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A Melanesian Culture-Contact Myth in Pidgin English Author(s): Gregory Bateson and Robert A. Hall Jr.

Source: The Journal of American Folklore, Vol. 57, No. 226 (Oct. - Dec., 1944), pp. 255-262 Published by: American Folklore Society Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/535357 . Accessed: 16/04/2013 13:58
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MYTH IN PIDGIN ENGLISH* A MELANESIAN CULTURE-CONTACT


Dictated and Commented by
GREGORY BATESON

Transcribed and Translated by


ROBERT A. HALL JR.

I. crajt. em tufela mxn hir-wanfela majki, na wanfela pusi. em magiki tel. i-no pikinini, i-majki tru. crajt. em tufEla i-go lcB tru hir, i-gat l1Jfela wokim grawn. gIslm spaten, na wokim bIgfela bigfela hol tufela go bug. lj1 hol i-go dawn crajt. wokim fInis, tufela i-go gIslm bigfela ston. tumao. aj bibij hol. bajmbaj clsem dor hir. zrajt. na tufela bajmbaj ston i-fesim lj ples billr wajtman. tufEla wetim tudark, na tufEla wckabawt 1nlj i-go lc1j wajtman. crajt. na tufela stilim najt i-go. tufela i-go kamap lci ples bilj nadarkajn samtiij. tufela stilim maIIs, plenti bablcjwajtman-plenti samtI1j
stillm lxplxp,

stilim E~r, stilim tebal, blaijkat, altagedar samtIj wajtman. i-no gat bib1 luk, wanfela samtIij tufela i-no stilim. zltagedar samtiij. na bigfela glas bilZ1j karim na i-stilim. samtiij, zltagedar crajt. tufela bigfela tufela liflmap tumao. i-go. tufela karim, putIm lij hol-em hol, bifor, tufla i-wokim. crajt, putIm finis, na glas bilbj luk hir-Em bigfela glas bilbj luk, tufela i-stilim-tufela i-fasim Insajd lij dor. crajt, fasIm bajmbaj i-clsem: spos man i-stap finil, kan lukim na i-no dor-i-lukim dor maen i-fes, insajd, tasel glas bibjl luk. na tufela gen i-wetim tudark. crajt, 2. crajt, altagedar samtIj i-redi finil, tufela wckabawt lij tudark, kamap gen lcj ples bblij wajtman. crajt, na tufEla i-go stret lij haws bibij kiap. crajt, tufela i-go Insajd lij haws, tufela i-wckabawt isi nogud kiap i-hirIm tufela. crajt, tufela i-go stret Inj tumao, rum bibij slip bibij tufela pikinini rum bilij slip-Em kiap. em kiap bilb1 meri. mxn, crajt, na tufela i-gat tufela pikinini. i-gat pikinini i-gat pikinini na stret bed magiki i-go bblij pikinini mxn, lflmap 1zj plkinini i-slip. crajt, na mxn. clsem bed bilbj crajt, pusi i-go Inj pikinini meri, lflmaplm plkinini
* Note by Bateson: The original story was collected in a Baining village of the Gazelle Peninsula (New Britain) in 1927. The native who told the story stated that he had learned it on a plantation in Kavieng (New Ireland). It is here reproduced,dictated in 1943 from memory. Inevitably some modifications have, come into the story since it was told to me, and specifically the readershould be warned of the following details about which I am doubtful: i. I am not sure of the precise lists of items stolen at the beginningof the story. 2. I am not sure that it was the Monkey who carriedthe boy child, and the Cat who carried the girl. 3. I am not certain that in the original telling the boy called out for his father and the girl for her mother. 4. I believe that there was another victory for the Monkey and the Cat, followingon their first victory by the use of fire, and preceding the second victory in which the Monkey uses scissors. 5. I am not sure who ate the pig. As the story is told here, it would appear that the Monkey and the Cat joined in the feast. This of course would be contrary to most New Guinea practice, accordingto which the giver of a feast never eats the pig. Note by Hall: The Pidgin text is given in the phonemictranscriptionused in my Melanesian Pidgin English: Grammar.Texts, Vocabulary (Baltimore, i943).

stillm

masket,

stillm

katles,

stillm su, stillm

tinbulmakaw,

255

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pIkinini meri. tufEla i-go 1IfImapIm gudfEla tumao, tufEla i-no opIm aj bIlcj tufEla. tufEla i-slip jEt, na tufEla i-lIfImap. crajt, tufEla i-karim tufEla i-go lnj bus, kamap lah hol tufEla i-wokim. crajt, na tufEla i-slip jet, na tufEla i-putIm tufEla i-slip laj hol. crajt, na fasim dor bilbi hol naw. crajt, naw bajmbaj lac mcrnIjtajm tufela pikinini i-opIm aj, na tufela kraj luj papa mama bilpi tufela. pIkinini man i-tak: "papa!", pikinini meri i-tak: "mama!" crajt, na magki i-harim tufrla, na i-go taktak lai tufela, i-tak: "a! ju tufela! ju kraj lah wanem samtlj ? i-no gat wanfela samtii i-no gat, ju kraj lahj m. altagedar samtIi bilbj wajtman i-stap. i-gat masket, i-gat katles, i-gat laplep, i-gat su, i-gat swop, i-gat tInbulmakaw, na ju tufela no kan kraj lah wanfela samtIj. altagedar samtI i-stap. taescl tufela pIkinini i-kraj lc13 papa mama bblij tufEla. 3. crajt. na kiap i-opIm aj bibjl em, i-girap, na sIjawtim pIkinini. na i-no gat pIkinini i-bakIm. sIIawtIm natij tamscl.crajt, na kiap i-sIgawtim altagEdar plisbaj billi em, siiawtim altagedar workbaj, selIm al i-go nobawt bilij fajnim pikinini. crajt, samfela baj i-go laj nabiv fajnim, samfela baj i-go laj altagedar hef bu, samfela baj i-go lcg altagedar rod. na i-no gat wanfela baj i-lukim pikinini. al i-tick: "pIkinini i-stap wer?" maski, al i-go bak lac kiap, na i-tak: "a! kiap, mifela no lukim pikinini bilbj ju. ajtiijk pIkinini bilbj ju i-stap wEr?" crajt, kiap i-girap, selIm al gen i-go lukawtim. al i-go lukawtim l j altagedar rod, altagedar hef bus, altagedar liklik ples bibjl kanaka. i-no gat wanfela mxn i-lukIm. maski, al i-kraj tamsel.kiap tu i-kraj. crajt, al i-kraj i-stap. na bihajn, em utbaj billj kiap, em i-go wckabawt lai bigbus, i-go lukawtim pIgIn kiap i-kajkaj. crajt, na i-wckablbjl i-wokim bifor. hol hol na klostu tufela hir, em bawt, crajt, na magki i-go laj na em i-kuruigUtim diwaj, i-hirIm leg bilbi utbaj. leg magki i-hirIm. blbjl crajt, na i-sIjawt: "a! husaet ju?" crajt, na gutbaj i-tak: "mi hir." na magki i-tak: "ju baj bill husxt?" na *utbaj i-tak: "mi baj bilb kiap hir. mi no baj bill nadarfela mxstar, mi baj bllb kiap." zrajt, na magki i-tok: "a! ju na magki i-tak: "arajt. 9rajt, baj bilbj kiap?" utbaj i-tak: "na, wanem?" ju ran ju go. go kamap la mastar bilbj ju. ju tk: 'kiap, tufela pikinini bilbj ju i-stap lah mi tufela. i-no gat haggri, i-stap gudfela crajt, tumoa.' na ju takim kiap: 'pilkinni i-kraj tamsel lab papa mama. tufela i-no gat haggri, in-o gat sik, tamsl kraj.' crajt, na ju takim kiap: em bajmbaj i-kam gIslm tufela. kiap i-no ka~n krcs, i-no kan gIsIm plisbaj, gIslm masket, samtij. bajmbaj em taesel i-kam, bajmbaj mi tufela i-kilim pig, na al i-kajkaj, na Em, i-go'bak lab ples bilbj Em." kiap i gIslm tufela pikinini bblj naw. i-go, i-kamap stret lcg kiap. i-tak: "kiap! 4. crajt, na *utbaj i-ran i-go em tufFla pikinini bilbj ju, tufela stilim. em magki na pusi, Em tamsel.i-no nadarfela man i-stilim, Em tufEla i-ars billj trabal." crajt, na kiap i-girap nogud naw. kiap i-siijawtim altagedar plisbaj, takam al i-gIsIm masket, gIsim katles, em i-go mekim sevi tufEla naw. crajt, altagedar i-go wakabawt i-hajd antap laJ diwaj; laJ bug, al i-kamap klostu laIJ hol. crajt, na maoki i-hajd i-lukluk. na i-lukIm plisbaj, lukIm al i-kartim i-hajd i-lukluk.-crajt, masket i-kam. crajt, na magki i-go gIsIm altagcEdarhaef diwaj. i-go redilm altagEdar liklIk hef pIpia billn bu. crajt, altagEdar hef diwaj, son i-kukim. crajt, redilm finiS, na i-go kInIm maeIs naw, skreplm maeIs, mekIm fajr.

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)rajt, naw altagsdar plisbaj i-namFl. na fajr i-stap laB hef i-go. )rajt, na alsem naw, fajr i-rawnim altagedar plisbaj. crajt, na altagedar plisbaj i-kuk finiS. i-stap. Emi-go bak laj ples bilaBjEm. Emi-tick: "bajmbaj 5. na kiap tamsel mi mekim wanem?" crajt, na bajmbaj mxnawar i-kam. na kiap i-go taktak 1ij keptan. i-takim em, na bajmbaj mxnawar i-go gIsIm altagedar masket, altagedar mxn bicj fajt, bajmbaj cl i-go 'utIm tufEla. crajt, na mxnawar i-go. i-go stret lBj sclwatar. crajt, i-go kamap laB ples blluj tufla. crajt, tmsAl magki i-stap antap B1i diwaj, i-hajd i-lukluk. na -m i-lukim manawar i-kam, crajt, na ran i-go laB hol, gisim wanfela sIsIs, bigfcla sIsis crajt, na tumao. karim sIsIs i-go, na putIm alsem: wanfela najf bibar sIsis i-stap ananit laB sAlwatar, na adarfela najf bllbj sIsis i-stap bihajn tru lcj bus. crajt, na wetlm crajt, na bihajn manawar i-kam stret laj sIsIs. na magki markim menawwar. gud, i-kam stret tru, crajt, katim naw! Em tufcla hef bllbj manawar, tufEla hef i-go dawn finIs crajt, na altag1dar men bllij fajt al i-swim 1j sAlwatar. nogud naw. al i-kajkaj sAlwatar, A1i-go dawn finiS. 6. crajt, na kiap tmsAl i-swim i-go, kamap laB ples Em. crajt, na blbl i-kraj i-stap, i-no gat nadarfela samti bajmbaj i-mekim. Em i-bagarap finis. crajt, al i-stap, na bihajn, magki kiap, na i-takim pusi, i-tijktIk taesal laBj stilim wanfela hef pepar, "ju ples wajtmaen, bajmbaj go ju i-tak: la biblu i-kam." crajt, na brijim kavarap pepar. crajt, ju blij alsem stillm finiS, pusi i-go stilIm, brliIm pepar i-kam, na stilim blajstlk. crajt, na magki i-gIslm blajstik, Em i-mekim wanfela "ju kiap! ju bajmbaj prs. pas i-tak: kam gIslm pikinini blBrj ju. pikinini i-stap gudfEla Bij tumao, tmsAl i-kraj papa mama blaij tufEla. bajmbaj ju no kan gIsim maskct alsem plisbaj. bajmbaj ju kam natlU, na mifela bajmbaj Sekan. bajmbaj kilim pig, wokam blgfela kajkaj. na bajmbaj ju gIslm tufela pikinini i-go bak laBjples bibj ju. crajt, rajtim pas finis, na i-gIvIm 1~cj pusi, takim em. crajt, takim magki pusi: "ju karim i-go. bajmbaj ju go 1ij najt. crajt, kamap 1ij haws bilaj prs kiap, ju putIm pa~s aij tebal. bajmbaj lai mcrnIgtajm kiap i-girap, na i-lukim pars." 7. crajt, pusi i-karIm i-go, putam 1cj tebal. na bajmbaj larBmcrnlrjtajm na kiap i-girap i-lukim. crajt, na i-brokim kavarap aBijem, na i-luklm pras. na mi trajIm tufbla, ajtirjk i-tljk: "arajt. bajmbaj i-tIk: "alsem wanem?" tufela i-gaman. no, ajtik i-no gat. maski, bajmbaj mi trajIm tufela naw." i-no gIsIm masket, i-no gIsim plisbaj, Em i-go crajt, kiap i-girap i-go 1j bug. na magki i-stap antap ij diwaj, i-hajd i-lukluk. na i-lukim notIij. crajt, i-no kartim masket. na i-lukim, i-no gat plisbaj. na i-ran i-go kiap, maoki naw, redilm kajkaj, wetim kiap i-kamap. crajt, na kiap i-kam klostu. kam klostu finis, naw tufbla i-go stret aj bilIc kiap. tufela i-tak: "ju kam naw.' 1i na tufela i-go gIslm tufela piklnlni bilwj kiap, na tufela plklnlni i-ran i-go stret tufla. papa bilab tufela i-tak: "papa!" crajt, na magki i-kIllm pig li naw, mekim redi altagedar samtIU. crajt, na kiap i-kajkaj naw, na al i-gekmn. crajt, na kiap i-tak: "a! mi lajk go naw." na tufbla i-tak: "ju tufbla! ju blhajnim papa naw." crajt, na tufela i-gudbaj 1 kiap, kiap i-gudbcj lai tufela, na kiap i-go stret lic ples bblaUem, na tufbla plklnlni i-blhajnim em, na al i-stap. em tamsl. i. Very well. [There were] these two men-one monkey and one cat. It

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was a real monkey, which had a long tail. It wasn't a child,' it was a real monkey. Very well. The two of them went to the bush. They went and made a big hole in the ground. They took a shovel and made a big, deep hole. Very well. When they had made it, they went and got a big stone, to fasten at the mouth of the hole. Then it was like a door. Very well. Then they went to the White man's village. They waited until dark, and then walked along in the night. They went and arrived at the White man's village. Then they stole many of the White man's things-many things of all kinds. They stole matches, stole loincloths, stole muskets, stole cutlasses, stole shoes, stole tinned beef, stole chairs, stole tables, blankets, all of the White man's things. There wasn't a single thing that they didn't steal. [They stole] everything. And they stole a big looking-glass. A very big one. Very well. And they lifted up everything and carried it along. They carried it and put it in the holethe hole that they had previously dug. Well, when they had put it all in, this looking-glass-the big looking-glass they had stolen-they fastened it inside the door. Well, when they had fastened it, it was like this: if a man was inside, and the door was shut, the man couldn't see the door-he saw only the looking glass. 2. Well, when everything was ready, then again the two waited until dark. Well, they walked at dark, and again arrived at the White man's village. Well, they went straight to the kiap's2 house. Well, they went inside the house and walked very quietly, so that the kiap should not hear them. Well, they went to the bedroom-the bedroom of the kiap's two children. The kiap had two children. He had a boy and a girl. Well, the two children were sleeping. Well, then the monkey went straight to the boy's bed and lifted up the boy. Well, the cat likewise went to the girl's bed and lifted up the girl. They both lifted them up very gently, so that neither of them awoke. The two [children] went on sleeping, when they lifted them up. Well, they took them to the bush, and arrived at the hole they had made. Well, the two [children] were still sleeping, as they laid them down in the hole. Well, now they fastened the door of the hole. Well, then in the morning the two children awoke, and both cried for their father and mother. The boy said, "Papa!" The girl said, "Mama!" Well, the monkey heard then, and went and spoke to them, saying: "Eh! You two! What are you crying for? There's nothing lacking that you should cry for. All of the White man's things are here. There are muskets, there are cutlasses, there are loincloths, there are shoes, there is tinned beef, and you can't cry for one single thing. There is everything." But the two children cried for their parents. 3. Very well. When the kiap awoke, he got up, and called to his children. But there weren't any children to answer. He called them in vain. Well, then the kiap called all his police-boys, called all his work-boys, and sent them all around to look for the children. Well, some "boys"' went to the beach to look for them, some "boys" went into all parts of the bush, and some "boys" went along all the roads. But there wasn't a single "boy" who saw the chilI The term maiki usually means "boy (young male child)." 2 The kiap is a White District Officer. s The word bzj is used of all male natives in indenturedservice.

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dren. They thought: "Where are the children?". No use, they went back to the kiap and said: "Eh! kiap, we haven't seen your children. Where can your children possibly be?" Well, the kiap got up and sent them all again to go and look for them. They went and looked for them on all the roads, in all parts of the bush, in all the little native villages. There was not a single man who saw them. No use, they all just cried. The kiap cried too. Well, they all kept on crying. Then later, a shoot-boy of the kiap's was walking in the deep forest, looking for birds for the kiap to eat. Well, as he walked along, he came near this hole-the hole which the two had previously dug. Well, the monkey heard the shoot-boy's leg. His leg hit against a piece of wood, and the monkey heard it. Well, then the monkey called out: "Eh! Who are you?" Well, then the shoot-boy said: "Me." Then the monkey said: "Whose 'boy' are you?" Then the shoot-boy said: "I am the kiap's 'boy.' I'm not the 'boy' of any other master, I'm the kiap's 'boy."' Well, then the monkey said: "Eh! You're the kiap's 'boy,' are you?" The shoot-boy said: "Yes, now what?" Well, then the monkey said: "Very well. You go running. Go and come to your master. Talk to him. I have a speech for you to take to your master. Say: 'Kiap, your two children are with the two of us. They are not hungry, they are very well.' Well, then say to the kiap: 'The children are just crying for their parents. They are not hungry, they are not sick, but they are just crying.' Well, you talk to the kiap, that he may come and get the two. The kiap musn't be angry, he mustn't take any police-boys, guns, or anything. He must come alone, then we two will kill a pig, and all will eat, [and then] the kiap will take his two children and go back to his village." 4. Well, then the shoot-boy went running now. He went and came straight to the kiap. He said: "Kiap! Your two children, the two have stolen them. A monkey and a cat, just they. Nobody else has stolen them, they are the cause of the trouble." Well, then the kiap got angry. The kiap called all his policeboys, and told them all to take guns and to take cutlasses, and go and attack the two now. Well, they all went marching along in the bush, and arrived near the hole. Well, the monkey was hiding in the top of a tree, hiding and looking. Well, as he was hiding and looking, he saw the police-boys, saw them all coming carrying guns. Well, then the monkey went and got many pieces of wood. He went and made ready all the little pieces of rubbish in the bush. Well, all the pieces of wood, the sun dried them. Well, when he had gotten them ready, he went and took a match, struck the match, and made a fire. Well, now all the police-boys were in the middle, and the fire was in their way. Well, in this way the fire surrounded all the police-boys. Well, then all the police-boys got burned up. 5. Then only the kiap was left. He went back to his village and thought: "Now what shall I do?" Well, then a man-of-war came. Then the kiap went and spoke to the captain. After he had talked to him, then the man-of-war went and got plenty of guns and plenty of fighting men, to go and shoot the two. Well, then the man-of-war went. It went straight along in the ocean. Well, it went and arrived at the place of these two. Well, but the monkey was up in the tree, hiding and looking. When he saw the man-of-war coming, well, he went running to the hole, and took a pair of scissors, a very big pair

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of scissors. Well, he brought the scissors along, and put them like this: one blade of the scissors was underneath the sea, and the other blade was way back in the forest. Well, he waited for the man-of-war. Well, then the man-ofwar came right up to the scissors. Then the monkey aimed well, so that it came absolutely straight, and cut it! The two pieces of the man-of-war, the two pieces went right down into the sea. Well, all the fighting men swam without success then. They all swallowed water and went right down. 6. Well, then the kiap alone went swimming along, and got to his village. Well, then he wept continually, there wasn't anything else for him to do. He was done for. Well, they lived on, and later the monkey just thought of the kiap, and said to the cat, he said: "Go to the White man's village, to steal a piece of paper and an envelope. Well, when you have stolen them, bring them back." Well, then the cat went and stole them, and brought the paper back, and stole a pencil. Well, then the monkey took the pencil, and wrote a letter. The letter said: "You kiap! Come and get your children. Your children are very well, but they cry for their parents. You must not bring any guns or police-boys. You shall come alone, and we will shake hands. We will kill a pig, and make a big feast. Then you will take your two children back to your village." Well, when he had written the letter, the monkey gave it to the cat, and spoke to him. Well, he said to the cat: "You take the letter. Ycu will go at night. Well, when you come to the kiap's house, put the letter on the table. Then when the kiap gets up in the morning, he will see the letter." 7. Well, the cat took it along and put it on the table. Then in the morning the kiap got up and saw it. Well, he tore open its envelope and looked at the letter. Then he thought: "What the dickens?" Then he thought: "Very well. I'll try them. They're probably deceiving me. No, probably not. Oh well, I'll try the two now." Very well, the kiap got up and went into the bush. He didn't take any guns, he didn't take any police-boys along, he went alone. Well, then the monkey was up in the tree, hiding and looking. Then he saw the kiap, who wasn't carrying any gun. And he saw he had no police-boys. Then the monkey went running, got the food ready, and waited for the kiap. Well, then the kiap approached. When the kiap approached, then the two went straight to meet the kiap. The two said: "You come now." Then they went and got the kiap's two children, and the two children went running straight to their father. The two said: "Papa!" Well, then the monkey killed the pig, and got everything ready. Well, then the kiap ate, and they all shook hands. Well, then the kiap said: "Eh! I would like to go now." Then the two said: "You two! Follow your father now." Well, the two said good-bye to the kiap, and the kiap said good-bye to them, and the kiap went straight to his village, and the children followed him, and they "lived happily ever after." That's all.
COMMENT

The main interest of mythology springs from the fact that it is in stories of this kind that people express their own emotional phrasings of the world and their own fears and fantasies.

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A Melanesian Culture-Contact Myth

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In its main structure the present story has a form such as we would expect in a New Guinea myth. Initiation in New Guinea has the typical structure of a rite de passage, in which there is first a separation of the novices from the home life which may be symbolized as a form of death; the novices may, for example, be "eaten" by some supernatural figure. This separation is followed by a period of confinement, and this again ends with a ceremony for which the boys are elaborately dressed and returned to secular life. I do not, however, know of any New Guinea myth which precisely follows this pattern. There are, of course, myths dealing with initiation, but these simply refer overtly to local initiatory practices. In the present story the initiatory reference is submerged in the structure of the story, so that the hearer will probably get the emotional satisfaction associated with the idea of initiating White children, without suffering the anxiety which might come from a cruder lese majest6. The special character of New Guinea initiation derives from a strong emphasis upon feeding up the novices and making them grow. The initiators may even describe themselves as "mothers" of the novices, and the whole re-birth theme of the rite de passage becomes, for the initiators, a compensation for that inadequacy of the male which prevents him from competing on even terms with women in the "mysteries" of parturition. In this myth, this basic structure of the New Guinea initiation ceremony is clearly recognizable, and the fantasy may be summed up as one in which the Monkey and the Cat take two children away from their white parents, put them in a hole, guard them carefully, feed them richly, and finally return them to their father. This particular story has, however, a special interest because in it are expressed the fears and fantasies of the New Guinea native vis-a-vis the White man. It is a myth created and told in the contact situation. It was probably invented by some native in the labor line on some plantation, and has probably been embroidered by other natives on plantations and schooners. The story has thus come to express the fears and fantasies of these natives in their culture contact situation. The story, as a whole, may be viewed as a dream that, somehow, if only the native people could be victorious over the White, in the end the White man and the native could eat together and be friends. It is not a simple dream of victory over the White man, but rather a dream of achieving equality with him. After each defeat the District Officer remains alive and unhurt, but each conflict is told with gusto and with evident satisfaction in the triumph of the Monkey and the Cat. If we examine in detail the characterization of the various people in the story, the picture becomes even clearer: The Monkey and the Cat are clearly the heroes, and it is with them that the native narrator gladly identifies himself. Neither Cat nor Monkey is native to New Guinea, and it is perhaps no accident that these culture-contact animals are chosen to personify the mythical hope of the native. They are characterized as all-powerful, clever, able to handle all the complexities of the

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262

Journal of American Folklore

White man's culture-writing and shoes and muskets. And yet they are gentle in their treatment of the White man's children and magnanimous in their final victory. The District Officer is not a villain. He is explosive and ready to believe the worst of the Monkey and the Cat, but he loves his children and he is courageous and determined. At the end, totally defeated, he is willing to believe in the good intentions of the Monkey and the Cat. The District Officer's children are scarcely characterized, but running through the story we can recognize the passionate tug on native maternal instincts which the White child seems to exercise throughout New Guinea. The real villains of the story are the native servants of the District Officer. Of these the most criminal is undoubtedly the shoot-boy, who perverts the first message sent by the Monkey. It is the shoot-boy who makes the District Officer believe that the Monkey and the Cat have "stolen" his children, and, later, vengeance is exacted of all the other employees of the government, the police-boys and the men on the Man-of-War. The dominant race may be regarded with affection, but its Quislings are to be ruthlessly exterminated by fire and water. Columbia University, New York, N. Y. Brown University, Providence, R. I.

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