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Commentary 2010-2013

Anthony Abel Sunga

Anthony Abel Sunga

Commentary 2010-2013

Projects from the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation at Columbia University

CONTENTS

4 Portals

Studio VI Spring 2013 Mark Collins Toru Hasegawa

100 S(Mines), L(Park)


Studio I Fall 2010 Joaquim Moreno

20 Spatializing Sexuality
Studio V Fall 2012 Mabel O. Wilson

114 Rose Center for Earth and Space


Tech IV Fall 2011 David Wallace

partner: Paola Echegaray

partners: Anne Baker Jen Eletto Jochen Hartmann Caroline Lebar

46 2072 Cyborg Olympics


Studio IV Spring 2012 Kazys Varnelis

126 Ice-Cycle
Tech IV Spring 2012 Jay Hibbs

partners: Caroline Lebar Jenna Miller Jenny Ratner

68 Capturing Weather
Studio III Fall 2011 Lot-Ek

138 TINA*

Fast Pace || Slow Space Spring 2013 Mark Bearak, Bridgette Borders partners: Nicole Allen Collin Anderson John Barrett Phillip Crupi Chelsea Hyduk Bo Liu Kimberly Nguyen Michelle Park Sydney Talcott

partner: Anne Baker

86 The Book Is Dead


Studio II Spring 2011 Christoph A Kumpusch

portals
Project 1
Studio VI Mark Collins Toru Hasegawa Spring 2013 M.Arch I GSAPP

Studio

merging zones of accessibility for the disabled and elderly population

Our studio will apply new and innovative computing technologies to a growing problem of deep significance, both in the US as well as the site of our travel, Japan. Changing demographics have led to an imbalance between a disproportionately aging and infirm population and too few young workers to support needed social structures such as the healthcare system. In Japan this crisis is particularly acute, with a quarter of its citizens reaching retirement age, already the highest in the world but expected to increase dramatically in the next decade.

Project

Accessibility should be a community endeavor that promotes interaction between different players (people, trained animals, and robots). Interactivity promotes good emotional health for all parties, Increases empathy for others, and existing buildings will have less intrusive renovations.

Site

Advanced Telecommuncations Research Institute International Kyoto, Japan

Program
Research labs Offices Housing Gardens

Software
Processing Rhino Grasshopper Illustrator Photoshop

A. 5
The use of portals to create interactions at remote locations for different types of players. This maintains the natural perspective of every individual and allow for interactions.

ONCEPT
RESEARCH
The complexities of human emotions can make it difficult to accurately assess the emotional wellbeing of a patient. Psychologists can easily measure the expressions of the companion animal rather than the human.

Portals
Sensors/Cameras can obtain more health information by Attribute players image analysis software/infrared.
Classifying players to understand strengths and weaknesses. Understand range of motion to obtain ideal measures for graspability.

of portals to create interactions at ocations for different types of players. intains the natural perspective of dividual AND allow for interactions

Can be connected to outside the campus (offsite family, bus network).


researcher / therapeutic class

RESEARCH
Wheelchair Patient (4-9)

Attribute players
Classifying players to understand strengths and weaknesses. Understand range of motion to obtain ideal measures for wheelchair patient graspability. 4-9
bedridden patient 3-9 surveillance quadcopter 5-6 hacked roomba 0-5 therapy dog 2-6 researcher/ technician 5-6 automated robotic class

CONCEP
Concept Parti

patient class

The complexities of human emotions can make it difficult to accurately assess the emotional wellbeing of a patient. Psychologists can easily measure the expressions of the companion animal rather than the human.

Users Range of Motion

rs
automated robotic class researcher / therapeutic class

to ass hs and

of motion to res for

wheelchair patient 4-9

bedridden patient 3-9

surveillance quadcopter 5-6

hacked roomba 0-5

therapy dog 2-6

researcher/ technician 5-6

Bedridden Patient (3-9)

ated c class

researcher / therapeutic class

B
therapy dog 2-6 researcher/ technician 5-6

surveillance quadcopter 5-6

hacked roomba 0-5

H
0-5

Therapy Dog (2-6) Attribute players


Classifying players to researcher / strengths and understand therapeutic class weaknesses. Understand range of motion to obtain ideal measures for therapy dog graspability.
2-6

can make otional can easily hacked anion roomba

researcher/ technician 5-6

Researcher (5-6)
automated robotic class researcher / therapeutic class

C
therapy dog 2-6 researcher/ technician 5-6

bedridden patient 3-9

surveillance quadcopter 5-6

hacked roomba 0-5

Floor Robot (0-5)

strength, flexibility, and range of motion are all hindered with advanced age and disability. Companions can be an extension of a patient's abilities to achieve normal accessibility ."
C

The use of portals to create remote locations for different This maintains the natural per every individual AND allow for

A. 6
A section exemplifying several interactions with the building and other players. The ground plane is sheered to bring different players at equal level.

TESTING
TESTING
Fictional Example
6 PORTALS

Fictional Example
More saturated colors mean more interactivity

Blended RGB to obtain CMY A section exemplifying several interactions More saturated colors mean depicts a space of multiple with the building and other players. The more interactivity interactivity. ground plane is sheered to bring different players at equal level. Blended RGB to obtain CMY A section exemplifying several interactions
Testing Interactivity

Fictional Example

NG TESTING

with the building and other players. The ground plane is sheered to bring different players at equal level.

depicts a space of multiple interactivity.

More saturated colors mean more interactivity

Fictional Example
More saturated colors mean more interactivity Blended RGB to obtain CMY depicts a space of multiple interactivity.

a.

a.
a. b.

b.

Blended RGB to obtain CMY everal interactions A section exemplifying several depicts interactions a space of multiple er players. The with the building and other players. interactivity. The to bring different ground plane is sheered to bring different players at equal level.

f.
a. b.

f.

b.

a.

c.c.

b. a.

d.

d. b.

. b.

d.

e.

e.

d.
c. e. f.
c.

c.

f.

f.

c.

e. d. c.

f. d.

. b. d.

e. d.

e.

e.

f. e.

f.

A. 7
The use of portals to create interactions at remote locations for different types of players. This maintains the natural perspective of every individual and allow for interactions.

b. a.

b.

TESTING
Blending the strips throughout the space creations a heat map effect identifying the extent of these interactions.
d.

Volumizing Interaction

Interactivity Heatmap

7 PORTALS

d. c. b.

d.

e.

f. e. d.

f.

f.

f.

8 PORTALS

Private Labs and Offices

Open Laboratories

Housing Unit

Garden Entry

A. 9
There are three major zones for wheelchair patients that correspond to the necessity of interactivity.

New Extension Wing

9 PORTALS

10 PORTALS

Existing Program
Hir
Laboratory Research Equipment Hallways Reception Auxiliary Room Canteen Public Relations

Str

osh i Is hig uro ate gic Lab Ma nag em ent

3F
Lib

Un

it

Existing Program
Laboratory Research Equipment Hallways/Reception

rar

loo
y

En
Management Affiliated Corporations Rental Spaces

try

Auxiliary Room Food/Public Relations

2F

Ca fe Sh teria op Ne ura l In form Un atio ive nA rsa nal lC ysis om mu Lab ME n G ica tion Exh Re ibit sea ion rch Ro om Ins t

loo

Management

Affiliated Corporations Rental Spaces

1F

loo

FM

GF

RI

loo

A. 11
Site analysis and massing for new program.

Proposed Circulation

11 PORTALS

3F

Existing Circulation
loo r

Existing Circulation 3
Flo or
Priv En ate Re sea try rch

Proposed Loop Circulation

En

try

Lab

2F

loo

2F

loo

Hig

h In

tera

1F

loo

1F
Re

ctiv

ity

loo

Lab

GF

loo

GF

sea rch Su er bje cts s Gar den Ga Su rde bje n cts Ho Me usi dic ng al E (4) qui pm ent

loo

A. 12
The tech-house can merge research and housing into a integrated system.

ARGUMENT
The tech-house can merge research and housing into a integrated system.
12 PORTALS

Technology
Constant monitoring will help the upkeep of the building and its inhabitants. Researchers can work alongside machines to further research.

Deployable Technology

Alzheimers Patient 142 Hippocampus shrinkage 25%. OK, target hippocampus for stimulation and tissue regrowth. Targeting hippocampus, inserting nanorobots Insert NRs A, B, and D in 3...2...1... Bark Bark Bark!!! TRANSLATE To be, or not to be: that is the question.

Tree # 152: Health status: Good O2 Output 140lbs/yr

Tree # 42: Health status: Poor O2 Output 80lbs/yr WARNING: Aphid Infestation

Fuji Apple # 1522: Calories: 80 Carbs: 22g Dietary Fiber: 5g Sugars: 16 g

A. 13
The network of over 100 1-to-1 camera and screens, similar to closed circuit televisions, remaps the building and signifies key moments of interaction.

All Screen Network

13 PORTALS

SCREEN NETWORK

A. 14
The complexities of human emotions can make it difficult to accurately assess the emotional wellbeing of a patient. Psychologists can measure the emotional state of the companion animal more easily than the human.

ARGUMENT
Graspability, strength, flexibility, and maneuverability are hindered with advanced age and disability. Companions can be an extension of a patients abilities.
14 PORTALS

Scenario 3: Extensions

Possible Interactions

Beasts of burden have been an integral part of civilization, many physical acts can be done by companion animals toelderly assist apopulation that needs constant For the patient. supervision but cannot afford hospice care or prefers staying at home, animals can be trained to recognize emergency situations and contact help.

ARGUMENT

Scenario 1: Emergencies

Animals can be outfitted with cameras & sensors to relay vital information to the authorities or doctor The complexities of human emotions can make it difficult to accurately assess the emotional wellbeing of a patient. Psychologists can easily measure the expressions of the companion animal rather than the human.

ARGUMENT

Sc

Bark Bark! Magda, are you ok? Wake up!

UMENT

Scenario 1: Emergencies
Animals can be outfitted with cameras & sensors to relay vital information to the authorities or doctor

ARGUMENT
The complexities of human emotions can make it difficult to accurately assess the emotional wellbeing of a patient. Psychologists can easily measure the expressions of the companion animal rather than the human.

Scenario 2: Proxies
Constant monitoring of people can increase distress, invade privacy, and cause further depression

tion that needs constant t afford hospice care or e, animals can be trained cy situations

Bark Bark! Magda, are you ok? Wake up!

Nobu, Magda
Emotional Health

A. 15
Typologies of screen networks. Each type has a particular filter, information overlay, or perspective.

Type Type Type 1 Type 1 ofof 13of 1 3of 33

Infinite Infinite Infinite Infinite 3rd 3rd 3 Person rd 3 Person rd Person Person Slimming Slimming Slimming Slimming Video Video Video Video Wheelchair Wheelchair Wheelchair Wheelchair Mirror Mirror Mirror Mirror Perspective Perspective Perspective Perspective Mirror Mirror Mirror Mirror Feedback Feedback Feedback Feedback Cam Cam Cam Cam Infinite Infinite 3rd 3rd Person Person Slimming Slimming Video Video Wheelchair Wheelchair Mirror Mirror Perspective Perspective Mirror Mirror Feedback Feedback Cam Cam
Type Type Type Type 11 Type ofof 131 of 3of 13of 33
Camera/Screen Typologies
Type 1 of 3

Funhouse Funhous Funhous Funhou Fun Fu


15 PORTALS

Type Type 11 of

Funhouse Funhouse Funhouse Funhouse Funhouse Health Health Health Health & & & & Funhouse Funhous Funhous Funhou Funhou Infinite Infinite Infinite Infinite Infinite 3 3 3 Person 3 Person 3 Person Person Person Slimming Slimming Slimming Slimming Slimming Video Video Video Video Video Wheelchair Wheelchair Wheelchair Wheelchair Wheelchair Mirror Mirror Mirror Mirror Mirror Perspective Perspective Perspective Perspective Perspective Mirror Mirror Mirror Mirror Mirror Feedback Feedback Feedback Feedback Feedback Cam Cam Cam Cam Cam Hea He Medical Medical Medical Medical FMRI FMRI FMRI FMRI Eye Eye Eye Eye Water Water Water Water Hallway Hallway Hallway Hallway Infinite Infinite Infinite Infinite Infinite 3 3 3 Person 3 Person 3 Person Person Person Slimming Slimming Slimming Slimming Slimming Video Video Video Video Video Wheelchair Wheelchair Wheelchair Wheelchair Wheelchair
Funhouse Type Type Type 2 Type 2 of of 2 3 2 3 3 3 Type Type Type 1 Type 1 of Type of 1 3of of 1 3of 1 of 3of 33
rdrd rdrd rd

Type Type 22 of

screening screening screening screening Scan Scan Scan Scanning Scanning Scanning Scanning Texture Texture Texture Mapping Mapping Mapping Mapping Mirror Mirror Mirror Mirror Mirror Scan Perspective Perspective Perspective Perspective Perspective Mirror Mirror Mirror Mirror Mirror Texture Feedback Feedback Feedback Feedback Feedback Cam Cam Cam Cam Cam Medical Medical FMRI FMRI Eye Eye Water Water Hallway Hallway screening screening Scan Scan Scanning Scanning Texture Texture Mapping Mapping
Type 2 of 3

Infinite Mirror

rd rd rd rd rd

3rd Person Perspective

Slimming Mirror

Video Feedback

Wheelchair Camera

Type Type Type Type 22 Type ofof 232 of 3of 23of 33

Type Type Type 2 Type 2 of Type of 2 3of 2 32 of 3of 33 Animal Animal Animal Animal Offsite Offsite Offsite Offsite to to totoGarden Garden Garden Garden Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Family Family Family Family Texture Texture Texture Texture Medical Screening FMRI Scan Eye Scanning Water Texture Hallway Mapping Animal Monitor Offsite to Family Animal Animal Offsite Offsite to to Garden Garden Medical Medical Medical Medical Medical FMRI FMRI FMRI FMRI FMRI Eye Eye Eye Eye Eye Water Water Water Water Water Hallway Hallway Hallway Hallway Hallway Monitor Monitor Family Family Texture Texture screening screening screening screening screening Scan Scan Scan Scan Scan Scanning Scanning Scanning Scanning Scanning Texture Texture Texture Texture Texture Mapping Mapping Mapping Mapping Mapping Medical Medical Medical Medical Medical FMRI FMRI FMRI FMRI FMRI Eye Eye Eye Eye Eye Water Water Water Water Water Hallway Hallway Hallway Hallway Hallway screening screening screening screening screening Scan Scan Scan Scan Scan Scanning Scanning Scanning Scanning Scanning Texture Texture Texture Texture Texture Mapping Mapping Mapping Mapping Mapping
Type 3 of 3

Health Health Health Health Health & & & & Wellness & Wellness Wellness Wellness Wellnes Health Health Health Health Health & & & &
ambient Type Type Type 3 Type 3 ofof 33of 3 3of 33

health

Animal Animal Animal Animal Animal Offsite Offsite Offsite Offsite Offsite to toto to to Garden Garden Garden Garden Garden Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor MonitorFamily Family Family Family Family Texture Texture Texture Texture Texture Transport Camera User Interface Floor Sensor Handicap Zone Transport Transport Transport Transport User User User User Floor Floor Floor Floor Handicap Handicap Handicap Handicap Animal Animal Animal Animal Animal Offsite Offsite Offsite Offsite Offsite to to toto to Garden Garden Garden Garden Garden Cam Cam Cam Cam Interface Interface Interface Interface Sensor Sensor Sensor Sensor Zone Zone Zone Zone Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Family Family Family Family Family Texture Texture Texture Texture Texture Transport Transport User User Floor Floor Handicap Handicap Cam Cam Interface Interface Sensor Sensor Zone Zone

Ambient Ambient Ambient Ambien Am Am

Type Type 33 of

16 PORTALS

Researchers Garden from Skybridge

The use of portals enforce interactions at remote locations for different types of players.
This maintains the natural perspective of every individual AND allow for interactions."

A. 17
This system connects the researchers garden with the patients private gardens.

Garden System

17 PORTALS

Floor Sensor

Infinite Mirror

Video Feedback

GARDEN TYPES

18 PORTALS

Tearoom GIF Animation

A. 19
The teahouse is the most important space and consequently has the highest concentration of screens.

Teahouse System

19 PORTALS

Eye Scanner x2

Water Texture

Water Texture x8 Garden Texture x2

Garden Texture

Spatializing Sexuality
Studio V Mabel O. Wilson Fall 2012 M.Arch I GSAPP

Studio

Media/Memory/Multitude examines networks of media and the dynamics of time that link people, institutions, and places in the vibrant global hub of Johannesburg, South Africa (population 7.2 million). The urbanization of the African continent is occurring at a rapid pace and will soon produce some of the largest megacities in world: Lagos, Cairo, and Kinshasa. In Johannesburg, apartheids planned racial segregation that deliberately separated the white city from the rural black townships have become the underlays for todays neoliberal hub of global capital and culture. This current urban and architectural organization, typical of the disjunctive spaces of many global cities, produces pockets of wealth, so-called formal sectors, that are surrounded by wide swathes of informal dwelling and commerce, with much of the historic racial and economic segregation still intact.

Project 2

This project endeavors to create a network that encourages sexuality and healthy sexual practices. Through the device of a graphic novel, we follow the protagonist on two different journeys following the same routeone journey as the everyday and the other as the spectacle. Our project will ultimately continue the CBDs evolution as the economic center of Africa and help to embrace sexuality as a positive aspect of the region.

Project

partner

Paola Echegaray

Site

Mary Fitzgerald Square and Maboneng District, Central Business District Johannesburg, South Africa

We programmed the two nodes to reflect the everyday and spectacle of sexual health. The Maboneng site houses a permanent 24 hour CCTV room, exhibition spaces, temporary clinics, event spaces, and a large rooftop gathering space. The satellite site expands the entry to Museum Africa and utilizes the pods for healthrelated activities.

Program

B. 21
Reimaging Colour Me series by South African artist Berni Serle

Cultural Context Through an Artists Lens

B. 22
Geolocating the CCTV and private surveillance cameras in the CBD to remap the neighborhood.

3. Closed Caption Television 3. Closed Caption Television

22 Spatializing Sexuality

Surveillance Camera Types

Private Surveillance 4,rosettenville,albert st,nw,-26.208171,28.047945,privat e,building 11,von weilligh st,commissioner st,nw,26.204792,28.047366,private,building 24,market st,polly st,nw,-26.203724,28.049979,private,b uilding 34,commissioner st,,s,-26.206067,28.037401,private,bu ilding 35,commissioner st,,s,-26.206029,28.037667,private,bu ilding 37,commissioner,,s,-26.205913,28.038646,private,build ing 40,loveday st,harrison st,ne,-26.205579,28.04066,privat e,building 41,loveday st,harrison st,ne,-26.205579,28.040765,priva te,building 43,commissioner st,,s,-26.205666,28.040869,private,bu ilding 44,commissioner st,,s,-26.205644,28.041025,private,bu ilding 71,president st,,n,-26.204157,28.038837,private,building

CCTV On Bus Station 9,market st,harrison st,sw,-26.2051,28.040768,cctv,bus station 12,market st,loveday,sw,-26.204927,28.040993,cctv,bus station 13,market st,loveday st,s,-26.204845,28.041444,cctv,bus station 14,market st,loveday st,s,-26.204802,28.041621,cctv,bus station 15,market st,loveday st,s,-26.204782,28.041916,cctv,bus station 18,market st,von weilligh st,s,26.204128,28.047624,cctv,bus station 19,market st,,s,-26.204133,28.047752,cctv,bus station 20,market st,delvers st,sw,26.204085,28.048101,cctv,BUS STATION 21,market st,delvers st,se,-26.204051,28.04845,cctv,bus station 22,market st,,s,-26.204003,28.04868,cctv,bus station 23,market st,troye,sw,-26.203955,28.048922,cctv,bus station 28,commissioner st,ntemi pilso st,ne,-

CCTV On Building 7,market st,simmonds,n,-26.205052,28.040071,cctv,bu ilding 8,von weilligh st,main st,nw,-26.207304,28.047731,cctv, building 10,von weilligh st ,fox st,nw,-26.205379,28.047581,cctv, building 17,market st,smal street mall,s,-26.204267,28.046524,cc tv,building 38,commissioner st,fraser st,ne,-26.205779,28.038995,cc tv,building 39,commissioner st,simmonds st,se,26.205791,28.039823,cctv,building 47,loveday st,,nw,-26.205411,28.041325,cctv,building 50,commissioner st,joubert st,nw,26.205312,28.043131,cctv,building 51,commissioner st,von brandis st,sw,26.205218,28.044791,cctv,building 53,commissioner st,von weilligh st,nw,26.204838,28.047336,cctv,building 62,commissioner st,polly st,sw,-26.204621,28.05012,cct v,building

CCTV On Pole 1,market st,ntemi pilso st,sw,26.205533,28.035414,cctv,pole 2,wemmer jubilee,rosettenville,nw,26.21127,28.047838,cctv,pole 3,market st,kort st,sw,-26.205437,28.03682,cctv,pole 5,market st,fraser st,nw,-26.204917,28.038837,cctv,pole 6,rosettenville,anderson st,ne,26.207304,28.047731,cctv,pole 16,market st,rissik st,se,-26.204768,28.042222,cctv,pole 25,market st,mooi st,se,-26.203757,28.051009,cctv,pole 26,main reef rd,alexander st,nw,26.206563,28.032185,cctv,pole 27,commissioner st,gerard sekoto st,ne,26.206231,28.034701,cctv,pole 36,commissioner st ,sauer st,ne,26.205853,28.038206,cctv,pole 52,commissioner st,kruis st,ne,26.205009,28.045695,cctv,pole 61,commissioner st,troye st,nw,26.204592,28.049139,cctv,pole 63,commissioner st,nugget st,sw,-

B. 23
The remapped CBD established new boundaries and nodes of varying degrees of surveillance.

Reimaging the Johannesburg CBD through the CCTV network

23 Spatializing Sexuality

CCTV on pole CCTV on building Bus stop CCTV Private surveillance

using grasshopper to create the new CBD map

B. 24
The building acts as a funnel to direct people to the roof during spectacle. People can choose a direct short path within the lighted core, or take the indirect route through exhibit space and private rooms.

24 Spatializing Sexuality

Main Hub Site Depicting Fast and Slow Paths Through the Space as a Continuation of the Parade Route

To Roofscape

Se

Public, Fast Path

B. 25
The relationship between the two nodes during the everyday occurs virtually through the transference of data between the two sites. The massing of the main site occupies only half of the site, leaving the rest as public space. Historically, public space occurs in secured courtyards within a block. We tried to open up public space back to the street to reflect the evolution of Johannesburg. We assumed the spectacle to occur at night because the neighborhood of Maboneng has a strong night life reputation in Johannesburg. We used light to express this vibrancy and to functionally signify entry and vertical circulation.

Contextual Changes for the Everyday

25 Spatializing Sexuality

Mary Fitzgerald Square

Maboneng Imaginarium

ar Mus yF e itz um ge A ra fric ld Sq a ua re

Pa r

k Pa rk M c ial a NE nic Pa P Ci Gov rk D ure In ed t y er Ba d Ha nm for est nk St r m i l r a l en al n C ee Gh t M On an our t ar ly ty di ke a Sq rd ts ua re

fo r

m al

F Pl NB az B a an

M M 31 31 M Hi Hi 31 gh gh H wa wa igh y y wa y

In

P M 31 Mriva Pu 31 te b H Hi Ro lic igh gh ad Sq w wa uaay M an PR y re icu O re JEC d T St SI re TE et

E Hi lev gh ate wa d y

ar

ke

ts

an

ra r

nc

Lib

Du

Ce nt er

Pr ov in

ut en g

Ga

Ca r

AB Sk SA yb HQ r id ge

lto

M 3 Pu 1 H bl ig ic hw Sq a ua y re

Pu b

lic

Sq Pa r k

ua

re

B. 26
We researched topics that attribute to the overall sexual health outlook of Johannesburg

26 Spatializing Sexuality

Positive Influences
Health clinics 1,O.R. Thambo Clinic,-26.14849,27.962613,15 1,Vuselela Ulwazi Iwakho,-25.934351,28.005435,12 1,Witkoppen Clinic,-26.027426,28.009149,15 2,Rabie Ridge,-26.01738,28.168505,15 2,Hikhensile Clinic,-25.995718,28.197118,8 2,Thuthukani Clinic,-25.995043,28.197073,20 2,Roman Catholic Church,-26.046913,28.091251,15 3,Randburg Clinic,-26.117219,27.999963,7 Sexual health outreach Region,Areas Covered,# volunteers,# homes visited,# people reached,# condoms distributed, 1 & 2,Angola, Lusaka, Tokyo informal settlement, Extension 7 and 11, Zone 1 informal settlement, T.C. informal settlement, Diepsloot, Zevenfontein and Kaya sands and Kanana ext. 4and 5.,200,15754,38190,13500,0.251792925 3,Alexandra 1st 3rd Avenue, Wynberg, Orange grove, Randburg, Ferndale and Blairgorie,60,3092,16685,59631,0.110073724

Negative Influences
Gay cruising sites 44 on Livingston Guesthouse,guesthouse,-26.134645,28.15314 7th Street Guesthouse,guesthoues,-26.178471,28.07035 Abafazi Guesthouse,guesthouse,-25.798011,28.28432 About Guest Lodge,guesthouse,-25.760058,28.23272 African Lodge (Sandton),guesthouse,-26.051985,28.110202 African Pride Melrose Arch Hotel,hotel,-26.148437,28.045 African Sky Guesthouse,guesthouse,-26.112751,27.808958 Afrique Boutique Hotel,hotel,-26.193701,28.248175 Prostitution sites Hotel,LAT,LON Hilton Plaza Hotel,-26.189177,28.048782 Park Lane Hotel,-26.187947,28.050155 Maxime Hotel,-26.196164,28.045094 The Summit Club,-26.188061,28.048994 Orion Devonshire Hotel,-26.192778,28.035616 intersection1,-26.204099,28.050281 intersection2,-26.204426,28.05292

Online prostitution solicitation sites Bedfordview,1,-26.177085,28.136072 Benoni,1,-26.183786,28.320299 Boksburg,2,-26.203502,28.262672 Brakpan/Carnival City,1,-26.229991,28.364588 Bryanston,2,-26.048147,28.026123 Croydon,1,-26.130705,28.197055 Douglasdale ,1,-26.03334,27.992477 East Rand,1,-26.175313,28.345928

B. 27
By overlaying the spatialized topics on the map of Johannesburg, the CBD emerges as a primary node of activity

Negative Influences

Comparison

Positive Influence

27 Spatializing Sexuality

Health clinics Sexual health outreach Prostitution sites Gay cruising sites Online prostitution solicitation sites Prostitution sites Gay cruising sites Online prostitution solicitation sites

Health clinics Sexual health outreach

West Shopping Centre

West Shopping Centre

West Shopping Centre

Balfour Park

Balfour Park

Carlton Centre

Carlton Centre

Maponya Mall

Maponya Mall

Maponya Mall

Carlton Centre

Balfour Park

B. 28
Using one layer of cut paper, the expanding balloon deforms the layer and exposes light

28 Spatializing Sexuality

Inflated Soft/Hard Surface Experiment One Layer

Balloon

Balloon

Balloon

Balloon

00;00;00;00

00;00;44;05

00;02;01;29

00;02;45;09

Balloon

Balloon

Balloon

Balloon

00;03;25;01

00;03;36;11

00;03;43;06

00;04;00:03

B. 29
With two layers of cut paper, we analyze the interactions of the layers during balloon expansion. Take note of trial E+A and E+B, the weight of the paper caused the balloon to pop and fail the experiment.

Inflated Soft/Hard Surface Experiment Double Layer

29 Spatializing Sexuality

C+A

D+A

E+A

C+B

D+B

E+B

C+A

D+A

E+A

C+B

D+B

E+B

C+A

D+A

E+A

C+B

D+B

E+B

C+A

D+A

E+A

C+B

D+B

E+B

00;00;00;00

00;00;22;05

00;00;26;00

00;001;12;22

C+A

D+A

E+A

C+B

D+B

E+B

C+A

D+A

E+A

C+B

D+B

E+B

C+A

D+A

E+A

C+B

D+B

E+B

C+A

D+A

E+A

C+B

D+B

E+B

00;03;32;16

00;03;37;01

00;03;41;16

00;003;44;26

B. 30
The satellite site acts as an extension of the hub to expand sexual health outreach. Unlike the hub, the satellites program is flexible to accommodate the needs of the neighborhood.

30 Spatializing Sexuality

Spatial Schedule Everyday


Museum entry, surveillance Gathering space Informal market Jeppe St.

Option 1
Museum Africa

Option 2

Option 3

Bree St.

Spectacle
Support space Parade gathering Viewing space

Option 4

Option 5

Option 6

Option 7

Option 8

Option 9

B. 31
The hub site is the gathering site for sexual health data. Clinics, herbalist shops, and pharmacies will be located here.

Selected scheme: Option 3


Reichstag

31 Spatializing Sexuality

Brooklyn Museum

US Pavilion Expo 67

B. 32
The hub and satellite sites have a direct area of effect because of its physical condition. To go beyond the perimeter, media, the internet, and other modes of communication become the vehicles to do that. The recent history of spectacle in South Africa is introduced to the global stage through the 2010 FIFA World Cup.

32 Spatializing Sexuality

Within a mile radius of a stadium in South Africa, Informal commercial activity is prohibited

Soccer City

Cape Town Stadium

World Cup Stadiums & Control Zones

Moses Mabhida Stadium

l Zones

Ellis Park Stadium

Loftus Versfield Stadium

Royal Bafokeng Stadium

World Cup Stadiums & Control Zones World Cup Stadiums & Control Zones World Cup Stadiums & Control Zones

33 Spatializing Sexuality

Chicks got a nice rack!

The herbalist shop is just a few more meters.

Mbombela Stadium

Free State Stadium

B. 34
The final iteration of the project became an exploration of comparative dichotomiesprogramming space for the everday and the spectacle. We explored this through a graphic novel following the protagonist on two journeys through the same spaces.

34 Spatializing Sexuality

Comic Excerpts

Top, Everyday Bottom, Spectacle

Pods stored to site

Why are there so many security cameras at a museum?

To Museum Africa

Surveillance zone

I am so lost and I dont know where my group is organizing, maybe theres a map somewhere.

B. 35
The comic book has an visually structured narrative. We were compelled to use it because we found that the protagonists story through the same site at different times best communicates the juxtaposition.

Comic Book Used for Final Presentation to Narrate the Protagonists Journey of the Spectacle and the Everday

35 Spatializing Sexuality

B. 36
Surveillance is a key component of the project. Each chapter of the novel begins from the perspective of the surveillance operator. This sets the purpose, time, and mood of the passage.

36 Spatializing Sexuality

Beginning the Narrative: Journey of the Everyday

AFRICA MUSEUM

The Sex Exhibit at Museum Africa should get get me in the mood... I should get some wormwood to make my love tea.

Pods stored to site

B. 37
Surveillance is a key component of the project. Each chapter of the novel begins from the perspective of the surveillance operator. This sets the purpose, time, and mood of the passage.

Day and Night Entry into the Hub Center

37 Spatializing Sexuality

B. 38
The interaction of the protagonist with the environment further expands the museum program into the public sphere. Windows in the facade are created as peeled segments of a surface. This provides an oblique view into the interior. Rather than direct view from adjacent windows, sight lines occur parallel to the street.

38 Spatializing Sexuality

Interaction with the Satellite Site

Top Floor

Conference Room, Offices

Studio Spaces

oof. ther

YEAH!!!

Top Floor

39 Spatializing Sexuality

B. 40
Possible programming: everday (commercial, clinic, gathering) and spectacle (temporary storage, safe space, and VIP gathering). Transformable pods are vital to the flexible programming of the satellite site.

40 Spatializing Sexuality

Depoloyable Pods
Pod assembly Transformations Light study Pod programming everyday

q. closed

Everyday prog.: safe space time: all day Spectacle prog.: safe space time: all day

Fully Closed State Fully Closed State Program: Safe Space Fully Closed State Time: Day/Night Fully Closed State Program: Safe Space Fully Closed State Time: Day/Night Program: Safe Space Program: Safe Space Time: Day/Night Time: Day/Night Program: Safe Space Time: Day/Night Outer Layer Shift Outer Layer Shift Hangout Program: Outer Layer Shift Evening Time: Outer Layer Shift Hangout Program: Outer Layer Shift Evening Time: Hangout Program: Hangout Program: Evening Time: Evening Hangout Time: Program: Evening Time: Middle Layer Shift Middle Layer Shift Playground Program: Middle Day Layer Shift Time: Playground Middle Layer Shift Program: Day Shift Middle Layer Time: Playground Program: Playground Program: Day Time: Day Playground Time: Program: Day Time: Inner Layer Shift Inner Layer Shift Isolation Program: Inner Layer Day Shift Time: Inner Layer Shift Isolation Program: Day Shift Inner Layer Time: Isolation Program: Isolation Program: Day Time: Day Isolation Time: Program: Day Time: Fully Opened State Fully Opened State Clinic/Pharmacy Program: Fully Opened Day State Time: Fully Opened State Clinic/Pharmacy Program: Fully Opened Day State Time: Clinic/Pharmacy Program: Clinic/Pharmacy Program: Day Time: Day Time: Clinic/Pharmacy Program: Day Time:
SALE

r. outer shift

Everyday prog.: hangout time: evening Spectacle prog.: stage time: night

Chicks got a nice rack! Chicks got a nice rack! Chicks got a Chicks got a nice rack! nice rack! Chicks got a nice rack!

The herbalist shop is just a few more The meters. herbalist shop is just a few more meters. shop The herbalist The herbalist shop is just a few more is just a few more meters. The herbalist shop meters. is just a few more meters.

s. middle shift

Everyday prog.: playground time: day Spectacle prog.: beacon time: night

spectacle

t. inner shift

Everyday prog.: isolation time: day Spectacle prog.: light display time: night

u. open

Everyday prog.: clinic/pharmacy time: day Spectacle prog.: booth time: dusk

B. 41
Manipulatable objects such as this pod acting as retail fulfills many of the everyday and spectacle functions.

Deployable Pod for Commercial Use

41 Spatializing Sexuality

Do I hear something in that pod? I cant see anything, only shadows.

Mmmmm...

42 Spatializing Sexuality

B. 43
John Portman invented the hollow-core form, pushing everything to the periphery to create a large primary interior space. The project utilizes the same form and includes a juxtaposing form to signify entrance and vertical circulation.

Atrium Space of Main Hub Comparing Day and Night

43 Spatializing Sexuality

B. 44
The users destination is the rooftop of the adjacent buildings. The maboneng district is known for rooftop nightlife, because of this, the building itself acts as the vertical conveyance to that space.

44 Spatializing Sexuality

Rooftop Event Space: Route Termination

45 Spatializing Sexuality

2072 Cyborg Olympics


Project 3
Studio IV Kazys Varnelis Spring 2012 M.Arch I GSAPP

Studio

This studio sets out to explore the re-construction of a large-scale infrastructural element in the city, specifically the Port Authority Bus Terminal in New York City. A structure of vast size, passed through by hundreds of thousands of commuters and thousands of vehicles a day, providing parking on top and surmounting a subway below, containing massive ramps that funnel vehicular traffic in and out of it, the Terminal operates in a realm between building, city, and infrastructure. We are interested in this overlap as a venue for experimentation in programming and design. As the largest commuter facility in the city, the Terminal is a necessary part of everyday life for hundreds of thousands of workers in the city. With the resurgence of bus travel, the Terminal also has the opportunity to become a significant gateway into the city for both commuters and visitors. Containing significant retail space, the Terminal is a major center of commerce in the Times Square area.

Project

In 2072, we will see New York City that is the eventing capital of the world. Party schools, sports teams, the Olympics, and musicians will be the drivers for economic development in the Hudson Yards and Hells Kitchen neighborhoods.

Site

Port Authority Bus Terminal Hudson Yards and Hells Kitchen neighborhoods Manhattan, NYC, NY

Program
Bus Terminal Stadium Infrastructure Retail Public space

C. 47
The Port Authority is composed of six departments in New York and New Jersey. The operating revenue of the bus terminal is a small segment of Port Authority revenue.

Revenue Generated at Port Authority Properties

The Olympics have been plagued with high initial costs in construction that have little to no plan for usage after the games. The proposal is to invest in financially unviable infrastructure properties to generate new longterm revenue streams that can compound on existing programs.

H St ollan Tet ewar d Tu erb t n oro Airp nel Air ort po rt

The Port Authority (PA) encompasses a diverse range of properties and services that are organized into departments based on types. According to fig. b on page 29, revenue varies greatly from department to department. This has led to the PAs dependence on cross subsidization, which funnels revenue from very successful departments to ones that operate at a loss. This has perpetuated systemic issues that allow underperforming properties to continue operating. The most underpeforming property, the Port Authority Bus Terminal (PABT) has not changed its economic structure much since its inception. The annual net loss of 100 million dollars has made the PABT an ideal candidate for creative investment. The project aims to revitalize Port Authority Bus Terminal as the main attraction amongst many that culminates in the formation of the Olympic village. Hybridizing programs serves to solve financial issues at the Port Authority Bus Terminal and issues of continued usage of Olympic building.

Tu n

nB gto hin s a eW org e G

rid

ge

T & T unne erm ls, ina Brid ls ge

Madison Squ are Garden earned 1.1 billion dollars in 2011, while the Port Authority Bus Terminal experienced a net loss of 100 million dollars."

World Trad

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Queens West Waterfront Hoboken Waterfront Newark Legal & Comm Ctr. Teleport Ferry Transport Services Bathgate Industrial Park PA Industrial Park

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Brooklyn Terminal Red Hook Container Terminal Howland Hook Terminal Greenville Yard New York & New Jersey Rail

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C. 48
In 2072, we will se e a NYC that is the eventing capital of the world. Party colleges, sports teams, the Olympics, and stadium concerts will drive an economic incentive to develop the Hudson Yards / Hells Kitchen neighborhoods as the epicenter of eventing.

48 2072 Cyborg Olympics

Two Nodes of PABTS (Port Authority Bus Terminal/Stadium)

8th

Ave

nue

8th

Ave

nue

9th

Ave

nue

9th

Primary Bus Terminal Event Space Stadium

Ave

nue

1s W. 4

t Str

eet 1s W. 4 t Str eet

Secondary Bus Terminal High Line Extension

n) nsio Exte el) e n i hl nn (Hig ln Tu rian Linco t s e o Ped nes (T La t Bus h Stree 0t W. 4

ion) tens ) x E ine unnel ighl n (H incoln T a i r t L es Ped nes (To La t e s e u r B St 0th W. 4

Pedestrian (Highline Extension) Pedestrian (Highline Extension)

Bus

Lan

co o Lin es (T

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49 2072 Cyborg Olympics

Highline Extension Nodes


Existing PABT Building Madison Square Garden Moynihan Station Morgan General Mail Facility Hudson Yards Development Javitz Center

50 2072 Cyborg Olympics

Commuter Population of New Jerseys Wealthiest Towns

Mantoloking 5.4%

Saddle River 7.1%

Far Hills 2.9%

Essex Fells 7.1%

Alpine 5.4%

Milburn 11.6%

Mantoloking 5.4%

Harding Township 5.3%

Teterboro 9.0%

Bernardsville 4.2%

Chatham Township 8.5%

Tewksbury Township 0.3%

Mountain Lakes 4.8%

Sea Girt 5.9%

Ho-Ho-Kus 9.0%

Summit 9.1%

Mendham Township 3.5%

Franklin Lakes 5.8%

Spring Lake 4.0%

Watchung 2.3%

A greater percentage of New Jersey com muters come from high capita commun when compared to low capita commun As a whole, there are still more low-inco commuters into NYC. There is a ring of density low-income communities surro

commmunities nities munities. nities. ncome ome of high high oundrround-

Alpine $76,995 17.6 mi, 0 hr 29 mins 1,849 30 Millburn $76,796 23.3 mi, 0 hr 37 mins 20,149 2163 Rumson $73,692 52.6 mi, 1 hr 12 mins 7,122 502 A greater A greater A greater A percentage greater A percentage greater percentage percentage percentage of New of New of Jersey New of Jersey of New New Jersey comJersey comJersey comcomcoming ing NYC ing NYC ing with NYC ing with NYC another with NYC another with another with another concentric another concentric concentric concentric concentric ring ring of ring low of ring low of ring low of of low low ing ing NYC NYC with with another another concentric concentric ring ring of of low low Harding Township $72,689 33.2 mi, 0 hr 49 mins 3,319 170 muters muters muters come muters come muters come from come from come high from from high capita from high capita high high capita communities capita communities capita communities communities communities density density density high-income density density high-income high-income high-income high-income communities. communities. communities. communities. communities. This This would This would This would This would would Teterboro $72,613 10.2 mi, 0 hr19 mins 67 0 density density high-income high-income communities. communities. This This would would Bernardsville $69,854 42.1 mi, 0 hr 51 mins 7,707 277 when when when compared when compared when compared compared compared to low to low to capita to low capita to low capita low communities. capita communities. capita communities. communities. communities. support support support support a dual support a dual asystem dual a system dual a system dual of system commuting; of system commuting; of commuting; of of commuting; commuting; pointpointpointpointpointsupport support a dual a dual system system of of commuting; commuting; pointpointChatham Township $65,497 28.3 mi, 0 hr 40 mins 10,452 831 As As a whole, As a whole, As a whole, As a there whole, a there whole, there are there are still there are still more are still more are still more low-income still more low-income more low-income low-income low-income to-point to-point to-point to-point and to-point and inner-city and inner-city and inner-city and inner-city routes. inner-city routes. routes. routes. routes. to-point to-point and and inner-city inner-city routes. routes. Township Tewksbury $65,470 50.6 mi, 1 hr 04 mins 5,993 7 Mountain Lakes $65,086 4,276 181 commuters commuters commuters commuters commuters into into NYC. into NYC. into NYC. There into NYC. There NYC. There is There a isring There ais ring a is of ring a is high of ring ahigh of ring high of of high high 33.9 mi, 0 hr 44 mins Sea Girt $63,871 63.9 mi, 1 hr 20 mins 1,828 99 density density density low-income density density low-income low-income low-income low-income communities communities communities communities communities surroundsurroundsurroundsurroundsurroundHo-Ho-Kus $63,594 22.4 mi, 0 hr 33 mins 4,078 326 Summit $62,598 24.4 mi, 0 hr 35 mins 21,457 1876 Medham Townshipo $61,460 40.2 mi, 0 hr 54 mins 5,539 189 Percentage Percentage Percentage Percentage Percentage of total of of total population total of population of total population total population population who who commute who commute who commute who commute to commute NYC to to NYC based NYC to based to NYC based NYC upon based upon based upon upon upon Franklin Lakes $59,763 27.0 mi, 0 hr 37 mins 10,590 570 Percentage Percentage Percentage Percentage of total of total of population of total population total population population who who commute who commute who commute commute to NYC to NYC to based to NYC based NYC based upon based upon upon upon Spring Lake $59,445 63.8 mi, 0 hr 37 mins 2,993 2010 2010 2010 respondents respondents 2010 respondents 2010 respondents respondents who who who lled who lled long-form who lled long-form lled long-form lled long-form census. long-form census. census. census. census. 113 2010 2010 respondents 2010 2010 respondents respondents respondents who who who lled who lled long-form lled long-form lled long-form long-form census. census. census. census. Watchung $58,653 31.3mi, 0 hr 41 mins 5,801 118

Aring greater A greater A greater percentage percentage percentage New New of Jersey New Jersey Jersey comcomcom- ing ing NYC ing NYC with NYC with another with another another concentric concentric concentric ring ring of ring of low low of Aring greater A greater A greater A percentage greater A percentage greater percentage percentage percentage of New of of New Jersey New ofJersey of New Jersey New comJersey comJersey comcomcominging NYC ing NYC with ing NYC ing with NYC another with NYC another with another with concentric another another concentric concentric concentric concentric ring of ring low of ring of low ring low of of low low of of A greater A greater A greater A percentage greater percentage percentage percentage of New of New ofJersey of New Jersey New Jersey comJersey comcomcom- ing ing NYC ing NYC ing with NYC with NYC another with another with another another concentric concentric concentric concentric ring of ring low of ring low of of low low muters muters muters come come come from from high from high capita high capita capita communities communities communities density density density high-income high-income high-income communities. communities. communities. This This woul This wo muters muters muters come muters come muters come from come from come from high high from capita high from capita high capita high communities capita communities capita communities communities communities density density density high-income density density high-income high-income high-income high-income communities. communities. communities. communities. communities. This This would This would This would This would would muters muters muters come muters come come from come from high from from high capita high capita high capita communities capita communities communities communities density density density high-income density high-income high-income high-income communities. communities. communities. communities. This This would This would This would would Commuters to NYC when when when compared compared compared to to low low to capita low capita capita communities. communities. communities. support support support a dual a dual asystem dual system system of of commuting; commuting; of commuting; pointpoint po when when when compared when compared when compared compared to compared low to to low capita low to capita to low capita low communities. capita communities. capita communities. communities. communities. support support support a support dual support a dual a system dual asystem dual asystem dual of system commuting; of system of commuting; commuting; of Bronx of commuting; commuting; pointpointpointpointpointTown Income Capita from PABT Population Manhattan Brooklyn Queens when when when compared when compared compared compared to low to low to capita to low capita low capita communities. capita communities. communities. communities. support support support support a dual a Per dual asystem dual a system dual system of system commuting; of commuting; of Distance of commuting; commuting; pointpointpointpointAsAs a whole, a As whole, a whole, there there there are are still are still more still more more low-income low-income low-income to-point to-point to-point and and inner-city and inner-city inner-city routes. routes. routes. As a As whole, As a whole, a As whole, As a there whole, a there whole, there are there are still there are still more are still more are still more low-income still more low-income more low-income low-income low-income to-point to-point to-point to-point and to-point and inner-city and inner-city and inner-city and inner-city routes. inner-city routes. routes. routes. routes. Mantoloking $114,017 68.3 mi, 1 hr 22 mins 296 16 0 0 0 As As a whole, As a whole, As a whole, athere whole, there there are there are still are still more are still more still more low-income more low-income low-income low-income to-point to-point to-point to-point and and inner-city and inner-city and inner-city inner-city routes. routes. routes. routes. Saddle River $85,934 25.0 mi, 0 commuters hr commuters 36 mins 3,152 20 8 19 commuters commuters commuters into into NYC. into NYC. NYC. There There There is a isring ais ring aof ring of high high of high commuters commuters commuters into into NYC. into NYC. into NYC. There into NYC. There NYC. There is a There is ring There a isring aof is ring a is high of ring a of high ring high of of high high 177 commuters commuters commuters commuters into into NYC. into NYC. into NYC. There NYC. There There is There a is ring ais ring a is of ring ahigh of ring high of of high high $81,535 Far Hills 42.3 mi, 0 hr 57 mins 919 21 0 0 6 density density density low-income low-income low-income communities communities communities surroundsurroundsurrounddensity density density low-income density density low-income low-income low-income low-income communities communities communities communities communities surroundsurroundsurroundsurroundsurroundEssex Fells $77,434 23.4 mi, 0 hr 34 mins 2,113 141 0 0 11 density density density low-income density low-income low-income low-income communities communities communities communities surroundsurroundsurroundsurround-

Rich Rich Rich Commuter Commuter Commuter Popul Popu Popu Rich Rich Rich Rich Rich Commuter Commuter Commuter Commuter Commuter Population Population Population Population Population Rich Rich Rich Rich Commuter Commuter Commuter Commuter Population Population Population Population
Sources: Sources: Sources: Sources: Sources: U.S. U.S. Census U.S. Census U.S. Census U.S. Bureau, Census Bureau, Census Bureau, Bureau, Bureau, MCD/County-To-MCD/County MCD/County-To-MCD/County MCD/County-To-MCD/County MCD/County-To-MCD/County MCD/County-To-MCD/County Worker Worker Worker Flow Worker Flow Worker Flow Flow Flow Sources: Sources: Sources: U.S. U.S. Census U.S. Census Census Bureau, Bureau, Bureau, MCD/County-To-MCD/County MCD/County-To-MCD/County MCD/County-To-MCD/County Worker Worker Worker Flow Flow Flow

27 30 13 0 127 39 0 7 8 Percentage of total population who com 0 7 0 2010 respondents who lled long-form 0 0 6 0 23 20 Sources: 0 39 17 0 7 5 U.S. Census Bureau, 0 18 5 0 4 4 MCD/County-To-MCD/County Worker F 0 31 11 Files 2000 0 60 20 0 Percentage 7 who 0based Percentage Percentage of of total total of population total population population who commute who commute commute to to NYC NYC tobased NYC upon upon upon 10 based 6 15 28 2010 2010 2010 respondents respondents respondents who who who lled lled long-form lled long-form long-form census. census. census. 0 0 8 0 13 0

Rich Com

Sources: Sources: Sources: Sources: U.S. U.S. Census U.S. Census U.S. Census Bureau, Census Bureau, Bureau, Bureau,

Commuter Population of New Jerseys Poorest Towns

51 2072 Cyborg Olympics

Camden 0.06%

Bridgeton 0.0%

Passaic 1.9%

Newark 1.7%

Paterson 0.8%

Asbury Park 1.2%

Union Township 6.3%

New Brunswick 1.3%

Trenton 0.5%

Perth Amboy 1.0%

Elizabeth 1.8%

Atlantic City 0.09%

East Orange 2.8%

Lakewood Township 0.7%

West New York 6.6%

Orange 3.0%

Irvington 3.0%

Gloucester City 1.1%

Keansburg 2.8%

Pleasantville 0.03%

Poor Commuter Population Poor Commuter Population Poor Commuter Population Poor Poor PoorCommuter Commuter CommuterPop Pop Pop Poor Commuter Population Poor Commuter Population Poor Commuter Population Poor Commuter Population Poor Commuter Population Poor Commuter Population mmuter Population

Point-toThis wou high-inco commute a moving Point-to-Point Commuting Inner-City Routes individua This would be ideal for the corporate This would be ideal for the populist lowerwork tim high-income population that has a longer income communities that are spread out in Point-to-Point Commuting Inner-City Routes gather pe commute. Buses on this service can provide high density areas. Buses will be optimized to This would be ideal for the corporate This would be ideal for Point-to-Point the populist lowerCommuting Inner-City Routes Point-to-Point Point-to-Point Point-to-Point Commuting Commuting Commuting Inner-City Inner-City Inner-City Route Rout Ro Point-to-Point Commuting Inner-City Routes route the Point-to-Point Commuting Inner-City Routes Point-to-Point Commuting Inner-City Routes Point-to-Point Commuting Inner-City Routes Point-to-Point Commuting Inner-City Routes Point-to-Point Commuting Inner-City Routes a moving o the cecorporate environment for fewerThis would be provide service to more lowerpeople in more areas. high-income population that has a longer income communities that are spread out infor This would be ideal ideal for the populist This This This would would would be be ideal be ideal ideal for for the for the the corporate corporate corporate This This This would would would be be id b i This would be ideal for the corporate This would be ideal for the populist lowerThis would be ideal for the corporate This would be ideal for the populist lowerThis would be ideal for the corporate This would be ideal for the populist lowerThis would be ideal for the corporate This would be ideal for the populist lowerThis would be ideal for the corporate This would be ideal for the populist lowerThis would be ideal for the corporate This would be ideal for the populist lowerindividuals. This will compound productive This will keep fare prices low and generate commute. Buses on this service can provide high density areas. Buses will be optimized to that has a longer high-income population income communities that are spread out in high-income high-income high-income population population population that that that has has has a a longer longer a longer income income income commu commu com high-income population that has a longer income communities that are spread out in high-income population that has a longer income communities that are spread out in high-income population that has a longer income communities that are spread out in high-income population that has a longer income communities that are to spread out in high-income has a longer income communities that are out in high-income population that has a longer income communities that are spread out in work time into the commute. The bus would high revenue for PABT. a population moving o that ce environment for fewer provide service to spread more people in more areas. commute. Buses on this service can provide high density areas. Buses will be optimized Commuters to NYC commute. commute. commute. Buses Buses Buses on on this on this this service service service can can can provide provide provide high high high density density density are ar commute. Buses on this service can provide high density areas. Buses will be optimized to commute. Buses on this service can provide high high density areas. Buses will be optimized to commute. Buses on this service can provide high density areas. Buses will be optimized to commute. Buses this service can provide density areas. Buses will be optimized to commute. Buses on thisThis service can provide high density areas. Buses will be optimized to Town Income Per Capita Distance from PABT Population Manhattan Bronx Brooklyn Queens commute. Buses on this service can provide high density areas. Buses will be optimized toone gather people in comunity and express individuals. will compound productive This will keep fare prices low and generate a moving o ce environment foron fewer provide service to more people in more areas. a a moving moving a moving o o ce o ce environment ce environment environment for for fewer for fewer fewer provide provide provide service service serv Camden $9,815 92.7 mi, 1 hr 51 mins 77,344 30 0 17 0 a moving o ce environment for fewer provide service to more people in more areas. a moving o ce environment for fewer provide service to more people in more areas. moving othe environment for fewer provide to more people ina more areas. moving o ce environment fewer provide service to more people in more areas. a moving o work ce a environment for fewer provide to more service people into areas. a moving oce ce environment for fewer service provide service more people in more areas. route them into PABT. time into commute. The bus would high revenue for PABT. individuals. This will compound productive for This will keep fare prices low and generate Bridgeton $10,917 133 mi, 2 hr 34 mins 25,349 0 0 productive 0keep 0 muting Inner-City Routes individuals. individuals. individuals. This This This will will will compound compound compound productive productive productive This This This will will will keep keep keep fa f individuals. This will compound This will fare prices low and generate individuals. This will compound productive This This will keep fare prices low and generate individuals. will compound productive This will keep fare prices low and generate individuals. This will compound will keep individuals. This will compound productive This keep fare prices low and generate individuals. This will compound productive This will keep fare prices low and generate gather people inThis one comunity and express Passaic $12,874 12.6 mi, 0will hr 20 mins 69,781 1090 44productive 91 fare prices low and generate 130 work time into the commute. The bus would high revenue for PABT. for the corporate This would be ideal for the populist lowerwork work work time time time into into into the the the commute. commute. commute. The The The bus bus bus would would would high high high revenue revenue revenue fo fo work time into the commute. The bus would high revenue for PABT. work time into the commute. The bus would high revenue for PABT. Newark $13,009 13.0 mi, 0 hr 22 mins 277,140 work time into the commute. bus would high revenue for PABT. 212 bus would 653 for PABT. 228 time into the commute. high revenue work time into the commute. The bus would The high revenue PABT. work time into the commute. The bus would for high revenue for PABT. route them into PABT. gather people work in 3736 one comunity and express The ation that has Paterson a longer gather income communities that are spread out in gather gather gather people people people in in one in one one comunity comunity comunity and and and express express express $13,257 18.1 mi, 0 hr 27 mins 146,199 810 148 147 45 gather people in one comunity and express gather people in one comunity and express gather people in one comunity and express gather people in one comunity and express people in one comunity and express gather people in one comunity and express Inner-City Routes Point-to-Point Point-to-Point Point-to-Point Commuting Point-to-Point Point-to-Point Commuting Commuting Commuting Commuting Inner-City Routes Inner-City Inner-City Inner-City Inner-City Routes Routes Routes Routes route them into PABT. Asbury Park $13,516 57.3 mi, 1 hr 12 mins 16,116 182 0 12 0 n this service can provide routehigh density areas. Buses will be optimized to route route route them them them into into into PABT. PABT. PABT. route them into PABT. route them into PABT. route them into PABT. route them into PABT. them into PABT. route them into PABT. This Union Township $13,997 19.2 mi, 0 hr 29 mins 66,455 3381 129 314 333 porate This would be ideal for the populist lowerwould beThis ideal This would This would for would would be the be ideal be corporate ideal be ideal for ideal for the for for the corporate the the corporate corporate corporate This would This beThis ideal This would This would for would would be the be ideal be populist ideal be ideal for ideal for the for lowerfor the populist the the populist populist populist lowerlowerlowerlowerironment for fewerBrunswick provide service to moreThis people in more areas. $14,308 37.5 mi, 1 hr 12 mins 55,181 634 25 25 17 as a longer New income communities that are spread out in high-income high-income population high-income high-income high-income population that population population has population a longer that that that has that has a has longer has a a longer income a longer longer communities income income income income communities that communities communities communities are spread that that that out are that are spread in are are spread spread spread out out in out out in in in Trenton $14,621 67.9 mi, 1 hr 21 mins 84,913 339 9 6 37 ll compound productive This will keep fare prices low and generate e can provide Perthhigh density areas. Buses will be optimized to Amboy $14,989 31.0 mi, 0 hr 45 on mins 50,814 316 49 commute. commute. Buses commute. commute. commute. on this Buses service Buses Buses Buses on this can on on this service this provide this service service service can can provide can can high provide provide provide density high areas. high high density high density Buses density density areas. will areas. areas. areas. be Buses Buses optimized Buses Buses will will will be will be to optimized be optimized be optimized optimized to to to to 94 63 commute. The bus would high revenue for PABT. Elizabeth $15,144 18.2 mi, 0 hr 30 mins 124,969 1768 102 185 197 or fewer provide service to more people in more areas. a moving o a moving ce a a moving environment a moving moving o o ce o o ce environment ce for environment ce environment fewer environment for for fewer for for fewer fewer fewer provide service provide provide provide to provide more service service service people service to more to to in more to more more people more people people areas. people in more in in more in more areas. more areas. areas. areas. ne comunity and express Atlantic City $15,402 127 mi, 2 hr 12 mins 39,558 36 0 0 0 Percentage of total population who commute to NYC based upon d productive East Orange This will keep fare prices low and generate individuals. individuals. This individuals. individuals. individuals. will compound This This This will This will compound will productive will compound compound compound productive productive productive productive This will keep This This fare This will This will prices keep will will keep keep low fare keep fare and fare prices fare prices generate prices prices low low and low low and and generate and generate generate generate $16,488 15.2 mi, 0 hr 25 mins 64,270 1489 75 155 94 BT. 2010 respondents who lled long-form census. Lakewood Township $16,700 70.0 mi, 1 hr 22 mins 92,843 441 8 150 31 The bus would high revenue for PABT. work time into work work the work time work commute. time time into time into into the into the commute. The the the commute. commute. bus commute. would The The bus The The bus would bus high bus would would revenue would high high for high revenue high PABT. revenue revenue revenue forfor PABT. for for PABT. PABT. PABT. New York $16,719 4.6 mi, 0 hr 11 mins 49,708 2893 67 165 133 Percentage of total population who commute upon and express West gather people gather gather in gather gather one people people comunity people people in in one in and one comunity one comunity express comunity comunity and and and express and express express express to NYC based Orange $16,861 15.6 mi, 0in hrone 26 mins 30,134 744 31 83 29 Sources: 2010 respondents census. route themroute into route route PABT. route them them them them into into PABT. into PABT. PABT. PABT. Irvington $16,874 16.7 mi, 0into hr 27 mins 53,926 who lled long-form 1359 Percentage of41 total population who commute 131 to NYC based upon 102 Percentage Percentage Percentage of of total of total total population population population wh wh Percentage of total population who commute to NYC based upon Percentage of total population who commute to NYC upon Percentage of total population who commute toto NYC based upon of total population who commute to NYC based upon Percentage of95.2 total population who commute to NYC based upon Gloucester City $16,912 mi, 1 hr 52 mins 11,456 101 0Percentage Percentage of total population who commute NYC based upon 9 based U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 respondents who 12 lled long-form census. 2010 2010 2010 responden responde respon Keansburg $17,417 42.9 mi, 0 hr 57 mins 10,105 227 census. 12 45 3 Flow 2010 respondents who lled long-form census. 2010 respondents who lled long-form census. 2010 respondents who lled long-form 2010 respondents who lled long-form census. 2010 respondents who lled long-form census. 2010 respondents who lled long-form census. MCD/County-To-MCD/County Worker Sources: Pleasantville $17,668 122 mi, 2 hr 09 mins 20,249 0 7 0 0 U.S. Census Bureau, Sources: Files 2000 Sources: Sources: Sources: Sources: Sources: Sources: MCD/County-To-MCD/County Worker Flow U.S. Census Bureau, U.S. Census Bureau, U.S. Census Bureau, U.S. Census Bureau, U.S. Census Bureau, U.S. Census Bureau, U.S. Census Bureau, 11 Files 2000 MCD/County-To-MCD/County Worker Flow Percentage of total population who commute to NYC based upon MCD/County-To-MCD/County MCD/Count MCD/Coun MCD/Co MCD/County-To-MCD/County Worker Flow MCD/County-To-MCD/County Worker Flow MCD/County-To-MCD/County MCD/County-To-MCD/County Worker Flow Worker Flow Worker Flow

Poor Co

C. 52
Wealth distribution in New Jersey concentrates follows a ring pattern with poorer neighborhoods closer to New York City and wealthier neighborhoods further out.

52 2072 Cyborg Olympics

New Jersey Wealthy and Poor Commuter Towns


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Analyzing per capital income of New Jersey communities brought forth a relationship of high income (corporate) entities to low incom (cooperative) structure. Because cooperatives have historically been a populist movement against capital concentration to the few, the

C. 53
Expanding the High Line to connect the Port Authority Bus Terminal, Madison Square Garden, Moynihan Station, and the Javits Center would create a network that can be upgraded to accommodate the Olympics in 2072.

Extension of the High Line to PABT


The Port Authority (PA) encompasses a diverse range of properties and services that are organized into departments based on types. According to fig. b on page 29, revenue varies greatly from department to department. This has led to the PAs dependence on cross subsidization, which funnels revenue from very successful departments to ones that operate at a loss. This has perpetuated systemic issues that allow underperforming properties to continue operating. The most underpeforming property, the Port Authority Bus Terminal (PABT) has not changed its economic structure much since its inception. The annual net loss of 100 million dollars has made the PABT an ideal candidate for creative investment. The project aims to revitalize Port Authority Bus Terminal as the main attraction amongst many that culminates in the formation of the Olympic village. Hybridizing programs serves to solve financial issues at the Port Authority Bus Terminal and issues of continued useage of Olympic building. The Olympics have been plagued with high initial costs in construction that have little to no plan for usage after the games. The proposal is to invest in financially unviable infrastructure properties to generate new long-term revenue streams that can compound on existing programs.

53 2072 Cyborg Olympics

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Analyzing per capital income of New Jersey communities brought forth a relationship of high income (corporate) entities to low income (cooperative) structure. Because cooperatives have historically been a populist movement against capital concentration to the few, the cooperative model of representation would be mutually beneficial for Port Authority and its constituency. Better representation of constituency would provide more efficient service.

Wealthy Commuters
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A greater percentage of New Jersey commuters come from high capita communities when compared to low capita communities. As a whole, there are still more low-income commuters into NYC. There is a ring of high density low-income communities surrounding NYC with another concentric ring of low density high-income communities. This would support a dual system of commuting; point-to-point and inner-city routes.

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C. 54
The present condition of the neighborhood is comprised of major public transportation nodes and event spaces.

54 2072 Cyborg Olympics

The Everyday Program of the Neighborhood


e tag ic S lage p m il Oly pic V Hub m cial nts y l O mer ve cE m Co quati A

Scenario: Emergence of Corporate Inuence

Port Authority will have to accept corporate capital and influence to increase revenue. in the coming years. New contracts with large corporations that will want to gain access to New York Citys workforce capital will increase revenue to sustainable levels. Port Authority will move forward on its initial conception to have a tower at the North Wing (it currently is structured to accommodate future construction). Private terminals optimized for specific corporate needs will allow corporations to increase productivity (replace commute time with work hours) by accessing the commuter community of New Jersey. Buses equipped as mobile workspace can pickup employees at designated communities (high-income) and be transported directly into the office environment.

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Scenario+: Introduction of the Bus Cooperative

In 60 years, the corrupting corporate influences will have transformed the PABT into a disservice for the city. Public access will all but disappear as it becomes a solely corporate facility that serves the wealthy commuter neighborhoods of New Jersey. To counteract this scenario, the formation of a bus service cooperative behaves as the foil to corporate influences. Cooperatives allow for democratic, open-memberships, economies of scale, and bargaining power, because of its collective numbers. Like the Egged Bus Cooperative, the largest provider of public transportation in Israel, public transportation is provided equitably.

Representative Assembly

Numbers eight-five members who are elected in internal elections every four years. A representative assembly is comprised of representatives from each branch or garage according to its relative size. The assembly democratically votes on fees, routes,

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This would be ideal for the corporate high-income population with a long commute time to New York City. Buses on this service can provide a moving office environment for fewer individuals. This will compound productive work time into the commute. The bus would gather people in one community and express route them into PABT.

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Inner-City Routes

This would be ideal for the populist lower-income communities that are spread out in high density areas. Buses will be optimized to provide service to more people in more areas. This will keep fare prices low and generate high revenue for PABT.

er/

Be ac

C. 55
Using the 2012 New York City Olympic bid as a template, the proposal will expand venues into northern New Jersey. This will increase utilization of the PATH train and NY-NJ bus services.

Programming the Venues for the 2072 New York/ New Jersey Olympics

55 2072 Cyborg Olympics

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The project aims to revitalize the PABT as the main attraction amongst many to form the olympic village for nyc."

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C. 56
The curvature generated from the shape of the soccer field makes maneuvering buses easier than the city grid. The occupiable roof and loop form allows for easy security deployment at two primary gatesideal for spectacle, and the integration of the Highline and park-like setting with commercial and bus terminals underneath creates a setting for high activity and continued everyday usage.

56 2072 Cyborg Olympics

Program for Primary Bus Terminal

PABT Offices

Commercial and Auxiliary Commercial and Auxiliary Main Concourse

Road and Bus Gates Storefronts

57 2072 Cyborg Olympics

C. 58
The continuation of the Highline into the PABT and the formation of two terminals allows for higherarchical structure similar to those employed by airlines and airports.

58 2072 Cyborg Olympics

The Secondary Bus Terminal Node

59 2072 Cyborg Olympics

C. 60
Donald Norman, an academic in cognitive science, design, and usability engineering, developed eight principles to optimize the experience of waiting lines.

60 2072 Cyborg Olympics

Design Rules for Queues for Today and Tomorrow A 1

2012: 2012: 2012: Optimizing 2012: 2012: 2012: Optimizing Optimizing Optimizing

the Queue Optimizing Optimizing Optimizing Optimizing the the the Queue Queue Queue Experience the the the Queue Queue Queue the Queue Experience Experience Experience Experience Experience Experience Experience Donald Norman outlines eight

A AA A A A A A

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2072:

Donald Donald Norman Norman outlines outlines eight eight design principles for waiting linesDonald Donald Donald Donald Norman Norman Norman outlines outlines outlines eight eight eight Donald Norman Norman outlines outlines eight eight design principles for waiting lines Donald Norman outlines eight design design principles principles for for waiting waiting lines lines based upon David MaistersThe design design design principles principles principles forfor waiting for waiting waiting lines lines lines Donald Donald Norman Norman outlines outlines eight eight Donald Norman outlines eight design design principles principles for for waiting waiting lines lines Donald Donald Donald Norman Norman Norman outlines outlines outlines eight eight eight Donald Norman outlines eight based upon David MaistersThe design principles for waiting lines based based upon upon David David MaistersThe MaistersThe Psychology of Waiting Lines, based based based upon upon upon David David David MaistersThe MaistersThe MaistersThe design design principles principles for for waiting waiting lines lines design principles for waiting lines based based upon upon David David MaistersThe MaistersThe design design design principles principles principles for for waiting waiting for waiting lines lines lines design principles forLines, waiting lines Psychology of Waiting based upon David MaistersThe Psychology Psychology of Waiting Waiting Lines, Lines, published in 1985. Psychology Psychology Psychology of of Waiting of Waiting Waiting Lines, Lines, Lines, based based upon upon David David MaistersThe MaistersThe based upon David MaistersThe Psychology Psychology of of of Waiting Waiting Lines, Lines, based based based upon upon upon David David David MaistersThe MaistersThe MaistersThe based upon David MaistersThe published in 1985. Psychology of Waiting Lines, published published in 1985. inWaiting 1985. published published published in in 1985. in 1985. 1985. Psychology Psychology of1985. Waiting of Lines, Lines, Psychology of Waiting Lines, published published in in 1985. Psychology Psychology Psychology of of Waiting Waiting of Lines, Lines, Lines, Psychology of Waiting Waiting Lines, Double Buffering published in1985. 1985. published published in1985. 1985. in published in published published published in inBuffering 1985. 1985. in published in1985. 1985. Double Double Double Buffering Buffering Spatial Double-Buffering Double Double Double Double Buffering Buffering Buffering Double Buffering Buffering Spatial Double-Buffering Double Buffering Spatial Spatial Double-Buffering Double-Buffering Temporal Double-Buffering Spatial Spatial Double-Buffering Double-Buffering Double-Buffering Double Double Buffering Buffering Double Buffering Spatial Spatial Double-Buffering Double-Buffering Double Double Spatial Double Buffering Buffering Buffering Double Buffering Temporal Double-Buffering Queue Memory is Important Start/End Strong Be Fair Occupy Time Spatial Double-Buffering Temporal Unoptimized Temporal Double-Buffering Double-Buffering One Line Feeding Multiples Temporal Temporal Double-Buffering Double-Buffering Double-Buffering Spatial Spatial Double-Buffering Spatial Double-Buffering Temporal Temporal Double-Buffering Double-Buffering Spatial Spatial Temporal Spatial Double-Buffering Double-Buffering Double-Buffering Spatial Double-Buffering Unoptimized Queue Memory is Important Start/End Strong Be Fair Occupy Time Unoptimized Unoptimized Queue Queue Memory Memory is is Important Start/End Start/End Strong Strong Be Be Be Fair Occu Occ One Line Feeding Multiples Unoptimized Unoptimized Unoptimized Queue Queue Queue Memory Memory Memory is is is Important Important Important Start/End Start/End Start/End Strong Strong Strong Be Be Be Fair Fair Fair Occupy Occupy Occupy Time Time Time Memories canQueue be augmented digitally The end can be Important a shared digital Economically Unstratified Temporal Double-Buffering Unoptimized Unoptimized Queue Memory Memory is is Important Important Start/End Start/End Strong Strong Be Fair Fair Occup Occup One One Line Line Feeding Feeding Multiples Multiples Number Assignments One One One Line Line Line Feeding Feeding Feeding Multiples Multiples Multiples Temporal Temporal Double-Buffering Double-Buffering Fair Nodes of Interaction Temporal Double-Buffering One One Line Line Feeding Feeding Multiples Multiples Temporal Temporal Temporal Double-Buffering Double-Buffering Double-Buffering Temporal Double-Buffering Reasonable wont necessarily trigger a Affects future behavior Targeted Serial position effect Unoptimized Queue Memory is Important Start/End Strong Be Fair Occ Number Assignments Unoptimized Unoptimized Queue Queue Memory Memory is is Important Important Start/End Start/End Strong Strong Be Be Fair Fair Occup Occu Memory Is Start and End Be Fair Memory Is Start and End Be Fair Unoptimized QueueMemory Unoptimized Queue Psychological properties of Economically Economically Unstratified Unstratified Memories Memories can can be augmented be augmented digitally digitally The The end end can can be a be shared a shared digital digital Unoptimized Queue Memory is Important Start/End Strong Be Fair Occupy Free Tickets Subconscious augmentation experience One Line Feeding Multiples Affects Affects Affects future future future behavior behavior behavior Serial Serial Serial position position position effect effect effect Reasonable Reasonable Reasonable wont wont wont necessarily necessarily necessarily trigger trigger trigger a a a Number Number Assignments Assignments Admission Times Unoptimized Unoptimized Unoptimized Queue Queue Queue Memory Memory is is Important Important is Important Start/End Start/End Start/End Strong Strong Strong Be Be Be Fair Fair Fair Occupy Occupy Occupy Time Time Time Number Number Number Assignments Assignments Assignments Nodes Nod One One Line Line Feeding Feeding Multiples Multiples Filled time seem to pass Memories Memories can can be be augmented augmented digitally digitally The The end end can can be be a a shared shared digital digital Economically Economically Unstratified Unstratified Unoptimized Queue Memory is Important Start/End Strong Be Fair Occupy Time Psychological Psychological Psychological properties properties properties of of of One Line Feeding Multiples Number Number Assignments Assignments One One One Line Line Line Feeding Feeding Feeding Multiples Multiples Multiples Nodes Nodes ofof One Line Feeding Multiples More important than real event Providing Difficult to overcome bad start strong negative emotion Important Strong Important Strong Targeted Reasonable wont Economically Economically Targeted Admission Times Economically Unstratified Memories can be augmented digitally The end can be shared digitalLines time and distance Subconscious Memories Subconscious augmentation augmentation experience experience Free Economically Free Tickets Tickets The start begins online Demand Increases/Longer Number Assignments strong strong strong negative negative negative emotion emotion emotion More More More important important important than than than real real real event event event Difficult Difficult Difficult to to overcome to overcome overcome bad bad bad start start start Memories can can be augmented be augmented digitally digitally The The end end can can be be shared a ashared digital digital Unstratified Unstratified Targeted Admission Admission Times Times Nodes Positive Memories can be augmented digitally The end can be aa shared digital Economically Unstratified Targeted Targeted Admission Admission Admission Times Times Times Filled Node Fill t Number Number Assignments Assignments more quickly Free Free Tickets Tickets Subconscious Subconscious augmentation augmentation experience experience time time time and and and distance distance distance Nodes of Number Assignments Affects Affects Affects future future future behavior behavior behavior Serial Serial Serial position position position effect effect effect Reasonable Reasonable Admission Reasonable wont wont wont necessarily necessarily necessarily trigger trigger trigger a a a Targeted Targeted Admission Times Times Nodes of Affects future behavior Serial position effect Reasonable wont necessarily trigger a Number Number Targeted Number Assignments Assignments Assignments Filled Filled tim tim Psychological Psychological Psychological properties properties properties of of of Number Assignments Affects future Memories can be Serial position effect necessary trigger The end can be unstratified Psychological properties of Resentment builds when advantages Memory set at the end Providing Positive Subconscious augmentation experience Free Tickets Filled time seem to pass Demand Demand Increases/Longer Increases/Longer Lines Lines The The start start begins begins online online Memory set at the end Targeted Admission Times Memory Memory Memory set set at set at the at the end the end end Resentment Resentment Resentment builds builds builds when when when advantages advantages advantages Free Free Tickets Tickets Subconscious Subconscious augmentation augmentation experience experience Providing Providing Positive Positive Filled Filled Free Tickets Subconscious augmentation experience Providing Providing Positive Positive Positive more more qui Targeted Targeted Admission Admission Times Times Moon illusion The The start start begins begins online online Demand Demand Increases/Longer Increases/Longer Lines Lines Filled Filled Filled time time time seem seem seem to to pass to pass pass Filled tim Targeted Admission Times strong strong strong negative negative negative emotion emotion emotion More More More important important important than thanthan real real event real event Difficult Difficult Difficult to to overcome overcome to bad bad start bad start Providing Providing Positive Positive Filled time behavior digitally augmented Difficult to overcome a strong negative a shared digital Free tickets strong negative emotion More important than realevent event Memories Difficult toovercome overcome badstart start Targeted Targeted Providing Targeted Admission Admission Admission Times Times Times more more quickl quick time time time and and distance and distance distance Targeted Admission Times time and distance are present Memories Demand Increases/Longer Lines more The start begins online more quickly Memory The Memory set set at the at the endend Providing Positive are are are present present present The start start begins begins online online Demand Demand Increases/Longer Increases/Longer Lines Lines Memories Memories more qi Cognitive The start begins online Increases/Longer Lines Memories Memories Memories More important than Memory Subconscious bad start emotion. experience more Moon Moo Demand demand increase/ Providing Providing Positive Positive Its not a line! 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Cognitive Dissonance Deliberately Deliberately Inducing Inducing Waits Waits Its Deliberate Chaos Deliberately Deliberately Inducing Inducing Inducing Waits Waits Waits Cognitive Cognitive Dissonance Dissonance Its Its not Its not not aillusion line! a a line! line! 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Deliberate Chaos Deliberate Deliberate Chaos Chaosunhappiness increase Deliberate Chaos Deliberate Deliberate Deliberate Chaos Chaos Chaos Deliberate Chaos
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3 Optimizing Optimizing Optimizing 3Queue 33 Optimizing the the Queue the the Queue Queue 3 3 33 the Queue the the Queue Queue the Queue Experience Experience Experience Experience Experience Experience Experience Donald Norman outlines eight Experience

2072: 2072: 2072: 2072: 2072: 2072: 2072: 2072: Optimizing Optimizing A Optimizing Optimizing

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001 0 11101 01 10 0 11 1011 0 01 111 1 11101 10 11 10 01 101 001 0 01 01 11 0 1 1101 0 0 10 1 0 01 11 0 10 1 11 01 0111 11 0 100 10 10 011 0 11 011 10 1 1 0 1 0 101 01 100 00 11 01 1 01 1 10 10

001 0 11101 01 10 0 11 1011 0 01 111 1 11101 10 11 10 01 101 001 0 01 11 0 10 1101 0 10 1 0 11 1 00 10 1 11 01 0111 1 0 100 0 10 10 011 1 01 11 0 10 1 1 0 10 01 1 0 10 0111 1 0 011 0 001

8
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5
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6
100001010110101 100111 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1101 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 11 0 0 0 01 0 0 10 1 1 1 1 11 1 1 00 1 1 11 1 01 01 01 0 01 10 10 1 0 01 0 0 01 0 1 10 01 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 00 0 1 0 1 11 1 1 1 10 01 0 011 0 1 10101 1 0 101 1 10

7
100001010110101 100111 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1101 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 11 0 0 0 01 0 0 10 1 1 1 1 11 1 1 00 1 1 11 1 01 01 01 0 01 10 10 1 0 01 0 0 01 0 1 10 01 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 00 0 1 0 1 11 1 1 1 10 01 0 011 0 1 10101 1 0 101 1 10

8
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0110 0 0 0 1101 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 11 0 00 00 0 0 0 11 0 0 01 0 0 10 1 1 1 1 11 1 1 00 1 1 11 1 5 6 7 8 01 01 01 0 01 10 10 In the 1970s 1 0 0 0 10 0 0 110 01 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 N: Tony S. 1 0 5 6 7 8 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 11 1 1 1 10 01 0 011 0 In the 1970s 1 10101 1 0 5 5 6 6 7 7 8 8 101 1 5 55 6 66 7 77 8 8 8 10 In In the the 1970s 1970s In In In the the the 1970s 1970s 1970s 5 5 6 6 7 7 8 8 In Inthe the1970s 1970s S: Male McDonald's N: N T N: N: To To 5 55 6 66 7 77 8 88 In the 1970s 8 5 6 7 In In the the 1970s 1970s McDonald's 5 5 5 6 6 6 7 7 7 8 8 8 In the 1970s A: 28 5 6 7 8 In In In the the the 1970s 1970s 1970s S M McDonald's McDonald's In the 1970s McDonald's McDonald's McDonald's N S: S:S: Ma M McDonald's McDonald's N: N: To N: Ton introducing A: A 2 S: McDonald's A: A: 28 28 S: S: Ma McDonald's McDonald's introducing S: Mal McDonald's McDonald's McDonald's McDonald's introducing introducing McDonald's introducing introducing introducing introducing introducing A QUEUE A:28 A: 28 A: introducing introducing introducing QUEUE introducing introducing introducing introducing QUEUE QUEUE introducing QUEUE QUEUE QUEUE QUEUE QUEUE MONITORS QUEUE QUEUE QUEUE MONITOR S QUEUE QUEUE QUEUE QUEUE MONITOR MONITOR QUEUE MONITOR MONITOR MONITOR SSS MONITOR SSS S -young women who MONITOR MONITOR Swho MONITOR MONITOR SS -young women who MONITOR S MONITOR MONITOR MONITOR S S S -young -young women women who MONITOR S -young -young -young women women women who who who -young -young women women who who channeled customers $ $ $ -young women who -young -young women women who who channeled customers -young women who -young -young -young women women women who who who channeled channeled customers customers -young women who channeled channeled channeled customers customers customers $$ channeled channeled customers customers $$$ $ into orderly lines. $$$ $ $ $ channeled customers channeled channeled customers customers into orderly lines. $ $$ channeled customers $ $ channeled channeled channeled customers customers customers $ $ $$ $ into into orderly orderly lines. lines. $ $ channeled customers into into into orderly orderly orderly lines. lines. lines. into into orderly orderly lines. lines. 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001 0 11101 01 10 0 11 1011 0 10 01 111 11 10 10 11 10 01 101 0 01 1 01 1 11 1 0 10 1101 0 0 10 10 11 0 10 1010 01 11 0111 10 1 0 10 10 10 01 0 11 11 10 1 1 01 0 101 01 100 00 11 01 1 0 1 0 111 0 001 0 11101 01 10 0 11 1011 0 01 111 1 11101 10 11 10 01 101 001 0 01 11 1 0 10 1101 0 0 10 1 0 11 0 10 1010 01 11 0111 10 1 0 10 10 10 011 0 11 11 10 1 1 01 0 101 01 100 00 11 01 1 0 1 0 111 0 001 0 11101 01 10 0 11 1011 0 01 111 1 11101 10 11 10 01 101 001 0 01 11 0 10 1101 0 10 1 0 11 1 00 10 1 11 01 0111 1 0 100 0 10 10 011 1 1 10 1 0 1 0 10 1 01 00 1 0 11 01 10 11111 0 01 001 1

11 0

001

10

Fast moving lines

reasonable

attention

Pay attention to the most upset

001 0 11101 01 10 0 11 1011 0 01 111 1 11101 10 11 10 01 101 001 0 01 11 0 101 1101 0 10 1 0 00 10 1010 11 11 0111 1 1 0 10 10 10 11 0110 10 1 01 0 1 0 01 00 11 01 1 10

01 10 11 1

01

001 0 11101 01 10 0 11 1011 0 10 01 111 11 10 10 11 10 01 101 0 01 1 01 1 11 0 10 1 0 10 111 0 11 1 0 00 10 11 01 0111 1 0 100 10 10 011 0 1 10 1 1 01 0 1 1 0 01 00 11 01 1 1

1 0 0 1 11 0 01 1 1101 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 00 1 010 0100 01 111 1 10 11 0 01 00 1 1 11 0 0 01 1 1 10 1 1 11 0 0 01 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 101 0 0 1 0 11 1 1 0 0 0 00 0 11001

1 0 0 1 11 0 01 1 1101 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 00 1 010 0100 01 111 1 10 11 0 01 00 1 1 11 0 0 01 1 1 10 1 1 11 0 0 01 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 101 0 0 1 0 11 1 1 0 0 0 00 0 11001 110101101011010 110010

1 0 0 1 11 0 01 1 1101 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 00 1 010 0100 01 111 1 10 11 0 01 00 1 1 11 0 0 01 1 1 10 1 1 11 0 0 01 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 101 0 0 1 0 11 1 1 0 0 0 00 0 11001 110101101011010 110010

1 0 0 1 11 0 01 1 1101 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 00 1 010 0100 01 111 1 10 11 0 01 00 1 1 11 0 0 01 1 1 10 1 1 11 0 0 01 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 101 0 0 1 0 11 1 1 0 0 0 00 0 11001 110101101011010 110010

01 10 11 1

01 11 00 10 11 010 01 1 10 1010 10 10

01

001

110101101011010 110010

1 0 0 1 11 0 01 1 1101 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 00 1 010 0100 01 111 1 10 11 0 01 00 1 1 11 0 0 01 1 1 10 1 1 11 0 0 01 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 101 0 0 1 0 11 1 1 0 0 0 00 0 11001

110101101011010 110010

1 0 0 1 11 0 01 1 1101 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 00 1 010 0100 01 111 1 10 11 0 01 00 1 1 11 0 0 01 1 1 10 1 1 11 0 0 01 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 101 0 0 1 0 11 1 1 0 0 0 00 0 11001

110101101011010 110010

1 0 0 1 11 0 01 1 1101 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 00 1 010 0100 01 111 1 10 11 0 01 00 1 1 11 0 0 01 1 1 10 1 1 11 0 0 01 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 101 0 0 1 0 11 1 1 0 0 0 00 0 11001

110101101011010 110010

110101101011010 110010

C. 61
In creating future scenarios, large public spaces are idea places to house people during emergency situations. We have seen this done Hurricane Katrina and the Louisiana Superdome.

Nuclear Winter Wonderland

61 2072 Cyborg Olympics

C. 62
A light show at the PABT stadium creates a spectacle for the whole city. Since the stadium is semi-enclosed as seen in figure m, more people can participate.

62 2072 Cyborg Olympics

Opening Ceremony for 2072 Olympics

C. 63
The flow pattern infers a primary direction as indicated in the figures. The separation of pedestrian and vehicular traffic increase safety and using acute angles for bus gates make turning easier than typical right angles.

Flow Patterns for Primary Bus Terminal Node and Stadium


Pedestrian

63 2072 Cyborg Olympics

Vehicular

Pedestrian Vehicular

C. 64
The installation was an exercise in distilling our project in one image. The top left hand box was a video of the professors daughter commenting on the future of transportation. Her insight was more profound than ours.

End-Of-The-Year Diorama Display of Future Scenarios at the PABT

64 2072 Cyborg Olympics

Photo by James Ewing

65 2072 Cyborg Olympics

C. 66
The PABT stadium is a semi-enclosed structure that can be prepared to have multiple levels of exclusivity. It also expands the Highline to act as the primary entry point for pedestrian and vehicular traffic.

66 2072 Cyborg Olympics

The Port Authority Bus Terminal & Stadium

A.
as

as

67 2072 Cyborg Olympics

Capturing Weather
Project 4
Studio III Lot-Ek Fall 2011 M.Arch I GSAPP

Studio

The housing studio examines contemporary issues surrounding people and the city. This studio will overlay the program of food production based upon one of the groups in the food pyramid.

Project

The overarching goal for the project is to analyze and manipulate climate to understand the connection between food production and housing. We do not want to hermetically seal or shrink-wrap our tropical environment within a bubble, but to allow the two environments to exchange and influence one another.

Pathmark in East Harlem, NYC 160 E 125th St New York, NY 10035

Site

partner
Anne Baker

Program
Housing Oil palm farming Food production Food processing Hotel Retail

Software
Rhino Grasshopper Illustrator Photoshop

D. 69
Looking at different crop plantations, our goal was to increase yield for a given square footage. Our selected scheme (bottom row) packed the palms three dimensionally in two layers. This ultimately doubled the yield, but had to increase soil nutrition. We opted to use a hydroponic system.

Crop Plantation Patterns for Oil Palm Production


Linear Versus Alternating Rows

Perimeter Condition

Interstitial Space

Alternative Crop Patterns

harness the abundance of NYC's infrastructure to support and mediate oil palm production and housing in a way which doesn't leech energy from these systems but gives back to them generously."
This project has a two-fold intention,we are trying to contend with industrial demand for exotic (naturally foreign) products while addressing the environmental challenges of growing a particular plant outside of its indigenous environment: we are proposing to grow oil palm trees in New York. Palm oil is in very high demand in the global food production industry, but to grow it in Malaysia or Indonesia, its native home, requires massive deforestation and the destruction of biologically essential habitat. This product not only has some global market implications, but some interesting architectural properties as well. The tall and slender trunk of the oil palm when planted as a large mono-culture references the hypostyle hall of Egypt. It would be counter-intuitive to grow this plant in New York City , given the amount of energy required to sustain a tropical climate throughout the year in a non-tropic site. However, we feel that there is a fairly good reason to do so, and that by looking at the inputs and outputs for the systems required to sustain the life of these trees

Temporal-Based Planting Pattern

Temporal and Vertically Stacked Planting Pattern

D. 70A
Comparison of wind direction and intensity per month. Sumatras wind is consistently high from the northwest. New Yorks wind is much less intense and changes from the northwest during the winter to the south in the summer.
ENVIRONMENTAL COMPARISON: -

D. 70B
Urban farming is one important strategy many architects and city planners are exploring to combat the issues of deforestation because of single-crop farming. There is no place where this issue is more prevalent than in Southeast Asia.

ENVIRONMENTAL COMPARISON:

WIND DIRECTION & INTENSITY

TEMPERATURE & DE
100

N
20

N
20 16 12 8 4

N
20 16 12 8

ENVIRONMENTAL COMPARISON: ENVIRONMENTAL COMPARISON:

16 12 8 4

ENVIRONMENTAL COMPARISON: ENVIRONMENTAL COMPARISON:

90

SUMATRA SUMATRA DEWPOINT 79F HUMAN COMFORT 74F


80

WIND DIRECTION & INTENSITY WIND DIRECTION & INTENSITY


ENVIRONMENTAL ENVIRONMENTAL ENVIRONMENTAL COMPARISON: COMPARISON: COMPARISON: -N
20 N 1620

TEMPERATURE & DEWPOINT TEMPERATURE & DEWPOINT


70 100 60 100

N
1620 16 12 8 12

ENVIRONMENTAL ENVIRONMENTAL ENVIRONMENTAL COMPARISON: COMPARISON: COMPARISON: february

--

N
20 N 1620 16 12 8

AVERAGE DAILY TEMPERAT AVERAGE TEMPERA NYC DAILY VS SUMATRA NYC VS SUMATRA 13 MONTHS 13 MONTHS

70 Capturing Weather

Monthly Wind Intensity and Direction

WIND WIND WIND DIRECTION DIRECTION DIRECTION & INTENSITY & & INTENSITY INTENSITY
ENVIRONMENTAL COMPARISON: ENVIRONMENTAL ENVIRONMENTAL COMPARISON: COMPARISON: - -

20 N

january

16 12 8 12

TEMPERATURE TEMPERATURE TEMPERATURE & DEWPOINT & & DEWPOINT DEWPOINT


48
100 100100

ENVIRONMENTAL COMPARISON: - - ENVIRONMENTAL COMPARISON: COMPARISON: SUMATRA AVERAGE AVERAGE AVERAGE DAILY DAILY DAILY TEMPERATURE TEMPERATURE TEMPERATURE 12 ENVIRONMENTAL
4

N
20

NN
20 20 16 16 12 12 88 44

WIND DIRECTION && INTENSITY WIND WIND DIRECTION DIRECTION &INTENSITY INTENSITY
N NN
20 16 12 20 20 16 16 12 12 8 N 8N

48 4

48 4

NN
20 20 16 16 12 12

N
20

N
20
90 90 90

13 MONTHS 13 13MONTHS MONTHS TEMPERATURE & DEWPOINT TEMPERATURE TEMPERATURE & &DEWPOINT DEWPOINT
80 70

march Deforestation on Sumatra Island, Indonesia NYCNYC NYC VS VS SUMATRA VS SUMATRA SUMATRA
90 90

50

20 16 12

ENVIRONMENTAL COMPARISON: Sumatra, ENVIRONMENTAL COMPARISON:

WIND DIRECTION INTENSITY WIND DIRECTION && INTENSITY


8 4

Indonesia

- -

16 12

ENVIRONMENTAL COMPARISON: ENVIRONMENTAL COMPARISON:


february february

- - 16
12

16 12
100 100 100

16 Rainforest 12 8 4
90 90 90

SUMATRA SUMATRA DEWPOINT SUMATRA 79F DEWPOINT HUMAN 79F COMFORT N HUMAN 70 74F COMFORT 20 74F
60

80

40

60

AVERAGE DAILY TEMPERATURE AVERAGE AVERAGE DAILY DAILY TEMPERATURE TEMPERATURE NYC VS VS SUMATRA NYC NYC VS SUMATRA SUMATRA 13 MONTHS 1313 MONTHS MONTHS

NYC

30

20

N 8
16 12

204 44 20 20 16 16 12 12 8 8 4 4

january january

N 8N N 8 8
20 16 12 8 4 20 20 16 16 12 12 8 8

TEMPERATURE DEWPOINT TEMPERATURE && DEWPOINT


44

SUMATRA SUMATRA SUMATRA N N N 80 80 80 8 SUMATRA SUMATRA SUMATRA DEWPOINT DEWPOINT 20 DEWPOINT 20 4 20 79F 79F 79F 16 HUMAN HUMAN HUMAN 16 16 COMFORT COMFORT COMFORT 70 70 70 12 74F 74F 1274F 12
8 8 8 4 4
60 60 60

march march

8 4

50 10 50

New York, N N USA 20


20 16 16 12 8 4

N N january january january


20 16 12 8 20 16 12 8 4

N N
20 16 12 8 4

february february february

20 16

N4 4 20 N
1620 16 12 8 12

100

100

AVERAGE DAILY TEMPERATURE AVERAGE DAILY TEMPERATURE NYC SUMATRA SUMATRA NYC VS VSSUMATRA SUMATRA SUMATRA MONTHS SUMATRA 13 13 MONTHS
80

20 N
90 90

marchmarch march

april

1620 16 12 8 12

50

50 50

may

ENVIRONMENTAL COMPARISON:

12 8 4

january
4

february
january january january N
20 16 12

12 8 4

ENVIRONMENTAL COMPARISON:

march

WIND DIRECTION & INTENSITY

N
20 16 12

NN
20 20 16 16 12 12 88N 20 44 16 12 8

NN
20 20 16 16 12 12

TEMPERATURE & DEWPOINT


february february february
48 4

16 12
100

16 16 12 12
60 60

20

20 20

16 12

40

40

12 8

N
20 16 12 8 4

N january january
20 16 12 8

february february

8 4

march march

N 8
20 4 16 12 8 4

N 8 N8
20 204 4
90

april april

N 8 N N88
20 16 12 4 44 20 20 16 16 12 12
40 40 50 50

may may

4 20 16 12 8 4

N N
20 20 16 16 12 12 8 8 4 4
0 0 0 10 10 10

june june

8 4

NYC 30 NYC NYC

30

30

16 16 12 12 8 8

Avg-NYC Avg-NYC Avg=NYC Avg=NYC Poly. (Avg-NYC) Poly. (Avg-NYC) Poly. (Avg=NYC) Poly. (Avg=NYC)

20

20

20

ENVIRONMENTAL COMPARISON: ENVIRONMENTAL COMPARISON:

SUMATRA
80

N N
20 16 12 8 20 16 12 8 4

N N april april april


20 16 12 8 20 16 12 8 4

12 8

12 8 4
50 60

12

20

20

16 12 8 12

ENVIRONMENTAL ENVIRONMENTAL ENVIRONMENTAL COMPARISON: COMPARISON: COMPARISON: -

--

12

48 4

january

february

march

N
20 16 12

NN

aprilapril april N
20 16

maymay may

10

10

N
20 16

NN
20 20 16 16 12 12 88
0 0

junejune june

48 20 16

HUMIDITY HUMIDITY HUMIDITY


N N
JUNE 11 - AUGUST 28 JUNE 11 - AUGUST 28 NO CONDENSATION NO CONDENSATION
120 120120

48

N Avg=NYC
20Poly. (Avg=NYC)
Poly. (Avg-NYC)

Avg-NYC

20 20 16 16 12 12 88

NN
20 20
40

1 4 7 10 1 13 4 16 7 19 10 22 13 25 16 28 19 31 22 34 25 37 28 40 31 43 34 46 37 49 40 52 43 55 46 58 49 61 52 64 55 67 58 70 61 73 64 76 67 79 70 82 73 85 76 88 79 91 82 94 85 97 88 100 91 103 94 106 97 100 109 103 112 106 115 109 118 112 121 115 124 118 127 121 130 124 133 127 136 130 139 133 142 136 145 139 148 142 151 145 154 148 157 151 160 154 163 157 166 160 169 163 172 166 175 169 178 172 181 175 184 178 187 181 190 184 193 187 196 190 199 193 202 196 205 199 208 202 211 205 214 208 217 211 220 214 223 217 226 220 229 223 232 226 235 229 238 232 241 235 244 238 247 241 250 244 253 247 256 250 259 253 262 256 265 259 268 262 271 265 274 268 277 271 280 274 283 277 286 280 289 283 292 286 295 289 298 292 301 295 304 298 307 301 310 304 313 307 316 310 319 313 322 316 325 319 328 322 331 325 334 328 337 331 340 334 343 337 346 340 349 343 352 346 355 349 358 352 361 355 364 358 367 361 370 364 373 367 376 370 379 373 382 376 385 379 388 382 391 385 394 388 391 394

ENVIRONMENTAL COMPARISON: ENVIRONMENTAL ENVIRONMENTAL COMPARISON: COMPARISON: 16


12 8 4

16 16 12 N12 N

12

N
20 16 12 8 4

N april april
20 16 12 8

N june june

N 12

may may

44 20 16 12 8 4

20 8 20 20 88 164 12 8 4 44 16 16 12 12 8 8 4 4

NYC

30

july july

JANUARY 112 - JUNE 10 JANUARY 1 - JUNE 10 CONDENSATION CONDENSATION 8N

N 4 N N 44
20 20 20 16 16 12 12 16 12

may
july july july
20 16 12 8

june

20

july

ENVIRONMENTAL COMPARISON: ENVIRONMENTAL COMPARISON:

august august

4 20

20 20 16 16 12 12 8 8 4 4
100 100100

september september

HUMIDITY HUMIDITY HUMIDITY


120 120 120

N4 N
20 16 12 8 4 20 16 12 8 4

N N
20 16

10

N N
20 16 12 8

20

1 4 7 10 13 16 19 22 25 28 31 34 37 40 43 46 49 52 55 58 61 64 67 70 73 76 79 82 85 88 91 94 97 100 103 106 109 112 115 118 121 124 127 130 133 136 139 142 145 148 151 154 157 160 163 166 169 172 175 178 181 184 187 190 193 196 199 202 205 208 211 214 217 220 223 226 229 232 235 238 241 244 247 250 253 256 259 262 265 268 271 274 277 280 283 286 289 292 295 298 301 304 307 310 313 316 319 322 325 328 331 334 337 340 343 346 349 352 355 358 361 364 367 370 373 376 379 382 385 388 391 394

august august august

16 12 8

8 N 8 8 420 N 4 4 20 september september september 16 16 12 12 8 JANUARY 1 - JUNE 10 CONDENSATION 48 4

HUMIDITY HUMIDITY
120 120

august

- - 12
8

16

N 4
20 N

N
20 N

october

1620 16 12 8 12

november
SUMATRA SUMATRA SUMATRA 80 80 80 80% 80% 80% AUGUST 29 - JANUARY 31 CONDENSATION

1620 16 12 8 12
100 100 100

12 8 4

JUNE 11 - AUGUST 28 NO CONDENSATION

48 4

april

may

june

N 4 N4 N
20 16 12 20 20 16 16 12 12 88 N 4 20 4 16 12 8 4 N N

july july july

48 4

50%

40 40

N
20 16 12

NN
20 20 16 16 12 12

ENVIRONMENTAL COMPARISON:

august august august

NN
20 20 16 16 12 12
100 100

september september september

N
20 16 12 8

20 16

60 NYC NYC NYC 60% 60% 60%

60 60

SUMATRA SUMATRA SUMATRA 80 80% 80% 80% 80

Avg-NYC 80 Avg-SUM

Avg-NYC Avg-NYC Avg-SUM Avg-SUM

Poly. (Avg-NYC) Poly. Poly. (Avg-NYC) (Avg-NYC) Poly. (Avg-SUM) Poly. Poly. (Avg-SUM) (Avg-SUM) 20 20

N
20 16 12 8 4

july july

N
20 16 12 8 N N 20 16 12 8 4 20 16 12 8 4

N N 8N 8 8 204 september 44 20 20 september


16 12 8 4 16 16 12 12 8 8 4 4

HUMIDITY
120

12

october october

8N N 8 8 20 4 20 16 16 12 12 8 8 4 4 44 SUMATRA SUMATRA 80% 80 80%

november november
80

N
20 16 12 8 4

HUMAN HUMAN HUMAN COMFORT COMFORT COMFORT 50% 50% 50%

N N

august august

20 20 16 16 12 12 8 8 4 4

40

40 40

december december

60 NYC NYC NYC 60% 60% 60%

60

60

HUMAN HUMAN HUMAN COMFORT COMFORT COMFORT 50% 50% 50%


20 20 20 40 40 40 Avg-NYC Avg-NYC Avg-SUM Avg-SUM Poly. (Avg-NYC) Poly. (Avg-NYC) Poly. (Avg-SUM) Poly. (Avg-SUM)

0 1 4 7 10 13 16 19 22 25 28 31 34 37 40 43 46 49 52 55 58 61 64 67 70 73 76 79 82 85 88 91 94 97 100 103 106 109 112 115 118 121 124 127 130 133 136 139 142 145 148 151 154 157 160 163 166 169 172 175 178 181 184 187 190 193 196 199 202 205 208 211 214 217 220 223 226 229 232 235 238 241 244 247 0 1 4 7 10 13 16 19 22 25 28 31 34 37 40 43 46 49 52 55 58 61 64 67 70 73 76 79 82 85 88 91 94 97 100 103 106 109 112 115 118 121 124 127 130 133 136 139 142 145 148 151 154 157 160 163 166 169 172 175 178 181 184 187 190 193 196 199 202 205 208 211 214 217 220 223 226 229 232 235 238 241 244 20 1 10 4 13 16 7 1 19 10 4 22 13 7 25 16 10 28 19 13 31 22 16 34 25 19 37 28 22 40 31 25 43 34 28 46 37 31 49 40 34 52 43 37 55 46 40 58 49 43 61 52 46 64 55 49 67 58 52 70 61 55 73 64 58 76 67 61 79 70 64 82 73 67 85 76 70 88 79 73 91 82 76 94 85 79 97 88 82 100 91 85 103 94 88 106 97 91 109 100 94 112 103 97 115 106 100 118 109 103 121 112 106 124 115 109 127 118 112 130 121 115 133 124 118 136 127 121 139 130 124 142 133 127 145 136 130 148 139 133 151 142 136 154 145 139 157 148 142 160 151 145 163 154 148 166 157 151 169 160 154 172 163 157 175 166 160 178 169 163 181 172 166 184 175 169 187 178 172 190 181 175 193 184 178 196 187 181 199 190 184 202 193 187 205 196 190 208 199 193 211 202 196 214 205 199 217 208 202 220 211 205 223 214 208 226 217 211 229 220 214 232 223 217 235 226 220 238 229 223 241 232 226 244 235 229 247 238 232 250 241 235 253 244 238 256 247 241 259 250 244 262 253 247 265 256 250 268 259 253 271 262 256 274 265 259 277 268 262 280 271 265 283 274 268 286 277 271 289 280 274 292 283 277 295 286 280 298 289 283 301 292 286 304 295 289 307 298 292 310 301 295 313 304 298 316 307 301 319 310 304 322 313 307 325 316 310 328 319 313 331 322 316 334 325 319 337 328 322 340 331 325 343 334 328 346 337 331 349 340 334 352 343 337 355 346 340 358 349 343 361 352 346 364 355 349 367 358 352 370 361 355 373 364 358 376 367 361 379 370 364 382 373 367 385 376 370 388 379 373 391 382 376 394 385 379 388 382 391 385 394 388 0

october october october

20 16 12 8

20 16 12 8 4

N N
20 16 12 8 4
100

november november november

20 16 12 8

december december december

NYC NYC 60% 60%

60

60

HUMAN HUMAN COMFORT COMFORT 50% 50%

0 0

20

july august

september

october october october

november november november


80

40

40

december december december

september
N
20 16 12 8 4

october
december december

SUMATRA 80%

november
20 20

december
Avg-NYC Avg-SUM Poly. (Avg-NYC) Poly. (Avg-SUM)

N
20 16 12 8 4

october october

november november

N
20 16 12 8 4

NYC 60% HUMAN COMFORT 50%

60

40

20

october

november

december

1 4 7 10 1 13 4 16 7 19 10 22 13 25 16 28 19 31 22 34 25 37 28 40 31 43 34 46 37 49 40 52 43 55 46 58 49 61 52 64 55 67 58 70 61 73 64 76 67 79 70 82 73 85 76 88 79 91 82 94 85 97 88 100 91 103 94 106 97 100 109 103 112 106 115 109 118 112 121 115 124 118 127 121 130 124 133 127 136 130 139 133 142 136 145 139 148 142 151 145 154 148 157 151 160 154 163 157 166 160 169 163 172 166 175 169 178 172 181 175 184 178 187 181 190 184 193 187 196 190 199 193 202 196 205 199 208 202 211 205 214 208 217 211 220 214 223 217 226 220 229 223 232 226 235 229 238 232 241 235 244 238 247 241 250 244 253 247 256 250 259 253 262 256 265 259 268 262 271 265 274 268 277 271 280 274 283 277 286 280 289 283 292 286 295 289 298 292 301 295 304 298 307 301 310 304 313 307 316 310 319 313 322 316 325 319 328 322 331 325 334 328 337 331 340 334 343 337 346 340 349 343 352 346 355 349 358 352 361 355 364 358 367 361 370 364 373 367 376 370 379 373 382 376 385 379 388 382 391 385 394 388 391 394

1 4 7

1 4 7 10 13 1 16 4 1 19 7 4 22 10 7 25 13 10 28 16 13 31 19 16 34 22 19 37 25 22 40 28 25 43 31 28 46 34 31 49 37 34 52 40 37 55 43 40 58 46 43 61 49 46 64 52 49 67 55 52 70 58 55 73 61 58 76 64 61 79 67 64 82 70 67 85 73 70 88 76 73 91 79 76 94 82 79 97 85 82 100 88 85 103 91 88 106 94 91 109 97 94 112 100 97 115 103 100 118 106 103 121 109 106 124 112 109 127 115 112 130 118 115 133 121 118 136 124 121 139 127 124 142 130 127 145 133 130 148 136 133 151 139 136 154 142 139 157 145 142 160 148 145 163 151 148 166 154 151 169 157 154 172 160 157 175 163 160 178 166 163 181 169 166 184 172 169 187 175 172 190 178 175 193 181 178 196 184 181 199 187 184 202 190 187 205 193 190 208 196 193 211 199 196 214 202 199 217 205 202 220 208 205 223 211 208 226 214 211 229 217 214 232 220 217 235 223 220 238 226 223 241 229 226 244 232 229 247 235 232 250 238 235 253 241 238 256 244 241 259 247 244 262 250 247 265 253 250 268 256 253 271 259 256 274 262 259 277 265 262 280 268 265 283 271 268 286 274 271 289 277 274 292 280 277 295 283 280 298 286 283 301 289 286 304 292 289 307 295 292 310 298 295 313 301 298 316 304 301 319 307 304 322 310 307 325 313 310 328 316 313 331 319 316 334 322 319 337 325 322 340 328 325 343 331 328 346 334 331 349 337 334 352 340 337 355 343 340 358 346 343 361 349 346 364 352 349 367 355 352 370 358 355 373 361 358 376 364 361 379 367 364 382 370 367 385 373 370 388 376 373 391 379 376 394 382 379 385 382 388 385 391 388 394 391 394

20

1990

2000

1 4 7 10 13 16 19 22 25 28 31 34 37 40 43 46 49 52 55 58 61 64 67 70 73 76 79 82 85 88 91 94

1 10 4 13 7 1 16 10 4 19 13 7 22 16 10 25 19 13 28 22 16 31 25 19 34 28 22 37 31 25 40 34 28 43 37 31 46 40 34 49 43 37 52 46 40 55 49 43 58 52 46 61 55 49 64 58 52 67 61 55 70 64 58 73 67 61 76 70 64 79 73 67 82 76 70 85 79 73 88 82 76 91 85 79 94 88 82 97 100 91 85 103 94 88 106 97 91 109 100 94 112 103 97 115 106 100 118 109 103 121 112 106 124 115 109 127 118 112 130 121 115 133 124 118 136 127 121 139 130 124 142 133 127 145 136 130 148 139 133 151 142 136 154 145 139 157 148 142 160 151 145 163 154 148 166 157 151 169 160 154 172 163 157 175 166 160 178 169 163 181 172 166 184 175 169 187 178 172 190 181 175 193 184 178 196 187 181 199 190 184 202 193 187 205 196 190 208 199 193 211 202 196 214 205 199 217 208 202 220 211 205 223 214 208 226 217 211 229 220 214 232 223 217 235 226 220 238 229 223 241 232 226 244 235 229 247 238 232 250 241 235 253 244 238 256 247 241 259 250 244 262 253 247 265 256 250 268 259 253 271 262 256 274 265 259 277 268 262 280 271 265 283 274 268 286 277 271 289 280 274 292 283 277 295 286 280 298 289 283 301 292 286 304 295 289 307 298 292 310 301 295 313 304 298 316 307 301 319 310 304 322 313 307 325 316 310 328 319 313 331 322 316 334 325 319 337 328 322 340 331 325 343 334 328 346 337 331 349 340 334 352 343 337 355 346 340 358 349 343 361 352 346 364 355 349 367 358 352 370 361 355 373 364 358 376 367 361 379 370 364 382 373 367 385 376 370 388 379 373 391 382 376 394 385 379

1 4 7

may may may

80

JANUARY 1 - JUNE 10 JANUARY JANUARY 1-1 JUNE - JUNE 10 10 CONDENSATION CONDENSATION CONDENSATION

120 120

JUNE 11 - AUGUST 28 JUNE JUNE 11 11 AUGUST - AUGUST 28 28 NO CONDENSATION NO NO CONDENSATION CONDENSATION

AUGUST 29 - JANUARY 31 AUGUST AUGUST 29 29 JANUARY - JANUARY 31 31 CONDENSATION CONDENSATION CONDENSATION

- -

20 16 12 8 4 SUMATRA 80 80% SUMATRA 80%


100 100

NYC 60% HUMAN COMFORT 50%

60

AUGUST 29 - JANUARY 31 AUGUST 29 - JANUARY 31 CONDENSATION CONDENSATION

40

1932
december

80

1980
20

NYC 60% NYC

60 60

60% HUMAN COMFORT HUMAN 50% COMFORT

388 382 391 385 394 388

SUMATRA DEWPOINT 4 4 N N79F HUMAN 20 20 COMFORT 74F 16 16

4 4 4 20 N
70

8 8

june june june

1620 16 12

NYC 30 NYC

30

N july
20 N 1620

JANUARY JANUARY JANUARY 1 - JUNE 11 10 JUNE - JUNE 10 N10 CONDENSATION CONDENSATION CONDENSATION 20 N
1620

10

10

10

JUNE 11 JUNE JUNE - AUGUST 11 11 - AUGUST - AUGUST 28 28 28 NO CONDENSATION NO NO CONDENSATION CONDENSATION

HUMIDITY HUMIDITY

1 4 7 10 13 1 16 4 1 19 7 4 22 10 7 25 13 10 28 16 13 31 19 16 34 22 19 37 25 22 40 28 25 43 31 28 46 34 31 49 37 34 52 40 37 55 43 40 58 46 43 61 49 46 64 52 49 67 55 52 70 58 55 73 61 58 76 64 61 79 67 64 82 70 67 85 73 70 88 76 73 91 79 76 94 82 79 97 85 82 100 88 85 103 91 88 106 94 91 109 97 94 112 100 97 115 103 100 118 106 103 121 109 106 124 112 109 127 115 112 130 118 115 133 121 118 136 124 121 139 127 124 142 130 127 145 133 130 148 136 133 151 139 136 154 142 139 157 145 142 160 148 145 163 151 148 166 154 151 169 157 154 172 160 157 175 163 160 178 166 163 181 169 166 184 172 169 187 175 172 190 178 175 193 181 178 196 184 181 199 187 184 202 190 187 205 193 190 208 196 193 211 199 196 214 202 199 217 205 202 220 208 205 223 211 208 226 214 211 229 217 214 232 220 217 235 223 220 238 226 223 241 229 226 244 232 229 247 235 232 250 238 235 253 241 238 256 244 241 259 247 244 262 250 247 265 253 250 268 256 253 271 259 256 274 262 259 277 265 262 280 268 265 283 271 268 286 274 271 289 277 274 292 280 277 295 283 280 298 286 283 301 289 286 304 292 289 307 295 292 310 298 295 313 301 298 316 304 301 319 307 304 322 310 307 325 313 310 328 316 313 331 319 316 334 322 319 337 325 322 340 328 325 343 331 328 346 334 331 349 337 334 352 340 337 355 343 340 358 346 343 361 349 346 364 352 349 367 355 352 370 358 355 373 361 358 376 364 361 379 367 364 382 370 367 385 373 370 388 376 373 391 379 376 394 382 379 385 382 388 385 391 388 394 391 394

AUGUST AUGUST AUGUST 29 - JANUARY 29 29 - JANUARY - JANUARY 31 31 31 CONDENSATION CONDENSATION CONDENSATION

september
0 0 0

august

16 12

1 4 7 10 13 16 19 22 25 28 31 34 37 40 43 46 49 52 55 58 61 64 67 70 73 76 79 82 85 88 91 94 97 100 103 106 109 112 115 118 121 124 127 130 133 136 139 142 145 148 151 154 157 160 163 166 169 172 175 178 181 184 187 190 193 196 199 202 205 208 211 214 217 220 223 226 229 232 235 238 241 244

20

40

16

1 4 7 10 13 16 19 22 25 28 31 34 37 40 43 46 49 52 55 58 61 64 67 70 73 76 79 82 85 88 91 94 97 100 103 106 109 112 115 118 121 124 127 130 133 136 139 142 145 148 151 154 157 160 163 166 169 172 175 178 181 184 187 190 193 196 199 202 205 208 211 214 217 220 223 226 229 232 235 238 241 244 247 250 0

20

SUMATRA SUMATRA SUMATRA 80 SUMATRA DEWPOINT DEWPOINT 79F 79F HUMAN HUMAN NN COMFORT COMFORT 74F 70 74F 20 20

80

april
march march march

SUMATRA SUMATRA80 DEWPOINT DEWPOINT DEWPOINT N 79F 79F 79F N HUMAN 20 HUMAN HUMAN COMFORT 70 COMFORT COMFORT 70 74F 1620 74F 74F 16 12
8 12
60 60

80

Deforested area
NYC NYC

40 0 40

30 30 Avg-NYC Avg=NYC 20 20 Avg-NYC Avg-NYC Avg=NYC Avg=NYC

70

june

Poly. (Avg-NYC) Poly. Poly. (Avg-NYC) (Avg-NYC) Poly. (Avg=NYC) Poly. Poly. (Avg=NYC) (Avg=NYC)

60

ENVIRONMENTAL COMPARISON:

48

40

40 40

48 4
50 50 50

10 10

N
20

N
20
0

HUMIDITY
JANUARY 1 - JUNE 10 CONDENSATION JANUARY 1 - JUNE 10 CONDENSATION JUNE 11 - AUGUST 28 NO CONDENSATION JUNE 11 - AUGUST 28
120

70

AVERAGE DAILY TEMPERATURE NYC VS SUMATRA16 12 13 MONTHS

NYC NYC NYC

30

30 30

100

SUMATRA 80%

1 4 7 10 13 16 19 22 25 28 31 34 37 40 43 46 49 52 55 58 61 64 67 70 73 76 79 82 85 88 91 94 97

JANUARY 1 - JU CONDENSAT

Av

Av

Po

Po

NO CONDENSATION

Av

Av

Po

Po

08 11

Prof: Lot-Ek Partner: Anne Baker Core III - Housing Studio

D. 71
Our first iteration of the housing unit and aggregation on the site. We expanded the aggregation into the fabric of NYC.

Tropical Harlem: Capturing Weather


Unit Propagation into the Site Context Volumetric Propagation into the Site Context
in juxtaposition to the inputs and outputs of human living (this is first and foremost a housing project), we can find some overlaps where energy exchange could be beneficial to both major programs. We aim to find solutions in which the project could be self-sustaining through harnessing by-products of existing infrastructures here in the city, such as compost, trapped subway heat, heat island effect, shower steam, etc. We are very conscious of these infrastructures and postulate that there is enough power to maintain the climactic equilibrium needed for these plants, or could produce so much power that it overflows and can give some of it to its neighbors and then also just "let off some steam" to the air. I suspect that perhaps thinking of the project as a cogeneration plant whose byproducts are the fundamental requirements for housing and this oil palm growth could be a productive exploration. On a larger philosophical scale, our goals for the project - to be a climate which is almost overly-abundant, which would be wasteful if it were not a positive source of energy, and to be a place full of life and health for the people who experience it, have provoked us to want the external membrane of the architecture to be porous, immaterial, and somewhat open to the environment of NYC. We do not want to "hermetically seal" or shrink-wrap our Indonesian tropical environment within a bubble, but want the two environments to dynamically engage each other, ideally in a way which provides useful energy for the project and its surroundings. We are currently looking at air curtain technologies as a way to provide an environmental barrier without the effect of a hermetic seal around the entire project. To give you some context, this move for openness and porosity was partially inspired by a place called the Blue Lagoon in Icelend; a natural hot spring which emerges from natural lava formations and has been used for a long time as a health spa; it is essentially a very warm and mineral-rich lake which 71 Capturing Weather

Study Model of Site

72 Capturing Weather

D. 73
The initial iteration is composed is several parts, the manipulated plane as the plantation, housing units in the canopy, and enclosure to separate climates. The space underneath the plane would occupy space to be programmed for the neighborhood.

Study Drawing: Envelope to Mediate the Sumatran Environment with New York City
opens unto the cold environment, steaming up into the sky. It's a beautiful experience to us because the collision of hot and cold, and the feeling of abundance and guiltless freedom of the elements is very powerful and a way to combat what I see to be a growing sense of guilt and paranoia that we sometimes feel about energy today. We believe that the approach of asceticism, restraint, and feeling of scarcity toward energy use is affecting humanity deeply in our relationship to the natural world. I think that many people have internalized our environmental crisis to the point where they feel morally incapable of exerting creative energy on the world around them, afraid of using any resources for the goal of expression, even to the point where many feel guilty about existing at all, as if they are no longer worth the resources they must consume to live, much less to thrive and prosper. As an artificial growing operation, we want to harness overproduction of energies latent in the artificial landscape of New York City to provide transformative abundance to put toward growing these trees and housing people in a way which doesn't leech energy from these systems but gives back to them generously.

73 Capturing Weather

D. 74
The building breathes to regulate the temperature and humidity of the green house. In the closed state, steam and heat is trapped inside to reach the optimal levels for growing oil palm.

74 Capturing Weather

Building in Closed State

D. 75
The plantation will have an oasis character to juxtapose the feel of the city. Steam is an important component to regulate temperature, humidity, and solar exposure.

Housing Units Inhabit the Volume Below the Palm Canopy

75 Capturing Weather

D. 76
Open and closed states of the proposal for climate control behaves much like the Blur Building: signifying wind direction and allowing the building to occupy beyond its footprint.

76 Capturing Weather

Operable Envelope (Open v Close) to Regulate the Internal Environment

D. 77
Using natural materials for both the housing units and the artificial trees, we do not want to create a huge distinctions between the natural and man-made.

Housing Units Attach to Mechanical Tree Structure

77 Capturing Weather

Multiple unit assemblies need are arranged so that the differences in height from unit to unit allows for enough internal headspace.

The studio which utilizes only one unit, is the most abundantly used scheme for the project.

Config 1_A3 Config 1_A3 Config 1_A3

Config 1_E1 Config 1_E1 Config 1_E1

Config 1_C1

Config 1_F2

Config 2_D1

0_G Config 0_GConfig Config 0_G Config 1_D4 Config 1_D4 Config 1_D4
Config 2_D1

Config 2_I1

Config 1_C1 Config 1_B4

Config 1_A2 Config 1_F1 Config 1_A2 Config 1_A2

Config 1_F2

Config 2_I1

Config 2_C2 Config 2_H1

0_F Config 0_FConfig Config 0_F

Config 0_M Config 0_M Config 0_M

Config 1_B4 Config 1_A3

Config 1_E1 Config 1_F1

Config 2_C2

Config 0_G Config 1_E1 Config 1_D4

Config 1_D3 Config 1_D3 Config 1_D3


Config 2_C1 Config 1_A3 Config 1_A2

Config 2_H1 Config 2_G1

78 Capturing Weather studio 118 interior sf 0_E Config 0_EConfig Config 0_E 0-236 exterior sf 229 assemblies
Config 0_G Config 0_F

0_L Config 0_L Config Config 0_L


Config 0_M

Config 1_B3 Config 1_B3 Config 1_B3


1 bedroom 236 interior sf 0-118 exteriorConfig sf 1_D4 Config 1_D3 71 assemblies
Config Config1_C1 1_C1 Config1_F2 1_F2 Config Config 2_C1

Config Config2_D1 2_D1 Config 2_G1

Config 1_A2 Config 1_B3

Config 2_F1 Config 2_B2

Config 0_L Config 0_F Config 0_E Config 0_M

Config 1_D2 Config 1_D2 Config 1_D2


Config Config1_B4 1_B4 Config 1_D3 Config 1_B2 Config 1_B2 Config Config 1_D2 1_B2 Config1_F1 1_F1 Config

0_D Config 0_DConfig Config 0_D


Config 0_D Config 0_E

0_K Config 0_KConfig Config 0_K


Config 0_L Config 0_K

Config Config2_C2 2_C2 Config 2_F1 Config 2_B2

Config 1_B3 Config 1_B2

Config Config1_A3 1_A3

Config 1_E1 Config 1_E1 Config 2_B1

Config 2_E1

Config 0_C

Config 0_J

Config 1_D2 Config 1_D1 Config 1_B2 Config 1_B1

0_C Config 0_CConfig Config 0_C

Config 0_D

0_J Config 0_J Config Config 0_J

Config0_G 0_G Config Config 0_K

Config 1_D1 Config 1_D1 Config 1_D1 Config 1_B1 Config 1_B1 Config 1_B1
Config Config1_A2 1_A2 Config 2_B1 Config1_D4 1_D4 Config Config 2_A1

Config Config2_C1 2_C1 Config 2_E1 Config 2_D2

Config 0_B Config 0_C

Config 0_I Config 0_J Config0_F 0_F Config Config 1_A1 Config0_M 0_M Config Config 1_B1

Config 1_D1 Config 1_C2

0_B Config 0_BConfig Config 0_B

Config 0_A Config 0_B

0_I Config 0_I Config Config 0_I

Config 0_H Config 0_I Config0_L 0_L Config Config 1_A1 Config0_E 0_E Config Config 1_C2

Config1_D3 1_D3 Config Config Config1_B3 1_B3 Config 2_A1

Config 2_D2 Config Config2_B2 2_B2

Config 1_A1 Config 1_A1 Config 1_A1

Config 1_C2 Config 1_C2 Config 1_C2


Config1_D2 1_D2 Config

Config 0_A

Config 0_H

0_A Config 0_AConfig Config 0_A

0_H Config 0_HConfig Config 0_H Config Config0_D 0_D

Config0_K 0_K Config

Config Config1_B2 1_B2 Config Config2_B1 2_B1

Studio 118 interior sf 0 - 236 exterior sf 229 units


+

Config0_C 0_C Config

Config0_B 0_B Config

1 Bedroom Config 0_J Config 0_J 236 interior sf 0 - 118 exterior sf 71 units
Config0_I 0_I Config

Config1_D1 1_D1 Config + Config Config1_B1 1_B1

2 Bedrooms 354 interior sf 0 - 118 exterior sf 48 units


+

Studio 118 interior sf 0 - 236 exterior sf 229 units

Config Config0_A 0_A

1 Bedroom 236 interior sf 0 - 118 exterior sf Config0_H 0_H Config 71 units

Config Config1_A1 1_A1

Config1_C2 1_C2 Config

2 Bedrooms 354 interior sf 0 - 118 exterior sf 48 units

Config Config2_A1 2_A1

++ Studio Studio Studio 118 118 interior sf sf 118interior interior sf

++ 1 1 Bedroom 1Bedroom Bedroom 236 236 interior sf sf 236interior interior sf

Config 2_H1 Config 2_H1

D. 79
Config 1_C1

Config 1_F2

Config 2_D1

Config 2_I1

Assembling the units to create four housing types is further manipulated through adjacencies.

Config 2_C1 Config 2_C1


1_C1 Config 1_B4 Config 1_C1 Config 1_C1 Config 1_F1 Config 1_F2 Config 1_F2 Config 1_F2

Config 2_G1 Config 2_G1


Config 2_D1 Config 2_C2 Config 2_D1 Config 2_D1 Config 2_I1 Config 2_I1 Config 2_H1 Config 2_I1

Config 3_C1 Config 3_C1

Config 1_A3 Config 1_B4 Config 1_B4 Config 1_B4

Config 1_E1 Config 1_F1 Config 1_F1 Config 1_F1

Config 2_C2 Config 2_C1 Config 2_C2 Config 2_H1 Config 2_G1 Config 2_H1 Config 2_H1

Config 1_A2 Config 1_A3

Config 1_D4 Config 1_E1 Config 1_E1 Config 1_E1

Config 2_C2

Config 3_C1

Config 3_E1 Config 3_E1

Config 2_B2 Config Config 1_A3 2_B2


Config 1_A3

Config 2_F1 Config 2_F1

onfig 1_F2 Config 1_F2

onfig 1_F2

2 bedrooms 354 interior sf Config 1_A2 0-118 exterior sf Config 1_B3 48 assemblies
Config 1_A2 Config 1_A2

Config 2_D1 Config 2_D1 Config 1_D3 Config Config 2_D1 1_D4 Config 1_D4 Config 1_D4

Config 2_I1 Config 2_I1 Config 2_I1

Config 2_C1 Config 2_C1 Config Config 2_B2 2_C1

Config 3_B2 Config 3_B2


Config 2_G1 Config Config 2_F1 2_G1 Config 2_G1

Unit Studies
Config 3_C1 Config 3_C1 Config 3_B2 3_C1 Config Config 3_E1

79 Capturing Weather

3 bedrooms 472 interior sf 0-236 exterior sf 7 assemblies

onfig 1_F1 Config 1_F1 Config 1_D2 Config 1_D3 Config 2_C2 Config 2_C2 Config Config 2_C2 1_D3 Config 1_D3 Config 2_H1 Config 2_H1 Config 3_E1 Config 2_F1 Config 2_B2 Config 2_E1 2_F1 Config 2_F1 Config 3_B2 Config 3_B1 Config 3_E1

onfig 1_F1 Config 1_B2 Config 1_B3

onfig 1_E1 Config 1_E1

Config 2_B1 Config 2_B1 Config 1_B3


Config 1_D1 Config 1_D2 Config 1_B1 Config 1_B2 Config 1_B2 Config 1_B2 Config 1_A1 Config 1_B1 Config 1_B1 Config 1_B1 Config 1_C2 Config 1_D1 Config 1_D1 Config 1_D1 Config 1_D2 Config 2_C1 Config Config1_D2 2_C1 Config 2_C1

Config 1_B3

Config 2_B1 Config 2_E1 Config Config 2_H1 2_E1 Config 2_B2 Config 2_B2

onfig 1_E1

Config 3_B1 Config 3_B1

Config 3_B2 Config 3_B2

Config 3_D2 Config 3_D2

Config 3_E1 Config 3_D2

onfig 1_D4 Config 1_D4

Config 2_G1 Config 2_G1 Config 2_B1 Config 2_G1 Config 2_A1 Config 2_B1 Config 2_B1

Config 2_D2 2_E1 Config 3_C1 Config Config 3_C1 Config 3_C1 Config 2_E1 Config 2_E1

Config 3_B1 Config 3_A1 Config 3_B1 Config 3_B1

Config 3_D2 Config 3_D1 Config 3_D2 Config 3_D2

onfig 1_D4

onfig 1_D3 Config 1_D3

Config 2_D2 Config 2_D2


Config 2_F1 Config 2_F1 Config 2_A1 Config 2_F1 Config 2_A1 Config 2_A1

Config 2_D2 Config 2_D2 Config 2_D2 Config 3_B2 Config 3_B2 Config 3_B2

Config 3_E1 Config 3_E1 Config 3_E1 Config 3_A1 Config 3_A1 Config 3_A1 Config 3_A1 Config 3_A1 Config 3_D1 Config 3_D1 Config 3_D1 Config 3_D1 Config 3_D1

onfig 1_D3

Config 2_A1 Config 2_A1


Config 1_A1 Config 1_A1 Config 1_A1

Config 2_B2 Config 2_B2 Config Config 2_B2 1_C2 Config 1_C2 Config 1_C2

onfig 1_D2 Config 1_D2

onfig 1_D2 Config 2_B1 Config 2_B1 Config 2_E1 Config 2_E1 Config 2_E1 Config 3_D2 Config 3_D2 Config 3_D2

Config 3_B1 Config 3_B1

onfig 1_D1 Config 1_D1

onfig 1_D1

1 Bedroom 236 interior sf 0 - 118 exterior sf 71 units 1 Bedroom 236 interior sf 1 Bedroom 0 118 exterior 1Bedroom 236 interior sf sf 71 units 236 interior sf sf 0 - 118 exterior 0 - units 118 exterior sf 71 71 units

Config 2_B1

Config 2_D2 Config 2_D2 Config 2_A1 Config 2_A1 Config 2_A1 Config 2_D2

2 Bedrooms 354 interior sf 0 - 118 exterior sf 48 units

Config 3_B1

3 Bedrooms 472 interior sf 0 - 236 exterior sf 7 units 3 Bedrooms 472 interior sf 3 Bedrooms 0 236 exterior 3Bedrooms 472 interior sf sf 7 units 472 interior sf sf 0 - 236 exterior 0 236 exterior sf 7units 7 units

onfig 1_C2 Config 1_C2

+ + +

+ + +

onfig 1_C2

2 Bedrooms Config 3_A1 354 interior sf 2 Bedrooms 0 118 exterior 2Bedrooms 354 interior sf sf 48 units 354 interior sf sf 0 - 118 exterior 0 - units 118 exterior sf 48 48 units

Config 3_A1 Config 3_A1

Config 3_D1 Config 3_D1 Config 3_D1

+ + +

2 Bedrooms + 2 Bedrooms 354 interior sf 354 interior sf


+

+
+

+ 3 Bedrooms 3 Bedrooms 472 interior sf 472 interior sf

D. 80
The final iteration included the creation of large artificial trees that became the structure for the housing units, the infrastructure conduit, and enclosure. The form of the plantation landscape allowed for a passage across the site and two spaces (one commercial and one hotel) at the uplifts.

80 Capturing Weather

Exploding the Layers to Expose the Relationships

D. 81
The plan cut at the housing units displays the internal avenues, and the vertical complexities.

Plan Cut at the Oil Palm Canopy

81 Capturing Weather

82 Capturing Weather

D. 83
The project has a clear separation of space for food production and space for the context.

Longitudinal Section

83 Capturing Weather

84 Capturing Weather

D. 85
The facade is ever changing as the building reacts to climates inside and outside of the building. We were very conscious of condensation at dew point and encouraged fogging as an element for the facade.

Longitudinal Elevation

85 Capturing Weather

The Book Is Dead


Studio II Christoph A Kumpusch Spring 2011 M.Arch I GSAPP

Studio

This exercise will explore the relational modalities of program-scaled and building-scaled elements and membranes study carrels, shelving system, signage, windows, building envelopes, and structural elements transforming them into new manifestations: collections of publics, collections of information, collections of light and view, collections of ideologies and civic engagements, collections of structured space. Utilizing methods developed in Analysis Assignment I, propose new transformations of at least one of the mid-town or branch libraries, and at least one noted precedent library (contemporary or his- torical), relating program-scaled collections of information with building-scale collections of structure and space.

Technology has altered our relationship with consuming literature. The computer screen has becoming the primary medium. This is evident in the number of magazines and newspapers that have become primarily internet based. What do we do then with the millions of books? This project aims to change the library into a factory to process books into new materials. I look at the physical attributes of books and explore what new things can be made.

Project

Project 5

Site

Mid-Manhattan Library 455 Fifth Ave New York, NY 10016

Program
Showroom Factory Storage Design Studios

Software
Rhino Grasshopper Photoshop Illustrator

E. 87
The proposed process of decomposing books. I examine the number of books processed daily, identifying and tagging books for posterity, storage, and decomposition.

Book Degradation Process to Output New Material

NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY BOOKS:20,402,004 BRANCHES: 87 BUDGET:$50,171,798 STAFF: 3,147

+18 in

Pre-Sorting (Identify book) 1. New Entry 2. Duplicate Entry 3. Valuable Entry Oversized Volumes Manual Handling 18in x 12in x 8in

MAX DAILY BOOK PROCESSING New Entry Duplicate Entry

600
*12 SCANNING MACHINES AT 300 PAGES PER BOOK

ROBOTIC BOOK SCANNING Quidenis Technology RBS TT A2+ Model

50 books/day @ 300 pg/book 2,000 pages/hr

+1

in

+8

in

ACCEPTED? YES NO

TEMPORARY STORAGE FOR CROSS REFERENCING AND EDITING (3 TO 6 MOS)

BARCODE TAGGING

1.SCAN FOR MARGINALIA 2.IDENTIFY MARGINALIA A. AUTHOR B. DATE C. PLACE D. REFERENCE 3. OVERLAY IN ORIGINAL DIGITAL ENTRY 4. TAG WITH IDENTIFICATION 5. INPUT IN MARGINALIA COMPEDIUM 6. MANUAL CHECK 1. ASSEMBLE DIGITAL 2. OPTIMIZE VOLUME 3. REFERENCE INTO CATALOG

1. DIMENSION LXWXD

2. MATERIAL A. COVER I. HARD II. PAPERBACK B. PAPER I NEWSPRINT II. BRISTOL III. BOOK IV. OFFSET V. BIBLE VI. MACHINE-FINISHED COATED VII. WOODFREE UNCOATED PAPER VIII. COATED FINE VIX. SPECIAL FINE

3. BINDING XII. TRADITIONAL CHINESE A. HISTORIC XIII. JAPANESE STAB I. COPTIC XIV. GIRDLE II. ETHIOPIAN XV. ANTHROPODERMIC III. LONG-STITCH BIBLIOPEGY IV. ISLAMIC V. WOODEN BOARD VI. LIMP VELLUM VII. CALF-BINDING VIII. PAPER CASE IX. IN-BOARD CLOTH X. CASED CLOTH XI. SECRET BELGIAN

B. MODERN I. OVERSEWING II. SEWING THROUGH III. DOUBLE-FAN ADHESIVE IV. DOUBLE WIRE V. COMB VI. VELOBIND VII. SPIRAL VIII. PROCLICK IX. ZIPBIND X. PERFECT XI. THERMAL XII. CARDBOARD ARTICLE

XIII. TAPE BINDING XIV. UNIBIND XV. SEWN XVI. STAPLING XVII. MAGAZINE 4. INK & PERCENTAGE A. B/W B. COLOR C. ILLUSTRATIONS

INDEX STORAGE LEVEL 1

SHOW ROOM

INDEX PULP STORAGE LEVEL 4

KRAFT PROCESS

INDEX PROCESS STORAGE LEVEL 3

PROCESSING COVER: 1. ASSEMBLE PAPER: 1.CUT INTO STRIPS 2. ASSEMBLE 3.DE-INK

INDEX PARTS STORAGE LEVEL 2

1. BELLY BAND 2. FLAP 3. ENDPAPER 4. BOOK COVER 5. TOP EDGE 6. FORE EDGE 7. TAIL EDGE 8. RIGHT PAGE 9. LEFT PAGE 10. GUTTER

E. 88
The project is dissected to expose the composition of the building.

88 The Book is Dead

Exploded Axonometric Drawings


The project takes the existing mid-manhattan library and guts all the interior material to leave the facade as a stand alone datum. The shell is then refilled to fulfill the new programming.

STUDIOS

The studios are located at the periphery, utilizing the window openings to condition space. The rhythm of these openings create a new composition of reflection and transparency.

SHOWROOM

A system of rails,columns, and secondary branches create a surface composed of book tiles. It occupies the ground floor and exhibits the adaptation of the book based on its materiality as an architectural element.

FACTORY

Following the process outlined in figure b, the factory follows a path of trolleys to organize, decompose, and store the books. Degradation is experienced through UV light exposure, and processing down to pages, strips, and pulp.

EXTERIOR/INTERIOR

The phenomenon of passing through the threshold of a building is to transition from exterior to interior. This project does not signify the existing building envelope as this threshold, but the studio spaces instead . This redefines the project largely as enclosure. The roof and walls do not need to contend with conditioning the interior, but mostly in controlling solar exposure and protection from weather.

CONTAINER

By examining the point by which volumes are transferred into the factory, a mechanized storage tower composed primarily of truck trailers. These trailers are transported into the space and organized based on material properties. Volumes will be slowly dematerialized emptying trailers. Several of the trailers can be converted into temporary studios for invited artists, designers, and architects. This is an answer to many issues of housing in New York.

BOOK OBJECTS

New objects are created at different stages of the books deterioration: full book, page, strips, and pulp. This will engage the designers of the studios as their main material for design. The showroom composed of book tiles showcases new products designed in-house.

89 The Book is Dead

E. 90
To monopolize on the physical attributes of books, the photographic mosaic technique aggregates the books as pixel to create a larger image. Anomalies to the rule set express a special spatial condition.

90 The Book is Dead

Image Mosaic Process Using Book Covers Figure Ground 100 Tiles
Original Rotate 90 Rotate 180 Unlimited Duplicates 3 Duplicate Spacing 30% Color Change

Figure Ground Original 2.5*Scalar Jump Rotate 90 (X)Module Replication/3 Rotate 180 30% Module Change 240 Tiles

Unlimited Duplicates 3 Duplicate Spacing 30% Color Change

Figure Ground 50% Module Change 100 Tiles

Original Rotate 90 Rotate 180

Unlimited Duplicates 3 Duplicate Spacing 30% Color Change

Figure Ground Original 10*Scalar Jump Rotate 90 (X)Module Replication/3 Rotate 180 30% Module Change 1000 Tiles

Unlimited Duplicates 3 Duplicate Spacing 30% Color Change

Figure Ground 50% Module Change 100 Tiles

Original Rotate 90 Rotate 180

No Duplicates No Duplicate Spacing 100% Color Change

Figure Ground 20*Scalar Jump (X)Module Replication Color Abstraction 1000 Tiles

Original Rotate 90 Rotate 180

No Duplicates No Duplicate Spacing 100% Color Change

Figure Ground Original 2.5*Scalar Jump Rotate 90 2x Module Replication Rotate 180 240 Tiles

1 Duplicates 10 Duplicate Spacing No Color Change

Figure Ground Original 30*Scalar Jump Rotate 90 (X)Module Replication/10Rotate 180 Rule Anomolies 1000 Tiles

1 Duplicates 10 Duplicate Spacing No Color Change

E. 91
New book prototypes in final presentation. The endof-the-year show exhibit. The class emphasized model making as a design process.

91 The Book is Dead

E. 92A
By using the process outlined in image c, I created a surface that can use the color qualities of books to assemble a larger image. The surface is employed as the showroom of new book products.

E. 92B
The surface will array thebooks to create a macro-image visible from afar.

92 The Book is Dead

Image Mosaic With Pixel Anomaly Applied to Book Product Showroom

Image Mosaic Showroom with Underlying Structure

93 The Book is Dead

AAS2232@COLUMBIA.EDU

v. Hank Byron vi. John Barnes vii. Luis Alarcon viii. Michael Georgopoulos ix. Steven Chou

14 ANTHONY ABEL SUNGA SP 2011 BOOK REINCARNATE

WEBSITE: G-C-LABS.COM
At first glance there is a certain utopian-ness to the present state of information distribution. The internet serves as a medium of endless freedom/access to information that is seemingly unrestricted. There is a sense of equality seemingly inherent with this with this limitless exchange. However, upon further investigation, there are many flaws with this structure of informational exchange. The main flaw takes shape through the idea of information overload, which directly effects informational literacy.

iv. Dan Luo

dan luo & anthony abel sunga

E. 94A
SELF-STORAGE

garrett traya & anthony abel sunga


BOOK REINCARNATE 15
ANTHONY ABEL SUNGA

I designed and organized the final class portfolio. It can be downloaded at g-ccompilation, layout, labs.com.

While it is being argued that the computer has rendered the book obsolete, the library of self-storage utilizes the tools of digital media to reconcile the analog tradition with the evolving digital era, bringing the book and the library back to life. The traditional analog system and the shelves in which they are traditionally organized are thus reinvented through the digital revolution

+ +

+ +
+ LONG + LONG + LONG

+ GYM

GROU + PLAY

ND + GARD

EN IC KITCH + PUBL EN HOOL ITIES ACTIV AURA + REST NT

+ AFTE

R-SC

HOOL

ITIES + AFTE ACTIV

R-SC

PUTE + COM

R/IN

TERN

ET ACCE

SS TION ENTA STAG

+ CULT INFO ER CENT

URAL

MUS

EUM

+ PRES

+ IMMI

GRAT

ION

MUN + COM

ITY

+ EXHI ES DENC

BITIO

G ERIN AL GATH G + + FORM GATHERIN L RMA INFO E N SPAC

-TERM

RESI

Y DENC

+ TEMP

ORAR

Y RESI

+ EVEN

T HALL

+ PERF

ANCE ORM

TRE THEA

+ GYM

GROU + PLAY

ND + GARD

EN IC KITCH + PUBL EN HOOL ITIES ACTIV AURA + REST NT

& interactivity
88 pgs 10 ch 2 ipads 95 mb

+ AFTE

R-SC

HOOL

ACTIV

R-SC ITIES + AFTE

PUTE + COM

R/IN

TERN

ET ACCE

SS TION ENTA

E STAG

+ CULT INFO ER CENT

URAL

MUS

EUM

+ PRES

+ IMMI

GRAT

ION

MUN + COM

ITY

BOOK REINCARNATE

x.

Yurika Sugimoto

II.

GSAPP CORE II SP 2011

BOOK REINCARNATE 17
ANTHONY ABEL SUNGA

II.

GSAPP CORE II SP 2011

This project is a reaction to the ever pressing issue of the digitization of the global book stock. This renders the physical book obsolete. The operative question is, "What do we do with the book?" BOOK REINCARNATE is a proposal to utilize the physical properties of books to create new products in an urban factory. It will work on these scales; the urban, building, and human. Issues of library re-programming, adaptive reuse, and sustainability are addressed.

April 26, 2011


Avery 115

FINAL REVIEW

+ +
-TERM -TERM + LONG

+ EXHI ES DENC

BITIO

G ERIN AL GATH G + + FORM GATHERIN L RMA INFO E N SPAC

-TERM

RESI

Y DENC

+ TEMP

ORAR

Y RESI

+ EVEN

T HALL

+ PERF

ANCE ORM

TRE THEA

+ GYM

GROU + PLAY

ND + GARD

EN IC KITCH + PUBL EN HOOL ITIES ACTIV AURA + REST NT

+ AFTE

R-SC

HOOL

R-SC ITIES + AFTE ACTIV

PUTE + COM

R/IN

TERN

ET ACCE

SS TION ENTA

E STAG

+ CULT INFO ER CENT

URAL

MUS

EUM

+ PRES

+ IMMI

GRAT

ION

MUN + COM

ITY

G ERIN AL GATH G + + FORM GATHERIN L RMA INFO E N SPAC BITIO + EXHI ES DENC

RESI

Y DENC

+ TEMP

ORAR

Y RESI

+ EVEN

T HALL

+18 in

THE URBAN CONTEXT

Book Deterioration
Beginning with the New York Public Libraries, volumes are collected and brought to the BOOK FACTORY located at the Mid-Manhattan Library: 455 5th Avenue New York, NY 10016-0118 This opens up valuable building stock available for neighborhood redevelopment. This aspect of the project is available for further speculation. What is the landscape of New York City if the library system digitizes and centralizes.
NEW Y0RK PUBLIC LIBRARY

ANCE ORM + PERF

TRE THEA

B00K

B00KS: 20,402,004 BRANCHES: 87 BUDGET: $50,171,798 STAFF: 3,147

MAXIMUM DAILY BOOK PROCESSING:


Pre-Sorting (Identify book) 1. New Entry 2. Duplicate Entry 3. Valuable Entry
Oversized Volumes:
Manual Handling 18in x 12in x 8in
in +12

600

*12 SCANNING MACHINES AT 300 PAGES PER BOOK

INDEX

1. New Entry

ROBOTIC BOOK SCANNING


Quidenis Technology RBS TT A2+ Model www.roboticbookscan.com

@ 300 pg/book 2,000 pages/hr Machine Dimension: 3ft x 3ft x 3.6ft Max Page Dimension: 1.2ft x 1.8 ft

50 books/day

1. ASSEMBLE DIGITAL 2. OPTIMIZE VOLUME 3. REFERENCE INTO CATALOG

BARCODE TAGGING TEMPORARY STORAGE FOR CROSS REFERENCING AND EDITING (3 TO 6 MONTHS)

2. Duplicate Entry

1.SCAN FOR MARGINALIA 2.IDENTIFY MARGINALIA A. AUTHOR B. DATE C. PLACE D. REFERENCE 3. OVERLAY IN ORIGINAL DIGITAL ENTRY 4. TAG WITH IDENTIFICATION 5. INPUT IN MARGINALIA COMPEDIUM 6. MANUAL CHECK

ACCEPTED? YES NO

1. DIMENSION L X W X D 2. MATERIAL A. COVER I. HARD II. PAPERBACK B. PAPER I NEWSPRINT II. BRISTOL III. BOOK IV. OFSET V. BIBLE VI. MACHINE-FINISHED COATED VII. WOODFREE UNCOATED PAPER VIII. COATED FINE VIX. SPECIAL FINE 3. BINDING A. HISTORIC I. COPTIC II. ETHIOPIAN III. LONG-STITCH IV. ISLAMIC V. WOODEN BOARD VI. LIMP VELLUM VII. CALF-BINDING VIII. PAPER CASE IX. IN-BOARD CLOTH X. CASED CLOTH XI. SECRET BELGIAN XII. TRADITIONAL CHINESE XIII. JAPANESE STAB XIV. GIRDLE XV. ANTHROPODERMIC BIBLIOPEGY (HUMAN SKIN) B. MODERN I. OVERSEWING II. SEWING THROUGH THE FOLD III. DOUBLE-FAN ADHESIVE IV. DOUBLE WIRE V. COMB VI. VELOBIND VII. SPIRAL VIII. PROCLICK IX. ZIPBIND X. PERFECT XI. THERMAL XII. CARDBOARD ARTICLE XIII. TAPE BINDING XIV. UNIBIND XV. SEWN XVI. STAPLING XVII. MAGAZINE 4. INK & PERCENTAGE A. B/W B. COLOR C. ILLUSTRATIONS (TEXT VS. ILLUSTRATION)

APPAREL

E-BOOK produced by GARRETT TRAYA & ANTHONY ABEL SUNGA

+ GYM

GROU + PLAY

ND + GARD

EN IC KITCH + PUBL EN HOOL ITIES ACTIV AURA + REST NT

R-SC + AFTE

HOOL

R-SC ITIES + AFTE ACTIV

R/IN PUTE + COM

TERN

ET ACCE

SS TION ENTA

E STAG

+ CULT INFO ER CENT

URAL

MUS

EUM

+ PRES

+8 in

NEW BOOK PRODUCT

Volume Transfer / Speculative Library Reprogram

SEED & PLANT & SEEDS


Interior Showroom

+ +
+ LONG-TER + LONG-TER + LONG-TER

+ GYM ND + PLAYGROU + GARDEN OOL OOL + AFTER-SCH ACCESS /INTERNET + COMPUTER + CULTURAL INFO G + FORMAL GATHERIN INFORMAL SPACE + EXHIBITION ES Y M RESIDENC Y RESIDENC + TEMPORAR + EVENT GATHERIN + G MUSEUM TION + PRESENTA STAGE ACTIVITIES + AFTER-SCH + PUBLIC KITCHEN

ACTIVITIES

NT + RESTAURA

ION + IMMIGRAT

TY CENTER

+ COMMUNI

There are 450,000 Terabytes of information in 1 gram of DNA. Our future depends on the concious collection and curation of the genetic information on which we depend for food. Climate change is causing us to intensivly continue the development of culivars (domesticated agrigultural crop species) which we can depend on given the different growing conditions of the future. Utilizing the local urban gardening demographic and and agricultural institutions and making available genes for widespread plant breeding practice is essential to our future adaptability.

+ IMMI

GRAT

ION

MUN + COM

ITY

+ EXHI ES DENC

G ERIN AL GATH G + + FORM GATHERIN L RMA INFO E N SPAC BITIO

RESI

Y DENC

+ TEMP

ORAR

Y RESI

T HALL + EVEN

ANCE ORM + PERF

TRE THEA

HALL

ANCE + PERFORM

THEATRE

BOOK RE-CONCEPTION
The building mediates between the conception of an authors work and the reception of his work by the masses. Conception occurs in the atrium which uses nature to filter out urban noise. The author's daily life is exposed as his works are removed from the bookshelf. Once these openings occur the author engages the public by holding books readings, books signing, and getting feedback, therefore exposing the process of materializing the last book.

THE SECRET LIBRARY


In the current environment where physical books aer in danger of becoming obsolete, this library project takes a stance that physical books should be treasured. They hold secrets that no other medium can hold. Where else can a reader gain insight into other readers insights other than through the margins of the book? The structure was designed to be amystical space, holder of these secrets, with chambers which act as stacks, housed within these towers. The circulation interweaves throughout the library so taht a person weaves and meanders through the towers to make his discoveries.

+ GYM ND + PLAYGROU + GARDEN OOL OOL + AFTER-SCH ACCESS /INTERNET + COMPUTER + CULTURAL INFO G + FORMAL GATHERIN INFORMAL SPACE GATHERIN + G MUSEUM TION + PRESENTA STAGE ACTIVITIES + AFTER-SCH + PUBLIC KITCHEN

ACTIVITIES

NT + RESTAURA

ION + IMMIGRAT

TY CENTER

+ COMMUNI

+ +
+ LONG-TER

+ EXHIBITION ES Y Y RESIDENC + TEMPORAR + EVENT

HALL

M RESIDENC

ANCE + PERFORM + GYM ND + PLAYGROU + GARDEN OOL OOL + AFTER-SCH ACCESS /INTERNET + COMPUTER + CULTURAL INFO MUSEUM ACTIVITIES + AFTER-SCH + PUBLIC

THEATRE

KITCHEN

ACTIVITIES

NT + RESTAURA

TION + PRESENTA

STAGE

ION + IMMIGRAT

TY CENTER

G + FORMAL GATHERIN INFORMAL SPACE + EXHIBITION ES GATHERIN + G

+ COMMUNI

Y RESIDENC + TEMPORAR

+ EVENT

HALL

M RESIDENC

ANCE + PERFORM

THEATRE

+ GYM ND + PLAYGROU + GARDEN OOL OOL + AFTER-SCH ACCESS /INTERNET + COMPUTER + CULTURAL INFO G + FORMAL GATHERIN INFORMAL SPACE + EXHIBITION ES Y Y RESIDENC + TEMPORAR + EVENT GATHERIN + G MUSEUM TION + PRESENTA STAGE ACTIVITIES + AFTER-SCH + PUBLIC KITCHEN

ACTIVITIES

NT + RESTAURA

ION + IMMIGRAT

TY CENTER

+ COMMUNI

HALL

M RESIDENC

ANCE + PERFORM

THEATRE

94 The Book is Dead

The Interactive E-book During Endof-Year Show

a compendium of 10 libraries
CORE II

PROFESSOR CHRISTOPH a KUMPUSCH


i. Alison Lugrin ii. Anthony Abel Sunga iii. Brian Lee iv. Dan Luo v. Hank Byron vi. John Barnes vii. Luis Alarcon viii. Michael Georgopoulos ix. Steven Chou x. Yurika Sugimoto
GSAPP
COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

SPRING 2011

INTERACTIVE E-BOOK
G-C-LABS.COM

garrett traya & anthony abel sunga


BOOK REINCARNATE
15

compilation, layout, & interactivit


II.

+
+

THE CONFUSION
Is this a landmark that demarcates the ambiguous zone between SOHO and Chinatown? Is this a manifestation of the gentrification within that urban context? The readers wrapped within the stacks of the library find themselves moving restlessly along the belt in search for a peaceful reading space. Yet they were disturbed/calmed by the noise of the public events inside the library as well as the visitors beyond the enveloping stacks. Some of the diagrids in which they thought would be shelves for books turn out to be windows to the public sphere. Is the building connecting the library once again to the public sphere? Is the library making a distinction between the reader and the public? +

LIBRARY OF NOWHERE
This project is a reaction to the ever pressing issue of the digitization of the global book stock. This renders the physical book obsolete. The operative question is, "What do we do with the book?" BOOK REINCARNATE is a proposal to utilize the physical properties of books to create new products in an urban factory. It will work on these scales; the urban, building, and human. Issues of library re-programming, adaptive reuse, and sustainability are addressed.

BOOK REINCARNATE
ANTHONY ABEL SUNGA

II.

GSAPP CORE II SP 2011

17

BOOK REINCARNATE
ANTHONY ABEL SUNGA

GSAPP CORE II SP 2011

+ +

PHYSICAL WHERE; DIGITAL WHERE


How would we define a boundary? By physical limit or digital access? Is library space to host the book or the coverage with access to the resources? Today, the wireless technology would offset the digital boundary away from the physical space, and the project is a investigation into the collapse and offset of the two boundaries.

+18 in

LIBRARY OF LIGHT
The Library of Light is situated within an actively evolving and transforming urban area within downtown New York City. As with all urban sites undergoing rapid change, chasms within the socio-economic and cultural fabric begin to emerge as swaths of the urban landscape move towards establishing a new equilibriumtowards a coalescence of identity embodying a dimension of 'community.' These urban fissures are reified in absencein the empty space created by the light-well...a crack through the center of the Library, dually seeking to further fracture internal space to propagate the light, as well as reach a resolution and cohesion to unite spatial pockets into larger fields.

CORE II: AVERY 500N


i. Alison Lugrin ii. Anthony Abel Sunga

B00K

Touch student name or project title to visit work

THE URBAN FACTORY/ BOOK DECAY

THE URBAN CONTEXT

Book Deterioration
Beginning with the New York Public Libraries, volumes are collected and brought to the BOOK FACTORY located at the Mid-Manhattan Library: 455 5th Avenue New York, NY 10016-0118 This opens up valuable building stock available for neighborhood redevelopment. This aspect of the project is available for further speculation. What is the landscape of New York City if the library system digitizes and centralizes.
NEW Y0RK PUBLIC LIBRARY
B00KS: 20,402,004 BRANCHES: 87 BUDGET: $50,171,798 STAFF: 3,147

MAXIMUM DAILY BOOK PROCESSING:


Pre-Sorting (Identify book) 1. New Entry 2. Duplicate Entry 3. Valuable Entry
Oversized Volumes:
Manual Handling 18in x 12in x 8in
+12 in

600

*12 SCANNING MACHINES AT 300 PAGES PER BOOK

INDEX

1. New Entry

ROBOTIC BOOK SCANNING


Quidenis Technology RBS TT A2+ Model www.roboticbookscan.com

@ 300 pg/book 2,000 pages/hr Machine Dimension: 3ft x 3ft x 3.6ft Max Page Dimension: 1.2ft x 1.8 ft

50 books/day

1. ASSEMBLE DIGITAL 2. OPTIMIZE VOLUME 3. REFERENCE INTO CATALOG

BARCODE TAGGING TEMPORARY STORAGE FOR CROSS REFERENCING AND EDITING (3 TO 6 MONTHS)

2. Duplicate Entry

1.SCAN FOR MARGINALIA 2.IDENTIFY MARGINALIA A. AUTHOR B. DATE C. PLACE D. REFERENCE 3. OVERLAY IN ORIGINAL DIGITAL ENTRY 4. TAG WITH IDENTIFICATION 5. INPUT IN MARGINALIA COMPEDIUM 6. MANUAL CHECK

ACCEPTED? YES NO

1. DIMENSION L X W X D 2. MATERIAL A. COVER I. HARD II. PAPERBACK B. PAPER I NEWSPRINT II. BRISTOL III. BOOK IV. OFSET V. BIBLE VI. MACHINE-FINISHED COATED VII. WOODFREE UNCOATED PAPER VIII. COATED FINE VIX. SPECIAL FINE 3. BINDING A. HISTORIC I. COPTIC II. ETHIOPIAN III. LONG-STITCH IV. ISLAMIC V. WOODEN BOARD VI. LIMP VELLUM VII. CALF-BINDING VIII. PAPER CASE IX. IN-BOARD CLOTH X. CASED CLOTH XI. SECRET BELGIAN XII. TRADITIONAL CHINESE XIII. JAPANESE STAB XIV. GIRDLE XV. ANTHROPODERMIC BIBLIOPEGY (HUMAN SKIN) B. MODERN I. OVERSEWING II. SEWING THROUGH THE FOLD III. DOUBLE-FAN ADHESIVE IV. DOUBLE WIRE V. COMB VI. VELOBIND VII. SPIRAL VIII. PROCLICK IX. ZIPBIND X. PERFECT XI. THERMAL XII. CARDBOARD ARTICLE XIII. TAPE BINDING XIV. UNIBIND XV. SEWN XVI. STAPLING XVII. MAGAZINE 4. INK & PERCENTAGE A. B/W B. COLOR C. ILLUSTRATIONS (TEXT VS. ILLUSTRATION)

APPAREL

NEW BOOK PRODUCT

88 pgs 10 ch 2 ipads 95 mb

+8 in

ii.

DYSTOPIA: the library of literacy


+ At first glance there is a certain utopian-ness to the present state of information distribution. The internet serves as a medium of endless freedom/access to information that is seemingly unrestricted. There is a sense of equality seemingly inherent with this with this limitless exchange. However, upon further investigation, there are many flaws with this structure of informational exchange. The main flaw takes shape through the idea of information overload, which directly effects informational literacy.

iii. Brian Lee iv. Dan Luo v. Hank Byron vi. John Barnes vii. Luis Alarcon viii. Michael Georgopoulos ix. Steven Chou

Volume Transfer / Speculative Library Reprogram

Interior Showroom

14 ANTHONY ABEL SUNGA SP 2011 BOOK REINCARNATE

AAS2232@COLUMBIA.EDU

SELF-STORAGE

While it is being argued that the computer has rendered the book obsolete, the library of self-storage utilizes the tools of digital media to reconcile the analog tradition with the evolving digital era, bringing the book and the library back to life. The traditional analog system and the shelves in which they are traditionally organized are thus reinvented through the digital revolution

+ +

+ +
+ LONG-T + LONG-T + LONG-T ERM

+ GYM + PUBLIC + PLAYGR OUND + GARDEN IES AFTER-S ACTIVIT + CHOOL IES ACTIVIT KITCHE

+ RESTAU

RANT

CHOOL + AFTER-S

ERNET + COMPU TER/INT

ACCESS M TATION + PRESEN

STAGE

+ CULTUR INFO NITY

AL MUSEU

+ IMMIGR

ATION

CENTER

+ COMMU

+ EXHIBIT NCES

INFORM SPACE ION

L GATHER + ING + FORMA GATHER AL

ING

RESIDE

NCY

ARY + TEMPOR

RESIDE

+ EVENT

HALL

+ PERFOR

MANCE

THEATR

+ GYM + PUBLIC + PLAYGR OUND + GARDEN IES AFTER-S ACTIVIT + CHOOL IES ACTIVIT KITCHE

+ RESTAU

RANT

CHOOL + AFTER-S

ERNET + COMPU TER/INT

ACCESS M TATION + PRESEN

STAGE

+ CULTUR INFO NITY

AL MUSEU

+ IMMIGR

ATION

CENTER

+ COMMU

BOOK REINCARNATE

x.

Yurika Sugimoto

This project is a reaction to the ever pressing issue of the digitization of the global book stock. This renders the physical book obsolete. The operative question is, "What do we do with the book?" BOOK REINCARNATE is a proposal to utilize the physical properties of books to create new products in an urban factory. It will work on these scales; the urban, building, and human. Issues of library re-programming, adaptive reuse, and sustainability are addressed.

April 26, 2011


Avery 115

FINAL REVIEW

+ +
ERM + LONG-T ERM

+ EXHIBIT NCES

INFORM SPACE ION

L GATHER + ING + FORMA GATHER AL

ING

ERM

RESIDE

NCY

ARY + TEMPOR

RESIDE

+ EVENT

HALL

+ PERFOR + GYM

MANCE

THEATR

+ PUBLIC + PLAYGR OUND + GARDEN IES AFTER-S ACTIVIT + CHOOL IES ACTIVIT

KITCHE

+ RESTAU

RANT

CHOOL + AFTER-S

ERNET + COMPU TER/INT

ACCESS M TATION + PRESEN

STAGE

+ CULTUR INFO NITY

AL MUSEU

+ IMMIGR

ATION

CENTER

+ COMMU

+ EXHIBIT NCES

INFORM SPACE ION

L GATHER + ING + FORMA GATHER AL

ING

RESIDE

NCY

ARY + TEMPOR

RESIDE

+ EVENT

HALL

+ PERFOR

MANCE

THEATR

E-BOOK produced by GARRETT TRAYA & ANTHONY ABEL SUNGA

+ GYM + PUBLIC + PLAYGR OUND + GARDEN IES AFTER-S ACTIVIT + CHOOL IES ACTIVIT KITCHE

+ RESTAU

RANT

CHOOL + AFTER-S

ERNET + COMPU TER/INT

ACCESS M TATION + PRESEN

STAGE

+ CULTUR INFO NITY

AL MUSEU

SEED & PLANT & SEEDS

There are 450,000 Terabytes of information in 1 gram of DNA. Our future depends on the concious collection and curation of the genetic information on which we depend for food. Climate change is causing us to intensivly continue the development of culivars (domesticated agrigultural crop species) which we can depend on given the different growing conditions of the future. Utilizing the local urban gardening demographic and and agricultural institutions and making available genes for widespread plant breeding practice is essential to our future adaptability.

+ IMMIGR

ATION

CENTER

+ COMMU

+ EXHIBIT NCES

INFORM SPACE ION

L GATHER + ING + FORMA GATHER AL

ING

RESIDE

NCY

ARY + TEMPOR

RESIDE

+ EVENT

HALL

+ PERFOR

MANCE

THEATR

BOOK RE-CONCEPTION
The building mediates between the conception of an authors work and the reception of his work by the masses. Conception occurs in the atrium which uses nature to filter out urban noise. The author's daily life is exposed as his works are removed from the bookshelf. Once these openings occur the author engages the public by holding books readings, books signing, and getting feedback, therefore exposing the process of materializing the last book.

THE SECRET LIBRARY


In the current environment where physical books aer in danger of becoming obsolete, this library project takes a stance that physical books should be treasured. They hold secrets that no other medium can hold. Where else can a reader gain insight into other readers insights other than through the margins of the book? The structure was designed to be amystical space, holder of these secrets, with chambers which act as stacks, housed within these towers. The circulation interweaves throughout the library so taht a person weaves and meanders through the towers to make his discoveries.

E. 95B
g-c-labs.com Dan Luo and I worked collaboratively to design and code the class website.

g-c-labs.com

95 The Book is Dead

E. 96
Exposing the structural reinforcement and its relationship to the studio spaces

96 The Book is Dead

Section Cut at Existing Facade Offices

E. 97
The internet has killed the book, consequently the library has disappeared with it. The library of the future will evolve into processing plants to transform the book into something more useful.

Plan Cut at Factory Core

97 The Book is Dead

E. 98
The scheme is organized to have studio spaces connected to the factory core via catwalks.

98 The Book is Dead

View Into Factory With Storage Spaces in Background

S(Mines), L(Park)
Project 6
Studio 1 Joaquim Moreno Fall 2010 M.Arch I GSAPP

Studio

The studio is organized into four projects of increasing size and scope, atmosphere I-IV. Atmosphere I: Analyze ice melting, Atmosphere II: Water backpack, Atmosphere III: An human scale enclosure, Atmosphere IV: an air lab.

Atmosphere III is generated from looking at natural phenomena. I chose the site of the Naica mine which has the largest crystal formations found on earth. I propose to create a research pod that contends with the extreme temperature of the cave to research and map the delicate cave. Atmosphere IVs brief is to create an air laboratory in the Southstreet Seaport. Because of the neighborhoods needs, I propose to create a hybrid park and air laboratory.

Project

Atmosphere III: Naica Mine, Mexico Atmosphere IV: Southstreet Seaport, NYC

Site

Atmosphere III: Research equipment, trolley Atmosphere IV: air laboratory, park

Program

Software
Rhino Illustrator Photoshop

F. 101
The five day work schedule for scientists in the mine. Because of the temperature in the mine, work is scheduled in small intervals with short periods of rest in between.

ATMOSPHERE III: the cell


Scientist 5-day Work Schedule in the Naica Mine

15 minutes

movement

research rest

domestic

12 HOUR SS HI F

S UR URS SHIFTS 12 HO HO TH 12 U TS

S SHIFTS OUR 2H 1

FRI

MON

TU

WED

12 HOURS SH IFTS IFT SH S RS

ES

F. 102A
The mine is located in the province of Chihuahua, Mexico. To reach the bottom of the mine, the mine needs to be constantly pumped of water. The main cave for exploration, Cristales Cave is the largest cave in the whole system.

F. 102B
I have identified three prime users and responsibilities for the mine exploration. It outlines cam locations at three cams for every structure node.

102 S (Mine), L (Park)

Location of Naica Mine

Process for Laying Suspended Track for Research Modules

3-0
30
1. Inspector:
Tightens track connections. Tightens connection lines. Secures all aspects of track.

2. Installer:

Connects new sections of track. Secures track to cam with tensile lines. Each track point has 5 cam connection lines.

3. Scout:

Determines the optimal path for track. Installs cams to cave cracks and crevices. Feeds safety line.

3-

103 S (Mine), L (Park)

1.

2.

3.

F. 104
The research module follows along the suspended track to minimize environmental disturbance. The track was proposed to operate as a tourist attraction for the mine after the research has been completed.

F. 104
Our first semester presentation at GSAPP portended the fate of my colleagues and me for the next three years.

104 S (Mine), L (Park)

Research module

Final Presentation for Atmosphere IV

1. 2.

3. 4.

1.

I-Beam Track 5.7 lb/ft 3H x 2.33W

2. 3.

Exposed Electric Track Motor with Drive Wheel

4.

Brake Box

Temp and Humidity Control Breathing Mask

Tool Set Temp Regulation Suit

105 S (Mine), L (Park)

F. 106
The air lab needed to have flexible spaces to accommodate rotating research.

106 S (Mine), L (Park)

Ground Floor

East River

Conference Room

Labs Labs

Gym

Flex Lab Conference Room Lavatories

F. 107
To connect the park to the waters edge, the project climbs up at an ADA appropriate slope to clear the elevated highway.

ABEL SUNGA OLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Studies Final Iteration

AIR PARK

ext/Diagram

The neighborhood at Southstreet Seaport lacked any existing park space. I wanted to have the Air Lab serve the neighborhood by providing this program which consequently builds public support for the facility.

ATMOSPHERE IV: air lab


Peck Slip, the site of the lab and park in Southstreet Seaport.

107 S (Mine), L (Park)

ANTHONY ABEL SUNGA GSAPP, COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Context/Diagram Studies Final Iteration

AIR PARK

Study Concept

F. 108
Wheelchair accessibility not only involves the steepness of the ground, but all obstructions that could impede access. I mapped all the micro obstructions like curbs, public furniture, and building protrusions to better understand this population.

108 S (Mine), L (Park)

Micro Obstructions for Wheelchair Accessibility

WHEELCHAIR ACCESS NEW YORK CITY


WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE SUBWAY STATIONS
A C J Z 2 3 4 5
SIMPSON ST 233 ST GUN HILL RD INWOOD/ 207 ST 175 ST 168 ST 125 ST 59 ST/ COLUMBUS CIR

A C J Z 2 3 4 5
42 ST/ PORT AUTHORITY 34 ST/ PENN STA 14 ST W 4 ST/ WASHINGTON SQ
BROOKLYN

MAN

JAMAICA CENTER PARSONS/ ARCHER


THE BRONX MANHAT TAN

SUTPHIN BLVD/ ARCHER AVE/ JFK AIRPORT 72 ST

FLUSHING AVE

MARCY AVE

PELHAM PKWY

SIMPSON ST

135 ST

66 ST/ LINCOLN CTR


THE BRONX

59TH ST/ COLUMBUS CIR


MANHAT TAN

TIME

FORDHAM RD 3 AVE/ 149 ST

125 ST

LEXINGTON AVE

1. 1. 2.

2.

Curbs Signage, public furniture, and site elements Planting Fencing

3. 4.

PEOPLE IN WHEELCHAIRS LIVE IN NYC

3.

A .7 8 4 2

60,000

would mandate all taxicabs in New York City to be wheelchairaccessible by 2012.


4.

958
Accessibility complaints

There are 1,800 Access-A-Ride

100%
of city

The Ac

F. 109
The Southstreet Seaport subway station is not wheelchair accessible, which is typical of most NYC stations. This has led to many transportation issues for the mobility impaired.

Y southside seaport centered


FULTON ST (SOUTHSIDE SEAPORT)
MANHAT TAN BROOKLYN

NO WHEELCHAIR ACCESS
JAY ST/ BOROUGH HALL FRANKLIN AVE EUCLID AVE HOWARD BEACH/JFK AIRPORT

Wheelchair Accessible Stations to Southstreet Seaport

109 S (Mine), L (Park)

W 4 ST/ WASHINGTON SQ

W 4 ST/ WASHINGTON SQ

ROCKAWAY PARK BEACH/ 116 ST

NHAT TAN

CANAL ST

BROOKLYN BRIDGE/CITY HALL


MANHAT TAN BROOKLYN

CROWN HTS/ UTICA AVE COURT ST/ BOROUGH HALL ATLANTIC AVE CHURCH AVE FLATBUSH AVE/ BROOKLYN COLLEGE

ES SQ/ 42 ST

34 ST/ PENN STATION

CHAMBERS ST
MANHAT TAN

BROOKLYN

CROWN HTS/ UTICA AVE COURT ST/ BOROUGH HALL ATLANTIC AVE CHURCH AVE FLATBUSH AVE/ BROOKLYN COLLEGE

E/ 63 ST

GRAND CENTRAL/ 42 ST

14 ST/ UNION SQ

Fulton Street Station No Wheelchair Access

7,695
units in NYC public housing are retro tted for mobility impaired families out of 178,407 total units

ccess-A-Ride ridership record is 18,000 trips in a single day.

F. 110
The project creates a park by thrusting a folded plane upward to address the highway and reach the water front. The laboratory occupies the space underneath the lifted plane and occupies adjacent buildings for added space.

110 S (Mine), L (Park)

Elevated Park

Scientists Lounge

Scientists Garden

Air Lab

Water Retention

Air Lab & S

section 02

F. 111A
The statistics for mobilityimpaired people in NYC exposes the many deficiencies the city has for this population.

F. 111B
Using natural gravel filtration system for rain water retention, it will help to alleviate pollution problems for storm water runoff.

Peck Slip, the site of the lab and park in Southstreet Seaport.

The Composition and Material Study of the Park.

111 S (Mine), L (Park)

Conventional public housing in NYC Mobilityimpaired accessible public housing in NYC

60, 000
people in live in NYC
wheelchairs

Material Section

Stone Gabion Grey-Water Retention Puri ed Water Outlet Phytoremediation System Gravel

a.7842

Would mandate all NYC taxis to be wheelchair accessible by 2012

112 S (Mine), L (Park)

S (Mine), L (Park) 113 |

Rose Center for Earth and Space


Project 7
Architectural Technology IV David Wallace Fall 2011 M.Arch I GSAPP

Studio

The Tech IV class is structured to analyze an existing project. We were given the complete construction documents of our respective buildings and had to work in teams to create 3D models, analysis drawings, and renderings of the project.

Project

We analyzed the construction documents of the Rose Center for Earth and Space by Polshek Architects to understand the structural, enclosure, and programmatic techniques employed by the project.

Rose Center for Earth and Space, American Museum of Natural History, New York City

Site

partners:
Anne Baker Jen Eletto Jochen Hartmann Caroline Lebar

Program
Exhibition space Planetarium Support program

Software
Rhino Illustrator

G. 115
The projects narrative is an expression of a floating object, the orb, within a crystalline glass box. The building behaves as a display for those within.

Sphere within the Glass Box

10 ft

Its a marriage of architecture and science. Its the universe as the architects muse. Neil deGrasse Tyson, director of Hayden Planetarium

Challenged with the task of renovating the long neglected Hayden Planetarium adjoining the American Museum of Natural History, Polshek Partnership Architects reconceived the way science can be experienced through Polsheks design takes on a witty significance beyond this, however, that begins to speak to its success as a architecture. people-friendly destination. Apropos to its context in a museum complex, the planetarium itself becomes an Polsheks design for the Rose Center combines two platonic forms, a sphere within a cube, in a gesture that is exhibit, a building as artifact: If you look at the rest of the Natural History Museum, you see its a collection of at once universally accessible, monumental, and iconic. artifacts housed in suitable cases. Our scenario for this This deceptively simple form unfolds further layers of building was that a team of cosmic archeologists had significance and experience. The metal-paneled sphere gone on an expedition and brought back this sphere. It of the planetarium evokes the earth, the sun, and even was our job to provide the proper case, said Polshek molecular structure. To further manifest this metaphor,

Polshek Architects floated the sphere, placing it on a three-pointed support, so that, from any given viewing angle, it appears to be (impossibly) supported by one post (Fig. 3). The transparent purity of the water white glass walls places the globe in an otherworldly context, evoking a recognition of earth and space.

116 Rose Center for Earth and Space

One Bay of the Facade with Details


c

1.
a d

4.

2.

a. top of glass

5.

1.
Top of glass
g

7.

b. roof-truss connection at gutter

6.

Dead

c. typical four-point spider joint

3.

Stainle

Typical C

Dou

Stainless Steel Ridge Cap Laminated Glass Skylight Stainless Steel Standoff Stainless Steel Node Curtain Glass 2 dia Stainless Steel King Post Steel Gusset Plate Steel Plate Steel Tension Rod Steel Vertical Rod 8 Vertical Pipe

Laminated Glass Skylight W 6x15 Member Gutter Support

Laminated Glass Skylight W 6x15 Member Gutter Support

8 Diagonal Pipe

8 Diagonal Pipe

5/8 Gusset Plate

5/8 Gusset Plate

8 Vertical Truss Angled Pipe Horizontal Pipe

8 Vertical Truss Angled Pipe Horizontal Pipe

a. top of glass

b. roof-truss connection at gutter

b. roof-truss connection at gutter


Roof Plates Laminated Glass Skylight W 6x15 Member Gutter Support

Stainless Steel Ridge Cap Laminated Glass Skylight Stainless Steel Standoff Stainless Steel Node Curtain Glass 2 dia Stainless Steel King Post Steel Gusset Plate Steel Plate Steel Tension Rod Steel Vertical Rod 8 Vertical Pipe b. roof-truss connection at gutter

Oversize Hole Sleeved Connection Wind Load Connection Dead Load Hanger Rod

Oversize Hole Sleeved Connection Wind Load Connection Dead Load Hanger Rod

8 Diagonal Pipe

5/8 Gusset Plate


Dead Load Node

Dead Load Node

8 Vertical Truss Angled Pipe Horizontal Pipe


Glass Bolt Slotted Hole Dead & Wind Load Connection

Glass Bolt Slotted Hole Dead & Wind Load Connection

117 Rose Center for Earth and Space

a. top of glass

c. typical four-point spider joint


Roof Plates Laminated Glass Skylight W 6x15 Member Gutter Support

c. typical four-point spider joint


Stainless Steel Dead Load Rod

Stainless Steel Dead Load Rod Typical Cast S.S. Column Bracket 8 Painted Steel Pipe Truss 1/2 S.S.Glazing Tension Rod Four-Point Fitting S.S. Clevis 1-1/4 S.S. Steel Strut Cast S.S. Column Bracket 3/4 S.S. Terrazo Tension Rod 3/8 Epoxy S.S. Pin Joint Grout Fill Double Machined S.S. Plates Stainless Steel Clevis Cast S.S. Column Metal Flashing Bracket (Typ.) Grout Fill 3/4 dia. S.S. Rod

Oversize Hole Sleeved Connection Wind Load Connection Dead Load Hanger Rod

Typical Cast S.S. Column Bracket 8 Painted Steel Pipe Truss 1/2 S.S. Tension Rod Four-Point Fitting S.S. Clevis 1-1/4 S.S. Steel Strut Cast S.S. Column Bracket 3/4 S.S. Tension Rod S.S. Pin Joint Double Machined S.S. Plates Stainless Steel Clevis

8 Diagonal Pipe
Dead Load Node

5/8 Gusset Plate

Granite Base

8 Vertical Truss Angled Pipe Horizontal Pipe


Glass Bolt Slotted Hole Dead & Wind Load Connection

Cast S.S. Column Bracket (Typ.) 3/4 dia. S.S. Rod

b. roof-truss connection at gutter

c. typical four-point spider joint

d. typical wind truss

d. typical wind truss


Stainless Steel Dead Load Rod Typical Cast S.S. Column Bracket

Vapor Barrier
f. sealant detail

2.
Roof-truss connection at gutter

3.

Oversize Hole Sleeved Connection Wind Load Connection Dead Load Hanger Rod

4.
Typical

Typical four-point spider joint

8 Painted Steel Pipe Truss 1/2 S.S. Tension Rod Four-Point Fitting S.S. Clevis 1-1/4 S.S. Steel Strut windCast truss Enlarged S.S. Column Bracket

5.

6.
wind truss at Sealant detail

8 Vertical Truss Pipe 8 Pipe 4 Pin 1 Bearing Steel Cap

glass 3/4 S.S. Tension Rod


S.S. Pin Joint

fin

Dead Load Node

Double Machined S.S. Plates Stainless Steel Clevis Cast S.S. Column Bracket (Typ.)

Glass Bolt Slotted Hole d. typical windDead truss & Wind Load Connection

c. typical four-point spider joint


Stainless Steel Dead Load Rod Typical Cast S.S. Column Bracket 8 Painted Steel Pipe Truss 1/2 S.S. Tension Rod Four-Point Fitting S.S. Clevis 1-1/4 S.S. Steel Strut Cast S.S. Column Bracket 3/4 S.S. Tension Rod S.S. Pin Joint Double Machined S.S. Plates Stainless Steel Clevis Cast S.S. Column Bracket (Typ.) 3/4 dia. S.S. Rod

3/4 dia. S.S. Rod Architects Todd Schliemann. Indeed, the architects worked closely with the Rose Centers exhibition designers to integrate the educational components of the building fully into the overall experience. The spiraling ramp leading out of the sphere is both a circulation path as well as the Heilbrunn Cosmic Pathway, an exhibit of the 13 billion year history of the universe that makes this incomprehensible passage of time tangible by referring it to the experience of walking down the ramp.

steel torsional tube spirals downward along the geometry of the sphere, providing the main structure for the 1 Painted Truss cantilevered ramp.

Support Pedastal,

In order to realize these metaphoric and experiential qualities, the Rose Center required a sophisticated treatment of structure and enclosure. To minimize visible supports, the sphere rests on a truss system at its equator, which directs loads to the ground via three support points. This three-pointed system is inherently stable as well as elegant, since it enables most of the supports to remain out of the viewers frame of reference so that the sphere appears to be self-supported. The design of the spiraling ramp likewise minimizes visible supports in order to achieve a floating effect; a 30 wide

to Base Polshek Architects did not, however, treat allWelded structure as hidden or purely utilitarian. In fact, all of the cubes 8 Pipe structural frame and hardware details are exposed in Spacer, order to express the elegance of their performative 1/2 Steel functions. To enable the cubes transparency, a series of 10 Pipe Spacer, vertical trusses support the roof, and are each supported by a highly expressive pin connection. The effect is 1/2 Steel at once light and ephemeral, but also speaks to the 12 Pipe Spacer, technological and futuristic sensibility that Polshek has 1/2 Steel stated as a design intent. 1-1/2 Bolts Non-shrink The purity of the glass enclosure completes1-1/2 the execution Grout of the design concept. In order to achieve the continuous, g. column and pin assembly crystalline effect of the cube, the architects chose lowiron tempered glass panels suspended by a system of spider connections, and jointed with a clear sealant, thereby eliminating the need for mullions or for breaking

d. typical wind truss

118 Rose Center for Earth and Space the facade. From a distance, the spider joints and their suspension system dissolve from view, offering the experience of a pure, uninterrupted faade. Up close, the hardware recalls the expressive quality of the other structural elements, again pointing to the technological intentions of the architects. By selectively obscuring and revealing the structure of the Rose Center, Polshek Architects realized their concept to change the way a museum can be experienced through architecture. The structural treatment and overall design execution enables both a fully integrated learning experience, uninterrupted by excessive supports and building, and an expression of the museums metaphoric and iconic intentions. As the president of the American Museum of Natural History has said, It de-brick[s] science and make[s] it visible from the street. That transparency goes to the heart of our mission. By selectively obscuring and revealing the structure of the Rose Center, Polshek Architects realized their concept to change the way a museum can be experienced through architecture. The structural treatment and overall design execution enables both a fully integrated learning experience, uninterrupted by excessive supports and building, and an expression of the museums metaphoric and iconic intentions. As the president of the American Museum of Natural History has said, It de-brick[s] science and make[s] it visible from the street. That transparency goes to the heart of our mission. Foundation The cube is a steel structure with trusses that bear on concrete columns, grade beams, and pile caps, and friction piles with a minimum length of 10 driven into the relatively unstable soil on a site that was once backfill. Some of the piles and pile caps of the previous planetarium were used to support new columns, but most of the existing pile caps were removed so that new piles and caps could be laid. Enormous pile caps with clusters of 15-18 piles were built to support the structural system of the sphere, which will be discussed in the next section. The foundation slabs were built with lowered areas to incorporate exhibition equipment, and one slab was especially reinforced to hold the Willamette meteorite, a 15.5 ton iron meteorite installed at the base of the sphere in the Hall of the Universe. the cube and the existing building, is supported on concrete columns. The lateral loadresisting superstructure will be discussed in the section on enclosure. Heilbrunn Cosmic Pathway The Heilbrunn Cosmic Pathway, the spiral ramp that brings visitors from the lower theater to the Hall of the Universe, is a cantilevered ramp supported on a steel torsion tube with its own structural supports. The 30 diameter torsion tube, which had to be fabricated in sections and welded on-site, supports a vertical steel plate with a solid pipe at the top to create a taller, stiffer section and resist overturning (Fig. 9). The walkway cantilevers out from the torsion tube toward the sphere. The tube is supported on steel props that spring from the same footings as the sphere supports, and is additionally tied back to some of the sphere supports. The ramp travels one and a half times around the sphere as it descends to floor level, integrating a time scale exhibit into its length. Enclosure System The enclosure system for the cube is a point-supported glass curtain wall system that incorporates lateral loadresisting elements (Fig. 10-11). The glass, in 5x106 panels, is supported by machined steel spider fittings in two- and four-point configurations; these and the other enclosure details will be examined in the next section in more detail. The spider fittings support the dead load of the curtain wall and transmit it to the bent frames. Two panes of tempered glass make up each bay (Fig. 13). The four-point spider fittings are supported on vertical steel rods at the locations of the bent frames and at the mid-point of the bay, while all the fittings are connected to horizontal counterbalance rods that keep the fittings in the correct horizontal orientation. Smaller steel rods connect the ends of these counter-balance rods in a lateral load-resisting truss configuration referred to as a fish truss. The truss elements resist both pressure and suction and are connected through bolted elements to the bent frames. Additionally, a small rod running vertically connects the ends of the mid-bay counterbalance rods to keep these rods, which are the longest, at level.

At the ground, a different system of vertical glass fins takes the place of the fish trusses to prevent injury to visitors (Fig. 14). Solid tempered glass plates, or fins, are held in place at the base and top with glass bolts; the spider fittings attach to the edges of these fins rather than to the rods and trusses as above. Special enlarged fittings at the bent frame connection hold the rods that keep the tops of the glass fins in place. Superstructure At the roof, a skylight condition also necessitates a change in system. At the 90 level, The superstructure that forms the cube is supported by a series of bent frames built larger vertical kingpost rods take the load of the glass from the spider fittings and of steel pipes and gusset plates bolted in a truss configuration (Fig. 6); six frames run direct it down to the bent frames, which end at a lower elevation than the glass. Special in each of the north-south and east-west directions. Horizontal pipes connect these steel nodes at the peak of the skylight support both the top of the vertical glass panes frames at the 20, 50, and 80 levels. An even number of frames was chosen to create and the diagonal skylight panes. (See also the section on bridle fittings, pg. 10, Fig. 17) a clear center bay for optimal viewing of the sphere inside. The frames are held in place The lateral loads, picked up at the curtain wall and transmitted through the fittings and by large steel pin connections (Fig. 20 and Details section, pg. 11) that are bolted to the rods to the bent frames, are also resisted through tie-backs from the frames to the infill column supports of the subgrade structure. The rest of the infill superstructure, between construction at the slab level at certain points (Figs. 4 and 12). the cube and the existing building, is supported on concrete columns. The lateral loadresisting superstructure will be discussed in the section on enclosure. Details The enclosure details (Figs. 15-20) are some of the most important and complex Hayden Planetarium elements in the structure, since they serve multiple functions (gravity and lateral The superstructure that forms the cube is supported by a series of bent frames built load support) and are carefully detailed to be exposed to view. To avoid placing of steel pipes and gusset plates bolted in a truss configuration (Fig. 6); six frames run excessive strain on the glass, most elements had to allow a certain amount of rotation in each of the north-south and east-west directions. Horizontal pipes connect these or flexibility. All the elements had to be both functional and aesthetically pleasing, and, frames at the 20, 50, and 80 levels. An even number of frames was chosen to create usually, as minimal as possible to avoid obstructing the view through the glass. Certain a clear center bay for optimal viewing of the sphere inside. The frames are held in place elements, however, were enlarged or detailed to give the effect of massive structure. by large steel pin connections (Fig. 20 and Details section, pg. 11) that are bolted to the column supports of the subgrade structure. The rest of the infill superstructure, between

G. 119
The Rose Center combines two Platonic forms, the sphere and the cube, to evoke ideas of space, time, and scientific achievement. The patterned aluminum planetarium sphere alludes to the orb of the earth and the sun, molecular models, and architectural precedents like Boullees Cenotaph for Newton, while the glass curtain wall enclosure acts as a giant display case for this architectural conceit.

120 Rose Center for Earth and Space Spider Fittings The spider fitting (Fig. 15), as the element that accepts the dead load of the curtain wall as well as the initial wind load, was designed to be flexible as well as strong. The fitting has bilateral symmetry rather than the more common radial symmetry because the project engineers determined that this was a more efficient shape. The glass bolts that support the panels are connected by ribs to a machined steel ball node that fits into the counterbalance rod, and is able to rotate slightly like a ball-and-socket joint. This rotation was needed in order to allow the curtain wall to flex slightly and to provide rotational tolerances for installation. The upper arm of the fitting is also able to slide horizontally in a sleeve, again to allow for installation and later movement. air exhausts by rising to the roof where it is drawn off and exhausted. The purpose of using two systems displacement and an overhead mixed system is for efficiency, since only the lower areas of the atrium need to be conditioned; thus, creating a pool of cool air at the walkway level, and conditioning all the air below it, is all the conditioning required, resulting in two systems. Conditioning all the space with one or the other system would have been too difficult and expensive. The height of the atrium makes a displacement exhaust system feasible, as the warm air in summer will rise to the roof level.

Fire System A separate system is in place in case of fire, to provide rapid exhaust of smoke; in this Wind Trusses case, fresh air and supply air from all the units can be pumped into the atrium to clear it Two types of wind truss fittings (Fig. 18) that connect the fish trusses to the vertical steel quickly of smoke. pipes were designed to accept different amounts of load: the enlarged truss fitting at the lower level, and the standard fitting above. The fitting is in the shape of a threePlanetarium piece ring around the pipe member, and is attached with self-closing rivnuts rather Further, a separate mechanical system feeds the planetarium sphere (Fig. 23). The AC than with bolts to avoid having to cut hand access holes in the structural pipes. At the unit that supplies the sphere is located at the roof rather than in the mechanical room. upper levels, large numbers of rivnuts were used to attain the necessary strength of the The supply ductwork for the sphere enters through the second floor bridge, contained connection. The truss rods attach to the fitting with clips that allow some movement within the bridge. From there the supply air travels around the sphere and is exhausted. of the rods. Conclusion Bridle Fittings The Rose Center combines two Platonic forms, the sphere and the cube, to evoke At the skylight level, a special set of fittings helps support the glass above the level of ideas of space, time, and scientific achievement. The patterned aluminum planetarium the bent frames. A series of diagonal bridle rods connect to rounded triangular plates sphere alludes to the orb of the earth and the sun, molecular models, and architectural at the roof and 80 levels, which together provide additional support for the kingposts precedents like Boullees Cenotaph for Newton, while the glass curtain wall enclosure that support the skylight (Fig. 17). The bridle fittings act as tension members connecting acts as a giant display case for this architectural conceit. The architects concept the king posts to the highest horizontal pipe member of the bent frames. was to create an instantly recognizable icon for the museum that would draw in new visitors, while also serving as highly functional exhibition space to meet contemporary Pin Connection needs. While the other additions to the museums North Side, which were planned The pin connection that supports the bent frames, unlike the enclosure fittings, is simultaneously with the new planetarium, are in red brick to match the existing building, meant to give an impression of massive strength as well as lightness (Fig. 20). This the Rose Center was intended to be as transparent as possible. The architectural idea connection takes the form of two vertical steel plates, connected by hollow steel pipes thus serves the educational mission of the client and increases the museums visibility with decreasing diameters from bottom to top. The upper-most pipe is actually a through its hi-tech and allusive qualities. welded piece of the bent frame, and is locked into place by a solid machined steel pin capped at both ends. This assembly sits on a plate assembly that attaches with bolts to The positioning of the sphere within the box, as well as its apparent levitation and the the top of the structural column below, and is then grouted and covered with the finish floating qualities of its attendant curving ramp, are crucial to the projects success. floor. The hollow pipes that connect the two plates allow visitors to look through the By skewing the supporting legs for the sphere and ramp off-axis and out of sight, assembly, creating a structural tour-de-force of strength plus lightness. the design makes the sphere appear to float within its crystal enclosure. The ramps design reduces the structure necessary for its support and increases its visual impact. Additionally, the spheres positioning above the site of the pre-existing planetarium, in Atrium a nod to the previous building, creates space for exhibits beneath and around it. The The mechanical system for the Rose Center is complex, as could be expected for a glass curtain wall of the cube, supported on spider fittings and thin vertical trusses with building that works so hard to achieve clarity and openness and that must contend tension cables, is intended to function as a cosmic cathedral allowing in the maximum with pre-existing structure (Fig. 21). A mechanical room at the north part of the new amount of light through its exceptionally clear low-iron glass. structure holds the AC units (equivalent to AHUs) that supply the atrium, and receives fresh air intake from ground level to that location. From there, the supply ductwork for Overall, the architectural design of the Rose Center attempts to satisfy the demands of the atrium within the cube travels out at the second floor level, which is at grade for the contemporary museum for space that is both functional, able to accommodate the the new terrace above the parking garage to the east of the center, and at the level of latest technology in exhibits and demonstrations, and indexical, marking the museum the Scale Walk (the base of the cube). Ductwork provides supply air in a displacement as a cathedral of hi-tech and artistic endeavor. The floating sphere within the glass system to the Scale Walk from linear diffusers between the glass fins and at the cube, by stretching the limits of structural possibility and materials science, while walkway edge (Fig. 22), as well as overhead mixed air to the exhibition halls below invoking archetypal connotations with its form, meets these demands and more. from diffusers beneath the walkway. The ducts reach out in small fingers between the columns to the plenum within the walkway, and then upward and downward to the different distribution areas (Fig. 24). There are numerous different AC units to provide supply air to different parts of the atrium and to the support areas around it. The atrium

121 Rose Center for Earth and Space

Sky Light and In Gutter System

Point-Supporte Curtain Wall

Bent Frames (S Steel Pipes) Pin Connection


122 Rose Center for Earth and Space

1. 1.

2.
Ramp to Third Floor Sky Theater

Ramp to Third F

Sky Light and Integrated Gutter System

Sky Light and Integrated Gutter System Point-Supported Glass Curtain Wall

Sky Theater Big Bang Theater Big Bang Theat To Spiral Ramp To Spiral Ramp Sphere Tripod Supports Sphere Tripod S

Point-Supported Glass Curtain Wall

AC Unit 18

AC Unit 18

AC Unit 6 To Spiral Ramp Bent Frame (Structural Steel Pipes)

2.

Pin Connection to Steel Base

Bent Frames (Structural Steel Pipes) Pin Connection to 3.Steel Base

AC Unit 4

AC Unit 6 To Spiral Ramp AC Unit 4

Ramp to Third Floor Sky Theater Big Bang Theater To Spiral Ramp Sphere Tripod Supports

Torsion Tube (Ramp Structur Cantilevered W

Ramp Supports

AC Unit 18

Sky Theater Big Bang Theater To Spiral Ramp Sphere Tripod Supports

G. 123

(Ramp Structure) Cantilevered Walkway Ramp Supports

The exploded axonometric exposes the nesting strategy employed for the project.

AC Unit 18

Sixth Floor Fifth Floor Fourth Floor Third Floor Second Floor First Floor Front Entrance Below-Grade Parking Garage 123
Rose Center for Earth and Space

AC Unit 6 To Spiral Ramp AC Unit 4

3. 2. 3.

4.

Torsion Tube (Ramp Structure) Cantilevered Walkway Cantilevered Walkway


Torsion Tube (Ramp Structure) Ramp Supports

Steel Columns

Steel Columns

Ramp Supports

To Spiral Ramp

To Spiral Ramp Sub Floor (Structural Slab)

Sub Floor (Structural Slab)

Sixth Floor Fifth Floor Fourth Floor Fourth Floor Third Floor Third Floor
Sixth Floor Fifth Floor Second Floor

4.

First Floor

Second Floor First Floor

Pile Cap Pile Grade Beam Grade Beam


Pile Cap Pile

Front Entrance

Below-Grade Parking Garage

Front Entrance Below-Grade Parking Garage

Steel Columns

G. 124
An atrium building and glass curtain wall enclosure calls for massive HVAC conditions.

10 ft

124 Rose Center for Earth and Space

HVAC Diagram

In Out

W 81st St

Central Park West

125 Rose Center for Earth and Space

AC UNIT 18

AC UNIT 16

AC UNIT 8 AC UNIT 4

Ice-cycle
Project 8
Architectural Technology V Jay Hibbs Spring 2012 M.Arch I GSAPP

This course is entitled Architectural Technology 5 (AT-5). It might be subtitled Intentions and Technology. AT-5 is a tech class in which your design skills are an essential tool that you will use to synthesize the various technical systems of a contemporary building type into a coherent expression of an architectural intention. Technical rigor is the pre-condition for design. If it doesnt work, you will have to redesign it until it does.

Studio

The Ice-Cycle ice manufacturing building balances sustainable design with the needs of an intensive industrial process, taking advantage of the by-products of ice manufacturing to condition the building. The buildings sustainable design helps offset the negative effects of the manufacturing process.

Project

Bronx, New York City

Site

partners:
Caroline Lebar Jenna Miller Jenny Ratner

Ice manufacturing Cold storage Transport Office

Program

Software
Revit Photoshop Illustrator

990 2385 2385 2385 2385 1656 6000

3.4137931 8.2241379 8.2241379 8.2241379 8.2241379 5.7103448 20.689655

4 9 9 9 9 6 21

248 265 265 265 265 276 286

H. 127
The volume of the ice box is the only area expressed by a large expanse of glass. The secondary spaces are expressed through living or ceramic tiles.

ping is 10" OC, factor of 1.2 ping is 20" OC, factor of .6 ops = tube length/290, rounded up

3
EAST

View of Ice Box Staircase at Building Perimeter, from Second Floor NTS

Expression of the Ice Box to the Exterior

EAST

128 Ice-cycle The Ice-Cycle ice manufacturing building balances sustainable design with the needs of an intensive industrial process, taking advantage of the byproducts of ice manufacturing to condition the building. The buildings sustainable design helps offset the negative effects of the manufacturing process. Located in the Bronx, the building uses its site for stormwater retention and treatment, responding to New York Citys emphasis on sustainable design as described in PlaNYC and Urban Greens Green Codes. The building also considers the structural and mechanical necessities of ice manufacturing in its design, providing an insulated pathway from production, to storage, to shipment of the ice.

The Ice-Cycle is a steel building with a primary structure of W12x152 columns and W36x194 beams with an average span of 28 feet. The floor slabs are concrete on metal deck, 10 inches thick to accommodate the radiant floor tubing (see Mechanical section). The north and south perimeter areas are cantilevered ten feet off the main structure. The gravity load system to support the ice box, which requires special structure to compensate for the weight of ice and equipment, is a one-story-high Warren truss supported on four W14x550 columns (Figure 4). 6 diameter pipes hang the floor plates and other structure from this truss, while diagonal bracing (two L6x4x1/2 angles forming a T) supports the floors in the areas around the three-story ice core. Formally, the building reveals its purpose through a layered faade of green-wall panels, The second floor slab is thickened to 8 at the center to support the weight of the ice equipment and storage. The slab tapers off to 8 thick at the far ends. Because terra cotta rain screens, and operable windows, with the glazed area framing the ice of the opening cut by the convenience stair that connects box within the building where the ice production takes place. The design references the three levels of the ice box, one area of the third floor is cantilevered off the east side pre-industrial ice storage buildings, where the valuable ice would be wrapped in turf or earth to protect it from heat during the warm months. The Ice-Cycle is similarly wrapped of the building. Inside the ice box, two levels of ice storage and walkways are supported on W10x30 columns, while the center of the box is an open space with cranes on in vegetated and terra cotta panels to prevent heat gain and to act as a didactic tool, symbolizing the buildings internal sustainable practices. The glazing symbolizes the ice ceiling-mounted tracks to move and package the ice. within, while the green walls and terra cotta relate to natural processes and the cycle The roof structure is designed to accommodate extra loads from the vegetated roof and of nature. The green panels wrap the building in extra insulation, while the terra cotta water storage system. A set of 78-gal tanks is suspended from the roof to filter and is distributed in thin, connected strips as if the green panels were stripped away to store water used for irrigating the roof and green wall panels. Additional beams and reveal the earth beneath, and then the terra cotta is itself cut away to reveal the ice struts are used to distribute the weight of the tanks back to the cores. box at the center (the glazed areas of the faade). The ice box, the manufacturing heart of the building, is set back from the building perimeter, wrapped in an insulating layer to prevent thermal breaks, and faced with LED-lit paneling that will allow the box to glow at night. A grand stair provides circulation among these three floors, as well as views into the ice box at multiple levels. The ice box windows contain special thermally-insulated glass to prevent heat transfer and condensation; these windows can maintain frost-free views in temperatures down to -22 degrees Fahrenheit. Structurally, the ice box hangs from a truss system above, which serves to support the anticipated loads of equipment and ice storage, while allowing for wide clear spans within and below the ice box. Mechanically, the ice box, with its own cooling system, is isolated from the rest of the building, but it provides both cooling and heating (from waste heat) as byproducts of its production. By running the ice production equipment continuously, including at night when electricity costs are lowest, the equipment can achieve peak efficiency and provide chilled water to the rest of the building. The waste heat is rejected through energy exchangers to the rest of the building in the winter, or is rejected to a ground-source heat pump in the summer. The lateral load-resisting structure for the building is located in the service core walls. Six braced frames in the north-south direction, and two in the eastwest direction, resist lateral loads in the two directions. These walls contain minimal penetrations and are spaced apart to achieve the necessary stance to resist wind and other lateral loads. The bracing in floors three and four also help achieve lateral stability, by directing the lateral loads from the enclosure back to the cores.

Structure

Enclosure

Program

The building is divided into three sections by its two large service cores, which are 112 feet apart and centered along the buildings long axis. The symmetrical cores contain the buildings mechanical rooms, egress stairs, bathrooms, and oversized freight elevators. The ice manufacturing ice box takes up the area between the two service cores on floors 2-4 and has special insulated access to the east freight elevator. The ground floor acts as an open, public plaza, with enclosed lobby space around the west service core and covered freight access to the east core. The plaza provides bike parking and inviting, shaded space. Floors 5-7 and the spaces east and west of the ice core are office zones, which can be used entirely by the ice manufacturer or can be sublet to other tenants. The double-height seventh floor has a smallmezzanine level with a balcony, and can be used as event space. The roof is fully accessible and is planted with an intensive green roof that has a shaded, paved terrace area spanning between the two cores.

The enclosure system is a custom unitized curtain-wall system that combines operable windows, terra cotta rain screen panels, and green wall panels into a single system. Each installed unit is two stories tall for ease of installation, measuring 28 feet tall by 7 feet wide (floor-to-floor height is 14 feet). The aluminum mullions are sized to resist up to 60mph wind loads. The vertical mullions are spaced every 3.5 feet in the vertical direction, and the horizontals are spaced 7ft-3ft-4ft, to accommodate the operable windows and a 4ft spandrel panel. The lower window opens casement-style into the interior of the building to allow for cleaning, while the upper window opens inward with a hinge at the base to allow natural ventilation. Low-e coated, double-paned glass is used for the units. A system of support struts is attached over the base unit frame to support the green wall and terra cotta units outboard of the glazing. While interchangeable, these two panel types are not meant to exchanged but can be replaced as needed. While the glazing-only units are used on the facades to indicate the location of the ice box, the typical curtain-wall condition has either a terra cotta rain screen installed in front of the glazing to provide 50% shading, or a green wall panel installed in front of an insulated aluminum panel with no glazing used. The use of the green panels and terra cotta allows the building to achieve an overall glazing of 32%, with 32% glazing on the south faade, 26% on the east and west facades, and 34% on the north faade. The low glazing percent should minimize heat gain to the interior, but the targeted areas of transparency should provide daylight to every floor, although not sufficient daylight to eliminate artificial lighting entirely. The terra cotta also provides a screen for the penetration of exhaust air louvers, as will be described in the next section (Mechanical system).

H. 129
The parti for the project is a box within a box. Levels of protection, exposure, or use mimics natural structures like eggs and oranges.

TYPICAL STEEL CONNECTION AXON NTS

The Overall Structure of the Building Emphasizing the EXPLODED STEEL CONNECTION AXON Extra Loads from 4 NTS the Ice Box

129 Ice-cycle

2 2 S100 A402 4 S100

Structure Axon

Icebox Structure Axon

Caroline Lebar / Jenna Miller / Jenny Ratner / Anthony Sunga Caroline Lebar / Jenna Miller /

CT: ROJECT:

M: TEAM:

1580 Story Avenue Ice-cycle

Ice-cycle

Steel Connection Details and Framing Axon

S100

130 Ice-cycle The rain screen panels are designed using a parametric system to achieve randomized openings with 50% overall opacity. The random openings create the effect of dappled light on the interior. Although an unlimited number of panels could be produced in this way, five panel designs were chosen and are distributed over the faade. The green wall panels are based on the system designed by Gsky Plant Systems, with stainless steel trays supporting a growing medium for the plants, and integrated drip irrigation systems (Source: gsky.com). Because the faade design requires that the green wall pattern is not continuous, but starts and stops, the irrigation driplines are integrated into the vertical mullions so they can travel from one area of panels to the next. The use of growth medium prevents the accumulation of soil in the drip and drainage lines. These driplines connect to the roof which they receive water from the roof storage tanks described in the Sustainability and Structural sections of this report. The curtain wall has gravity connections at every other slab in the typical condition with wind-load-only connections at the intermediate slabs. The seventh floor condition is unique because this floor is 28 feet tall, requiring a hanging strut system to provide wind-load/lateral support at the mid-point. This strut system consists of structural steel tubes (HSS) suspended from the roof girders to bring the loads back to the cores. The seventh floor units have an extra 5ft spandrel/solid panel to act as the parapet wall for the accessible roof. The dead-load connections at the roof and slab are designed to accommodate three-axis adjustments in installation and vertical slab deflection after installation, using a hanging system that can accept both dead load and wind load. Slab-end insulation is used to avoid thermal breaks. The entire connection system at the slab edge is encased in concrete following installation. (Examples of buildings using ice cooling are the University of Arizona and the American Indian Cultural Center in Oklahoma, both of which have intense summertime cooling needs; see http://uanews.org/node/20121). The ice production equipment is run continuously for maximum efficiency, and the excess ice produced is converted to chilled water within the ice box, then run through the buildings radiant system. Since the ice production equipment requires constant cooling, an oversized groundsource heat pump is installed on-site to provide continuous cooling. In the winter, some or all of the waste heat from ice production is used to condition ventilation air; in the summer, all of this waste heat must be rejected to the ground. Since the ice itself provides cooling for the building, essentially the ground source pump provides the cooling for the building plus the ice manufacturing, but allows the building to reduce its energy use considerably.

Sustainability

Mechanical

The Ice-Cycle building has separate ventilation and heating/ cooling systems, using an overhead forced-air ventilation system and radiant heating/cooling system. The ventilation system has two main intakes on the roof, one for each service core, and exhaust louvers on each floor from the mechanical rooms. This system provides the necessary separation between intake and exhaust, intakes the air from the roof to minimize the presence of fumes and other pollutants, and exhausts the air on the faade to provide additional CO2 to the green wall plants. The floors are divided into ventilation zones of approximately equal area to rationalize the duct sizes. All ductwork crossings take place inside the mechanical rooms to avoid the reduction of head height in the occupied areas of the building. Toilet and janitorial exhaust are collected into two shafts, in the mechanical rooms, and ducted out. The ice box is considered a minimallyoccupied area, since the equipment generally runs automatically, so no ventilation ductwork is sent into the ice box. Eliminating ductwork into the ice box also eliminates thermal breaks. The chilled water provided by the ice manufacturing process, and heat rejected from the ice box, are used to condition the ventilation air. The heating and cooling system is a radiant floor system, with tubing for the conditioning fluid spaced 10 on center in the perimeter zones and 20 on center in the core zones. The thermostatic zones correspond to their compass locations, so they can respond to differential solar gain. The main floors have nine zones while the first (ground) floor has five zones in the west lobby and three in the east lobby. Winter heating for the building is provided by the local steam loop, converted to hot water and circulated through the building. This hot water can also provide supplementary heating to the ventilation air. Summertime cooling is provided by the ice core, so the building does not rely on the chilled water loop, but can be connected to this loop in an emergency or if the building ceases to be used for ice manufacturing

The building incorporates numerous sustainable features to offset the environmental cost of ice manufacturing. The building is sited to minimize its east and west faade area, since those facades are difficult to shade, and instead provides natural light to every floor from the north and south facades. The majority of the facades receive filtered light, screened by terra cotta rain screens with 50% opacity, while the grand pedestrian stair on the south and the corridor on the north receive full sun. The limited occupation of these spaces means they do not need to be conditioned to the same degree as the office space, which permits the use of extensive glazing desired by the design team. The site itself provides stormwater collection, retention, and remediation with the use of permeable pavement in the parking area, a phytoremediation retention pond, and a drainage system that allows remediated water from the parking area to be used to irrigate the vegetated facades. The intensive green roof and extensive green wall panels provide carbon offsets as well as shading and insulating benefits, while the roof additionally collects water in tanks on the seventh floor which can be used for irrigation. Water requirements for the roof and walls are thus met by the building systems, and the sites stormwater is retained and cleaned before being released to the city stormwater system. The roof tanks are sized to meet the need for irrigation, and are sufficient to hold 90% of the average rainfall that accumulates on the roof or 85% of the 1-year design storm rainfall as per NY State Department of Environmental Conservation guidelines. The green roof itself, however, can retain up to 50% of average rainfall, according to EPA studies, so the tanks should be sufficient for most storm events. The parking areas, in addition to having permeable paving to collect stormwater, are covered by solar carports that provide the necessary electricity to power the pumps for the stormwater system. The carports shade the parking lot, preventing the creation of a heat island, while providing sufficient surface area for photovoltaic panels. The controlled amount of glazing on the facades, the use of operable windows in the curtain wall system, and the heat rejection of the ice manufacturing to the interior in the winter months reduce the buildings reliance on mechanical ventilation, heating, and cooling, reducing the buildings carbon emissions and energy use. The use of an oversized ground-source heat rejection system, to account for the buildings constant need for heat rejection, provides energy-efficient cooling year-round. In short, while the ice manufacturing process requires a large amount of energy input to run the equipment, and must constantly reject heat, the building has been designed to meet these needs in a way that reduces their impact on the site and environment.

11. 22. 33. 44. 55. 66. 77. 88. 99. 10 11 12

ICEBOX WINDOWS TERRA COTTA RAIN SCREEN PANELS OVER OPERABLE WINDOW UNITS (TYP .) FOUNDATION FOOTINGS THICKENED SLAB ENTRANCE PLAZA ROOF TERRACE LOADING DOCK LOADING / FREIGHT ENTRANCE RECEPTION / LOBBY IRRIGATION TANKS

Longitudinal FLOOR HEIGHT TRUSS Section


K

OFFICE SPACE

131 Ice-cycle

A
26' - 9"

B
30' - 0"

C
26' - 0"

D
28' - 0"

E
28' - 0"

F
28' - 0"

G
28' - 0"

H
26' - 0"

I
30' - 0"

J
26' - 9"

5 A303

3 A302

1 A302

2 A302

6
Roof 116' - 0"

10

9
Level 7.5 102' - 0"

2
Level 7 88' - 0"

2 11 11

Level 6 74' - 0"

12 11 11
Level 5 60' - 0"

Level 4 46' - 0"

1 2
1 A303

Level 3 32' - 0"

2
Level 2.1 Level 2 19' - 0" 18' - 0"

7
Level 1 0' - 0" Foundations -4' - 0"

East-West Section Through Staircase 1/8" = 1'-0"

CONSULT:

PROJECT:

TEAM:

1580 Story Avenue Bronx, NY 10473

DATE:

Caroline Lebar / Jenna Miller / Jenny Ratner / Anthony Sunga

Ice-cycle

Longitudinal Section (thru Corridor)

A301

A. Jay Hibbs / Pat Hopple / Jeff Huang

1 May 2012 SCALE: 1/8" = 1'-0"

4/30/2012 2:26:34 PM

132 Ice-cycle

3 A302

1 A302 A200 1

A
26' - 9"

B
30' - 0"

C
26' - 0"

D
28' - 0" 4' - 0"

E
28' - 0"

113' - 7"

1
13' - 0"
1

11' - 0"

6' - 0"

9' - 2"

16' - 10"

A300

2
JAN. STAIR 1

10' - 0"

2
A202 S101 2

WOMEN MEP MEN

2 1
UP

ELEC.

3
1 A303

6' - 2"

13' - 10"

3.6
1

A301

62' - 1"

2 A303

1 S101 A201

Level 1

H. 133
The typical floor plan identifies the ice box at the center flanked by two structural cores and auxiliary spaces at the perimeter.

1 LOBBY Typical Plan 2 BRACED FRAME


2 A302

133 Ice-cycle

38. 49.

FREIGHT ENTRANCE PLAZA ELEVATOR PIT TERRA COTTA (TYP.)

G
28' - 0" 28' - 0"

H
26' - 0"

I
6
30' - 0"

J
26' - 9"

K
5 9.

9. 6
15' - 0" 10' - 6" 14' - 0"
WOMEN

9' - 8"

9' - 2"

16' - 10"

56' - 6" 5' - 6"

6' - 6"

ELEC.

STAIR 2

30' - 0"

61' - 9"

30' - 0"

9' - 10"

A202

2
MEN
UP

JAN.

MEP

10' - 0"

4' - 0" 6' - 2"

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

ICE BOX ICE STORAGE / WALKWAY FLOOR-HEIGHT TRUSS SEVENTH FLOOR BALCONY LOBBY THICKENED SLAB WATER TANKS PLAZA ROOF TERRACE

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

ICE BOX ICE STORAGE / WALKWAY FLOOR-HEIGHT TRUSS SEVENTH FLOOR BALCONY LOBBY THICKENED SLAB WATER TANKS PLAZA ROOF TERRACE

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

ICE BOX ICE STORAGE / WALKWAY FLOOR-HEIGHT TRUSS SEVENTH FLOOR BALCONY LOBBY THICKENED SLAB WATER TANKS PLAZA ROOF TERRACE

134 Ice-cycle

1 A301

1 A301

1 A300

1 A301

1 A300

1 A300

1 A301

1 A301

1 A300

1 A301

1 A300

1 A300 1 A300 1 A300 1 A301 1 A300 1 A301 1 A301

4 3.6
10' - 0" 4' - 0" 6' - 2"

3
10' 30' - 0" 0"

4 3.6
4' - 0" 6' - 2"

3 2
9' - 10"

1
30' -- 0" 0" 10'

4 3.6
4' - 0" 6' - 2"

2 3
9' - 10"

1
10' 30' - 0" 0"

2
9' - 10"

1
10' - 10' 0" - 0"

4 3.6
4' - 0" 6' - 2"

3
10' 30' - 0" 0"

4 3.6
4' - 0" 6' - 2"

3 2
9' - 10"

1
30' -- 0" 0" 10'

4 3.6
4' - 0" 6' - 2"

2 3
9' - 10"

1
10' 30' - 0" 0"

2
9' - 10"

1
10' - 0" 10' - 0"

1
9' - 10"

2
10' -- 0" 0" 30'

1
9' - 10"

2 3

3.6 4
30' 0" 6' - 2" 4' - 0" 10' 10' -0" 0".

1
9' - 10"

3 2

3.6 4
6' - 2" 4' - 0" 10' 30'- -0" 0" .

3.6 4
6' - 2" 4' - 0" 10' - 0" .

9
Roof 116' - 0" Roof 116' - 0" Roof 116' - 0"

9
Roof 116' - 0" Roof 116' - 0" Roof 116' - 0" Roof 116' - 0" Roof 116' - 0" Roof 116' - 0"

4
Level 7.5 102' - 0" Level 7.5 102' - 0" Level 7.5 102' - 0" Level 7.5 102' - 0" Level 7.5 102' - 0" Level 7.5 102' - 0"

7
Level 7.5 102' - 0"

7
Level 7.5 102' - 0" Level 7.5 102' - 0"

Level 7 88' - 0"

Level 7 88' - 0"

Level 7 88' - 0"

Level 7 88' - 0"

Level 7 88' - 0"

Level 7 88' - 0"

Level 7 88' - 0"

Level 7 88' - 0"

Level 7 88' - 0"

Level 6 74' - 0"

Level 6 74' - 0"

Level 6 74' - 0"

Level 6 74' - 0"

Level 6 74' - 0"

Level 6 74' - 0"

Level 6 74' - 0"

Level 6 74' - 0"

Level 6 74' - 0"

3
Level 5 60' - 0" Level 5 60' - 0" Level 5 60' - 0" Level 5 60' - 0" Level 5 60' - 0" Level 5 60' - 0"

3
Level 5 60' - 0"

3
Level 5 60' - 0" Level 5 60' - 0"

2
Level 4 46' - 0" Level 4 46' - 0" Level 4 46' - 0" Level 4 46' - 0" Level 4 46' - 0" Level 4 46' - 0"

2
Level 4 46' - 0" Level 4 46' - 0" Level 4 46' - 0"

1
Level 3 32' - 0" Level 3 32' - 0" Level 3 32' - 0" Level 3 32' - 0" Level 3 32' - 0" Level 3 32' - 0"

1
Level 3 32' - 0" Level 3 32' - 0" Level 3 32' - 0"

Level 2.1 Level 2 19' - 0" 18' - 0"

Level 2.1 Level 2 19' - 0" 18' - 0"

Level 2.1 Level 2 19' - 0" 18' - 0"

Level 2.1 Level 2 19' - 0" 18' - 0"

Level 2.1 Level 2 19' - 0" 18' - 0"

Level 2.1 19' - 0" Level 2.1 Level 2 19' - 0" 18' - 0" Level 2 18' - 0"

Level 2.1 19' - 0" Level 2 18' - 0"

Level 2.1 19' - 0" Level 2 18' - 0"

6 5

5
Level 1 0' - 0" Foundations -4' - 0" Level 1 0' - 0" Foundations -4' - 0" Level 1 0' - 0" Foundations -4' - 0"

5
Level 1 0' - 0" Foundations -4' - 0" Level 1 0' - 0" Foundations -4' - 0" Level 1 0' - 0" Foundations -4' - 0"

8
Level 1 0' - 0" Foundations -4' - 0"

8
Level 1 0' - 0" Foundations -4' - 0" Level 1 0' - 0" Foundations -4' - 0"

North-South Section Beyond Core 1/8" = 1'-0"

North-South Section Beyond Core 1/8" = 1'-0"

North-South Section Beyond Core 1/8" = 1'-0"

North-South Section Through Core 1/8" = 1'-0"

North-South Section Through Core 1/8" = 1'-0"

North-South Section Through Core 1/8" = 1'-0"

North-South Section Through Ice Box 1/8" = 1'-0"

North-South Section Through Ice Box 1/8" = 1'-0"

North-South Section Through Ice Box 1/8" = 1'-0"

Ice-cycle Ice-cycle /Caroline Lebar / Jenna Miller Caroline Lebar / Jenna Miller / Caroline Lebar / Jenna Miller / 1580 Story Avenue Sunga 1580 Story Avenue Jenny Ratner / Anthony SungaJenny Ratner / Anthony Jenny Ratner / Anthony Sunga Bronx, NY 10473 Bronx, NY 10473
PROJECT: PROJECT: PROJECT: TEAM: TEAM:

CONSULT:

TEAM:

DATE:

1580 Story Avenue Bronx, NY 10473

DATE:

Transverse Sections Transverse Sections Transverse Sections A302

DATE:

A302

A. Jay Hibbs / Pat Hopple / Jeff Huang

A302

A. Jay Hibbs / 1 May 2012 Pat Hopple / SCALE: Jeff Huang 1/8" = 1'-0"

CONSULT:

Ice-cycle

CONSULT:

A. Jay Hibbs / 2012 1 May Pat Hopple / SCALE: Jeff Huang 1/8" = 1'-0"

1 May 2012 SCALE: 1/8" = 1'-0"

135 Ice-cycle

H. 136
The intensive green roof and extensive green wall panels provide carbon offsets as well as shading and insulating benefits, while the roof additionally collects water in tanks on the seventh floor which can be used for irrigation. Water requirements for the roof and walls are thus met by the building systems, and the sites stormwater is retained and cleaned before being released to the city stormwater system. The roof tanks are sized to meet the need for irrigation, and are sufficient to hold 90% of the average rainfall that accumulates on the roof or 85% of the 1-year design storm rainfall as per NY State Department of Environmental Conservation guidelines. The green roof itself, however, can retain up to 50% of average rainfall, according to EPA studies, so the tanks should be sufficient for most storm events.

136 Ice-cycle

Living Wall Facade

137 Ice-cycle

TINA*
Project 9
Fast Pace || Slow Space Mark Bearak, Bridgette Borders Spring 2013 M.Arch I GSAPP

Studio

tensile integrity nodal assembly

To design, fabricate, and assemble a small architectural installation using advanced digital design tools, CNC milling, and ingenuity. Time is an imperative, where instinct, gut reactions, and quick turnover is key to a successful project.

Project

TINA is coming! She will put a smile on your face and make you stop and smell the roses. She is more than the sum of her parts, but if she snaps she breaks your heart. Her tensengrity is her integrity, and it is not her folly.

Site

Avery Hall, Columbia University New York, NY

partners:
Nicole Allen Collin Anderson John Barrett Phillip Crupi Chelsea Hyduk Bo Liu Kimberly Nguyen Michelle Park Sydney Talcott

Program
Architectural folly

Software

Rhino, Rhinocam, Grasshopper, Illustrator

I. 139
Experimenting with different tensegrity models to convey movement, lightness, and strength.

Tensegrity Study Model

I. 140
The spinal tensegrity model inspired us for the enclosed folly. The ability to create a curve allowed us to create a single unit arch, 4-unit arch, and ultimiately a double curve barrel vault.

140 TINA*

Spinal Tensegrity: from Inspiration to Production

compression joint

screw guide tension member guide

shape determined by nesting pattern and member to member connection

I. 141
The concept was to aggregate the curved spinal tensile structure to insinuate enclosure.

Conceptual Rendering for First Scheme

141 TINA*

TINA*

142 TINA*

I. 143
After optimizing the unit for material efficiency and milling time, we tested the structural limits of a 4-unit prototype.

4-unit Arch Prototype

143 TINA*

144 TINA*

I. 145
The final scheme is to be erected at the End of the Year Show at the entry of Avery Hall. This site specific installation glorifies the building as a generator of architectural thought.

Final Scheme: To Be Constructed at EOYS

145 TINA*

146 TINA*

147 TINA*