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NPS War of 1812 Lesson Plan Outline Understanding by Design Template Teacher: Anna Newton Date: July, 2013

Grade: 8th (Middle School Level) Subject: US History

White House & Presidents Park Primary Interpretive Themes: 1A) The responses of presidents and first ladies to the challenges of the presidency provide important lessons in their varying capabilities to handle their job. 2A. The White House is a symbol of the presidency, of a free democratic society, and through its continuity, of the stability of our nation. 3A) The White House is an example of the continuum of history through its architecture, stories, decorative, and fine arts. 4) Presidents Park, as a primary element of the nations capital city, serves as a stage for active participation in the democratic process, and is linked by Pennsylvania Avenue Americas main street to the legislative and judicial processes on Capitol Hill.

Stage 1- Desired Results


Established Standards & Objectives: Maryland Objectives (Voluntary State Curriculum): Standard 5.0 History, Topic C: Conflict between ideas & institutions, Indicator 2: Analyze the emerging foreign policy of the United States, Objectives a: The student will explain why the United States adopted a policy of neutrality prior to the War of 1812 & b: The student will explain how the continuing conflict between Great Britain and France influenced the domestic policy of the United States. Virginia Objectives (SOLs): Standard USI.7c: The student will demonstrate knowledge of the challenges faced by the new nation by: describing the major accomplishments of the first five presidents of the United States. Specifically James Madison and the War of 1812. Students will analyze how the War of 1812 caused European nations to gain respect for the United States. D.C. Objectives: Standard 8.6: Students analyze US foreign policy in the early Republic. Topic # 1: Students will explain the political and economic causes and consequences of the War of 1812 and the major battles, leaders, and events that led to a final peace. Common Core Objectives (Meets many of the skills that all districts want students to meet): ELA Standards: Reading Informational Text: Grade 8 CCSS.ELA-Literacy. RI.8.1: Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text is says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. CSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.8.6: Determine an authors point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints. CSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.8.9: Analyze a case in which two or more text provide conflicting information on the same topic and identify where the texts disagree on matters of fact or interpretation.

ELA Standards: Writing: Grade 8 CSS.ELA-Literacy.W.8.1: Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence. CSS.ELA-Literacy.W.8.3: Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences CSS.ELA-Literacy.W.8.8: Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, using search terms effectively; assess the credibility and accuracy of each source; and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation. CSS.ELA-Literacy.W.8.9: Draw evidence from literary or information texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. ELA Standards: Speaking & Listening: Grade 8 CSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.8.1: Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-onone, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 8 topics, texts, and issues, building on others ideas and expressing their own clearly. CSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.8.2: Analyze the purpose of information presented in diverse media and formats (e.g. visually, quantitatively, and orally) and evaluate the motives (e.g. social, commercial, political) behind its presentation. CSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.8.3: Delineate a speakers argument and specific claims, evaluating the soundness of the reasoning and relevance and sufficiency of the evidence and identifying when irrelevant evidence is introduced. CSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.8.4: Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with relevant evidence, sound valid reasoning, and well-chosen details; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation. CSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.8.5: Integrate multimedia and visual displays into presentations to clarify information, strengthen claims and evidence, and add interest. Understandings: Essential Questions: Students will understand .. The reasons why the US tried to remain neutral Why did the US want to maintain neutrality? during the Napoleonic Wars, neither siding Why did the US declare war on Great Britain with France or Great Britain. in 1812? The reasons why the US declared war on Great What problems did the US face prior to and Britain and began the War of 1812. during the War of 1812? The arguments for and against declaring war How did the War of 1812 affect the US? prior to and during the War of 1812. Student Outcomes: Student will be able to Assume the perspective of a member of Congress in 1812 and write a floor speech recommending and justifying war with Great Britain, war with France, or continued diplomatic efforts and neutrality. Based on the speeches given and discussion on the potential impact of each action on the United States foreign and domestic development, students will determine and vote on which option is the best course of action. Another Option: Have students pretend they are the 8 American and British delegates in Ghent,

Belgium and they must negotiate to create a peace treaty between the two nations. Students then would compare the peace treaty they created with the real Treaty of Ghent and analyze its impact on the United States. (for Britain included minor diplomats William Adams, James Lord Gambier, and Henry Goulburn. The American delegates were John Quincy Adams, James A. Bayard, Sr., Henry Clay, Albert Gallatin, and junior member Jonathan Russell.)

Stage 2- Assessment Evidence


Performance Tasks: Students will research the state of the United States prior to the War of 1812 and international situation to gain the knowledge needed to create their speeches. Students will create a speech that contains and uses evidence from primary and secondary sources to effectively support their viewpoint on whether or not to go to war in 1812 and with which nation to go to war. This speechs goal is to gain support from other members of Congress (their class). Students will give their speeches and use speaking and writing skills to gain support for their viewpoint from other members of Congress (their class). Other Evidence: Formative and summative should be used. Each class has individual needs, but the following are recommended. Status Reports as graded formative assessments. These status reports will check on the status of student work on their project and speech and give them feedback in order to improve their final product. Other non-formal formative assessments, such as meeting with students one-on-one to discuss their progress and written reflections during the various parts of the project. The summative assessment will be the final speech written and presented by the student that will be graded based upon a rubric.

Stage 3 Learning Plan


Teacher Background: From http://mdk12.org/instruction/curriculum/social_studies/standard5/grade8.html From its emergence as a new nation until the War of 1812, the United States attempted to remain neutral in international affairs, preferring not to intervene in a persistent state of war between Great Britain and France that also involved other European countries. The young nation favored neutrality primarily in order to maintain trade relations with foreign states, as the health of American commerce was paramount. In addition, the United States did not wish to enter into alliances that might force it into conflicts against its will. This was a lesson learned from the perpetual alliance made between the young United States and France during the American Revolution. In theory this agreement should have placed the United States on the side of France in the Napoleonic Wars, but it was not in the interest of the country to engage in this conflict. The United States was also too militarily weak to successfully battle the stronger European powers. The United States also believed that it was unique among the nations of the world and should therefore act independently and avoid entangling itself in messy European affairs. Originally outlined in President George Washingtons Farewell Address, the principle of neutrality guided American foreign policy until the War of 1812. After the American Revolution, the young United States attempted to withdraw from world affairs, adopting a stance of strict neutrality so that it could avoid the unending wars of Europe and maintain trade with all European powers. Unfortunately, France and Britain were engaged in ongoing hostilities resulting from the

French Revolution and Napoleons rise to power, and both nations refused to respect Americas policy of neutrality. Neither Britain nor France wanted the other to benefit from trade with the United States. Both intercepted U.S. ships and confiscated cargoes. Between 1798 and 1800, American and French ships engaged in frequent hostilities, although war was never formally declared. Ultimately, in 1812 the United States declared war on Great Britain, which had been especially aggressive in its violation of American rights, impressing sailors, closing vital Caribbean ports to American trade, and refusing to vacate its forts in the Northwest. At home, foreign crises served as fodder for the ongoing battles between the Federalists, who tended to support Great Britain, and Republicans, who favored France. Ostensibly intended to protect the United States from disloyalty, the Alien and Sedition Acts were drafted by the Federalists as a way to suppress Republican dissent and prevent Republican-leaning immigrants from further strengthening that party. Republicans countered with the Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions, which declared the Alien and Sedition Acts invalid because they were unconstitutional and indicated that states might nullify federal laws deemed unconstitutional. Learning Activities: 1. In order to prepare/motivate students for this lesson, begin the first class period or block with a warm-up in which students brainstorm what they feel a politician should do and include in a speech in order to gain support for their cause or viewpoint. (The teacher should write down their list.) 2. Have a class discussion on the list brainstormed by students, particular ask students why the items they listed would help a politician gain support for their cause or viewpoint. You can further the discussion by asking students what would hurt the politicians argument and why. 3. Using the above discussion, the teacher will then discuss the purpose of the discussion by stating that they will be creating their own speeches as if they were a member of Congress, but in early 1812. Their speech will help the nation decide if they will be going to war with either France or Great Britain or try and maintain US neutrality and peace. 4. Prior to this lesson, there should have been some discussion on events leading up to 1812 in order for students to have some background knowledge on why the US may be considering war. Completing a KWL chart (Appendix A) is a great way to assess students prior knowledge of the causes of the War of 1812. 5. Have students use their textbooks and primary sources to create three lists (Appendix B): a list of grievances against France, a list of grievances against Great Britain, and a list of American attempts to remain neutral and avoid hostilities with either party. You may choose to have each student create each list, or divide the class into three groups, each group taking one list and sharing their results with the class. This step can take more than one day because this is the beginning of the research process for students and is the first step/status report of their project. 6. Based upon their list/initial research, students must decide as a member of Congress whether to recommend war with Great Britain, war with France, or continued diplomatic efforts. You may also assign individual students or groups to a particular choice. Once the student has decided which recommendation they are going to make, students will need additional time to research in order to gather and analyze the evidence in order to have a well supported speech. Based on your class schedule, this could be a few days or a longer term project that can span several weeks. Students will complete a research journal to keep track of their research. (Appendix C is the Congress speech project with status reports). 7. Once their research is done, students would turn in their research journal and a written reflection on how they plan to use their research in their speeches for a status report. After the teacher has reviewed this status report, this is a great time to meet with students one-on-one to discuss the teacher feedback. 8. Students then will be given the next status report in which they will need to create a draft speech.

9. Once the drafts are completed, students will have a fellow student review their speech based upon the questions provided. This is a point where you could have students share their drafts with the students from Ghent, if you are a part of this international education opportunity. 10. Based upon their peer review, students will revise their draft speeches and then submit the final speech and give their speech in class. ***Extension: To create an authentic feeling for students, you could have a field trip to Presidents Park, particularly Lafayette Park and/or Octagon House (since it is right in front of the White House), where students will dress up and give their speeches to their peers. This could be recorded to share with the students in Ghent, Belgium as well. ***Extension # 2: Students could create a PSA as a member of Congress that includes their speech to convince the public (and the students in Ghent) why their recommended course of action is the correct one. 11. Once students have given their speeches, the students will discuss their options and then vote on which course of action they will take and why. Students will then compare their decision and the decision Congress made in 1812 to go to war with Great Britain and complete the previously started KWL chart (Appendix A). Students will then write a written reflection on what they learned about the origins of the War of 1812 and how they feel this war helped to establish the US as a nation on the international scale. This discussion could also be done with the students in Ghent. 12. The teacher will also grade the students speeches based upon the rubric. ***Special Note: If you are having the student pretend they are the American and British Delegates who negotiated the Treaty of Ghent, follow the procedure below and see the Appendices listed.*** Learning Activities: 1. In order to prepare/motivate students for this lesson, begin the first class period or block with a warm-up in which students brainstorm what they feel a politician should do when negotiating a treaty with another country they are at war with. What circumstances will make negotiations easier or harder for the negotiators? (The teacher should write down their list.) 2. Have a class discussion on the list brainstormed by students, particular ask students why the items they listed would help a politician during peace treaty negotiations. 3. Using the above discussion, the teacher will then discuss the purpose of the discussion by stating that they will be engaging in their own peace treaty negotiations as if they were one of the American or British delegates in Ghent, Belgium in 1814. Their negotiations will help their nation gain peace and potentially territory, rights, or economic incentives. 4. Prior to this lesson, there should have been some discussion on events during the War of 1812. Completing a KWL chart (Appendix D) is a great way to assess students prior knowledge of the War of 1812. 5. Have students use their textbooks and primary sources to create four lists (Appendix E): a list of gains by the United States, a list of gains by Great Britain, a list of losses by the United States, and a list of losses by Great Britain. You may choose to have each student create each list, or divide the class into four groups, each group taking one list and sharing their results with the class. This step can take more than one day because this is the beginning of the research process for students and is the first step/status report of their project. 6. Based upon their list/initial research, students will be assigned a role, one of the 8 British and American delegates at the peace conference in Ghent, Belgium. Since your class will be larger than 8 students, students can work in 8 small groups and create one group speech. These groups can be the delegate and his staff. Once the roles have been assigned, students will need additional time to research in order to gather and analyze the evidence in order to be prepared to negotiate at the peace conference. Based on

your class schedule, this could be a few days or a longer term project that can span several weeks. Students will complete a research journal to keep track of their research. (Appendix F is the Peace Negotiation project with status reports). 7. Once their research is done, students would turn in their research journal and a written reflection on how they plan to use their research during the treaty negotiations. After the teacher has reviewed this status report, this is a great time to meet with students one-on-one to discuss the teacher feedback. 8. Students then will be given the next status report in which they will need to create an outline of a persuasive speech that will discuss and explain their desired outcomes at the peace conference, based upon their assigned delegate. 9. Once the drafts are completed, students will have a fellow student review their speech based upon the questions provided. This is a point where you could have students share their drafts with the students from Ghent, if you are a part of this international education opportunity. 10. Based upon their peer review, students will revise their draft speeches and then submit the final speech and give their speech in class. ***Extension: To create an authentic feeling for students, you could have a field trip to the Octagon House, where students will dress up and give their speeches to their peers and engage in treaty negotiations. This could be recorded to share with the students in Ghent, Belgium as well. 11. Once each speech is presented, the students will then engage in treaty negotiations. To make the treaty negotiation process more organized, the teacher should set the main points of discussion and record the class decisions. The teacher will also act as a moderator. The treaty negotiations could take several days, plan ahead how many days you would like to spend. The teacher should write down the results/decisions that were agreed upon during the negotiation process. Students will then compare their treaty and the real Treaty of Ghent and complete the previously started KWL chart (Appendix D). Students will then write a written reflection on what they learned about the peace conference in Ghent and how the War of 1812 ended and how they feel this war helped to establish the US as a nation on the international scale. This discussion could also be done with the students in Ghent. 12. The teacher will also grade the students speeches based upon the rubric. Resources List for both Projects: General Resources: Thinkport War of 1812 Classroom Resources: Has interactive and documents great site! http://warof1812.thinkport.org/#home.html History Channels War of 1812 page. Good for basic info on the War of 1812: http://www.history.com/topics/war-of-1812 Galafilms War of 1812 page. Has links for primary sources from multiple perspectives and song lyrics: http://www.galafilm.com/1812/e/index.html Indian Affairs & Treaties: http://digital.library.okstate.edu/kappler/Vol2/toc.htm#T http://digital.library.okstate.edu/kappler/Vol2/treaties/wya0039.htm Maryland Resources: Maryland in the War of 1812 chronology: http://msa.maryland.gov/msa/mdmanual/01glance/chron/html/war1812.html Maryland War of 1812 Bicentennial Commission Teacher Resources, includes documents and other lessons: http://starspangled200.org/resources/Pages/ForTeachers.aspx Online lessons and games on the War of 1812 has good information for students: http://www.pride2.org/NewPrideSite/MD/MD_Exploring.html

This guide includes resources and worksheets to help students interpret documents: http://starspangled200.org/Resources/Documents/1812%20Teacher%20Resource%20Guide_Color.pdf Maryland Humanities Council War of 1812 website: http://www.mdhc.org/programs/chautauqua/past-chautauquas/chautauqua-2012-exploring-the-/war-of-1812bicentennial-resou/ Maryland Historical Society: http://www.mdhs.org/

Virginia Resources: War of 1812 Virginia Bicentennial Commission: http://va1812bicentennial.dls.virginia.gov/ Library of Virginia: Soldiers of the war: http://www.lva.virginia.gov/public/guides/rn19_sold.htm Alexandria, VA War of 1812 Bicentennial website: http://alexandriava.gov/historic/info/default.aspx?id=49310 D.C. Resources: Burning of D.C. Eyewitness to History: http://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/washingtonsack.htm War of 1812 D.C. Bicentennial Commission: http://www.washingtondcwarof1812bicentennialcommission.org/ Primary Sources for the Burning of the White House: http://www.ourwhitehouse.org/warof1812.html Music and Sound effects: http://starspangled200.org/Resources/Documents/1812%20Teacher%20Resource%20Guide_Color.pdf http://www.warof1812.ca/songs.htm http://www.c-spanvideo.org/program/302069-1 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oTNDdZ6_3pk http://www.militaryheritage.com/cd_1.htm http://www.militaryheritage.com/sound.htm - free http://www.earlyamerica.com/music/war-1812.htm http://www.cruzatte.com/warof1812.html https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/ballads-war-1812-1791-1836/id218967614 http://www.mcneilmusic.com/rev.html http://www.pbs.org/wned/war-of-1812/classroom/intermediate/every-song-tells-story/ http://www.soundgator.com/ http://www.audiomicro.com/free-sound-effects http://soundbible.com/ Books/Publications: Primary Source Accounts of the War of 1812 by Helen Koutras Bozonelis Publications on the soldiers of the War: http://societyofthewarof1812.org/about-us-2/publications/

Benn, Carl. The War of 1812. New York: Routledge, 2003. Borneman, Walter R. 1812: The War that Forged a Nation. New York: HarperCollins Publishers, 2004. Heidler, David S., and Jeanne T. Heidler, eds. Encyclopedia of the War of 1812. Santa Barbara, Calif.: ABCCLIO, 1997. Hickey, Donald R. Dont Give Up the Ship!: Myths of the War of 1812. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2006. -----. The War of 1812: A Forgotten Conflict. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1989. Langguth, A. J. Union 1812: The Americans Who Fought the Second War of Independence. New York : Simon & Schuster, 2006. Remini, Robert V. The Battle of New Orleans. New York: Viking, 1999. Stagg, John C.A. Mr. Madison's War: Politics, Diplomacy, and Warfare in the Early American Republic, 17831830. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1983.

Appendix A:

What I Know

What I Want to Know

What I Learned

Appendix B:

Source: oh-la-laproductions.com

Source: www.frequencycast.co.u k

Throughout the first decade of the 1800s, both France and Britain repeatedly disrupted the economic interests of the United States. Directions: Based upon your previous knowledge of the situation of the United States prior to the War of 1812, you are to create THREE lists. The first will be a list of grievances against France. The second list will be a list of grievances against Great Britain. The final list will be a list of American attempts to remain neutral and avoid hostilities with France and Great Britain. Resources: You may use your textbook, the internet, as well as some of the following websites to help you create your list of grievances. Newspaper articles: http://webs.wofford.edu/byrnesms/1812.htm President Madisons War Message, Edited/Annotated Version: http://edsitement.neh.gov/sites/edsitement.neh.gov/files/worksheets/WarMsgEdited.pdf Annals of Congress (debates in Congress) Search: http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/amlaw/lwac.html XYZ Affair: http://history.state.gov/milestones/1784-1800/XYZ James Madison Timeline: http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/collections/madison_papers/mjmtime3.html Impressments: http://www.archives.gov/publications/prologue/2012/summer/1812impressment.html Records of Impressed Seamen: http://www.archives.gov/research/military/war-of1812/1812-discharge-certificates/impressed-seamen-1793-to-1814.html
Grievances against Great Britain US attempts to remain neutral

Grievances against France

Appendix C:

Source: www.nrsweb.org

Congress needs to make a choice! Will it be war with France or Great Britain? Or do we try to keep the peace?

Situation: You are a member of Congress in early 1812 debating what to do next to address France and Great Britains actions. Based upon your grievance list, you must decide whether to recommend war with Great Britain, war with France, or continued diplomatic efforts. Once you decided which recommendation you are going to make, you will create a speech to convince the other members of Congress that your recommendation is the option they should vote for. **Remember to consider multiple reasons why you should or should not go to war.**

Status Report # 1: Research Journal and Reflection


Directions: You will need to engage in extensive research to gain evidence to include in your speech. Without strong evidence in your speech, other members of Congress will not vote for your recommendation. Using the sources from your grievance list and other sources you find on your own, you will complete the below research journal for each source you find that will help support your speech.

STUDENTS RESEARCH JOURNAL LOG Citation:


1. AUTHOR(S): Who were they? What was their authority? (Personal? Institutional?) What was their specialized knowledge or experience? How would you describe the author's tone of voice? (Formal, angry, respectful, other?) List one or more quotations that justify your choice. 2. AUDIENCE(S): Who was the intended reader(s) or listener(s)? Were there other readers or listeners beyond those originally intended? Who? How did the audience affect the ways the author(s) presented ideas? 3. PURPOSE: What was the explicit intent behind this document? (To do what? Or to cause what to happen?) What was the relation between this intent and other policy or practice?

Was there an implicit purpose, or hidden agenda, behind this document? Who benefited directly or indirectly, from the policy reflected in the document? 4. CONTEXT: What were the date and place of the document? What was the interval between the initial problem or event and this document that responded to it? What medium or form was the document communicated through? (Newspaper, government record, letter, other?) Where was the document written and read? What were other events or conditions at the same time that could have affected the reading or writing of the document? 5. MEANING: Is there any ambiguity in the literal meaning of the document? Which words? Are there striking omissions in the document? How does this affect its meaning? Does the organization of ideas or the repetition of themes in the document suggest those that the writer(s) believed most important? Are there any confusing terms in this document? Which words? Can you detect bias in the choice of any words or terms? Which? Can you detect any underlying assumptions (of values or attitudes) revealed in any loaded remarks or passing remarks? What? Can you sense any contradictory or conflicting attitudes or issues expressed in the document? What? How does the form or medium affect the meaning of this document? CORROBORATION: Do other sources support this document? How do other documents from this period illuminate or contradict this document? **The above questions are to be completed with each document you will use in your speech. Once you have completed your research complete the reflection below.** REFLECTION: Write a reflection on how you plan to use your research in your speech. Which documents have the strongest evidence to support your speech? How do you plan to use them within the speech to gain Congress support?

Status Report # 2: Drafting your Speech & Peer Review


Directions: Now that you have done your research, you are to write a full draft of your speech. It must be complete because one of your peers will be reviewing your draft. One of your peers will complete the peer review sheet below. Congressional speech peer review critique sheet Name of speaker__________________ Name of Reviewer__________________________ Gained attention in the intro while introducing topic? Related the material to the audience? Hint gave us a compelling reason to care about this topic! Established personal credibility? Main points in the body of the speech match the central idea? Preview is succinct order of main points in speech Support material for each of the main points? Smooth transitions and signposts throughout the speech? Is the speech adapted to this audience? Does the speech meet the assignment by recommending the course of action the US should take? After reading the speech would you support the authors recommendation? What was your impression of the conclusion- was it memorable? Ask yourself, what would you be thinking during or at the end of the speech that the speaker should consider. Share this with them. General comments overall: _____________________________________________________________________________ _ _____________________________________________________________________________ _ _____________________________________________________________________________ _

Source: www.kintera.org

Status Report # 3: Final Written Speech & Presentation


Directions: Based upon the comments of your peer reviewer, you must edit your speech in preparation to present it to Congress (the class). Be sure to practice your speech, you will be giving the speech during a special session(s) of Congress. Rubric:

Congressional Speech
Student Name: ________________________________________

CATEGORY Content

5-4
Covers topic in-depth with details and examples. Subject knowledge is excellent.

3
Includes essential knowledge about the topic. Subject knowledge appears to be good.

1-0

Includes essential Content is minimal information about the OR there are several topic but there are 1- factual errors. 2 factual errors.

Requirements

All requirements are All requirements are One requirement met and exceeded. met. was not completely met.

More than one requirement was not completely met.

Mechanics

No misspellings or grammatical errors.

Three or fewer misspellings and/or mechanical errors.

Four misspellings and/or grammatical errors.

More than 4 errors in spelling or grammar.

Organization

Content is well organized using headings or bulleted lists to group related material.

Uses headings or bulleted lists to organize, but the overall organization of topics appears flawed.

Content is logically organized for the most part.

There was no clear or logical organizational structure, just lots of facts.

CATEGORY

5-4

1-0

Oral Presentation

Interesting, wellrehearsed with smooth delivery that holds audience attention.

Relatively interesting, rehearsed with a fairly smooth delivery that usually holds audience attention.

Delivery not smooth, Delivery not smooth but able to hold and audience audience attention attention lost. most of the time.

Attractiveness

Makes excellent use of graphics, effects, etc. to enhance the presentation.

Makes good use of graphics, effects, etc. to enhance to presentation.

Makes use of graphics, effects, etc. but occasionally these detract from the presentation content.

Use of graphics, effects etc. but these often distract from the presentation content.

Originality

Product shows a large amount of original thought. Ideas are creative and inventive.

Product shows some original thought. Work shows new ideas and insights.

Uses other people\'s Uses other people\'s ideas (giving them ideas, but does not credit), but there is give them credit. little evidence of original thinking.

Sources

Source information collected for all graphics, facts and quotes. All documented in desired format. The audio (music and voice) is clear and well paced. Students annunciate to make sure the viewer can understand and learn from the presentation.

Source information collected for all graphics, facts and quotes. Most documented in desired format. The audio (music and voice) may not be as clear and/or well paced. The information may be harder to understand in a few places.

Source information collected for graphics, facts and quotes, but not documented in desired format. The audio (music and voice) may not be as clear and/or well paced. The information may be harder to understand in a some places.

Very little or no source information was collected.

Clarity

The audio (music and voice) is not clear and/or well paced. The information may be harder to understand in a several places.

Status Report # 4: Conclusion & Vote


Directions: Once all the members of Congress have given their speeches, you will discuss your options and then vote on which course of action you believe the US should take and why. Be sure to refer back to some of the speeches you heard. You will then compare your decision with the decision Congress made in 1812 to go to war with Great Britain and write what you have learned about the causes of the War of 1812 in the KWL chart from a previous class. You will then write a written reflection on what you learned about the origins of the War of 1812 and how you feel this war helped to establish the US as a nation on the international scale. Rubric:

Essay: Reflection
Student Name: ________________________________________

4 - Above Standa 3 - Meets Standa 2 - Approaching Standa 1 - Below Standa CATEGORY rds rds rds rds Score Position Statement The position statement provides a clear, strong statement of the author\'s position on the topic. The position statement provides a clear statement of the author\'s position on the topic. A position statement is There is no present, but does not position make the author\'s statement. position clear.

Evidence and All of the Examples evidence and examples are specific, relevant and explanations are given that show how each piece of evidence supports the author\'s position.

Most of the At least one of the evidence and pieces of evidence and examples are examples is relevant specific, relevant and has an explanation and explanations that shows how that are given that piece of evidence show how each supports the author\'s piece of evidence position. supports the author\'s position.

Evidence and examples are NOT relevant AND/OR are not explained.

4 - Above Standa 3 - Meets Standa 2 - Approaching Standa 1 - Below Standa CATEGORY rds rds rds rds Score

Sequencing

Arguments and support are provided in a logical order that makes it easy and interesting to follow the author\'s train of thought. A variety of thoughtful transitions are used. They clearly show how ideas are connected The conclusion is strong and leaves the reader solidly understanding the writer\'s position. Effective restatement of the position statement begins the closing paragraph. All sentences are well-constructed with varied structure.

Arguments and support are provided in a fairly logical order that makes it reasonably easy to follow the author\'s train of thought. Transitions show how ideas are connected, but there is little variety

A few of the support details or arguments are not in an expected or logical order, distracting the reader and making the essay seem a little confusing.

Many of the support details or arguments are not in an expected or logical order, distracting the reader and making the essay seem very confusing. The transitions between ideas are unclear OR nonexistent.

Transitions

Some transitions work well, but some connections between ideas are fuzzy.

Closing paragraph

The conclusion is recognizable. The author\'s position is restated within the first two sentences of the closing paragraph.

The author\'s position is There is no restated within the conclusion - the closing paragraph, but paper just ends. not near the beginning.

Sentence Structure

Most sentences Most sentences are well are wellconstructed, but there is constructed and no variation is structure. there is some varied sentence structure in the essay.

Most sentences are not wellconstructed or varied.

4 - Above Standa 3 - Meets Standa 2 - Approaching Standa 1 - Below Standa CATEGORY rds rds rds rds Score

Grammar & Spelling

Author makes no Author makes 1errors in grammar 2 errors in or spelling that grammar or distract the reader spelling that from the content. distract the reader from the content. Author makes 12 errors in capitalization or punctuation, but the essay is still easy to read.

Author makes 3-4 errors in grammar or spelling that distract the reader from the content.

Author makes more than 4 errors in grammar or spelling that distracts the reader from the content. Author makes several errors in capitalization and/or punctuation that catch the reader\'s attention and interrupt the flow.

Capitalization Author makes no & errors in Punctuation capitalization or punctuation, so the essay is exceptionally easy to read.

Author makes a few errors in capitalization and/or punctuation that catch the reader\'s attention and interrupt the flow.

Appendix D:

What I Know

What I Want to Know

What I Learned

Appendix E:

Who has the upper hand? British vs. American gains and losses during the War of 1812.
Source: totalsoccershow.com

Directions: Based upon your previous knowledge of the War of 1812, you are to create FOUR lists. The first will be a list of battles and territory won by the United States during the war. The second list will be a list of the battles, territory, and men lost by the United States during the war. The third will be a list of battles and territory won by Great Britain during the war. The final list will be a list of the battles, territory, and men lost by Great Britain during the war. Resources: You may use your textbook, the internet, as well as some of the following websites to help you create your list of gains and losses by each country. A Military History of the War of 1812: http://www.militaryhistoryonline.com/19thcentury/articles/militaryhistoryofwarof1812.as px War of 1812 Statistics: http://www.historyguy.com/war_of_1812_statistics.htm Impact of the War of 1812 on US National Defense: http://www.dodlive.mil/index.php/2012/02/historian-explains-war-of-1812-impact-onnational-defense/ Results of the War of 1812: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Results_of_the_War_of_1812 Hartford Convention: http://www.constitution.org/amend/hartford1814-intro.htm Amendments to Constitution proposed at the Hartford convention: http://avalon.law.yale.edu/19th_century/hartconv.asp List of Major Battles of the War of 1812: http://www.historycentral.com/1812/Index.html The War of 1812: The Forgotten War: http://www.academicamerican.com/jeffersonjackson/topics/warof1812.html Gains made by the United States Losses Gains made by Great British Losses United States Britain

Appendix F:

Ending the War of 1812 in Ghent, Belgium: Negotiating for Peace

Source: www.warof1812trail.com

Situation: You are a delegate sent Ghent, Belgium to end the War of 1812. You and your staff members will be negotiating on behalf of the United States or Great Britain. The delegates for Britain included minor diplomats William Adams, James Lord Gambier, and Henry Goulburn. The American delegates were John Quincy Adams, James A. Bayard, Sr., Henry Clay, Albert Gallatin, and junior member Jonathan Russell. You are going to research many historical records to create a speech that will be presented on the opening day of negotiations. This speech will outline your countries desired outcomes for this treaty and bring peace between the United States and Great Britain. Once the speeches are given, negotiations will begin and will result in the Treaty of Ghent. ***As you begin your research, search for the goals that your country had for the War of 1812 or why you entered the war. This will help guide you to your countrys desired outcomes.***

Status Report # 1: Research Journal and Reflection


Directions: You will need to engage in extensive research to gain evidence to include in your speech. Without strong evidence in your speech, your nation will be less likely to gain their desired outcomes and peace may not be achieved. Using the sources from your gains and losses list and other sources you find on your own, you will complete the below research journal for each source you find that will help support your speech.

STUDENTS RESEARCH JOURNAL LOG Citation:


1. AUTHOR(S): Who were they? What was their authority? (Personal? Institutional?) What was their specialized knowledge or experience? How would you describe the author's tone of voice? (Formal, angry, respectful, other?) List one or more quotations that justify your choice.

2. AUDIENCE(S): Who was the intended reader(s) or listener(s)? Were there other readers or listeners beyond those originally intended? Who? How did the audience affect the ways the author(s) presented ideas? 3. PURPOSE: What was the explicit intent behind this document? (To do what? Or to cause what to happen?) What was the relation between this intent and other policy or practice? Was there an implicit purpose, or hidden agenda, behind this document? Who benefited directly or indirectly, from the policy reflected in the document? 4. CONTEXT: What were the date and place of the document? What was the interval between the initial problem or event and this document that responded to it? What medium or form was the document communicated through? (Newspaper, government record, letter, other?) Where was the document written and read? What were other events or conditions at the same time that could have affected the reading or writing of the document? 5. MEANING: Is there any ambiguity in the literal meaning of the document? Which words? Are there striking omissions in the document? How does this affect its meaning? Does the organization of ideas or the repetition of themes in the document suggest those that the writer(s) believed most important? Are there any confusing terms in this document? Which words? Can you detect bias in the choice of any words or terms? Which? Can you detect any underlying assumptions (of values or attitudes) revealed in any loaded remarks or passing remarks? What? Can you sense any contradictory or conflicting attitudes or issues expressed in the document? What? How does the form or medium affect the meaning of this document? CORROBORATION: Do other sources support this document? How do other documents from this period illuminate or contradict this document? **The above questions are to be completed with each document you will use in your speech. Once you have completed your research complete the reflection below.** REFLECTION: Write a reflection on how you plan to use your research in your speech. Which documents have the strongest evidence to support your speech? How do you plan to use them within the speech to accomplish your goal at the peace conference?

Status Report # 2: Drafting your Speech & Peer Review


Directions: Now that you have done your research, you are to write a full draft of your speech. It must be complete because one of your peers will be reviewing your draft. One of your peers will complete the peer review sheet below. Congressional speech peer review critique sheet Name of speaker__________________ Name of Reviewer__________________________ Gained attention in the intro while introducing topic? Related the material to the audience? Hint gave us a compelling reason to care about this topic! Established personal credibility? Main points in the body of the speech match the central idea? Preview is succinct order of main points in speech Support material for each of the main points? Smooth transitions and signposts throughout the speech? Is the speech adapted to this audience? Does the speech meet the assignment by recommending the course of action the US should take? After reading the speech would you support the authors recommendation? What was your impression of the conclusion- was it memorable? Ask yourself, what would you be thinking during or at the end of the speech that the speaker should consider. Share this with them. General comments overall: _____________________________________________________________________________ _ _____________________________________________________________________________ _ _____________________________________________________________________________ _

Source: http://www.entrepreneur.com/

Status Report # 3: Final Written Speech & Presentation


Directions: Based upon the comments of your peer reviewer, you must edit your speech in preparation to present at the peace conference (in class). Be sure to practice your speech, you will be giving the speech at a peace conference. Rubric:

Ghent Peace Conference Speech


Student Name: ________________________________________

CATEGORY Content

5-4
Covers topic in-depth with details and examples. Subject knowledge is excellent.

3
Includes essential knowledge about the topic. Subject knowledge appears to be good.

1-0

Includes essential Content is minimal information about the OR there are several topic but there are 1- factual errors. 2 factual errors.

Requirements

All requirements are All requirements are One requirement met and exceeded. met. was not completely met.

More than one requirement was not completely met.

Mechanics

No misspellings or grammatical errors.

Three or fewer misspellings and/or mechanical errors.

Four misspellings and/or grammatical errors.

More than 4 errors in spelling or grammar.

Organization

Content is well organized using headings or bulleted lists to group related material.

Uses headings or bulleted lists to organize, but the overall organization of topics appears flawed.

Content is logically organized for the most part.

There was no clear or logical organizational structure, just lots of facts.

CATEGORY

5-4

1-0

Oral Presentation

Interesting, wellrehearsed with smooth delivery that holds audience attention.

Relatively interesting, rehearsed with a fairly smooth delivery that usually holds audience attention.

Delivery not smooth, Delivery not smooth but able to hold and audience audience attention attention lost. most of the time.

Attractiveness

Makes excellent use of graphics, effects, etc. to enhance the presentation.

Makes good use of graphics, effects, etc. to enhance to presentation.

Makes use of graphics, effects, etc. but occasionally these detract from the presentation content.

Use of graphics, effects etc. but these often distract from the presentation content.

Originality

Product shows a large amount of original thought. Ideas are creative and inventive.

Product shows some original thought. Work shows new ideas and insights.

Uses other people\'s Uses other people\'s ideas (giving them ideas, but does not credit), but there is give them credit. little evidence of original thinking.

Sources

Source information collected for all graphics, facts and quotes. All documented in desired format. The audio (music and voice) is clear and well paced. Students annunciate to make sure the viewer can understand and learn from the presentation.

Source information collected for all graphics, facts and quotes. Most documented in desired format. The audio (music and voice) may not be as clear and/or well paced. The information may be harder to understand in a few places.

Source information collected for graphics, facts and quotes, but not documented in desired format. The audio (music and voice) may not be as clear and/or well paced. The information may be harder to understand in a some places.

Very little or no source information was collected.

Clarity

The audio (music and voice) is not clear and/or well paced. The information may be harder to understand in a several places.

Status Report # 4: Negotiation & Treaty Agreement


Directions: Once all the members of the peace conference have given their speeches, you will negotiate with the other members of the delegation to create a treaty to end the War of 1812, which will become known as the Treaty of Ghent. Once our treaty has been agreed upon, you will then compare our treaty with the real Treaty of Ghent and write what you have learned about the War of 1812 and the Treaty of Ghent in the KWL chart from a previous class. You will then write a written reflection on what you learned about the War of 1812 and how you feel this war helped to establish the US as a nation on the international scale. Rubric:

Essay: Reflection
Student Name: ________________________________________

4 - Above Standa 3 - Meets Standa 2 - Approaching Standa 1 - Below Standa CATEGORY rds rds rds rds Score Position Statement The position statement provides a clear, strong statement of the author\'s position on the topic. The position statement provides a clear statement of the author\'s position on the topic. A position statement is There is no present, but does not position make the author\'s statement. position clear.

Evidence and All of the Examples evidence and examples are specific, relevant and explanations are given that show how each piece of evidence supports the author\'s position.

Most of the At least one of the evidence and pieces of evidence and examples are examples is relevant specific, relevant and has an explanation and explanations that shows how that are given that piece of evidence show how each supports the author\'s piece of evidence position. supports the author\'s position.

Evidence and examples are NOT relevant AND/OR are not explained.

4 - Above Standa 3 - Meets Standa 2 - Approaching Standa 1 - Below Standa CATEGORY rds rds rds rds Score

Sequencing

Arguments and support are provided in a logical order that makes it easy and interesting to follow the author\'s train of thought. A variety of thoughtful transitions are used. They clearly show how ideas are connected The conclusion is strong and leaves the reader solidly understanding the writer\'s position. Effective restatement of the position statement begins the closing paragraph. All sentences are well-constructed with varied structure.

Arguments and support are provided in a fairly logical order that makes it reasonably easy to follow the author\'s train of thought. Transitions show how ideas are connected, but there is little variety

A few of the support details or arguments are not in an expected or logical order, distracting the reader and making the essay seem a little confusing.

Many of the support details or arguments are not in an expected or logical order, distracting the reader and making the essay seem very confusing. The transitions between ideas are unclear OR nonexistent.

Transitions

Some transitions work well, but some connections between ideas are fuzzy.

Closing paragraph

The conclusion is recognizable. The author\'s position is restated within the first two sentences of the closing paragraph.

The author\'s position is There is no restated within the conclusion - the closing paragraph, but paper just ends. not near the beginning.

Sentence Structure

Most sentences Most sentences are well are wellconstructed, but there is constructed and no variation is structure. there is some varied sentence structure in the essay.

Most sentences are not wellconstructed or varied.

4 - Above Standa 3 - Meets Standa 2 - Approaching Standa 1 - Below Standa CATEGORY rds rds rds rds Score

Grammar & Spelling

Author makes no Author makes 1errors in grammar 2 errors in or spelling that grammar or distract the reader spelling that from the content. distract the reader from the content. Author makes 12 errors in capitalization or punctuation, but the essay is still easy to read.

Author makes 3-4 errors in grammar or spelling that distract the reader from the content.

Author makes more than 4 errors in grammar or spelling that distract the reader from the content. Author makes several errors in capitalization and/or punctuation that catch the reader\'s attention and interrupt the flow.

Capitalization Author makes no & errors in Punctuation capitalization or punctuation, so the essay is exceptionally easy to read.

Author makes a few errors in capitalization and/or punctuation that catch the reader\'s attention and interrupt the flow.