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Service Manual Horizonmacro indoor

E Motorola 1999 - 2007 All Rights Reserved Printed in the U.K.

Service Manual: Horizonmacro indoor


29 Jan 2007

68P02902W06-C006

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Copyrights, notices and trademarks


Copyrights
The Motorola products described in this document may include copyrighted Motorola computer programs stored in semiconductor memories or other media. Laws in the United States and other countries preserve for Motorola certain exclusive rights for copyright computer programs, including the exclusive right to copy or reproduce in any form the copyright computer program. Accordingly, any copyright Motorola computer programs contained in the Motorola products described in this document may not be copied or reproduced in any manner without the express written permission of Motorola. Furthermore, the purchase of Motorola products shall not be deemed to grant either directly or by implication, estoppel or otherwise, any license under the copyrights, patents or patent applications of Motorola, except for the rights that arise by operation of law in the sale of a product.

Restrictions
The software described in this document is the property of Motorola. It is furnished under a license agreement and may be used and/or disclosed only in accordance with the terms of the agreement. Software and documentation are copyright materials. Making unauthorized copies is prohibited by law. No part of the software or documentation may be reproduced, transmitted, transcribed, stored in a retrieval system, or translated into any language or computer language, in any form or by any means, without prior written permission of Motorola.

Accuracy
While reasonable efforts have been made to assure the accuracy of this document, Motorola assumes no liability resulting from any inaccuracies or omissions in this document, or from the use of the information obtained herein. Motorola reserves the right to make changes to any products described herein to improve reliability, function, or design, and reserves the right to revise this document and to make changes from time to time in content hereof with no obligation to notify any person of revisions or changes. Motorola does not assume any liability arising out of the application or use of any product or circuit described herein; neither does it convey license under its patent rights of others.

Trademarks

and MOTOROLA are registered trademarks of Motorola Inc. Intelligence Everywhere, M-Cell and Taskfinder are trademarks of Motorola Inc. All other brands and corporate names are trademarks of their respective owners.

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Contents
Issue status of this manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . General information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reporting safety issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Warnings and cautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . General warnings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . General cautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Devices sensitive to static . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Motorola manual sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GMR amendment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GMR amendment record . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 5 6 7 11 12 13 14 15

Technical Description (Tech.) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Chapter 1 Overview and specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 11


Equipment introduction and manual definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 13 M-Cell6 comparison with Horizonmacro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 19 Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Overview of Horizonmacro indoor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Names and acronyms for main cabinet equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cabinet inside view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuration information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Finding information in this manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stacking capability and cabinet view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Functional diagram of Horizonmacro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Comparison overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Horizonmacro and M-Cell6 compatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Comparison of Horizonmacro and M-Cell6 connections and modules . . Overview of specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Software requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Approval and safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Environmental limits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Power requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . RF power output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sensitivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Battery backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BSC connectivity options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Indoor cabinet dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Weights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Torque values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Frequency capability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Structural considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Layout plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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111 1 3 1 4 1 5 1 6 1 6 1 7 1 8 1 9 1 9 110 111 111 111 111 112 113 114 114 114 114 115 115 116 118 118

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Chapter 2 Cabinet structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 21


Cabinet structure of Horizonmacro indoor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 23 Empty cabinet and SURF harness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 26 Top panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 28 Cage backplane interface panel harness assembly (CBIA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . External cabinet view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Overview of structure description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Space required around cabinet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Filled cabinet view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cabinet door and optional hood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SURF harness and cabinet attachment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cabinet view with installed SURF harness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SURF harness view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stacking bracket and CCB basket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Top panel description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Top panel view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CBIA overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CBIA and interface panel schematic view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Backplane and harness view including door switch and heat sensors . . CBIA cage function and diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CBIA harness function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CBIA backplane function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Attachment of cage to cabinet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Interface panel function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Interface panel diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Interface panel pinouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . External alarm connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GPS connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CCB connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BIB (BIM) interconnection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T43 (CIM) interconnection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PIX conditions input/output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ICS connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Door function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Door external and internal view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hood function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . View of hood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Securing pins and hood removal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stacking bracket function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stacking bracket diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stacking bracket front cover function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . View of stacked cabinets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. 2 9 23 2 4 2 4 25 220 26 2 6 27 222 2 8 28 2 9 2 9 210 211 211 212 212 212 213 213 214 214 215 215 217 218 219 220 220 221 221 221 222 222 223 223

Chapter 3 Temperature control system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 31


Indoor temperature control system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 33
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Fan unit description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Temperature control overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cabinet over temperature control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Temperature sensors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cabinet restart after shutdown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fan unit overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fan operation and reset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Filter option and effect on fans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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34 3 3 3 3 33 33 34 34 34

Chapter 4 Cabinet power supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 41


Horizonmacro indoor power supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Power supply module (PSM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hold-up battery module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Circuit breaker module (CBM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Power supply overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Location of power modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MicroBCU Power Supply Module (BPSM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Types and overview of PSM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PSM locations and redundancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PSM module view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PSM alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PSM LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PSM backplane protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Introduction to hold-up battery module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Front panel switch and LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hold-up module batteries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Functional description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hold-up battery module functional diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CBM overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . View of CBM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Operation of CBM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Introduction to BPSM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BPSM diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Functional description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. 4 3 44 4 7 412 4 3 4 3 414 4 4 4 5 45 4 6 4 6 4 6 4 7 48 49 4 9 410 410 411 411 412 412 413 414 414 415

Chapter 5 RF modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 51


RF equipment detail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . RF overview and RF test function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Compact transceiver unit (CTU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Compact transceiver unit 2 (CTU2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Overview of RF equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . RF specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Receive RF hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transmit (Tx) RF hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rx/Tx single antenna duplexing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Frequency hopping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . RF overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . RF main component explanation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . RF loopback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . RF functional diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Description of RF test modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SURF module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Overview of CTU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CTU internal boards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alarm reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . View of a CTU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CTU front panel detail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CTU Tx connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CTU Rx function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CTU interface function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tx blocks overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Restrictions when using CTU2s in Horizonmacro indoor . . . . . . . . . . . . . Overview of the CTU2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CTU2 internal boards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alarm reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . View of a CTU2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CTU2 front panel detail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CTU2 Tx connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CTU2 Rx function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CTU2 interface function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EGPRS capability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Blanking plate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Overview of transceiver frequency hopping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Synthesizer frequency hopping (SFH) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Baseband frequency hopping (BBH) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Feedthrough plate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SURF module overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Single band SURF module view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Functional description of the single band SURF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Single band SURF functional diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dual band SURF module view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Functional description of dual band SURF modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dual band SURF functional diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . HCU plate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Introduction to transmit blocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Screw retention in Tx block locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . View of basket for Tx blocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transmit block connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . View of Tx block connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech.

524 56 5 6 58 59 510 525 511 511 512 513 514 515 515 515 533 516 516 517 518 519 520 521 521 522 523 536 524 524 524 537 525 526 528 529 530 531 532 538 533 533 534 534 535

TDF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 540 Purpose of blanking plate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 536 View of blanking plate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 536
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Dual band TDF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Purpose of feedthrough plate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . View of feedthrough plate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Feedthrough plate connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . DCF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . HCU overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . HCU view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . HCU functional diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . HCU connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . DDF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Overview of TDF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TDF view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TDF functional diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TDF connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CCB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Overview of dual band TDF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dual band TDF view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dual band TDF functional diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dual band TDF connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . DCF overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . DCF view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . DCF functional diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . DCF connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Overview of DDF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . DDF view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . DDF functional diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . DDF connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CCB overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CCB control board (TCB) and set switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TCB and link redundancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CCB view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CCB configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CCB functional description and diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech.

542 537 537 537 544 538 538 538 539 546 540 540 541 541 548 542 542 543 543 544 544 545 545 546 546 547 547 548 548 548 549 550 551

Chapter 6 Digital modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 61


Overview of digital modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 63 MCUF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 66 NIU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 616 T43/BIB-NIU - E1/T1 mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Overview and redundancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Digital module and BPSM locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MCUF and NIU redundancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Full size and half size modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Digital module and transceiver connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Diagram of digital module and transceiver connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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FMUX module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MCUF overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Capability to replace MCU of M-Cell6 and M-Cell2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GPROC TSW and GLCK functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MCUF module view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MCUF functional diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Link to redundant MCUF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Front panel interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Front panel switches and indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PIX interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . DRAM, flash EPROM and code loading functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ASIC functionality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sync block functionality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Integral MCUF FMUX functionality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alarm module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Overview of NIU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NIU locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NIU command identity number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module view and LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NIU functionality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NIU diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Control processor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NIU/MCUF framing and clocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Distance measurement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Radio signalling links (RSLs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T1 NIU need to set link type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Overview of T43/BIB-NIU connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NIU to T43 mapping and command ID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Diagram of T43 connection to NIUs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Overview of FMUX module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FMUX module view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FMUX functional diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FMUX functional explanation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alarm module overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alarm module view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alarm module functionality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alarm module replacement effect on alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alarm collection from extension cabinets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alarm module display presentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech. Tech.

623 66 6 6 67 67 68 69 6 9 610 610 611 612 613 615 625 616 616 616 617 617 618 619 619 619 620 620 621 621 622 623 623 624 624 625 625 626 626 626 627

Maintenance and Parts (Maint.) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Chapter 1 Routine maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 11


Routine maintenance overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 13 Horizonmacro indoor tool list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 15 Doors removal and refitting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 18
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6-monthly maintenance procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . In this chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reporting faulty devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Routine maintenance intervals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-monthly maintenance procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Overview of tool list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tool list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cleaning agents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Annual check of the installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Assumptions door, hood, and stacking bracket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Door operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hood removal and refitting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stacking bracket removal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stacking bracket front cover removal and fit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24-monthly maintenance procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Type of procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cleaning inlets and exhaust grilles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Replacing the air filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Summary of 12-monthly procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Checking and cleaning fans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cabinet modules in operational positions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Checking normal operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Powering down the cabinet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Visual inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Earth continuity check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AC power system insulation check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Power up procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Summary of 24-monthly procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mechanical inspection of cabinet, locks and hinges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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110 1 3 1 3 13 1 4 111 1 5 1 5 1 7 114 18 1 8 1 8 18 1 9 119 110 110 110 111 111 112 113 114 114 115 115 116 119 120

Chapter 2 FRU replacement procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 21


Overview of replacement procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 23 Additional replacement parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 26 Replacing a door . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 27 Replacing a cabinet heat sensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Field Replaceable Units (FRUs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FRU list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Torque values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FRU locations within cabinet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Replacing a hood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Policy on non-FRU parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . List of non-FRU parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Procedure for replacing non-FRU parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CBIA attachment screws . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Replacing a stacking bracket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Introduction to door replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Views of door . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Replacement of door . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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211 2 7 2 7 28

Replacing a fan module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 213 Overview of heat sensors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 29 Procedure for heat sensor replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 29 Replacing a circuit breaker module (CBM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Introduction to hood replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . View of hood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Replacing the hood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. 215 210 210 210

Replacing a power supply module (PSM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 217 View of stacking bracket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 211 Procedure to replace a stacking bracket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 212 Replacing a hold-up battery module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Introduction to fan replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . View of fan modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Identifying fan module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Replacing fan modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Replacing a transceiver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Preconditions for CBM replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Views of CBM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Replacing a CBM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Preserving transceiver calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Introduction to PSM replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Preconditions for PSM replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . View of PSM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Replacing a non-redundant PSM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Replacing a redundant PSM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. 219 213 213 214 214 221 215 215 216 225 217 217 217 218 218

Enabling the preserve transceiver calibration data feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 230 To Replace a hold-up battery module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 219 Transceiver calibration data exchange procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Preconditions for transceiver replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . View of a CTU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . View of a CTU2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Replacement procedure for a transceiver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Calibrating transceiver bay level offset tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Introduction to preserving transceiver calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Calibration data overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Test equipment required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Commands used . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CINDY commissioning tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Replacing a SURF module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Introduction to the preserve transceiver calibration data feature . . . . . . . Enabling the preserve feature at the OMC-R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Enabling the preserve feature at the BSC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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231 221 221 222 223 236 225 225 229 229 229 262 230 230 230

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Replacing a Tx block, HCU or plate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Introduction to transceiver calibration data exchange procedures . . . . . Preserve transceiver calibration data procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transceiver calibration procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transceiver recalibration procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Replacing a CCB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Introduction to bay level offset tables calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Test equipment required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CTU Rx bay level calibration procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CTU2 Rx bay level calibration procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Site restoration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Digital module replacement (MCUF, NIU, FMUX, BPSM, Alarm) . . . . . . . . . . . . Preconditions for SURF replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . View of the SURF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Replacing a SURF module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Redundant MCUF firmware compatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Introduction to Tx block replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Views of typical Tx block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Replacing a Tx block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Blanking plate, feedthrough plate or HCU replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Calibrating the MCUF (GCLK) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Overview of CCB replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . View of CCBs in stacking bracket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Removing CCBs and CCB control boards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fitting replacement CCBs and CCB control boards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Introduction to digital module replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Diagram of digital modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Replacing digital modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Overview of MCUF firmware compatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Checking MCUF firmware compatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Updating redundant MCUF firmware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Testing MCUF redundancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Introduction to MCUF (GLCK) calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . When to calibrate the GCLK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Test equipment required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Preparation for GCLK calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GCLK calibration procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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265 231 231 232 234 269 236 236 237 252 261 272 262 262 263 275 265 266 267 268 279 269 269 270 271 272 272 273 275 275 275 278 279 279 279 280 281

Chapter 3 Site verification procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 31


Introduction to Horizonmacro verification procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 33 Test equipment, leads and plugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 34 Transceiver VSWR and cell site offset information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 37 Normal CTU VSWR and cell site power calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 315 Purpose of this chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 33 CINDY commissioning tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 33
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Normal CTU2 cell site power calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Introduction to test equipment, leads and plugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Test equipment required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Test leads required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CTU VSWR and cell site power calibration for CCBs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Introduction to output power calibration and VSWR check . . . . . . . . . . . . Test equipment required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Commands used . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Test stages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Preparation for output power calibration and VSWR check . . . . . . . . . . . Output format for clear_cal_data command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Checking the database equipage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Introduction to normal VSWR and cell site power calibration . . . . . . . . . . Automatic VSWR test procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Manual VSWR test procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . VSWR reverse power test procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tx output power calibration procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Checking the E1/T1 link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tx output power calibration procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tx cabinet channel numbers and frequencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Checking PIX connections and alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Introduction to CCB VSWR and cell site power calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . Calibration procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CCB cavities tuning procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . VSWR calibration procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cell site power calibration procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parking the CCB cavities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Repeat for remaining cavities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Site restoration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . RF output power check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Returning the CTUs to call processing mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Introduction to checking the database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Test equipment required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Commands used . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Preparation for database checks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Database equipage check procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Introduction to checking the E1/T1 link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Test equipment required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Commands used . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Preparation for the E1/T1 link check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E1/T1 link test procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Introduction to checking the PIX connections and alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . Test equipment required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Commands used . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Preparing for the PIX connections and alarms test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PIX connection test procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint.

321 3 4 3 4 35 326 3 7 3 8 39 310 311 314 334 315 316 317 318 319 337 321 325 339 326 327 328 329 330 330 331 332 332 333 334 334 334 334 335 337 337 337 337 338 339 339 339 340 340

Chapter 4 Parts information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 41


Horizonmacro indoor parts list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 43
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Glossary of unique terms for this equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Introduction to Horizonmacro indoor parts list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FRU items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ordering method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Diagram of cabinet modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Spares tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . View of CCBs in stacking bracket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CCB spares table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Digital module and BPSM locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Digital module and BPSM table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Diagram of the door . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Door table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Diagram of hood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Indoor hood table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Glossary terms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint. Maint.

411 4 3 43 43 4 4 45 4 7 4 7 4 8 4 8 49 49 410 410 411 411

Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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List of Figures
Figure Tech. 1-1 Indoor cabinet on plinth with optional hood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 13 Figure Tech. 1-2 Cabinet with components identified (door and base plinth removed) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 15 Figure Tech. 1-3 View of two cabinets stacked in maximum assembly . . . . . . . Tech. 17 Figure Tech. 1-4 Functional diagram of cabinet components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 18 Figure Tech. 1-5 Digital connections in maximum BTS site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 19 Figure Tech. 1-6 Indoor cabinet site layout plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 118 Figure Tech. 2-1 Closed cabinet and cabinet with hood removed and door open . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 23 Figure Tech. 2-2 Cabinet, without door or hood, showing main components . Tech. 25 Figure Tech. 2-3 SURF harness installed in empty cabinet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 26 Figure Tech. 2-4 SURF harness with connectors indicated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 27 Figure Tech. 2-5 Top panel with major features labelled . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 28 Figure Tech. 2-6 View of CBIA cage and the interface panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 29 Figure Tech. 2-7 Rear view of CBIA showing backplane and harness . . . . . . . Tech. 210 Figure Tech. 2-8 Front view of CBIA cage showing where modules fit . . . . . . . Tech. 211 Figure Tech. 2-9 Interface panel connector locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 213 Figure Tech. 2-10 Balanced-line interconnect board (BIB) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 215 Figure Tech. 2-11 Type 43 interconnect board (T43) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 217 Figure Tech. 2-12 External and internal view of cabinet door . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 220 Figure Tech. 2-13 View of hood as seen from the front of the cabinet . . . . . . . Tech. 221 Figure Tech. 2-14 View of stacking bracket with CCB basket installed. . . . . . . Tech. 222 Figure Tech. 2-15 View of two stacked Horizonmacro indoor cabinets showing stacking bracket front covers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 223 Figure Tech. 3-1 View of 2-fan and 4-fan units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 34 Figure Tech. 4-1 Location of power modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 43 Figure Tech. 4-2 View of PSM with LEDs identified . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 45 Figure Tech. 4-3 View of the hold-up battery module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 47 Figure Tech. 4-4 Hold-up battery module electrical layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 410 Figure Tech. 4-5 Views of CBM with circuit breaker buttons identified . . . . . . . Tech. 412 Figure Tech. 4-6 BPSM view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 414 Figure Tech. 4-7 Functional diagram of BPSM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 415 Figure Tech. 5-1 RF functional diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 59 Figure Tech. 5-2 View of CTU showing main external features . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 513 Figure Tech. 5-3 CTU front panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 514 Figure Tech. 5-4 CTU2, showing main external features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 519 Figure Tech. 5-5 CTU2 front panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 520
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Figure Tech. 5-6 SURF to CTU2 interconnections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 521 Figure Tech. 5-7 Single band SURF module (later type) with features identified . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 526 Figure Tech. 5-8 Single band SURF module (earlier type) with features identified . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 527 Figure Tech. 5-9 Functional diagram of the single band SURF module . . . . . . Tech. 529 Figure Tech. 5-10 Later type dual band SURF module with features identified Tech. 530 Figure Tech. 5-11 Functional diagram of the dual band SURF module . . . . . . Tech. 532 Figure Tech. 5-12 View of top panel showing Tx block basket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 534 Figure Tech. 5-13 Typical Tx block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 535 Figure Tech. 5-14 View of blanking plate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 536 Figure Tech. 5-15 View of feedthrough plate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 537 Figure Tech. 5-16 HCU plate view showing connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 538 Figure Tech. 5-17 HCU functional diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 538 Figure Tech. 5-18 View of TDF Tx block with connectors identified . . . . . . . . . Tech. 540 Figure Tech. 5-19 TDF functional diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 541 Figure Tech. 5-20 View of dual band TDF Tx block with connectors identified Tech. 542 Figure Tech. 5-21 Dual band TDF functional diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 543 Figure Tech. 5-22 DCF Tx block view with connectors identified . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 544 Figure Tech. 5-23 Functional diagram of the DCF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 545 Figure Tech. 5-24 DDF Tx block view with connectors identified . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 546 Figure Tech. 5-25 Functional diagram of the DDF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 547 Figure Tech. 5-26 EGSM900 CCBs with control boards fitted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 549 Figure Tech. 5-27 DCS1800 CCBs with control boards fitted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 550 Figure Tech. 5-28 CCB configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 550 Figure Tech. 5-29 Functional diagram of CCB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 551 Figure Tech. 6-1 Digital and BPSM module locations, including optional redundancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 63 Figure Tech. 6-2 Digital module and transceiver connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 65 Figure Tech. 6-3 View of the MCUF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 67 Figure Tech. 6-4 Functional diagram of MCUF in MCUF mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 68 Figure Tech. 6-5 View of NIU module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 617 Figure Tech. 6-6 Functional diagram of NIU module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 618 Figure Tech. 6-7 Diagram of T43 connection to NIUs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 622 Figure Tech. 6-8 View of the FMUX module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 623 Figure Tech. 6-9 Functional diagram of FMUX module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 624 Figure Tech. 6-10 Alarm module view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 625 Figure Maint. 1-1 Removing and fitting the stacking bracket front cover . . . . . Maint. 19
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Figure Maint. 1-2 Cabinet modules with door and hood removed . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 112 Figure Maint. 1-3 Diagram of cabinet with expanded view of CBM . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 116 Figure Maint. 2-1 Cabinet, without door or hood, showing FRU components . Maint. 25 Figure Maint. 2-2 Inside and outside views of door . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 27 Figure Maint. 2-3 Hood view when placed on top of cabinet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 210 Figure Maint. 2-4 Stacking bracket view with optional CCB basket . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 211 Figure Maint. 2-5 View of fan modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 213 Figure Maint. 2-6 Views of CBM with circuit breaker buttons identified . . . . . . Maint. 215 Figure Maint. 2-7 View of PSM with key features identified . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 217 Figure Maint. 2-8 Connecting battery isolation jumper lead . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 220 Figure Maint. 2-9 CTU view with key features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 221 Figure Maint. 2-10 CTU2 view with key features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 222 Figure Maint. 2-11 View of a later type single band SURF module . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 262 Figure Maint. 2-12 Views of typical Tx block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 266 Figure Maint. 2-13 CCBs in installed position with CCB basket bar attached . Maint. 269 Figure Maint. 2-14 Digital and BPSM module locations including optional redundancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 272 Figure Maint. 2-15 Horizonmacro GCLK calibration cable connections . . . . . . Maint. 280 Figure Maint. 3-1 Horizonmacro 9-way to 9-way hardware verification cable connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 35 Figure Maint. 3-2 Horizonmacro 9-way to 9-way transceiver cable connections . . . . . . Maint. 36 Figure Maint. 4-1 Diagram of indoor cabinet showing major FRUs . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 44 Figure Maint. 4-2 CCBs in installed position with CCB basket bar attached . . Maint. 47 Figure Maint. 4-3 Digital module and BPSM locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 48 Figure Maint. 4-4 Internal and external view of the door . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 49 Figure Maint. 4-5 View of the hood as seen from the front of the cabinet . . . . Maint. 410

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Table Tech. 1-1 Main components of Horizonmacro and M-Cell6 . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 110 Table Tech. 1-2 Horizonmacro specification compliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 111 Table Tech. 1-3 Environmental limits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 111 Table Tech. 1-4 Main indoor cabinet power supply requirements . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 112 Table Tech. 1-5 Power consumption of full cabinet, including digital redundancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 112 Table Tech. 1-6 CTU RF power output at cabinet after Tx blocks . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 113 Table Tech. 1-7 CTU2 RF power output at cabinet after Tx blocks . . . . . . . . . Tech. 113 Table Tech. 1-8 Rx sensitivity * . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 114 Table Tech. 1-9 Cabinet dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 114 Table Tech. 1-10 Main indoor cabinet weights (with six transceivers) . . . . . . . Tech. 115 Table Tech. 1-11 Torque values for all cabinet screws/bolts and RF connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 115 Table Tech. 1-12 Frequency band characteristics GSM/EGSM900 and DCS1800 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 116 Table Tech. 1-13 Frequency band characteristics GSM850 and PCS1900 . Tech. 117 Table Tech. 2-1 External alarms indoor pin shorts (37-way D-type) . . . . . . . . . Tech. 214 Table Tech. 2-2 GPS pin connections (15-way D-type) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 214 Table Tech. 2-3 CCB pin connections (15-way D-type) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 215 Table Tech. 2-4 BIB interconnections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 216 Table Tech. 2-5 T43 interconnections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 217 Table Tech. 2-6 PIX0 pin connections (37-way D-type) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 218 Table Tech. 2-7 PIX1 pin connections (37-way D-type) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 219 Table Tech. 2-8 ICS pin connections (25-way D-type) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 219 Table Tech. 4-1 Input currents for power supply module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 44 Table Tech. 4-2 PSM operational configurations, CTUs only . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 45 Table Tech. 4-3 PSM operational configurations, CTU/CTU2 combinations . . Tech. 45 Table Tech. 4-4 Power supply module LEDs function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 46 Table Tech. 4-5 Hold-up battery module specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 48 Table Tech. 5-1 CTU front panel status indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 512 Table Tech. 5-2 CTU front panel connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 514 Table Tech. 5-3 CTU2 front panel status indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 518 Table Tech. 5-4 CTU2 front panel connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 520 Table Tech. 5-5 Comparison between GPRS and EGPRS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 523 Table Tech. 6-1 Full size and half size digital modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 64 Table Tech. 6-2 MCUF front panel LED indication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 610 Table Tech. 6-3 NIU slot and equivalent command identity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 616
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Table Tech. 6-4 NIU LED display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 617 Table Tech. 6-5 T43/BIB connector to NIU boards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 621 Table Tech. 6-6 Alarm module LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tech. 627 Table Maint. 1-1 Routine maintenance schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 14 Table Maint. 1-2 Horizonmacro indoor tool list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 15 Table Maint. 1-3 Fan positions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 111 Table Maint. 1-4 Normal LED indication of cabinet modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 113 Table Maint. 1-5 BS7671 (16th edition) Table 71A (part of) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 115 Table Maint. 2-1 Torque values for all cabinet screws/bolts and RF connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 24 Table Maint. 2-2 Fan positions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 214 Table Maint. 2-3 Transceiver calibration scenarios and procedures . . . . . . . . Maint. 227 Table Maint. 2-4 Transceiver calibration commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 229 Table Maint. 2-5 MMI commands for CTU bay level offset calibration . . . . . . . Maint. 237 Table Maint. 2-6 GSM850 CTU test frequencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 242 Table Maint. 2-7 EGSM900 CTU test frequencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 242 Table Maint. 2-8 DCS1800 CTU test frequencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 243 Table Maint. 2-9 PCS1900 CTU test frequencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 244 Table Maint. 2-10 CTU frequency offset addresses (GSM850) . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 249 Table Maint. 2-11 CTU frequency offset addresses (EGSM900) . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 250 Table Maint. 2-12 CTU frequency offset addresses (DCS1800) . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 250 Table Maint. 2-13 CTU frequency offset addresses (PCS1900) . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 251 Table Maint. 2-14 MMI commands for CTU2 Rx bay level offset calibration . . Maint. 252 Table Maint. 2-15 EGSM900 CTU2 test frequencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 259 Table Maint. 2-16 DCS1800 CTU2 test frequencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 260 Table Maint. 2-17 Connectors for each type of Tx block module . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 267 Table Maint. 3-1 Hardware verification equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 34 Table Maint. 3-2 Test plug pin connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 36 Table Maint. 3-3 CTU VSWR and power calibration commands . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 39 Table Maint. 3-4 CTU2 power calibration commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 310 Table Maint. 3-5 Achievable Tx RF power output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 319 Table Maint. 3-6 CTU2 Tx power offsets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 323 Table Maint. 3-7 Switch settings for example of value 75 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 326 Table Maint. 3-8 Achievable Tx RF power output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 330 Table Maint. 3-9 CTU 900 CCB cavity tuning commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 331 Table Maint. 3-10 CTU 1800 CCB cavity tuning commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 331 Table Maint. 3-11 CTU 900 and CTU 1800 CCB cavity parking commands . . Maint. 331 Table Maint. 4-1 List of Horizonmacro indoor spares . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 45
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Table Maint. 4-2 CCB and stacking bracket spares . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 47 Table Maint. 4-3 Digital module and BPSM spares . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 48 Table Maint. 4-4 Door spare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 49 Table Maint. 4-5 Indoor hood spare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maint. 410

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xx

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Issue status of this manual

Issue status of this manual


Introduction
The following shows the issue status of this manual since it was first released.

Version information
The following table lists the versions of this manual in order of manual issue: Manual issue
O A B

Date of issue
03 Jun 1999 15 Oct 1999 29 May 2002 Original issue.

Remarks

Updated to include details for EGSM900. Includes redesigned component information (e.g. SURF, internal fans and packaging). Optimization information added. Updated to new service manual format. CTU2, AMR and EGPRS information added.

C C005 C006

31 Oct 2003 13 Dec 2005 29 Jan 2007

Updated with CDCNs 02W06001, 02W06004 and 02W06005.


Updated with CDCN 02W06006.

Resolution of Service Requests


The following Service Requests are now resolved in this manual: Service Request
1052244 272322/272 278 2024770 2069242 2146101

GMR Number
N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

Remarks
References to snd cmb command replaced by send eqcp in the CCB cavities tuning procedure. Variations observed between the output of the two carriers in a CTU2. Replacement of an analog wattmeter with a digital wattmeter for calibrating a base station. Amendment to the GCLK calibration procedure. Replaced content in subsection NIU command identity number of section NIU.

Incorporation of CDCNs
CDCN Number 02W06001 Remarks Revised few sections of Chapter 3 to provide documentation support for a CQSR delivery. Revised table 31 of Category 523.

02W06004

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Issue status of this manual

GSM

CDCN Number 02W06005 02W06006

Remarks Amendments to GCLK calibration procedure. Replaced content above Tech. Table 63 of Category Technical Description.

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General information

General information
Important notice
If this manual was obtained when attending a Motorola training course, it will not be updated or amended by Motorola. It is intended for TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY. If it was supplied under normal operational circumstances, to support a major software release, then corrections will be supplied automatically by Motorola in the form of General Manual Revisions (GMRs).

Purpose
Motorola cellular communications manuals are intended to instruct and assist personnel in the operation, installation and maintenance of the Motorola cellular infrastructure equipment and ancillary devices. It is recommended that all personnel engaged in such activities be properly trained by Motorola.
WARNING

Failure to comply with Motorolas operation, installation and maintenance instructions may, in exceptional circumstances, lead to serious injury or death.

These manuals are not intended to replace the system and equipment training offered by Motorola, although they can be used to supplement and enhance the knowledge gained through such training.

About this manual


The manual contains: technical description of the hardware elements, maintenance procedures and parts lists for the Horizonmacro indoor equipment in Motorola GSM850, GSM/EGSM900, DCS1800 and PCS1900 systems. The objectives are to help the reader:
S S S S

Gain an overview of the equipment and interconnection of components. Understand the function and operation of all components. Recognize configurations, and equivalent module functions to M-Cell6 (an interchangeable previous cabinet). Be aware of the warnings (potential for harm to people) and cautions (potential for harm to equipment) to be observed when working on the equipment. Understand how to inspect and maintain the equipment. Have a clear ready reference for all dedicated information in one manual. NOTE
The Horizonmacro indoor service manual no longer contains installation and commissioning information. Refer to

S S

Installation and Configuration: Horizonmacro indoor, 68P02902W08 .

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Feature references
Most of the manuals in the set, of which this manual is part, are revised to accommodate features released at Motorola General System Releases (GSRn) or GPRS Support Node (GSNn) releases. In these manuals, new and amended features are tagged to help users to assess the impact on installed networks. The tags are the appropriate Motorola Roadmap DataBase (RDB) numbers or Research and Development Prioritization (RDP) numbers. The tags include index references which are listed in the manual Index. The Index includes the entry feature which is followed by a list of the RDB or RDP numbers for the released features, with page references and hot links in electronic copy. The tags have the format: {nnnn} or {nnnnn} Where: {nnnn} {nnnnn} The tags are positioned in text as follows: New and amended feature information New sentence/s or new or amended text. Complete new blocks of text as follows: S Full sections under a main heading S Full paragraphs under subheadings Tag position in text Immediately before the affected text. Immediately after the headings as follows: S Main heading S Subheading is: the RDB number the RDP number

New or amended complete Figures and Tables Warning, Caution and Note boxes. General command syntax, operator input or displays (in special fonts).

After the Figure or Table number and before the title text. Immediately before the affected text in the box. On a separate line immediately above the affected item.

For a list of Roadmap numbers and the RDB or RDP numbers of the features included in this software release, refer to the manual System Information: GSM Overview (68P02901W01), or to the manual System Information: GPRS Overview (68P02903W01).

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General information

Data encryption
In order to avoid electronic eavesdropping, data passing between certain elements in the GSM and GPRS network is encrypted. In order to comply with the export and import requirements of particular countries, this encryption occurs at different levels as individually standardised, or may not be present at all in some parts of the network in which it is normally implemented. The manual set, of which this manual is a part, covers encryption as if fully implemented. Because the rules differ in individual countries, limitations on the encryption included in the particular software being delivered, are covered in the Release Notes that accompany the individual software release.

Cross references
Throughout this manual, cross references are made to the chapter numbers and section names. The section name cross references are printed bold in text. This manual is divided into uniquely identified and numbered chapters that, in turn, are divided into sections. Sections are not numbered, but are individually named at the top of each page, and are listed in the table of contents.

Text conventions
The following conventions are used in the Motorola cellular infrastructure manuals to represent keyboard input text, screen output text and special key sequences.

Input
Characters typed in at the keyboard are shown like this.

Output
Messages, prompts, file listings, directories, utilities, and environmental variables that appear on the screen are shown like this.

Special key sequences


Special key sequences are represented as follows: CTRLc ALTf | CR or RETURN Press the Control and c keys at the same time. Press the Alt and f keys at the same time. Press the pipe symbol key. Press the Return (Enter) key. The Return key is identified with the symbol on both the PC and the Sun keyboards. The keyboard Return key may also be identified with the word Return.

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Reporting safety issues


Introduction
Whenever a safety issue arises, carry out the following procedure in all instances. Ensure that all site personnel are familiar with this procedure.

Procedure
Whenever a safety issue arises: 1. 2. 3. Make the equipment concerned safe, for example by removing power. Make no further attempt to adjust or rectify the equipment. Report the problem directly to the Customer Network Resolution Centre, Swindon +44 (0)1793 565444 or China +86 10 68437733 (telephone) and follow up with a written report by fax, Swindon +44 (0)1793 430987 or China +86 10 68423633 (fax). Collect evidence from the equipment under the guidance of the Customer Network Resolution Centre.

4.

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Warnings and cautions

Warnings and cautions


Introduction
The following describes how warnings and cautions are used in this manual and in all manuals of this Motorola manual set.

Warnings
Definition of Warning
A warning is used to alert the reader to possible hazards that could cause loss of life, physical injury, or ill health. This includes hazards introduced during maintenance, for example, the use of adhesives and solvents, as well as those inherent in the equipment.

Example and format


WARNING

Do not look directly into fibre optic cables or data in/out connectors. Laser radiation can come from either the data in/out connectors or unterminated fibre optic cables connected to data in/out connectors.

Failure to comply with warnings


Observe all warnings during all phases of operation, installation and maintenance of the equipment described in the Motorola manuals. Failure to comply with these warnings, or with specific warnings elsewhere in the Motorola manuals, or on the equipment itself, violates safety standards of design, manufacture and intended use of the equipment. Motorola assumes no liability for the customers failure to comply with these requirements.

Cautions
Definition of Caution
A caution means that there is a possibility of damage to systems, software or individual items of equipment within a system. However, this presents no danger to personnel.

Example and format


CAUTION

Do not use test equipment that is beyond its due calibration date; arrange for calibration to be carried out.

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General warnings
Introduction
Observe the following specific warnings during all phases of operation, installation and maintenance of the equipment described in the Motorola manuals:
S S S S S S S S

Potentially hazardous voltage Electric shock RF radiation Laser radiation Heavy equipment Parts substitution Battery supplies Lithium batteries

Failure to comply with these warnings, or with specific warnings elsewhere in the Motorola manuals, violates safety standards of design, manufacture and intended use of the equipment. Motorola assumes no liability for the customers failure to comply with these requirements.

Warning labels
Warnings particularly applicable to the equipment are positioned on the equipment. Personnel working with or operating Motorola equipment must comply with any warning labels fitted to the equipment. Warning labels must not be removed, painted over or obscured in any way.

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General warnings

Specific warnings
Specific warnings used throughout the GSM manual set are shown below. These will be incorporated into procedures as applicable. These must be observed by all personnel at all times when working with the equipment, as must any other warnings given in text, in the illustrations and on the equipment.

Potentially hazardous voltage


WARNING

This equipment operates from a hazardous voltage of 230 V ac single phase or 415 V ac three phase supply. To achieve isolation of the equipment from the ac supply, the ac input isolator must be set to off and locked.

When working with electrical equipment, reference must be made to the Electricity at Work Regulations 1989 (UK), or to the relevant electricity at work legislation for the country in which the equipment is used.
NOTE

Motorola GSM equipment does not utilise high voltages.

Electric shock
WARNING

Do not touch the victim with your bare hands until the electric circuit is broken. Switch off. If this is not possible, protect yourself with dry insulating material and pull or push the victim clear of the conductor. ALWAYS send for trained first aid or medical assistance IMMEDIATELY.

In cases of low voltage electric shock (including public supply voltages), serious injuries and even death, may result. Direct electrical contact can stun a casualty causing breathing, and even the heart, to stop. It can also cause skin burns at the points of entry and exit of the current. In the event of an electric shock it may be necessary to carry out artificial respiration. ALWAYS send for trained first aid or medical assistance IMMEDIATELY. If the casualty is also suffering from burns, flood the affected area with cold water to cool, until trained first aid or medical assistance arrives.

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RF radiation
WARNING

High RF potentials and electromagnetic fields are present in this equipment when in operation. Ensure that all transmitters are switched off when any antenna connections have to be changed. Do not key transmitters connected to unterminated cavities or feeders.

Relevant standards (USA and EC), to which regard should be paid when working with RF equipment are:
S

ANSI IEEE C95.1-1991, IEEE Standard for Safety Levels with Respect to Human Exposure to Radio Frequency Electromagnetic Fields, 3 kHz to 300 GHz. CENELEC 95 ENV 50166-2, Human Exposure to Electromagnetic Fields High Frequency (10 kHz to 300 GHz).

Laser radiation
WARNING

Do not look directly into fibre optic cables or optical data in/out connectors. Laser radiation can come from either the data in/out connectors or unterminated fibre optic cables connected to data in/out connectors.

Lifting equipment
WARNING

When dismantling heavy assemblies, or removing or replacing equipment, a competent responsible person must ensure that adequate lifting facilities are available. Where provided, lifting frames must be used for these operations.

When dismantling heavy assemblies, or removing or replacing equipment, the competent responsible person must ensure that adequate lifting facilities are available. Where provided, lifting frames must be used for these operations. When equipments have to be manhandled, reference must be made to the Manual Handling of Loads Regulations 1992 (UK) or to the relevant manual handling of loads legislation for the country in which the equipment is used.

10

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General warnings

Parts substitution
WARNING

Do not install substitute parts or perform any unauthorized modification of equipment, because of the danger of introducing additional hazards.Contact Motorola if in doubt to ensure that safety features are maintained.

Battery supplies
WARNING

Do not wear earth straps when working with standby battery supplies.

Lithium batteries
WARNING

Lithium batteries, if subjected to mistreatment, may burst and ignite. Defective lithium batteries must not be removed or replaced. Any boards containing defective lithium batteries must be returned to Motorola for repair.

Contact your local Motorola office for how to return defective lithium batteries.

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General cautions

GSM

General cautions
Introduction
Observe the following cautions during operation, installation and maintenance of the equipment described in the Motorola manuals. Failure to comply with these cautions or with specific cautions elsewhere in the Motorola manuals may result in damage to the equipment. Motorola assumes no liability for the customers failure to comply with these requirements.

Caution labels
Personnel working with or operating Motorola equipment must comply with any caution labels fitted to the equipment. Caution labels must not be removed, painted over or obscured in any way.

Specific cautions
Cautions particularly applicable to the equipment are positioned within the text of this manual. These must be observed by all personnel at all times when working with the equipment, as must any other cautions given in text, on the illustrations and on the equipment.

Fibre optics
CAUTION

Fibre optic cables must not be bent in a radius of less than 30 mm.

Static discharge
CAUTION

Motorola equipment contains CMOS devices. These metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) devices are susceptible to damage from electrostatic charge. See the section Devices sensitive to static in the preface of this manual for further information.

12

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Devices sensitive to static

Devices sensitive to static


Introduction
Certain metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) devices embody in their design a thin layer of insulation that is susceptible to damage from electrostatic charge. Such a charge applied to the leads of the device could cause irreparable damage. These charges can be built up on nylon overalls, by friction, by pushing the hands into high insulation packing material or by use of unearthed soldering irons. MOS devices are normally despatched from the manufacturers with the leads shorted together, for example, by metal foil eyelets, wire strapping, or by inserting the leads into conductive plastic foam. Provided the leads are shorted it is safe to handle the device.

Special handling techniques


In the event of one of these devices having to be replaced, observe the following precautions when handling the replacement:
S S

Always wear an earth strap which must be connected to the electrostatic point (ESP) on the equipment. Leave the short circuit on the leads until the last moment. It may be necessary to replace the conductive foam by a piece of wire to enable the device to be fitted. Do not wear outer clothing made of nylon or similar man made material. A cotton overall is preferable. If possible work on an earthed metal surface or anti-static mat. Wipe insulated plastic work surfaces with an anti-static cloth before starting the operation. All metal tools should be used and when not in use they should be placed on an earthed surface. Take care when removing components connected to electrostatic sensitive devices. These components may be providing protection to the device.

S S

S S

When mounted onto printed circuit boards (PCBs), MOS devices are normally less susceptible to electrostatic damage. However PCBs should be handled with care, preferably by their edges and not by their tracks and pins, they should be transferred directly from their packing to the equipment (or the other way around) and never left exposed on the workbench.

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Motorola manual sets

GSM

Motorola manual sets


Introduction
The following manuals provide the information needed to operate, install and maintain the Motorola equipment. CD-ROMs are available, with full navigation, for GSM, and GPRS manual sets. Each CD-ROM includes all manuals related to a specified main GSM or GPRS software release, together with current versions of appropriate hardware manuals. A snapshot copy of online documentation is also included, though it will not be updated in line with subsequent point releases. The CD-ROM does not include Release Notes or documentation supporting specialist products such as MARS or COP. Printed hard copy Electronic, as fully navigable PDF files on:
S

On the Motorola service web. (https://mynetworksupport.motorola.com/index.asp). CD-ROM library produced in support of a major system software release.

The following are the generic manuals in the GSM manual set, these manuals are release dependent: The CD-ROM does not include Release Notes or documentation supporting specialist products such as MARS or COP.

Ordering manuals
The Motorola 68P order (catalogue) number is used to order manuals. All orders for Motorola manuals must be placed with your Motorola Local Office or Representative. Manuals are ordered using the order (catalogue) number.

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GMR amendment

GMR amendment
Introduction to GMRs
Changes to a manual that occur after the printing date are incorporated into the manual using General Manual Revisions (GMRs). GMRs are issued to correct Motorola manuals as and when required. A GMR has the same identity as the target manual. Each GMR is identified by a number in a sequence that starts at 01 for each manual at each issue.

GMR availability
GMRs are published as follows:
S

Printed hard copy - Complete replacement content or loose leaf pages with amendment list. Remove and replace pages in this manual, as detailed on the GMR instruction sheet.

S S

Motorola service web - Updated at the same time as hard copies. CD-ROM - Updated periodically as required.

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Technical Description (Tech.)

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CHAPTER 1 OVERVIEW AND SPECIFICATIONS

CHAPTER 2 CABINET STRUCTURE

CHAPTER 3 TEMPERATURE CONTROL SYSTEM

CHAPTER 4 CABINET POWER SUPPLY

CHAP RF MO

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CHAPTER 5 RF MODULES

iv

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CHAP RF MO

GSM

CHAPTER 6 DIGITAL MODULES

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Chapter 1

Overview and specifications

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Equipment introduction and manual definition

Equipment introduction and manual definition


Overview of Horizonmacro indoor
The Horizonmacro indoor is a base transceiver station (BTS) cabinet with variants that operate in the following frequency bands GSM850, GSM/ EGSM900, DCS1800, and PCS1900. Up to six (single density) Compact Transceiver Units (CTUs) can be fitted, providing up to six carriers. If the later double density CTU2s (developed for Horizon II macro) are installed, up to twelve carriers are supported. Indoor cabinets operate from either 48/60 V dc (positive earth), +27 V dc (negative earth), or wide input, nominal 120/240 V, ac single phase supplies. An optional battery backup system is available for use with the 48/60 V dc BTS, and is described in Service Manual: Battery Backup System for Horizonmacro Indoor 68P02900W59. Cooling is provided by circulation fans located in the bottom of the unit. Figure Tech. 1-1 shows an external view of a standard cabinet with an optional hood fitted.

Figure Tech. 1-1 Indoor cabinet on plinth with optional hood

ig.225.rh

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Equipment introduction and manual definition

GSM

Names and acronyms for main cabinet equipment


This section is intended to give the reader a basic understanding of how components interconnect. The BTS cabinet consists of the cabinet frame structure, a main cage and a top panel, and contains the following equipment, as shown in Figure Tech. 1-2:
S

A digital module shelf, located in the lower right side of the cabinet. This contains master and optional redundant digital modules: Fibre optic multiplexer (FMUX), 1 + 1 redundant (if required). Main control unit with dual FMUX (MCUF), 1 + 1 redundant (if required). Network interface units (NIUs), four in total. An alarm board (no redundancy option). One or two (for redundancy) mBCU power supply modules (BPSMs).

Up to three power supply modules (PSMs) and one circuit breaker module (CBM) in the upper right portion of the cabinet. The PSMs are load sharing, with the third PSM providing optional redundancy. Up to six compact transceiver units (CTUs), located in the left side of the cabinet. NOTE
CTUs may be replaced by CTU2s (with restrictions).

S S

Fan modules mounted in the bottom of the cabinet, two 2-fan modules and one 4-fan module. RF modules, mounted in the top panel, comprising transmit (Tx) blocks, and a receive (Rx) module, the sectorized universal receiver front-end (SURF). The various Tx blocks are listed in Specifications in this chapter. Interface panel, mounted in the top panel, for power and customer communications connectors.

Tech. 14

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Equipment introduction and manual definition

Cabinet inside view


Figure Tech. 1-2 shows the location of components and main headings for detailed information in this manual.

Figure Tech. 1-2 Cabinet with components identified (door and base plinth removed)
RF MODULES
ONE SURF (Rx) THREE Tx BLOCKS (DCFs SHOWN AS EXAMPLE) SIX TRANSCEIVERS (CTU/CTU2s)

POWER SUPPLIES AND CIRCUIT BREAKER


THREE PSMs (see NOTE) CIRCUIT BREAKER MODULE (CBM) T43/BIB DC POWER IN INTERFACE PANEL CONNECTORS

TWO 2-FAN UNITS ONE 4-FAN UNIT

TEMPERATURE CONTROL SYSTEM

ALARM MODULE

DIGITAL MODULES

MCUF FMUX/NIU/BPSM (NOT VISIBLE) TOP SECTION OF PLINTH (SLIDES INTO BASE PLINTH)

NOTE

Three PSMs = 2 + 1 redundant (if required). An optional hold-up battery module may be installed instead of a redundant PSM.

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Equipment introduction and manual definition

GSM

Configuration information
Configuration information can be found in System Information: BSS Equipment Planning (68P02900W21).

Finding information in this manual


A full table of contents (TOC) is provided at the front of this manual. Headings are designed to convey contents accurately, to simplify searching for specific information. The index at the back of the manual provides an alternative method of finding subsections of information. This chapter provides a summary of the equipment, to enable readers to understand terminology and thus locate information through the TOC and index. The service manual comprises two main sections:
S

Technical Description Provides an introduction, specifications, and technical descriptions of all components.

Maintenance and Parts Provides information on maintenance and repair, with procedures to change field replaceable units (FRUs). Lists of options and spares, with diagrams to illustrate FRUs, are also included.

Each section is divided into chapters. The information in each chapter is grouped according to functionality, as shown in Figure Tech. 1-2. NOTE
Installation information for the Horizonmacro indoor is not provided in this manual (refer to Installation and Configuration, (68P02902W08) for installation and configuration information).

Tech. 16

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Equipment introduction and manual definition

Stacking capability and cabinet view


An optional stacking bracket enables any of the BTS variants to have a second cabinet mounted on top of the first. The stacking bracket also enables an optional Cavity Combining Block (CCB) to be installed in an optional stacking bracket basket. A stacking bracket can be placed on top of the second (stacked) cabinet, as shown in Figure Tech. 1-3. NOTE
CCBs are not currently available for the GSM850 or PCS1900 BTS variants.

Figure Tech. 1-3 View of two cabinets stacked in maximum assembly

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Tech. 17

Equipment introduction and manual definition

GSM

Functional diagram of Horizonmacro


Figure Tech. 1-4 shows the functional modules of a Horizonmacro. For clarity, only one transceiver and one Tx block has been shown.

Figure Tech. 1-4 Functional diagram of cabinet components


ANTENNAS (Tx and Rx SEPARATE OR COMBINED)

TO SURF or MCell6 Rx OF EXTENSION CABINET

EXT

0A

0B Rx0

1A

1B Rx1

2A Rx2

2B Rx FILTER Tx FILTER

SURF

SWITCH (CONTROLLED BY TRANSCEIVER)

UP TO THREE Tx BLOCKS

Rx A

Rx B

RF LOOPBACK Tx

UP TO SIX TRANSCEIVERS

RF MODULES DIGITAL MODULES

FMUX FMUX FMUX

2 2 2

TO FMUX OF EXTENSION CABINET TO FMUX OF EXTENSION CABINET TO FMUX OF EXTENSION CABINET

MCUF

NIU

NIU

NIU

NIU

TO NETWORK

Tech. 18

Technical Description: Horizonmacro indoor 68P02902W06-C006

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GSM

M-Cell6 comparison with Horizonmacro

M-Cell6 comparison with Horizonmacro


Comparison overview
The Horizonmacro is a replacement for M-Cellt2/6 base stations, and the GSM/EGSM900 and DCS1800 Horizonmacro variants are directly compatible with M-Cell6. For example, a mixture of up to four Horizonmacro and M-Cell6 BTSs can be combined to form a single site, with either a Horizonmacro or an M-Cell6 being in control of the other units. Since many customers are familiar with M-Cell6, and will use Horizonmacro with M-Cell6, equivalent components are described in this section, to assist understanding. The Horizonmacro is a single cabinet, using reduced size and higher reliability components. The plinth base fix points are the same as M-Cell6, though direct replacement may require repositioning, to allow for adequate cabinet spacing. The Horizonmacro can have a stacking bracket fitted to enable CCB installation, and/or to enable mounting a second Horizonmacro.

Horizonmacro and M-Cell6 compatibility


A 24-carrier BTS site (in an 8/8/8 configuration) can be achieved by combining four units as shown in Figure Tech. 1-5. This is the maximum BTS size. Each unit can be either a Horizonmacro or an M-Cell6. Either a Horizonmacro or an M-Cell6 can control the other three units; the MCU of M-Cell6 and the MCUF of Horizonmacro being identical in control function. An MCUF can be fitted into an M-Cell6 and will then function as an MCU. An MCU cannot be fitted into a Horizonmacro. Figure Tech. 1-5 shows a schematic diagram of the digital connectons in a four cabinet BTS site. Figure Tech. 1-5 Digital connections in maximum BTS site

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Tech. 19

M-Cell6 comparison with Horizonmacro

GSM

Comparison of Horizonmacro and M-Cell6 connections and modules


Table Tech. 1-1 compares the main components of the Horizonmacro, with equivalent components of M-Cell6 (the previous generation of equipment).
Table Tech. 1-1 Main components of Horizonmacro and M-Cell6 Function Horizon macro component M-Cell6 equivalent

Input power conversion units Power to radios and BPSM Transceiver

PSM Backplane CTU (see Note) MCUF

PSM (different) Cables TCU/TCU-B No M-Cell6 equivalent MCU

Main processor board (formerly GPROC, KSW and GCLK boards in BTS4/5/6 (pre-M-Cell) equipment) Connection radio to MCU

Backplane

FOX FMUX

Connection MCU to MCUF internal FMUX transceivers in another cabinet (two) or external FMUX (one) Rx components and distribution Radio to Rx components Tx components Links to terrestrial network E1/T1 links Power for digital boards SURF SURF Harness DCF, TDF, DDF, HCU and CCB NIU T43/BIB BPSM

DNLB & IADU Cables CBF, MPDM, HPDM HC and CCB NIU T43/BIB BPSM

NOTE

The original CTU may be replaced by the later CTU2, as used in the Horizon II macro.

Tech. 110

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GSM

Specifications

Specifications
Overview of specifications
All Horizonmacro specifications are included in this section.

Software requirements
The GSM/EGSM900 and DCS1800 BTSs require software release GSR4 (or later) in the network. The GSM850 and PCS1900 BTSs require software release GSR5.1 (or later) in the network. If any CTUs have been replaced by CTU2s in the cabinet, BSS and OMC-R software release GSR6 (Horizon II) or later is required in the network.

Approval and safety


Table Tech. 1-2 lists the specifications with which the Horizonmacro indoor complies.
Table Tech. 1-2 Horizonmacro specification compliance GSM/EGSM900 & DCS1800 Type appro al approval ETS 301 502 CFR47 Part 2 CFR47 Part 22 (850 only) CFR47 Part 24 (1900 only) EN301 489-8 CFR 47 Part 2 and 15 CFR47 Part 22 (850 only) CFR47 Part 24 (1900 only) Safety EN 60215, IEC 60215, EN 60950, IEC 950, CSA 22.2 No. 950, UL 1950 GSM850 & PCS1900

EMC

Environmental limits
Table Tech. 1-3 lists the operating and storage environmental limits.
Table Tech. 1-3 Environmental limits Environment Operating Storage Temperature 5 _C to +45 _C. 45 _C to +70 _C. Relative Humidity 5% to 100% relative humidity, not to exceed 0.029 g water/m3 dry air. 8% to 100% relative humidity, not to exceed 0.029 g water/m3 dry air.

NOTE

This specification is valid up to 3 km altitude, corresponding to an atmospheric pressure range of 648 millibars to 1048 millibars.

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Tech. 111

Specifications

GSM

Power requirements
Cabinet power supply requirements
Table Tech. 1-4 lists the power supply requirements for the different power supply options.
Table Tech. 1-4 Main indoor cabinet power supply requirements Nominal Voltage Voltage supply range Current supply maximum (at nominal voltage) 6 x CTUs 6 x CTU2s

+27 V dc (negative earth) 48 V dc (positive earth) 120/240 V ac (50 60 Hz)


1

+20 V to +30 V dc 39 V to 72 V dc 88 V to 264 V ac

64 A 36 A 7.5 A

100 A 56.3 A 11.7 A


1

CTU2s cannot be installed in cabinets powered from 120 V ac. NOTE


Voltage transients must be less than 35 V peak amplitude (never below 0 V). Ripple and noise must be less than 200 mV p-p (30 mV rms) over 10 Hz to 14 MHz. Voltage application stabilization must be within the specified range in less than 1 second.

Power consumption
Table Tech. 1-5 lists typical and maximum cabinet power consumption values (excluding power supplies) when either CTUs or CTU2s are installed in the cabinet.
Table Tech. 1-5 Power consumption of full cabinet, including digital redundancy Configuration Typical measured consumption Maximum power consumption

6 x CTUs 6 x CTU2s

1400 W 1960 W

1700 W 2700 W

NOTE

Maximum power consumption figures are theoretical values derived under extreme conditions and are affected by variables such as temperature, component tolerances, transmission power and supply voltage. Although these figures must be considered when planning site power requirements, typical measured consumption values will be lower.

Tech. 112

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GSM

Specifications

RF power output
Table Tech. 1-6 lists the expected power output from the various Tx blocks for the CTU transceiver.
Table Tech. 1-6 CTU RF power output at cabinet after Tx blocks Tx block TDF DCF DDF1 CCB2 GSM850 EGSM900 DCS1800 PCS1900

40 W (46.0 dBm) 20 W (43.0 dBm) 8.5 W (39.3 dBm) 20 W (43.0 dBm)

32 W (45.1 dBm) 16 W (42.1 dBm) 7 W (38.5 dBm) 16 W (42.1 dBm)

1 Assumes the highest loss DDF path, i.e. two stages of hybrid combining in the DDF. Refer to configuration diagrams in Installation and Configuration: Horizonmacro indoor (68P02902W08) for additional details. 2 For a six-channel configuration with minimum cavity separation of 800 kHz. NOTE
CCBs are not currently available for the GSM850 or PCS1900 variants.

Table Tech. 1-7 lists the expected RF power output from the various Tx blocks for low and high band CTU2s in a Horizonmacro indoor cabinet for single carrier and dual carrier GMSK and single carrier 8-PSK modes.
Table Tech. 1-7 CTU2 RF power output at cabinet after Tx blocks Tx block TDF Mode EGSM900 DCS1800

DCF

DDF1

CCB

Dual carrier GMSK Single carrier GMSK Single carrier 8-PSK Dual carrier GMSK Single carrier GMSK Single carrier 8-PSK Dual carrier GMSK Single carrier GMSK Single carrier 8-PSK Cannot

10 W (40.0 dBm) 10 W (40.0 dBm) 40 W (46.0 dBm) 32 W (45.0 dBm) 20 W (43.0 dBm) 16 W (42.0 dBm) 5 W (37.0 dBm) 5 W (37.0 dBm) 20 W (43.0 dBm) 16 W (42.0 dBm) 10 W (40.0 dBm) 8 W (39.0 dBm) 2.2 W (33.5 dBm) 2.2 W (33.5 dBm) 8.5 W (39.3 dBm) 7.1 W (38.5 dBm) 4.5 W (36.5 dBm) 3.5 W (35.5 dB) be used with CTU2s.

1 Assumes the highest loss DDF path, i.e. two stages of hybrid combining in the DDF. Refer to configuration diagrams in Installation and Configuration: Horizonmacro indoor (68P02902W08) for additional details.

NOTE

All power levels are average power per carrier, measured to ETSI 05.05 at the BTS antenna port. All are to be within ETSI tolerances over frequency and temperature. The Horizonmacro indoor requires 3 PSUs when more than 4 CTU and CTU2 transceivers are used. PSU redundancy is not available in these configurations.

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Tech. 113

Specifications

GSM

Sensitivity
The receive sensitivity of the equipment is shown in Table Tech. 1-8.
Table Tech. 1-8 Rx sensitivity * Frequency Band Without Duplexer With Duplexer

850 MHz 900 MHz 1800 MHz 1900 MHz

107 dBm 107 dBm 108.5 dBm 107 dBm

106 dBm 106 dBm 107.5 dBm 106 dBm

* Guaranteed over all channel types, fading profiles, RF frequencies and operating conditions.

Battery backup
The Horizonmacro indoor cabinet has no internal battery backup as standard. An optional hold-up battery module, (sufficient to provide ten seconds of backup power), can be fitted in the PSM shelf, in an empty slot or in place of the redundant PSM. The optional hold-up battery module is described in Chapter 4 of this manual in Hold-up battery module. Additional battery backup capacity can be provided by installation of an optional battery back up system, described in Service manual: Battery backup system for Horizonmacro indoor 68P02900W59.

BSC connectivity options


Options exist for E1, T1 and HDSL (star and daisy chain) connection.

Indoor cabinet dimensions


The dimensions of cabinets are shown in Table Tech. 1-9.
Table Tech. 1-9 Cabinet dimensions Cabinet type Cabinet (without hood) Cabinet with optional hood Cabinet with stacking bracket (to hold CCB) Two cabinets, with stacking bracket between, and optional hood on top Two cabinets, with stacking bracket between, and stacking bracket on top Height 750 mm 870 mm 1025 mm 1900 mm 2050 mm Width 700 mm 700 mm 700 mm 700 mm 700 mm Depth 430 mm 430 mm 430 mm 430 mm 430 mm

The optional hood allows cables to enter the cabinet from the back and above. The stacking bracket allows a second cabinet to be stacked on top of the first cabinet. The stacking bracket can also contain a metal basket, in which CCBs are fitted (the only Tx unit that cannot fit in the cabinet itself).
Technical Description: Horizonmacro indoor 68P02902W06-C006

Tech. 114

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GSM

Specifications

Weights
The maximum weight of the cabinet is shown in Table Tech. 1-10. CAUTION
Consider future expansion. Another cabinet may be added by stacking on top of the existing cabinet. This, if used with stacking units on both, each with CCBs, and associated cables, could result in a total weight of 280 kg. Ensure floor is capable of supporting this weight.

Table Tech. 1-10 Main indoor cabinet weights (with six transceivers) Cabinet with plinth and optional hood Cabinet with plinth, stacking bracket and CCB

115 kg

130 kg

Torque values
Table Tech. 1-11 details torque values used during installation, maintenance and repair procedures.
Table Tech. 1-11 Torque values for all cabinet screws/bolts and RF connectors Size of screw/bolt M4 M6 M8 M10 SMA N-type 7/16

Torque value

2.2 Nm

3.4 Nm

5 Nm

10 Nm

1 Nm

3.4 Nm

25 Nm

NOTE

Torque values used with M12 anchor bolts will depend on the anchor bolt manufacturer. Check manufacturers data for correct values.

Technical Description: Horizonmacro indoor


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Tech. 115

Specifications

GSM

Frequency capability
Frequency hopping
The Horizonmacro supports baseband frequency hopping (BBH) and synthesizer frequency hopping (SFH). NOTE
Baseband frequency hopping (BBH) is not supported in the GSM850 and PCS1900 Horizonmacro variants. In addition, BBH is not possible using CTU2s in double density mode in a Horizonmacro cabinet which is controlled by a MCUF site controller (refer to System Information: BSS Equipment Planning (68P02900W21) for further details).

Frequency band characteristics


BTS radio channels (RF carriers) are full duplex (transmit and receive) with the characteristics listed in Table Tech. 1-12 for GSM/EGSM900 and DCS1800 BTSs and in Table Tech. 1-13 for GSM850 and PCS1900 BTSs.
Table Tech. 1-12 Frequency band characteristics GSM/EGSM900 and DCS1800 GSM900 Transmit frequency band (MHz) Receive frequency band (MHz) Transmit/receive duplex separation (MHz) Channel width (kHz) Number of channels Transmit frequency guard bands (MHz) 935 to 960 890 to 915 45 200 124 935.0 to 935.1 959.9 to 960.0 890.0 to 890.1 914.9 to 915.0 Even 10ths of a MHz from 935.2 to 959.8 Even 10ths of a MHz from 890.2 to 914.8 EGSM 925 to 960 880 to 915 45 200 174 925.0 to 925.1 959.9 to 960.0 880.0 to 880.1 914.9 to 915.0 Even 10ths of a MHz from 925.2 to 959.8 Even 10ths of a MHz from 880.2 to 914.8 DCS1800 1805 to 1880 1710 to 1785 95 200 374 1805.0 to 1805.1 1879.9 to 1880.0 1710.0 to 1710.1 1784.9 to 1785.0 Even 10ths of a MHz from 1805.2 to 1879.8 Even 10ths of a MHz from 1710.2 to 1784.8

Receive frequency guard bands (MHz)

Transmit channel centre frequency (MHz)

Receive channel centre frequency (MHz)

Tech. 116

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GSM

Specifications

Table Tech. 1-13 Frequency band characteristics GSM850 and PCS1900 GSM850 Transmit frequency band (MHz) Receive frequency band (MHz) Transmit/receive duplex separation (MHz) Channel width (kHz) Number of channels Transmit frequency guard bands (MHz) Receive frequency guard bands (MHz) Transmit channel centre frequency (MHz) 869 to 894 824 to 849 45 200 124 869.0 to 869.1 893.9 to 894.0 824.0 to 824.1 848.9 to 849.0 Even 10ths of a MHz from 869.2 to 893.8 Even 10ths of a MHz from 824.2 to 848.8 PCS1900 1930 to 1990 1850 to 1910 80 200 299 1930.0 to 1930.1 1989.9 to 1990.0 1850.0 to 1850.1 1909.9 to 1910.0 Even 10ths of a MHz from 1930.2 to 1989.8 Even 10ths of a MHz from 1850.2 to 1909.8

Receive channel centre frequency (MHz)

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Tech. 117

Specifications

GSM

Structural considerations
Adequate clearance must be provided at the front of the equipment for operation and maintenance purposes. There must be adequate side clearance (50 mm) to enable the door to open beyond 90 (see Figure Tech. 1-6). The door can also stop at 95 and 130 , but this is only to protect the door, or give optional additional operator space. The cabinet ventilation entry can be solely from the bottom front of the cabinet. This allows a cabinet to be placed against a wall. However, if the unit is placed 50 mm from back or side obstructions, such as wall or other cabinets, the ventilation will be improved, and fan noise reduced. Up to 100 mm rear space may be required for cables if using stacking bracket. The foundation or structure on which the BTS cabinet is mounted must be of sufficient strength to support a maximum gross weight of 130 kg for a single cabinet or 280 kg for two stacked cabinets. NOTE
In seismically active areas, Motorola suggest using a qualified structural engineer to assess frame mounting requirements, such as floor construction, mounting anchors, cell site construction and to provide a suitable design for top frame support if a stacked configuration is required.

Layout plan
Figure Tech. 1-6 shows the cabinet installation layout plan. Figure Tech. 1-6 Indoor cabinet site layout plan
100 mm clearance if using stacking bracket to allow cable space 50 mm minimum side clearance for door opening INDOOR CABINET 70 mm width when door at 95 500 mm width when door at 130 430 mm 700 mm

700 mm door at second position (130)

700 mm door at first position (95)

Tech. 118

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Chapter 2

Cabinet structure

Technical Description: Horizonmacro indoor


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Tech. 21

GSM

Tech. 22

Technical Description: Horizonmacro indoor 68P02902W06-C006

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GSM

Cabinet structure of Horizonmacro indoor

Cabinet structure of Horizonmacro indoor


External cabinet view
Figure Tech. 2-1 shows an external view of a closed cabinet with optional hood, and a cabinet with door open and no hood. Figure Tech. 2-1 Closed cabinet and cabinet with hood removed and door open

Technical Description: Horizonmacro indoor


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Tech. 23

Cabinet structure of Horizonmacro indoor

GSM

Overview of structure description


The equipped cabinet is shown in Figure Tech. 2-2. The cabinet, intended for minimum maintenance and maximum ease of module replacement, and has access only from the front and the top. This chapter describes the cabinet structure and inner connections to assist understanding of the cabinet functions. There should be no need to dismantle the cabinet beyond Field Replaceable Unit (FRU) level. The cabinet structure components are explained in the following sections:

Empty cabinet and SURF harness


This section describes the empty cabinet and the SURF harness connections between the SURF and the backplane and transceivers.

Top panel
This section describes the bare top panel with all the modules removed.

Cage backplane interface panel harness assembly (CBIA)


This section describes the CBIA. It also describes the backplane connections between all modules, and the harness from the backplane to the interface top panel connectors.

Door and hood


This section describes the structure and function of the door and optional hood.

Stacking bracket and CCB basket


This section describes the stacking bracket. It is used for mounting a second cabinet on top of the first, and/or providing a mounting position for CCBs.

Space required around cabinet


See Specifications in Chapter 1.

Tech. 24

Technical Description: Horizonmacro indoor 68P02902W06-C006

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GSM

Cabinet structure of Horizonmacro indoor

Filled cabinet view


Figure Tech. 2-2 shows a cabinet with maximum number of modules installed. Further information is detailed in the later technical description chapters.

Figure Tech. 2-2 Cabinet, without door or hood, showing main components
RF MODULES
ONE SURF (Rx) THREE Tx BLOCKS (DCFs SHOWN AS EXAMPLE) SIX TRANSCEIVERS (CTU/CTU2s)

POWER SUPPLIES AND CIRCUIT BREAKER


THREE PSMs (see NOTE) CIRCUIT BREAKER MODULE (CBM) T43/BIB

DC POWER IN INTERFACE PANEL CONNECTORS

TWO 2-FAN UNITS ONE 4-FAN UNIT

TEMPERATURE CONTROL SYSTEM

ALARM MODULE

DIGITAL MODULES

MCUF FMUX/NIU/BPSM (NOT VISIBLE) TOP SECTION OF PLINTH (SLIDES INTO BASE PLINTH)

Technical Description: Horizonmacro indoor


29 Jan 2007

68P02902W06-C006

Tech. 25

Empty cabinet and SURF harness

GSM

Empty cabinet and SURF harness


SURF harness and cabinet attachment
The SURF harness is fitted on the back wall of the cabinet, as shown in Figure Tech. 2-3. The chassis of the SURF harness supports the SURF module. The SURF harness provides:
S S

Three connectors to the SURF, for RF and power. One RF connector to each transceiver, consisting of three inputs, one each for RxA, RxB and RF loopback test, as shown in Figure Tech. 2-4. The RF connectors are free floating to ensure fitting of transceiver modules. One connector to the backplane, for power from the PSMs.

Cabinet view with installed SURF harness


Figure Tech. 2-3 shows the SURF harness installed in an empty cabinet, with, for clarity, SURF harness cables not shown.

Figure Tech. 2-3 SURF harness installed in empty cabinet.


SURF HARNESS

EARTH CABLE FOR MAIN CAGE

ig.232.rh

Tech. 26

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GSM

Empty cabinet and SURF harness

SURF harness view


Figure Tech. 2-4 shows the SURF harness with connectors indicated.

Figure Tech. 2-4 SURF harness with connectors indicated


SLOT FOR SURF MODULE

RxB X 6 RF LOOPBACK X 6 RxA X 6

THREE CONNECTORS TO SURF POWER CONNECTOR TO BACKPLANE

TRANSCEIVER 5

CONNECTOR FOR EACH CTU

RxA TRANSCEIVER 0 LOCATING PINS RF LOOPBACK TEST PORT (L) RxB


ig.233.rh

Technical Description: Horizonmacro indoor


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Tech. 27

Top panel

GSM

Top panel
Top panel description
The top panel provides:
S

A basket to hold up to three Tx blocks. This includes three holes to enable connection of CTU/CTU2 Tx cables to the underside of each Tx block. The holes also allow cooling of the Tx blocks from underneath. A slot for insertion of the SURF module. A location hole for the interface panel. An area for ventilation purposes above the PSMs. A cable hole for fibre optic extension cables from the MCUF FMUX to an FMUX of another cabinet.

S S S S

Top panel view


Figure Tech. 2-5 shows a top panel with major features labelled.

Figure Tech. 2-5 Top panel with major features labelled


SLOT FOR SURF MODULE

LOCATION HOLE FOR INTERFACE PANEL

BASKET TO HOLD THREE Tx BLOCKS VENTILATION PANEL (LOCATED ABOVE PSMs)

HOLE FOR ONE Tx BLOCK CTU/CTU2 CONNECTIONS


ig.235.rh

CABLE HOLE FOR FIBRE OPTIC EXTENSION CABLES

Tech. 28

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GSM

Cage backplane interface panel harness assembly (CBIA)

Cage backplane interface panel harness assembly (CBIA)


CBIA overview
The CBIA provides a platform for module installation and power and digital signal interconnection to cabinet modules. The CBIA consists of:
S S S S

The main cage - providing compartments for fans, transceivers, digital modules, BPSMs, PSMs and CBM. The backplane - routes power and signals for all cage modules and power to the SURF. The harness - links the backplane to the interface panel. The interface panel - carries the T43/BIB, the required power and communications connectors.

CBIA and interface panel schematic view


Figure Tech. 2-6 shows the CBIA main cage and the interface panel.

Figure Tech. 2-6 View of CBIA cage and the interface panel
INTERFACE PANEL MAIN CAGE
HARNESS LINKS BACKPLANE CONNECTORS TO UNDERSIDE OF INTERFACE PANEL

BACKPLANE ATTACHED TO ENTIRE BACK OF CAGE

DIGITAL MODULE SECTION OF CAGE

ig.236.rh

Technical Description: Horizonmacro indoor


29 Jan 2007

68P02902W06-C006

Tech. 29

Cage backplane interface panel harness assembly (CBIA)

GSM

Backplane and harness view including door switch and heat sensors
Figure Tech. 2-7 shows the CBIA harness linking the interface panel and the backplane at rear of main cage. Each backplane harness connector is identified.

Figure Tech. 2-7 Rear view of CBIA showing backplane and harness
INTERFACE PANEL NIU to T43/BIB J21 DOOR SWITCH

T43/BIB

THREE HEAT SENSORS

DOOR SWITCH CONNECTOR J55 EXTERNAL ALARMS J23 RTC J32 ICS J26 GPS J22 (if fitted) PIX J25 POWER CONNECTOR FOR SURF HARNESS SIX TRANSCEIVER CONNECTOR HOLES FOR SURF HARNESS

ig.237.rh

Tech. 210

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GSM

Cage backplane interface panel harness assembly (CBIA)

CBIA cage function and diagram


The main cage holds modules and supports the backplane. Each compartment has appropriate sliders for insertion of the modules. Figure Tech. 2-8 shows the module compartments of the cage.

Figure Tech. 2-8 Front view of CBIA cage showing where modules fit

MAIN CAGE

POWER SUPPLY MODULES (PSMs)

CIRCUIT BREAKER MODULE

TRANSCEIVERS (CTU/CTU2s)

FULL SIZE DIGITAL MODULES (MCUFs AND ALARM)

HALF SIZE DIGITAL MODULES (FMUX, NIUs AND BPSM)

HALF SIZE DIGITAL MODULES (FMUX, NIUs AND BPSM)

2-FAN

2-FAN

4-FAN

HOLES IN BACK PANEL OF CAGE FOR BACKPLANE FAN CONNECTORS

CBIA harness function


The harness provides cables to link connectors on the backplane with connectors on the underside of the interface panel.

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Tech. 211

Cage backplane interface panel harness assembly (CBIA)

GSM

CBIA backplane function


The cabinet design enables all possible RF and digital module combinations to be served by the same backplane. The only module-to-module cabling required are the Tx cables from the transceivers to the Tx blocks. Any external attachments will also require separate cabling. The backplane is a multilayered printed circuit board with attached connectors on front and back. The backplane:
S S S S S S

Routes power and digital signals throughout the cabinet. Provides connectors for the harness cables linking to the interface panel. Provides connectors for plug in modules. Provides power to the SURF harness, when the main cage is inserted into the cabinet. Provides a connector for the door switch cable. Provides connectors for three heat sensors in the main cage above the transceivers.

Attachment of cage to cabinet


The CBIA is fitted to the cabinet at the factory and is not intended to be removed in the course of normal maintenance or FRU replacement procedures.

Interface panel function


The interface panel provides all connection points to:
S S S

The required power sources. External alarms (for example battery backup system alarms). Connection points to all telecommunications links.

All connectors are linked to the backplane through the CBIA harness. Plastic connector covers, supplied by Motorola, keep unused connectors protected from damage by static or foreign matter and should be retained.

Tech. 212

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GSM

Cage backplane interface panel harness assembly (CBIA)

Interface panel diagram


Figure Tech. 2-9 shows the locations of the interface panel connectors.

Figure Tech. 2-9 Interface panel connector locations


T43/BIB DC POWER INPUT

VENTILATION GRID

GPS (if fitted) CCB PIX 0 PIX 1 ICS EXTERNAL ALARMS


ig.239.rh

AC POWER SOCKET INPUT

Interface panel pinouts


The following tables list the connector pinouts:
S S S S S S S S

External alarms see Table Tech. 2-1 and accompanying information. GPS see Table Tech. 2-2. CCB see Table Tech. 2-3. BIB see Table Tech. 2-4. T43 see Table Tech. 2-5. PIX0 see Table Tech. 2-6. PIX1 see Table Tech. 2-7. ICS see Table Tech. 2-8. NOTE
Some pin connections only refer to indoor or outdoor cabinets.

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Tech. 213

Cage backplane interface panel harness assembly (CBIA)

GSM

External alarm connector


The external alarms connector is used by the battery backup system (BBS). When this connector is not in use, a shorting plug, Motorola part number 2886169N01, is inserted. This plug must be removed to allow connection of the alarm cable from the BSS and should be retained for refit during decommissioning of BBS. The external alarm connector carries different alarms in the Horizonmacro outdoor. The shorting plug joins pairs of pins as shown in Table Tech. 2-1.
Table Tech. 2-1 External alarms indoor pin shorts (37-way D-type) Pin Nos Pin Nos Pin Nos Pin Nos

1+2 3 +4 5+6 7+8 9 10

11 12 13+14 15+16 17+18 19 +20

21+22 23+24 25+26 27+28 29+30 31

32 33 34 35 36+37

GPS connector
Table Tech. 2-2 lists the GPS connector pinouts. NOTE
The GPS connector is optional on later BTS cabinets. Table Tech. 2-2 GPS pin connections (15-way D-type) Pin No Signal/Description Pin No Signal/Description

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

GPS power 1 Not connected chassis earth Tx negative Tx positive Rx negative Earth GPS return 1

9 10 11 12 13 14 15

GPS power 2 Not connected PPS positive PPS negative Rx positive VPP GPS return 2

Tech. 214

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GSM

Cage backplane interface panel harness assembly (CBIA)

CCB connector
Table Tech. 2-3 lists the CCB connector pinouts. This provides a single connector, to provide power for up to two CCBs. NOTE
The CCB connector is not currently used on GSM850 or PCS1900 BTS variants. Table Tech. 2-3 CCB pin connections (15-way D-type) Pin No Signal/Description Pin No Signal/Description

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Not connected Not connected CCB0 27 V CCB0 27 V Not connected CCB1 27 V CCB1 27 V Not connected

9 10 11 12 13 14 15

Not connected Not connected Earth Earth Not connected Earth Earth

BIB (BIM) interconnection


The Balanced-line Interconnect Board (BIB), also known as BIM, provides the line isolation between the E1/T1 circuit lines and the CBIA backplane. The board provides an interface for up to six input and six output balanced 120 ohm lines. 12 transformers are used to provide line isolation while maintaining impedance matching between the E1/T1 circuit lines and the NIU module. Each transformer has a 1:1 turns ratio to match the external and backplane 120 ohm connections. Connection is made using a 37-pin D-type connector to both the BIB and the external PCM twisted pair circuit lines. Figure Tech. 2-10 shows a typical BIB and Table Tech. 2-4 lists BIB interconnections: Figure Tech. 2-10 Balanced-line interconnect board (BIB)
J0

J1

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Tech. 215

Cage backplane interface panel harness assembly (CBIA)

GSM

Table Tech. 2-4 BIB interconnections NIU/ port Pin no Equipment/Ext Pin no Pin no Equipment/Ext Pin no

A0/0 B0/0 A0/1 B0/1 A1/0 B1/0

J0-1 J0-2 J0-4 j0-5 J0-7 J0-8 j0-10 j0-11 J0-13 J0-14 J0-16 J0-17

Tx1+ Rx1+ Tx4+ Rx4+ Tx2+ Rx2+ Tx5+ Rx5+ Tx3+ Rx3+ Tx6+ Rx6+

J1-1 J1-2 J1-4 J1-5 J1-7 J1-8

J0-20 J0-21 J0-23 J0-24 J0-26 J0-27

Tx1 Rx1 Tx4 Rx4 Tx2 Rx2 Tx5 Rx5 Tx3 Rx3 Tx6 Rx6

J1-20 J1-21 J1-23 J1-24 J1-26 J1-27 J1-29 J1-30 J1-32 J1-33 J1-35 J1-36

J1-10 J0-29 J1-11 J0-30 J1-13 J0-32 J1-14 J0-33 J1-16 J0-35 J1-17 J0-36

Connector J0 and J1 pins 3,6,9,12,15,18,19, 22, 25, 28, 31, 34 and 37 are connected to earth

Tech. 216

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GSM

Cage backplane interface panel harness assembly (CBIA)

T43 (CIM) interconnection


The Type 43 Interconnect Board (T43), also known as CIM, provides the impedance matching and line isolation between the E1/T1 circuit lines and the CBIA backplane. The board provides an interface for up to six input and six output unbalanced coaxial 75 ohm lines. 12 transformers are used to provide impedance matching and line isolation between the E1/T1 circuit lines and the NIU module. Each transformer has a 1:1.25 turns ratio to match the external 75 ohm and backplane 120 ohm connections. Connection is made using a 37-pin D-type connector to the interconnect board and twelve type 43 coaxial connectors to the external E1/T1 circuit lines. Figure Tech. 2-11 shows a typical T43, and Table Tech. 2-5 lists the T43 interconnections. Figure Tech. 2-11 Type 43 interconnect board (T43)
J0 J8 J14 J16 J13 J7 J17 J5 J11 J1 J10 J2 J4

Table Tech. 2-5 T43 interconnections NIU/ port Pin no Equipment / Ext Pin no Pin no Equipment / Ext Pin no

A0/0 B0/0 A0/1 B0/1 A1/0 B1/0

J0-1 J0-2 J0-4 j0-5 J0-7 J0-8 j0-10 j0-11 J0-13 J0-14 J0-16 J0-17

Tx1+ Rx1+ Tx4+ Rx4+ Tx2+ Rx2+ Tx5+ Rx5+ Tx3+ Rx3+ Tx6+ Rx6+

J1 centre J2 centre J4 centre J5 centre J7 centre J8 centre J10 centre J11 centre J13 centre J14 centre J16 centre J17 centre

J0-20 J0-21 J0-23 J0-24 J0-26 J0-27 J0-29 J0-30 J0-32 J0-33 J0-35 J0-36

Tx1 Rx1 Tx4 Rx4 Tx2 Rx2 Tx5 Rx5 Tx3 Rx3 Tx6 Rx6

J1 shield J2 shield J4 shield J5 shield J7 shield J8 shield J10 shield J11 shield J13 shield J14 shield J16 shield J17 shield

Connector J0 pins 3,6,9,12,15,18,19, 22, 25, 28, 31, 34 and 37 are not used

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Tech. 217

Cage backplane interface panel harness assembly (CBIA)

GSM

PIX conditions input/output


PIX outputs
PIX outputs comprise 4 relay contacts controlled by the alarm board and MCUF. The relays have multiple contacts, some normally open and some normally closed. The contacts are rated for 1A at 30 V. The contacts may be used for control of external equipment such as fans or audible alarms.

PIX inputs
PIX inputs comprise 16 connections to external sensors. These inputs report alarms to the BSC, through the alarm board and MCUF, which forwards the alarms to the OMC-R. The end-user supplies the external sensors. Each sensor connects across an opto-coupled pair of PIX inputs (eight per PIX connector). All sensors must be dry-contact type with the following specification:
S S

5 kohms or greater across sense inputs for logic 1 (PIX opto-coupler off). 500 ohms or less across sense inputs for logic 0 (PIX opto-coupler on).

Table Tech. 2-6 shows PIX0 connections and Table Tech. 2-7 shows PIX1 connections.
Table Tech. 2-6 PIX0 pin connections (37-way D-type) Pin No Signal/Description Pin No Signal/Description

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

Site input Ext 11 Site input Ext 21 Site input Ext 31 Site input Ext 41 Site input Ext 51 Site input Ext 61 Site input Ext 71 Site input Ext 81 Not connected Not connected Site output relay 1 NO Site output relay 2 NO Site output relay 2 NC Site output relay 3 NO Site output relay 4 NO Site output relay 4 NC Not connected Not connected

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36/37

Not connected Site input Ext 12 Site input Ext 22 Site input Ext 32 Site input Ext 42 Site input Ext 52 Site input Ext 62 Site input Ext 72 Site input Ext 82 spare Site output relay 1 NC Site output relay 1 COM Site output relay 2 COM Site output relay 3 NC Site output relay 3 COM Site output relay 4 COM Not connected Not connected

Tech. 218

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GSM

Cage backplane interface panel harness assembly (CBIA)

Table Tech. 2-7 PIX1 pin connections (37-way D-type) Pin No Signal/Description Pin No Signal/Description

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Site input Ext 91 Site input Ext 101 Site input Ext 111 Site input Ext 121 Site input Ext 131 Site input Ext 141 Site input Ext 151 Site input Ext 161 Not connected Pins 10 to 18 not connected

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27

Not connected Site input Ext 92 Site input Ext 102 Site input Ext 112 Site input Ext 122 Site input Ext 132 Site input Ext 142 Site input Ext 152 Site input Ext 162 Pins 28 to 37 not connected

ICS connector
Table Tech. 2-8 lists the Integrated Cell Site (ICS) connector pinouts. This is a future feature.
Table Tech. 2-8 ICS pin connections (25-way D-type) Pin No Signal/Description Pin No Signal/Description

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

ICS0 TTY earth ICS0 TTY Rx ICS0 TTY Tx ICS1 TTY earth ICS1 TTY Rx ICS1 TTY Tx ICS2 TTY earth ICS2 TTY Rx ICS2 TTY Tx

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

ICS3 TTY earth ICS3 TTY Rx ICS3 TTY Tx ICS4 TTY earth ICS4 TTY Rx ICS4 TTY Tx ICS5 TTY earth ICS5 TTY Rx ICS5 TTY Tx

Pins 19 to 25 not connected

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Tech. 219

Cabinet door and optional hood

GSM

Cabinet door and optional hood


Door function
The cabinet is fitted with a door and a hood option. The optional hood cannot be fitted in conjuction with a stacking bracket. The door has the following functions:
S S S

Protects modules from damage. Ensures correct air ventilation. Provides EMC shielding.

The door has a ventilation grid with internal honeycomb grid, a vertical aluminium air baffle, and a horizontal door stop bracket. The door stop bracket enables the door to open to 95 or 130 degrees. The lock is a trigger latch, opened (if unlocked) by pressing the middle button. There is also a door alarm bracket, to touch the cabinet door switch.

Door external and internal view


Figure Tech. 2-12 shows both sides of the cabinet door. Figure Tech. 2-12 External and internal view of cabinet door
INTERNAL VIEW
DOOR ALARM BRACKET DOOR STOP BRACKET

EXTERNAL VIEW

VERTICAL AIR BAFFLE

HONEYCOMB VENTILATION

VENTILATION GRID

TRIGGER LATCH

ig.266.rh

Tech. 220

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GSM

Cabinet door and optional hood

Hood function
The optional hood can be fitted to keep unsightly cables and connectors out of view, where this is important.

View of hood
Figure Tech. 2-13 shows a top view of the hood.

Figure Tech. 2-13 View of hood as seen from the front of the cabinet
LIFTING EDGE

ig.267.rh

Securing pins and hood removal


The hood mounts on four pins that screw into the cabinet top panel, replacing existing screws. The hood can be easily lifted off the cabinet by pulling on the lifting edge at the rear, as shown in Figure Tech. 2-13.

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Tech. 221

Stacking bracket and CCB basket

GSM

Stacking bracket and CCB basket


Stacking bracket function
The stacking bracket has two main functions:
S S

To enable a second cabinet to be stacked on top of the first cabinet. To house CCBs in a dedicated optional CCB basket.

The stacking bracket is fixed to the top of the cabinet by eight M8 screws. If the stacking bracket is replacing an existing hood, then the four hood securing pins must first be removed to accommodate four of the stacking bracket screws. A second cabinet may be attached on top of the stacking bracket by four M10 screws. Lower cabinet outlet and additional upper cabinet inlet ventilation is provided by the large open sides of the stacking bracket (especially on the right side of the cabinet). The CCB basket is fitted only if CCBs are required. The CCB basket is removable, to enable access for SURF module replacement.

Stacking bracket diagram


Figure Tech. 2-14 shows a view of the stacking bracket with CCB basket installed.

Figure Tech. 2-14 View of stacking bracket with CCB basket installed.
M10 HOLES (4) FOR TOP CABINET ATTACHMENT (IF REQUIRED) REAR OF BRACKET

CCB BASKET (IF REQUIRED) DETACHABLE CCB BASKET BAR

M8 HOLES (8) FOR BOTTOM CABINET ATTACHMENT.


ig.268.rh

Tech. 222

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GSM

Stacking bracket and CCB basket

Stacking bracket front cover function


The stacking bracket front cover clips onto the front of the stacking bracket and provides the following functions:
S S

Protection for CCB (if fitted). Blanking panel to match appearance of cabinet door.

View of stacked cabinets


Figure Tech. 2-15 shows a view of two stacked Horizonmacro indoor cabinets with front covers attached to the two stacking brackets.

Figure Tech. 2-15 View of two stacked Horizonmacro indoor cabinets showing stacking bracket front covers

Stacking bracket front cover Outlet air Outlet air

Inlet air

Inlet air

Stacking bracket front cover Outlet air

Outlet air Inlet air

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Tech. 223

Stacking bracket and CCB basket

GSM

Tech. 224

Technical Description: Horizonmacro indoor 68P02902W06-C006

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Chapter 3

Temperature control system

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68P02902W06-C006

Tech. 31

GSM

Tech. 32

Technical Description: Horizonmacro indoor 68P02902W06-C006

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GSM

Indoor temperature control system

Indoor temperature control system


Temperature control overview
The Horizonmacro indoor cabinet contains equipment that has to be maintained within the operational temperature range, to ensure correct operation of the equipment and to guard against premature failure of the individual components. The internal temperature is maintained within these limits by internal fans.

Cabinet over temperature control


Under overheat conditions, as the temperature rises above preset levels, temperature sensors located in various areas within the cabinet provide alarms. A further increase in temperature causes dual sensors, set at a higher threshold temperature to initiate PSM and cabinet shutdown. The cabinet is restarted when the sensors are reset by a substantial fall in temperature. The transceivers have their own shutdown responses to overheating. The CTUs shutdown at 92 _C. 850/900 MHz CTUs also have an internal 4 dB power reduction response to overheating at 85 _C. 1800/1900 MHz CTUs have a 0.6 dB cut back at 70 _C, in addition to the 4 dB power reduction at 85 _C. If CTU2s are installed in the cabinet, these will shut down if the ambient temperature exceeds 57 _C. The transceiver shutdown response to overheating provides a second level of cabinet protection, independent of the cabinet heat sensors.

Temperature sensors
The three cabinet temperature sensors are located above the transceiver compartment (see Figure Tech. 2-7) and consist of the following:
S

One 70 _C sensor provides a cabinet overtemperature alarm when the cabinet temperature exceeds planned level. The alarm is processed by the alarm board and MCUF, and sent on to the OMC-R through the BSC. Two 85 _C sensors shut down the PSMs to protect the cabinet equipment from heat damage. Both sensors must detect excess temperature for the shutdown to take place; this reduces the risk of an unnecessary shutdown. No prior notification of shutdown is given to the OMC-R, except for the original 70 _C sensor alarm. This is because the MCUF and transceivers immediately lose power and functionality.

Cabinet restart after shutdown


The cabinet is restarted when the overtemperature condition initiating shutdown has reset. The two 85 _C temperature sensors reset at 55 _C. This re-establishes an earth point for the PSM internal detectors connected to the cabinet heat sensors, which then reactivate the PSM outputs. The MCUF then reboots as in a normal power up.
Technical Description: Horizonmacro indoor
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Tech. 33

Fan unit description

GSM

Fan unit description


Fan unit overview
The indoor cabinet operating temperature is maintained by three sets of fans:
S S

One 4-fan unit (referred to as FAN0), located in front and beneath the digital module shelf. Two identical 2-fan units (FAN1 and FAN2), located beneath the transceivers.

Figure Tech. 3-1 shows the two types of fan unit: Figure Tech. 3-1 View of 2-fan and 4-fan units
2-FAN UNIT

4-FAN UNIT

RESET BUTTONS (ONE PER FAN) SLIDE LATCH FOR MODULE REMOVAL

Fan operation and reset


The fans draw in air from beneath the cabinet, and the air is expelled through the door and top cabinet vents. The fans run continuously, and respond to temperature changes to ensure adequate flow. The speed of each fan is controlled by a heat sensor mounted on the fan hub. Each fan has a reset button, for use if a fan has stopped or cannot start. Each reset button is marked FRONT or REAR to identify the appropriate fan.

Filter option and effect on fans


The filter is an option and not essential in a clean environment. The single filter is mounted under all the fan units. If clogged, fan airflow may be reduced, straining fan motors and increasing fan noise.
Technical Description: Horizonmacro indoor 68P02902W06-C006

Tech. 34

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Chapter 4

Cabinet power supply

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Tech. 41

GSM

Tech. 42

Technical Description: Horizonmacro indoor 68P02902W06-C006

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GSM

Horizonmacro indoor power supplies

Horizonmacro indoor power supplies


Power supply overview
The Horizonmacro indoor power supplies consist of the following elements:
S

The power supply modules (PSM): +27 V dc PSM (negative earth input). 48/60 V dc PSM (positive earth input). 120/240 V ac (nominal) PSM.

S S S

The hold-up battery module. The circuit breaker module (CBM). The mBCU power supply module (BPSM).

Location of power modules


Figure Tech. 4-1 shows the CBIA with the power modules indicated. Figure Tech. 4-1 Location of power modules
PSM or HOLD-UP BATTERY MODULE CBM

BPSMs

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Tech. 43

Power supply module (PSM)

GSM

Power supply module (PSM)


Types and overview of PSM
There are two types of dc power supply modules (PSMs):
S S

Nominal +27 V (negative earth input). Nominal 48 V (positive earth input). Nominal 120/240 V. NOTE
CTU2 transceivers cannot be used in cabinets powered from 120 V ac.

There is one type of ac PSM:


S

All PSMs have the same external appearance and are located in the same positions. Different types are identified only by front panel labels. The PSMs are fed from a backplane connector and use pulse width modulation to generate output supply. A front panel switch (shown in Figure Tech. 4-2), disables the output, reducing the input current as shown in Table Tech. 4-1.
Table Tech. 4-1 Input currents for power supply module Type of PSM Output voltage full load Input current full load Input load when output switch off

+27 V nominal dc 48 V nominal dc 120/240 V nominal ac

+27 V +27 V +27 V

32 A 18 A 3.75 A

1A 0.5 A 0.1 A

NOTE

There are several manufacturers of the PSMs. Each is fully compatible with the same type of PSM of a different manufacturer.

Tech. 44

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GSM

Power supply module (PSM)

PSM locations and redundancy


The PSMs are located above the digital cage and circuit breaker module. There are three slots. When CTUs only are installed, the PSM configuration is as described in Table Tech. 4-2.
Table Tech. 4-2 PSM operational configurations, CTUs only Number of PSMs installed Maximum load capability Complete operation of cabinet for up to three CTUs. Complete operation of cabinet for up to six CTUs. Redundancy and power load sharing (further enhancing reliability by reducing temperature of operation).

1 2 3

When a combination of CTUs and CTU2s or CTU2s only are installed, all three slots may be required for PSMs and in such cases redundancy cannot be provided. Table Tech. 4-3 shows the PSM configuration requirements for different CTU/CTU2 combinations.
Table Tech. 4-3 PSM operational configurations, CTU/CTU2 combinations No. of PSMs installed 1 2 3 CTU/CTU2 combinations supported 1/1, 0/1 4/1, 3/1, 2/1, 3/2, 2/2, 1/2, 0/2, 1/3, 0/3, 0/4 5/1, 4/2, 3/3, 2/3, 2/4, 1/4, 1/5, 0/5, 0/6

PSM module view


Figure Tech. 4-2 shows a view of the PSM with LEDs identified. Figure Tech. 4-2 View of PSM with LEDs identified
AIR VENTS ON ENTIRE TOP AND BOTTOM PANELS

GREEN LED ACTIVE RED LED ALARM

OUTPUT DISABLE SWITCH M4 MODULE ATTACHMENT SCREWS

PSM FRONT PANEL

Technical Description: Horizonmacro indoor


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Tech. 45

Power supply module (PSM)

GSM

PSM alarms
There are three alarms for each PSM, indicated by LEDs (see Table Tech. 4-4):
S S S

Output fail. Input fail. Overtemperature.

PSM LEDs
The LEDs function with the properties shown in Table Tech. 4-4.
Table Tech. 4-4 Power supply module LEDs function Green LED ACTIVE Red LED ALARM Indication

OFF ON OFF

OFF OFF ON

1. Cabinet power supply off, or 2. Module not connected. Normal operation. 1. Output disable switch off, or 2. Alarm condition with module unable to supply power. Internal problem (such as over temperature), but still able to maintain supply.

ON

ON

PSM backplane protection


If a power track on the backplane is broken or short-circuited, the PSM detects the fault and shuts down to prevent further damage.

Tech. 46

Technical Description: Horizonmacro indoor 68P02902W06-C006

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GSM

Hold-up battery module

Hold-up battery module


Introduction to hold-up battery module
The optional hold-up battery module provides short term backup power for one ac powered Horizonmacro indoor BTS cabinet. The hold-up battery module is fitted in the PSM shelf within the CBIA main cage, in any empty slot or in place of the redundant PSM. It connects to the Horizonmacro indoor BTS through the PSM slot backplane connector. NOTE
If the hold-up battery module is used in a Horizonmacro cabinet with more than three CTUs fitted, power supply redundancy cannot be supported. If CTU2s are installed in combination with or instead of CTUs, the third PSM may be required and therefore the hold-up battery module cannot be used (see PSM locations and redundancy in Tech. Chapter 4.

Under normal operating conditions the hold-up batteries provide ten seconds of backup power (at 25 _C) for a fully populated (six CTU) Horizonmacro indoor BTS cabinet. NOTE
Due to the discharge characteristics of the internal batteries, hold-up duration is reduced at temperatures below 25 _C.

Figure Tech. 4-3 shows a view of the hold-up battery module, with LEDs identified. Figure Tech. 4-3 View of the hold-up battery module

AIR VENTS ON ENTIRE TOP AND BOTTOM PANELS

GREEN LED ACTIVE RED LED ALARM GREEN LED CHARGE

OUTPUT ENABLE SWITCH M4 MODULE ATTACHMENT SCREWS FRONT PANEL


ig.223.rh

Technical Description: Horizonmacro indoor


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68P02902W06-C006

Tech. 47

Hold-up battery module

GSM

Specifications
Table Tech. 4-5 shows the hold-up battery module specifications.
Table Tech. 4-5 Hold-up battery module specifications Weight Environmental limits Nominal input voltage and frequency Supply voltage and frequency range Nominal output voltage Output voltage range

5.9 kg 5 to +45 _C (indoor only) 100 to 240 V ac 50 to 60 Hz 88 to 270 V ac 45 to 66 Hz 24 V dc 27.5  0.25 V dc (max) 19  0.25 V dc (min) 1500 watts 5 Ah < 2 hours (from LVD level) < 10 msec 88 volts (110 V ac nominal systems) 150 volts (230 V ac nominal systems) 10 seconds (@ 25 _C) 3 to 5 y years 1200 cycles

Maximum output power Battery capacity Recharge time Response time (from external supply failure to battery operation) Back up switching voltage Typical output power duration * (six CTUs) Expected battery life (standby) Expected battery life (discharge)

* The duration is reduced when CTU2s are installed in the cabinet. NOTE
This specification is valid up to 3 km altitude, corresponding to an atmospheric pressure of approximately 70 kPa (648 to 1048 millibars).

Tech. 48

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GSM

Hold-up battery module

Front panel switch and LEDs


Front panel enable switch
The rocker style switch mounted on the front panel is used to enable the output of the hold-up module.

Front panel LED indicators


The front panel LEDs function as follows:
S

ACTIVE (green). Normally lit, this LED indicates that the module is capable of powering cabinets. The ACTIVE LED flashes during discharge.

ALARM (red). Normally unlit, when lit continuously this LED indicates one or more of the following alarm conditions exists: Battery charger fail. Input voltage drops below 88 V ac (110 V systems) or below 150 V ac (230 V systems). Enable fail, the module is not receiving an enable signal from the Horizonmacro backplane.

When the ALARM LED is flashing the batteries have failed and are not capable of providing sufficient energy to supply a ten second hold-up. NOTE
If a battery failure occurs, the batteries may have reached the end of life. The hold-up battery module is disabled and must be returned to Motorola for repair.

CHARGE (green). The CHARGE LED is lit while batteries are charging.

Hold-up module batteries


The hold-up module contains two 12 V batteries connected in series to provide a nominal output of 24 V dc, with a capacity of 5 Ah. Input protection is provided by a 3.15 A fuse mounted on the battery charger PCB, this fuse is not user replaceable. The hold-up module must be returned to Motorola for repair.

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68P02902W06-C006

Tech. 49

Hold-up battery module

GSM

Functional description
During normal operation the batteries are charged by an internal battery charger. The charger provides battery temperature compensation to protect the batteries. In the case of external ac power supply failure, the unit automatically switches the BTS to battery operation. The hold-up battery module indicates failure alarms to the OMC-R, through the Horizonmacro alarm board.

Low voltage disconnect (LVD)


The hold-up battery module has an LVD function to protect the batteries from deep discharge. The battery does not discharge when not in the system or after operation of the low voltage disconnect.

Hold-up battery module functional diagram


Figure Tech. 4-4 shows the electrical layout of the hold-up battery module.

Figure Tech. 4-4 Hold-up battery module electrical layout


To backplane dc bus 19 to 27.5 V External supply 88 to 270 V ac

Enable

Transistor switch
LVD

Input detect

Fuse

BATTERY CHARGER AND INPUT POWER DETECT

2  12 V LEAD ACID BATTERIES

Tech. 410

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GSM

Hold-up battery module

Alarms
Alarms are generated by the open contacts of de-energized relays within the hold-up battery module, (during normal operation the relays are energized and the contacts closed). The contacts are rated for 1 A at 30 V. The alarms are then passed to the Horizonmacro alarm board, through the CBIA backplane, for onward transmission to the OMC-R. These alarms are equivalent to the PSM alarms. The alarm signals generated are:
S

Output fail. This alarm is triggered if: The enable pin is not correctly plugged into the backplane. The battery charger fails. The front panel enable switch is off. The batteries fail.
If a battery failure occurs, the batteries may have reached the end of life. The hold-up battery module is disabled and must be returned to Motorola for repair.

NOTE

Input fail. This alarm is triggered if the external ac supply voltage drops below: 88 volts (110 V ac nominal systems). 150 volts (230 V ac nominal systems).

Over temperature. This alarm is triggered if the hold-up battery module temperature exceeds 50 _C.

Signals
The following signals interface with the Horizonmacro backplane:
S

Enable. The output of the hold-up battery module is inhibited unless the ENABLE signal pin is connected to the output return pin through the Horizonmacro backplane.

Hold-up module ID. The hold-up module provides a five bit TTL signal to the OMC-R that allows identification of the hold-up module. This signal is available when ac is present and during battery discharge and identifies to the OMC-R the that a battery hold-up module is fitted.

Technical Description: Horizonmacro indoor


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Tech. 411

Circuit breaker module (CBM)

GSM

Circuit breaker module (CBM)


CBM overview
The CBM provides circuit protection and manual isolation for all parts of the cabinet, except the PSMs. The CBM is located above the digital module shelf and below the PSMs. The honeycomb casing permits cabinet ventilation through the module. The CBM is connected to the backplane, providing isolator switches and overload protection for the equipment indicated in Figure Tech. 4-5.

View of CBM
Figure Tech. 4-5 shows views of the CBM with circuit breaker buttons identified.

Figure Tech. 4-5 Views of CBM with circuit breaker buttons identified
BACKPLANE CONNECTOR HANDLE-BAFFLE

M4 MODULE ATTACHMENT SCREWS

CCB (0 AND 1) 4A

SURF FANS 2A 7A

BPSMs (A AND B) 7A

6 TRANSCEIVERS (0 TO 5) 12 A

FRONT VIEW

Tech. 412

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GSM

Circuit breaker module (CBM)

Operation of CBM
Power for each module is supplied through the appropriate circuit breaker switch. Overload of any circuit results in appropriate front panel circuit breaker button tripping to the off (out) position. The button can be pressed to the on (in) position when overload problem has been corrected. Transceivers, BPSMs, CCBs, SURF and fans can be isolated by pressing and releasing the appropriate button to the off (out) position. Power is restored by pushing the appropriate button to the on (in) position.

Technical Description: Horizonmacro indoor


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68P02902W06-C006

Tech. 413

MicroBCU Power Supply Module (BPSM)

GSM

MicroBCU Power Supply Module (BPSM)


Introduction to BPSM
This section describes the mBCU power supply module (BPSM). The BPSM, located in the digital module shelf of the main cage, supplies regulated dc power to the digital modules. A single (master) BPSM mounted in the lower half of the digital module shelf can provide sufficient power for:
S S S S

One MCUF. One FMUX. Two NIUs. The alarm module.

An optional second BPSM can be fitted in the upper half of the digital module shelf to supply any or all of the following:
S S S

Backup power to the alarm module, which is the only digital module supplied by both BPSMs (for redundancy). Optional redundant MCUF and associated FMUX. Up to two additional NIUs.

During normal operation, with all the outputs within their regulation limits, a green LED located on the front panel is illuminated. No alarms are generated by the BPSM.

BPSM diagram
Figure Tech. 4-6 shows a BPSM. Figure Tech. 4-6 BPSM view

BACKPLANE CONNECTOR

GREEN LED

ig.274.rh

Tech. 414

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29 Jan 2007

GSM

MicroBCU Power Supply Module (BPSM)

Functional description
The BPSM is a switching type dc/dc power converter that converts the cabinet +27 V dc power to the following regulated dc outputs:
S S S S

+3.3 V 1 % at 10 A (full load current) +5 V 2 % at 10 A (full load current). +12 V 5 % at 4 A (full load current). 12 V 5 % at 2 A (full load current).

Internal BPSM circuits monitor the +3.3 V, +5 V, +12 V and 12 V outputs for the following purposes:
S S S

Output voltage regulation. Over-voltage protection - provides shutdown if output voltage exceeds 1.1 to 1.2 times the rated output. Over-current protection - maximum output current has the following limits: 1.1 to 1.8 times full load rating of +3.3 V output. 1.1 to 1.8 times full load rating of +5 V output. 1.25 to 2 times full load rating of +12 V and 12 V outputs.

Circuit protection
Additional internal circuitry protects the BPSM:
S S S

Input dc reverse polarity protection, achieved by an input series diode. Thermal protection by automatic BPSM shutdown. Normal BPSM operation resumes after BPSM temperature returns to a safe level. A 10 Amp fuse is located near the backplane connector.

LED display
An active (Green) LED mounted on the front of the BPSM is on when all output voltages are present and within specified limits. A functional diagram is shown in Figure Tech. 4-7. Figure Tech. 4-7 Functional diagram of BPSM
BACKPLANE CONNECTOR VOUT (+5 V) VOUT (+12 V) Green LED Power converter and system monitor VIN (+27 V) VOUT (12 V) VOUT (+3.3 V)

ig.275.rh

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Tech. 415

MicroBCU Power Supply Module (BPSM)

GSM

Tech. 416

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Chapter 5

RF modules

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Tech. 51

GSM

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GSM

RF equipment detail

RF equipment detail
Overview of RF equipment
This chapter describes the functional operation of radio frequency (RF) modules used in the cabinet. All descriptions are presented at a block diagram level.

RF modules described
The following equipment is described:
S S S S

Compact Transceiver Unit (CTU). Compact Transceiver Unit 2 (CTU2). Sectorized Universal Receiver Front-end SURF module (for receive path), both single and dual band variants. Several types of transmit block (Tx block). Tx blocks are used for various configurations of transmit path, depending on number of antennas, CTUs and functionality, including potential shared receive path. Cavity combining block CCB, used to combine three CTU transmit paths in conditions where Synthesizer Frequency Hopping (SFH) is not required. Two CCBs can combine up to six CTU transmit paths on to a single Tx antenna.

RF general information and loopback test function


The following additional information is presented in this chapter:
S S S

General definition of transmit and receive functions in this section. An RF overview and RF test function description in the next section. An explanation of Frequency hopping in a section immediately after the CTU section.

These descriptions are intended to assist the reader in understanding the information on the RF modules.

RF specifications
All equipment meets or exceeds ETSI regulations. Frequency information is listed in the Specifications part of this manual.

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Tech. 53

RF equipment detail

GSM

Receive RF hardware
Receiver RF hardware consists of the SURF module and optional Tx block receive path, and the receive section of the transceiver. The SURF module provides bandpass filtering and low-noise amplification for up to three sectors, with diversity receive antenna signals, together with switching to the transceivers.

Transceiver Rx role
The transceiver (CTU or CTU2) provides the following receive functions:
S S S S S S S

Receiver tuning (on a timeslot basis) to any receive channel frequency. Demodulation and equalization of the receive channel signal. Measurement of the received signal strength indication (RSSI) and signal quality. Recovery of received data from the demodulated radio channel. Channel decoding of the received data and processing of the recovered signal. Traffic data is passed on to the MCUF for routeing to the MSC. Digital interface to the SURF module, which controls selection by the SURF switch of the receive signals from the appropriate antenna. Comparison and processing of an additional receive path from a second diversity antenna input to compensate for multipath fading and interference.

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GSM

RF equipment detail

Transmit (Tx) RF hardware


Transmit RF hardware consists of Tx blocks in appropriate combinations to meet requirements of antenna sharing for the transceivers.

Transceiver Tx role
The transceiver (CTU or CTU2) provides the following transmit functions:
S S S S S S

Transmit tuning (on a timeslot basis) for generation of any transmit channel RF frequency. Encoding transmit data output. Digital modulation of transmit data onto the transmit radio channel signal. Final RF power amplification and output power level control of the transmit radio channel RF signal. When using a CCB, the output of control data to the CCB (CTU only). Channel encoding of the data to be transmitted, interleaving signal and traffic channel data, as defined by ETSI.

Rx/Tx single antenna duplexing


Duplexers allow a single antenna to be used for both transmit and receive operations. Duplexers exist within several of the transmit blocks. Normally duplexed RF signals are used through one antenna, with a second receive antenna to provide diversity. CAUTION
If a single antenna (non-diversity) is required, the duplex antenna RF receive cable from the transmit block must be connected to the RxA path at the SURF. Simply switching off diversity at the OMC-R without the correct SURF configuration will cause a loss of reception.

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Tech. 55

RF overview and RF test function

GSM

RF overview and RF test function


RF overview
This section explains the RF functional blocks and additional RF loopback test capability. The terminology, functionality and optional capabilities are set out, as a basis for understanding more detailed descriptions in RF module sections of this chapter.

RF main component explanation


The following description should be read in conjunction with Figure Tech. 5-1. The RF equipment consists of three main blocks:
S S S

The transceiver (CTU or CTU2). The SURF module. The Tx block or alternatively CCBs.

CTU
The CTU can operate at 850 MHz, 900 MHz, 1800 MHz or 1900 MHz, depending on the BTS variant ordered. It can receive two inputs, RxA and RxB, from the SURF. These inputs are converted into digital voice/data. The two Rx signals provide diversity of the Rx function from the MS (uplink). The CTU also generates a Tx data signal, translated from received digital voice/data, which is transmitted by cable to the Tx block for antenna transmission to the MS (downlink). The third (middle) port provides an RF loopback test signal capability, for automatic transmission of RF test signals to the SURF.

CTU2
The CTU2 operates in a similar manner to the CTU but has the following differences:
S S

Does not support operation at 850 MHz or 1900 MHz. Does not have a separate loopback test port (L). Port RxC is used instead.

Separate detailed descriptions of the CTU and CTU2 are provided later in this chapter.

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GSM

RF overview and RF test function

SURF module
One of six variants of the SURF module can be installed in the Horizonmacro indoor:
S S S S S S

Single band 850 MHz SURF. Single band 900 MHz SURF. Dual band 900 MHz SURF. Single band 1800 MHz SURF Dual band 1800 MHz SURF. Single band 1900 MHz SURF.

The single band SURF modules accept up to three pairs of antenna inputs, and the dual band SURF modules accept up to four pairs of antenna inputs. The SURF switches the inputs to the appropriate transceivers under the control of the database through the MCUF. There are two inputs to each transceiver for Rx diversity. The SURF also contains loopback test circuitry, connecting with a test signal from each transceiver.

Tx block
There are up to three Tx blocks, each block serving two transceivers. Tx blocks filter the transmit signal for the required Tx band. Tx blocks also use filters to enable the Rx frequency signal to be passed to the SURF, if one antenna is used for both Tx and Rx signals.

CCBs
Cavity combining blocks (CCBs) are an alternative to Tx blocks. CCBs combine up to three CTU transmit paths. Two CCBs can combine up to six CTU transmit paths. CCBs have no duplexing capability and must be connected to an antenna through an external high power duplexer (HPD). CCBs cannot be used with the GSM850 or PCS1900 BTS variants, or when SFH (see Frequency hopping) is required. NOTE
CCBs cannot be used with CTU2 transceivers.

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Tech. 57

RF overview and RF test function

GSM

RF loopback
Purpose
The loopback test function is primarily used to identify faults when the RF system has failed. The loopback test function enables a diagnostic capability at the OMC-R, by creating a test signal to identify if the fault is either:
S S

Software (that the OMC-R can correct). Particular hardware (transceiver or SURF).

The result is a reduction in site assessment visits, and avoidance of unnecessary visits when hardware is functioning correctly. NOTE
The RF loopback test feature available on the Horizonmacro is not available on previous generations of equipment.

Hardware
The RF loopback test function is essentially a hardware capability built into the transceiver and the SURF. Software instructions activate the test hardware, to route test signals through the RF system.

Software operation
When installed with suitable software, GSR5 or later, the OMC-R can operate the loopback test functions, and receive the results of the tests.

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GSM

RF overview and RF test function

RF functional diagram
Figure Tech. 5-1 shows the basic RF and loopback/VSWR test functions. For clarity, only one CTU (and one CTU2), one Tx block, and part of the SURF are shown. CCBs could be used instead of Tx blocks with CTUs (but not CTU2s). Figure Tech. 5-1 RF functional diagram
B A A B SURF B

RxA

RxB

RxA CTU2

RxB

RxC

of CTU2 Tx

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Tech. 59

RF overview and RF test function

GSM

Description of RF test modes


The following description should be read in conjunction with Figure Tech. 5-1. NOTE
The RF test capability described requires software load GSR5 or later.

The loopback test hardware picks up an attenuated signal by coupled link from the normal transceiver transmit signal. The signal is mixed down to the receive band for testing the Rx functionality of the SURF and transceiver. Power to the loopback circuitry is automatically turned off when the radio is in normal operation.

SURF test mode


The loopback signal is injected into the antenna receive path of the SURF by coupled link. This tests the complete SURF and transceiver Rx system path.

Test of CTU Rx circuitry


The loopback signal is injected directly internally into the Rx input of the transceiver to test its receive portion.

VSWR test mode


The test signal, at Rx frequency, is injected into the antenna port through coupled link on the SURF. Reflected power is monitored by the receive system to calculate VSWR. Detection of a high VSWR may indicate the presence of a cable or antenna fault.

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GSM

Compact transceiver unit (CTU)

Compact transceiver unit (CTU)


Overview of CTU
This section provides the technical description of the CTU. The CTU2 is described separately. NOTE
The CTU may be an 850 MHz, 900 MHz, 1800 MHz or a 1900 MHz transceiver, depending on requirements. The functionality of the CTU is the same for all variants.

The CTU:
S S

Generates the RF frequencies required to perform the transmit and receive functions. Contains the digital circuits required for eight timeslots of channel equalization, encoding and decoding, and transceiver control logic.

The CTU provides the air interface between a BSS and MSs, with the following features:
S S S

Capability of diversity reception (input from two antennas) which improves the quality reception in the presence of multipath fading and interference. Frequency change on a timeslot basis for frequency hopping and equipment sharing. Transmit power control.

CTU Tx RF output specification


For Tx RF output, see Overview and specifications.

Location and requirements


The transceiver shelf is adjacent to the digital module shelf in the base of the cabinet. The cabinet can contain up to six transceivers (CTUs, CTU2s, or a mix of the two). A minimum of one transceiver must be fitted in each cabinet.

CTU internal boards


The CTU is a single field replaceable unit (FRU), which contains:
S S S

CTU transceiver (XCVR) board. Power amplifier (PA) board. Power supply unit.

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Compact transceiver unit (CTU)

GSM

Alarm reporting
The CTU status is displayed by LED indicators on the front panel, as shown in Figure Tech. 5-2, and detailed in Table Tech. 5-1. Major sub-systems, such as synthesizers and RF amplifiers, are monitored, with alarm signals as necessary.
Table Tech. 5-1 CTU front panel status indicators Indicator LED When the LED is Then CTU

RADIO STATUS

OFF Flashing green Green Flashing yellow Yellow Red

Module off Code required or being loaded Normal operational mode Test mode Radio inhibited Alarm condition Transmitter is off Transmitter is keyed on Non-volatile memory boot code upgrade (Do not remove power or reset see CAUTION)

Transmit (Tx) STATUS RADIO STATUS AND TRANSMIT (Tx) STATUS

OFF Yellow Both LEDs flashing rapidly

CAUTION

When both LEDs are flashing, the boot code is downloading into non-volatile memory for software upgrade. Power should not be removed, nor the cabinet reset, until downloading has been completed, as this will corrupt the non-volatile memory. If the boot code is corrupted, contact Motorola Customer Network Resolution Centre requesting the boot code restoration procedure and the appropriate boot code file.

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GSM

Compact transceiver unit (CTU)

View of a CTU
Figure Tech. 5-2 shows the CTU with main features identified.

Figure Tech. 5-2 View of CTU showing main external features

M4 MODULE ATTACHMENT SCREW

BACKPLANE POWER AND SIGNAL CONNECTOR

Tx OUT CONNECTOR

TEST INTERFACE

Rx A LOOPBACK TEST PORT (L) Rx B

HANDLE

TTY INTERFACE CONTROL PROCESSOR

RADIO STATUS LED RECESSED MANUAL RESET BUTTON (if fitted) Tx STATUS LED

M4 MODULE ATTACHMENT SCREW

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Compact transceiver unit (CTU)

GSM

CTU front panel detail


The TTY RS-232 serial port has three serial links onto the 9-way connector:
S S S

Radio subsystem (RSS). Equalizer and control processor (EQCP). Channel coder control processor (CCCP).

A test interface port on the CTU front panel provides access to critical test points for factory alignment and maintenance. Pressing the reset push button generates a hard reset of the processor, initiating a normal power-up. Later versions of the CTU (mid 2001 onward) have no reset button, reset is acheived by operation of the appproriate CTU circuit breaker on the CBM. Figure Tech. 5-3 shows the front panel and Table Tech. 5-2 lists connector functions. Figure Tech. 5-3 CTU front panel

Tx OUT CONNECTOR

TEST INTERFACE

TTY INTERFACE . RADIO STATUS LED RECESSED MANUAL RESET BUTTON (if fitted) Tx STATUS LED

Table Tech. 5-2 CTU front panel connectors Front panel legend Function Connection to

TRANSMIT OUT TTY INTERFACE TEST INTERFACE

Transmitter RF output Test access to processor Factory use

Tx Block Three RS-232s Test equipment

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GSM

Compact transceiver unit (CTU)

CTU Tx connector
The CTU Tx connector is a short SMA to SMA link to the base of the appropriate Tx block or feedthrough plate. NOTE
The Tx cable has a 90 SMA connector at one end and a straight SMA connector at the other end. The 90 end is designed for connection to the Tx port of a CTU.

CTU Rx function
The receiver part of the CTU accepts two amplified and filtered receive antenna signals from the SURF module. These two signals are applied to inputs (branch A and branch B) of the CTU transceiver board. The input from the SURF module is filtered, amplified and down converted to ensure the signal level and frequency range are correct for the next stage.

CTU interface function


The CTU interface function provides the air interface timing and radio control circuitry required for Rx (uplink) and Tx (downlink) control functions. The CTU interface includes:
S S S S S S S S S

Master GSM air interface timing function. Independent Rx gain control interface for each diversity receiver branch. Baseband Rx data interface for each diversity receiver branch. Receiver front end and CCB control. Tx data interface including GMSK modulator which provides baseband data to the transmitter. Tx and power amplifier power control interface. Rx and Tx frequency synthesizer control which supports RF frequency hopping. CTU and cabinet alarm data collection. Alarms sampling and multiplexing.

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Tech. 515

Compact transceiver unit 2 (CTU2)

GSM

Compact transceiver unit 2 (CTU2)


Restrictions when using CTU2s in Horizonmacro indoor
The CTU2, developed for the Horizon II macro, is backwards compatible with the CTU used in Horizonmacro indoor. However, the following restrictions apply when CTU2s are used in Horizonmacro indoor BTSs:
S S

CTU2s cannot be used in Horizonmacro outdoor BTSs. CTU2s cannot be used in Horizonmacro indoor BTSs that are powered from 110 V ac. BBH is only supported in single density mode when CTU2s are used in Horizonmacro indoor BTSs. CCBs are not supported when CTU2s are used in Horizonmacro indoor BTSs. RF output power from the CTU2s is reduced (see Specifications in Chapter 1). PSU requirements may change, depending on the number of CTU2s installed (see Table Tech. 4-3 in Chapter 4).

Overview of the CTU2


This section provides the technical description of the CTU2. NOTE
Two versions of the CTU2 are available for the Horizonmacro indoor. One version operates in the EGSM900 frequency band and the other operates in the DCS1800 frequency band.

The CTU2:
S

Generates the RF frequencies required to perform the transmit and receive functions. Contains the digital circuits required for 32 timeslots of channel equalization, encoding and decoding, and transceiver control logic.

The CTU2 provides the air interface between a BSS and MSs, with the following features:
S

Capability of diversity reception (input from up to four antennas) which improves the quality reception in the presence of multipath fading and interference. Frequency change on a timeslot basis for frequency hopping and equipment sharing. Transmit power control.
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Tech. 516

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GSM

Compact transceiver unit 2 (CTU2)

CTU2 features
The CTU2 has the following features:
S

Single or double density mode in the Horizonmacro indoor cabinet. Single density mode provides single carrier GSM Tx capability. Double density mode provides 2 carrier GSM Tx capability (both carriers must be in the same sector). Single carrier EGPRS Tx capability. Backwards compatible with the CTU (but BBH restrictions apply if used in double density mode). Transmit diversity. Two branch Rx diversity. Hardware support for AMR (upgrade required for pre-GSR7 software).

S S S S S

CTU2 Tx RF output specification


For Tx RF output, see Overview and specifications.

Location and requirements


The transceiver shelf is adjacent to the digital module shelf in the base of the cabinet. The cabinet can contain up to six transceivers (CTUs, CTU2s, or a mix of the two). A minimum of one transceiver must be fitted in each cabinet. At least one transceiver must be fitted in each cabinet. All CTU2s in the cabinet must operate at the same frequency (either 900 MHz or 1800 MHz).

CTU2 internal boards


The CTU2 is a single field replaceable unit (FRU), which contains:
S S S

CTU2 transceiver (XCVR) board. Power amplifier (PA) board. Power supply unit.

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Tech. 517

Compact transceiver unit 2 (CTU2)

GSM

Alarm reporting
The CTU2 status is displayed by LED indicators on the front panel, as shown in Figure Tech. 5-4, and detailed in Table Tech. 5-3. Major sub-systems, such as synthesizers and RF amplifiers, are monitored with alarm signals as necessary.
Table Tech. 5-3 CTU2 front panel status indicators LED Status Meaning

RADIO STATUS

Unlit Flashing green

CTU2 is off. Boot code being loaded. (Do not remove power or reset see CAUTION below.) Normal operational mode. Test mode. Transceiver inhibited. Alarm condition. Flash reprogramming in progress. (Do not remove power or reset see CAUTION below.) Transmitter A is off. Transmitter A is keyed on. Transmitter B is off. Transmitter B is keyed on.

Green Flashing yellow Yellow Red Alternately flashing red and green TRANSMIT (Tx) (T ) STATUS A TRANSMIT (Tx) (T ) STATUS B Unlit Yellow Unlit Yellow

CAUTION

Removing power or resetting the cabinet while the boot code is downloading or flash reprogramming is taking place will cause memory corruption. If the boot code is corrupted, contact Motorola Customer Network Resolution Centre requesting the boot code restoration procedure and the appropriate boot code file.

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GSM

Compact transceiver unit 2 (CTU2)

View of a CTU2
Figure Tech. 5-4 shows the CTU2 with main features identified.

Figure Tech. 5-4 CTU2, showing main external features

M4 MODULE ATTACHMENT SCREW

Tx OUT CONNECTOR

BACKPLANE POWER AND SIGNAL CONNECTOR

TEST INTERFACE HANDLE TTY INTERFACE CONTROL PROCESSOR VCAT INTERFACE

Rx D Rx A Rx C Rx B

M4 MODULE ATTACHMENT SCREW

RADIO STATUS LED Tx STATUS A LED Tx STATUS B LED

NOTE

Rx D is not used when the CTU2 is used in the Horizonmacro indoor.

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Compact transceiver unit 2 (CTU2)

GSM

CTU2 front panel detail


The TTY RS-232 serial port has three serial links onto the 9-way connector:
S S S

Radio subsystem (RSS). Equalizer and control processor (EQCP). Channel coder control processor (CCCP).

A test interface port on the CTU2 front panel provides access to critical test points for factory calibration and maintenance. Figure Tech. 5-5 shows the front panel and Table Tech. 5-4 lists connector functions. Figure Tech. 5-5 CTU2 front panel

Tx OUT CONNECTOR

TEST INTERFACE

TTY INTERFACE . VCAT INTERFACE RADIO STATUS LED NOTE The CTU2 does not have a reset button. A reset is acheived using the appproriate CTU2 circuit breaker on the CBM. Tx STATUS A LED Tx STATUS B LED

Table Tech. 5-4 CTU2 front panel connectors Front panel legend Function Connection to

TRANSMIT OUT TTY INTERFACE TEST INTERFACE VCAT INTERFACE

Transmitter RF output Test access to processor Factory use Factory use

Tx block Three RS-232s Test equipment Test equipment

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GSM

Compact transceiver unit 2 (CTU2)

CTU2 Tx connector
The CTU2 Tx connector is a short SMA to SMA link to the base of the appropriate Tx block or feedthrough plate. NOTE
The Tx cable has a 90 SMA connector at one end and a straight SMA connector at the other end. The 90 end is designed for connection to the Tx port of the CTU2.

CTU2 Rx function
The receiver part of the CTU2 can accept two amplified and filtered receive antenna signals from the SURF module. These two signals are applied to inputs (branch A and branch B) of the CTU2 transceiver board. The transceiver can be configured to provide double density receive capacity or 4 branch Rx diversity, although only 2 branch Rx diversity is possible when used in the Horizonmacro indoor. In double density mode, the receiver provides demodulation of a main and diversity path for two RF channels. The input from the SURF module is filtered, amplified and down converted to ensure the signal level and frequency range are correct for the next stage.

SURF to CTU2 interface


Figure Tech. 5-6 shows the interconnections between the SURF and the CTU2 for 2 carrier / 2-branch diversity, with loopback (LPBK) and VSWR. Figure Tech. 5-6 SURF to CTU2 interconnections
Branch 2 Branch 1

2B

1B

0B

2A

1A

0A EXT EXT B A

SURF CTU2
Rx D Rx A Rx C Rx B Branch 1 (main) LPBK / VSWR Branch 2 (diversity) B C A

NOTE

Rx A on the CTU2 carries the SURF control and alarm signals. The 7-pin connectors A and C on the base of the SURF carry 6 x RF signals + 1 earth and connector B carries 6 x RF signals + 1 power.

The physical interface between the SURF and the CTU2 consists of three connections, one bi-directional and two directional. The bi-directional connection is for the RF receive main branch (branch 1) and for digital communication between the SURF and the CTU2. One directional connection is for the RF receive diversity branch (branch 2), and the other is for the loopback or VSWR mode selection and the LPBK / VSWR signal.
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Compact transceiver unit 2 (CTU2)

GSM

CTU2 interface function


The CTU2 interface function provides the air interface timing and transceiver control circuitry required for Rx (uplink) and Tx (downlink) control functions. The CTU2 interface includes:
S S S S S S S S S

Master GSM air interface timing function. Independent Rx gain control interface for each diversity receiver branch. Baseband Rx data interface for each diversity receiver branch. Receiver front end control. Tx data interface including GMSK modulator which provides baseband data to the transmitter. Tx and power amplifier power control interface. Rx and Tx frequency synthesizer control which supports RF frequency hopping. CTU2 and cabinet alarm data collection. Alarms sampling and multiplexing.

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GSM

Compact transceiver unit 2 (CTU2)

EGPRS capability
The CTU2 is EGPRS-capable, enabling data rates up to 384 kbit/s. From a hardware perspective the main difference between GSM/GPRS and EGPRS is the use of 8PSK (8 Phase Shift Keying) modulation instead of GMSK (Gaussian Minimum Shift Keying). GPRS and EGPRS use the same symbol rate, however the modulation bit rates are different. In GSM/GPRS, each transmitted symbol (phase change) represents one bit, wheras with 8PSK modulation three consecutive bits are related to a symbol. A basic technical comparison between GPRS and EGPRS is shown in Table Tech. 5-5.
Table Tech. 5-5 Comparison between GPRS and EGPRS GPRS Modulation Symbol rate Modulation bit rate Radio data rate per time slot User data rate per timeslot User data rate (8 time slots) EGPRS

GMSK 270 ksyms 270 kbit/s 22.8 kbit/s 20 kbit/s 160 kbit/s

8PSK 270 ksyms 810 kbit/s 69.2 kbit/s 59.2 kbit/s 473.6 kbit/s

NOTE

Although theoretical bit rates of 473.6 kbit/s can be achieved, it is limited to the ITU-defined bit rate of 384 kbit/s, corresponding to 48 kbit/s per timeslot.

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Frequency hopping

GSM

Frequency hopping
Overview of transceiver frequency hopping
The CTU and CTU2 transceivers support two types of frequency hopping, synthesizer frequency hopping (SFH) and baseband frequency hopping (BBH). This section provides an explanation of both types. In either type, the MS switches channels after every transmit/receive (Tx/Rx) burst pair. The difference between SFH and BBH is in the method by which channel switching is achieved at the BTS. NOTE
BBH is not possible if the CTU2 is used in double density mode in a Horizonmacro cabinet which is controlled by a MCUF site controller (refer to System Information: BSS Equipment Planning 68P02900W21 for further details).

Synthesizer frequency hopping (SFH)


SFH can only be used with wideband combining. SFH uses the frequency agility of the transceiver to change Tx/Rx frequency on any timeslot (TS), without affecting other timeslots. A minimum of two transceivers are required per cell due to BCCH requirements. Timeslot 0 of CTU/CTU2 0 is used for the BCCH carrier and therefore CTU/CTU2 0 cannot use SFH. Only CTU/CTU2 1 and additional transceivers can use SFH.

Baseband frequency hopping (BBH)


BBH can use either Tx blocks or CCB Tx combining equipment. The main reason for using BBH instead of SFH is to enable frequency hopping when using CCBs, because the mechanical tuning of CCBs is too slow for SFH. The number of transceivers required to support BBH is equal to the number of frequencies used. NOTE
BBH is not supported on GSM850 or PCS1900 BTSs.

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GSM

SURF module

SURF module
SURF module overview
The sectorized universal receiver front end (SURF) module is located in a slot at the rear of the cabinet top panel. Three connectors on the underside of the module connect to the SURF harness which provides connectivity to up to six transceivers. Antenna connections are located on the top of the unit. There are six types of SURF module available for the Horizonmacro indoor BTS, depending on the frequency variant:
S S S S S S

850 (MHz) single band SURF. 900 (MHz) single band SURF. 900 (MHz) dual band SURF. 1800 (MHz) single band SURF. 1800 (MHz) dual band SURF. 1900 (MHz) single band SURF.

The single band SURFs contains three amplifier sections for connection to three pairs of receive antenna inputs providing reception at the appropriate frequency. The 900 dual band SURF contains three amplifier sections for connection to three pairs of antennas providing 900 MHz reception and, being dual band, a further amplifier section for connection to a pair of 1800 MHz receive antennas. The 1800 dual band SURF similarly contains three amplifier sections for connection to three pairs of antennas providing 1800 MHz reception and a further amplifier section for connection to a pair of 900 MHz receive antennas. Each amplifier section provides two receive outputs which may be directed to any of the six transceivers, by the switch section. There are three connections to each transceiver; RxA, RxB and loopback test (L). The two receive outputs from amplifier 0 are split and may be used as extensions to other cabinets if required. These act as extended antenna connections from antenna 0. The extension cables are connected to the receive antenna connection ports on the SURF of the extension cabinet (which is able to respond to each amplified signal as if it were a normal antenna input). NOTE
The 900 MHz and 1800 MHz single and dual band SURFs may vary slightly in appearance, depending on when the BTS was manufactured. Later single band SURFs have blanked out holes in the positions where the second frequency N-type connectors would be fitted in dual band variants (see Figure Tech. 5-7). Later dual band SURFs have slightly different label numbering for the second frequency connectors. These were originally numbered 0A and 0B, but are now numbered 1A and 1B respectively. This later numbering convention is used throughout the remainder of this manual.

Technical Description: Horizonmacro indoor


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Tech. 525

SURF module

GSM

Single band SURF module view


Figure Tech. 5-7 shows a later type single band SURF module with features identified. An earlier type single band SURF module is shown in Figure Tech. 5-8.

Figure Tech. 5-7 Single band SURF module (later type) with features identified
SIX N-TYPE RECEIVE ANTENNA CONNECTIONS (2 PER DLNB EQUIVALENT)

RX-Pn RX-Pn 2B 0B RX-Pn 1B RX-Pn 2A RX-Pn 1A RX-Pn 0A EXTENSION PORTS TO OTHER CABINETS M6 MODULE ATTACHMENT SCREWS HANDLE FOR MODULE REMOVAL

SURF MODULE

GUIDES FOR INSERTION

3 CONNECTORS ON UNDERSIDE TO SURF HARNESS

NOTE

Where RX-Pn appears in Figure Tech. 5-7, the n may be 850, 900, 1800 or 1900, depending on the frequency of the SURF module.

Tech. 526

Technical Description: Horizonmacro indoor 68P02902W06-C006

29 Jan 2007

GSM

SURF module

Figure Tech. 5-8 Single band SURF module (earlier type) with features identified
SIX N-TYPE RECEIVE ANTENNA CONNECTIONS (2 PER DLNB EQUIVALENT) RXn 2B RXn 1B RXn 0B RXn 2A RXn 1A RXn 0A

EXTENSION PORTS TO OTHER CABINETS

M6 MODULE ATTACHMENT SCREWS

HANDLE FOR MODULE REMOVAL

SURF MODULE
GUIDE RAIL FOR INSERTION

3 CONNECTORS ON UNDERSIDE TO SURF HARNESS

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Tech. 527

SURF module

GSM

Functional description of the single band SURF


The single band SURF provides front end filtering, amplification, and matrix control of the RF receive signal between the antenna and the transceiver. The single band SURF functional sections (Figure Tech. 5-9) consist of loopback, filtering, amplification, splitting, digital processing and power selection. Each section is duplicated for the second diversity path except for the digital and dc power section which is shared by the two diversity paths. There are three antenna pair inputs (ANT 0, ANT 1 and ANT 2) for each of the two diversity branches (Branch A and Branch B). There are six outputs to the transceiver for each of the two diversity branches as well as one input from the transceiver for the loopback (LPBK) signal. There is also an output for an expansion cabinet for ANT 0 on each branch. The software database must be configured at the OMC-R to accept transceivers of the same frequency as the single band SURF module in the cabinet. The digital section switch, under the control of the database (signalled through the MCUF and transceivers), routes the six amplifier outputs to the appropriate transceivers. The digital and power supply section is also responsible for loopback switch control, manual overrides, alarms and dc voltages. The RF loopback test function is described in RF overview and RF test function in this chapter.

Tech. 528

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GSM

SURF module

Single band SURF functional diagram


Figure Tech. 5-9 shows a functional diagram of the single band SURF module.

Figure Tech. 5-9 Functional diagram of the single band SURF module

six transceivers via SURF harness

Technical Description: Horizonmacro indoor


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Tech. 529

SURF module

GSM

Dual band SURF module view


Figure Tech. 5-10 shows a view of a later type dual band SURF module with features identified. Both the 900 and 1800 variants are similar in appearance.

Figure Tech. 5-10 Later type dual band SURF module with features identified
EIGHT N-TYPE RECEIVE ANTENNA CONNECTIONS (2 PER DLNB EQUIVALENT) SECOND FREQUENCY RX-S 1B

SECOND FREQUENCY RX-S 1A

MAIN FREQUENCY RX-P 2B RX-P 1B RX-P 0B

MAIN FREQUENCY RX-P 2A RX-P 1A RX-P 0A EXTENSION PORTS TO OTHER CABINETS

M6 MODULE ATTACHMENT SCREWS

HANDLE FOR MODULE REMOVAL

DUAL BAND SURF

GUIDES FOR INSERTION

3 CONNECTORS ON UNDERSIDE TO SURF HARNESS

NOTE

Second frequency labelling on earlier types of dual band SURF differs slightly from that shown in Figure Tech. 5-10. 1A and 1B are labelled 0A and 0B on earlier SURFs.

Tech. 530

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29 Jan 2007

GSM

SURF module

Functional description of dual band SURF modules


The dual band SURF modules provide front end filtering, amplification, and matrix control of the RF receive signal between the antenna and the transceiver. The dual band SURFs each have three antenna pair connections providing main frequency reception, and one antenna pair providing reception on a second frequency. The two types of dual band (DB) SURF enable 900 MHz transceivers to be mixed with 1800 MHz transceivers in any combination, up to the maximum total of six transceivers per cabinet. The software database must be configured at the OMC-R to accept 1800 MHz transceivers and 900 MHz transceivers in the appropriate cabinet locations. The dual band SURF functional sections (Figure Tech. 5-11) consist of loopback, filtering, amplification, splitting, digital processing and power selection. Each section is duplicated for the second diversity path except for the digital and dc power section which is shared by the two diversity paths. There are four antenna pair inputs (ANT 0, ANT 1, ANT 2 and ANT DB) for each of the two diversity branches (Branch A and Branch B). There are six outputs to the transceiver for each of the two diversity branches as well as one input from the transceiver for the loopback (LPBK) signal. There is also an output for an expansion cabinet for ANT 0 on each branch. Digital codes are transmitted from the transceivers to the digital section. The digital codes are different, so that 900 MHz or 1800 MHz transceivers can be recognized and appropriate switching can be made to the required antenna for transmission and reception. The digital and power supply section is also responsible for loopback switch control, manual overrides, alarms and dc voltages. The RF loopback test function is described in RF overview and RF test function in this chapter.

Technical Description: Horizonmacro indoor


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Tech. 531

SURF module

GSM

Dual band SURF functional diagram


Figure Tech. 5-11 shows a functional diagram of the dual band SURF module.

Figure Tech. 5-11 Functional diagram of the dual band SURF module

six transceivers via SURF harness

Tech. 532

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GSM

Tx blocks overview

Tx blocks overview
Introduction to transmit blocks
Transmit (Tx) blocks are located in three positions in the basket above the transceivers. There are four types of transmit (Tx) blocks, three of which are available as 850, 900, 1800 or 1900 variants, and one dual band variant (for use with 900 MHz or 1800 MHz BTSs only). CAUTION
S S S S Unused Tx block locations must be covered with a blanking plate for correct air flow and EMC shielding.

TDF (850, 900, 1800 or 1900) Twin duplexed filter. Dual band TDF (900/1800) Dual band twin duplexed filter. DCF (850, 900, 1800 or 1900) Duplexed combining bandpass filter. DDF (850, 900, 1800 or 1900) Dual-stage duplexed combining filter.

These Tx blocks are cooled by airflow underneath. The DDF has fins, whereas the TDF, dual band TDF and DCF do not. Three types of plate can be located in the basket, one as blanking plate and two to interface transceiver Tx cables:
S S S

Blanking plate. This ensures proper air flow and EMI shielding for an unused basket Tx block location. Feedthrough plate. This converts two SMA connectors to two N-type connectors, used for connecting Tx cables to CCBs or DDFs. Hybrid combining unit (HCU). This combines two SMA connectors to one N-type, enabling two additional transceivers to be connected to a DDF.

One type of Tx unit is installed in the stacking bracket, and is connected to three CTUs: CCB Cavity Combining Block. Two CCBs are required for the six CTUs of a filled cabinet. The CCB has no duplexing capability and, if a single Rx/Tx antenna is used, connection must be through an external high power duplexer. NOTE
CCBs are not currently available for use with the 850 MHz or 1900 MHz BTS variants. CCBs cannot be used with CTU2 transceivers.

Screw retention in Tx block locations


The plates are attached to the base of the top panel basket using six M4 screws. Tx blocks are attached to the top surface of the top panel using two M6 screws. To ensure correct EMC shielding and general containment, it is important to ensure that all Tx block/plate screw locations have a screw in place and tightened to correct torque.
Technical Description: Horizonmacro indoor
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Tech. 533

Tx blocks overview

GSM

View of basket for Tx blocks


Figure Tech. 5-12 shows the top panel and basket which holds the Tx blocks.

Figure Tech. 5-12 View of top panel showing Tx block basket


SLOT FOR SURF MODULE

LOCATION HOLE FOR INTERFACE PANEL

BASKET TO HOLD THREE Tx BLOCKS VENTILATION PANEL (LOCATED ABOVE PSMs)

HOLE FOR ONE Tx BLOCK TRANSCEIVER CONNECTIONS

CABLE HOLE FOR FIBRE OPTIC EXTENSION CABLES

Transmit block connectors


The transmit block connectors are of the following types:
S S S

SMA connectors for cables to transceivers. 7/16 connectors to antennas. N-type duplex receive connectors, also used by HCU, CCB inputs and feedthrough plate.

The SMA connectors are underneath the unit (for ease of connection to the transceivers), and the other connectors on top, as shown in Figure Tech. 5-13. NOTE
All unused SMA inputs to DCF, DDF and HCU modules must be fitted with 50 ohm load terminations.

Tech. 534

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GSM

Tx blocks overview

View of Tx block connectors


Figure Tech. 5-13 shows a typical Tx block with connector locations. Figure Tech. 5-13 Typical Tx block
7/16 CONNECTOR TO ANTENNA N-TYPE CONNECTOR TO SURF

HOLE FOR TOP PANEL BASKET ATTACHMENT

ISOMETRIC VIEW
SMA Tx CONNECTORS FROM TRANSCEIVERS

N-TYPE CONNECTOR TO SURF

7/16 CONNECTOR TO ANTENNA

SIDE VIEW
SMA Tx CONNECTORS FROM TRANSCEIVERS

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Tech. 535

Blanking plate

GSM

Blanking plate
Purpose of blanking plate
The blanking plate is fitted in locations where a Tx block is not required. The blanking plate ensures correct air flow through the cabinet. The plate is attached to the base of the top panel basket using six M4 screws. NOTE
It is important to ensure that all unused Tx block screw locations have a screw in place and tightened to correct torque (see Chapter 1 Overview and specifications). This is to ensure maximum quality of EMC and general containment.

View of blanking plate


Figure Tech. 5-14 shows a view of the blanking plate.

Figure Tech. 5-14 View of blanking plate


M4 HOLES FOR ATTACHMENT

Tech. 536

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29 Jan 2007

GSM

Feedthrough plate

Feedthrough plate
Purpose of feedthrough plate
The feedthrough plate converts the normal SMA connector from the transceiver to an N-type connector. Each feedthrough plate has a pair of these converters, one for each of two transceivers. The top N-type connectors are used to connect with either a CCB, or at the (optional) third Tx port on the top of a DDF Tx block. The plate is attached to the base of the top panel basket using six M4 screws.

View of feedthrough plate


Figure Tech. 5-15 shows a top view of a feedthrough plate.

Figure Tech. 5-15 View of feedthrough plate


M4 HOLES FOR ATTACHMENT

N-TYPE CONNECTORS FOR CCBs OR DDFs

SMA CONNECTORS BENEATH FROM TRANSCEIVERS

Feedthrough plate connectors


Each feedthrough plate connects to:
S S

The Tx outputs of two transceivers, using SMA connectors. Tx inputs of CCBs, or DDFs, using N-type connectors.

Technical Description: Horizonmacro indoor


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Tech. 537

HCU plate

GSM

HCU plate
HCU overview
The hybrid combining unit (HCU) combines two transceiver Tx outputs. There are six holes for attachment into the bottom of the Tx block basket.

HCU view
Figure Tech. 5-16 shows the HCU plate with connectors identified. Figure Tech. 5-16 HCU plate view showing connectors
M4 HOLES FOR ATTACHMENT

N-TYPE CONNECTOR TO DDF

SMA TRANSMIT CONNECTORS BENEATH HCU MODULE FROM TRANSCEIVERS

HCU functional diagram


Figure Tech. 5-17 shows a functional diagram of the HCU. Figure Tech. 5-17 HCU functional diagram

INPUT TO DDF

N-TYPE CONNECTOR

HCU 3 dB TYPICAL LOSS ACROSS COMBINER

LOAD

Tx

SMA CONNECTORS

Tx

FIRST TRANSCEIVER

SECOND TRANSCEIVER

Tech. 538

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29 Jan 2007

GSM

HCU plate

HCU connectors
Each HCU connects to:
S S

The Tx outputs of two transceivers, using SMA connectors. A Tx input of a DDF, using an N-type connector. NOTE
All unused SMA inputs to HCU modules must be fitted with 50 ohm load terminations.

Technical Description: Horizonmacro indoor


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Tech. 539

TDF

GSM

TDF
Overview of TDF
The purpose of the twin duplexed filter (TDF) Tx block is to enable each antenna to serve one transceiver for both Tx and Rx. The TDF has two identical sections, each providing a single path from a transceiver to a separate antenna. There is no combining in the TDF. The TDF is located in the basket above the transceivers, and attached to the top surface of the top panel using two M6 screws.

TDF view
Figure Tech. 5-18 shows the TDF Tx block with connectors identified.

Figure Tech. 5-18 View of TDF Tx block with connectors identified


HOLES FOR TOP PANEL BASKET ATTACHMENT N-TYPE CONNECTORS TO SURF

7/16 CONNECTORS TO ANTENNAS

TWO SMA Tx CONNECTORS BENEATH TDF (FROM TRANSCEIVER)

Tech. 540

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29 Jan 2007

GSM

TDF

TDF functional diagram


Figure Tech. 5-19 shows a functional diagram of the TDF.

Figure Tech. 5-19 TDF functional diagram


Tx TO ANTENNA Rx FROM ANTENNA 7/16 CONNECTOR TDF Rx TO SURF Tx TO ANTENNA Rx FROM ANTENNA N-TYPE CONNECTOR 7/16 CONNECTOR N-TYPE CONNECTOR Rx TO SURF

Rx BANDPASS FILTER 1 dB TYPICAL LOSS ACROSS TDF Tx BANDPASS FILTER

Rx BANDPASS FILTER

Tx BANDPASS FILTER

Tx FIRST TRANSCEIVER

SMA CONNECTORS

Tx SECOND TRANSCEIVER

TDF connectors
Each TDF connects to:
S S S

The Tx outputs of two transceivers, using SMA connectors. The two connectors are underneath the TDF. Two antennas, each for both Rx and Tx, using 7/16 connectors. These connectors are on top of the TDF. The SURF, using two N-type connectors. These connectors are on top of the TDF.

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Tech. 541

Dual band TDF

GSM

Dual band TDF


Overview of dual band TDF
The purpose of the dual band twin duplexed filter (dual band TDF) Tx block is to enable one 900 MHz antenna to serve one EGSM900 transceiver for both Tx and Rx, and an 1800 MHz antenna to serve one DCS1800 transceiver for both Tx and Rx. NOTE
The dual band TDF for the GSM850 and PCS1900 BTS variants is not currently available.

The dual band TDF is essentially a TDF with one section providing a path for 900 MHz signals and another section providing a path for 1800 MHz signals. There is no combining in the dual band TDF. The dual band TDF is located in the basket above the transceivers, and is attached to the top surface of the top panel using two M6 screws.

Dual band TDF view


Figure Tech. 5-20 shows the dual band TDF Tx block with connectors identified. Figure Tech. 5-20 View of dual band TDF Tx block with connectors identified
N-TYPE CONNECTOR TO 900 MHz SURF CONNECTION 7/16 CONNECTOR TO 900 MHz ANTENNA (ANT. EGSM900) 7/16 CONNECTOR TO 1800 MHz ANTENNA (ANT. DCS1800) N-TYPE CONNECTOR TO 1800 MHz SURF CONNECTION

SMA Tx CONNECTOR BENEATH DUAL BAND TDF (FROM 900 TRANSCEIVER)

SMA Tx CONNECTOR BENEATH DUAL BAND TDF (FROM 1800 TRANSCEIVER)

Tech. 542

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29 Jan 2007

GSM

Dual band TDF

Dual band TDF functional diagram


Figure Tech. 5-21 shows a functional diagram of the dual band TDF.

Figure Tech. 5-21 Dual band TDF functional diagram


Tx TO 900 ANTENNA Rx FROM 900 ANTENNA 7/16 CONNECTOR DUAL BAND TDF Rx BANDPASS FILTER Rx BANDPASS FILTER Rx TO 900 SURF Tx TO 1800 ANTENNA Rx FROM 1800 ANTENNA N-TYPE CONNECTOR 7/16 CONNECTOR N-TYPE CONNECTOR Rx TO 1800 SURF

1 dB TYPICAL LOSS ACRSS DUAL BAND TDF

Tx BANDPASS FILTER

Tx BANDPASS FILTER

Tx

SMA CONNECTORS

Tx

900 TRANSCEIVER

1800 TRANSCEIVER

Dual band TDF connectors


Each dual band TDF connects to:
S S

The Tx output of one 900 transceiver and one 1800 transceiver, using SMA connectors. The two connectors are underneath the dual band TDF. One 900 MHz antenna and one 1800 MHz antenna. Each antenna is used for both Rx and Tx, and each is connected to the dual band TDF using 7/16 connectors. These connectors are on top of the dual band TDF. A SURF module with dual band capability. Two N-type connectors, located on top of the dual band TDF, connect one receive path to the SURFs 900 MHz input and one receive path to the SURFs 1800 MHz input.

Technical Description: Horizonmacro indoor


29 Jan 2007

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Tech. 543

DCF

GSM

DCF
DCF overview
The purpose of the duplexed combining bandpass filter (DCF) Tx block is to enable each antenna to serve two transceivers for both Tx and Rx. The DCF combines two Tx inputs, dissipating half the power within an internal load. The signal then passes through a bandpass filter and out to the antenna. A receive bandpass filter passes only the Rx signal to the SURF module. The DCF is located in the basket above the transceivers, and attached to the top surface of the top panel using two M6 screws.

DCF view
Figure Tech. 5-22 shows a DCF with connectors identified.

Figure Tech. 5-22 DCF Tx block view with connectors identified


HOLE FOR TOP PANEL BASKET ATTACHMENT

N-TYPE CONNECTOR TO SURF

7/16 CONNECTOR TO ANTENNA

HOLE FOR TOP PANEL BASKET ATTACHMENT

TWO SMA Tx CONNECTORS BENEATH DCF (FROM TRANSCEIVER)

Tech. 544

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29 Jan 2007

GSM

DCF

DCF functional diagram


Figure Tech. 5-23 shows a functional diagram of the DCF.

Figure Tech. 5-23 Functional diagram of the DCF


Tx TO ANTENNA Rx FROM ANTENNA Rx TO SURF

7/16 CONNECTOR

N-TYPE CONNECTOR

DCF

Rx BANDPASS FILTER

4 dB TYPICAL LOSS ACROSS TDF

Tx BANDPASS FILTER

Tx

SMA CONNECTORS

Tx

FIRST TRANSCEIVER

SECOND TRANSCEIVER

DCF connectors
Each DCF connects to:
S S S

The Tx outputs of two transceivers, using SMA connectors. The two connectors are underneath the DCF. A single antenna for both Rx and Tx, using a 7/16 connector. This connector is on top of the DCF. The SURF, using an N-type connector. This connector is on top of the DCF. NOTE
All unused SMA inputs to DCF modules must be fitted with 50 ohm load terminations.

Technical Description: Horizonmacro indoor


29 Jan 2007

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Tech. 545

DDF

GSM

DDF
Overview of DDF
The dual-stage duplexed combining filter (DDF) differs from the DCF in having a second stage of combining to allow a third transceiver Tx input. This third Tx input is connected to either:
S

A feedthrough plate connector for a single additional transceiver An HCU plate connector for combining two additional transceivers.

or
S

The DDF is located in the basket above the transceivers, and attached to the top surface of the top panel using two M6 screws.

DDF view
Figure Tech. 5-24 shows a view of the DDF Tx block with connectors identified.

Figure Tech. 5-24 DDF Tx block view with connectors identified


HOLE FOR TOP PANEL BASKET ATTACHMENT N-TYPE CONNECTOR TO SURF N-TYPE CONNECTOR FROM TRANSCEIVER BY FEEDTHROUGH PLATE OR HCU

7/16 CONNECTOR TO ANTENNA

HOLE FOR TOP PANEL BASKET ATTACHMENT

TWO SMA Tx CONNECTORS BENEATH DDF (FROM TRANSCEIVER)

COOLING FINS

Tech. 546

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29 Jan 2007

GSM

DDF

DDF functional diagram


Figure Tech. 5-25 shows a functional diagram of the DDF. Figure Tech. 5-25 Functional diagram of the DDF
THIRD (OR COMBINED THIRD/FOURTH) TRANSCEIVER Tx TO ANTENNA Rx FROM ANTENNA Tx N-TYPE CONNECTOR 7/16 CONNECTOR N-TYPE CONNECTOR Rx TO SURF

LOAD Rx BANDPASS FILTER 7 dB TYPICAL LOSS ACROSS TDF

Tx BANDPASS FILTER

LOAD DDF Tx SMA CONNECTORS SECOND FIRST TRANSCEIVER TRANSCEIVER Tx

DDF connectors
Each DDF connects to:
S

The Tx outputs of three or four transceivers, using: Two SMA connectors underneath the DDF. An N-type connector on top of the DDF for connection to a feedthrough plate (for a third transceiver) or HCU plate (for combined third/fourth transceivers).

S S

A single antenna for both Rx and Tx, using a 7/16 connector. This connector is on top of the DDF. The SURF, using an N-type connector. This connector is on top of the DDF. NOTE
All unused SMA inputs to DDF modules must be fitted with 50 ohm load terminations.

Technical Description: Horizonmacro indoor


29 Jan 2007

68P02902W06-C006

Tech. 547

CCB

GSM

CCB
CCB overview
The Cavity Combining Block (CCB) has EGSM900 and DCS1800 variants. A CCB consists of three independently tuneable cavity resonators, one per CTU. NOTE
CCBs cannot be used with CTU2 transceivers. CCBs are not currently available for the GSM850 or PCS1900 BTS variants.

The CCBs are fitted in the CCB basket in the stacking bracket. The basket can contain up to two CCBs, one for three CTUs. The two CCBs cannot be in different cabinets because of the short phasing lead connecting the two CTUs. Configurations where five or more carriers per sector are required could utilize CCBs. The recommended minimum channel spacing between cavities is 800 kHz. There are two types of CCB:
S S

Master CCB with Band Pass Filter (BPF) and control board. Extension CCB, identical to the master CCB but without the BPF and only having a control board if redundancy is required.

Unlike the Tx blocks, the CCB has no duplexing capability. If a single Rx/Tx antenna is used then connection to the CCB must be through an external high power duplexer.

CCB control board (TCB) and set switch


The CCB control board is also known as the Transmit Antenna Transceiver Interface (TATI) control board (TCB). The CCB control board controls the interface to the CTU. This allows different vendor CCBs to be installed without requiring amended CTU software. The address of the control board is set manually using an 8 bit DIL switch, set by Motorola. Data links are automatically set up.

TCB and link redundancy


The redundant TCB has the ability to maintain the separated CCB, if the inter-CCB link fails.

Tech. 548

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GSM

CCB

CCB view
NOTE
CCBs may vary slightly, depending on manufacturer and type.

Figure Tech. 5-26 shows two EGSM900 CCBs with main and redundant control boards fitted.

Figure Tech. 5-26 EGSM900 CCBs with control boards fitted


EXTENSION CCB OUTPUT TO MASTER CCB SHORT CIRCUIT STUB EXTENSION CCB WITHOUT BPF BAND PASS FILTER (BPF) ANTENNA CONNECTOR ON BPF

3 Tx INPUTS CCB CONTROL BOARD (REDUNDANT) PHASING LEAD 3 Tx INPUTS CCB CONTROL BOARD (MASTER)

CCB OUTPUT TO BPF BPF INPUT FROM CCB MASTER CCB WITH BPF POWER LEAD TO BOTH CCB CONTROL BOARDS

ig.317.rh

Technical Description: Horizonmacro indoor


29 Jan 2007

68P02902W06-C006

Tech. 549

CCB

GSM

Figure Tech. 5-27 shows two DCS1800 CCBs with main and redundant control boards fitted. Figure Tech. 5-27 DCS1800 CCBs with control boards fitted
ANTENNA CONNECTOR

CCB CONTROL BOARDS


ig.319.rh

CCB configuration
The master CCB has a second output to enable the extension CCB to be connected. The bandpass filter can then serve both CCBs in parallel. Any unused output is terminated with a short circuit stub. The two configurations are shown in Figure Tech. 5-28. Figure Tech. 5-28 CCB configurations

Tech. 550

Technical Description: Horizonmacro indoor 68P02902W06-C006

29 Jan 2007

GSM

CCB

CCB functional description and diagram


The CCB has three independently tuneable cavity resonators, as shown in Figure Tech. 5-29. The cavities are narrow band devices which pass transmit signals at the cavity tuned (resonant) frequency. The three cavity outputs are coupled together. The CCB cavities are tuned by software commands from the CCB control board. Control data is sent from the CTU, through the coaxial cable, to the CCB. This data is separated from the RF signal at the bias tee, and sent to the CCB control board. The CCB control board then sends control signals through the control bus to the motor control of the CCB cavity of the same transceiver.
CCB tuning change Time taken

One cavity retuned and verified Three cavities retuned and verified

8 seconds 19 seconds

Figure Tech. 5-29 Functional diagram of CCB

Technical Description: Horizonmacro indoor


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Tech. 551

CCB

GSM

Tech. 552

Technical Description: Horizonmacro indoor 68P02902W06-C006

29 Jan 2007

Chapter 6

Digital modules

Technical Description: Horizonmacro indoor


29 Jan 2007

68P02902W06-C006

Tech. 61

GSM

Tech. 62

Technical Description: Horizonmacro indoor 68P02902W06-C006

29 Jan 2007

GSM

Overview of digital modules

Overview of digital modules


Overview and redundancy
Digital modules provide the Horizonmacro indoor equivalent of M-Cell6 micro base control unit (BCU) functionality. They are located in the bottom right side of the CIBA maincage, and are electronically interconnected through the backplane. Fibre optic connections are at the front of the appropriate modules. Each digital module is assigned A (master) or B (redundant), with one BPSM (BCU Power Supply Module) for A and one BPSM for B. The alarm module is not assigned to A or B, as it is supplied by both BPSMs for redundancy. The master MCUF is assigned to A, and the redundant MCUF to B, each with an associated FMUX. The four NIUs are used by the operational MCUF, but two NIUs are powered by BPSM A and two NIUs by BPSM B. All slots are annotated with the legend of the appropriate module and located as shown in Figure Tech. 6-1.

Digital module and BPSM locations


Figure Tech. 6-1 shows the position of modules within the digital module shelf. Figure Tech. 6-1 Digital and BPSM module locations, including optional redundancy
DIGITAL MODULE SHELF
FMUX NIU B0 NIU B1 BPSM

MCUF B

ALARM MODULE

REDUNDANT (B)

MCUF A FMUX NIU A0 NIU A1 BPSM

MASTER (A)

ig.322.rh

Technical Description: Horizonmacro indoor


29 Jan 2007

68P02902W06-C006

Tech. 63

Overview of digital modules

GSM

MCUF and NIU redundancy


The digital module shelf can:
S S S S

Support two MCUFs at a BTS site, one master and one slave (for redundancy). Enable master MCUF failure to result in the slave MCUF becoming the master after reset. Enable the OMC-R operator to initiate master/slave MCUF swap. Configure transceivers by the master MCUF. NOTE
Any situation which causes a switch to the redundant MCUF (for example, master MCUF failure or use of the swap_devices command) will cause a site reset.

All four NIUs operate from the master MCUF, but each pair of NIUs depend on a BPSM for power. All NIUs configure to the master MCUF clock. NOTE
When fitting a replacement redundant MCUF, care must be taken to ensure firmware compatibility with the master MCUF. Firmware incompatibility may result in a loss of communication between the two MCUFs so that the redundant MCUF is not in a position to take control in the event of a failure of the master MCUF.

Full size and half size modules


Modules are full size and half size, as shown in Table Tech. 6-1.
Table Tech. 6-1 Full size and half size digital modules Full size modules Half size modules

Main Control Unit with dual FMUX (MCUF) Alarm module

Network interface unit (NIU) Fibre optic multiplexer (FMUX) BPSM (BCU Power Supply Module)

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GSM

Overview of digital modules

Digital module and transceiver connections


The MCUF is connected to the transceivers in the same cabinet through the backplane. Optional connection to transceivers in up to three additional cabinets (six transceivers per cabinet) is by fibre optic links. FMUXs, two internal to the MCUF and one half size module, convert the electronic data stream into a fibre optic signal. An FMUX module in each extension cabinet converts the fibre optic signal back to electronic data stream, for transmission to transceivers through the backplane. The NIU modules convert signals for terrestrial E1 or T1 lines.

Diagram of digital module and transceiver connections


Figure Tech. 6-2 shows a block diagram of the digital module and transceiver connections.

Figure Tech. 6-2 Digital module and transceiver connections

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MCUF

GSM

MCUF
MCUF overview
The main control unit with dual FMUX (MCUF) provides the site processing functions, apart from RF functions of the transceiver. The MCUF also provides switching for up to six network interfaces (including the four NIUs) and up to 24 transceivers. The cabinet may contain up to two MCUF modules, (one master and one for redundancy). Each site and module has an electronic ID for remote identification. The MCUF provides the following functions:
S S S S S S

Maintenance and operational/control processing. Call processing (for example resource management and switching of baseband hopping data). Switching of traffic and control information. Timing reference and network/BTS master clock synchronization. The functionality of two FMUX. Support of up to six transceivers through backplane in first cabinet and up to an additional 18 transceivers including FMUX connections to other cabinets. Support of up to six E1 or T1 circuits, through NIU modules. Support of the CSFP function through the PCMCIA flash memory card. NOTE
If any CTU2 transceivers are installed in the cabinet, a 20 Mbyte PCMCIA memory card running CSFP must be installed in the MCUF to accommodate the use of the CTU2 from a code storage standpoint. If the site is equipped with a redundant MCUF, the PCMCIA is also mandatory for the redundant MCUF.

S S

Capability to replace MCU of M-Cell6 and M-Cell2


The MCUF combines the MCU function of M-Cell6 with two FMUX modules. If the MCUF is installed in an M-Cell6 or M-Cell2 the MCUF automatically reverts to the functionality of an MCU. The internal FMUX devices no longer operate. In M-Cell2 the reversion to MCU mode includes ability to directly connect to two transceivers by modified use of the front panel FMUX fibre optic connections. NOTE
This capability to use MCUF in M-Cell6 and M-Cell2 is only possible with GSR4 or later.

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MCUF

GPROC TSW and GLCK functions


The MCU section of the MCUF module combines functions of older generation equipment:
S

The BTP (Base Transceiver Processor) functions and CSFP (Code Storage Facility Processor) functions (provided PCMCIA card fitted), formerly achieved by generic processor boards (GPROCs). The timeslot switch (TSW). The generic clock (GCLK).

S S

MCUF module view


Figure Tech. 6-3 shows an MCUF module.

Figure Tech. 6-3 View of the MCUF


PROCESSORS

INTERNAL FMUX FIBRE OPTIC CONNECTIONS

BACKPLANE CONNECTORS

TTY MMI DEBUG PORT CAL PORT OSCILLATOR

BDM PORT PCMCIA CARD SLOT

STATUS LEDS (RED & GREEN) RESET BUTTONS (FULL - REMOVES SOFTWARE FROM MEMORY CPU RESETS MCUF CPU)

PCMCIA EJECT BUTTON

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Tech. 67

MCUF

GSM

MCUF functional diagram


Figure Tech. 6-4 shows a functional diagram of the MCUF.

Figure Tech. 6-4 Functional diagram of MCUF in MCUF mode


SINGLE CONNECTOR TO BACKPLANE TTY INTERFACE BDM PORT 2

2 MAIN PROCESSORS

3 RS232 4 V.28

3 MMI GPS (if USED) 4 PIX OUTPUT EXTERNAL SITE ID

RED LED GREEN LED

RESET AND WARM RESET SWITCHES

RESET 16/32 Mbyte DRAM

PCMCIA INTERFACE

CONTROL DATA PCMCIA ADDRESS

FAST FLASH EEPROM SLOW FLASH EEPROM 6 NIU REDUNDANT MCUF SYNC BLOCK FLASH EEPROM RAM 6 EXTERNAL FMUX MODULE TRANSCEIVER x6 IN SAME CABINET GPS 1PPS (IF USED) EXTERNAL CLOCK

ASIC

DEBUG PORT

TRANSCEIVER x6 VIA FMUX IN OTHER CABINETS (OR TCU x6 VIA FMUX IN M-CELL6 CABINETS)

2 FMUX

FIBRE OPTIC CONNECTORS 6 2 FMUX

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MCUF

Link to redundant MCUF


The link to the redundant MCUF is similar to a transceiver link, but does not have the BBH capability, or the link delay measurement and compensation facility. The 6.12 s, and 60 ms signals, are inserted into timeslots 8 and 16. When the MCUF is in slave mode, timeslot and E1/T1 clock information is extracted from the MCUF link and passed to the sync block. The main processor HDLC link to the redundant MCUF can be routed in any unused timeslot(s) of this link. The ASIC can switch any timeslot on the redundancy link to any timeslot on any of the other links connected to it such as the transceiver links, network links, redundancy link or processor links.

Front panel interfaces


TTY interface
A standard TTY interface is provided on the front panel, of 9.6 kbit/s (8 bits, no parity, 1 stop bit (8 N 1)). A local maintenance terminal can be attached to this port to use the MMI (Man Machine Interface) of the MCUF.

Debug and BDM ports


Two front panel ports are for Motorola factory and development use only:
S

The debug port, consists of a TTY connection to the sync processor to access sync firmware, together with other connections to the ASIC and main processors. The Background Debug Mode (BDM) port is used for low level debugging of the main processors.

FMUX fibre optic connections


There are fibre optic connections from the MCUF internal FMUX modules. The fibre optic connectors enable connection to FMUX modules in other cabinets for additional transceivers.

CAL port
The CAL port on the front panel of the MCUF can be used to calibrate the sync block clock via MMI commands. The 8 kHz reference output is used in the GCLK calibration procedure (see Calibrating the MCUF (GCLK) in the Maintenance Information section of this manual).

PCMCIA interface
The PCMCIA card is located on the front panel of the MCUF, and is used for:
S S

Code Storage Facility Processor (CSFP) memory. Rapid site initialization.

The PCMCIA socket is an industrial standard 68 pin single socket, fitted with an ejector. The PCMCIA interface supports rev 2.1 type I and II cards. The 20 Mbyte card can be write enabled, for upgrade of site information, or disabled to protect card use for other sites or secure the site code.
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MCUF

GSM

Front panel switches and indicators


The front panel of the MCUF module has two reset switches as shown in Figure Tech. 6-3:
S S

FULL is a hard reset (power up - removes software from the memory). CPU is a soft reset (this resets the MCUF main processors, but the software remains in RAM).

A hard reset results in the software being reloaded to the DRAM in the same way as normal power up. NOTE
During the CPU (soft) reset, pressing CPU reset again will perform a hard reset. Pressing the CPU reset button twice thus has the same effect as a hard reset.

The MCUF has two front panel LEDs (one green and one red) as shown in Figure Tech. 6-3, with indications as shown in Table Tech. 6-2. CAUTION
When red and green LEDs are flashing, the boot code is downloading into non-volatile memory for software upgrade. Do not remove power or reset the cabinet until downloading has been completed, as this will corrupt the non-volatile memory. If boot code is corrupted, contact the Motorola Customer Network Resolution Centre, requesting the boot code restoration procedure and the appropriate boot code file. Table Tech. 6-2 MCUF front panel LED indication Red Green Status Board not powered up or in rest cycle Normal operation Fault condition Non-volatile memory boot code upgrade (Do not remove power nor reset see CAUTION)

Off Off On Flashing

Off On Off Flashing

PIX interfaces
The MCUF provides four PIX outputs on the backplane, driven at V. 28 levels. The four PIX outputs, routed to the cabinet alarm board, enable relay contact control of external customer equipment.

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MCUF

DRAM, flash EPROM and code loading functions


DRAM
The 16 Mbyte DRAM provides operational code and data storage for the main processors. There is also a SIMM socket in the circuit board, enabling the addition of a further 16 Mbytes if required. After software initialization, the DRAM uses ECC protection. Memory protection is provided by the main processors.

Fast flash EPROM


The fast flash 1 Mbyte bank is used for bootcode and executive process code. It has a fast access time (<75 ns), enabling direct execution. The bootcode is factory set, and reprogrammed only in major software upgrades.

Slow flash EPROM


The slow flash 0.5 Mbyte bank is used for non-volatile data storage of diagnostic data and module ID information.

Code loading
The boot and executive code, held in the fast flash EPROM, initiates the MCUF on power up or reset. If a PCMCIA memory card is fitted, operational code may be obtained and copied to the DRAM for execution. If no card or code is available, the operational code is obtained from the BSC. Before execution, the operational code held in DRAM is checked with code held at the BSC. The BSC downloads any changed code objects to the DRAM. After successful checking of the DRAM operational code, the code is executed, and the PCMCIA memory card updated with any changed objects.

CSFP code loading


If a PCMCIA memory card is available,then a code storage facility processor (CSFP) function can be supported. A new software load can be downloaded in the background, without any reduction in service, and stored on the PCMCIA card. Once the complete load has been transferred to the PCMCIA card, a code swap can be initiated. The site is reset and the new software brought into service (<10 minutes). As a precaution, the old version is held on the PCMCIA card to support a roll back to the original version, if required.

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MCUF

GSM

ASIC functionality
The Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) provides central switching capabilities for the MCUF. It is capable of supporting up to 24 transceivers, together with up to six network interfaces and two links to the on-board processors, one link to the sync processor and a link to the redundant MCUF. The link to the sync processor is used for code loading purposes only. The ASIC supports baseband hopping across the 24 transceiver links. The ASIC provides interface features associated with the transceiver links, these include synchronization features to allow for delay in the link to the transceivers, and the necessary framing and encoding to support the link. All of the serial links into the ASIC are internal lines (I lines), 125 ms framed, with 32 eight bit timeslots per frame.

ASIC transceiver link features


The ASIC interfaces to a maximum of 24 transceiver links. The ASIC can switch any timeslot on any of the transceiver links to any timeslot on other links connected to the ASIC; transceiver links, network links, MCUF redundancy link or processor links. The ASIC provides the following features associated with the transceiver links:
S

Link advance/delay compensation. The ASIC will continually measure the round trip delay on each transceiver link to calculate a timing advance for each link. The link advance is applied, and can be adjusted, by the main processor via the processor parallel interface.

BBH data switching. BBH switching is performed automatically on any timeslot configured as BBH data. A single timeslot from the transceiver is selected for BBH routeing information, and defines which transceiver link (0-23) should be used for downlink.

Timing reference insertion. The ASIC receives timing pulses from the sync block and inserts the appropriate bits into the transceiver downlink synchronization and framing timeslots. The sync block will provide a version of the 6.12 s and 60 ms signals that is advanced by 125 ms for this purpose.

Manchester coding/decoding. The transceiver links are all Manchester coded/decoded by the ASIC. This function can be switched on or off (default on) on a per link basis. The disable feature is for applications outside of the MCUF module.

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MCUF

ASIC/network and processor link switching


The ASIC supports a maximum of six network links and two main processor links. The data to/from these links can be switched to or from any timeslot on other links connected to the ASIC. The two links to the main processor allow it to route HDLC and other links to the appropriate place:
S S S S S

24 HDLC timeslots for the BCF RSS channel to each transceiver. Four timeslots for NIU control channels (two local, two redundant). Sync processor code load channel. Two channels for RSL links. One HDLC channel occupying up to three timeslots to the redundant MCUF.

Sync block functionality


The sync block is controlled through the parallel interface of the main processors. The sync block is responsible for site synchronization functions. It generates all required local references from a high stability local clock source. This clock source may also be locked to the incoming network clocks. The sync clock source is in the form of a crystal oscillator (OCXO) which warms up for phase locking in 4 minutes, and achieves frequency stabilization in 15 minutes. Site frame reference generation and re-timing includes:
S S S S S

2.048 MHz - For serial communications. 16.384 MHz - For FMUX communications. 125 ms - For NIU framing and transceiver framing. 60 ms- For transceiver GSM timing. 6.12 s - For GSM superframe. Six network extracted clocks (E1/T1 source including NIUs). Any of the NIU modules under control of the MCUF can extract a reference clock from an E1/T1 link and pass to the Sync block. CAL port. The CAL port can be used to calibrate the sync block clock through the MMI commands. The reference output provides a monitoring point. Redundant MCUF link.

The reference clocks available to the sync block are:


S

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Tech. 613

MCUF

GSM

Phase lock loop (PLL) operating modes


The PLL uses the selected reference signal as the loop reference clock. It includes an OCXO accurate to 0.05 ppm, a phase comparator and a loop filter. The PLL has the following operating modes:
S

Warm-up The PLL is open loop and using the calibration frequency, but the OCXO is not yet warmed up.

Set frequency The PLL is open loop and using the calibration frequency, and the OCXO is warmed up.

Fast tune Closed loop with wide filter for coarse locking to the reference (extracted from network clock).

Fine tune Closed loop with narrow filter for accurate locking to the reference (extracted from network clock).

When in fine tune closed loop mode, the accuracy is 0.01 ppm.

Sync block code load


The sync block controller has a dedicated 2.048 Mbit/s serial link into the ASIC enabling a 64 kbit/s HDLC channel to the main processors for code loading. The sync block includes 256 kbytes of flash EPROM used to store:
S S

Boot code. Operational code.

The boot code, which cannot be altered, queries the main processors on the current version of the sync operational code. If the stored operational code is the correct version, the boot code will move the operational code to RAM and execute the code. If the query results in the need for new operational code, the sync processor will download the operational code from the main processors through the ASIC to the RAM in the sync block. After a successful download, the boot code programmes the flash EPROM with the new operational code and runs the operational code in RAM.

GSM counters
The following counters are provided:
S S

GSM frame incremented every 4.615 ms, range 0 to 1325. GSM superframe incremented every 6.12 s, range 0 to 2047.
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GSM

MCUF

Integral MCUF FMUX functionality


The equivalent function of two FMUX modules exists integral to the MCUF, enabling two extension cabinets to be connected. To enable total of four cabinets to be joined together as one BTS site, an FMUX module is also required in the master cabinet to connect the third extension cabinet. A single cabinet site has no need for the FMUX functionality, because the MCUF connects with the cabinet transceivers through the backplane. Each fibre optic multiplexer (FMUX) function multiplexes and demultiplexes six, full duplex, transceiver links to one (TX/Rx) pair of fibre optic cables. This enables up to six transceivers in a single extension cabinet (either Horizonmacro or M-Cell6) to be linked to the master cabinet. Each FMUX fibre optic link is full duplex 16.384 Mbit/s. The FMUX optical link is capable of driving up to 1 km. For functional description of FMUX see FMUX module and FMUX function in this chapter.

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NIU

GSM

NIU
Overview of NIU
The network interface unit (NIU) module provides two E1 or two T1 termination links to the terrestrial network. The NIU E1/T1 outputs are connected to a T43 or BIB board, depending on the impedance matching requirement of the customer terrestrial circuits. There are two types of NIU board, one for E1, one for T1. The NIU layout is common to both E1 and T1, the only differences being in the associated crystal oscillators and line matching resistor values. An on-board NIU control processor provides network interface configuration and supervision, controlled by the MCUF.

NIU locations
The cabinet may contain up to four NIU modules in the digital module shelf, as shown in Figure Tech. 6-1. Two NIUs are located in the master (lower) part of the shelf. Two NIUs are in the redundant (upper) part of the shelf, though these upper NIUs are also used for non-redundant purposes. An NIU in slot A0 supports two E1/T1 links. An NIU in slot A1 supports one E1/T1 link. An NIU in slot B0 supports two E1/T1 links. An NIU in slot B1 supports one E1/T1 link.

NIU command identity number


Each NIU is identified in the database by an identity number, from 0 to 3. Table Tech. 6-3 shows the recommended NIU slots to NIU identity number mapping, for use in the commands database.
Table Tech. 6-3 NIU slot and equivalent command identity NIU (MSI) identity number used in commands NIU slot

0 1 2 3

A0 B0 A1 B1

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NIU

Module view and LEDs


Figure Tech. 6-5 shows an NIU module. Figure Tech. 6-5 View of NIU module

BACKPLANE CONNECTOR

NIU GREEN LED

NIU RED LED RESET/DISABLE SWITCH

ig.325.rh

The NIU status is indicated by the two front panel LEDs, one green and one red, controlled by the on-board processor, as shown in Table Tech. 6-4.
Table Tech. 6-4 NIU LED display Red LED Off Off Flashing On Green LED Off On Flashing On Status of NIU board NIU not powered up or in reset cycle. Normal operation. NIU undergoing system code download. NIU self testing following switch on or reboot. Red LED extinguishes after 20 seconds, or after 50 seconds following a reboot due to code download.

NIU functionality
The NIU provides two E1/T1 interfaces into the network (link 0 and link 1) as well as LAPD encoding/decoding and clock recovery from a selected E1/T1 link. The second E1/T1 interface (link 1) is not used for NIUs placed in positions at A1 and B1, as shown in Figure Tech. 6-1. An NIU control processor provides network interface configuration and supervision, controlled by the MCUF. The NIU control processor maintains two independent control links in the redundant configuration (one to each MCUF), each using timeslot 0 of MCUF link 0.
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NIU

GSM

NIU diagram
Figure Tech. 6-6 identifies the functional blocks in the NIU.

Figure Tech. 6-6 Functional diagram of NIU module

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NIU

Control processor
The control processor interfaces to timeslot 0 of link 0 from each connected MCUF. The processor uses 512 kbytes of flash EPROM for boot code. operational code storage and module ID. Code is executed directly from the Flash EPROM. The boot code can be overwritten under control of the MCUF, if required. The processor also has an on-chip 1 Mbyte of DRAM.

TTY ports
The processing section provides two TTY ports for Motorola debugging purposes only.

Resets
The processor is capable of soft resetting itself. The front panel reset causes a hard reset of the entire board. Power-on also resets the processor. The MCUF is able to reset the NIU through a message on the HDLC link.

NIU/MCUF framing and clocks


The control processor is supplied with a clock from an on-board crystal oscillator, which has an output enable pad for test purposes. The framer devices also have their own crystal oscillators on-board. The framer devices provide the decoded and jitter attenuated receive data, for passing to the MCUF. The framer devices also extract a clock signal from an E1/T1 link, which is then passed to the MCUF synchronization circuit. At the MCUF, this signal is used to phase lock a local 16.384 MHz clock signal. Once phase locked, three reference clock signals are provided for NIU use: S REF 2.048 MHz clock signal.
S S

REF 6.12 s clock signal.

REF 125 ms clock signal. The NIU transmit and receive framing is controlled by this 125 ms reference pulse received from the MCUF.

Distance measurement
The NIU provides the ability to perform network distance delay measurement on either of the two network links. Measurement can only be performed on one link at a time. Three modes of operation are possible:
S

Mode 1. A pattern is transmitted in a selected network timeslot and the corresponding receive timeslot is monitored for its return. The delay is measured to an accuracy of 488 ns. The pattern is transmitted on the 6.12 second reference signal. Mode 2. The receive link is monitored for the pattern. When received the pattern is transmitted back in the next frame. The time between receipt and transmission of the pattern is measured to an accuracy of 488 ns. Mode 3. The receive link is monitored for the pattern. When it is detected a strobe is generated for the MCUF sync block.
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Tech. 619

NIU

GSM

Radio signalling links (RSLs)


The radio signalling links (RSL) to the BSC from the main processor on the MCUF are 64 kbit/s LAPD links. The LAPD encoding of this RSL data is performed on the NIU by the NIU control processor. The RSL links between the MCUF and NIU must be sent as follows:
S

RSL link 1 is embedded in the NIU control link; that is, it will be in timeslot 0 of link 0 to the NIU. This link is important for initialization. NOTE
When the NIU is on a network link to a BSC or another BTS, the RSL can be placed on either link on any default timeslot other than zero.

RSL link 2 is on a different timeslot from that used for the network connection.

The NIU supports a maximum of two RSL links. The RSL links may both be on a single network link or shared between the two network links. The NIU hardware supports switching for 64 k and 16 k LAPD channels.

T1 NIU need to set link type


T1 NIUs and E1 NIUs cannot be interchanged. A T1 link line consists of 24 timeslots as opposed to 32 timeslots for an E1 link line. A T1 link generates specific T1 alarms, referred to as Red alarms. A T1 NIU supports the same MSI type of device transitions as an E1 NIU. The OMC-R operator should set the link type or it will default the site to an E1 system. In ROM it is set by a ROM-only MMI command. In RAM it is a database parameter set by a chg_element command. The RSL default timeslots are the same for a T1 NIU and an E1 NIU. The basic mechanism for communicating and configuring is also the same.

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GSM

T43/BIB-NIU - E1/T1 mapping

T43/BIB-NIU - E1/T1 mapping


Overview of T43/BIB-NIU connection
The NIU network interface (E1/T1) links connect to a single T43 (CIM) or BIB (BIM) board on top of the cabinet by a single backplane connector and cable.

NIU to T43 mapping and command ID


Only six network interfaces are used, three pairs to the master NIU modules, and three pairs to the redundant NIU modules. Each NIU is identified in the database by an identity number, from 0 to 3, as shown in the final column of Table Tech. 6-5. NOTE
The redundant NIU modules are only redundant in the sense of being supplied by a different BPSM, and can thus continue to operate if the master BPSM fails. All NIUs are available for separate use.

Table Tech. 6-5 defines the mapping from the T43/BIB connector to NIU boards.
Table Tech. 6-5 T43/BIB connector to NIU boards

T43 network side connector J1 J2 J7 J8 J13 J14 J4 J5 J10 J11 J16 J17

37-way D-type connections (BIB) 1,20 2,21 7,26 8,27 13,32 14,33 4,23 5,24 10,29 11,30 16,35 17,36

NIU location

NIU identity (MSI) used in commands MSI(NIU) 0 MSI(NIU) 0 MSI(NIU) 2 MSI(NIU) 1 MSI(NIU) 1 MSI(NIU) 3

NIU A0 - Tx1 NIU A0 - Rx1 NIU A0 - Tx2 NIU A0 - Rx2 NIU A1 - Tx1 NIU A1 - Rx1 NIU B0 - Tx1 NIU B0 - Rx1 NIU B0 - Tx2 NIU B0 - Rx2 NIU B1 - Tx1 NIU B1 - Rx1

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Tech. 621

T43/BIB-NIU - E1/T1 mapping

GSM

Diagram of T43 connection to NIUs


Figure Tech. 6-7 shows a diagram of T43 connection to NIUs.

Figure Tech. 6-7 Diagram of T43 connection to NIUs

J1 J2 J7 J8 J13 J14

NIU A0

NIU A1 T43

J4 J5 J10 J11 J16 J17 J0

NIU B0

NIU B1

Tech. 622

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GSM

FMUX module

FMUX module
Overview of FMUX module
The fibre optic multiplexer (FMUX) module multiplexes and demultiplexes six, full duplex, transceiver links to one (TX/Rx) pair of fibre optic cables. This enables up to six transceivers in a single extension cabinet (either Horizonmacro or M-Cell6) to be linked to the master cabinet. The FMUX module has two modes of operation:
S S

Working in conjunction with the MCUF to multiplex transceiver links to/from a third extension cabinet. Operating in the extension cabinet to supply the transceivers in that cabinet.

To enable a total of four cabinets to be joined together as one BTS site, an FMUX module is required in the master cabinet to connect the third extension cabinet. A single cabinet site has no need for an FMUX module, because the MCUF connects with the cabinet transceivers through the backplane. Two FMUX modules may be fitted in the digital module shelf, one for the master MCUF, and one for the slave. An extension cabinet only requires one FMUX to connect to six transceivers within the cabinet, (plus one for redundancy if required). Each FMUX fibre optic link is full duplex 16.384 Mbit/s. The FMUX optical link is capable of driving up to 1 km.

FMUX module view


Figure Tech. 6-8 shows an FMUX module. Figure Tech. 6-8 View of the FMUX module

BACKPLANE CONNECTOR

FIBRE OPTIC INPUT FROM ANOTHER MCUF/FMUX IN ANOTHER CABINET AT THE SITE

FIBRE OPTIC OUTPUT TO ANOTHER MCUF/FMUX IN ANOTHER CABINET AT THE SITE

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Tech. 623

FMUX module

GSM

FMUX functional diagram


Figure Tech. 6-9 shows a block diagram of the FMUX module.

Figure Tech. 6-9 Functional diagram of FMUX module


BACKPLANE CONNECTOR

Rx DATA TO FMUX IN ANOTHER CABINET

FIBRE OPTIC RECEIVER

MANCHESTER ENCODED

Tx/Rx

MUX/ DEMUX

2:1 SELECT

TO MCUF (IF MASTER CABINET) TO TRANSCEIVERS (IF EXTENSION CABINET) SELECT CONTROL (FROM MCUF)

TO FMUX IN ANOTHER CABINET Tx DATA FIBRE OPTIC TRANSMITTER

FMUX functional explanation


The MCUF transmits and receives a 2.048 Mbit/s data stream link to each operational transceiver. In the master cabinet this is achieved by the backplane, without using an FMUX. If the transceiver is in an extension cabinet, the master cabinet FMUX combines the data stream with up to five others (see Figure Tech. 6-9), and then converts the electronic signal to fibre optic, for onward transmission to the extension cabinet. At the extension cabinet, another FMUX converts the fibre optic signal back to electronic form, for transmission to the transceivers. The data stream return from the extension cabinet is a reverse of the above. The multiplexer/demultiplexer can support up to six transceiver links. It uses a 16.384 Mbit/s Manchester encoded serial data link organized as 256 x 8-bit timeslots in a 125 ms frame. Manchester coding is used to detect errors, indicated at timeslot zero for each transceiver, enabling error correction at the other FMUX.

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GSM

Alarm module

Alarm module
Alarm module overview
The alarm module is located in the digital module shelf, adjacent to the MCUFs. It provides the cabinet equipment with an external alarm system to report operational status. The alarm module:
S S

Collects all cabinet alarms (received from the backplane). Provides current sensing for 16 customer inputs, referred to as site alarms. These inputs are provided by the PIX connectors PIX0 and PIX1. Controls up to four relay driven outputs linked to customer equipment. (Changeover contacts 30 V 1 A maximum). These outputs are provided by the PIX0 connector. Transmits alarm information to all transceivers in the same cabinet.

Alarm module view


Figure Tech. 6-10 shows an alarm module.

Figure Tech. 6-10 Alarm module view

BACKPLANE CONNECTOR

5 LED PAIRS

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Alarm module

GSM

Alarm module functionality


The alarm module receives inputs from:
S S S S

The external alarm connector on the interface panel, (from the optional batery backup system BBS). Cabinet PSMs (identifying type, manufacturer and slot number). Environmental control devices. Customer defined alarms.

The alarm board receives these inputs, encodes them, and then passes the code word to all transceivers in the cabinet through the backplane.

Alarm module replacement effect on alarms


The alarm module can be replaced while the cabinet system is running (hot replacement). This will temporarily interrupt alarms, with the OMC-R receiving an additional alarm module out of service alarm, which automatically clears upon correct insertion of the replacement module.

Alarm collection from extension cabinets


Extension cabinet alarms are sent from the extension cabinet alarm module to the extension cabinet transceivers. These transmit the alarms to the main cabinet, by using the normal FMUX connection, for transmission to the MCUF.

Tech. 626

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GSM

Alarm module

Alarm module display presentation


All alarms LEDs are green or off when equipment is functioning correctly, and red when equipment is faulty. The LED designations are shown in Table Tech. 6-6. NOTE
Only five of the ten front panel LEDs are utilized in the Horizonmacro indoor equipment. Others are utilized in the Horizonmacro outdoor. Table Tech. 6-6 Alarm module LEDs LED location Light colour states Equipment monitored by light (Green = OK, Red = FAULT)

1 (top) 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 (bottom)

Off/Red Off/Red Off/Red Off/Red Off/Red Green/Red Green/Red Green/Red Off/Red Off/Red

Not used in Horizonmacro indoor. Not used in Horizonmacro indoor. Door 1 main cabinet door open alarm. Not used in Horizonmacro indoor. Low voltage disconnect (LVD) alarm (battery backup option). Fan Tray 0 fully operational (4-fan tray). Fan Tray 1 fully operational (2-fan tray). Fan Tray 2 fully operational (2-fan tray). Not used in Horizonmacro indoor. Not used in Horizonmacro indoor.

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Tech. 627

Alarm module

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Tech. 628

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Maintenance and Parts (Maint.)

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ii

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CHAPTER 1 ROUTINE MAINTENANCE

CHAPTER 2 FRU REPLACEMENT PROCEDURES

CHAPTER 3 SITE VERIFICATION PROCEDURES

CHAPTER 4 PARTS INFORMATION

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Chapter 1

Routine maintenance

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Routine maintenance overview

Routine maintenance overview


In this chapter
This chapter contains the procedures for the routine maintenance of a Horizonmacro indoor base transceiver station (BTS). NOTE
Since a Horizonmacro BTS operates as part of a network, the procedures in this chapter must be performed in conjunction with the relevant network procedures in the associated OMC-R manuals. Before attempting any work on the cabinet, contact should be made with the OMC-R to advise on proposed activity.

Safety
WARNING
Potentially lethal voltages and high energy sources are present in the cabinet when the external ac mains isolator switch is set to the on position and/or batteries are connected. Remove rings, watches and jewellery before starting these procedures, and exercise extreme caution when working on the equipment. Maintenance procedures on this equipment must only be carried out by suitably qualified personnel.

Safety features are built into the equipment to protect against the potentially lethal hazards that exist. All statements regarding safety within these routine maintenance procedures must be adhered to when working on the equipment.

Reporting faulty devices


During routine maintenance and FRU replacement procedures, it may be possible to identify signs of damage that might indicate a problem that could repeat, cause additional damage, or be a symptom of a failure elsewhere. Analysis of the problem may identify the fault and make corrective action possible. Whenever a safety issue arises:
S S S S

Inform the OMC-R that an equipment safety problem has been identified. Make the equipment concerned safe, for example, by removing power. Make no further attempt to tamper with the equipment. Report the problem directly to GSM Customer Network Resolution Centre +44 (0)1793 565444 (telephone) and follow up with a written report by fax +44 (0)1793 430987 (fax). Collect evidence from the equipment under the guidance of the Customer Network Resolution Centre. Seek local office advice.
Maintenance and Parts: Horizonmacro indoor

S S

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Routine maintenance overview

GSM

Routine maintenance intervals


Routine maintenance for Horizonmacro indoor installations is recommended at the intervals shown in Table Maint. 1-1:
Table Maint. 1-1 Routine maintenance schedule 6 months Ensure that cabinet air inlets, exhaust grilles and filter (if fitted) are not blocked. 12 months Annual check of the installation. 24 months Inspect general mechanical condition of the cabinet.

Check normal operation, including fans. Also cable integrity and state of all connections.

Inspect locks, handles, and hinges of door. Lubricate if required.

These procedures are described in subsequent sections of this chapter, one to cover 6 monthly, one 12 monthly, and one 24 monthly.

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Horizonmacro indoor tool list

Horizonmacro indoor tool list


Overview of tool list
This section lists the recommended tools required for installing, commissioning and maintaining the Horizonmacro indoor cabinet.

Tool list
Table Maint. 1-2 lists the recommended tools for the Horizonmacro indoor.
Table Maint. 1-2 Horizonmacro indoor tool list Quantity Description Safety goggles Hard hat Dust mask Ear defenders Antistatic wrist strap with coiled lead Antistatic mat Marker pen Torch Socket set (A/F/Metric 13 mm or 1/2 sq drive) 280 mm insulated adjustable spanner Combination spanners A/F: 1/4, 5/16, 3/8, 7/16, 1/2, 9/16, 5/8, 11/16, 7/8, 3/4, 1 Combination spanners metric: 8 mm to 25 mm Ratchet ring spanner (15 mm x 13 mm) Torque spanner (12 mm) Torque wrench (125 Nm) Torxdriver set (T10 to T30) and Security Torxdriver set (T10 to T30) 6 mm torque spanner (for SMA Tx block connectors) Security Allen key set Claw hammer Pipe cutter Junior hacksaw 300 mm hacksaw 150 mm side cutters 150 mm heavyduty side cutters Flush cut wire cutters Light duty cable cutters

1 pair 1 1 1 pair 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 each 1 each 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 pair 1 pair 1 pair 1 pair

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Horizonmacro indoor tool list

GSM

Quantity

Description Cable shears Knife with retractable blade General purpose pliers Snipe nose pliers Industrial scissors GP serrated jaw pliers Set of jewellers screwdrivers Screwdriver set (including flat and cross-head blades) Isolating transformer (suitable for site use) Piston drill (suitable for drilling concrete and capable of accepting an M20 drill bit) M20 drill bit Drill bit set 6 m 240 V extension cable (twin outlet) Soldering iron (dual temperature) with holder Coax cable stripper for 2002 (75 ohm coaxial cable) Hand crimp tool Crimp tool for type 43 connectors BNC crimp tool with inserts Telephone plug crimp tool 50 mm crimp tool Cable tie gun 1.5 m wooden step ladder Table vice 250 mm vice grips 7.5 m tape measure 300 mm steel rule Spirit level (1 m) Centre punch Pocket scriber 250 mm half round file Straight point tweezers Null modem RS232 mini tester M to M gender changer

1 pair 1 1 pair 1 pair 1 pair 1 pair 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 pair 1 1 1

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Horizonmacro indoor tool list

Cleaning agents
The following is a list of cleaning and lubricant materials required for routine maintenance:
S S S S S S S S

Dustpan Soft brush Vacuum cleaner Mild detergent De-ionized water Soft cloth Lubricant (WD40 or equivalent) Light grease (TBI or equivalent)

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Doors removal and refitting

GSM

Doors removal and refitting


Assumptions door, hood, and stacking bracket
Any requirement to open a door, or remove any hood (if fitted), is assumed in all procedures. Shutting the door, or replacing the optional hood is also assumed at the end of any procedure. SURF module and Tx block replacement may be carried out with the stacking bracket in place, but the CCB basket must be removed (if fitted), see Replacing a CCB.

Door operation
The door lock is a trigger latch. To operate the door, perform the following steps: 1. 2. 3. Insert the correct key into the lock and turn. Press middle square panel by the lock to release the lock. Open door to 95_ locking position. CAUTION NOTE 4. 5.
Avoid damaging honeycomb door vent. If the equipment is active, a door open alarm will be signalled to the OMC-R.

To open door to 130_, lift up the middle of the slide arm. To close, lift up the middle of the slide arm, close the door firmly, and lock.

Hood removal and refitting


The optional hood is held in place by four pins. Remove by lifting the hood rear edge until free of the pins, then lift off. To fit the optional hood, align the hood to the back pins, lower hood onto the pins, and press down firmly.

Stacking bracket removal


The stacking bracket is held by eight M8 screws (including four locations which can be alternatively used for pins by hood option). To remove or replace a stacking bracket see Replacing a stacking bracket.

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GSM

Doors removal and refitting

Stacking bracket front cover removal and fit


The stacking bracket front cover is attached to the stacking bracket by four locating clips. To remove a stacking bracket refer to Figure Maint. 1-1 and then remove the stacking bracket front cover by applying gentle pressure to the outer edges, while easing the cover up and pulling it away from the bracket.

Figure Maint. 1-1 Removing and fitting the stacking bracket front cover
REMOVAL
Lift and pull

Apply gentle pressure


ig.334.rh

STACKING BRACKET Apply gentle pressure

FRONT COVER

FITTING

To fit the front cover, perform the following steps: 1. Align the four locating clips on the front cover with the four square holes in the front of the stacking bracket. Ensure that the cut out slot on each clip is facing downward. Press the cover against the stacking bracket, so that the cut out slot on each locating clip engages with the bottom edge of each square hole. It may be necessary to gently push in and down to ensure the cut out slots are fully engaged and the cover securely in place.
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6-monthly maintenance procedures

GSM

6-monthly maintenance procedures


Type of procedures
The 6-monthly maintenance procedures involve the following:
S S

Cleaning air inlets and exhaust grilles. Examining and, if necessary, replacing the optional air filter. WARNING
Potentially lethal voltages and high energy sources are present in the cabinet when the external ac mains isolator switch is set to the on position and/or batteries are connected. Remove rings, watches and jewellery before starting these procedures, and exercise extreme caution when working on the equipment.

Cleaning inlets and exhaust grilles


CAUTION
If the cabinet is operational, this maintenance procedure should be completed without delay, in order to minimize duration of air cooling disruption.

Inlets are along the back, sides and front at the base of the cabinet. Air is expelled through the door vent and through the top panel beneath hood or stacking bracket. The following procedure should be followed to clean inlets and exhaust grilles:
S S

Use vacuum cleaner or brush to ensure bottom inlets are clear of debris. Open door and clean aluminium door vent, taking care to avoid damage.

Replacing the air filter


Air filters are an option and not essential in a clean environment. The single filter is mounted under all the fan units. If clogged, fan airflow may be reduced, straining fan motors and increasing noise.
S S

If a filter is fitted, remove two front M6 screws to allow filter holding plate to drop down. Remove filter, examine and, if dirty, replace with a new filter. Replace filter (original or new) then lift up holding plate and secure with the two M6 screws. Tighten to correct torque (see Technical Description Overview and specifications). Close and secure the door.

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12-monthly maintenance procedures

12-monthly maintenance procedures


Summary of 12-monthly procedures
The 12-monthly maintenance procedures involve the following:
S S S S

6-monthly procedures. Checking and cleaning fans. Checking normal operation. Annual check of the installation. WARNING
Potentially lethal voltages and high energy sources are present in the cabinet when the ac mains isolator switch is set to the on position and/or batteries are connected. Remove rings, watches and jewellery before starting these procedures, and exercise extreme caution when working on the equipment.

Checking and cleaning fans


CAUTION
If the cabinet is operational, this maintenance procedure should be completed without delay, in order to minimize duration of air cooling disruption.

There are three cabinet fan modules, one 4-fan unit and two identical 2-fan units. Table Maint. 1-3 shows the three fan positions.
Table Maint. 1-3 Fan positions Fan reference Type of module Cabinet position

0 1 2

4-fan unit 2-fan unit 2-fan unit

Right side, beneath digital cage. Middle, beneath transceivers. Left side, beneath transceivers.

The fans can be checked and cleaned by the following procedure:


S S S S

Remove the fan module by lifting the central slide latch and pulling out. Use a brush and vacuum cleaner to remove any dust and dirt on the module. Refit fan and check operation. Any fan not operating should be started by using the appropriate RESET button. Observe the fans through the grilles to ensure correct operation. Listen for excessive noise. If there is excessive noise, identify fan and replace fan module (see Replacing a fan module).

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12-monthly maintenance procedures

GSM

Cabinet modules in operational positions


Figure Maint. 1-2 shows the cabinet modules, (door and optional hood omitted for clarity).

Figure Maint. 1-2 Cabinet modules with door and hood removed
ONE SURF (Rx) THREE Tx BLOCKS (DCFs SHOWN AS EXAMPLE) SIX TRANSCEIVERS (CTU/CTU2s) THREE PSMs (see NOTE) CIRCUIT BREAKER MODULE (CBM) T43/BIB DC POWER IN INTERFACE PANEL CONNECTORS

HEAT SENSORS LOCATED ON BACKPLANE

TWO 2-FAN UNITS ONE 4-FAN UNIT

ALARM MODULE MCUF FMUX/NIU/BPSM (NOT VISIBLE)

NOTE

An optional hold-up battery module may be installed instead of a redundant PSM.

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12-monthly maintenance procedures

Checking normal operation


Check normal operation by visual inspection in the following procedure: 1. Inspect the inside of the cabinet and note any signs of physical damage, overheating, loose connections, or badly fitting components. Take appropriate action to correct the damage, and inform the OMC-R. Ensure that the LEDs on modules shown in Table Maint. 1-4 are lit, this indicates correct functioning of the cabinet. If any red LEDs are lit, other than the door alarm (alarm 3 on the alarm module), inform the OMC-R.
Table Maint. 1-4 Normal LED indication of cabinet modules Equipment with LEDs Colour of LEDs lit

2.

Transceivers in locations 0 to 5

Tx status (ORANGE) or Operational status (GREEN). Top LED (GREEN). GREEN. 6, 7, 8 GREEN (fans) 3 RED (as door is open)

PSMs in locations 0 to 2 Digital modules (NIU, MCUF, FMUX, BPSM) Alarm module

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Annual check of the installation

GSM

Annual check of the installation


It is recommended the following be performed annually:
S S S S S S

Power down cabinet. Earth continuity check. Power system insulation check. Check of electricity company connection. Pre-power up check of supply and earth connection security and condition. Power up of cabinet.

Log the maintenance activity. After procedures have been completed, restore the cabinet to operational state and notify the OMC-R of base station availability.

Powering down the cabinet


To power down the cabinet: 1. 2. 3. Press and release all circuit breaker buttons to the out (off) position. Switch each PSM to the OUTPUT DISABLE position. Switch off the external power supply to the cabinet.

Visual inspection
Inspect the installation for damage in accordance with BS 7671 (16th Edition <Section 712>) or the IEC 364 equivalent. WARNING
If damage is discovered during the visual inspection, the commissioning must not proceed further until the damage has been inspected and rectified by the manufacturers or their representatives.

Cabinet exterior
Examine the exterior of the cabinets for structural, paint or mechanical damage and report any damage to Motorola.

Cabinet interior
Examine the interior of the cabinet for structural, paint or mechanical damage and report any damage to Motorola.

Power equipment
Examine the power equipment for mechanical damage and report any damage to Motorola.

Earth continuity check


Ensure an earth continuity check has been performed on appropriate equipment if required. Use the digital multimeter to check that the resistance of the test equipment leads is less than 0.05 ohms.
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Annual check of the installation

Main equipment earths


Connect the PAT tester to the earth terminal and to the following earth points:
S S

Antenna feeders. AC supply input earth. The local electricity board termination point. AC distribution board. AC supply isolator.
The switched isolator will not be connected to earth if it is a double insulated device and will therefore not require testing.

NOTE

S S S S

Battery box chassis. Cabinet chassis (all cabinets). +27 V power supply unit chassis. Rack members.

Check that the measured resistance is less than 0.1 ohms with the tester connected to a conductive surface (bare metal) at extreme ends of the earth cables. On completion of each earth check apply conductive non-oxidizing grease to the earth connections on the earth busbar.

AC power system insulation check


Ensure an insulation check has been performed on all ac power cables which supply the site up to the ac input to the Cabinet. Testing must be carried out in accordance with the BS 7671 (16th Edition <section 713-0401 to 713-04-06>) or IEC 364 equivalent, at the voltage levels shown in Table Maint. 1-5, using an approved insulation tester. Check that the resistance at each point is as shown in Table Maint. 1-5.
Table Maint. 1-5 BS7671 (16th edition) Table 71A (part of) Parameter AC test voltage (volts) Minimum insulation (megohms)

Up to and including 500 V

500

0.5

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Annual check of the installation

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Power up procedure
The following procedure should be carried out to power up the cabinet. Figure Maint. 1-3 shows the cabinet components and enlarged view of CBM showing circuit breaker buttons. Figure Maint. 1-3 Diagram of cabinet with expanded view of CBM

SIX TRANSCEIVERS (CTUs/CTU2s)

SURF

PSM2 PSM1 PSM0

TRANSCEIVER 5 TWO 2-FAN UNITS

BPSMs B BPSMs A TRANSCEIVER 0 ONE 4-FAN UNIT FANS

CIRCUIT BREAKER MODULE

7A

CCB (0 AND 1)

4A

SURF

2A

BPSMs (A AND B)

7A

6 TRANSCEIVERS (0 TO 5)
ig.281.rh

12 A

TRANSCEIVER 0

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Annual check of the installation

CAUTION

This procedure should be carried out only by experienced field engineers.

Procedure to prepare cabinet for power up


To prepare the cabinet prior to power up, proceed as follows: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Ensure E1 connection to BSC is made. Insert (optional) PCMCIA card in MCUF PCMCIA socket. Connect the 9 to 9-way cable from the PC serial A port to MCUF TTY port. At the PC start the terminal emulator program. Change to Level 3 and at the MMI-RAM> prompt type: CTRL N Set the switch of each PSM to the OUTPUT DISABLE position. Press and release all push on/push off circuit breaker buttons to the out (off) position.

Power up of cabinet
To power up the cabinet, proceed as follows: CAUTION
When the two LEDs of the transceiver or the MCUF are flashing, the boot code is downloading into non-volatile memory for software upgrade. Power should not be removed, nor the cabinet reset, until downloading has been completed, as this will corrupt the non-volatile memory. If boot code is corrupted, contact the Motorola Customer Network Resolution Centre and request the boot code restoration procedure and the appropriate boot code file.

1. 2. 3.

Switch on the external power supply to the cabinet. Turn each PSM switch to the OUTPUT ENABLE position; check that each PSM has the active (green) LED on and the alarm (red) LED off. Press the CBM circuit breaker button marked FANS. Check that each fan module is operating correctly. Activate any fan not started by the restart button (marked either FRONT or REAR) on the fan module. Press the CBM circuit breaker button marked SURF, and if CCBs are fitted, press the circuit breaker buttons marked CCB0 and CCB1.

4.

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Annual check of the installation

GSM

5.

Press the CBM circuit breaker button marked BPSM A and (if redundant BPSM fitted) BPSM B. Check all associated digital module LEDs operate correctly; green LEDs lit on BPSM, NIU and MCUF, and red LEDs off on NIU and MCUF. MCUF initialization will commence at power up. A connection to the BSC will be established and code download will take place. After download the site will be initialized. NOTE
The NIU module will initially show both red and green LEDs lit while the unit conducts a self test. When rebooting due to a code download, the red LED extinguishes after approximately 50 seconds. If the code is a different version, the non-volatile memory will be upgraded at this point. Both LEDs will be flashing, and a warning message will appear on the PC terminal. Do not power down or reset the cabinet as this will corrupt the non-volatile memory. If this happens, contact Motorola Customer Network Resolution Centre and request the boot code restoration procedure and the appropriate boot code file.

CAUTION

6.

Press the CBM circuit breaker buttons for the appropriate transceivers fitted, and check that the RADIO STATUS LED for each transceiver flashes green. At this point, after the MCUF has initialized, the transceivers will download code from the MCUF. CAUTION
If the code is a different version, the non-volatile memory will be upgraded at this point. Both LEDs will be flashing. Do not power down or reset the cabinet as this will corrupt the non-volatile memory. If this happens, contact Motorola Customer Network Resolution Centre and request the boot code restoration procedure and the appropriate boot code file.

7. 8. 9.

Once fully initialized, all transceivers should have RADIO STATUS LED solid green, and TRANSMIT STATUS LED either off or solid yellow. Disconnect the 9 to 9-way cable from the MCUF TTY port. Close the door to ensure correct ventilation.

This completes the power up of the cabinet.

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24-monthly maintenance procedures

24-monthly maintenance procedures


Summary of 24-monthly procedures
WARNING
Potentially lethal voltages and high energy sources are present in the cabinet when the ac mains isolator switch is set to the on position and/or batteries are connected. Remove rings, watches and jewellery before starting these procedures, and exercise extreme caution when working on the equipment.

The 24-monthly maintenance procedures involve the following:


S S S

6-monthly procedures. 12-monthly procedures. Mechanical inspection of cabinet, including inspection and lubrication of locks and hinges.

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24-monthly maintenance procedures

GSM

Mechanical inspection of cabinet, locks and hinges


The following must be performed every 24 months.

Inspecting the cabinet exterior


NOTE
Use a step ladder or platform for access to a stacked cabinet unit, where necessary.

To inspect the cabinet exterior, perform the following steps:


S S

Check exterior panels and hood/stacking bracket for dents and structural damage. Check cabinet top connections for signs of overheating and security of attachment.

Inspecting the door


To inspect the door, proceed as follows:
S S

Check cabinet door for distortion, security and correct operation. Check hinges for damage, security and correct operation. Carefully lubricate the hinges. Ensure that all door seals are wiped clean of the lubricant. Check earth connection for damage and security. Check door lock mechanism and inspect for ease of operation. Lubricate the mechanism with light grease. Ensure that lubricated surfaces are grit-free.

S S

Inspecting the cabinet interior


To inspect the cabinet interior, follow these steps:
S

Check all rack equipment for security of attachment, especially PSM, CBM and transceiver attachment screws using a Torxdriver. Tighten to the correct torque (see Technical Description Overview and specifications). Carry out a visual check of all wiring for signs of overheating and security of attachment. WARNING
Do not overstress the earth connections as this may damage the connector and reduce the protective function.

Check the earth connections for corrosion and tightness using a torque spanner. Tighten to the correct torque (see Technical Description Overview and specifications).

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Chapter 2

FRU replacement procedures

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GSM

Overview of replacement procedures

Overview of replacement procedures


Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)
WARNING
Potentially lethal voltages and high energy sources are present in the cabinet when the external isolator switch is set to the on position and/or batteries are connected. Remove rings, watches and jewellery before starting these procedures, and exercise extreme caution when working on the equipment. Maintenance procedures on this equipment must only be carried out by suitably qualified personnel.

This chapter provides information on replacement of field replaceable units (FRUs). Only components classed as FRUs are detailed in this chapter. Any requirement to open or close a door, or remove and replace the optional hood, is assumed in procedures. Shutting the door, or replacing the hood is assumed at the end of any procedure. SURF module and Tx block replacement may be carried out with the stacking bracket in place, but the CCB basket (if fitted) must be removed, (see Replacing a CCB ). For door opening, or hood or stacking bracket removal, see Routine maintenance overview. Where customers wish to perform a minor repair on an FRU, in order to save the cost of full replacement, they should consult Motorola for more detailed procedures or replacement components (see Additional replacement parts).

FRU list
The following is a list of FRUs used in this equipment:
S S S S S S S S S S S S S

Door. Heat sensor modules. Hood. Stacking bracket. Fan units. Circuit breaker module (CBM). Power supply module (PSM). Hold-up battery module. Transceiver (CTU or CTU2). SURF module. Tx blocks, including feedthrough plate. CCBs (installed in stacking bracket basket as CCB FRU). Digital modules (MCUFs, NIUs, FMUXs, alarm board and BPSMs).
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Overview of replacement procedures

GSM

Torque values
Table Maint. 2-1 details torque values used during repair procedures.
Table Maint. 2-1 Torque values for all cabinet screws/bolts and RF connectors Size of screw/bolt M4 M6 M8 M10 SMA N-type 7/16

Torque value

2.2 Nm

3.4 Nm

5 Nm

10 Nm

1 Nm

3.4 Nm

25 Nm

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Overview of replacement procedures

FRU locations within cabinet


Figure Maint. 2-1 shows a cabinet with FRUs identified. Door, optional hood, stacking bracket and CCBs are shown in the relevant FRU sections.

Figure Maint. 2-1 Cabinet, without door or hood, showing FRU components
ONE SURF (Rx) THREE Tx BLOCKS (DCFs SHOWN AS EXAMPLE) SIX TRANSCEIVERS (CTU/CTU2s) THREE PSMs (see NOTE) CIRCUIT BREAKER MODULE (CBM) T43/BIB DC POWER IN INTERFACE PANEL CONNECTORS

HEAT SENSORS LOCATED ON BACKPLANE

TWO 2-FAN UNITS ONE 4-FAN UNIT

ALARM MODULE MCUF FMUX/NIU/BPSM (NOT VISIBLE)

NOTE

An optional hold-up battery module may be installed instead of a redundant PSM.

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Maint. 25

Additional replacement parts

GSM

Additional replacement parts


Policy on non-FRU parts
Non-FRU parts are:
S S

Items unlikely to fail, but replacement of which is essential if failure occurs. Subsections of FRUs, where local conditions may make it more economical to repair the FRU. CAUTION
Only qualified personnel should attempt non-FRU replacement, in order to minimize risk of equipment damage. For example, the CBIA main cage requires care in removal and installation, and Individual fans require care in ensuring correct direction of airflow.

List of non-FRU parts


Non-FRU parts include the following:
S S S

Door lock. Individual fans within a fan module. Any part of the CBIA: main cage, harness, door sensor, interface panel, or backplane.

Procedure for replacing non-FRU parts


Customers requiring non-FRU replacement should: 1. 2. Contact the local Motorola office for availability. Seek Motorola advice for fitting non-FRU parts.

CBIA attachment screws


The CBIA is attached to the cabinet by screws which should not be loosened:
S S S

Seven M4 screws to SURF harness (two guide pins lock cage into position). Four M6 (left side) and five M6 (right side) screws at cabinet front. Eight M6 T30 screws for interface panel attachment to top panel.

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Replacing a door

Replacing a door
Introduction to door replacement
The door is essential to the correct operation of the ventilation system. The door also provides protection to equipment inside. For these reasons, the replacement procedure should be completed in one session, and the cabinet then secured.

Views of door
Figure Maint. 2-2 shows an inside and outside view of the door.

Figure Maint. 2-2 Inside and outside views of door


INTERNAL VIEW
DOOR ALARM BRACKET DOOR STOP BRACKET

EXTERNAL VIEW

VERTICAL AIR BAFFLE

HONEYCOMB VENTILATION

VENTILATION GRID

TRIGGER LATCH

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Replacing a door

GSM

Replacement of door
Removing a faulty door
To remove a door, open and perform the following steps: 1. 2. 3. At the cabinet, unscrew M6 nut, holding the door earth cable to the cabinet. Retain nut for re-use. Unscrew M6 holding screw on slide arm several turns, then unhook slide arm from the cabinet attachment point by lifting up. Move door to about 90 and lift door off hinges.

Fitting a replacement door


CAUTION
Avoid damaging the honeycomb door vent.

To install a replacement door, proceed as follows: 1. 2. 3. Hold door at about 90 and lift onto door hinges. Attach the door earth cable to the cabinet by using the M6 nut. Tighten to the correct torque (see Overview of replacement procedures). Place the slide arm onto the cabinet attachment holding point and apply several turns of the M6 holding screw.

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Replacing a cabinet heat sensor

Replacing a cabinet heat sensor


Overview of heat sensors
Heat sensors plug into the backplane from the front, above the transceivers. Each one can be separately detached, and a replacement inserted. Transceivers are removed to gain access for this procedure. There is one 70 _C sensor and two 85 _C sensors. Each sensor is marked with the appropriate temperature.

Procedure for heat sensor replacement


Proceed as follows to replace heat sensors: WARNING
Before disconnecting RF cables, ensure that the RF power is OFF by turning cabinet PSMs off. If RF power is ON when cables are disconnected, severe burns may result.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Remove the transceivers (see Replacing a transceiver). Identify the faulty heat sensor. Remove the faulty heat sensor by pulling. Install the replacement heat sensor by pushing firmly into place. Install the transceivers (see Replacing a transceiver).

The heat sensors should now be operational.

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Replacing a hood

GSM

Replacing a hood
Introduction to hood replacement
This procedure assumes an optional hood is already fitted, with hood pins located in the correct cabinet locations. If the hood is to replace a stacking bracket, refer to the appropriate procedures in this chapter Replacing a stacking bracket and Installation and Configuration: Horizonmacro 68P02902W08 Chapter 2, Hood or stacking bracket fit.

View of hood
Figure Maint. 2-3 shows a top view of the hood.

Figure Maint. 2-3 Hood view when placed on top of cabinet


LIFTING EDGE HOOD

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TOP SECTION OF CABINET DOOR

Replacing the hood


The hood is held in place by four pins. Remove the faulty hood by lifting the edge, until free of the pins. To fit the replacement hood, first align the hood to the back pins, then lower the hood onto the pins and press firmly into place.

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Replacing a stacking bracket

Replacing a stacking bracket


View of stacking bracket
Figure Maint. 2-4 shows a stacking bracket with optional CCB basket.

Figure Maint. 2-4 Stacking bracket view with optional CCB basket
M10 HOLES (4) FOR TOP CABINET ATTACHMENT (IF REQUIRED) REAR OF BRACKET

CCB BASKET (IF REQUIRED) DETACHABLE CCB BASKET BAR

M8 HOLES (8) FOR BOTTOM CABINET ATTACHMENT.


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GSM

Procedure to replace a stacking bracket


Replace the stacking bracket as follows: 1. Remove the front cover by pulling away. WARNING 2.
The cabinet can weigh as much as 115 kg with the hood fitted. Observe correct lifting precautions.

If an upper cabinet is fitted on top of stacking bracket, decommission the cabinet as described in Installation and Configuration: Horizonmacro 68P02902W08 Chapter 5 Decommissioning Horizonmacro indoor. If a CCB is fitted, remove it (see Replacing a CCB). Loosen and remove the eight M8 screws holding the faulty bracket. WARNING
The stacking bracket can weigh as much as 15 kg (more if CCB is contained in CCB basket). Observe the correct lifting precautions.

3. 4.

5. 6.

Lift the faulty stacking bracket off the cabinet. Align the replacement stacking bracket onto the cabinet, and fit the eight M8 screws. Tighten to correct torque (see Overview of replacement procedures ). Install and commission any upper cabinet removed in step 2 as described in Installation and Configuration: Horizonmacro 68P02902W08 Chapter 2 and Chapter 3. Refit the front cover by attaching to side lugs and pushing into position.

7.

8.

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Replacing a fan module

Replacing a fan module


Introduction to fan replacement
The fan modules can be replaced while the cabinet is operational, but be aware that airflow is reduced while fans are out of service, and while door is open. This will raise equipment temperature, and could shut down the cabinet by triggering the heat sensors.

View of fan modules


Figure Maint. 2-5 shows a view of the two types of fan module fitted in a Horizonmacro cabinet, with reset buttons indicated.

Figure Maint. 2-5 View of fan modules


2-FAN UNIT

4-FAN UNIT
RESET BUTTONS (ONE PER FAN)

SLIDE LATCH FOR MODULE REMOVAL

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Replacing a fan module

GSM

Identifying fan module


There are three cabinet fan modules, one 4-fan unit and two identical 2-fan modules. Table Maint. 2-2 shows the three fan positions.
Table Maint. 2-2 Fan positions Fan reference Type of module Cabinet position

0 1 2

4-fan unit 2-fan unit 2-fan unit

Right side, underneath digital cage. Middle, beneath transceivers. Left side, beneath transceivers.

Replacing fan modules


CAUTION
If the cabinet is operational, this replacement procedure should be completed without delay to minimize the duration of air cooling disruption.

To replace the fan, perform the following steps: 1. 2. 3. 4. Lift the central slide latch. Pull out the fan module. Insert the replacement module firmly in place, ensuring the slide latch has engaged. Ensure all fans are operating. Any fan not operating should be started by using the appropriate RESET button.

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Replacing a circuit breaker module (CBM)

Replacing a circuit breaker module (CBM)


Preconditions for CBM replacement
The CBM controls power for the whole of the cabinet, apart from the PSMs. Consequently, the replacement of a CBM can only take place after the cabinet has been taken out of service and isolated, in agreement with the OMC-R.

Views of CBM
Figure Maint. 2-6 shows views of the CBM with circuit breaker buttons identified.

Figure Maint. 2-6 Views of CBM with circuit breaker buttons identified
BACKPLANE CONNECTOR HANDLE-BAFFLE

M4 MODULE ATTACHMENT SCREWS

4A
CCB (0 AND 1)

2A

7A

7A
BPSMs (A AND B)

12 A
6 TRANSCEIVERS (0 TO 5)

SURF FANS

FRONT VIEW

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Replacing a circuit breaker module (CBM)

GSM

Replacing a CBM
To replace a CBM, proceed as follows: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Verify that the power source isolator is switched to OFF, and locked (if possible). Set the switch of each PSM to the OUTPUT DISABLE position. Unscrew both CBM module attachment screws (shown in Figure Maint. 2-6), using a torxdriver. Pull out module, using handle-baffle. Press and release all push on/push off circuit breaker buttons of the new CBM module into the out (off) position. Insert the replacement module and press firmly into place. Tighten both module attachment screws to correct torque (see Overview of replacement procedures), using an M4 Torx driver. Switch on the external power supply to the cabinet. Turn each PSM switch to the OUTPUT ENABLE position. Check that each PSM has the ACTIVE (green) light on and the ALARM (red) light off. Press the CBM isolator marked FANS. Check that each fan, eight in total, is operating correctly. Any fan not started may be activated by the reset button (marked either FRONT or REAR) on the appropriate fan unit. Press the CBM circuit breaker button marked BPSM A and (if redundant BPSM fitted) BPSM B. Check all associated digital module indicators operate correctly. Press the CBM circuit breaker button marked SURF, and if CCBs fitted the circuit breaker buttons marked CCB0 and CCB1. Press the appropriate CBM circuit breaker buttons for the transceivers fitted, and check that the LEDs for each transceiver indicate correct operation. Close the door to ensure correct ventilation.

To restore power to the cabinet, perform the following steps: 1. 2. 3.

4.

5. 6.

7.

This completes the CBM replacement and power up sequence for a cabinet.

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Replacing a power supply module (PSM)

Replacing a power supply module (PSM)


Introduction to PSM replacement
There are three slots for PSMs. A single PSM can power a cabinet containing up to three CTUs therefore, a cabinet populated with six CTUs only requires two PSMs to be fully operational. The third slot can be used for an additional power supply to provide redundancy, or for the hold-up battery unit. A replacement PSM can be inserted into a vacant slot without powering down, thereby avoiding any need to take the cabinet out of service. When CTU2s are fitted, all three slots may be required for power supply, depending on the number and mix of transceivers installed. In such cases, redundancy cannot be provided, and the cabinet will have to be taken out of service to change a faulty unit.

Preconditions for PSM replacement


Replacement PSM must be of appropriate type for the cabinet (+ 27 V dc, 48/60 V dc, or 110/240 V ac). CAUTION
Replacement PSM must have the correct input voltage rating for the cabinet.

View of PSM
Figure Maint. 2-7 shows a view of the PSM with key features identified. Figure Maint. 2-7 View of PSM with key features identified
AIR VENTS ON ENTIRE TOP AND BOTTOM PANELS

GREEN LED ACTIVE RED LED ALARM

OUTPUT DISABLE SWITCH M4 MODULE ATTACHMENT SCREWS

PSM FRONT PANEL

NOTE

There are several manufacturers of the PSMs. All PSMs of the same type are fully compatible with each other, regardless of manufacturer.

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Replacing a power supply module (PSM)

GSM

Replacing a non-redundant PSM


The following procedure should be followed if there are one or two PSMs fitted in the cabinet. To replace a non-redundant PSM, perform the following steps: 1. 2. 3. 4. Set the switch of the replacement PSM to OUTPUT DISABLE. Remove the blanking assembly of spare slot, if fitted, by unscrewing the attachment screws with a torxdriver. Remove the hold-up battery module, if fitted, as described in Replacing a hold-up battery module. Insert the replacement PSM in resulting or spare slot, and tighten both module attachment screws to the correct torque (see Overview of replacement procedures), using a torxdriver. Set the replacement PSM switch to OUTPUT ENABLE. Check that the ACTIVE LED (green) is lit. Set switch of faulty PSM to OUTPUT DISABLE. The ACTIVE LED will extinguish (the ACTIVE LED may already be off if a fault has resulted in output failure of that PSM). The ALARM LED (red) will light, or if already lit due to alarm state, will stay on. Unscrew the faulty PSM module attachment screws using an M4 torxdriver, and remove the module. The ALARM LED will extinguish. If removed in step 3, refit hold-up battery module as described in Replacing a hold-up battery module. Fit the cover plate in the vacated PSM position, if required, by tightening the attachment screws to the correct torque with a torxdriver, as stated in step 4.

5. 6.

7. 8. 9.

Replacing a redundant PSM


The following procedure should be followed if there are three PSMs fitted. To replace a redundant PSM, perform the following steps: 1. 2. Set the switch of replacement PSM to OUTPUT DISABLE. Set switch of faulty PSM to OUTPUT DISABLE. The ACTIVE (green) LED will extinguish (the ACTIVE LED may already be off, if a fault has resulted in output failure of that PSM). The ALARM LED (red) will light, or if already lit due to alarm state, will stay on. Unscrew the module attachment screws by M4 torxdriver, and remove the module. The ALARM LED will extinguish. Insert the replacement PSM, and tighten both module attachment screws to the correct torque (see Overview of replacement procedures), using a torxdriver. Set switch to OUTPUT ENABLE. Check the ACTIVE LED is lit.

3. 4.

5.

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Replacing a hold-up battery module

Replacing a hold-up battery module


To Replace a hold-up battery module
WARNING
The batteries are capable of supplying high short circuit currents and as such provides a high energy hazard.

Proceed as follows to replace a hold-up battery module: 1. 2. Verify that the enable switch of the replacement hold-up battery module is set to O. Cut the cable tie that secures the jumper lead to the isolation connection access hatch. Open the access hatch by turning the fastener a quarter turn anticlockwise and lifting. Fit the jumper lead between the battery spade terminals as shown in Figure Maint. 2-8. Close the access hatch and turn the fastener a quarter turn clockwise to secure. Set the enable switch of the faulty hold-up battery module to O (off). The ACTIVE LED (green) will extinguish (the green LED may already be off, if a fault has resulted in output failure). The ALARM LED (red) will light, or if already lit due to alarm state, will stay on. WARNING 5. 6. 7.
The hold-up battery module weighs 5.9 kg. Handle with care.

3.

4.

Unscrew the module attachment screws using a torxdriver, and remove the module. The red LED will go off. Insert the replacement hold-up battery module. Ensure the replacement hold-up battery module is firmly in position and tighten both module attachment screws using a torxdriver. Tighten to a torque of 2.2 Nm. Set the hold-up battery module enable switch to I (on). Check that the CHARGE LED (green) is lit. NOTE
The ACTIVE LED (green) will not light until 1.5 to 2 hours after installation. The ALARM LED (red) may also be lit if the initial battery voltage is below 19 V dc (+/0.25 V).

8.

9.

Remove the battery isolation jumper lead from the faulty hold-up battery module and secure it to the outside of the access hatch before transportation.

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Replacing a hold-up battery module

GSM

Figure Maint. 2-8 shows the battery hold-up with the battery isolation jumper connection shown in detail.

Figure Maint. 2-8 Connecting battery isolation jumper lead


ACCESS HATCH

BATTERY SPADE CONNECTORS

JUMPER LEAD

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Replacing a transceiver

Replacing a transceiver
Preconditions for transceiver replacement
There are up to six transceivers in a cabinet, which may be all CTUs, all CTU2s, or a mix of the two. Replacing a transceiver requires removal of RF transmitter power for that transceiver; it is therefore advisable to perform this procedure during periods of low traffic. The OMC-R should be notified of imminent repair activity. NOTE
The transceiver replacement procedure is the same for all transceivers, regardless of frequency rating. Read the Preserving transceiver calibration section later in this chapter prior to removing the module.

View of a CTU
Figure Maint. 2-9 shows a view of a CTU with key features identified.

Figure Maint. 2-9 CTU view with key features

M4 MODULE ATTACHMENT SCREW

BACKPLANE POWER AND SIGNAL CONNECTOR

Tx OUT CONNECTOR

Rx A TEST INTERFACE LOOPBACK TEST PORT (L) Rx B

HANDLE TTY INTERFACE CONTROL PROCESSOR

RADIO STATUS LED RECESSED MANUAL RESET BUTTON (if fitted) Tx STATUS LED

M4 MODULE ATTACHMENT SCREW

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Replacing a transceiver

GSM

View of a CTU2
Figure Maint. 2-10 shows a view of a CTU2 with key features identified.

Figure Maint. 2-10 CTU2 view with key features

M4 MODULE ATTACHMENT SCREW

Tx OUT CONNECTOR

BACKPLANE POWER AND SIGNAL CONNECTOR

TEST INTERFACE HANDLE TTY INTERFACE CONTROL PROCESSOR

Rx D Rx A Rx C Rx B

M4 MODULE ATTACHMENT SCREW

RADIO STATUS LED Tx STATUS A LED Tx STATUS B LED

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Replacing a transceiver

Replacement procedure for a transceiver


CAUTION
An earthing wrist strap must be worn when handling transceivers. An ESP earthing connection point is provided above the leftmost PSM.

Removing a faulty transceiver


NOTE
Ensure that the preserve transceiver calibration data feature is enabled and determine which calibration data exchange scenario applies before proceeding further (refer to Enabling the preserve transceiver calibration data feature and Table Maint. 2-3 respectively, later in this chapter).

To remove a transceiver, proceed as follows: 1. Locate the transceiver to be replaced. They are sequentially numbered, with transceiver 0 on the right, and transceiver 5 on the left, as shown in Figure Maint. 2-1. Disable the transceiver transmit RF power by using the lock_device or shutdown_device command at the OMC-R or from a PC connected to the MCUF. NOTE
Refer to Technical Description: BSS Command Reference 68P02901W23 for information on usage and specific commands.

2.

3. 4.

When the transceiver has been shutdown, check the Tx STATUS LED (solid yellow) is unlit. Press and release the appropriate transceiver circuit breaker button on the CBM to the out (off) position. Ensure the RADIO STATUS LED is unlit. WARNING
Ensure that RF power is OFF, before disconnecting RF cables. Severe burns may result if RF power is ON when cables are disconnected.

5. 6.

Unscrew the coaxial cable from the Tx OUT SMA connector at the top of the transceiver front panel. Unscrew the two transceiver attachment screws using M4 Torx driver. WARNING CAUTION
The transceiver weighs 5 kg. Handle with care. Take care to avoid damage of transceiver rear connectors when handling outside of the cabinet.

7.

Withdraw the transceiver using the handle. Support the unit from underneath as it slides out.

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Replacing a transceiver

GSM

Fitting a replacement transceiver


Proceed as follows to fit a replacement transceiver: 1. 2. Ensure that the correct transceiver push-on/push-off circuit breaker button on the CBM has been pressed to the out (off) position. Ensure that the transmit RF power of the correct transceiver has been locked using the lock_device or shutdown_device command at the OMC-R or from a PC connected to the MCUF. Insert replacement transceiver module, taking care to locate the module on the guide rails. Press firmly into place. Tighten both module attachment screws to the correct torque (see Overview of replacement procedures), using an M4 Torx driver. NOTE
The Tx cable has a 90 SMA connector at one end, and a straight SMA connector at the other end. The 90 end is designed for connection to the Tx port of the transceiver.

3. 4.

5.

Screw the 90 SMA connector of the coaxial cable onto the Tx OUT SMA connector at the top of the transceiver front panel. Tighten to correct torque (see Overview of replacement procedures). Press and release the appropriate transceiver circuit breaker button on the CBM. The RADIO STATUS LED will flash green for about two minutes, and then remain lit. CAUTION
If both RADIO STATUS and Tx STATUS LEDs are flashing, the bootcode is downloading into non-volatile memory for software upgrade. Power should not be removed, nor the cabinet reset, until downloading has been completed, as this will corrupt the non-volatile memory. If bootcode is corrupted, contact Motorola Customer Network Resolution Centre requesting the bootcode restoration procedure and the appropriate bootcode file.

6.

7.

Enable the transceiver transmit RF power by using the unlock_device or ins_device command at the OMC-R or from a PC connected to the MCUF. The Tx STATUS LED (yellow) will be lit if the transceiver is transmitting. Calibrate the transceiver using the appropriate procedure, as described in Transceiver calibration data exchange procedures later in this chapter. Notify the OMC-R of base station availability and log the maintenance activity.

8. 9.

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Preserving transceiver calibration

Preserving transceiver calibration


Introduction to preserving transceiver calibration
This section describes the preserve CTU or CTU2 transceiver calibration feature, which uses commands to store, display and clear calibration data. This feature is used on busy systems where there is a need to replace a transceiver quickly and thus reduce system down time during peak hours. NOTE
After the transceiver has been replaced, it will be necessary to revisit the site at an off-peak period to carry out bay level and cell site power (CSPWR) calibration to fully optimize the hardware. The bay level calibration procedure is described later in this chapter. The CSPWR calibration procedure is described in Chapter 3.

Calibration data overview


This function enables malfunctioning transceivers to be replaced without the need to remove the cell from service. The calibration offsets can be displayed and cleared using the disp_cal_data and clear_cal_data commands.

Display calibration offsets data


The disp_cal_data command only displays offsets from the transceiver if the DRI is in the busy-unlocked (B-U) state. The GPROC CM database values are displayed when the transceiver is locked or not busy. If the calibration values have been cleared, they will not be available on the specific RAM of the transceiver or the CM database, and the response will be NO CALIBRATION DATA AVAILABLE. NOTE
Calibration data from the CTU can be transferred to the CTU2 and vice-versa.

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Preserving transceiver calibration

GSM

Store calibration data


The store_cal_data command sets a flag to indicate that when the transceiver is unlocked and comes into service, the calibration values will be copied from the RAM in the transceiver into the GPROC CM database. The values from the RAM in the transceiver will only be copied to the database if there are no calibration values in the GPROC CM database, and if the transceiver has values in the RAM to be copied. If the RAM in the transceiver has been cleared of all values, and the GPROC CM database has calibration values for that specific transceiver, when the transceiver is unlocked it will get a copy of these values from the CM database. Different calibration values for the same transceiver can exist in the CM database and the RAM in the transceiver. Care has to be taken when calibrating a transceiver. To ensure that the values in the RAM of the transceiver and CM database have the same calibration data, the existing values have to be cleared using the clear_cal_data command before a calibration can be successful and the correct calibration data saved. Calibration data is stored in the master CM database at the BSC, and is used to update the CM database copy at the BTS if it is valid. NOTE
The value 80H must be cleared from all the paths (columns of data) stored in the transceiver, otherwise the calibration data will not be uploaded to the CM database.

Clear calibration data


The clear_cal_data command removes the offsets from RAM and the database. To clear the data from a transceiver that is B-U in the network, the command is issued after the transceiver is locked. A new transceiver being put into the network must first be allowed to become B-U and then locked, only after this will the command clear the calibration data for that transceiver. This is explained in the calibration procedure.

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Preserving transceiver calibration

Calibration data exchange procedures


The process of uploading/downloading calibration data between the transceiver and the CM database is automatic, but the actual procedure used is determined by one of the scenarios described in Table Maint. 2-3.
Table Maint. 2-3 Transceiver calibration scenarios and procedures Scenario: Site initialization with ... calibration data held in the CM database, but with invalid/no calibration data in the transceiver. Description Procedure Used

If a transceiver malfunctions and has Preserve to be replaced, the associated DRI is transceiver locked and the malfunctioning calibration data transceiver replaced with a new transceiver while the cell remains in service. The DRI is then unlocked. When the executive message Radio Standby Success is received by the CA at the BTS, the database is queried to determine if any valid offset data is stored. If any is found in the database, this is downloaded to the new transceiver and the transceiver is allowed to come into service (B-U). Once the CA at the BTS receives the Transceiver executive message Radio Standby calibration Success, it checks the CM database for valid offsets. If none exist, the BTS then queries the transceiver for valid data. If none exists in the transceiver, the transceiver is brought into service but the Invalid transceiver calibration data alarm is triggered. Initially a transceiver is calibrated and Transceiver the antenna offsets stored within the recalibration transceiver. When the BTS initializes and enters call processing mode, the Central Authority (CA) at the BTS queries Configuration Management (CM) to see if valid offset data exists. If no valid data exists then the transceiver(s) are queried for the offset data, which is sent through the Radio Signalling Link (RSL) to the CM at the BSC.

invalid/no calibration data held in the CM database and invalid/no calibration data in the transceiver.

invalid/no calibration data held in the CM database, but with valid calibration data in the transceiver.

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Preserving transceiver calibration

GSM

Calibration data format from the CM database


The format of the calibration data output from the CM database is described here. This information is provided in response to the command: disp_cal_data <location> DRI <device_id> <device_id2> [<device_id3>] For example, disp_cal_data 21 dri 5 3 0 Where:
21 dri 5 3 0

is:
site dri device first dev_id second dev_id third dev_id

System response:
DRI ID 5 3 0 Data read from transceiver Calibration data (All values in Hex): Transmit Power Offset = 77 Receive System Data: Antenna Number 1 2 3 4 5 6 73, 77, 74, 7E, 70, 81, 77, 81, 71, 76, 6D, 74, 74, 6F, 68, 69, 70, 83, 6D, 55, 56, 57, 55, 68, 67, 65, 66, 56, 80, 77, 66, 6C, 5F, 66, 78, 54, 67, 66, 56, 5F, 6C, 6D, 77, 5F, 66, 87, 9D, 56, 66, 66, 65, 64, 62, 44, 54, 5A, 5D, 5F, 60, 55, 55, 43, 44, 4D, 4E, 44, 65, 6F, 6D, 67, 77, 81, 66, 45, 4F, 4D, 44, 4A, 61, 60, 64, 66, 6D, 64, 54, 5D, 55, 5F, 60, 5B, 5D, 55, 5A, 67, 6F, 60,

Note that the second line of the system response indicates whether the data is read from the transceiver or the database. In the example above the information is read from the transceiver. The number of rows of offset calibration data are as follows:
S S S S S

GSM850 16 PGSM900 16 EGSM900 22 DCS1800 47 PCS1900 38


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Preserving transceiver calibration

Test equipment required


The following equipment is needed to carry out the transceiver calibration/recalibration procedures:
S S S S

An IBM-compatible personal computer (PC). Terminal emulator software. A 9-way to 9-way cable (BTS). A 9-way to 25-way cable (BSC).

Commands used
Table Maint. 2-4 lists the commands required to carry out this procedure.
Table Maint. 2-4 Transceiver calibration commands BTS Command Function Prevents the device being used (see Note below). Enables the device to be used (see Note below). Function

lock_device unlock_device
OMC-R/BSC Command

store_cal_data Stores calibration data for all transceivers in the master CM


database at the BSC, which is then used to update the CM database copy at the BTS.

disp_cal_data

When transceiver is locked: Displays calibration data in the CM database for the specified transceiver. When transceiver is unlocked: Displays calibration data in the RAM of the specified transceiver. for a specified transceiver.

clear_cal_data Clears calibration data in the CM database at the BSC and BTS NOTE
Use shutdown_device instead of lock_device if the transceiver is currently active. Use ins_device instead of unlock_device if shutdown_device was used to lock the transceiver. If there is no RSL from the BTS to the BSC then a command will not be executed by the BSC, as the BSC has no knowledge of the command being entered.

NOTE

All calibration data is stored in the master CM database at the BSC, which is then used to update the CM database copy at the BTS only if the data is valid.

CINDY commissioning tool


Many of the procedures described in this chapter can be carried out automatically using the CINDY commissioning tool. Refer to the relevant CINDY user documentation for details.
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Enabling the preserve transceiver calibration data feature

GSM

Enabling the preserve transceiver calibration data feature


Introduction to the preserve transceiver calibration data feature
NOTE
The preserve transceiver calibration data feature must be enabled at either the OMC-R or the BSC, otherwise none of the calibration data exchange procedures described in Table Maint. 2-3 will work.

Determine the BSC/BTS configuration and cage slot allocation before starting any of the calibration data exchange procedures. NOTE
Calibration data is interchangeable between the CTU and CTU2 transceivers. This means that a CTU2 can be used to replace a CTU and the original CTU calibration data used.

Enabling the preserve feature at the OMC-R


Proceed as follows to enable the preserve transceiver calibration data feature at the OMC-R: 1. 2. At the OMC-R man-machine interface (MMI), log in to the required base site controller (BSC). To initiate the preserve feature type: store_cal_data <site_id> All calibration data will be stored in the master CM database at the BSC, which is then used to update the CM database copy at the BTS (if the data is valid).

Enabling the preserve feature at the BSC


Proceed as follows to enable the preserve transceiver calibration data feature at the BSC: 1. 2. 3. 4. Connect the 9-way to 25-way cable from the PC serial A port to the BSP TTY port. At the PC start the terminal emulator program. At the MMI prompt, enter the appropriate level change command and passwords. At the MMI prompt type: store_cal_data <location>

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Transceiver calibration data exchange procedures


Introduction to transceiver calibration data exchange procedures
The procedures listed in Table Maint. 2-3 are described here in detail. All three procedures assume that the preserve transceiver calibration data feature (described previously) has been enabled.

Preserve transceiver calibration data procedure


NOTE
This procedure assumes that the store_cal_data command has been used on the transceiver at some time previously while it was operational.

To replace a transceiver using preserved calibration data, follow the procedures for transceiver replacement given previously in Replacement procedure for transceiver. The calibration data stored in the CM database is downloaded into the RAM of the new transceiver. The data is also stored in the non-volatile transceiver memory. NOTE
After the transceiver has been replaced, it will still be necessary to revisit the site at an off-peak hour, to carry out bay level and CSPWR calibration to fully optimize the hardware.

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Transceiver calibration procedures


Calibrating the transceiver
This procedure is used to put a new transceiver into service. If recalibration of a working transceiver is required, use the Transceiver recalibration procedures provided later in this chapter. Proceed as follows to calibrate the new transceiver: NOTE
The transceiver requires a code load prior to the calibration process. Wait until the transceiver finishes the code load and stops flashing (in BUSY-UNLOCKED or ENABLED-UNLOCKED state) before proceeding.

1.

Lock all the DRIs in the same sector of the transceiver to be calibrated. Always lock the transceiver providing the BCCH last, as this prevents the BCCH switching to an alternative transceiver. Enter the following command for each of the DRIs. lock_device <location> DRI <device_id1> <device_id2> [<device_id3>]

2. 3.

Display the data in the CM database for the transceiver to be calibrated: disp_cal_data <location> DRI <device_id1> If valid data is present, proceed to step 4. If the response seen is:
NO CALIBRATION DATA AVAILABLE

Enter the following: store_cal_data <location> 4. Check there is calibration data present in the CM database for the DRI, then clear that data for the transceiver to be calibrated: clear_cal_data <location> DRI <device_id1> 5. Confirm the data has been cleared from the CM database for the specified transceiver: disp_cal_data <location> DRI <device_id1> If no problems have occurred, the response will be:
NO DATA AVAILABLE

NOTE 6.

If there is a different response, ensure the transceiver is in the LOCKED state and carry out from step 2 again.

Carry out bay level and CSPWR procedures, as described in the relevant section of this manual. Record the data.

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Checking the transceiver calibration


Proceed as follows to check the transceiver calibration: 1. Unlock the DRI of the calibrated transceiver. NOTE
Ensure the previous calibration data has been cleared before unlocking the transceiver.

Enter the command: unlock_device <location> DRI <device_id1> Check that the calibrated transceiver passes into BUSY-UNLOCKED state. The new calibration data is uploaded to the CM database and is then used to update the copy at the BTS. 2. Check the calibration data of the DRI of the calibrated transceiver against the values noted in step 6 of the previous procedure. NOTE
Allow one minute after uploading for the values in the CM database at the BSC to be updated.

Enter the command: disp_cal_data <location> DRI <device_id1> The values seen should match the previous ones. NOTE
If the transceiver is BUSY-UNLOCKED the data can be read directly from the transceiver. In ENABLED-UNLOCKED or LOCKED state calibration data is read from the CM database.

3.

Make test calls in all timeslots of the new DRI to check audio quality and then lock the tested DRI using the command: lock_device <location> DRI <device_id1> With the transceiver LOCKED (or in ENABLED-UNLOCKED state), ensure the calibration process has been carried out correctly by checking that the CM database at the BSC has been updated with the new values. Enter the command: disp_cal_data <location> DRI <device_id1> The values seen should match the previous ones.

4.

5.

If everything is in order, the cell can be put back into service. Unlock all the DRIs in the same sector that were locked previously using the command: unlock_device <location> DRI <device_id1> <device_id2> [<device_id3>]

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Transceiver recalibration procedures


Recalibrating the transceiver
This procedure is used to recalibrate a working transceiver when there is invalid or no calibration data held in the CM database, but valid calibration data is present in the transceiver. Proceed as follows to recalibrate the transceiver: 1. At the site BTP, remote login to the serving BSC and enter the following MMI command: store_cal_data <location> 2. Lock all the DRIs in the same sector of the transceiver to be recalibrated. Always lock the transceiver providing the BCCH last, as this prevents the BCCH switching to an alternative transceiver. Enter the following command for each of the DRIs: lock_device <location> DRI <device_id1> <device_id2> [<device_id3>] 3. Display the data in the CM database for the transceiver that is to be recalibrated in the sector: disp_cal_data <location> DRI <device_id1> 4. If valid data is present proceed to step 5. If the response seen is:
NO CALIBRATION DATA AVAILABLE

Enter the following: store_cal_data <location> 5. Check there is calibration data present in the CM database for the DRI, then clear that data for the transceiver to be recalibrated: clear_cal_data <location> DRI <device_id1> 6. Confirm the data has been cleared from the CM database for the specified transceiver: disp_cal_data <location> DRI <device_id1> If no problems have occurred, the response will be:
NO DATA AVAILABLE

NOTE 7.

If there is a different response, ensure the transceiver is in the LOCKED state and proceed from step 3 again.

Carry out bay level and CSPWR procedures, as described in the relevant section of this manual. Record the data.

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Checking the transceiver recalibration


Proceed as follows to check the recalibration: 1. Unlock the DRI of the recalibrated transceiver. NOTE
Ensure the previous calibration data has been cleared before unlocking the transceiver.

Enter the command: unlock_device <location> DRI <device_id1> Check that the recalibrated transceiver passes into UNLOCKED state. The new calibration data is uploaded to the CM database and is then used to update the copy at the BTS (even if the DRI does not have an RTF assigned). 2. Check the calibration data of the DRI of the recalibrated transceiver against the values noted in step 7 of the previous procedure. NOTE
Allow one minute after uploading for the values in the CM database at the BSC to be updated.

Enter the command: disp_cal_data <location> DRI <device_id1> The values seen should match the previous ones. NOTE
If the transceiver is BUSY-UNLOCKED the data can be read directly from the transceiver. In ENABLED-UNLOCKED or LOCKED state calibration data is read from the CM database.

3. 4.

Lock the tested DRI using the command: lock_device <location> DRI <device_id1> With the transceiver LOCKED (or in ENABLED-UNLOCKED state), ensure the recalibration process has been carried out correctly, by checking that the CM database at the BSC has been updated with the new values. Enter the command: disp_cal_data <location> DRI <device_id1> The values seen should match the previous ones.

5.

If everything is in order, the cell can be put back into service. Unlock all the DRIs in the same sector that were locked previously using the command: unlock_device <location> DRI <device_id1> <device_id2> [<device_id3>]

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Calibrating transceiver bay level offset tables


Introduction to bay level offset tables calibration
NOTE
Transceiver bay level offset tables calibration and VSWR checks can be carried out automatically using the CINDY commissioning tool. Refer to the relevant CINDY user documentation for details.

Follow the appropriate CTU or CTU2 procedure to calibrate the bay level offset tables to compensate for the losses or gains due to preselectors and RF cabling from the antenna inputs at the Horizonmacro to the transceiver input. All units are factory calibrated. This procedure is thus necessary only if one of the following changes occur:
S S S S

A transceiver is replaced. RF front end equipment is changed. The site is reconfigured. High power duplexers are fitted. NOTE
The procedures contained in Calibrating transceiver bay level offset tables are to calibrate a single transceiver. Repeat the procedures for all transceivers affected by the changes listed above.

Test equipment required


The following test equipment is required:
S S S S S S

An IBM-compatible personal computer (PC). Terminal emulator software. A 50 ohm 50 W dummy load. A signal generator (0 to 2 GHz). A 9-way to 9-way MCUF/transceiver cable. A 9-way to 9-way EQCP/RSS (CTU) or DSP MMI/RSS (CTU2) transceiver cable. NOTE
The EQCP/RSS cable (for CTU) and DSP MMI/RSS cable (for CTU2) are actually the same cable, it is only the nomenclature that is different. All test equipment and test leads must be calibrated annually by a recognized laboratory. Test equipment and test leads must not be calibrated in the field. Do not optimize Motorola cellular base stations with test equipment that is beyond its calibration due date. Allow test equipment to warm up for 30 minutes before use.

CAUTION

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CTU Rx bay level calibration procedures


These procedures are for calibrating the CTU only. The equivalent procedures for calibrating the CTU2 are provided later in this chapter.

Commands used
Table Maint. 2-5 lists the MMI commands used to carry out the procedure. NOTE
1. The symbol 0 used in the commands in this procedure is a zero. 2. BSS MMI commands may be entered in upper or lower case. All other commands must be entered in the case shown below. CTU passwords are not case sensitive.

Table Maint. 2-5 MMI commands for CTU bay level offset calibration BSS MMI command Function Initializes the device, bringing it into service. Prevents the device being used. Frees the device for further use. Clears previously stored calibration data for a specified radio unit on a per DRI basis. Function Places the CTU into test mode. Inhibits the BBH alarm. Calibrates the bay level receive equipment. Disables automatic intermodulation compensation. Activates the Control Processor. Sets all timeslots to channel #. Sets all timeslots to antenna #. Stops synthesizer switching with synth 1 permanently on. Enables synthesizer switching into normal working. Transfers bay level calibration stored data in RAM to FLASH EPROM. Informs control processor that bay level calibration is valid for branch N and sets bay level flag. Stops the control processor. Write enables the FLASH EPROM. Write protects the FLASH EPROM. Reads cal bay offsets from FLASH EPROM. Reads cal bay offsets from RAM. Function Stops the CTU hunting between fibre A and fibre B and forces the CTU to look only at fibre A.

ins_device lock_device unlock_device clear_cal_data


CTU TTY command

TEST
BBH ALARM OFF

CAL BAY @1/@2 AIC OUT


ACT C

TS A CHAN # TS A ANT # SYNTH 1 SYNTH NRM SAVE CAL BAY BAYDONE @N


HALT C WRENB WRPTC FR BAY MR BAY CTU command

tcu_clock 0

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Preparation for bay level calibration


The RF path has to be prepared for bay level calibration. The CTU has to be reset and locked, a dummy load connected if no antenna and the alarms disabled. Proceed as follows: 1. 2. 3. Connect the 9-way to 9-way MCUF cable from the PC serial A port to MCUF TTY port. At the PC start the terminal emulator program. Change to Level 3 and at the MMI-RAM> prompt type: ins_device # dri A * 0 Where:
# A *

is:
the number of the site logged into. the antenna/relative cell number (0 to 5). DRI number on the antenna. The CTU must be brought into service as there is no flash EPROM storage of code at the transceiver control processor level. If a connection to the BSC is not available a PCMCIA commissioning card must be used.

NOTE

4.

Wait for the radio to finish initializing, then lock the cell using the lock device command. WARNING
Failure to lock the cell could result in the BCCH transmitting into, and causing damage to the signal generator. Maintenance personnel could receive RF burns when connecting to the antenna socket.

Type: lock_device # dri A * 0 Where:


# A *

is:
the number of the site logged into. the antenna/relative cell number (0 to 5). DRI number on the antenna. For ease of calibration, all CTUs in a cell should be initialized and then locked. Always lock the transceiver providing the BCCH last as this prevents the BCCH being switched to alternate transceivers.

NOTE

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5.

Type: clear_cal_data # dri A * 0 Where:


# A *

is:
the number of the site logged into. the antenna/relative cell number (0 to 5). DRI number on the antenna. The clear_cal_data command clears all calibration data out of the CM database. This is required to override the preserve calibration feature, if enabled.

NOTE

6. 7.

Connect port COM1 on the PC to the TTY Interface port on the transceiver using the 9-way to 9-way EQCP/RSS cable. At the MMI-ROM prompt type: tcu_clock 0 The system responds with the following:
WARNING: CTU/CTU2 must be reset to get connection to MCU.

8.

If a tx antenna is not connected to the radio under test, connect a 50 ohm 50 W dummy load to the Tx port of the radio under test. CAUTION
Ensure that you have entered the tcu_clock 0 command at the RSS MMI-ROM 0000> prompt, as shown in step 7 before entering call processing to avoid EQCP instability at step 3 of Bay level calibration (next procedure).

9. 10.

Switch the 9-way to 9-way EQCP/RSS cable from providing RSS connectivity to providing EQCP connectivity. At the EQCP prompt type: .GSMFW TEST The system responds with the following:
WARNING: The EQCP is now in test mode.

11.

At the EQCP TEST prompt type: BBH ALARM OFF The system responds with the following:
The alarm reporting for the BBH connection is turned off

12.

At the EQCP TEST prompt type: AIC OUT The system responds with the following:
The AIC pad for branch 1 is OUT. The AIC pad for branch 2 is OUT.

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Branch 1 RX0A bay level calibration procedure


The following procedure is used for bay level calibration of branch 1 RX0A: 1. Connect the output of the signal generator to branch 1 of the antenna port at the top of the Horizonmacro cabinet. NOTE
It is important to choose the correct number in the TS A ANT command. If Rx path is 0A or 0B of SURF then antenna is TS A ANT 1. If Rx path is 1A or 1B of SURF then antenna is TS A ANT 2. If Rx path is 2A or 2B of SURF then antenna is TS A ANT 3. For 900 MHz dual band SURF, if Rx path is 1800 1A or 1800 1B of SURF then antenna is TS A ANT 2.

The antenna number can also be found by using the disp_equipment # DRI A * 0 command. The number next to antenna_select is the antenna number. 2. Set the signal generator to the first (lowest) test frequency for the correct frequency band under test and set the output level of the signal generator to 65 dBm. Table Maint. 2-6 to Table Maint. 2-9 list the test frequencies for GSM850, EGSM900, DCS1800 and PCS1900 frequency bands. 3. At the EQCP TEST prompt type: ACT C The system responds with the following:
The EQCP is in the Call Processing state Warning: After locking carrier down, enter CTU/CTU2_CLOCK 0 command at RSS MMI-ROM 0000> prompt before entering Call Processing to avoid EQCP instability.

4.

At the EQCP TEST prompt type: TS A ANT 1 The system responds with the following:
All timeslots are under user control.

5.

At the EQCP TEST prompt type: TS A CHAN # Where:


#

is:
the channel number of the selected frequency, as shown in the test frequency tables.

The system responds with the following:


The data for all timeslots has been changed.

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6.

At the EQCP TEST prompt type: SYNTH 1 The system responds with the following:
Synthesizer 1 is enabled.

7.

At the EQCP TEST prompt type: CAL BAY @1 The system responds with the following:
BAY LEVEL OFFSET = XX

Where XX = The hex value of the bay level reading. 8. At the EQCP TEST prompt type: SYNTH NRM The system responds with the following:
The system is under real time control.

9.

Set the signal generator to the next frequency and repeat steps 5 and 6 for all the test frequencies in the appropriate test frequency table.

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CTU test frequency tables


The GSM850, EGSM900, DCS1800 and PCS1900 test frequencies for the CTU are listed in Table Maint. 2-6, Table Maint. 2-7, Table Maint. 2-8 and Table Maint. 2-9.
Table Maint. 2-6 GSM850 CTU test frequencies Channel 132 140 148 156 164 172 180 188 Frequency (MHz) 825.001 826.601 828.201 829.801 831.401 833.001 834.601 836.201 Channel 196 204 212 220 228 236 244 250 Frequency (MHz) 837.801 839.401 841.001 842.601 844.201 845.801 847.401 848.601

Table Maint. 2-7 EGSM900 CTU test frequencies

Channel
979 987 995 1003 1011 1019 03 11 19 27 35

Frequency (MHz)
881.001 882.601 884.201 885.801 887.401 889.001 890.601 892.201 893.801 895.401 897.001

Channel
43 51 59 67 75 83 91 99 107 115 123

Frequency (MHz)
898.601 900.201 901.801 903.401 905.001 906.601 908.201 909.801 911.401 913.001 914.601

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Table Maint. 2-8 DCS1800 CTU test frequencies

Channel
516 524 532 540 548 556 564 572 580 588 596 604 612 620 628 636 644 652 660 668 676 684 692 700

Frequency (MHz)
1711.001 1712.601 1714.201 1715.801 1717.401 1719.001 1720.601 1722.201 1723.801 1725.401 1727.001 1728.601 1730.201 1731.801 1733.401 1735.001 1736.601 1738.201 1739.801 1741.401 1743.001 1744.601 1746.201 1747.801

Channel
708 716 724 732 740 748 756 764 772 780 788 796 804 812 820 828 836 844 852 860 868 876 883

Frequency (MHz)
1749.401 1751.001 1752.601 1754.201 1755.801 1757.401 1759.001 1760.601 1762.201 1763.801 1765.401 1767.001 1768.601 1770.201 1771.801 1773.401 1775.001 1776.601 1778.201 1779.801 1781.401 1783.001 1784.401

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Table Maint. 2-9 PCS1900 CTU test frequencies Channel 516 524 532 540 548 556 564 572 580 588 596 604 612 620 628 636 644 652 660 Frequency (MHz) 1851.001 1852.601 1854.201 1855.801 1857.401 1859.001 1860.601 1862.201 1863.801 1865.401 1867.001 1868.601 1870.201 1871.801 1873.401 1875.001 1876.601 1878.201 1879.801 Channel 668 676 684 692 700 708 716 724 732 740 748 756 764 772 780 788 796 804 Frequency (MHz) 1881.401 1883.001 1884.601 1886.201 1887.801 1889.401 1891.001 1892.601 1894.201 1895.801 1897.401 1899.001 1900.601 1902.201 1903.801 1905.401 1907.001 1908.601

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Branch 1 RX1A bay level calibration procedure


Continue the bay level calibration procedure for the second antenna port as follows: 1. 2. Connect the output of the generator to RX1A. Set the signal generator to provide 65.0 dBm at the antenna port and to the first channel test frequency shown in the appropriate test frequency table. At the EQCP TEST prompt type: TS A ANT 2 4. At the EQCP TEST prompt type: TS A CHAN # Where:
#

3.

is:
the channel number of the selected frequency, as shown in the test frequency tables.

5.

At the EQCP TEST prompt type: SYNTH 1 CAL BAY @1 SYNTH NRM

6.

Set the signal generator to the next frequency and repeat steps 4 and 5 for all the test frequencies in the appropriate test frequency table.

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Branch 1 RX2A bay level calibration procedure


Continue the bay level calibration procedure for the third antenna port as follows: 1. 2. Connect the output of the generator to RX2A. Set the signal generator to provide 65.0 dBm at the antenna port and to the first channel test frequency shown in the appropriate test frequency table. At the EQCP TEST prompt type: TS A ANT 3 4. At the EQCP TEST prompt type: TS A CHAN # Where:
#

3.

is:
the channel number of the selected frequency, as shown in the test frequency tables.

5.

At the EQCP TEST prompt type: SYNTH 1 CAL BAY @1 SYNTH NRM

6.

Set the signal generator to the next frequency and repeat steps 4 and 5 for all the test frequencies in the appropriate test frequency table.

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900 (dual band) SURF Rx1800 1A bay level calibration procedure


For the 900 MHz dual band SURF modules, two additional antenna ports, 1800 1A and 1800 1B, are available for 1800 MHz use. NOTE
On earlier dual band SURFs the 1A and 1B second frequency ports are designated 0A and 0B respectively.

Continue the bay level calibration procedure for the branch 1 1800 antenna port as follows: 1. 2. Connect the output of the generator to RX1800 1A. Set the signal generator to provide 65.0 dBm at the antenna port and to the first channel test frequency shown in the appropriate test frequency table. At the EQCP TEST prompt type: TS A ANT 2 4. At the EQCP TEST prompt type: TS A CHAN # Where:
#

3.

is:
the channel number of the selected frequency, as shown in the test frequency tables.

5.

At the EQCP TEST prompt type: SYNTH 1 CAL BAY @1 SYNTH NRM

6.

Set the signal generator to the next frequency and repeat steps 4 and 5 for all the test frequencies in the appropriate test frequency table.

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Branch completion
To complete the bay level procedure for the branch, proceed as follows: 1. At the EQCP TEST prompt type: BAYDONE @1 The system responds with the following:
BAY LEVEL CALIBRATION IS DONE

2.

At the EQCP TEST prompt type: HALT C The system responds with the following:
The EQCP is in the Active Standby state

3.

At the EQCP TEST prompt type: WRENB The system responds with the following:
Device OK. Flash is now write enabled.

4.

At the EQCP TEST prompt type: SAVE CAL BAY The system responds with the following:
Save Cal Completed.

5.

At the EQCP TEST prompt type: WRPTC The system responds with the following:
Flash is now write protected.

Branch 2 procedure
Repeat the procedures Bay level calibration branch 1 RX0A, Bay level repeat for RX1A, Bay level repeat for RX2A and Bay level repeat for RX1800 1A for branch 2 by connecting to RX0B, RX1B, RX2B and RX1800 1B alternately. Enter @2 instead of @1 in the cal bay and baydone commands.

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CTU calibration check procedure


The following procedure should be used to check the bay level calibration has been successful. 1. To verify that the bay level offset values have been stored in EPROM, use the read command with the required offset address as an argument. Offset addresses for the relevant frequency band can be found in Table Maint. 2-10 to Table Maint. 2-13.
FR BAY MR BAY To verify writes to flash. To verify writes to RAM.

Table Maint. 2-10 lists the CTU frequency offset addresses for GSM850 frequencies.
Table Maint. 2-10 CTU frequency offset addresses (GSM850) Bay Level Calibration Storage Branch 1 Valid Flag Branch 2 Valid Flag Branch 1 Checksum Branch 2 Checksum Bay Level Offsets For Branch 1 Antenna 1 Bay Level Offsets For Branch 1 Antenna 2 Bay Level Offsets For Branch 1 Antenna 3 Bay Level Offsets For Branch 2 Antenna 1 Bay Level Offsets For Branch 2 Antenna 2 Bay Level Offsets For Branch 2 Antenna 3 Flash Address A000700 A000703 A000706 A000709 A00070C A00073B A00073C A00076B A00076D A00079B A00079C A0007CB A0007CC A0007FB A0007FC A00082B

GSM850 CTUs store offsets in 16 locations in each memory area per antenna per branch.

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Table Maint. 2-11 lists the CTU frequency offset addresses for EGSM900 frequencies.
Table Maint. 2-11 CTU frequency offset addresses (EGSM900) Bay Level Calibration Storage Branch 1 Valid Flag Branch 2 Valid Flag Branch 1 Checksum Branch 2 Checksum Bay Level Offsets For Branch 1 Antenna 1 Bay Level Offsets For Branch 1 Antenna 2 Bay Level Offsets For Branch 1 Antenna 3 Bay Level Offsets For Branch 2 Antenna 1 Bay Level Offsets For Branch 2 Antenna 2 Bay Level Offsets For Branch 2 Antenna 3 Flash Address A000700 A000703 A000706 A000709 A00070C A00074D A00074E A00078F A000790 A0007D1 A0007D2 A000813 A000814 A000855 A000856 A000897

EGSM900 CTUs store offsets in 22 locations in each memory area per antenna per branch. Table Maint. 2-12 lists the CTU frequency offset addresses for DCS1800 frequencies.
Table Maint. 2-12 CTU frequency offset addresses (DCS1800) Bay Level Calibration Storage Branch 1 Valid Flag Branch 2 Valid Flag Branch 1 Checksum Branch 2 Checksum Bay Level Offsets For Branch 1 Antenna 1 Bay Level Offsets For Branch 1 Antenna 2 Bay Level Offsets For Branch 1 Antenna 3 Bay Level Offsets For Branch 2 Antenna 1 Bay Level Offsets For Branch 2 Antenna 2 Bay Level Offsets For Branch 2 Antenna 3 Flash Address A000700 A000703 A000706 A000709 A00070C A000798 A000799 A000825 A000826 A0008B2 A0008B3 A00093F A000940 A0009CC A0009CD A000A59

DCS1800 CTUs store offsets in 47 locations in each memory area per antenna per branch.

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Table Maint. 2-13 lists the CTU frequency offset addresses for PCS1900 frequencies.
Table Maint. 2-13 CTU frequency offset addresses (PCS1900) Bay Level Calibration Storage Branch 1 Valid Flag Branch 2 Valid Flag Branch 1 Checksum Branch 2 Checksum Bay Level Offsets For Branch 1 Antenna 1 Bay Level Offsets For Branch 1 Antenna 2 Bay Level Offsets For Branch 1 Antenna 3 Bay Level Offsets For Branch 2 Antenna 1 Bay Level Offsets For Branch 2 Antenna 2 Bay Level Offsets For Branch 2 Antenna 3 Flash Address A000700 A000703 A000706 A000709 A00070C A00077D A00077E A0007EF A0007F0 A000861 A000862 A0008D3 A0008D4 A000945 A000946 A0009B7

PCS1900 CTUs store offsets in 38 locations in each memory area per antenna per branch. NOTE
Each location consists of three bytes. For example, the branch 1 valid flag data is stored in address locations A000700, A000701 and A000702.

2.

The following is an example of the first line of the FLASH BAY LEVEL OFFSET table when using the FR BAY command, and a description of the fields displayed:
BR1 BR2 flag BR1 Cksum BR2 Cksum BL offse t BL offse t 000002 BL offse t 000005 BL offse t 000002

Addres s A000700

00000 000001 000595 000060 1 000595

The remaining rows of the table contain BL offset values

3.

If the bay level calibration is successful, each appropriate table location will contain valid offsets, and not the factory default of 80. NOTE
Any value from 81 to FF and 00 to 7F except 80 is a valid offset.

4.

The value 80 indicates an unsuccessful calibration procedure or an uncalibrated antenna port and will result in error alarm DRI 218: Invalid Transceiver Calibration Data being reported when the unit is unlocked. The calibration procedure will have to be repeated after checking the configuration and RF cables. NOTE
Unused data columns in a site configuration may have value 80. No alarm will be reported as such table locations are inappropriate to the site.

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CTU2 Rx bay level calibration procedures


These procedures are for calibrating the CTU2 only. The equivalent procedures for calibrating the CTU are provided earlier in this chapter.

Commands used
Table Maint. 2-5 lists the MMI commands that must be used to carry out the procedure: NOTE
The symbol 0 used in the commands in this procedure is a zero.

Table Maint. 2-14 MMI commands for CTU2 Rx bay level offset calibration

BSS MMI command ins_device lock_device unlock_device clear_cal_data chglev fm test_mode on


fm_test block none none 0xff

Function
Initializes the device, bringing it into service. Prevents the device being used. Frees the device for further use. Clears previously stored calibration data for a specified radio unit on a per DRI basis. Changes the DSP MMI security level. Puts the DSP fault management module in test mode. Blocks all DSP fault management alarms. Switches DSP MMI control to carrier A. Switches DSP MMI control to carrier B. Turns off Tx closed-loop power control for the current carrier. Configures which carriers will be calibrated by the Rx cabinet calibration procedure. Executes the Rx cabinet calibration procedure. Stores the calibration data. Sets the second carrier to Rx double density mode so that the calibration procedure is effective for both branches and both carriers.

set carrier cara set_carrier carb


ts a txp 0xff

cal_config rx_cab_antennas cal_cabinet rx_cab cal_store_1 ts a rx_br_sel 2

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Preparation for Rx bay level calibration


The RF path has to be prepared for bay level calibration. All DRIs in the site must be locked, the CTU2 has to be reset, a dummy load must be connected if there is no antenna, and all alarms must be disabled. A CTU2 may consist of one or two DRIs. If a CTU2 is configured for double density mode (two DRIs), Rx cabinet calibration need only be performed on one of the DRIs because the same cabinet calibration data will be used by both DRIs. The following will help determine whether a CTU2 is configured as single or double density transceiver and which DRI numbers correspond to which CTU2s. At the BSC TTY, change to Level 3 and at the MMI-RAM> prompt type the following: disp_eq # dri A * 0 Where:
# A *

is:
the number of the site logged into. the antenna/relative cell number (0 to 5). DRI number of the transceiver.

For single density CTU2s the output will look similar to the following:
[05/02/03 14:42:37] MMIRAM 0115 > disp_eq 81 dri 0 0 DRI identifier: 0 0 DRI Density[dri_density]: SINGLE Cabinet identifier: 0 Type of connection to the BTP: MASTER Port to which the TCU is connected[tcu_port]: 0 RTF identifier[pref_rtf_id]: GSM cell ID where the DRI appears: 001 01 1 91 Antenna select number for this cell[antenna_select]: 1 Tuneable combining used: No The diversity flag for this DRI is[diversity_flag]: 0 The fm cell type is[fm_cell_type]: 0

For double density CTU2s the output will look similar to the following:
[05/02/03 14:47:55] MMIRAM 0115 > disp_eq 81 dri 0 1 DRI identifier: 0 1 DRI Density[dri_density]: DOUBLE Associated DRI identifier: 0 2 Cabinet identifier: 0 Type of connection to the BTP: MASTER Port to which the TCU is connected[tcu_port]: 1 RTF identifier[pref_rtf_id]: GSM cell ID where the DRI appears: 001 01 1 91 Antenna select number for this cell[antenna_select]: 1 Tuneable combining used: No The diversity flag for this DRI is[diversity_flag]: 0 The fm cell type is[fm_cell_type]: 0

In this case we see that DRI 0 1 is a double density CTU2 and is associated with DRI 0 2.
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Repeating the command for DRI 0 2 yields the following:


[05/02/03 14:48:07] MMIRAM 0115 > disp_eq 81 dri 0 2 DRI identifier: 0 2 DRI Density[dri_density]: DOUBLE Associated DRI identifier: 0 1 Cabinet identifier: 0 Type of connection to the BTP: MASTER Port to which the TCU is connected[tcu_port]: 1 RTF identifier[pref_rtf_id]: GSM cell ID where the DRI appears: 001 01 1 91 Antenna select number for this cell[antenna_select]: 1 Tuneable combining used: No The diversity flag for this DRI is[diversity_flag]: 0 The fm cell type is[fm_cell_type]: 0

Thus, in this example, DRI 0 1 and DRI 0 2 are on the same CTU2. In the case of the single density CTU2, cabinet calibration will be performed once on the DRI. In the case of the double density CTU2, cabinet calibration is still performed on only one of the two DRIs, but the other DRI must be locked for the procedures to be carried out. Furthermore, the clear_cal_data commands must be issued for both DRIs.

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Rx bay level calibration procedure


To calibrate the Rx bay level, proceed as follows: 1. 2. 3. Connect the 9-way to 9-way MCUF cable from the PC serial A port to the MCUF TTY port. At the PC, start the terminal emulator program. Lock all DRIs in the sector. At the MCUF TTY, change to Level 3 and at the MMI-RAM> prompt type: lock_device # dri A * 0 Where:
# A *

is:
the number of the site logged into. the antenna/relative cell number (0 to 5). DRI number of the transceiver. Always lock the transceiver providing the BCCH last as this prevents the BCCH being switched to alternate transceivers.

NOTE 4. 5.

If a Tx antenna is not connected to the transceiver under test, connect a 50 ohm 50 W dummy load to the Tx port. Unlock the CTU2 to be calibrated. Change to Level 3 and at the MMI-RAM> prompt type: ins_device # dri A * 0 Where:
# A *

is:
the number of the site logged into. the antenna/relative cell number (0 to 5). DRI number of the transceiver. In the case of a double density CTU2, Rx cabinet calibration only needs to be performed on one of the two DRIs. The other DRI must remain locked.

NOTE

6.

Connect a serial port on the PC to the TTY Interface port on the CTU2 to be calibrated using the 9-way to 9-way DSP MMI/RSS cable. If necessary, switch the 9-way to 9-way DSP MMI/RSS cable from providing RSS connectivity to providing DSP connectivity.

7.

At the DSP MMI prompt type: chglev and then enter the following password: pizza

8.

Enter calibration test mode and disable alarms by typing the following commands: cal_test_mode on fm test_mode on fm_test block none none 0xff
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9.

If required, set the second carrier to Rx double density mode by typing the following command: ts a rx_br_sel 2 This enables the calibration procedure to take effect on both branches and both carriers.

10.

Turn the CTU2s transmitters off by typing the following at the DSP MMI prompt: set_carrier cara ts a txp 0xff set_carrier carb ts a txp 0xff set_carrier cara The response at the DSP MMI should be: CTU2.carA.ts_0>

11.

Configure which Rx antennas are to be calibrated using the following command: cal_config rx_cab_antennas <antenna> <antenna> <antenna> <antenna> <antenna> <antenna> Where <antenna> is one of the following: all All antennas. 0a Antenna 0A. 1a Antenna 1A. 2a Antenna 2A. 0b Antenna 0B. 1b Antenna 1B. 2b Antenna 2B. Up to six antenna options can be specified, separated by spaces. The option all is equivalent to 0A 1A 2A 0B 1B 2B. For example, to calibrate antennas 0A and 0B, type the following command: cal_config rx_cab_antennas 0a 0b The response will be:
Setting RX Cabinet Calibration antennas to: 0A 0B

To calibrate all antennas, type the following command: cal_config rx_cab_antennas all The response will be:
Setting RX Cabinet Calibration antennas to: ALL

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12.

Start the Rx cabinet calibration procedure by typing the following command at the DSP MMI prompt: cal_cabinet rx_cab The following message will be displayed on the screen. This includes the SURF antenna connector to which the signal generator should be connected (shown in bold text).
cal_cabinet rx_cab Enabling receive [c A, b 0] Setting RX diversity switch to double density (inject carrier A into carrier B) Enabling transmit Number of frequency groups = 47 Please connect the signal generator to branch 0A Press return when the signal generator is connected. Press any key to continue

13.

When the signal generator is connected to the appropriate SURF antenna connector and configured, press ENTER at the DSP MMI prompt. The on-screen instructions will list the new signal generator settings required (shown in bold in the sample output below):
Please set the signal generator to POWER 65.2000 dBm FREQ 1710.8052 MHz Press any key to continue

Be sure to allow for any loss in the cables connecting the signal generator to the antenna connector. For example, if the cables have a loss of 1.5 dB and you are asked to provide 65.2 dBm, set the signal generator to 63.7 dBm. Make the appropriate adjustments and then press ENTER. The readings for each test frequency will look something like the following:
IQ average reading C0B0: 2565696, 0x00272640 IQ average reading C1B0: 2762909, 0x002a289d Measured gain: 14.76 (0x0ec2) Measured gain: 15.69 (0x0fb0) Frequency group 2 of 47 Please set the signal generator to POWER 65.2000 dBm FREQ 1712.4052 MHz Press any key to continue

14. 15.

Repeat the calibration procedure in step 13 for all the appropriate test frequencies (22 for EGSM and 47 for DCS1800). Once all frequencies have been calibrated, the program will request the signal generator is moved to the next SURF antenna connection (refer to example message in step 12). Repeat step 13 and step 14 for each antenna connection, until all frequencies on all antennas have been calibrated.
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17.

Type the following command at the DSP MMI prompt when the calibration procedure has been completed: cal_store_1 After a few seconds delay (up to 16 seconds), the result of the data storage is displayed on the screen in the format:
cal_store_1 PASS CTU2.carA.ts_0>

18. 19.

Take the CTU2 out of test mode by entering the following command: fm test_mode off Connect to the BSC MMI and enter the following command to lock the CTU2 that has been calibrated: lock_device # dri A * 0 Where:
# A *

is:
the number of the site logged into. the antenna/relative cell number (0 to 5). DRI number on the transceiver.

20.

Clear the calibration data for both DRIs using the following command: clear_cal_data # dri A * 0 NOTE
The clear_cal_data command clears all calibration data out of the CM database. This is required to override the preserve calibration feature, if enabled.

21.

Move the 9-way to 9-way DSP MMI/RSS cable to the CTU2 TTY port of the next CTU2 to be calibrated and repeat the procedure from step 4.

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CTU2 test frequency tables


The EGSM900 and DCS1800 channel numbers and test frequencies are listed in Table Maint. 2-7 and Table Maint. 2-8.
Table Maint. 2-15 EGSM900 CTU2 test frequencies

Channel
978 986 994 1002 1010 1018 03 11 19 27 35

Frequency (MHz)
880.8052 882.4052 884.0052 885.6052 887.2052 888.8052 890.4052 892.0052 893.6052 895.2052 896.8052

Channel
43 51 59 67 75 83 91 99 107 115 123

Frequency (MHz)
898.4052 900.0052 901.6052 903.2052 904.8052 906.4052 908.0052 909.6052 911.2052 912.8052 914.4052

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Table Maint. 2-16 DCS1800 CTU2 test frequencies

Channel
515 523 531 539 547 555 563 571 579 587 595 603 611 619 627 635 643 651 659 667 675 683 691 699

Frequency (MHz)
1710.8052 1712.4052 1714.0052 1715.6052 1717.2052 1718.8052 1720.4052 1722.0052 1723.6052 1725.2052 1726.8052 1728.4052 1730.0052 1731.6052 1733.2052 1734.8052 1736.4052 1738.0052 1739.6052 1741.2052 1742.8052 1744.4052 1746.0052 1747.6052

Channel
707 715 723 731 739 747 755 763 771 779 787 795 803 811 819 827 835 843 851 859 867 875 883

Frequency (MHz)
1749.2052 1750.8052 1752.4052 1754.0052 1755.6052 1757.2052 1758.8052 1760.4052 1762.0052 1763.6052 1765.2052 1766.8052 1768.4052 1770.0052 1771.6052 1773.2052 1774.8052 1776.4052 1778.0052 1779.6052 1781.2052 1782.8052 1784.4052

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Site restoration
After all the appropriate bay level calibration procedures are completed, restore the site by the following: 1. 2. 3. Remove the signal generator and dummy load and refit the site RF cables. Remove the 9-way to 9-way cable from the TTY interface port on the transceiver. Connect the 9-way to 9-way cable from the PC serial A port to an MCUF TTY port. CAUTION 4.
The following step must be carried out to initialize software and so ensure the transceiver is correctly brought into service.

Press the reset button on the front panel of the transceiver. If there is no reset button (some CTUs and all CTU2s), switch off the appropriate circuit breaker button on the CBM and then switch on again. Type unlock_device # dri A * 0 Where:
# A *

5.

is:
the number of the site logged into. the antenna/relative cell number (0 to 5). DRI number on the antenna.

The transceiver is now in the unlocked_busy state. 6. Type: disp_act_alarm # dri A * 0 Where:
# A *

is:
the number of the site logged into. the antenna/relative cell number (0 to 5). DRI number on the antenna.

Confirm that there is no DRI 218 alarm. If there is a DRI 218 alarm, redo the whole bay level calibration procedure. 7. Remove the 9-way to 9-way cable from the MCUF TTY port.

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Replacing a SURF module


Preconditions for SURF replacement
The cabinet only has one SURF module, either a dual band or a single band SURF. Consequently, the replacement of a SURF module can only take place after the cabinet has been taken out of service, in agreement with the OMC-R. If a stacking bracket is fitted with a CCB basket, the CCB basket has to be removed in order to gain access to the SURF module. To remove CCB basket see Replacing a CCB. CAUTION
An earthing wrist strap must be worn when handling SURF modules. An ESP earthing connection point is provided above the leftmost PSM.

View of the SURF


Figure Maint. 2-11 shows a single band SURF module (later type). Where RX-Pn appears in Figure Maint. 2-11, the n may be 850, 900, 1800 or 1900, depending on the frequency of the SURF module.

Figure Maint. 2-11 View of a later type single band SURF module
RX-Pn 2B RX-Pn 1B SIX N-TYPE RECEIVE ANTENNA CONNECTIONS (2 PER DLNB EQUIVALENT) RX-Pn 1A RX-Pn 0A

RX-Pn 0B RX-Pn 2A

EXTENSION PORTS TO OTHER CABINETS HANDLE FOR MODULE REMOVAL

M6 MODULE ATTACHMENT SCREWS

Single Band SURF

GUIDES FOR INSERTION

3 CONNECTORS ON UNDERSIDE TO SURF HARNESS

NOTE

The dual band SURF replacement procedure is almost identical, with the addition of the extra two second frequency antenna connections.

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Replacing a SURF module


Removing a faulty SURF module
To remove a SURF, perform the following steps: NOTE 1.
The procedure for replacing a faulty SURF module is the same for both single and dual band SURF variants.

Note the RF cable connections to the SURF module to enable correct reconnection to the replacement module. WARNING
Before disconnecting RF cables, ensure that RF power is OFF. If RF power is ON when cables are disconnected, severe burns may result.

2.

Disable all transceiver transmit RF power by using the shutdown_ device command at the OMC-R or from a PC connected to the MCUF. NOTE
Refer to Technical Description: BSS Command Reference 68P02901W23 for information on usage and specific device codes.

3. 4. 5. 6.

When all transceivers have been shutdown, check that the Tx STATUS LED (yellow) is unlit. Press and release the transceiver circuit breaker buttons on the CBM to the out (off) position. Ensure each RADIO STATUS LED is unlit. Press and release the SURF circuit breaker button on the CBM to the out (off) position. Disconnect the coaxial RF cables by carefully unscrewing and pulling them out of the module sockets. Note the positions for correct replacement. Using a torxdriver, unscrew the four M6 Torx captive screws holding the SURF module to the top of the cabinet. Using the handles, lift the SURF block from the slot.

7. 8.

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Fitting a replacement SURF module


To fit a replacement SURF, proceed as follows: 1. 2. 3. 4. Transfer the protective caps on the RF connectors from the replacement module to the faulty module. Insert the replacement SURF module firmly into place. Take care to avoid trapping cables as the module is seated. Tighten the four captive M6 Torx screws to correct torque (see Overview of replacement procedures). Reconnect the coaxial RF cables to the positions noted in the removal procedure. Tighten to correct torque (see Overview of replacement procedures ). Reset the SURF circuit breaker button on the CBM. Reset the transceiver circuit breaker buttons on the CBM. Each RADIO STATUS LED will flash green for about two minutes, and then remain lit. Enable the transceiver transmit RF power by using the ins_device command at the OMC-R or from a PC connected to the MCUF. The Tx STATUS LED (yellow) will be lit if the transceiver is transmitting. Notify the OMC-R of base station availability and log the maintenance activity.

5. 6. 7.

8.

The SURF module replacement is now complete.

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Replacing a Tx block, HCU or plate

Replacing a Tx block, HCU or plate


Introduction to Tx block replacement
WARNING
Ensure that RF power is OFF, before disconnecting RF cables. Severe burns may result if RF power is ON when RF cables are disconnected. An earthing wrist strap must be worn when handling Tx blocks. An ESP earthing connection point is provided above the leftmost PSM.

CAUTION

There are three slots for Tx blocks in the top panel basket of a cabinet, above the transceivers. There are four types of Tx block; DCF, TDF, DDF and HCU. Replacing a Tx block requires removal of RF transmitter power for the transceiver(s) that connect with the faulty Tx block. It is therefore advisable to perform this procedure during periods of low traffic. The OMC-R should be notified of imminent repair activity. If a stacking bracket is fitted, the CCB basket has to be removed in order to gain access to the Tx block modules (see Replacing a CCB). It is important to ensure that all unused Tx Block M6 screw locations have a screw in place and tightened to correct torque (see Overview of replacement procedures ). This is to ensure maximum quality of EMC and general containment.

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Views of typical Tx block


Figure Maint. 2-12 shows a typical Tx block module used in the Horizonmacro indoor cabinet.

Figure Maint. 2-12 Views of typical Tx block


7/16 CONNECTOR TO ANTENNA N-TYPE CONNECTOR TO SURF

HOLE FOR TOP PANEL BASKET ATTACHMENT

ISOMETRIC VIEW
SMA Tx CONNECTORS FROM TRANSCEIVERS

N-TYPE CONNECTOR TO SURF

7/16 CONNECTOR TO ANTENNA

SMA Tx CONNECTORS FROM TRANSCEIVERS

SIDE VIEW

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Replacing a Tx block, HCU or plate

Replacing a Tx block
Removing a faulty Tx block
To remove a Tx block, proceed as follows: 1. Locate the faulty Tx block, and note the RF cable connections to enable correct reconnection to the replacement module. WARNING
Ensure that all transceivers associated with the faulty Tx block are identified (for example inputs to an HCU or feedthrough plate connected to a DDF).

2.

Identify the transceivers that make Tx connections to the underside of the faulty Tx block (plus any transceivers connected to the third Tx connector on top of a DDF). See Table Maint. 2-17.
Table Maint. 2-17 Connectors for each type of Tx block module Tx block SMA from transceiver TX 7/16 Rx/Tx to antenna N-type Rx to SURF

DCF TDF (including dual band) DDF HCU 3.

2 (beneath Tx block) 2 (beneath Tx block)

1 2

1 2

3 (2 beneath Tx block) (1 on top of Tx block from HCU) 2

1 0

1 1 to next Tx block

Disable each transceiver transmit RF power by using the shutdown_ device command at the OMC-R or from a PC connected to the MCUF. Refer to Technical Description: BSS Command Reference 68P02901W23 for information on usage and specific device codes. When each transceiver has been shutdown, check that the Tx status LED (yellow) is extinguished. Press and release each transceiver circuit breaker button on the CBM to the out (off) position. Ensure each RADIO STATUS LED is extinguished. WARNING
Ensure that RF power is OFF, before disconnecting RF cables. Severe burns may result if RF power is ON when RF cables are disconnected.

4. 5.

6. 7.

Disconnect all coaxial RF cables by carefully unscrewing and pulling them out of the Tx block sockets. Note the positions for correct replacement. Using a Torx driver, unscrew and retain the two M6 Torx screws holding the Tx block to the top of the cabinet. WARNING
Tx blocks can weigh as much as 5 kg. Handle with care.

8.

Using the handles, lift the Tx block from the basket.

Fitting a replacement Tx block


To install a replacement Tx block, perform the following steps:
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1. 2.

Transfer the protective caps on the RF connectors from the replacement Tx block to the faulty Tx block. Carefully insert the replacement Tx block into its basket location on the top panel, adjusting alignment for retaining screws. Take care to avoid trapping cables as the Tx block is seated. Fit the two M6 torx screws to hold the Tx block to the top of the cabinet. Tighten to correct torque (see Overview of replacement procedures). Reconnect the coaxial RF cables to the positions noted in the removal procedure. Tighten to correct torque (see Overview of replacement procedures ). NOTE
Ensure all unused SMA inputs to DCF, DDF and HCU modules are fitted with 50 ohm load terminations.

3. 4.

5.

Reset the appropriate transceiver circuit breaker buttons on the CBM. Each RADIO STATUS LED will flash green for about two minutes, and then remain lit. Enable the transceiver transmit RF power by using the ins_device command at the OMC-R or from a PC connected to the MCUF. The Tx STATUS LED (yellow) will be lit if the transceiver is transmitting. Notify the OMC-R of base station availability and log the maintenance activity.

6.

7.

Blanking plate, feedthrough plate or HCU replacement


The procedure for plates is the same as for Tx blocks, but the plates are held by six M4 screws in the base of the Tx block basket. The two M6 Tx block screw locations are not used for plate attachment. CAUTION
Unused Tx block locations must be covered with a blanking plate, with all screws fitted and tightened to the correct torque (see Overview of replacement procedures) to ensure correct airflow and EMC shielding.

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Replacing a CCB

Replacing a CCB
Overview of CCB replacement
CCBs, or their associated CCB control boards, can be individually replaced. It is assumed that the OMC-R has identified which item requires replacement. CCB block 0 is the right most block looking from the front, as shown in Figure Maint. 2-13, and is the main CCB, with master CCB control board. CCB block 1 is the extension CCB, with an optional redundant CCB control board. The replacement of CCBs can only take place after the cabinet has been taken out of service, in agreement with the OMC-R.

View of CCBs in stacking bracket


Figure Maint. 2-13 shows the CCBs located in stacking bracket (cabinet not shown).

Figure Maint. 2-13 CCBs in installed position with CCB basket bar attached

CCB0

CCB1

CCB CONTROL BOARD (MASTER)

CCB CONTROL BOARD (REDUNDANT)

CCB BASKET BAR CAPTIVE SCREWS ON CCB BASKET CAPTIVE SCREW ON BAR

ig.336.rh

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Removing CCBs and CCB control boards


WARNING
Before disconnecting RF cables, ensure that the RF power is OFF by turning cabinet PSMs off. If RF power is ON when cables are disconnected, severe burns may result.

The removal off CCBs is accomplished in two stages:


S S

Removing the CCB basket from the stacking bracket. Separating CCBs from CCB basket.

Removing the CCB basket from the stacking bracket


To remove the CCB basket: 1. 2. Close cabinet down by turning off PSMs. Remove the stacking bracket front cover by applying gentle pressure to the outer edges, while easing the cover up and pulling it away from the bracket. Disconnect power cable from each CCB and from single connector (marked CCB) on Interface panel. CAUTION 4.
Do not detach CCB basket bar unless basket is to be immediately removed.

3.

Loosen the three captive screws attaching CCB basket bar to basket and the two captive screws securing CCB basket bar to the sides of the stacking bracket. Remove the bar. Disconnect the six N-type to N-type RF cables from the CCB inputs, and leave draped over the front of the cabinet. Note the locations for correct replacement. Slide basket part way out of the stacking bracket, and disconnect antennas to CCBs. Remove the CCB basket, complete with CCBs, from stacking bracket.

5.

6. 7.

Separating CCBs from the CCB basket


To separate CCBs from CCB basket: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Place the CCB basket, complete with CCBs, onto a flat surface. Disconnect and remove the phasing lead between CCB control boards. Remove the four M4 screws securing each control board cover, and remove the CCB control boards. Remove the six screws securing each CCB to the basket, (four M6 screws on the front and two M8 screws at the back). Remove the CCBs from the basket.

The CCBs have now been removed, ready for replacement CCBs.

Fitting replacement CCBs and CCB control boards


Follow these procedures to fit replacement CCBs.
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Replacing a CCB

Fitting CCBs into the basket


1. 2. Place CCB basket onto flat surface. Place the CCBs into the basket and secure with four M6 screws on the front and two M8 screws at the back. Tighten to correct torque (see Overview of replacement procedures). Insert each CCB control board, then securing cover with four M4 screws. Tighten to correct torque (see Overview of replacement procedures). Connect phasing lead between CCB control boards.

3. 4.

Fitting the basket to the stacking bracket


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Ensure N-type cables are connected to the feedthrough plates and draped over the front of the cabinet. Slide the basket part way into the stacking bracket, and connect antennas to the CCBs. Slide the CCB basket fully home. Connect the six N-type to N-type RF cables from the feedthrough plates to the CCB inputs. Connect to the positions noted in the removal procedure. Attach the CCB basket bar to the sides of the stacking bracket using the two captive screws. The bar is then directly underneath the basket captive screws. Attach the CCB basket bar to the basket with the three captive screws on the basket. Connect the power cable to each CCB from the single connector (marked CCB) on the Interface panel. Refit the front cover onto the stacking bracket, pushing it in so that it can drop into position on the side lugs.

6. 7. 8.

The CCBs are now replaced and ready for power up of the cabinet.

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Digital module replacement (MCUF, NIU, FMUX, BPSM, Alarm)

GSM

Digital module replacement (MCUF, NIU, FMUX, BPSM, Alarm)


Introduction to digital module replacement
CAUTION
MCUF removal during flash memory programming may result in bootcode corruption. This is only repairable by returning the MCUF to Motorola. For this reason, the MCUF should not be removed while the code load is taking place, indicated by a flashing LED.

A faulty master MCUF, FMUX or BPSM will cause a redundant module (if fitted) to take over until the faulty module is replaced. Faulty MCUF, FMUX and BPSM modules can be hot swapped without harm to the module or effect on normal operation, provided the equivalent redundant module has taken over. Removal of a faulty digital module that has not had its function taken over by a redundant module, and is still partially functional, will affect service. Inform the OMC-R before replacing out such modules.

Diagram of digital modules


Figure Maint. 2-14 shows the location of modules within the digital module shelf.

Figure Maint. 2-14 Digital and BPSM module locations including optional redundancy
DIGITAL MODULE SHELF
FMUX NIU B0 NIU B1 BPSM

MCUF B

ALARM MODULE

REDUNDANT (B)

MCUF A FMUX NIU A0 NIU A1 BPSM

MASTER (A)

ig.322.rh

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Digital module replacement (MCUF, NIU, FMUX, BPSM, Alarm)

Replacing digital modules


Removing a faulty digital module
Proceed as follows to remove a digital module: WARNING
There is a possibility of laser radiation when fibre optic cables are disconnected. Do not look directly into cables with or without the use of any optical aids. Radiation can come from either the data in/out connectors or unterminated fibre optic cables connected to data in/out connectors. An earthing wrist strap must be worn when handling digital modules. An ESP earthing connection point is provided above the leftmost PSM.

CAUTION

1. 2. 3.

If the faulty digital module is still partially functional, due to no redundancy option, inform the OMC-R before proceeding. Locate the faulty module, as shown in Figure Maint. 2-14. Note location of any fibre optic cable connections to the module, (MCUF or FMUX modules only), to enable correct reconnection to the replacement module. Disconnect each fibre optic cable by gently pushing the knurled connector in and rotating it through a quarter-turn anticlockwise to disengage, then withdraw the cable carefully. NOTE
It is advisable to protect the tips of the fibre optic cables with a protective cover and secure the cables to one side.

4.

5.

Unseat the module by gripping the upper and lower pair of ejectors between the thumb and first finger of each hand, then gently squeeze and pull on the ejectors until the module unclips at the top and bottom of the front panel and unplugs from the rear connector. Carefully slide the module from its location and place it in an anti-static storage container.

6.

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Fitting replacement digital module


To install a replacement digital module: 1. 2. 3. Remove the replacement module from the antistatic storage container. In the case of the NIU, ensure it is of the correct type (E1 or T1). Slide the module into the guide rails and push firmly into place. The ejectors will audibly click into place as confirmation of correct insertion. Connect any fibre optic cables by inserting the connector and rotating a quarter-turn clockwise to engage. NOTE 4.
Ensure fibre optic cables are correctly connected to the locations noted during module removal.

Ensure appropriate LEDs indicate correct operation. CAUTION


When the two LEDs of the MCUF, are flashing, the boot code is downloading into non-volatile memory for software upgrade. Power should not be removed, nor the cabinet reset, until downloading has been completed, as this will corrupt the non-volatile memory. If the boot code is corrupted, contact Motorola Customer Network Resolution Centre requesting the boot code restoration procedure and the appropriate boot code file. Following an NIU switch on or reboot, both red and green LEDs are initially lit. After approximately 20 seconds, the red LED will extinguish, indicating normal condition. This waiting period may be extended to 50 seconds after rebooting due to a code download.

NOTE

5. 6.

When fitting a redundant MCUF refer to Redundant MCUF firmware compatibility for details of further checks required. Notify the OMC-R of base station availability and log the maintenance activity.

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Redundant MCUF firmware compatibility

Redundant MCUF firmware compatibility


Overview of MCUF firmware compatibility
In many installations a redundant MCUF is fitted and configured to assume control in the event of a failure of the master MCUF. Under normal circumstances, the redundant MCUF accepts code downloads from the master MCUF and so remains updated and available for use. If the redundant MCUF is replaced with a module containing firmware which is incompatible with the master MCUF firmware, then the communicating link between MCUFs will not be established. The redundant MCUF will therefore not be updated and will not be available to take over when required.

Checking MCUF firmware compatibility


To check firmware compatibility between MCUFs, check the state of the base transceiver processor (BTP) within each MCUF as follows: 1. 2. Connect a PC to the TTY connection on the master MCUF. At the CUST MMI prompt, enter state <site #> btp * * Where <site #> is the site number. The status of both BTPs will be displayed as follows:
BTP 0 0 0 BTP 1 0 0 BU EU NO REASON NO REASON

or,
BTP 0 0 0 BTP 1 0 0 BU DU NO REASON No Redundant Link

If No Redundant Link is indicated then the master MCUF is not in communication with the redundant MCUF and firmware incompatibility may be assumed. Refer to Updating redundant MCUF firmware.

Updating redundant MCUF firmware


The following procedure to update firmware in the redundant MCUF requires a PCMCIA card containing current network configuration data. The procedure assumes that the PCMCIA card is already in the master MCUF. NOTE
No call processing can take place during the MCUF firmware update process. The entire process should take approximately one hour.

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Site preparation
To prepare for the firmware update the site must first be taken out-of-service as follows: 1. 2. Connect a PC to the TTY connection on the master MCUF. At the CUST MMI prompt, disable all transceivers in turn by typing shutdown_device <site #> dri * * * <seconds> Where <site #> * ** <seconds> 3. 4. is the site number the DRI identifier the time delay before shutdown occurs

Confirm this action by observing each transceiver Tx status LED, which should extinguish shortly after issuing the shutdown command. Disconnect the 2.048 Mbit/s link.

Redundant MCUF firmware update procedure


The following procedure describes how to update redundant MCUF firmware by placing the redundant MCUF into the master position and downloading code from a PCMCIA card. 1. 2. 3. 4. Remove the uploaded PCMCIA card from the master MCUF, and ensure that write protect is switched to OFF. Remove both MCUFs. Insert the PCMCIA card into the original redundant MCUF then insert this MCUF into the master position. Connect a PC to the TTY connection on the MCUF front panel. At the MMI-ROM prompt, type burn This will flash object 8, the MCUF boot object, from the PCMCIA card onto the MCUF card. The flash download takes approximately 30 seconds, then the MCUF will reset. 5. At the MMI ROM prompt, type set_site <site #> Where <site #> is the site number. The MCUF now carries out a system initialization using data from the PCMCIA card. After a short wait the screen displays:
Initialization complete. All commands accepted.

The MCUF firmware update is complete and both MCUFs now hold identical firmware. The MCUF originally removed from the master position may now be used in the redundant position.
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Redundant MCUF firmware compatibility

6.

Insert the original master MCUF into the redundant position. The redundant MCUF now requires a 15 minute sync warm up period, followed by a further delay of four minutes while the two MCUFs achieve phase lock. Once phase lock is achieved the master MCUF immediately begins codeloading to the redundant MCUF. Codeloading takes a further 15 minutes. The process is complete when the following message is displayed on screen:
Redundant MSW is INS <*><*><*> NEW STANDBY Switch CONFIGURED <*><*><*>

7.

To confirm correct MCUF status, at the CUST MMI prompt, enter: state <site #> btp * * Where <site #> is the site number. The status of both BTPs will be displayed as follows:
BTP 0 0 0 BTP 1 0 0 BU EU NO REASON NO REASON

Where
BU E-U

is busy unlocked (master) enabled unlocked (redundant)

8.

Reconnect the 2.048 Mbit/s link. NOTE NOTE


There is no need to unlock the transceiverss as these are automatically unlocked during the initialization procedure. If a PCMCIA card is not available then the firmware in the redundant MCUF may be updated by removing the master MCUF and placing the redundant MCUF in the master position. Code download from the BSC will ensure the newly installed MCUF is fully updated. This procedure however is likely to take up to 30 minutes longer than the procedure involving a PCMCIA card, resulting in a longer out of service time for the BTS.

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Testing MCUF redundancy


The following procedure tests MCUF redundancy by forcing the master and redundant MCUFs to swap roles. The commands refer to the base transceiver processors (BTPs) within each MCUF. NOTE 1. 2.
Forcing a switch to the redundant MCUF by using the swap_devices command will cause a site reset.

Connect a PC to the TTY connection on the master MCUF. At the CUST MMI prompt, type state <site #> btp * * Where <site #> is the site number. The status of both BTPs will be displayed as follows:
BTP 0 0 0 BTP 1 0 0 BU EU NO REASON NO REASON

Where
BU E-U

is busy unlocked (master) enabled unlocked (redundant)

3.

At the CUST MMI prompt, type swap_devices <site #> btp 0 0 0 btp 1 0 0 Where
<site #> btp 0 0 0 btp 1 0 0

is the site number the master MCUF the redundant MCUF

This command will swap MCUF roles by forcing:


S S

the redundant MCUF into a busy state , and making it master. the master MCUF into an enabled state, and making it redundant.

4.

At the CUST MMI prompt, confirm the swap by typing: state <site #> btp * * Where <site #> is the site number. The status of both BTPs will now show changed roles:
BTP 0 0 0 BTP 1 0 0 EU BU NO REASON NO REASON

5. 6.

Make test calls on the site to verify the new master MCUF. At the CUST MMI prompt type, swap the MCUFs back to their original states by typing: swap_devices <site #> btp 1 0 0 btp 0 0 0 Where
<site #> btp 1 0 0 btp 0 0 0

is the site number the master MCUF the redundant MCUF

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7.

At the CUST MMI prompt, confirm the swap by typing: state <site #> btp * * Where <site #> is the site number. Both BTPs have now reverted to their original roles:
BTP 0 0 0 BTP 1 0 0 BU EU NO REASON NO REASON

8.

Make test calls on the site to verify the new master MCUF.

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Calibrating the MCUF (GCLK)

GSM

Calibrating the MCUF (GCLK)


Introduction to MCUF (GLCK) calibration
NOTE
GCLK calibration can be carried out automatically using the CINDY commissioning tool. Refer to the relevant CINDY user documentation for details.

This procedure explains how to calibrate the Ovenized Crystal Oscillator (OCXO) in the MCUF GCLK in the Horizonmacro product at a BSS site.

When to calibrate the GCLK


The calibration procedure is to be used on the following occasions:
S S

When more than one frame slip per hour is observed at the OMC-R (typically more than 34/day). Whenever calibration is required. (Display the active alarms for a site - if calibration is required, there will be an alarm stating this). CAUTION
This procedure should only be carried out by fully trained, GSM qualified personnel. Under NO circumstances should this procedure be undertaken, unless all the correct test equipment is readily available. The command gclk_cal_mode used in this procedure should only be executed at the BTS where the calibration is being carried out. No call processing can occur involving the MCUF during calibration mode. Allow a period of 15 minutes to elapse after switching the OCXO power on, to give sufficient time for the unit to reach operating temperature and achieve frequency stabilization.

NOTE

Test equipment required


The test equipment required to carry out the GCLK calibration is as follows:
S S S S S

An IBM compatible personal computer (PC). A 9-way to 9-way TTY cable. A caesium or rubidium clock standard with 1 or 10 MHz output frequency. A Universal counter with external reference, for example, the Hewlett Packard model HP5385A or equivalent. A BNC to 3-way MCUF test lead, part number 3086144E01.

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Calibrating the MCUF (GCLK)

Preparation for GCLK calibration


The following procedure is used to prepare the MCUF (GCLK) for calibration: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Connect the serial A port of the PC to the MCUF TTY port using the 9-way to 9-way TTY cable (see Figure Maint. 2-15). Start the terminal emulator program. Connect the output from the 10 MHz standard to the reference input of the frequency counter, select external standard. Set the frequency gate time to 10 seconds and the display to 10 significant digits. Connect the test cable extracting the 8 kHz output signal from the front of the MCUF to the input of the frequency counter. Pin 3 Earth (top pin) Pin 1 8 kHz signal (bottom pin)

Figure Maint. 2-15 Horizonmacro GCLK calibration cable connections

MCUF TTY

MCUF 8 kHz OUT

8000.000000
10 MHz REFERENCE UNIVERSAL COUNTER

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GCLK calibration procedure


The following procedure is used to calibrate the MCUF (GCLK): 1. At the BSC MMIRAM prompt type: clear_gclk_avgs <location> Where <location> is the site number. 2. 3. A prompt for a mms id appears. Enter 0 0 To start the GCLK calibration mode, enter the command: gclk_cal_mode The gclk_cal_mode command is used to tell the sync function and MCUF software that a calibration is to be performed. NOTE
The gclk_cal_mode command is used to tell the sync function and MCUF software that a calibration is to be performed and can only be executed at Horizonmacro sites outside sysgen mode. The command is NOT allowed on a master MCUF when a standby MCUF is available.

When the command is executed the system will prompt for verification:
Site <Local site number> starting GCLK CALIBRATION MODE. If this is a single MCU site, the site will be down until calibration is complete. Are you sure (y=yes, n=no)?

Enter y The MCUF will begin calibration mode. The command is aborted if the reply is anything other than y. 4. The following prompt will appear:
Frequency Counter Connected, Enter y when ready, or a to abort test.

Enter y The command is aborted and calibration mode exited if the reply is anything other than y.

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Calibrating the MCUF (GCLK)

5.

Adjust the OCXO control voltage using the +/ and 0 to 3 keys until the measured frequency is exactly 8000,000000 Hz. The values entered here, change the frequency by varying degrees. For example: +0 will increase the output by a small amount. +1 will increase the frequency by approximately 10 times. +2 will increase the frequency by approximately 100 times. +3 will increase the frequency by approximately 1000 times.

These are not exact values as every OCXO has a different gain. This method gives sufficient control to correct the frequency within a short time. A typical sequence of numbers may look as follows:
Enter a to abort. s to save, +(0..3) to inc, (0..3) to dec >3 (7.99999898) Enter a to abort. s to save, +(0..3) to inc, (0..3) to dec >+3 (8.00000020) Enter a to abort. s to save, +(0..3) to inc, (0..3) to dec >0 (8.00000019 - 8.00000020) Enter a to abort. s to save, +(0..3) to inc, (0..3) to dec >2 (8.00000004) Enter a to abort. s to save, +(0..3) to inc, (0..3) to dec >+2 (8.00000020) Enter a to abort. s to save, +(0..3) to inc, (0..3) to dec >1 (8.00000018) Enter a to abort. s to save, +(0..3) to inc, (0..3) to dec >2 (8.00000002 -8.00000003) Enter a to abort. s to save, +(0..3) to inc, (0..3) to dec >1 (8.000000--) Enter a to abort. s to save, +(0..3) to inc, (0..3) to dec >+0 (8.000000-) Enter a to abort. s to save, +(0..3) to inc, (0..3) to dec >+0 (8.00000000)

6.

A prompt will appear for saving the results:


Enter a to abort, s to save, +(0..3) to inc, (0..3) to dec >

Enter s
CAL OFFSET is 23654 DAC bits.

After calibration, the MCUF applies a set of voltages to the DAC that feeds the OCXO, requiring the user to input the corresponding output frequency. This is necessary because the OCXO frequency/voltage characteristic is not linear and the MCUF adjusts for this by taking readings across a range of DAC voltages.
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7.

To calibrate the OCXO, gain, enter the measured frequency value from the counter after the value has settled in response to the MMI prompts. NOTE
When taking frequency measurements, ensure that a full gate period elapses from the time the new value is set to reading the counter. This wait may be several seconds depending on the counter.

A typical sequence of frequency measurements may be presented as follows:


Dac set to 1.0 volts, Enter Freq Value or a to abort > 7999.99853 Dac set to 2.0 volts, Enter Freq Value or a to abort > 7999.99915 Dac set to 3.0 volts, Enter Freq Value or a to abort > 7999.99969 Dac set to 4.0 volts, Enter Freq Value or a to abort > 8000.00020 Dac set to 5.0 volts, Enter Freq Value or a to abort > 8000.00070 Dac set to 6.0 volts, Enter Freq Value or a to abort > 8000.00122 Dac set to 7.0 volts, Enter Freq Value or a to abort > 8000.00176 Calibration Gain 3.865560e-01 SYNC>

NOTE 8.

The MCUF is reset when the calibration is complete.

On completion, the MCUF will automatically reject the calibration if it is outside the threshold and the following message will be displayed:
Computed Gain > Max WILL RETRY GAIN

Calibration must be performed again. If calibration fails the second time with the same or similar value, the OCXO may be operating outside the Motorola specification, in which case the MCUF is deemed faulty and should be replaced.

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Chapter 3

Site verification procedures

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GSM

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Introduction

to Horizonmacro verification procedures

Introduction to Horizonmacro verification procedures


Purpose of this chapter
This chapter provides information required for the verification of Horizonmacro hardware equipment. The procedures described in this chapter are as follows:
S S S S

Checking the antenna VSWR and calibrating the transmit output power. Checking the database equipage. Checking the E1/T1 link. Checking the PIX connections and alarm test.

CINDY commissioning tool


Many of the procedures described in this chapter can be carried out automatically using the CINDY commissioning tool. Refer to the relevant CINDY user documentation for details.

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Test equipment, leads and plugs

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Test equipment, leads and plugs


Introduction to test equipment, leads and plugs
This section provides information on the test equipment required for the procedures in this chapter. CAUTION
Ensure that all test equipment associated with commissioning of Motorola cellular base stations is within calibration date.

Test equipment required


Table Maint. 3-1 provides details of the test equipment required to perform the hardware verification procedures provided in this chapter.
Table Maint. 3-1 Hardware verification equipment Quantity
1

Description PC

Comments To have a serial comms port for sending or configuring messages to the BSC and/or BTS. Up to 2 GHz. PC PLUS or similar software. Hewlett Packard E2378A or equivalent. 100 W minimum. RTLXQ98088 or equivalent.

1
1 1 1 1 2 1 1

Signal generator Commercial terminal emulator software Digital multimeter 30dB attenuator RF adapter kit N to 7/16 inch adapter N to N barrel adapter

RF wattmeter with 5 W, 10 W, 25 W and 50 W elements Digital RF wattmeter with wideband power sensor

For measuring average power on the calibration channel, use a Bird model 43 wattmeter or equivalent. For measuring TX power on a BCCH/TCH channel, use a meter capable of measuring burst average power.
Must be calibrated. Must be calibrated. Compatible with PC to TTY port on transceiver/MCUF. EQCP/RSS cable (CTU) or DSP MMI/RSS cable (CTU2), connecting PC to transceiver TTY port. See Note below.

1 1

2 metres of N to N male coaxial cable 4 metres of N to N male coaxial cable 9-way to 9-way cable 9-way to 9-way cable (transceiver only)

2 1

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Test equipment, leads and plugs

NOTE

The EQCP/RSS cable (for CTU) and DSP MMI/RSS cable (for CTU2) are actually the same cable, it is only the nomenclature that is different.

Test leads required


Test lead calibration
To minimize variations in test results, ensure that all appropriate test leads used in hardware verification procedures are calibrated. CAUTION
A recognized laboratory must calibrate all test equipment and associated test leads annually. Do not calibrate test equipment or test leads in the field.

9-way to 9-way transceiver/MCUF cable


Figure Maint. 3-1 Horizonmacro 9-way to 9-way hardware verification cable connections
PIN NUMBER 2 3 5 4 6 PIN NUMBER 3 2 5

7 8 9-WAY D-TYPE PC COMMUNICATIONS PORT

4 m SCREENED CABLE 9-WAY D-TYPE TRANSCEIVER CONNECTOR

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9-way to 9-way transceiver cable


Figure Maint. 3-2 Horizonmacro 9-way to 9-way transceiver cable connections
PIN NUMBER 2 3 PIN NUMBER 3 2 9 8 5 SELECTOR SWITCH 9-WAY D-TYPE F CONNECTOR (PC COMMUNICATIONS PORT) 4 m SCREENED CABLE 5 RSS PINS EQCP PINS

25-WAY D-TYPE M CONNECTOR (TRANSCEIVER TTY PORT)

NOTE

TCU-B test lead 3086240N01 may alternatively be used instead of transceiver test lead 3086299N01, but adapter (58C86540N01) is required to attach the 25-way cable connector to the 9-way transceiver port.

Connections for a PIX test lead


Table Maint. 3-2 shows pinout details to make a PIX test lead.
Table Maint. 3-2 Test plug pin connections From Pin To Pin

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 and 10 not used 11 NOTE

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 n/a 29

When making the PIX test lead: Normally open (N/O) PIX inputs should be connected through a 50 ohm resistor. Normally closed (N/C) PIX inputs should be connected through a 50 kohm resistor. Details of N/O and N/C site inputs can be found in the equip_eas file in the site commissioning database.

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Transceiver VSWR and cell site offset information

Transceiver VSWR and cell site offset information


Introduction to output power calibration and VSWR check
NOTE
Transceiver cell site offset calibration and VSWR checks can be carried out automatically using the CINDY commissioning tool. Refer to the relevant CINDY user documentation for details. VSWR checks can only be performed on CTUs.

The objective of the VSWR check and output power calibration procedure is to ensure that antenna feeders and connectors are properly terminated and then set the pre-defined maximum transmitter output power at the top of the cabinet. When a transceiver is manufactured, it undergoes comprehensive transmit and receive calibration procedures. These procedures aim to produce a transceiver that exhibits a flat frequency response over the GSM band. In the case of the transmitter, this is performed by distributing the channels over three detector groups (the detector being the device that maintains a steady output power level). In the field, the procedure for setting the transmit output power involves using a set of commands called Cell Site Power (CSPWR). During CSPWR the user can trim the cabinet output power to account for any abnormalities that may occur between the transceiver and the top of the cabinet. The offset is effectively subtracted from the requested power level, such that for whatever channel is selected, a steady output is maintained at the top of the cabinet. There are three sets of procedures available for checking VSWR and cell site power:
S S S

Normal CTU VSWR and cell site power calibration. Normal CTU2 cell site power calibration. CTU VSWR and cell site power calibration for CCBs. NOTE
The procedure CTU VSWR and cell site power calibration for CCBs does not apply to GSM850 and PCS1900 CTUs or any CTU2s.

The appropriate Preparing for test procedure at the end of this section should be completed before attempting the VSWR and cell site power calibration procedures.

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Transceiver VSWR and cell site offset information

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Test equipment required


The following test equipment is required during the VSWR and output power calibration procedure:
S S S S S

An IBM-compatible personal computer (PC). Terminal emulator software. A Bird model 43P (Thru-line) wattmeter, or equivalent, with 5 W and 50 W elements. A 9-way to 9-way cable (a diagram of this cable is provided in the Test equipment, leads and plugs section). A 9-way to 9-way EQCP/RSS (CTU) or DSP MMI/RSS (CTU2) cable. NOTE
These cables are the same, only the nomenclature is different.

S S

A 7/16 N-type adapter. A 50 ohm/100 W power attenuator. CAUTION


All test equipment and test leads must be calibrated annually by a recognized laboratory. Test equipment and test leads must not be calibrated in the field. Do not optimize Motorola cellular base stations with test equipment that is beyond its calibration due date. Allow test equipment to warm up for 30 minutes before use.

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Transceiver VSWR and cell site offset information

Commands used
The command set used depends on the type of transceiver being calibrated.

CTU commands
Table Maint. 3-3 lists the commands for the CTU VSWR and output power calibration procedure.
Table Maint. 3-3 CTU VSWR and power calibration commands BSS MMI Command Function Initializes the device, bringing it into service. Prevents the device being used. Frees the device for further use. Clears previously stored calibration data for a specified radio unit on a per DRI basis. Function Stops the CTU hunting between link A and link B and forces the CTU to look only at link A. Function Places the CTU in test mode. Activates the control processor. Inhibits the BBH alarm. Cell site power. Allows the cell site power to be set to the maximum output power. Stops the control processor.

ins_device lock_device unlock_device clear_cal_data


CTU Command

tcu_clock 0
CTU Command Emulator

TEST ACT C BBH ALARM OFF CSPWR HALT C TS <T> CHAN


and

XXX

TS <T> TXPWR <nn> U and D ESC (key)or CTRL-Y or CTRL-C WRENB SAVE CAL TX WRPTC FR TX MR TX SNDCMB NOTE

Timeslot set up. Where: <T> = Timeslot no. or A = ALL XXX = ARFCN to tune timeslot to. nn = Attenuation level from max. Used with the CSPWR command to increase (U) or decrease (D) the power level by a factor of 0.2 dB. Used to exit the CSPWR command and store the resulting offset to RAM. Write enables the FLASH EPROM. Used to store the resulting offset in FLASH EPROM. Write protects the FLASH EPROM. Reads Tx offset for FLASH EPROM. Reads Tx offset for RAM. Emulates combiner control processor messaging.

1. The symbol 0 used in the commands is a zero. 2. BSS MMI commands may be entered in upper or lower case. All other commands must be entered in the case shown.

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CTU2 commands
Table Maint. 3-4 lists the commands for the CTU2 output power calibration procedure. NOTE
The symbol 0 used in the commands is a zero. Table Maint. 3-4 CTU2 power calibration commands BSS MMI Command Function Initializes the device, bringing it into service. Prevents the device being used. Frees the device for further use. Clears previously stored calibration data for a specified transceiver on a per DRI basis. Changes the DSP MMI security level. Initiates Tx calibration test mode. Puts the DSP fault management module in test mode. Blocks all DSP fault management alarms. Set Tx power calibration mode for single or double density. <single> is the default mode and may be omitted. Set Tx power calibration to calibrate the first carrier only or both carriers when in double density mode. <carriera> is the default and may be omitted. Perform Tx power calibration. Stores the calibration data.

ins_device lock_device unlock_device clear_cal_data chglev


cal_test_mode on

fm test_mode on
fm_test block none none 0xff

cal_config tx_cab_mode <single> / <double> cal_config tx_cab_carriers <carriera> / <both> cal_cabinet tx_cab cal_store_1

Test stages
There are four stages to the procedure:
S S S S

Preparing for test. Checking the VSWR (CTU only). Calibrating the transmit output power. Restoring the site. NOTE
VSWR checks ensure correct antenna matching and can prove the serviceability of the antenna. Repeat the procedures for all antennas on site, including receive antennas.

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Preparation for output power calibration and VSWR check


The RF path has to be prepared for bay level calibration. All DRIs in the site must be locked, the transceiver has to be reset, a dummy load must be connected if there is no antenna, and all alarms must be disabled. Use the appropriate procedure, depending on whether a CTU or a CTU2 is to be calibrated.

CTU preparation procedure


The following procedure is used to prepare a CTU for the VSWR check and output power calibration: 1. 2. 3. 4. If CCBs are fitted, set all DIP switches on the CCB control board to zero (this assists programming and checksum calculations). Connect the 9-way to 9-way cable from the PC serial A port to MCU TTY port. At the PC start the terminal emulator program. Change to Level 3 and at the MMI-RAM> prompt type: ins_device # dri A * Where:
# A *

is:
the number of the site logged into. the antenna/relative cell number (0 to 5). DRI number on the antenna. The CTU must be brought into service as there is no flash EPROM storage of code at the radio control processor level. If a connection to the BSC is not available a PCMCIA commissioning card must be used.

NOTE

5.

Wait for the transceiver to finish initializing, then lock the DRI using the lock device command. WARNING
An RF hazard exists during DRI transmissions. As one antenna may be connected to a number of DRIs, the lock command must be repeated for all DRIs on the antenna being worked on before connecting the wattmeter.

Type: lock_device # dri A * Where:


# A *

is:
the number of the site logged into. the antenna/relative cell number (0 to 5). DRI number on the antenna. For ease of calibration, all transceivers in a cell should be initialized and then locked. Always lock the transceiver providing the BCCH last, as this prevents the BCCH being switched to alternate transceivers.

NOTE

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6.

Type clear_cal_data # dri A * 0 Where:


# A *

is:
the number of the site logged into. the antenna/relative cell number (0 to 5). DRI number on the antenna. The clear_cal_data command clears all calibration data out of the CM database. This is required to override the preserve calibration feature, if enabled.

NOTE

7. 8.

Connect port COM1 on the PC to the TTY Interface port on the transceiver using the 9-way to 9-way RSS cable. At the MMI-ROM prompt, type tcu_clock 0 The system will respond with the following:
WARNING: TCU must be reset to get connection to MCU.

NOTE

Do not reset the CTU at this time. The reset is carried out on completion of the transceiver VSWR and cell site power calibration procedure, as described in Site restoration.

9.

Remove the 9-way to 9-way RSS cable from the transceiver and replace it with the 9-way to 9-way EQCP cable.

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CTU2 preparation procedure


The procedure described below is used to prepare a CTU2 for output power calibration. NOTE
VSWR checks are not possible on the CTU2.

A CTU2 may consist of one or two DRIs. If a CTU2 is configured for double density mode (two DRIs), Tx cabinet calibration need only be performed on one of the DRIs because the same cabinet calibration data will be used by both DRIs. The following will help determine whether a CTU2 is configured as single or double density transceiver and which DRI numbers correspond to which CTU2s. At the BSC TTY, change to Level 3 and at the MMI-RAM> prompt type the following: disp_eq # dri A * 0 Where:
# A *

is:
the number of the site logged into. the antenna/relative cell number (0 to 5). DRI number of the transceiver.

For single density CTU2s the output will look similar to the following:
[05/02/03 14:42:37] MMIRAM 0115 > disp_eq 81 dri 0 0 DRI identifier: 0 0 DRI Density[dri_density]: SINGLE Cabinet identifier: 0 Type of connection to the BTP: MASTER Port to which the TCU is connected[tcu_port]: 0 RTF identifier[pref_rtf_id]: GSM cell ID where the DRI appears: 001 01 1 91 Antenna select number for this cell[antenna_select]: 1 Tuneable combining used: No The diversity flag for this DRI is[diversity_flag]: 0 The fm cell type is[fm_cell_type]: 0

For double density CTU2s the output will look similar to the following:
[05/02/03 14:47:55] MMIRAM 0115 > disp_eq 81 dri 0 1 DRI identifier: 0 1 DRI Density[dri_density]: DOUBLE Associated DRI identifier: 0 2 Cabinet identifier: 0 Type of connection to the BTP: MASTER Port to which the TCU is connected[tcu_port]: 1 RTF identifier[pref_rtf_id]: GSM cell ID where the DRI appears: 001 01 1 91 Antenna select number for this cell[antenna_select]: 1 Tuneable combining used: No The diversity flag for this DRI is[diversity_flag]: 0 The fm cell type is[fm_cell_type]: 0

In this case we see that DRI 0 1 is a double density CTU2 and is associated with DRI 0 2.
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Repeating the command for DRI 0 2 yields the following:


[05/02/03 14:48:07] MMIRAM 0115 > disp_eq 81 dri 0 2 DRI identifier: 0 2 DRI Density[dri_density]: DOUBLE Associated DRI identifier: 0 1 Cabinet identifier: 0 Type of connection to the BTP: MASTER Port to which the TCU is connected[tcu_port]: 1 RTF identifier[pref_rtf_id]: GSM cell ID where the DRI appears: 001 01 1 91 Antenna select number for this cell[antenna_select]: 1 Tuneable combining used: No The diversity flag for this DRI is[diversity_flag]: 0 The fm cell type is[fm_cell_type]: 0

Thus, in this example, DRI 0 1 and DRI 0 2 are on the same CTU2. In the case of the single density CTU2, cabinet calibration will be performed once on the DRI. In the case of the double density CTU2, cabinet calibration is still performed on only one of the two DRIs, but the other DRI must be locked for the procedures to be carried out. Furthermore, the clear_cal_data commands must be issued for both DRIs.

Output format for clear_cal_data command


The CTU2 stores calibration data in a higher precision format (UWORDs) than the CTU (UBYTEs). As the two transceivers are interchangeable, the data needs to be stored in the database in a common format and the higher precision UWORD format is now used. This does not affect the output format of the clear_cal_data command when the transceiver is unlocked (UWORDs for the CTU2 and UBYTEs for the CTU). However, if the transceiver is locked, the data on it cannot be accessed nor can the transceiver type be determined and therefore the data can only be displayed in the format in which it is stored on the database (i.e. UWORD format). Use one of the following formulae to convert the appropriate clear_cal_data output to a gain value (FEG): For the CTU2: FEG = 2s_complement_16_bit_value / 256 For the CTU: FEG = 17.5 + (2s_complement_8_bit_value / 10) Use one of the following formulae to convert the gain value (FEG) to the UWORD or UBYTE format: UWORD: 2s_complement_16_bit_value = round(FEG x 256) UBYTE: 2s_complement_8_bit_value = round{(FEG 17.5) x 10}

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Normal CTU VSWR and cell site power calibration

Normal CTU VSWR and cell site power calibration


NOTE
The procedures described here relate to CTU Tx power calibration only. CTU2 Tx power calibration procedures are described separately, later in this chapter.

Introduction to normal VSWR and cell site power calibration


NOTE
CTU cell site power calibration and VSWR checks can be carried out automatically using the CINDY commissioning tool. Refer to the relevant CINDY user documentation for details.

Two methods available for normal VSWR checking are described in this section; one automatic and one manual. The reason for the two methods is as follows:

VSWR method 1 (automatic)


When typing the CSPWR command at the EQCP prompt, it effectively executes a small script containing the following commands: TS A CHAN 31 TS A CHAN 196 TS A CHAN 700 TS A CHAN 668 TS A TXP 00 MDLTR UC
Set all timeslots to channel 31 (CTU900). Set all timeslots to channel 196 (CTU850). Set all timeslots to channel 700 (CTU1800). Set all timeslots to channel 668 (CTU1900). Set all timeslots to full power. Turn the modulation off.

Prior to executing the CSPWR command, it assumes that the synthesizers are in normal mode (not locked), as is the case after the unit is powered up for the first time.

VSWR method 2 (manual)


To allow a specific channel to be specified (instead of defaulting to channels 31, 196, 668 or 700) additional commands must be entered, rather than using the CSPWR command. One command sets the appropriate channel and the other switches the CTU output power on and off.

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Automatic VSWR test procedure


The first method for normal VSWR checking uses automatic channel selection. The CSPWR command automatically selects a midpoint channel number, however if required manual channel selection can be performed following the steps detailed in method 2. WARNING
Full power is transmitted during VSWR checks. Ensure all personnel are clear of the antenna. Do not carry out this check unless antenna installation is complete. To reduce the possibility of interference with other users, minimize the time that the CTU is powered up.

CAUTION

The following procedure automatically checks the VSWR of the transmission path: 1. 2. Disconnect antenna. Connect a dummy load to the meter, ensuring the meter is fitted with a 50 W element and connect the meter to the Tx output. At the EQCP prompt type: .GSMFW TEST ACT C BBH ALARM OFF CSPWR 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Monitor and record the wattmeter reading (the forward output power). Press ESC or CTRL-Y or CTRL-C. Replace the 50 W element in the wattmeter with a 5 W element and reverse the direction on the power meter. Remove the dummy load and connect the power meter through to the antenna. At the EQCP TEST prompt, type CSPWR Monitor and record the reverse power reading indicated on the power meter. NOTE
Readings should show reflected (reverse) power of no more than 5% of the forward power at the point of measurement, and less than 1 W. If the ratio of the forward and reverse readings is unacceptable, suspect an improper termination of the antenna feeder and connector.

9. 10.

Press ESC or CTRL-Y or CTRL-C. At the EQCP TEST prompt, type HALT C

11.

Remove the power meter and reconnect the antenna.


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Normal CTU VSWR and cell site power calibration

Manual VSWR test procedure


The second method for normal VSWR checking allows the manual selection of a channel. The following procedure is used to manually check the VSWR of the transmission path through to the antenna: 1. Disconnect the antenna. Connect a dummy load to the meter, ensuring the meter is fitted with a 50 W element and connect the meter to the Tx output. At the EQCP prompt type: .GSMFW TEST ACT C BBH ALARM OFF 3. Enter the following command: TS A CHAN nnn Where:
A nnn

2.

is:
all timeslots (TS). the specified channel number.

4.

To switch the power on, enter the following command: TS A TXPWR 00 Where:
A 00

is:
all timeslots (TS). maximum output power.

5. 6.

Monitor and record the wattmeter reading (the forward output power). To switch the power off, enter the following command: TS A TXPWR FF Where:
A FF

is:
all timeslots (TS). zero output power.

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VSWR reverse power test procedure


WARNING
Full power is transmitted during VSWR checks. Ensure all personnel are clear of the antenna. Do not carry out this check unless antenna installation is complete. To reduce the possibility of interference with other users, minimize the time that the CTU is powered up.

CAUTION

The following procedure is used to manually check the VSWR reverse power: 1. 2. 3. 4. Replace the 50 W element in the wattmeter with a 5 W element and reverse the direction on the power meter. Remove the dummy load and connect the power meter through to the antenna. To switch the power on, enter TS A TXPWR 00 Monitor and record the reverse power reading indicated on the power meter. NOTE
Readings should show reflected (reverse) power of no more than 5% of the forward power at the point of measurement, and less than 1 W. If the ratio of the forward and reverse readings is unacceptable, suspect an improper termination of the antenna feeder and connector.

5. 6. 7. 8.

To switch the power off, enter TS A TXPWR FF Repeat the forward and reverse power checks for the required number of channels. At the EQCP TEST prompt, type HALT C Remove the power meter and reconnect the antenna.

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Normal CTU VSWR and cell site power calibration

Tx output power calibration procedure


NOTE
Calibration is not required unless the desired configuration is different to the shipped configuration.

The following procedure is used to calibrate CTU transmit output power: 1. Disconnect the antenna. Connect a dummy load/attenuator/coupler to the power meter, ensuring the meter is fitted with a 100 W element. Connect the meter to the Tx output, ensuring you have sufficient attenuation as to protect the power meter/sensor from damage. NOTE
Ensure that the digital power wattmeter has been correctly set up. Refer to the manufacturers manual for detailed instructions on how to carry out the following: S Perform selfcalibration of power meter with sensor.

S S 2.

Enter cable offset (Cable loss) into power meter to display the correct output power. Enable burst averaging or Burst Average Power.

At the EQCP prompt type: .GSMFW TEST ACT C BBH ALARM OFF

3.

At the EQCP prompt type: CSPWR The following message is displayed:


Hit U or D until desired max is measured then hit ESC, CTRL-Y or CTRL-C

4.

Enter U or D to adjust the CTU Tx power to achieve the appropriate value, as detailed in Table Maint. 3-5:
Table Maint. 3-5 Achievable Tx RF power output RF configuration CTU 900/850 CTU 1800 CTU 1900

TDF DCF DDF All 5.

40 W (46.0 dBm) 20 W (43.0 dBm) 8.5 W (39.3 dBm)

32 W (45.1 dBm) 16 W (42.1 dBm) 7 W (38.5 dBm)

32 W (45.1 dBm) 16 W (42.1 dBm) 6 W (38 dBm)

Or the customer-specified value at the top of the cabinet, taking cable losses into account.

As U or D is typed, a message similar to the following example, indicating the CTU output power and offset value, is displayed:
D P: 46.8 dBm Cell Site Offset: 1

When the required output level is achieved, press ESC or CTRL-Y or CTRL-C.
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6.

At the EQCP TEST prompt type: HALT C WRENB SAVE CAL TX WRPTC NOTE
The cell site offset can be checked by reading the memory location:

S S 7. 8. 9.

Use FR TX to verify writes to FLASH. Use MR TX to verify writes to RAM.

Repeat steps 1 to 6 until all transceivers have been calibrated. Remove the power meter and reconnect the antenna. Use the Site restoration procedure to return the site to service.

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Normal CTU2 cell site power calibration

Normal CTU2 cell site power calibration


NOTE
The procedures described here relate to CTU2 Tx power calibration only. CTU Tx power calibration procedures are described separately, earlier in this chapter.

Tx output power calibration procedure


When CTUs and CTU2s are used together in a Horizonmacro indoor cabinet, the CTU2 output power falls short of that of a CTU in some configurations. In these situations, there are two options for Tx output power calibration: A. Recalibrate all CTUs in the cell to match the maximum output power of the CTU2. If this option is preferred, perform the CTU Tx output calbration procedure described earlier in this chapter. Do not recalibrate the CTUs. Instead, calibrate the CTU2s and specify an estimated offset that adjusts the CTU2 to that of the existing CTUs. Because this cannot increase the CTU2 Tx output power beyond its maximum, the Tx power for the entire cell must be reduced to account for the difference. If this option is preferred, carry out the calibration procedure described below.

B.

In some configurations a newly installed CTU2 may power up in a Horizonmacro indoor cabinet in the following state:
Device DRI 1 1 0 DRI 1 2 0 State DU DU Reason Cell Tx Pwr Unachievable Cell Tx Pwr Unachievable Last Transition dd/mm hh:mm:ss 19/08 11:10:03 19/08 11:10:28 Related Function None None

In such cases the max_tx_bts parameter for that cell should be changed to at least 4. The transceivers will then come into service and the CTU2 Tx output power calibration procedure described below can be performed. Proceed as follows to calibrate CTU2 transmit output power: 1. 2. 3. Connect the 9-way to 9-way MCUF cable from the PC serial A port to the MCUF TTY port. At the PC, start the terminal emulator program. Lock all DRIs in the sector. At the MCUF TTY, change to Level 3 and at the MMIRAM> prompt type: lock_device # dri A * 0 Where:
# A *

is:
the number of the site logged into. the antenna/relative cell number (0 to 5). DRI number of the transceiver. Always lock the transceiver providing the BCCH last as this prevents the BCCH being switched to alternate transceivers.

NOTE

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4.

Disconnect the antenna. Connect a dummy load to the power meter, ensuring the meter is fitted with a 50 W element. Connect the meter to the Tx output. Change to Level 3 and at the MMIRAM> prompt, type ins_device # dri A * 0 Where:
# A *

5.

is:
the number of the site logged into. the antenna/relative cell number (0 to 5). DRI number of the transceiver.

6.

Connect a serial port on the PC to the TTY Interface port on the CTU2 to be calibrated using the 9way to 9way DSP MMI/RSS cable. If necessary, switch the 9way to 9way DSP MMI/RSS cable from providing RSS connectivity to providing DSP connectivity.

7.

At the DSP MMI prompt, type chglev and then enter the following password: pizza

8.

Enter calibration test mode and disable alarms by typing the following commands: cal_test_mode on fm test_mode on fm_test block none none 0xff

9.

By default, Tx calibration is performed in the mode specified in the database. To force Tx calibration in either single or double density mode for a transceiver, enter one of the following commands as required: cal_config tx_cab_mode single cal_config tx_cab_mode double To reset Tx calibration to the mode specified in the database, enter the following command: cal_config tx_cab_mode database

10.

OPTIONAL STEP TO CALIBRATE CARRIER B. This step is only applicable if calibrating in double density mode (see step 9). By default, only the first carrier (Carrier A) is calibrated. To calibrate the second carrier (Carrier B) additionally, specify that both carriers are to be calibrated with the following command: cal_config tx_cab_carriers both
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Normal CTU2 cell site power calibration

NOTE

Both carriers have approximately the same output power. Due to variations in the hardware and factory calibration, small differences can occur. To finetune the calibration so that both carriers can achieve the same power, specify that both carriers should be calibrated by entering the above command.

To reset Tx calibration to only calibrate Carrier A, enter the following command: cal_config tx_cab_carriers carriera 11. Start the Tx cabinet calibration procedure by typing the following command at the DSP MMI prompt: cal_cabinet tx_cab The following warning message will be displayed on the screen:
WARNING! All attenuation is about to be removed. Please ensure that appropriate attenuation is attached to the CTU2 TX output. Press any key to continue

12. 13.

Check the connections to the antenna and then press ENTER. Press U to increase output power or D to decrease output power until the reading on the power meter matches the target maximum power for the sector. As the output power is adjusted, a message similar to the following will be displayed:
Setting offset to = 0x14 (4.0dB)

In configurations where the maximum output power of the CTU2 falls below that of a CTU, the initial offset is not 0x00. The initial CTU2 offsets shown in Table Maint. 3-6 below are based on the difference in maximum Tx power between CTU and CTU2 transceivers in the specified configuration.
Table Maint. 3-6 CTU2 Tx power offsets RF band EGSM900 EGSM900 DCS1800 DCS1800 Mode Single density Double density Single density Double density Initial offset 0x04 (0.8 dB) 0x10 (3.2 dB) 0x00 (0.0 dB) 0x0a (2.0 dB)

14.

An offset less than this initial value may be specified by pressing U when the transceiver is already at maximum power. Doing so will not change the maximum output power, but it will allow the CTU2 to be aligned with existing CTUs in the same cell that have not been recalibrated. After pressing U, follow the on-screen instructions to enter the measured and target powers; the target should be the same as that used when the CTUs in the cell were calibrated. Examples of methods of entering Tx power values are given at the end of this procedure.
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NOTE

In some configurations with CTU2s in a Horizonmacro cabinet, the cells maximum transmit power (cell element max_tx_bts ) must be decreased to allow the CTU2s to come into service.

16. 17.

Press Q when the desired output power level has been reached. If Carrier B was configured to be calibrated in Step 10, then follow the on screen directions to repeat Steps 12 to 16 for Carrier B. Otherwise, proceed to the next step. Store the new Tx cabinet calibration using the following DSP MMI command: cal_store_1 After a few seconds delay (up to 16 seconds), the result of the data storage is displayed on the screen in the format:
cal_store_1 PASS CTU2.carA.ts_0>

18.

19.

After the data has been stored, connect the 9-way to 9-way MCUF cable from the PC serial A port to the MCUF MMI TTY port and enter the following command to lock the CTU2 that has been calibrated: lock_device # dri A * 0 Where:
# A *

is:
the number of the site logged into. the antenna/relative cell number (0 to 5). DRI number on the transceiver.

20. 21. 22.

Move the 9-way to 9-way DSP MMI/RSS cable to the CTU2 TTY port of the next CTU2 to be calibrated and repeat the procedure from step 4. Remove the power meter and check that all antennas have been reconnected. Use the clear_cal_data command at the BSC, followed by the Site restoration procedure described in Chapter 2 to return the site to service. NOTE
The clear_cal_data command clears all calibration data out of the CM database. This is required to override the preserve calibration feature, if enabled. If the CTU2 is operating in double density mode, both DRIs must be cleared.

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Normal CTU2 cell site power calibration

Methods of entering CTU2 Tx power values


These two methods of entering Tx power values relate to step 15 in the previous procedure. An example of the on-screen instructions displayed is as follows:
Setting offset to = 0x10 (3.2 dB) The radio cannot put out any more power in the current configuration. However, the radio has 3.2 dB more dynamic range with which to calibrate to. In order to align the radio with others in the cabinet, you will need to input the currently measured power and the desired output power. Please press W to input the power in Watts, press D to input the power in dBm, or press Q to go back to an allowable power. Enter W, D, or Q:

Entering values in Watts (W option). An example of the MMI dialogue is as follows:


You have chosen to input power levels in Watts. Please enter powers in 1/10 of a Watt increments. For example, you can enter 39.5 Watts. Currently measured output power (Watts): 10 Maximum desired output power (based on measured power): 20.9 Watts Desired output power (Watts): 20 Power difference: 3.0 dB Storing 0x01 (0.2 dB) as offset

Entering values in dBm (D option). An example of the MMI dialogue is as follows:


You have chosen to input power levels in dBm. Please enter powers in 1/10 of a dBm increments. For example, you can enter 42.9 dBm. Currently measured output power (dBm): 40 Maximum desired output power (based on measured power): 43.2 dBm Desired output power (dBm): 43 Power difference: 3.0 dB. Storing 0x01 (0.2 dB) as offset

Tx cabinet channel numbers and frequencies


The Tx cabinet channel numbers and frequencies for a CTU2 in a Horizonmacro indoor cabinet are as follows:
EGSM900: DCS1800: RF channel 23 RF channel 668 939.6 MHz 1836.4 MHz

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CTU VSWR and cell site power calibration for CCBs


Introduction to CCB VSWR and cell site power calibration
NOTE
CTU cell site power calibration and VSWR checks can be carried out automatically using the CINDY commissioning tool. Refer to the relevant CINDY user documentation for details.

The Cavity Combining Block (CCB) combines the output of up to three transceivers to a common output and up to six CTUs by use of an additional CCB (extension). The CCB extension output is an input to the CCB (output) for a single antenna system. Every transmitted frequency will be attenuated by approximately 3.5 dB for a six cavity system and 2.7 dB in a three cavity system. NOTE
CCBs are not used in GSM850 or PCS1900 cabinet configurations and cannot be used in conjunction with CTU2s.

A Horizonmacro indoor can support one or two CCB modules. There is a minimum of one CCB control board. The CCB control board is located at the front of the CCB beneath a screw-down cover. If redundancy of the CCB control board is provided, both CCB modules will be equipped with a CCB control board. The CCB has an address which is defined in the database using the equip_device COMB command. The address can also be displayed by using the disp_equipment COMB command. NOTE
All CCB commands are issued through the TTY port on a CTU.

The CCB control board has a set of eight DIP switches which are used to provide the binary representation of the address defined in the database. These switches have all been set to zero in the Preparing for test procedure. Once the cell site power has been set, the DIP switches should be returned to positions for the address defined in the database.

Example of DIP switch setting


If the combiner address is required to be 75 (hex 4B), the DIP switches will be set as in Table Maint. 3-7.
Table Maint. 3-7 Switch settings for example of value 75 Switch On/off for value 75 Binary value of each switch 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

off 128

on 64

off 32

off 16

on 8

off 4

on 2

on 1

NOTE

If CCB control board redundancy is supported, the dip switches must be set the same on both CCB control boards. 255, all dip switches set to on, is not a valid address.

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CCB control board details


The CCB control board is equipped with a green LED to indicate the presence of power. If a single CCB control board is used it must be in position 0, or the right of the cabinet when viewed from the front. If two CCB control boards are used, the one mounted on the right, looking from the front, will normally be the master. If this unit fails, the redundant unit will automatically assume control. The initial main/standby relationship is defined from the power connection to the top panel of the cabinet. The two CCB control boards receive power from different pins in the connector, this provides the main/ standby relationship. A fault or problem with the CCB control board is indicated by a red LED, which can be viewed from above. There is not a master/slave relationship as no CCB control board has any influence over the other. It is a main/standby relationship where each CCB control board is equally aware of what is happening with the CCB system, hence the ability for the standby CCB control board to take seamless control in the event of a problem with the main CCB control board. NOTE
The CCB control board is sometimes referred to as the Transmit Antenna Transceiver Interface Control Board (TATI Control Board or TCB).

Calibration procedures
The procedures Tuning the CCB cavities, VSWR calibration procedure, Calibrating cell site power and Parking the CCB cavities should be used for VSWR and cell site calibration of Horizonmacro cabinets equipped with CTUs and CCB RF combiners. NOTE
The four calibration procedures should be completed sequentially, and without pause, for each transceiver. Failure to do so could result in the associated CCB being parked on the wrong channel.

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CCB cavities tuning procedure


The following procedure details the steps necessary to tune the cavities in preparation for the VSWR and cell site power calibration. The CTUs use channel 31 as the default value associated with the CSPWR command. The procedure should be performed on each transceiver in turn: 1. 2. 3. Disconnect antenna. Connect a dummy load to the meter and ensure the meter is fitted with a 50 W element. Connect the meter to the Tx output. Connect a PC to the CTU TTY interface port. At the EQCP prompt type: .GSMFW TEST ACT C BBH ALARM OFF 4. Issue the full tuning command to the CCB. To tune cavity 0, at the EQCP TEST prompt: For...
CTU 900 CTU 1800

Type...
send eqcp 02 05 00 01 00 1F 00 27 send eqcp 02 05 00 01 02 BC 00 C6

Where: 02 is the parameter download message ID. 05 is the number of bytes to follow, excluding final checksum. 00 is the CCB address (as set on the DIP switches). 01 is the hex value of the address of the cavity to be tuned. (set for cavity 0). 00 is the channel high byte for CTU 900 (02 for CTU 1800). 1F is the channel low byte for a CTU 900 set to channel 31 (BC for a CTU 1800 set to channel 700). 00 is the power level always 00. 27 is the low byte of the checksum 02 + 05 + 00 + 01 + 00 + 1F + 00 for a CTU 900. (C6 is the low byte of checksum 02 + 05 + 00 + 01 + 02 + BC + 00 for a CTU 1800). The response should occur in under 12 seconds and begin with 01. A typical response, if OK, is:
01 04 00 01 00 00 06

A typical failure response is:


F1 0B 00 A0

followed by a repetition of the input bytes.

Table Maint. 3-9 (CTU 900) and Table Maint. 3-10 (CTU 1800) detail the tuning commands for all possible cavities.
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VSWR calibration procedure


WARNING
Full power is transmitted during VSWR checks. Ensure all personnel are clear of the antenna. Do not carry out this check unless antenna installation is complete. To reduce the possibility of interference with other users, minimize the time that the radio is powered up.

CAUTION

To check the VSWR of the transmission path, perform the following steps: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. At the EQCP TEST prompt, type CSPWR Monitor and record the wattmeter reading (the forward output power). Press ESC or CTRL-Y or CTRL-C. Replace the 50 W element in the wattmeter with a 5 W element and reverse the direction on the power meter. Remove the dummy load and connect the power meter through to the antenna. At the EQCP TEST prompt, type CSPWR Monitor and record the reverse power reading indicated on the power meter. NOTE
Readings should show reflected (reverse) power of no more than 5% of the forward power at the point of measurement, but less than 1 W. If the ratio of the forward and reverse readings is unacceptable, suspect an improper termination of the antenna feeder and connector.

8.

Press ESC or CTRL-Y or CTRL-C.

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Cell site power calibration procedure


To calibrate the cell site power, proceed as follows: 1. At the MMI prompt, type CSPWR The following message is displayed:
Hit U or D until desired max is measured then hit ESC, CTRL-Y or CTRL-C

2.

Enter U or D to adjust the CTU Tx power to achieve the appropriate value, as detailed in Table Maint. 3-8:
Table Maint. 3-8 Achievable Tx RF power output RF configuration Achievable value CTU 900 CTU 1800

20 W (43.0 dBm) CCB 3.

16 W (42.1 dBm)

Or the customer-specified value at the top of the cabinet, taking cable losses into account.

As U or D is typed, a message similar to the following example, indicating the CTU output power and offset value, is displayed:
D P: 46.8 dBm Cell Site Offset: 1

When the required output level is achieved, press ESC or CTRL-Y or CTRL-C. 4. Save the transmit power calibration. At the EQCP TEST prompt type: HALT C WRENB SAVE CAL TX WRPTC

Parking the CCB cavities


To prevent cavity interference park the cavity. To park cavity 0, at the EQCP prompt type: send eqcp C2 02 00 01 C5 Where: C2 is the park request message ID. 02 is the number of bytes to follow, excluding final checksum. 00 is the CCB address (as set on the DIP switches). 01 is the hex value of the address of the cavity to be tuned (set for cavity 0). C5 is the low byte of the checksum (C2 + 02 + 00 + 01).
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Repeat for remaining cavities


Repeat the procedures Tuning the CCB cavities, VSWR calibration procedure , Calibrating cell site power and Parking the CCB cavities until all transceivers have tuned the CCB cavity they are connected to and the Tx output power has been calibrated. The cavity tuning commands are detailed in Table Maint. 3-9 (CTU 900) and Table Maint. 3-10 (CTU 1800). The cavity parking commands are detailed in Table Maint. 3-11, and are the same for CTU 900 and CTU 1800.
Table Maint. 3-9 CTU 900 CCB cavity tuning commands Cavity to be tuned Cavity tuning command

0 1 2 3 4 5

02 02 02 02 02 02

05 05 05 05 05 05

00 00 00 00 00 00

01 02 04 08 10 20

00 00 00 00 00 00

1F 1F 1F 1F 1F 1F

00 00 00 00 00 00

27 28 2A 2E 36 46

Table Maint. 3-10 CTU 1800 CCB cavity tuning commands Cavity to be tuned Cavity tuning command

0 1 2 3 4 5

02 02 02 02 02 02

05 05 05 05 05 05

00 00 00 00 00 00

01 02 04 08 10 20

02 02 02 02 02 02

BC BC BC BC BC BC

00 00 00 00 00 00

C6 C7 C9 CD D5 E5

Table Maint. 3-11 CTU 900 and CTU 1800 CCB cavity parking commands Cavity to be parked Cavity parking command

0 1 2 3 4 5

C2 C2 C2 C2 C2 C2

02 02 02 02 02 02

00 00 00 00 00 00

01 02 04 08 10 20

C5 C6 C8 CC D4 E4

1. 2.

Remove the power meter and reconnect the antenna. Use the Restoring the site procedure to return the site to service.
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GSM

Site restoration
After all installed CTUs have been checked and calibrated, perform the following steps to restore the site: This is done in two stages:
S S

RF output power check. Returning the CTUs to call processing mode.

RF output power check


To check RF output power, perform the following steps: 1. Disconnect the antenna. Connect a dummy load to the meter and ensure the meter is fitted with a 50 W element. Connect the meter to the Tx output. Return the DIP switches on the CCB control boards to their original positions. Remove the 9-way to 9-way EQCP cable from the TTY port and connect the 9-way to 9-way cable to the MCU MMI port. CAUTION 4. 5.
The following step must be carried out to initialize software and so ensure the CTU is correctly brought into service.

2. 3.

Press the reset button on the front panel of the CTU. Unlock the DRI under test using the following commands: unlock_device # dri A * state # DRI A * Where:
# A *

is:
the number of the site logged into. the antenna/relative cell number (0 to 5). DRI number on the antenna.

This returns the CTU to the Unlocked_Busy state (confirmed by the state command). 6. 7. Monitor and record the wattmeter reading. This should be the same as the maximum power set up in step 3 of Calibrating cell site power. Lock the CTU by entering: lock_device # dri A * 0 Where:
# A *

is:
the number of the site logged into. the antenna/relative cell number (0 to 5). DRI number on the antenna.

Repeat step 5 to step 7 for all CTUs.


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Returning the CTUs to call processing mode


To return the CTUs to call processing mode, proceed as follows: 1. 2. 3. 4. Remove the wattmeter and reconnect the antenna lead to the Tx port. Unlock all CTUs tested using the command detailed in step 5 of RF output power check. Remove the 9-way to 9-way cable from the MCUF MMI port. Inform the OMC-R the VSWR and cell site power calibration has been completed.

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Checking the database equipage

GSM

Checking the database equipage


Introduction to checking the database
The database equipage checks determine what devices and functions have been equipped in the BSC/Horizonmacro database. There are two stages to the procedure:
S S

Preparing for the test. Checking the database equipage.

Test equipment required


The following test equipment is required during the procedure:
S S S

An IBM-compatible personal computer (PC). Terminal emulator software. A 9-way to 9-way cable (a diagram of this cable is provided in Figure Maint. 3-1 of the Test equipment, leads and plugs section). CAUTION
All test equipment and test leads must be calibrated annually by a recognized laboratory. Test equipment and test leads must not be calibrated in the field. Do not optimize Motorola cellular base stations with test equipment that is beyond its calibration due date. Allow test equipment to warm up for 30 minutes before use.

Commands used
The following commands are used during the procedure: disp_site disp_equipment
Displays the site number. Displays the active equipment at a specified site.

Preparation for database checks


To prepare for the database equipage checks, perform the following steps: 1. 2. 3. Ensure that the site is in call processing mode. Connect the serial A port on the PC to a MCUF TTY port using the 9-way to 9-way cable. Start the terminal emulator program at the PC.

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Checking the database equipage

Database equipage check procedure


To check the database for devices and functions, perform the following steps: 1. At the CUST MMI prompt type: disp_site The following message (from the MCUF) is displayed:
current site is #

where # = the number of the site logged into. 2. At the CUST MMI prompt type: disp_equipment # where # = the number of the site logged into. A complete list of the equipment and functions in the database is displayed. For example:
CSFP BTP DRI DRI DRI DRI DRI DRI DRI DRI DRI DRI DRI DRI MSI MMS MMS MMS MMS MMS MMS RSL GCLK EAS CAB SITE PATH RTF RTF RTF RTF RTF RTF RTF RTF RTF RTF RTF RTF 000 000 000 010 020 030 100 110 120 130 200 210 220 230 000 000 010 020 030 040 050 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 010 020 030 100 110 120 130 200 210 220 230

(0 1 0) (0 0 0) (0 3 0) (0 2 0) (1 1 0) (1 0 0) (1 3 0) (1 2 0) (2 1 0) (2 0 0) (2 3 0) (2 2 0)

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GSM

3.

To check the MSI configuration at the CUST MMI prompt type: disp_equipment # MSI 0 0 Where: # = site number. A message similar to the following example is displayed:
MSI identifier: 0 MSI type [msi_type]: NIU2

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Checking the E1/T1 link

Checking the E1/T1 link


Introduction to checking the E1/T1 link
The E1/T1 link checks verify the integrity of the links back to the BSC/MSC. There are two stages to the procedure:
S S

Preparing for the test. Checking the E1/T1 link.

Test equipment required


The E1/T1 link checks require the following test equipment:
S S S

An IBM compatible personal computer (PC). Terminal emulator software. A 9-way to 9-way cable (a diagram of this cable is provided in Figure Maint. 3-1 of the Test equipment, leads and plugs section). CAUTION
All test equipment and test leads must be calibrated annually by a recognized laboratory. Test equipment and test leads must not be calibrated in the field. Do not optimize Motorola cellular base stations with test equipment that is beyond its calibration due date. Allow test equipment to warm up for 30 minutes before use.

Commands used
The following command is used to carry out the procedure: state
Displays the status of specified devices or functions.

Preparation for the E1/T1 link check


The following procedure is used to set up the equipment to check the E1/T1 links: 1. 2. 3. Make sure the site is in call processing mode. Connect the serial A port on the PC to an MCUF TTY port using the 9-way to 9-way cable. Start the terminal emulator program at the PC.

The system and the hardware are set up to check the E1/T1 links.

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Checking the E1/T1 link

GSM

E1/T1 link test procedure


The following procedure is used to check the E1/T1 link: 1. Contact the BSC/MSC of the E1/T1 link to be tested, and request a loopback on the relevant Digital Distribution Frame (DDF) port. NOTE
Repeat for all NIUs and E1/T1 links.

S S

If the E1/T1 link has not been installed, perform this test at the DDF in the site. If no DDF is fitted, do this test at the top of the cabinet.

2. 3.

Ascertain the site number, equipment list and MMS configuration. At the CUST MMI prompt enter: state # MMS * * * Where:
# * * *

is:
location. dev/func id. dev/func id. dev/func id.

For example: state 2 MMS 0 1 0 The system displays the following message from the MCUF:
DEVICE STATUS INFORMATION FOR LOCATION 2: OPER STATES: D:Disabled E:Enabled B:Busy ADMIN STATES: L:Locked U:Unlocked E:Equipped

S:Shutdown

Last Transition Related Device State Reason dd/mm hh:mm:ss Function MMS 0 1 0 BU No reason 18/02 13:23:05 None

END OF STATUS REPORT

If this display shows Unlocked and Busy, then the NIU port (MMS), T43, cabling and the E1/T1 link are all good. If the loop is removed and the command re-entered, the result will be Unlocked and Disabled. NOTE
The NIU requires a minimum of 20 seconds after receiving these commands before it registers a change in status. If the display continues to show Unlocked and Busy, this may be because: 1. The wrong connection is looped, if the cabling is direct. 2. The MMS may be terminated by a device generating an E1/T1 link.

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Checking PIX connections and alarms

Checking PIX connections and alarms


Introduction to checking the PIX connections and alarms
The alarm tests check the serial connections and alarm status. There are two stages to the procedure:
S S

Preparing for the test. Testing the PIX connections using the database external alarm system (EAS).

Test equipment required


The serial and alarm tests require the following test equipment:
S S S

An IBM compatible personal computer (PC). Terminal emulator software. A 9-way to 9-way cable (a diagram of this cable is provided in Figure Maint. 3-1 of the Test equipment, leads and plugs section. CAUTION
All test equipment and test leads must be calibrated annually by a recognized laboratory. Test equipment and test leads must not be calibrated in the field. Do not optimize Motorola Cellular Base Stations with test equipment that is beyond its calibration due date. Allow test equipment to warm up for 30 minutes before use.

Commands used
The following command is used to test the PIX connections: alarm_mode <site number> on disp_act_alarm <site number>
Enables alarm reporting for a specified site. Displays active alarms at the specified site.

equip <site number> Equip the external alarm system at the specified site. EAS

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GSM

Preparing for the PIX connections and alarms test


The following procedure is used to prepare for the PIX connections and alarms test: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Make sure the software download has been completed. Connect the serial A port on the PC to the master MCUF using the 9-way to 9- way cable. Start the terminal emulator program at the PC. The system displays the CUST MMI prompt. Enter the password at the CUST MMI prompt. Use the equip <site number> EAS command to set up reference conditions for checking that the alarms operate correctly when the appropriate relay changes state. Refer to Technical Description: BSS Command Reference, (68P02901W23) for specific details regarding the equip command.

PIX connection test procedure


The following procedure can be used to test the PIX connections on each PIX board. 1. At the CUST MMI prompt type: alarm_mode # on Where:
#

is:
the site number.

2.

Connect a suitable test plug to the PIX input on the cabinet interface panel. NOTE
Wait at least six seconds before continuing the testing. The time is required to allow polling to detect the presence of the test plug.

3.

Type the disp_act_alarm command to view the alarms. The system displays all 8 alarms. NOTE
The display depends on the database settings, that is, whether a fault condition is indicated by a closed loop or an open loop.

4.

Change the state of each alarm using the test plug/lead. If the appropriate relay is operating correctly, the alarm state will change accordingly (alarm either cleared or activated). Remove the test plug. The system clears the alarm display.

5.

6.

Repeat the procedure for the second PIX board.


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Chapter 4

Parts information

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Horizonmacro indoor parts list

Horizonmacro indoor parts list


Introduction to Horizonmacro indoor parts list
In the parts lists contained in this chapter, each item consists of a location number (related to the associated diagram), description, and an order number. The order number uniquely identifies the required component. Some components are used in different equipment in addition to Horizonmacro indoor. Many items are the same for Horizonmacro outdoor. Several items are the same for M-Cell6.

FRU items
The majority of items on the parts list are field replaceable units (FRUs). It is not intended to supply sub-units of these spares.

Ordering method
Contact the local Motorola office for ordering information, including cost and delivery. If an item in the parts list is marked TBA, this means that the part number for the item was not available at the time of publication of this manual. NOTE
Motorola reserves the right to change the design of the product without notice. The information provided in this chapter is intended as a guide. If the customer requires the latest information, then consult the Motorola local office who will be able to check on the web and confirm the current situation. Some items, for example CCBs and PSMs, are produced by different manufacturers, and so a replacement may appear slightly different to the item it is replacing. All items bearing the same order number, regardless of manufacturer, are fully compatible.

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Horizonmacro indoor parts list

GSM

Diagram of cabinet modules


Figure Maint. 4-1 to Figure Maint. 4-5 shows the cabinet modules, including major FRUs, without door or hood/stacking bracket for clarity.

Figure Maint. 4-1 Diagram of indoor cabinet showing major FRUs


FEEDTHROUGH PLATE THREE Tx BLOCKS (DCFs SHOWN AS EXAMPLE) 4 5

3 ONE SURF (Rx)

6 INDOOR SPLIT SECTOR CABLE PAIR SIX CTU/CTU2s 2

14 50 OHM LOAD (FITTED TO UNUSED PORT) 7 T43/BIB 8 DIGITAL MODULE SHELF (see Figure Maint. 4-3)

13 TWO 2-FAN UNITS 12 3 x PSMs OR 2 x PSMs + HOLD-UP BATTERY MODULE 11 CIRCUIT BREAKER MODULE (CBM)

9 10 ONE 4-FAN UNIT EXTENSION CABINET OPTICAL FIBRE

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Horizonmacro indoor parts list

Spares tables
Table Maint. 4-1 to Table Maint. 4-5 list the Horizonmacro indoor spares, available as at October 2003. Location numbers in each table refer to the associated preceding diagram. Contact the Motorola local office for an up to date list.
Table Maint. 4-1 List of Horizonmacro indoor spares Location Description Order No

1 2 3 4 4 4 4 2 2 3 3 4 4 4 4 2 2 3 3 4 4 4 4 2 3 4 4 4 4 4

Indoor cabinet 1900 CTU 1900 SURF 1900 DCF 1900 DDF 1900 HCU 1900 TDF 1800 CTU 1800 CTU2 1800 SURF (single band) 1800 SURF (dual band) 1800 DCF 1800 DDF 1800 HCU 1800 TDF 900 CTU 900 CTU2 900 SURF (single band) 900 SURF (dual band) 900 DCF 900 DDF 900 HCU 900 TDF 850 CTU 850 SURF 850 DCF 850 DDF 850 HCU 850 TDF Dual band TDF
Maintenance and Parts: Horizonmacro indoor

SW1053 TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA SWRG5197 SWRG9135 SWRG2880H SVRG1179H SVLG1224 SVLG1225 SVLG1227 SVLG1226 SWRF5193 SWRF9139 SWRF8352H SWRF2879H SVLF1224 SVLF1225 SVLF1227 SVLF1226 TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA SVLX1198

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Horizonmacro indoor parts list

GSM

Location

Description

Order No

5 6 7 7 8 9 9 9 10 11 12 12 12 12 13 14

Feedthrough plate assembly Indoor split sector cable pair BIM/BIB CIM/T43 Digital module shelf 2nd (Extension) cabinet fibre 3rd (Extension) cabinet fibre 4th (Extension) cabinet fibre 4-fan unit CBM Hold-up battery module Indoor 27 V PSM Indoor 48 V PSM Indoor 110/240 V PSM 2-fan unit SMA 50 ohm load Indoor plinth *Indoor blanks set PCMCIA Air filter kit (pack of 10) CTU/CTU2 Tx cable Duplexer cable

SVLN1243 SVKN1233 SWLN4024 SWLN4025 (see Table Maint. 4-3) SVKN1244 SVKN1245 SVKN1246 SWHN5790B SWHN5519 SVPN1161 SVPN1220 SVPN1221 SVPN1222 SWHN5289B SVLN1230 SVLN1247 SVLN1219 SWLN5239 SVFF1209 SVKN1304 SVKN1305

NOTE

*These are sets of blank plates which fit PSMs, Tx blocks and transceivers.

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Horizonmacro indoor parts list

View of CCBs in stacking bracket


Figure Maint. 4-2 shows the CCBs located in the stacking bracket.

Figure Maint. 4-2 CCBs in installed position with CCB basket bar attached
CCB0 1 CCB1 1

2 2 CCB CONTROL 3 CCB BOARD INSTALLATION (REDUNDANT) KIT (BASKET) CCB CONTROL BOARD (MASTER)

ig.336.rh

CCB spares table


Table Maint. 4-2 outlines the spares for the CCBs and stacking bracket.
Table Maint. 4-2 CCB and stacking bracket spares Location Description Order No

1 1 1 1 2 3 NOTE

1800 CCB (Master) 1800 CCB (Extender) 900 CCB (Master) 900 CCB (Extender) CCB control board CCB installation kit

SVLG1241 SVLG1242 SVLF1241 SVLF1242 SWLN4507 SWHN5927

CCBs are not currently available for the GSM850 and PCS1900 BTS variants and cannot be used with CTU2s.

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Horizonmacro indoor parts list

GSM

Digital module and BPSM locations


Figure Maint. 4-3 shows the individual digital module and microBCU power supply module (BPSM) locations.

Figure Maint. 4-3 Digital module and BPSM locations


MCUF B 2

DIGITAL MODULE SHELF

FMUX 3 NIU B0 4 NIU B1 4 BPSM 5

1 ALARM MODULE

REDUNDANT (B)

2 MCUF A

MASTER (A)

3 FMUX 4 NIU A0 4 NIU A1

5 BPSM

ig.322.rh

Digital module and BPSM table


Table Maint. 4-3 outlines the spares for the digital modules and BPSM.
Table Maint. 4-3 Digital module and BPSM spares Location Description Order No

1 2 3 4 4 5

Alarm module MCUF FMUX NIU-E1 NIU-T1 BPSM

SWLN5228 SWLN5227 SWLN4406 SWLN4403 SWLN4404 SWPN2567

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Horizonmacro indoor parts list

Diagram of the door


Figure Maint. 4-4 shows the internal and external view of the door.

Figure Maint. 4-4 Internal and external view of the door


INTERNAL VIEW
DOOR ALARM BRACKET DOOR STOP BRACKET

EXTERNAL VIEW

VERTICAL AIR BAFFLE

HONEYCOMB VENTILATION

VENTILATION GRID

TRIGGER LATCH

ig.266.rh

Door table
Table Maint. 4-4 outlines the door spare.
Table Maint. 4-4 Door spare Location Description Order No

Indoor door

SWHN5556

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Horizonmacro indoor parts list

GSM

Diagram of hood
Figure Maint. 4-5 shows a top view of the optional hood.

Figure Maint. 4-5 View of the hood as seen from the front of the cabinet

Indoor hood table


Table Maint. 4-5 outlines the indoor hood spare.
Table Maint. 4-5 Indoor hood spare Location Description Order No

Indoor hood

SVLN1231

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Glossary of unique terms for this equipment

Glossary of unique terms for this equipment


Overview
These glossary items have been selected as unique to this Horizonmacro product, or common only to M-Cell6. These and other GSM terms can be found in System Information: GSM Overview 68P02901W01.

Glossary terms
BPSM Micro BCU Power Supply Module CBM Circuit Breaker Module CCB Cavity Combining Block CTU Compact Transceiver Unit CTU2 Compact Transceiver Unit 2 DCF Duplexed Combining bandpass Filter DDF Dual-stage Duplexed combining Filter FMUX Fibre optic Multiplexer HCU Hybrid Combining Unit HPD High Powered Duplexer MCUF Main Control Unit with dual FMUX NIU Network Interface Unit SURF Sectorized Universal Receiver Front-end TDF Twin Duplexed Filter
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Glossary of unique terms for this equipment

GSM

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Index

Service Manual: Horizonmacro indoor


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68P02902W06-C006

I1

GSM

I2

Service Manual: Horizonmacro indoor 68P02902W06-C006

29 Jan 2007

GSM

A
Acronyms, main cabinet equipment, Tech. 14 Alarm module display, Tech. 627 extension cabinet, Tech. 626 functionality, Tech. 626 overview, Tech. 625 replacement, Maint. 272 replacement alarm, Tech. 626 view, Tech. 625 Alarms extension cabinets, Tech. 626 PSM, Tech. 46 Anchor bolts, torque values, Tech. 115

C
Cabinet dimensions, Tech. 118 weight, Tech. 115 Cage backplane, Tech. 29 replacement, Maint. 26 CAL port, MCUF, Tech. 69 Calibration, preserving on a transceiver, Maint. 225 CBIA attachment screws, Maint. 26 interface panel, Tech. 212 overview, Tech. 29 replacement, Maint. 26 CBM front panel diagram, Tech. 412 operation, Tech. 413 overview, Tech. 412 replacement, Maint. 215 CCB calibration, Maint. 326 control board, Tech. 548 functional diagram, Tech. 551 identification, TCB0 and TCB1, Maint. 269 overview, Tech. 548 replacement, Maint. 269 spares, Maint. 47 CCB basket, description, Tech. 222 CCB connector, pinouts, Tech. 215 CCB control board, removal, Maint. 270 Cell site power (CSPWR), Maint. 225 calibration, Maint. 315 CIM, pinouts, Tech. 217 CIM/BIM, (T43/BIB), Tech. 621 CINDY tool, Maint. 33 Circuit breaker module operation, Tech. 413 overview, Tech. 412 Cleaning, filter, Maint. 110 clear_cal_data command, output format, Maint. 314 Clearance, cabinet positioning, Tech. 118 CM database, viewing calibration data, Maint. 228
Service Manual: Horizonmacro indoor

B
Backplane cage, Tech. 29 function, Tech. 212 harness, Tech. 210 replacement, Maint. 26 Baseband hopping, Tech. 524 Battery backup, holdup module, optional BBS, Tech. 114 Bay level calibration, CTU/CTU2, Maint. 236 BDM port, MCUF, Tech. 69 BIB, pinouts, Tech. 215 BIM, pinouts, Tech. 215 Blanking plate replacement, Maint. 268 Tx block screws, Tech. 533 Boot code download, Tech. 610 CTU status LEDs, Tech. 512 CTU2, Tech. 518 BPSM dc power outputs, Tech. 415 LED display, Tech. 415 locations, Tech. 63 replacement, Maint. 272

29 Jan 2007

68P02902W06-C006

I3

GSM

Component identification, main cabinet, Tech. 1 5 Connectors torque values, Tech. 115 transceiver, Tech. 514 Control board, CCB, Tech. 548 CTU description, Tech. 511 front panel, Tech. 514 LED status indicators, Tech. 512 power output, Tech. 511 Rx bay level calibration procedures, Maint. 237 Rx function, Tech. 515 testing Rx circuitry, Tech. 510 Tx connector, Tech. 515 CTU/CTU2 preserving calibration, Maint. 225 replacement, Maint. 221 CTU2 description, Tech. 516 features, Tech. 516 front panel connectors, Tech. 520 interface function, Tech. 522 interface to SURF, Tech. 521 LED status indicators, Tech. 518 reset, Tech. 520 restrictions, Tech. 516 Rx bay level calibration procedures, Maint. 252 Rx function, Tech. 521 Tx connector, Tech. 521

Dimensions cabinet, Tech. 114 indoor cabinet, Tech. 118 site for cabinet, Tech. 118 Door locking angles, Maint. 18 operation, Maint. 18 replacement, Maint. 27 spares, Maint. 49 Door lock, replacement, Maint. 26 Door sensor, replacement, Maint. 26 Duplexing, Tech. 55

E
E1 NIU, Tech. 620 E1/T1 link, checking, Maint. 337 EGPRS, Tech. 523 EMC, containment, Maint. 268 Extension cabinets, alarm transmission, Tech. 626 External alarm connector, pinouts, Tech. 214 External alarms, shorting plug, Tech. 214

F
Fan, replacement, Maint. 213 Fan module, individual fan replacement, Maint. 2 6 Fans heat control, Tech. 33 temperature control, Tech. 34 Feedthrough plate replacement, Maint. 268 Tx block screws, Tech. 533 Fibre optic extension, top panel, Tech. 28 Filter, removal and cleaning, Maint. 110 FMUX connecting extension cabinets, Tech. 623 function, Tech. 624 internal to MCUF, Tech. 615 overview, Tech. 623 replacement, Maint. 272 FMUX fibre optic connections, MCUF, Tech. 69

D
Debug port, MCUF, Tech. 69 Digital boards power supply, Tech. 414 replacement, Maint. 272 Digital module shelf, spares, Maint. 48 Digital modules locations, Tech. 63 overview, Tech. 63 redundancy, Tech. 63

I4

Service Manual: Horizonmacro indoor 68P02902W06-C006

29 Jan 2007

GSM

Frequency band characteristics, Tech. 116 Frequency hopping, description, Tech. 524 FRU CBM, Maint. 215 door, Maint. 27 fan, Maint. 213 hood, Maint. 210 PSM, Maint. 217 stacking bracket, Maint. 211 SURF, Maint. 262 Tx block, Maint. 265 FRUs, assumed procedures, Maint. 18

L
LAPD encoding, Tech. 620 LED status indicators, transceiver, Tech. 512, Tech. 518 Loopback test availability software, Tech. 510 functional diagram, Tech. 59 mode description, Tech. 510

M
MCell2, Use of MCUF as MCU, Tech. 66 MCell6 Horizonmacro compatibility, Tech. 19 Horizonmacro component comparison, Tech. 110 Use of MCUF as MCU, Tech. 66 MCUF code loading, Tech. 611 front panel interfaces, Tech. 69 front panel LEDs, Tech. 610 functional diagram, Tech. 68 GPROC functions, Tech. 67 link to redundant MCUF, Tech. 69 redundancy, Tech. 64 replacement, Maint. 272 synchronization circuit, Tech. 619 technical description, Tech. 66 Used as MCU, Tech. 66 view, Tech. 67 MCUF (GCLK), calibration, Maint. 279

G
GPS connector, pinouts, Tech. 214

H
Harness backplane, Tech. 210 cage, replacement, Maint. 26 HCU, replacement, Maint. 268 Heat control, cabinet, PSMs, CTUs, Tech. 33 Heat sensors description, Tech. 33 replacement, Maint. 29 Holdup battery module, Tech. 47 Hood Removal, Maint. 18 replacement, Maint. 210 spares, Maint. 410 Hybrid Combining Unit, Tx block screws, Tech. 533

N
Names, main cabinet equipment, Tech. 14 NIU block diagram, Tech. 618 connections to T43, Tech. 622 database identity, Tech. 616, Tech. 621 distance delay measurements, Tech. 619 front panel LEDs, Tech. 617 redundancy, Tech. 64 replacement, Maint. 272 reset, Tech. 619 TTY ports, Tech. 619

I
ICS connector, pinouts, Tech. 219 Indoor cabinet, dimensions, Tech. 114 Indoor cabinet , fans, Tech. 34 Interface panel As part of CBIA, Tech. 212 replacement, Maint. 26 Interfaces, MCUF front panel, Tech. 69

P
Parts list, introduction, Maint. 43
Service Manual: Horizonmacro indoor

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68P02902W06-C006

I5

GSM

PCMCIA interface, MCUF, Tech. 69 Pinouts BIB/BIM, Tech. 215 CCB connector, Tech. 215 external alarm connector, Tech. 214 GPS connector, Tech. 214 ICS connector, Tech. 219 PIX connectors, Tech. 218 T43/CIM, Tech. 217 PIX outputs and inputs, Tech. 218 test lead connections, Maint. 36 PIX alarms, checking, Maint. 339 PIX connectors, pinouts, Tech. 218 PIX outputs, MCUF, Tech. 610 Power consumption, Tech. 112 supply requirements, Tech. 112 Power supplies, BPSM, Tech. 414 Power Supply Module, technical information, Tech. 44 Power up, code load, Maint. 116 Preserve transceiver calibration data feature, Maint. 230 PSM alarms, Tech. 46 front panel LEDs, Tech. 46 replacement, Maint. 217 types, Tech. 44

Responses, CTU shutdown, Tech. 33 RF output power, Tech. 113 receive hardware, Tech. 54 test modes, Tech. 510 transmit hardware, Tech. 55

RF connections, torque values, Tech. 115 RF equipment, overview, Tech. 53 RF loopback, test function, Tech. 58 RF overview, Tech. 56 RF test function, functional diagram, Tech. 59

S
Sensitivity, Tech. 114 Sensors cabinet shut down, Tech. 33 fan control, Tech. 33 indoor temperature, Tech. 33 replacement, Maint. 29 SMA connector CTU, Tech. 515 CTU2, Tech. 521 Software requirements, Tech. 111 Spares, Maint. 45 introduction, Maint. 43 Specifications, Tech. 111 Stacking bracket description, Tech. 222 maintenance removal, Maint. 18 replacement, Maint. 211 Structural cosiderations, Tech. 118 SURF installing a replacement module, Maint. 264 module variants, Tech. 525 removal procedure, Maint. 263 replacement, Maint. 262 test mode, Tech. 510 module variants, Tech. 57 SURF (dual band), functional description, Tech. 531 SURF (single band), functional description, Tech. 528 SURF module, dual band capability, Tech. 531 Synthesizer hopping, Tech. 524

R
Replacement CBM, Maint. 215 door, Maint. 27 fan, Maint. 213 heat sensors, Maint. 29 hood, Maint. 210 PSM, Maint. 217 stacking bracket, Maint. 211 SURF, Maint. 262 Tx block, Maint. 265 Reporting faulty devices, Maint. 13 Reset, CTU2, Tech. 520 Reset button, transceiver, Tech. 514

I6

Service Manual: Horizonmacro indoor 68P02902W06-C006

29 Jan 2007

GSM

T
T1 NIU, Tech. 620 T43, pinouts, Tech. 217 T43/BIB (CIM/BIM), Tech. 621 Connector to NIU, Tech. 621 TATI, Maint. 327 control board CCB, Tech. 548 TCB, set switch, Tech. 548 Temperature, environmental limits, Tech. 111 Temperature control fan unit description, Tech. 34 sensors, Tech. 33 Test frequency tables CTU, Maint. 242 CTU2, Maint. 259 Test leads, verification, Maint. 35 Tools, required for installation, Maint. 15 Top panel description, Tech. 28 fibre optic extension hole, Tech. 28 Torque values, general, Tech. 115

Transceiver bay level offset tables, Maint. 236 calibration procedure, Maint. 232 CTU description, Tech. 511 CTU2 description, Tech. 516 front panel, Tech. 514 preserve calibration data procedure, Maint. 231 recalibration procedure, Maint. 234 Rx function, Tech. 515 Rx functions, Tech. 54 Tx calibration, Maint. 37 Tx functions, Tech. 55 variants, Tech. 56 Transceiver link features, MCUF, Tech. 612 TTY interface, MCUF, Tech. 69 TTY port CTU2, Tech. 520 transceiver, Tech. 514 Tx block, Tech. 57 fitting a replacement module, Maint. 268 introduction, Tech. 533 replacement, Maint. 265 screw retention, Tech. 533 Type approval, Tech. 111

V
Verification, Maint. 33 VSWR CCBs, Maint. 326 checking, CTU, Maint. 315 VSWR test mode, Tech. 510

Service Manual: Horizonmacro indoor


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68P02902W06-C006

I7

GSM

I8

Service Manual: Horizonmacro indoor 68P02902W06-C006

29 Jan 2007

CMM labeling and disclosure table


The Peoples Republic of China requires that Motorolas products comply with China Management Methods (CMM) environmental regulations. (China Management Methods refers to the regulation Management Methods for Controlling Pollution by Electronic Information Products.) Two items are used to demonstrate compliance; the label and the disclosure table. The label is placed in a customer visible position on the product. Logo 1 means that the product contains no substances in excess of the maximum concentration value for materials identified in the China Management Methods regulation. Logo 2 means that the product may contain substances in excess of the maximum concentration value for materials identified in the China Management Methods regulation, and has an Environmental Friendly Use Period (EFUP) in years, fifty years in the example shown.
Logo 2

Logo 1

The Environmental Friendly Use Period (EFUP) is the period (in years) during which the Toxic and Hazardous Substances (T&HS) contained in the Electronic Information Product (EIP) will not leak or mutate causing environmental pollution or bodily injury from the use of the EIP. The EFUP indicated by the Logo 2 label applies to a product and all its parts. Certain field-replaceable parts, such as battery modules, can have a different EFUP and are marked separately. The Disclosure Table is intended only to communicate compliance with China requirements; it is not intended to communicate compliance with EU RoHS or any other environmental requirements.

2007 Motorola, Inc.

68P02901W00-E