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ENGR&240

Applied Numerical Methods

Everett Community College

Engineering 240: Applied Numerical Methods Spring 2011 Online


Instructor Eric Davishahl Office: Whitehorse Hall Room 312 Phone: (425) 388-9246 Email: edavishahl@everettcc.edu Office Hours: M 10-11, W10-12, Th 10-12 *Please feel free to call/email me anytime and I will return your call/email at my earliest convenience. Textbooks and Supplies Applied Numerical Methods with MATLAB for Engineers and Scientists, 3rd Edition Steven C. Chapra, McGraw Hill 2012. Available at the EvCC bookstore (http://www.evccbookstore.com) and from Amazon.com MATLAB Software: o MATLAB is available on the EvCC campus for student use in SHK 231, Baker 112, and on the WHI 253 Laptops during open lab times. o The student edition of MATLAB has more functionality than you will ever need as an engineering undergraduate. It is available for purchase in the EvCC bookstore or directly from The MathWorks at http://www.mathworks.com/academia/student_version/

Course Description Numerical solutions to problems in engineering and science using modern scientific computing tools. Application of mathematical judgment in selecting computational algorithms and communicating results. Introduction to MATLAB programming for numerical computation. Transfer Equivalents AMATH 301 at University of Washington. EE 221 at Washington State University. Prerequisites MATH& 153, MATH 260; or instructors permission Important Dates Wednesday, March 30 Last day to add a class without instructor permission Friday, April 1 100% refund deadline Friday, April 8 Deadline to drop a class without transcript entry Friday, May 20 Deadline to drop with W grade or change to audit Course Workload It is important students have a realistic expectation of how much time they should expect to spend on this course. Since this is a 4 credit class, students should expect to spend an average of 4 hours per week participating in the online classroom environment through ANGEL as described in the Participation section below. As with any science or engineering class, students should expect to spend an additional 2-3 hours of study time for each credit. Typical study activities include reading the text, reviewing notes, and/or working on assignments. That means you should expect to devote an average total of 12-16 hours per week to this class to be successful. In order to make the most efficient use of your time, please consider the following suggestions for how you might focus your study time:

ENGR&240

Applied Numerical Methods

Everett Community College

READ the textbook as your first introduction to all new material. The recorded lectures, demos, and other learning activities will focus on concepts that have historically been most challenging for students. You are expected to start these activities prepared with some idea about the basic concepts from the reading and some questions about what you found confusing or difficult. Take notes while you read the book. Identify key questions or points of confusion and post them to the discussion boards. Write in your book. You wont want to sell this one back since youll need the reference for future courses. Dont let confusion about course content linger until it costs you a nights sleep the day before something is due. Seek help in the discussion boards, through the live chat office hours, by calling the instructor, and from your fellow students. Form study groups with other students in the class. You can learn by teaching your peers and when they teach you. Review graded assignments after they are completed. Make sure you still understand what you did to solve the problems. The concepts in this course build upon one another, so it is very important that you retain learning from day one. Experiment with your study strategies (time of day, length of session, frequency, coffee, Red Bull, groups or solo, etc) to find what works best for YOU. What works best for your friend might not work well for you. What works best in math classes might not work well in engineering classes. What works well in one engineering class might not work well in the next class. Reflect frequently on what is working well and what is not and make adjustments. Understanding your own learning style is the key to success in college, in engineering school specifically, and in your professional career in the future.

Course Requirements Participation: Being an online class, there is no regularly scheduled meeting time. It is important that students manage their time and efforts effectively to keep current with the class material. Recorded lectures and demos as well as a variety of online learning activities (e.g. self assessment quizzes, discussion boards, etc) will be organized in one-week segments and linked to specific chapters in the textbook. Many of these activities will have points assigned to them, totaling 10 points per week. For example a certain week might have two 3-point activities and one 4-point activity to total 10 points. Specific point totals, instructions, and due dates will be given with each activity and in the weekly task list where the activities are assigned. Grading of these activities will be based exclusively on constructive participation and effort demonstrated by the activity-specific due date. No credit will be given for late participation in these activities. In general participating in the online classroom environment for this course involves the following learning activities: Starting each week by reviewing the assigned learning activities in the weekly task list. These are accessed by selecting the appropriate folder link (e.g. Week 1) in the Lessons section. For the purpose of this course, weekly activities will be made available each Monday at 8am with expected completion before the following Monday at 11pm. Note that there will often be intermediate due dates set for specific activities. Viewing the recorded lectures and software demos Completing the various interactive learning activities that are assigned each week Contributing to collaborative work on the discussion boards

ENGR&240

Applied Numerical Methods

Everett Community College

Posting questions and answers to the discussion boards (starting threads and contributing to those started by others) Using other outside resources as instructed.

Additional introduction to the online learning environment is presented in the orientation assignments included in the Week 1 lesson. Programming Assignments: There will be a programming assignment each week. The length and point value of these assignments will vary some week-to-week depending on content and other course activities (e.g. exams). These assignments will generally draw on the material presented in the weekly lessons in addition to the textbook. Deliverables will be completed using MATLAB programming. Some hand calculations or derivations will often be required in order to setup a MATLAB solution, but this work will not be turned in. Electronic Grading of MATLAB programming assignments All MATLAB problems for a particular assignment should be submitted to the Scorelator website at www.scorelator.com. The website is the same system used for grading AMATH 301 assignments at the University of Washington and is also used by other MATLAB based classes at universities throughout the country. A video tutorial on how to submit assignments to the Scorelator is included in the first weeks lesson. Basically, the Scorelator uploads your MATLAB files, runs them, and compares your output to the solutions. The Scorelator also runs your file through an anti-cheating algorithm developed at UC Berkeley and alerts the instructor to evidence of cheating. There is no partial credit for incorrect answers in these assignments; however, you may submit your assignment up to five times with instant feedback as to what is correct. The idea is that you will seek assistance through the various avenues available (office hours, discussion boards) if you are unable to figure out the reason for an incorrect answer. NO late assignments will be accepted unless there are unusual extenuating circumstances (e.g illness, family emergency, etc) discussed with the instructor BEFORE the due date. Your lowest programming assignment score will be dropped from consideration in your overall course grade. Exams: There will be two exams over the course of the quarter and a final exam during the scheduled final examination period. Exams will be administered through Angel and will generally consist of short MATLAB programming problems, a multiple choice portion, and short answer conceptual questions. The final exam will be comprehensive. All exams will be open book and open note. Since test difficulty can vary, the instructor may adjust test scores and/or class grades for the entire class. This process would only be used to increase grades, not decrease them. Tentative exam dates are shown in the schedule below. Grading Course grades will be based on the following breakdown: Participation Programming Assignments Exams Final Exam 10% 50% 25% 15%

ENGR&240

Applied Numerical Methods

Everett Community College

Letter grades will be assigned as follows: 95-100 % 90-94 % 87-89 % 84-86 % A AB+ B 80-83 % 77-79 % 74-76 % 70-73 % BC+ C C67-69 % 64-66 % 60-63 % 0-59 % D+ D DE

Note: Students who do not attend regularly and/or fail to do required work, should withdraw from this class. Failure to follow proper procedures may result with an (E) grade. Review the college catalog for grading details.

Learning Outcomes The college has the following six core learning outcomes: 1. Engage and take responsibility as active learners Students will be involved in the learning process as they gain deeper levels of understanding of the subject matter. They will design, complete, and analyze projects while developing group interaction and leadership skills. 2. Think critically Students will develop and practice analytical skills, problem-solving skills, and quantitative reasoning skills. Using creativity and self-reflection, they will be able to engage in inquiry that produces well-reasoned, meaningful conclusions. 3. Communicate effectively Students will develop the organizational and research skills necessary to write and speak effectively. The students will demonstrate awareness of different audiences, styles, and approaches to oral and written communication. 4. Participate in diverse environments Students will gain the awareness of and sensitivity to diversity, including ones own place as a global citizen. Students attain knowledge and understanding of the multiple expressions of diversity, and the skills to recognize, analyze, and evaluate diverse issues and perspectives. 5. Utilize information literacy skills Students will develop and employ skills to recognize when information is needed and to locate, evaluate, effectively use and communicate information in its various forms. 6. Demonstrate computer and technology proficiency Students will use computers and technology as appropriate in their course of study. This course works to develop a subset of those outcomes with the following course-specific objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Demonstrate computer and technology proficiency 1. Write and document effective MATLAB scripts involving logical and iterative flow control and file input and output. 2. Utilize the vector/matrix paradigm underlying MATLAB to write efficient commands to manipulate data and implement numerical solution algorithms. 3. Produce effective plots of numerical data using MATLABs various data visualization functions. Think critically

ENGR&240

Applied Numerical Methods

Everett Community College

4. Explain the consequences of finite precision and the inherent limits of the numerical methods considered. 5. Select appropriate numerical methods to apply to various types of problems in engineering and science in consideration of the mathematical operations involved, accuracy requirements, and available computational resources. 6. Demonstrate they understand the mathematics concepts underlying the numerical methods considered. 7. Demonstrate understanding and implementation of numerical solution algorithms applied to the following classes of problems: a. Finding roots of equations b. Solving systems of algebraic equations c. Curve fitting d. Interpolation e. Numerical differentiation of data and functions f. Numerical integration of data and functions g. Solutions of ordinary differential equations including: i. Initial value problems ii. Boundary value problems iii. Systems of equations

ENGR&240

Applied Numerical Methods

Everett Community College

Tentative Schedule
Week 3/28 Topics Orientation Introduction to Numerical Methods MATLAB Fundamentals MATLAB Programming MATLAB Programming Computer Precision and Numerical Error Root Finding (Bisection) Root Finding (Open Methods) Matrix Operations Review Gauss Elimination LU Factorization, Cholesky Factorization MATLAB Left Division Gauss-Seidel Iteration Nonlinear Systems Curve-Fitting: Least-Squares Regressions Linearization of Data Multiple Linear Regression General Linear Least Squares Exam 1 Polynomial Interpolation LaGrange Polynomials Splines Numerical Integration: Newton-Cotes Methods Romberg Integration Gauss Quadrature Numerical Differentiation Truncation Error and Total Numerical Error Ordinary Differential Equations Initial Value Problems, Euler Runge-Kutta Methods Systems of ODEs Exam 2 Adaptive Methods and Stiff Systems Boundary Value Problems -Shooting Method -Finite Difference Methods Final Exam Reading 1.1-1.3 2.1-2.7 3.1-3.3 3.4-3.6 4.1-4.2, 4.5 5.1-5.4 6.2-6.5 8.1-8.3 9.1-9.5 10.1-10.4 12.1-12.3

4/4

4/11

4/18

4/25

14.1-14.6 15.1-15.6

5/2

17.1-17.5 18.1-18.5 19.1-19.6 20.1-20.5 21.1-21.8 4.3-4.4 22.1-22.3 22.4-22.6

5/9

5/16

5/23

5/30

23.1-23.5 24.1-24.3

6/6

Note: The above schedule and procedures in this course are subject to change in the event of extenuating circumstances; students will be given advance written notice of such changes.