AMERICA’S ENERGY SAVERS

The Oxford English Dictionary records the first use of the word “efficiency” in literature in 1593.

ENERGY EFFICIENCY IS A CORE VALUE.
It’s also a daily practice of America’s oil and natural gas industry. Energy efficiency helps companies manage costs, strengthening their competitiveness and bringing more affordable energy products to consumers. It helps improve the environmental performance of the industry, including reducing greenhouse gas emissions associated with climate change. And it increases the energy resources Americans depend on for a high quality of life. It may seem paradoxical that energy efficiency has become a hallmark of America’s biggest energy providers. But refinery managers are as committed to saving energy as snow-belt homeowners. And oil and natural gas producers monitor their energy consumption as carefully as Americans at the pump. America is vastly more energy-efficient today than a generation ago. The U.S. oil and natural gas industry is striving to do its part to build on that progress.

The U.S. is becoming more energy efficient, when measured by how much energy is consumed for every dollar of domestic economic production.

CO-GENERATE TO CONSERVE
Refineries generate energy from the heat given off by their operations. The process is called co-generation (also known as combined heat and power.) The heat creates steam that powers turbines that generate electricity. That electricity is then used to help power the refinery itself. Think of a hybrid electric car that captures energy from its braking to help recharge its batteries. Sometimes enough electricity is generated at refineries to help supply other electricity users — much as homeowners with solar panels sometimes produce excess electricity, which they sell back to the electric grid. The incentives for investing in co-generation are huge, and benefits are substantial. Energy accounts for 44 percent of refiner operating costs. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimates that co-generation can provide a 50percent improvement in overall energy efficiency resulting in a 35-percent fuel savings.

BETWEEN 1980 AND 2005, OIL AND NATURAL GAS INDUSTRY CO-GENERATION CAPACITY GREW OVER NINE-FOLD.
Between 1980 and 2005, oil and natural gas industry co-generation capacity grew over nine-fold, and in 2005 the industry produced more electricity than 17 mediumsized coal-fired power plants (each with 600 megawatt capacity).

530,000 CARS 950,000 HOMES
In 2002, API (American Petroleum Institute) member refiners pledged to steadily improve their energy efficiency over the next decade as part of a program to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. In 2006 alone, the energy savings produced were equivalent to the gasoline consumed by more than 530,000 cars or the electricity used by 950,000 homes.

A PLEDGE FOR GREATER EFFICIENCY

One of the most energy-efficient buildings is one built underground where insulation provided by the earth minimizes heat loss.

TECHNOLOGY IS AS MUCH A FIRST PRINCIPLE OF THE U.S. OIL AND NATURAL GAS INDUSTRY AS ENERGY EFFICIENCY.

T E C H N O L O G Y
Indeed, technology often drives energy efficiency improvements. Oil and gas exploration companies employ computers to turn seismic vibrations into 3-D and 4-D images that help pinpoint the location of oil and natural gas, reducing the number of wells drilled and energy used to drill them. In fact, in the last 17 years, the exploration drilling success rate has nearly tripled, growing from 26 percent in 1990 to 71 percent in 2007. Remotely operated vehicles — submersibles — help deepwater operators install, inspect and repair underwater facilities with less energy use. Other remote control technology allows offshore production platforms to operate unmanned saving energy and dollars.
The wheel is mankind’s oldest and most important energy saving technology.

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“Smart pigs” with ultrasonic sensors travel inside buried pipelines, detecting corrosion, cracks, and dents. This helps reduce energy-intensive excavation that might otherwise be necessary.

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E F F I C I E N C Y
A new solvent extraction system that operates without using tremendous heat or pressure makes it possible to re-refine used lubricating oil with one-third less energy. Pipeline companies use higher grades of steel for pipelines, enabling the transport of natural gas at higher pressures with less energy. Refineries, pipelines and terminals use more sensitive monitoring devices to detect and eliminate fuel and emission leaks and to keep temperatures, pressures and operating conditions optimal. Less energy is consumed and less is lost.
A Google search of the phrase “energy efficiency” produces more than 17 million hits.

NATURAL GAS WILL BE AN IMPORTANT PART OF OUR ENERGY LANDSCAPE FOR MANY DECADES.
Clean-burning with low greenhouse gas emissions, natural gas heats homes, powers vehicles and fires electricity generation. It is also used as a feedstock in many plastic, chemical and fertilizer manufacturing processes. In cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (the Natural Gas STAR Program), API member oil and natural gas companies have been installing new equipment and changing management practices to eliminate the leaking, venting and flaring of natural gas, preventing wasted energy. The program has fostered more efficient management of our natural gas resources. According to the EPA, “Natural Gas STAR partners have eliminated more than 577 billion cubic feet of methane emissions through the implementation of more than 120 cost-effective technologies and practices.”

For the average person, at a speed above 4.5 miles per hour, running becomes more energy-efficient than walking.

SAVING NATURAL GAS

RE-REFINING OF USED ENGINE OIL TAKES FROM 50 PERCENT TO 85 PERCENT LESS ENERGY THAN REFINING ENGINE OIL FROM CRUDE OIL.
ENERGY IS VALUABLE:RECYCLE IT
Used engine oil is like used paper, glass and metal. It can be recycled, either burned as fuel or re-refined for reuse in engine oil, in both cases extending our energy supplies. Re-refining of used engine oil takes from 50 percent to 85 percent less energy than refining engine oil from crude oil. The U.S. oil and natural gas industry promotes recycling of used oil through a variety of means including the website www.recycleoil.org, and many service stations, repair facilities and quick lubes accept it. Two gallons of recycled used engine oil can generate enough electricity to run the average household for almost 24 hours.
The ruby-throated hummingbird is the Hummer of the avian family, consuming twice its weight in food each day.

To locate a nearby used oil collection center, visit www.Earth911.org.

ALL OF US NEED TO WORK TOGETHER TO USE ENERGY MORE EFFICIENTLY.
That’s why the U.S. oil and natural gas industry is helping Americans learn more about energy and energy-efficiency — and even going into communities to help them put energy efficiency tips into practice. Working in partnership with Rebuilding Together through its Energy Efficient Homes Initiative, the industry is providing money and hands-on assistance to thousands of low-income homeowners, helping make homes more energy-efficient by installing better windows, ENERGY STAR appliances and other energy-saving upgrades. In 2008, some 10,000 residences are being given an energy efficiency overhaul with major sweat equity and financial assistance from oil and natural gas companies and hundreds of industry employees. The industry is also leveraging the Internet to help Americans become more energy-efficient. Please visit www.energytomorrow.org, which includes educational games and information on using energy more wisely at home and on the road. While there, don’t forget to test your “Energy IQ.” Also, please visit www.sixdegreechallenge.org, a partnership of the Alliance to Save Energy, API and others, that was created to help educate consumers about energy efficiency in the home. And click on www.drivesmarterchallenge.org, a creation of The Drive $marter Challenge, to calculate how to get more miles to the gallon.

The heart is the most efficient machine in the world, circulating about one million barrels of blood in a lifetime.

ENERGY EFFICIENT NEIGHBORS

1220 L Street, NW Washington, DC 20005-4070 USA

Phone 202-682-8000

www.api.org

Copyright 2008 - API, All rights reserved. API and the API logo are either trademarks or registered trademarks of API in the United States and/or other countries. Printed in the United States of America. API Creative: 2008-123 | 11.08 | PDF

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