
64 Fancy singles
event in
Stockholm?
67 New coin of 2002
68 One may work
with a chair
69 Vivacity
70 Church section
71 Angling banes
72 Oh’s role in
“Grey’s Anatomy”
DOWN
1 Humongous
2 Worshipper of the
Earth goddess
Pachamama
3 Condo cousin
4 Complete
5 British university
city
6 Legal issue
7 “Off the Court”
author
8 Separate
9 Post
10 Links standard
11 Like citrus fruit
12 They might make
cats pause
13 Chef’s array
18 57-Across’s
wheels
19 Military surprises
24 First name in
humor
27 Tar
28 Sea inlet
29 One who
observes a
fraternal Hour of
Recollection
30 Source of
invigoration
31 One leaving a
wake
36 Mess up
38 Self-recriminating
cries
40 Have a health
problem
41 Hindu title
42 Sweetie
44 Muscat native
45 Some Roman
Catholics
47 Babbles
48 Perspective
50 Mature
51 Adds to the
database
52 __ Detroit: “Guys
and Dolls” role
53 Like some tree
trunks
54 Having no clue
59 Peel on “The
Avengers”
61 King who
succeeded
59-Down
62 Swedish model
Nordegren in
2004 nuptial
news
63 Tough going
65 Buck’s mate
66 Hosp. test
By Jim Holland
(c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
04/26/13
04/26/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
316 Clothes
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
LADIES CLOTHES - Tops & pants (20)
Size S-M, each under $10., (954)940-
0277 Foster City
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
LEVIS JACKET - size XXL, Beautiful
cond., med., $35., (650)595-3933
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
NEW! OLD NAVY Coat: Boy/Gril, fleece-
lined, hooded $15 (415)585-3622
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, beauitful color, megenta, with
shawl like new $40 obo (650)349-6059
316 Clothes
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
brand new, never worn for $25
(650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, $30.
each, (808)271-3183
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all, (650)851-
0878
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
STEEL MORTAR BOX - 3 x 6, used for
hand mixing concrete or cement, $35.,
(650)368-0748
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
4 TENNIS RACKETS- and 2 racketball
rackets(head).$25.(650)368-0748.
AIR RIFLE, Crossman, 2200 Magnum,
vintage perfect condition. Must be 18 or
over to purchase. $65.00 SOLD!
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
318 Sports Equipment
CROSMAN PELLET/BB rifle - 2100
Classic, .177 caliber, excellent condition,
rare, $50.obo, SOLD!
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees good condition $19
(650)365-1797
GOLF CLUBS -2 woods, 9 irons, a put-
ter, and a bag with pull cart, $50., SOLD!
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
MEN'S PEUGOT 10 speed bike; Good
Condition. $70.00 OBO call:
(650)342-8510
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call SOLD!
ROWING MACHINE. $30.00
(650)637-0930
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
VOLKI SNOW SKIS - $40., (408)764-
6142
319 Firewood
MIXED FIREWOOD, ALL FIREPLACE
SIZE- 5’ high by 10’ long . SOLD!
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
381 Homes for Sale
SUPER PARKSIDE
SAN MATEO
Coming Soon!
3 bedroom, 1 bath
All remodeled with large dining room
addition. Home in beautiful condition.
Enclosed front yard. Clean in and out.
Under $600K. (650)888-9906
VOLUNTEER WITH
Habitat for Humanity and help us
build homes and communities in
East Palo Alto.
Volunteers welcome
Wed-Sat from 8:30-4pm.
415-625-1022
www.habitatgsf.org
435 Rental Needed
SEEKING:
Granny Unit /
Guest House /
Studio
Harvard Masters Degree
Graduate
CEO of a Local Start-Up
Responsible, Healthy, Single,
Pet Free, Non-Smoker looking
for a Granny Unit / Guest Home
in San Mateo/Burlingame.
Ready to move in 01 July
2013.
Please e-mail or call me at:
oliverpmj@gmail.com
Phone: 408.234.1572.
Excellent References
available upon request.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. 650 591-4046
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
470 Rooms
ROOM FOR RENT in sunny San Mateo
duplex. Rent is $940 plus utilities. Lots of
patio space, garage space for storage
and bonus office room. Close to down-
town and easy access to Highway 101
for quick trip to San Francisco or Silicon
Valley. Share with one other professional
middle-aged male. One cat lives in
house now and a second will be wel-
comed. RENTED!
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
1998 CHEV. Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$5,000, Call Glen @ (650) 583-1242
Ext. # 2
‘93 FLEETWOOD $ 2,000
Good Condition (650)481-5296
AUTO REVIEW
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Automotive Section.
Every Friday
Look for it in today’s paper to find
information on new cars,
used cars, services, and anything
else having to do
with vehicles.
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
CHEVY 1963 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop,
390 engine, Leather Interior. Will consid-
er $2,500 Bid (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
DODGE ‘06 DAKOTA SLT model, Quad
Cab, V-8, 63K miles, Excellent Condtion.
$8500, OBO, Daly City. (650)755-5018
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
need some brake work. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,800.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAG with
brackets $35., (650)670-2888
NEW MOTORCYCLE HELMET - Modu-
lar, dual visor, $69., (650)595-3933
645 Boats
‘72 18’ RAYSON V Drive flat boat, 468
Chevy motor with wing custom trailer,
$20,000 obo, (650)851-0878
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
650 RVs
‘73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 1976 Nova rims with tires 2057514
leave message $80 for both
(650)588-7005
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
JEEP TJ 2004-2006 (1) ALUMINUM
WHEEL & TIRE, brand new condition,
$90., (650)200-9665
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
MECHANIC'S CREEPER - vintage,
Comet model SP, all wood with
pillow,four swivel wheels, great shape.
$40.00 (650)591-0063
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TIRES (2) - 33 x 12.5 x 15, $99.,
(650)589-8097
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
680 Autos Wanted
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
29 Friday • April 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Building/Remodeling
CONSIDERING A
HOME REMODEL
OR ADDITION?
Call (650)343-4340
for Drafting Services at
Reasonable Rates
Cabinetry
Cleaning
Concrete
POLY-AM
CONSTRUCTION
General Contractor
Free Estimate
Specializing in
Concrete • Brickwork • Stonewall
Interlocking Pavers • Landscaping
Tile • Retaining Wall
Bonded & Insured Lic. #685214
Ben: (650)375-1573
Cell: (650) 280-8617
Construction
Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
ART'S MARTIN DOORS
Sales Installation Service
Call (650) 878 1555
for all your garage door
needs.
BEST PRICE GUARANTEE:
$100 off
any other company's
written proposal on a
garage door-and-opener
package. Bring this ad to
our showroom and get $50
more on the above offer!
1000 King Drive, Suite 200
Daly City, CA 94015
BBB Rating: A+
www.arts-martindoors.com
State License #436114
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Housecleaning
FAMILY HOUSE SERVICE
Green products
Residential & Commerical
Monthly, Weekly, Bi-Weekly
Free Estimates
(650)315-6681
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
AL’S HOME
SERVICES
Build it, Fix it, Paint it
Projects, Bathrooms,
Remodels, Repairs
(408)515-8907
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof Re-
pair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
•Carpet Installation
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
HAULING
Low Rates
Residential and Commercial
Free Estimates,
General Clean-Ups, Garage
Clean-Outs, Construction Clean-Ups
& Gardening Services
Call (650)630-0116
or (650)636-6016
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$40& UP HAUL
Since 1988 • Licensed/Insured
Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating
(650)341-7482
Hauling
Landscaping
ASP LANDSCAPING
• All kinds of Concrete • Stamp
• Retaining Wall • Tree Service
• Brick • Roofing • Fencing
• New Lawns
Free Estimates
(650)544-1435
(650)834-4495
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Craig’s
Painting
Residential
Interior
Exterior
10 years
of Experience
FREE ESTIMATES
(650) 553-9653
Lic# 857741
Plaster/Stucco
PLASTERING & STUCCO
Interior & Exterior,
Dry Rot Repair
Free Estimates
Lic.# 632990
Call Ray (650)994-7451
(415)740-5570
Plumbing
DRAIN & SEWER
CLEANING
PLUMBING/ RE-PIPING
VIDEO SEWER
INSPECTIONS
TRENCHLESS PIPE
INSTALLATIONS
EMERGENCY HELP
15% SENIOR DISCOUNT
Free estimates
(408)347-0000
Lic #933572
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
Solar Power
GO SOLAR
with
SOLEENIC
• $0 Down
• Excellent Financing
• Free LED Lighting retrofit for your
bedrooms/bathrooms
Call us for free estimates
(415)601-8454
www.soleenic.com
Licensed and Bonded Lic. #964006
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Window Coverings
RUDOLPH’S INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)685-1250
Window Coverings
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame • 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos • 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates • Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
30 Friday • April 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAY’S
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
DR INSIYA SABOOWALA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
Food
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
TACO DEL MAR
NOW OPEN
856 N. Delaware St.
San Mateo, CA 94401
(650)348-3680
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WALLBEDS
AND MORE!
$400 off Any Wallbed
www.wallbedsnmore.com
248 Primrose Rd.,
BURLINGAME
(650)888-8131
Health & Medical
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. JENNIFER LEE, DDS
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
Special Combination Pricing:
Facials, Microdermabrasion,
Waxing , Body Scrubs, Acu-
puncture , Foot & Body Massage
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
www.LeJuinDaySpa.com
(650) 347-6668
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AUTO • HOME • LIFE
Brian Fornesi
Insurance Agency
Tel: (650)343-6521
bfornesi@farmersagent.com
Lic: 0B78218
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
www.collinscoversyou.com
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
AMAZING MASSAGE
Foot Massage $25/hr
Foot/Back $40/hr
Open 10:00 AM to 9:00 PM
703 Woodside Rd. Suite 5
Redwood City
(650)261-9200
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
GRAND OPENING
for Aurora Spa
Full Body Massage
10-9:30, 7 days a week
(650)365-1668
1685 Broadway Street
Redwood City
GREAT FULL BODY
MASSAGE
Tranquil Massage
951 Old County Rd. Suite 1,
Belmont
10:00 to 9:30 everyday
(650) 654-2829
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT
SENIOR LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
WORLD 31
Friday • April 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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154 West 25th Avenue San Mateo 650-574-3429
Workers pinned in
Bangladesh rubble cry for rescue
SAVAR, Bangladesh — “Save us, brother. I
beg you, brother,” Mohammad Altab moaned
to the rescuers who could not help him. He
had been trapped for more than 24 hours,
pinned between slabs of concrete in the ruins
of the garment factory building where he
worked.
“I want to live,” he pleaded, his eyes glis-
tening with tears as he spoke of his two young
children. “It’s so painful here.”
Altab should not have been in the building
when it collapsed Wednesday, killing at least
238 people.
No one should have.
After seeing deep cracks in the walls of the
building on Tuesday, police had ordered it
evacuated. But officials at the garment facto-
ries operating inside ignored the order and
kept more than 2,000 people working, author-
ities said.
The disaster in Savar, an industrial suburb
of Dhaka, the capital city, is the worst ever for
Bangladesh’s booming and powerful garment
industry, surpassing a fire five months ago that
killed 112 people and brought widespread
pledges to improve the country’s worker-safe-
ty standards.
Bomb in Pakistan kills
five near political office
KARACHI, Pakistan — A bomb exploded
outside an election office of one of Pakistan’s
main political parties Thursday evening,
killing five people in the latest attack ahead of
the nation’s May 11 elections.
As the election approaches, militant groups
have increasingly been attacking liberal, secu-
lar parties such as the one targeted Thursday
in the port city of Karachi. The onslaught has
forced many of the parties to change their
campaign strategy and raised questions about
whether the vote can be considered valid if
some mainstream parties can’t properly take
part.
Around the world
By Julie Pace and Bradley Klapper
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The White House
declared Thursday that U.S. intelligence
indicates Syrian President Bashar Assad has
twice used deadly chemical weapons in his
country’s fierce civil war, a provocative
action that would cross President Barack
Obama’s “red line” for a significant military
response. But the administration said the
revelation won’t immediately change its
stance on intervening.
The information, which has been known to
the administration and some members of
Congress for weeks, isn’t solid enough to
warrant quick U.S. involvement in the 2-
year-old conflict, the White House said.
Officials said the assessments were made
with “varying degrees of confidence” given
the difficulty of information gathering in
Syria, though there appeared to be little
question within the intelligence community.
As recently as Tuesday, when an Israeli
general added to the growing chorus that
Assad had used chemical weapons, White
House spokesman Jay Carney said the
administration was continuing to monitor
and investigate but had “not come to the
conclusion that there has been that use.”
The Syrian civil war has persisted, with an
estimated 70,000 dead. Obama has so far
resisted pressure, both from Congress and
from within his own administration, to arm
the Syrian rebels or get involved militarily.
He has, however, declared the use of chemi-
cal weapons a “game changer” that would
have “enormous consequences.”
The White House disclosed the new intel-
ligence Thursday in letters to two senators,
but had Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel
announce it to reporters traveling with him
in the United Arab Emirates. The letters
were sent in response to questions from sen-
ators of both parties who are pressing for
more U.S. involvement, and it marked the
first time the administration has publicly
disclosed evidence of chemical weapons
use.
U.S. says Syria used chemical weapons
BY Diaa Hadid
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
JERUSALEM — Israel shot down a drone
Thursday as it approached its northern coast
from neighboring Lebanon, raising suspicions
that the Hezbollah militant group was behind
the infiltration attempt.
Hezbollah denied involvement, but the inci-
dent was likely to heighten Israeli concerns
that the Shiite militant group is trying to take
advantage of the unrest in neighboring Syria
to strengthen its capabilities.
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu,
who was in a helicopter in northern Israel
at the time of the incident, said he viewed
it with “utmost gravity.”
Israeli military spokesman Lt. Col. Peter
Lerner said the unmanned aircraft was detect-
ed as it was flying over Lebanon and tracked
as it approached Israeli airspace.
He said the military waited for the aircraft
to enter Israeli airspace, confirmed it was
“enemy,” and then an F-16 warplane shot it
down, smashing its wreckage into the sea
about five miles (eight kilometers) off the
northern port of Haifa. Lerner said Israeli
naval forces were searching for the remains of
the aircraft.
He said it still was not clear who sent the
drone, noting it flew over Lebanese air-
space, but that it could have originated
from somewhere else.
Other military officials, speaking on condi-
tion of anonymity because they were not per-
mitted to talk to the media, said they believed
it was an Iranian-manufactured aircraft sent
by Hezbollah. The Lebanese group sent a
drone into Israeli airspace last October that
Israel also shot down.
Israel shoots down drone, Hezbollah suspected
REUTERS
A group of boys watch a group of activists sing and shout slogans against Syrian president
Bashar Assad in Raqqa province, eastern Syria.
32 Friday • April 26, 2013 THE DAILY JOURNAL
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