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Chapter I Introduction Business companies are part of society and therefore must be concerned about societal issues such

as ethical, responsible behavior toward people and the environment and sensitivity to the diversity of people in the marketing environment. This view of the Business companies can be beneficial to their marketing effort. This study focuses on Nokias CSR direct effect on DLSUD students brand perception. The researchers found this idea to be interesting because much has been written about the current state of corporate social responsibility (CSR), and depending on your point of view, its waxing or waning influence inside the worlds largest corporations. While it may be true that some companies have de-emphasized their CSR programs while they were fighting for survival or focused on maintaining some semblance of order, corporate social responsibility will continue to grow in importance inside most major publicly traded companies particularly those who are interested in enhancing their reputations with stakeholders and build good image in their target market. According to their vision and values posted in the website www.nokia.com, NOKIA was committed to helping the society build a healthy environment. In fact, Nokia is determined to integrate sustainability in their products and operations. They improve their offices, factories, logistical operations and use of technologies in ways that save energy and reduce emissions. And they aim to ensure that sound environmental, health and safety, labor and ethical practices are embedded within all their operations. They created the clear climate strategy in 2006 and it was reviewed and updated in 2010. The strategy looks at the energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions of their

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products and operations and sets reduction targets accordingly. While Nokia is not a particularly energy intensive company, theyve still made major improvements. They also manufacture our phones primarily in their own factories and apply the highest standards to ensure safe and supportive labor conditions. Proximity to suppliers and partners also brings environmental benefits. They also set the goal to have Eco choices at factories. They have set a target to reduce waste sent to landfill from their factories by half annually, with a view to reaching close to 100% waste utilization by the end of 2012. And theyre doing pretty well so far. Five out of seven Nokia factories have already reached 100% waste utilization or are within 1% of that target. In 2011, Nokia caused 45,900 tons of waste. Of this, 91% was reused or recycled, energy was recovered from 5%, and only 4% went for final disposal in landfill or incineration without energy recovery. They also ensure that the materials used in their products come from socially and environmentally responsible sources. In line with Nokia Natural Resources Policy they want to ensure that all materials used in our products come from socially and environmentally responsible sources. For fiber based printing and packaging materials their aim is to use 100% certified renewable or recycled materials by 2015. They accept certifications by Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) and / or The Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC) with priority on the former. (http://www.nokia.com/global/about-nokia/people-and-planet/operations/operations/) Locally, in SM City Dasmarias, Nokia is also launching its campaign for proper ways of disposing old cellular phones and batteries.

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DLSUD, on the other hand, is also inculcating environmental awareness to its students. One of the universitys most fervent advocacies is the conservation of Mother N ature. It is in this regard that the City Government of Legazpis Office of City Environment and Natural Resources visited the DLSU-D campus on Feb. 14 as part of their cross-visit to successful local government units and schools implementing the Ecological Solid Waste Management (ESWM) Program.(Newsette Vol. 20 no. 13 January 30-February 18, 2011 )The university is rich with projects geared towards the conservation of Mother Nature. One of these is recently concluded fun run TAKATAK: Takbo para sa Kabataa n, Takbo para sa Kalikasan. Connecting these institutions is their goal of taking care of the environment. Likewise, the students of DLSUD are also one of the target markets of NOKIA. College students are one of the main users of their products. By the use of this study we will be able to identify the effects of NOKIAs CSR to college students in DLSUD. This study likewise would like to further understand if CSR done by companies such as Nokia has direct effect on DLSUD students brand perception.

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Statement of the Problem This study aims to investigate the effects of Nokias Company Social Responsibility for the environment Green & Ethical Operations, in the DLSUD students brand perception. Specifically, this study will answer the following: 1. What are the profile of the respondents. 1.1 Age 1.2 Gender 2. What are the cognitive effects of Nokias Company Social Responsibility for the environment Green & Ethical Operations in the DLSUD students brand perception in terms of: 2.1 Knowledge 2.2 Meanings 2.3 Beliefs 3. What are the affective effects of Nokias Company Social Responsibility for the environment Green & Ethical Operations in the DLSUD students brand perception in terms of: 3.1 Emotions 3.2 Feelings 3.3 Moods 3.4 Evaluations 4) What is the significant relationship of CSR and brand image.

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Research objectives The following are the research objectives the group aims to follow as our guide throughout the research process: 1. To know the cognitive effects of Nokias Company Social Responsibility for the environment Green & Ethical Operations in the DLSUD students brand perception in terms of: 1.1 Knowledge 1.2 Meanings 1.3 Beliefs 2. To identify the affective effects of Nokias Company Social Responsibility for the environment Green & Ethical Operations in the DLSUD students brand perception in terms of: 2.1 Emotions 2.2 Feelings 2.3 Moods 2.4 Evaluations 3. To determine the significant relationship of CSR with brand image.

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Theoretical and Conceptual Framework Corporate Social Responsibility in Marketing

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities have the potential to create several distinct forms of value for customers. It is the customer perception of this value that mediates the relationship between CSR activities and subsequent financial performance. By categorizing major CSR activities and the different types of value each can create, this report offers a number of practical recommendations to business leaders embarking in CSR programs for their companies as stressed in the (Consumer Psychologist , 2009).

Affect and Cognition as Psychological Responses

This figure shows the relationship of affect and cognition, consumer behavior along with its consumer environment that must be considered in evaluating the marketing strategy. All of these factors might strongly affect it.

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Affect and cognition are different types of psychological responses consumers can have in consumer environment Affect are feeling responses. Cognition is mental (thinking) responses. Affect-Consumers can have both affective and cognitive responses to any element in the Wheel of Consumer Analysis Basic characteristics of the affective system are it is largely reactive; people have little direct control over their affective responses; affective responses are felt physically in the body; the system can respond to virtually any type of stimulus and lastly, most affective responses are learned . The three major factors of affect are the following: Emotions Feelings Moods Evaluations

Cognition is broadly refer to the thoughts and meanings produced by the system, as well as to mental processes such as: understanding, evaluating ,planning , deciding and thinking Major functions of peoples cognitive systems are: -To interpret, make sense of, and understand significant aspects of their personal experiences -To process these interpretations or meanings in carrying out cognitive tasks

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The three major factors of cognition are the following: Knowledge Meanings Beliefs

This figure shows the relationship of affective and cognitive responses with its environment. (Peter, J.P., & Olson, J.C. ,2009). Consumer Behavior and Marketing Strategy (McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. 8th edition )

The research will discuss the relationship between the NOKIAs CSRGreen and Ethical Operations and the brand image among DLSUD students. It can help us to determine how possibly consumer slow the pace of forgetting NOKIA because of its several campaigns. It may also enable us to identify how consumers could store observations regarding NOKIA and use their accumulated knowledge later 8|Page

to guide their own behavior in dealing with NOKIA and its products. It can be useful for us to measure how consumer thinks about NOKIA after launching its campaign NOKIAs CSR Green and Ethical Operations.

Brand Image of NOKIA among DLSUD students in terms of: NOKIAs CSR Green and Ethical Operations Cognition o Knowledge o Meanings o Beliefs Affect o Emotions o Feelings o Moods o Evaluations

Hyphothesis

Nokias Corporate Social Responsibility Green and Ethical Operations has no effect in their brand image among DLSU-D Students

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Scope and delimitation The study will cover the sample space, college students from De La Salle University-Dasmarinas. It will focus on the effects of Nokias corporate social responsibility towards the students of the specific University. The researchers will conduct a FGD (Focus Group Discussion) to a randomly selected student. Each student will be given short briefing about the topic of the survey before letting them to answer. The study will also include how these students react to the CSR activities of Nokia Green and Ethical Operations. Did it affect their brand perception or not. And what did they understand about these CSR activities. The study will basically focus on the cognitive effects of Nokias Company Social Responsibility for the environment Green & Ethical Operations in the DLSUD students brand perception in terms of knowledge, meanings and beliefs. It will also explore the affective effects of Nokias Company Social Responsibility for the environment Green & Ethical Operations in the DLSUD students brand perception in terms of emotions, feelings, moods and evaluations only. The study will not cover specific actions of the students resulting to the outcome Nokias CSR, as well as their preferred or current brand that they are using. IT will also not cover other CSR of Nokia. Students who are not enrolled in DLSU-D wont be able to participate in the research method to be conducted. Professors and other staffs or faculty are also not included as a respondent in the research. No questions not related to the topic are going to be given to the respondents.

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Significance of the study This study on the the effects Nokias Company Social Responsibility for the environment Green & Ethical Operations to their brand image among DLSUD students has significance to the problem is: The researchers will be able to get the insights and reaction of the students about these activities of Nokia. The researchers sample space will be educated (if theyre not awa re) that these CSR activities are done by the company. The students are going to appreciate CSR activities and do their part as a citizen. The students are going to be aware of the campaigns done by Nokia Nokia Company might be able to improve their CSR. Nokia Company might be able to assess their brand image in terms of CSR. Nokia Company might be able to determine what are the effects of their CSR efforts to DLSU-D students.

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Definition of terms Brand image- The impression in the consumers' mind of a brand's total personality (real and imaginary qualities and shortcomings). Can be classified into two main branches which is the cognitive and affective. Cognitive- the consumers way of thinking towards a product, company or brand Affective- the consumers emotional attachment towards a product, company or brand Belief- the consumers confidence or trust towards a product, company or brand Knowledge- the consumers information or understanding towards a product, company or brand that may be formed through the group to which they belonged. Meanings- are the variety of instrumental and symbolic connotations an individual associates with both tangible and intangible attributes formed in the mind of the consumers about a product, company or brand. Emotion - the consumers sentiment or sensation towards a product, company or brand. Feeling- the consumers personal or subjective experiences towards a product, company or brand. Mood- the consumers short-term temper, disposition towards a product, company or brand.

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Evaluation- the consumers assessment towards a product, company or brand. DLSUD students- students who are enrolled currently studying at De La Salle University Dasmarinas. CSR Corporate Social Responsibility-A companys sense of responsibility towards the community and environment (both ecological and social) in which it operates. Sample space- This is where the study will cover. The college students of DLSUD. Brand Perception- How they perceived, think about the brand. FGD (Focus Group Discussion)- used as a method to gather information from the respondents.

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Chapter 2 Review of Related Literature

Brand Image matters so much in business, and this is because it is the way people will look at your company, it is what affects who shops at your store, who buys your products and who uses your services. The phrase brand image gained notoriety when sales patterns began to show that feelings and visuals associated with brands were powerful motivators to purchase products. A lot of companies these days turn to effective brand strategies in order to connect effectively with their clients. However, having a brand is not enough; a company must maintain a good image to be able to attract prospective clients (http://www.brandidentityguru.com/brand_image_company.htm). Without a brand image which in some way reflects what you want to achieve, you wont be able to meet your objectives, as you will get the wrong customers, or in the extreme case, no customers and this will lead to you making no money and therefore no profits. Furthermore, brand image is the companys overall character. Thats why companies should present their objectives in a clear manner; of course, they dont want you to confuse their customers with unclear goals (http://profitduck.com/why-is-brand-image-and-brand-reputation-so-important/).

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Brand image is the overall impression in consumers mind that is formed from all sources. Consumers develop various associations with the brand. Based on these associations, they form brand image. It is the overall opinion of the customers about a certain brand. It can be characterized as one of a kind collection of associations in the mind of the target market. It also indicates the brands set of beliefs (http://managementstudyguide.com/brand-image.htm). Affect-Consumers can have both affective and cognitive responses to any element in the Wheel of Consumer Analysis Basic characteristics of the affective system are it is largely reactive; people have little direct control over their affective responses; affective responses are felt physically in the body; the system can respond to virtually any type of stimulus and lastly, most affective responses are learned . The three major factors of affect are the following: Emotions Feelings Moods Evaluations

Cognition is broadly refer to the thoughts and meanings produced by the system, as well as to mental processes such as: understanding, evaluating ,planning , deciding and thinking

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Major functions of peoples cognitive systems are: -To interpret, make sense of, and understand significant aspects of their personal experiences -To process these interpretations or meanings in carrying out cognitive tasks

The three major factors of cognition are the following: Knowledge Meanings Beliefs

(Peter, J.P., & Olson, J.C. ,2009). Moods are shorter-term emotional states, typically lasting hours, although they can last for days or longer. For example you may wake up feeling a bit down and stay that way for most of the day. We can be sent into a mood by an unexpected event, from the happiness of seeing an old friend to the anger of discovering betrayal by a partner. We may also just fall into a mood. Medical conditions such as depression are not really moods and are typically caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain. Moods can be caused by shorter-term chemical imbalances, for example brought on by a poor diet. The mental state you experience at a particular time is called mood. It encompasses both your thoughts and feelings, lasting longer than the latter and can refer to a group.

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Depending on the mood, we act relative to others. This is why, for example, you avoid a person when she is "one of those moods". Emotions as commonly experienced and discussed are different from moods and temperament in several ways. First, emotions tend to last for much shorter periods. The delight at being given a birthday present may subside in minutes as it is replaced by disappointment about a useless gift. Emotions thus tend to replace one another and it can be difficult to be both happy and sad (although we may have a good go at it). Emotions also tend to be more extreme than moods and temperament, with higher highs and lower lows. We can become very angry very quickly, though it is difficult to stay very angry and it may subside into an irritable mood or be replaced by another completely different emotions. Emotions tend to be very specific, triggered by noticeable events and are immediate reactions to these and which drive us to particular actions, for example running away from a snarling dog or going to chat up an attractive other person. Emotions represent the objective way to look at feelings or affects (in psychological terminology). For instance, you feel "yucky" (a feeling), but a psychologist will try to determine whether the emotion is sadness, irritability, anger or depression. Feelings encompass personal or subjective experiences of an emotion or sensation. Linguistic expressions like "I feel sad", "I feel pain" are ways of communicating feelings. In other words, a feeling represents the way you personally experience something. The syntagm "gut feeling" endorses the assertion that they are subjective and that logical and material explanations cannot account for them. Feelings

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is associated with your personality and can be based on beliefs, which does hold out hope. Product evaluation is important for several reasons. The obvious one, which makes it sometimes a life-saving matter for the consumer, arises because our lives, and the quality of those lives, depend on the evaluation of products by external agencies-for example, on the evaluation of drugs and of automobile safety systems. The second, a (metaphorically) life-saving matter for inventors, manufacturers, and service providers, is the role of product evaluation in the improvement of products and services, a role which has, for example, driven the computer field to an unmatched rate of improvement, although the quality of its product evaluation leaves much room for further improvement. The third reason for its importance is its involvement within other applied fields in evaluation, particularly within program evaluation. The extent of this involvement is only now beginning to be appreciated. Product Knowledge comes in various forms - a product's features for its intended purpose, what goes with what - a product's associations, and how a product works. A sales representative would be expected to know the product's features and sufficient of how it is used to convince the customer of its worth. When a sales contact is made, there is usually already understanding on the buyer's side of what the product broadly does, the sales rep only needing to fill in the holes - anticipate the customer's requirements, suggest support products and services, show how product features relate to the buyer's use of the product. Online selling cuts out the human representative, so some other means must be found to deliver the product knowledge.

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Product meaning is used to refer to the variety of instrumental and symbolic connotations an individual associates with both tangible and intangible attributes of a particular product or product category. Insight into the origins and nature of product meaning is of great application value to scientists and practitioners alike. Because product meaning reveals how consumers relate to certain products, it may predict how they respond to actual designs, and it allows one to explore the manner and extent to which past experience (e.g., frustrating product encounters) biases future use interaction. Product beliefs are the consumers confidence or trust towards a product, company or brand. It can be the chained ideas that consumers have conviction about the product. (Peter, J.P., & Olson, J.C. ,2009). Weve set recycling points mainly in the Nokia Care centers around the world to drop off your old Nokia equipment and give it a new life. If there is no recycling point near you, you can also drop your phone off at any electronics recycling point organized by your local authority. Nokia believes that affordable mobile technology has the potential to transform the delivery of these services, improve their quality and make them unavailable to many more people. And that can promote social and economic change on a huge scale (http://www.nokia.com/global/about-nokia/people-and-planet/sustainabledevices/recycling/recycling/). Esko Aho, Executive Vice President of Corporate Relations Responsibility explained it:

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We recognized that Nokias transformation was going to be a tough call for individuals working for Nokia, for local communities where we were operating, and for the company itself as well. If we are not handling this well, the company itself is going to suffer and our brand will suffer. Thats why we decided that we had to do this in a different way, in a way which creates opportunities as much as possible, and we can mitigate all of the risks related with this transformation. And that whole thinking was based on shared value. The idea that we do things in a way that everyone is able to win.

(http://www.triplepundit.com/2012/06/nokias-2011-csr-report-shows-sustainabilitydifficult-times/). We continued to look for possibilities to reduce the environmental impact of our devices and operations at each stage of the product life cycle. Focus areas include materials used, energy efficiency, the manufacturing process and recycling. We also introduced several new mobile services advocating sustainable lifestyles. They are constantly striving for superior performance in energy efficiency. The devices now feature a power-saving standby mode or a battery saver, which help you to save handset energy (http://i.nokia.com/blob/view/-/225536/data/2/-/nokia-cr-report-2008-pdf.pdf). Eco services have been developed to help people to make sustainable choices and to consider environment in everyday life (http://i.nokia.com/blob/view/-/225536/data/2/-/nokia-cr-report-2008-pdf.pdf). Corporate Social Responsibility creates a landing place in the minds of the target consumers. It not only caters to the Brand Equity awareness among the consumers but 20 | P a g e

also leads to a positive Brand Image in the minds of the potential consumers. Jamshedji Tata has very beautifully defined the Corporate Social Responsibility The clear definition of Corporate Social Responsibility is that the community is not just another stakeholder in our business but the very purpose of our existence (http://asbbs.org/files/2011/ASBBS2011v1/PDF/K/KaurM.pdf). CSR is not all about philanthropy or doing charity services for the community. This is not to say that such activities are unimportant. These actions on the part of a firm can help establish good relations with community members and leaders; however philanthropy and related actions are at best superficial manifestations of CSR. In order to understand CSR, one must consider the holistic attempt, on the part of a firm, to engage and conduct a meaningful dialogue with a wide spectrum of constituents or Stakeholders (http://www.ecrc.org.eg/Uploads/documents/Articles_Corporate%20social%20Responsi bility.pdf). Besides organizational identification, employees reactions to CSR initiatives may be governed by reciprocity, broadly defined as a pattern of mutually contingent exchange of gratifications (Gouldner, 1960) Men make charitable donations, not to earn the gratitude of the recipients, whom they never see, but to earn the approval of their peers who participate in the philanthropic campaign. Donations are exchanged for social approval, though the recipients of the donations and the suppliers of the approval are not identical, and the clarification of the connection between the two requires an analysis of the complex

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structures of indirect exchange. (http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/business/ICCSR/assets/muihqmluwosf.pdf). While companies increase the transparency of their CSR activities, they will also be doing efforts to enhance the way that they communicate proactively about the positive attributes of what they are doing. Corporate Social Responsibility Reports are everywhere.Social media like Facebook and Twitter and blogs like this one are increasingly being used by companies to not only report on what they do, but to promote what they do for the benefit of their various stakeholders and of course to their target market. Individuals, bloggers, governments, vendors, business partners, and citizens are all demanding more and better information about corporate impact on the environment and their communities. Therefore companies are more and more able to communicate their companies image as well that may surely affect the perception about their brand.

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Chapter 3 Methodology

Research Design Descriptive- Qualitative research is used to obtain information concerning the current status of the phenomena to describe "what exists" with respect to variables or conditions in a situation. The methods involved range from the survey which describes the status quo, the correlation study which investigates the relationship between variables, to developmental studies which seek to determine changes over time as found in Research Design in Occupational Education(2010). This will be a qualitative research using the descriptive method in order to suffice the problems stated in the first part of the study. According to Fraenkel and Wallen (2008), a descriptive or illustrative research is a method is used to determine a current phenomena where the topic occurs. This will answer the effects of Nokias corporate social responsibility in their brand image among DLSU-D Students. The researchers particularly choose to use this type of research where they will be able to probe in depth into each of our individual respondents situation or personality with the intent of diagnosing its relationship with their affective and cognitive responses to Nokias CSR. Respondents of the Study This study will be using the purposive random sampling which means that the researchers will be the one choosing the respondents. All the DLSUD students who have qualified or criteria may be chosen as one of the respondents. The criteria for choosing the respondents are the following: (1) Nokia phone user; (2) student of DLSUD; and (3) ages 18-25. The researchers chose the DLSUD students. One of the major target market of Nokia are the college students who need their product and has the buying power for it. Another point is that DLSUD is known for being environmental concerned conforming with their Lasallian core values. There will be two sets of FGD. The respondents in both FGD should follow the same criteria. Research Instrument The researcher use FGD Questionnaire Guide to comprehensively state their questions to their respondents. It has preliminary questions that test the awareness of the respondents of the brand itself. It is followed by several questions in each advocacy campaign and then a closing question. A letter for the FGD respondents will be provided stating the purpose of the research. The researchers also use video recorder that will be rotating to ensure every conversation and details will be captured especially to consider nonverbal reactions. Data Gathering Procedure 23 | P a g e

The researchers are going to conduct are focus group discussion near the vicinity of our respondents. A room with a capacity of 20-25 persons will be used for their convenience. The first batch will gather at around 1pm. The focus group discussion will start at around 1:30 pm. The video cameras were set in the room. One of the researchers will take pictures for documentation. The ushers and usherettes will assists the respondents in their corresponding seats where they are numbered 1-8. Papers and pen are prepared in their table. Opening prayer will be offered by one of the ushers. One facilitator will explain the discussion and house rules. The facilitator will discuss about Nokias CSR Green and Ethical Operations and will show some pictures of its products and campaign. Questions will be thrown by the facilitator. Respondent will raise their hand to answer. The questions will all be regarding the effects of Nokias corporate social responsibility in their brand image among DLSU-D Students. The respondents will also be asked to answer profiling sheet that will be given o them before or after the FGD. After which, refreshments will be served. The whole process repeats for the second batch. Statistical Treatment Data The data gathered will undergo the following processes. The verbal responses using the video will be transcribed written out word per word so that their verbal responses may be analyzed carefully. The answers of the respondent will be segregated according to their similarities. Each response will be analyzed and evaluated. Conclusion will be drawn out of it. Using the video, the researchers will also be observing the non-verbal data from the respondents to further juice up the information from them. The researchers will be using direct structured human observation To circumspectly assess the data, the gathered results from the FGD will be compared to each other. Using the theories stated in our framework, the results will be analyzed. The results will be presented using textual presentations.

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Chapter 4 Findings Chapter 5 Conclusion Researchers concluded that Nokias Company Social Responsibility for the environment Green & Ethical Operations, does not influence the DLSUD students perceptions of the brand. A big factor that cause the advocacy not to positively affect their brand image is the lack of awareness of it. They feel that NOKIA is concern with the quality of their product but are not aware with most of their campaign for the environment. Influenced by the Lasallian values the respondents are also motivated to be concerned to their environment but are not wellinvolved in activities and campaigns. With all the competing cellular companies foreign and local they found Nokia to be really aggressive with regards to product innovation but that ends there. Most respondents in both groups have and had no knowledge of the campaign and does understood the importance of such. The campaign gained no positive emotional responses from the group 1 However, in group 2 the campaign gained a bit more interest, for they are more susceptible to what the campaign aims to do. Upon showing them the campaigns, these responses give a favorable insight about Nokia. However, these does not make them more attached to the brand. The respondents are generally not aware of the campaigns. However, upon knowing the campaign, there is an increase interest manifested. Regardless of the respondents awareness, they agree on the conclusion that this campaign is very timely in relation to the environmental problems the Philippines had experienced and therefore found Nokia not only as a company of cellular phones but a company that has a communion of service. As a general conclusion, the study found that the Nokias Advocacy campaign does not influenced its target market's perception about the brand.

Chapter 6 Recommendation

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After a thorough analysis of data, the following recommendations are hereby made for each campaign in general: The study suggest that the company, Nokia should expand more the scope of their campaign Green & Ethical Operations, knowing that one of their market which are the students can be also much interested in campaigns like this believing that it is in line with their universities vocation. The researchers recommend that this campaign should be more visible on social networking sites in order to reach their target market. They can also work along with nongovernment organizations that has the same goals. It would be a great help if Nokia will do a plan to get the involvement of college students with the help of their university. Tie-up activities would surely do. A larger awareness campaign using different media will also help them increase involvement. Furthermore, Nokia should give priority on how to get people know more about this

particular campaign because most are willing to become part of a said campaign to help another people. More information regarding this campaign should be given to people in order for them to be more involved They should ensure coherence of CSR activity to build a CSR brand. Researchers have found evidence that when a company positions itself as a CSR brand as opposed to a company that just engages in CSR activities customers awareness levels increase. Ensure consistent, long-term commitment to each CSR activity in the portfolio In addition to the value perception of the activity per se, different corporate activities may have different impacts on the customers perception of the overall firms effort and long-term commitment to CSR. These two effects of CSR activities (the perception of value and the perception of firm commitment) are instrumental in customers decisions to support the firm,

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with higher levels of perceived effort and long-term commitment leading to more positive customer responses. Make adequate use of marketing to enhance the customer value proposition of CSR Cause-related marketing that makes a compelling case for the adoption of new social norms can help enhance the customer value proposition of a certain CSR activity. This study suggests that the future researchers may expand their research not just to ..

Bibliography Howell, L. (2002). Advocacy Marketing. Retrieved September 22, 2012, from http://EzineArticles.com/3779998) Peter, J.P., & Olson, J.C., (2009).Consumer Behavior and Marketing Strategy (8th ed), The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Key, J., Oklahoma State University, (1997). Retrieved September 22, 2012, from http://www.okstate.edu/ag/agedcm4h/academic/aged5980a/5980/newpage110.ht m Research Design in Occupational Education. Retrieved August 21, 2012, from http://www.okstate.edu/ag/agedcm4h/academic/aged5980a/5980/newpage110.ht m Business Ethics. Retrieved December 15 2012, from http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/business/ICCSR/assets/muihqmluwosf.pdf Company image and Branding. Retrieved December 15, from http://www.ecrc.org.eg/Uploads/documents/Articles_Corporate%20social %20Responsibility.pdf Your Branding, Young Identity. Retrieved January 5,2013 , from http://www.brandidentityguru.com/brand_image_company.htm Maximize Your Profit. Retrieved January 5,2013, from http://profitduck.com/why-is-brandimage-and-brand-reputation-so-important/

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Company Management Ethics. Retrieved January 5, 2013, from http://managementstudyguide.com/brand-image.htm Nokias CSR. Retrieved January 5,2013, from http://www.nokia.com/global/about-nokia/peopleand-planet/sustainable-devices/recycling/recycling/ CSR Trends. Retrieved January 12,2013, from www.triplepundit.com/2012/06/nokias-2011-csrreport-shows-sustainability-difficult-times/ Nokia. Retrieved January 12, 2013, from http://i.nokia.com/blob/view/-/225536/data/2/-/nokiacr-report-2008-pdf.pdf CSR and Brand Equity. Retrieved January 13, 2013 from, http://asbbs.org/files/2011/ASBBS2011v1/PDF/K/KaurM.pdf Company Social Responsibility. Retrieved January 13, 2013, from http://www.ecrc.org.eg/Uploads/documents/Articles_Corporate%20social %20Responsibility.pdf

Appendix A FGD Guide Questions

1. What is Nokia for you? Why? 2. At first knowing about the Nokias CSR, what are your emotions towards it? (eg., sad, happy, angry, confident, confused, certain) 3. How do you feel about Nokias CSR? Are you positive and comfortable about it? Why or why not? 4. If you will be asked to join Nokias CSR, would you delighted to join? why? or Why not? 5. What have you learned with Nokias CSR with regards to its companys vision for its community?

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6. Now knowing that Nokia is engage in these kind of CSR, how would you describe Nokia? 7. What does it mean to you, that Nokia is extending these kinds of programs for our environment? 8. What do you believe about CSR, particularly at Nokias CSR? Do you believe it will be effective? Why or Why not? 9. Do you think Nokias CSR will succeed? Why or Why not? 10. Do you feel Nokias sincerity in their CSR? Why or why Not? 11. What would you recommend to Nokia in their CSR? Why?

Appendix B Transcription Appendix C Visual Materials used in the FGD Presentation Appendix D Documentation ( see attached Compact Dik for Video files)

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Appendix E Curriculum Vitae Name: Elijah R. Bugayong Student Number: 201000740 Gender: Female Date of Birth: October 17, 1993 Email: 1017.elijah@gmail.com Contact Number: 639 061 250 301 Hobbies: Reading Novels, Acting, Writting

Name: Daryl John B. Tamio Student Number: 201001319 Gender: Male Date of Birth: January 13, 1994 Email: john.tamio@yahoo.com Contact Number: 639 175 305 022 Hobbies: Reading Car Magazines

Name: Mark Japheth C. Ventosa Student Number: 201001578 Gender: Male Date of Birth: September 16 1993 Email: japsventosa_16@yahoo.com Contact Number:639 356 221 468 Hobbies: playing music

Name: Vincent Lampano Student Number: 201001831 Gender: Male Date of Birth: September 16, 1994 Email: cent_pouring94@yahoo.com Contact Number: 639 175 305 021 Hobbies: Dancing 30 | P a g e

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