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Larry Lourcey

APRIL 2013
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PROFESSIONAL
senior editor
JOAN SHERWOOD
jsherwood@ppa.com
features editor
LESLIE HUNT
lhunt@ppa.com
editor-at-large
JEFF KENT
jkent@ppa.com
art director/production manager
DEBBIE TODD
dtodd@ppa.com
creative services manager/
publications & SSA
CHERYL PEARSON
cpearson@ppa.com
creative services coordinator
VALENCIA JACKSON
vjackson@ppa.com
eastern region ad manager
TARA TRUITT
404-522-8600, X230, ttruitt@ppa.com
central region ad manager
MARINA ANDERSON
937-902-8217, manderson@ppa.com
western region ad manager
AMY WALLS
404-522-8600, X279, awalls@ppa.com
publications sales staff
director of sales & strategic alliances
WAYNE JONES
404-522-8600, x248, wjones@ppa.com
EDITORIAL
director of publications
JANE GABOURY
jgaboury@ppa.com
Senior specialists
CAPTURING TEENS IS A DISTINCT ART
When I thumb through the stack of senior photos I collected untold
years ago, one thing that strikes me is their similarity. The lighting,
the posing, the toothy smilesall lovely kids in their apple-cheeked
youthfulness, and all images by the book. The same book. Never
mind that my small town had three professional photography
studios. Conformity was a sign of the times.
Because the images were all so similarly conceived, they fail to
capture the essence of my classmates and me. The tough girl looks
like the prom queen, looks like the Bohemian artist, looks like the
class clown, looks like the track star. There were no props, no locations.
There was no consultation that I can recall, just instructions to sit,
look this way, and smile.
How fortunate for todays teens (and their parents) that senior
photography has been elevated to the level of real portraiture, a
discovery of the individual, a study in revealing the true self. We
have some dandy examples to share with you in this issue. Larry
Lourcey, whose work graces our cover, is a master portraitist whose
mission is to move his subjects beyond the genteel grin, even push
them a little in order to peel back the faade they display to the
world and get real. (See Out of the Picture, page 58.)
Another seniors specialist, Ben Shirk, recounts his entrepreneurial
journey from near burnout in a high-volume, low-income business
to a comfortable perch as one of the premier portrait photographers
in his state (Not Just Another Job, page 96). Along the way he
discovered that by bumping up prices he was able to slow down,
improve the quality of his work, and specialize in a nicely profitable
seniors niche: young people who are highly invested in sports and
other extracurricular activities.
What I love about these stories is that they illustrate how Lourcey
and Shirk both find business success by expressing their art in a
unique style. And in doing so, theyre giving clients memorable,
personal, and insightful portraiture.
Jane Gaboury
Director of Publications
jgaboury@ppa.com
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journal of the Professional Photog raphers of America, Inc., is the oldest exclusively professional
photographic publication in the Western Hemisphere (founded 1907 by Charles Abel,
Hon.M.Photog.), incorporating Abels Photo graphic Weekly, St. Louis &
Canadian Photographer, The Commercial Pho tog rapher, The National
Photographer, Professional Photographer, and Pro fes sional Photographer
Storytellers. Circulation audited and verified by BPA Worldwide.
contributing editors
DON CHICK, ROBYN L. POLLMAN, ELLIS VENER
OUT OF THE PICTURE
Whether hes working with
seniors or other portrait clients,
Larry Lourcey documents their
personalities by minimizing his own
by Stephanie Boozer
ATTITUDE ADJUSTER
Having reconciled his misconceptions
about photography, Gary Hughes calls on
the profession to overcome differences
by Stephanie Boozer
SOUND FOUNDATION
Andy Ryan amasses a notable catalog
by Will Pollock
PHOTOJOURNALISM: ITS ONLY NATURAL
Erika Larsen goes where the story takes her
by Eric Minton
SENIORS: NOT JUST ANOTHER JOB
Ben Shirks custom team sport posters
bring in the senior business
by Jeff Kent
IMAGE BY: BEN SHIRK
88
76
96
58
68
Features
APRIL 2013
Departments
CONTACT SHEET
20 Autism awareness:
A panorama of stories
22 PPs giveaway of the month
22 PP asks: I remember when ___.
24 Beth Forester: Indispensable you
PROFIT CENTER
33 What I think: Ben Shirk
34 Ask the experts
36 A taxing time for pros
by Kalen Henderson
38 Plan to market
by Bridget Jackson
42 Measure your way to success
by Angela Pointon
44 My studio:
Indigo Photographic Inc.
by Michael Barton
THE GOODS
47 What I like: Beth Forester
48 Roundup: Products for teens
by Robyn L. Pollman
50 Pro review: Chimera Studio
System Plus Kit 5645
by Stan Sholik
54 Pro review: DMLite Lumos
100 LED Light
by Stan Sholik
ON THE COVER: Larry Lourcey, M.Photog.Cr.,
CPP, created the Loan Collection image "School
Spirit" for a senior who had earned his varsity
letter but hadn't yet received the jacket on
which it would be displayed. Lourcey used a
Nikon D700 camera with a Nikkor 80-200mm
f/2.8 lens, shooting at f/14 for 1/250 second,
ISO 200. Studio lighting was supplied by
Novatron strobes; the lockers were photographed
at the school. The image was composited and
retouched in Photoshop, then enhanced with Topaz
Adjust. Corel Painter was used to add very tight
brush strokes to create an almost cartoon-like look.
8 www.ppmag.com
14 FEEDBACK
16 FOLIO
103 PPA TODAY
110 AFFILIATE SCHOOL DATES
114 GOOD WORKS
PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHER | APRIL 2013 | WWW.PPMAG.COM
Luscious food photography is just one of Andy Ryans specialties. His
architectural photographs are vivid and his celebrity portraits evocative. In the right place at a
dangerous time, Ryan aced photojournalism, too. (Don't miss his sweet aside on copyrights.)
IMAGE BY: ANDY RYAN
CONTENTS
76
CONNECT
YOUR
IMAGINATION
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Professional Photographers
of America
229 Peachtree St., NE, Suite 2200
Atlanta, GA 30303-1608
404-522-8600, 800-786-6277
FAX: 404-614-6400,
www.ppa.com
2013-2014 PPA board
president
*RALPH ROMAGUERA SR.
M.Photog.Cr., CPP,
API, F-ASP
rromaguera@ppa.com
vice president
*SUSAN MICHAL
M.Photog.Cr., CPP, ABI
smichal@ppa.com
treasurer
*MICHAEL GAN
M.Photog.Cr., CPP
mgan@ppa.com
chairman of the board
*TIMOTHY WALDEN
M.Photog.Cr.,
Hon.M.Photog, F-ASP
twalden@ppa.com
directors
DON MACGREGOR
M.Photog.Cr., API
dmacgregor@ppa.com
ROB BEHM, M.Photog., CPP
rbehm@ppa.com
LORI CRAFT, Cr.Photog.
lcraft@ppa.com
MICHAEL TIMMONS
M.Photog.Cr., F-ASP
mtimmons@ppa.com
RICHARD NEWELL
M.Photog.Cr.
rnewell@ppa.com
STEPHEN THETFORD
M.Photog.Cr., CPP
sthetford@ppa.com
AUDREY L. WANCKET
M.Photog.Cr., CPP
awancket@ppa.com
MIKE FULTON
Cr.Photog.
mfulton@ppa.com
industry advisor
LOU GEORGE
lgeorge@ppa.com
PPA staff
DAVID TRUST, CAE
Chief Executive Officer
trustd@ppa.com
SCOTT KURKIAN, CAE
Chief Financial Officer
Chief Operating Officer
skurkian@ppa.com
JANE GABOURY
Director of Publications
jgaboury@ppa.com
KRISTEN HARTMAN
Director of Membership
khartman@ppa.com
WAYNE JONES
Director of Sales &
Strategic Alliances
wjones@ppa.com
ANGELA KURKIAN,
M.Photog.Cr.
Director of Education
akurkian@ppa.com
SCOTT MORGAN
Director of Information
Technology
smorgan@ppa.com
WILDA OKEN
Director of Administration
woken@ppa.com
CARLA PLOUIN
Director of Marketing
and Communications
cplouin@ppa.com
LENORE TAFFEL
Director of Events
ltaffel@ppa.com
SANDRA LANG
Executive Assistant
slang@ppa.com
*Executive Committee
of the Board
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COVER STUNNER
Just goes to show you dont need SFX.
Just good composition, makeup, and lighting.
Lynda Bowyer
Why drag the shutter at 1/30 if there are no
hot lights involved?
Max and Karin Hermans
Major wow.
Jeffrey R. Williams
Heres to the power of clean and simple.
Mahmoud El-Darwish
DOGGONE
Every month I read your magazine
cover to cover. I always come away learning
something or being inspired.
Ive been a professional dog photographer
for nearly 10 years and teach dog photography
workshops nationwide. Finally it is being rec-
ognized that clients want portraits of their
pet and it is a viable source for making a profit.
Your magazine has done a good job pro-
moting dog photography to its readers. I was
shocked at the Contact Sheet article Puppy
Love (February). This article is really grasp-
ing for straws trying to find a market that
does not exist.
Barbara Breitsameter
Poppyblue Photography
I just wanted to say how disappointed and angry
I am with your Puppy Love article regarding
dog maternity portraits. While this may seem
like a cute keepsake for the owners and a
unique business niche, it is wrong. Currently,
there are 4 million dogs and cats euthanized
every year in the United States simply because
there are no homes for them. There is absolutely
no reason that dogs should continue to be
bred while there is such an extreme over-
population, and it disgusts me that you
would promote breeding in your publication.
Melanie Beckman
POWER TOOL
I got a lot out of the Refine Edge tutorial
in the January issue. I use selection tools fre-
quently, but I didnt realize the power behind the
refine edge tool. Thanks to this article, Im able to
spend less time masking after selecting. Sure
appreciate the time savings with what I learned.
Definitely one of my favorite articles to date!
Gwen Meehan
LIFELONG LEARNER
I have enjoyed the magazine for 30-
plus years. Every year it gets better. Keep up
the good work.
Ira Nozik
CLARIFICATION
Some readers were confused by an hourly pric-
ing example in Bridget Jacksons February col-
umn, Pricing Wedding Commissions. The
rate of $30 per hour was a point of contention
among the photographers who posted com-
ments on PPAs social networks. We asked
her to clarify:
PPA never recommends specific rates.
The $30 hourly rate is an example. PPA Studio
Management Services (SMS) mentors encourage
each photographer to determine his or her own
rate. Be mindful that the time you invest in a
wedding commission isnt limited to the wed-
ding day. Based on estimates from SMS men-
tors, the amount of time spent to photograph
the wedding, process the images, and pro-
duce the products is about 40 hours. In the
example I presented, youd multiply the $30
hourly rate by 40 hours ($1,200) and add the
total amount of the clients product purchase
($3,200) to calculate the total earnings from
that fictitious wedding ($4,400). Ill cover
the details of how to determine your own
hourly rate in a future Making Money column.
Bridget Jackson
CORRECTION
We apologize for the
incorrect photograph
credit in the February
issues product
roundup, Sweet Con-
fection (page 52). The
correct attribution is LeZandra Photography. I
14 www.ppmag.com
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folio|
Showcasing images selected from the files of the PPA Loan Collection, Folio is a monthly sample of
award-winning photography from the most recent International Photographic Competition (IPC), which
is open to non-PPA members. The current Loan Collection is a select group of more than 400
photographs chosen for distinction by the IPC jurors. ppa.com/IPC.
MOON LIGHT DANCE
Moon Light Dance by Frank Salas, M.Photog.Cr., A-ASP, was taken minutes before the end of the wedding
couples reception at the St. Regis Hotel, Monarch Beach Resort, in Southern California. Wedding day time
constraints typically test the photographers creativity, Salas says. By offering to stay until the end of most
events, Im able to spend a few more minutes looking for new scenic spots where I can create something unique
not only for the couple but for myself as well. Frank Salas Photography is in Irvine, Calif. franksalas.com
CAMERA & LENS: Canon EOS 5D Mark III camera, Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L USM lens
SETTINGS & EXPOSURE: f/2.8 for 1/80 second, ISO 1600
LIGHTING: Available light only
POST CAPTURE: Processed and retouched in Adobe CS6 and Lightroom 4; enhanced with filters in Nik software
Frank Salas
PROFESSOR GIZMO
Being interested in
steampunk [a sci-fi subgenre
of art and literature], I
jumped at the opportunity to
photograph some of the
characters at the opening of
the Steampunk: History
Beyond Imagination exhibition
at the Muzeo Museum in
Anaheim, Calif., says Charlie
Laumann, CPP, explaining
Professor Gizmo. Thats
where he met artist Jay Davis
(aka professor Phineas J.
Flockmocker III), the subject
of this image. Laumann is
the proprietor of Blue Moon
Photography in Tustin, Calif.
bluemoonphotography.com
CAMERA & LENS: Canon
EOS 5D Mark II camera,
Canon 24-105mm f/4 IS L
series lens used at 70mm
SETTINGS & EXPOSURE:
f/4 for 1/250 second, ISO 160
LIGHTING: Available light,
no modifiers
POST CAPTURE: The raw
file was processed in Adobe
Lightroom 3.5 for basic
exposure, contrast, and color
balance. The background was
replaced in Adobe Photoshop
CS 3. Nik Color Efex Pro and
Viveza filters were used to
further enhance the image.
Charlie Laumann
April 2013 Professional Photographer 17
ARTES Y LAS CIENCIAS
Jaime Mezquida Caudelis studio, Bokehconcept, in Dnia, Spain, specializes in architectural,
wedding, and portrait photography. Artes y las Ciencias (above) was taken at the Queen
Sofa Palace of the Arts opera house and cultural center at the City of Arts and Sciences
complex in Valencia, Spain, one of Caudelis favorite shooting locations. Photographers
have photographed the City of Arts and Sciences extensively, but this time I tried to
capture in a different perspective, a different angle, a close-up of one part of the building
during a photo shoot, he says. bokehconcept.com
CAMERA & LENS: Canon EOS 5D Mark II camera, Canon EF 17-40mm f/4L USM lens at 40mm
SETTINGS & EXPOSURE: f/13 for 1/250 second, ISO 100
LIGHTING: Natural light only
POST CAPTURE: Adobe Photoshop CS4 Extended for color correction and the application of
curves and levels zone by zone and the high pass filter in the texture of the building.
YOU KISS IT!
Michelle Parsley, CPP, made You Kiss It! (right) before she and her daughter, the subject of
the portrait, headed out to Princess Day at Disney World. I made her dress for this occasion,
says Parsley. As we all know, photographers children are broken in the smile
department, and when I asked her to smile, she gave me the smirk that inspired the final
image. Im quite certain this is the face I would make if someone asked me to kiss a frog!
Parsleys Kindle the Heart Photography is in Woodbury, Tenn. kindletheheart.com
CAMERA & LENS: Canon EOS-1D Mark III camera, Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM
lens at 63mm
SETTINGS & EXPOSURE: f/8 for 1/200 second, ISO 100
LIGHTING: Main light, White Lightning X800 strobe, camera left, modified by a 4x6-
foot Larson soft box. Fill light, another X800 strobe behind the camera, modified by a
36-inch Larson flying starfish. Hair light, X800 strobe and a 10x36-inch Larson strip
light. Background, one AlienBees B400 on the subjects left, another slightly behind her,
both modified by 7-inch silver reflectors.
POST CAPTURE: Photoshop CS5. The frog, photographed separately in the same
lighting, was enlarged by about 30 percent.
Michelle Parsley
Jaime Mezquida Caudeli
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CONTACT SHEET
Whats New, Cool Events, Interesting People, Great Ideas, Etc.
All images Carrie Anciaux
These stories share the
good, the ugly, and how
their lives are affected.
They have a huge impact
on others who are newly
traveling the journey of
autism or who may need
support, resources, and
encouragement.
CARRIE ANCIAUX
Apanorama
of stories
Nonprofit
photography
group raises
autism
awareness
BY JEFF KENT
pril is National Autism Awareness
Month. According to the United
States Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention, roughly one in 88 American
children has some degree of autism. Thats a
tenfold increase over the past 40 years.
Autism is a broad term for a spectrum of
complex brain development disorders that are
exhibited in social or communication difficul-
ties, repetitive behavior, and other cognitive
abnormalities. About 40 percent of individu-
als with autism function at an average to
above average intellectual level, while those at
the severe end have difficulty functioning in
society and are unable to live independently.
Photographer Charles Cotugno, the father
of an autistic child, wanted to shed light on
the condition and launched the nonprofit
Stories of Autism. The organization pairs
professional photographers with people who
have autism and their families to create
insightful portraits and recount stories about
their lives. The portraits and stories are pre-
sented in exhibitions and have been used in
television stories and in various print media.
Stories of Autism volunteer photographers
around the world agree to provide a free por-
trait session and at least one 8x10-inch print
to each family they photograph.
One of these volunteers is PPA member
Carrie Anciaux, proprietor of Carrie Anciaux
Photography in Sun Prairie, Wis., and a one-
time language pathologist. With a passion for
working with special needs individuals, Anciaux
joined Stories of Autism in February 2012.
Last year, she photographed 11 sessions for
the organization, and this year she plans to do
20, almost all with children. To commemo-
rate National Autism Awareness Month, she
20 www.ppmag.com
A
is highlighting each session and story on her
blog (carrieanciauxblog.com). These stories
share the good, the ugly, and how their lives
are affected, she says. They have a huge
impact on others who are newly traveling
the journey of autism or who may need sup-
port, resources, and encouragement.
Anciaux conducts photo sessions at the
families homes. Calling on her 17-year expe-
rience as a speech pathologist working with
special needs children, she begins by putting
the family at ease. She says she wants to cap-
ture their children as they are, to show their
unique natural beauty. That helps release
tension, especially among families who have
had difficulty conforming to standard por-
trait experiences. Its important not to place
demands on the autistic individual, says
Anciaux. I am an observer. I dont try to
make the child look in a particular direction
or smile. I dont force eye contact, which can
be uncomfortable for them. I accept the
environment as it is and the beauty of the
individual and the situation.
This project has been so rewarding,
says Anciaux. People Ive worked with say
that this project has changed their life. I
know it has changed mine.
Learn more about Stories of Autism at
storiesofautism.com.
April 2013 Professional Photographer 21
22 www.ppmag.com
CONTACT SHEET
PP Asks
Are you Facebook-friendly?
We are! Just LIKE us at
facebook.com/ppmagazine
and you can be part of the
conversation. This month we asked you to
think back to your high school days and fin-
ish this sentence: I remember when ____.
I was cool wearing a mullet and acid-washed
jeans.
Mike Fulton
The photographer had me holding a phone like
I was talking, and my dad asked my mom, Why
was she on the phone during her photos?
Julie Carrier
I thought perms were a good idea.
Natalie Shivers
We had to put film in the camera and set the
ISO400 was fast!
David Young
It was the 90s. I remember how developer
smelled like cat pee and using test strips for
seeing which exposure worked best in the
enlarger. Anyone remember photo paints for
spot-coloring black-and-white glossy prints?
I kinda miss the attention to all the science
in that old-school development process.
Mandy Correnti Kar
Everyone stood by a tree with their arms
crossed.
Christina Kjar
The round-backed wicker chair for the girls.
Angela Plackowski Lawson
We had a plain gray backdrop and a really
ugly drape that went just over the edge of
our shoulders. Senior photos were awful.
Stephanie Sutherlin
Having to hold still and pose quite a bit. Lots
of hands by the face, arms folded, head tilted.
All of my friends used the same photographer,
so all of our images looked exactly alike. I also
remember the folio of eight images and tak-
ing weeks to decide which images to select.
Amy Allen
You got no clothing changes for senior pics,
sat for all of the poses, and got to pick only
one pose for the package.
Caroline Sullivan
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Want to ensure success in the senior portrait
market? Make yourself indispensable by
going beyond everyone else in your market.
Become such an exceptional service provider
that no one could imagine going anywhere
else. When you eliminate the alternatives,
price is not an issue. Heres how to do it in
your market.
SHOW THEM YOURE THE ONE.
Marketing boils down to convincing con-
sumers that youre the best choice. Use every
available medium to demonstrate how and
why. Use a blog post to show and discuss the
difference between snapshots and portraits,
professional, customized lighting versus
one-size-fits-all available lighting, good skin
tones versus inconsistent skin tones, and
professionally retouched versus what-you-
see-is-what-you-get.
Better yet, educate clients so they can
spread the knowledge to others by strategi-
cally supplying them with key talking points.
Youd be surprised by what your clients tell
others. As Im shooting a session, Ill explain
a little about what Im doing technically and
why. Ill talk about lighting and leading
lines, lens and aperture choice, and how
each decision I make will affect the look of
the finished portrait. Clients say things like,
Wow! I never realized it was so technical!
SET YOURSELF APART. Everyone
seems to be shooting outdoors, so Ive been
emphasizing in-studio sessions with profes-
sional lighting. Will an amateur shooter
match my investment in professional studio
equipment, let alone my investment in gain-
ing expertise in using it? In senior sessions, I
often use six or seven lighting setups with
one to six lights, and I explain the effects of
each variation as I go.
PUSH YOURSELF. Stay ahead of the
studio down the street, and keep striving to
best your own work. Continually search for
new ideas. People will tire of your work if
youre not delivering something new and
better every year.
DESIGN YOUR IMAGE. I spend a lot
of time designing. Many of my clients pick
CONTACT SHEET
Indispensable you
A
l
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i
m
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e
s

B
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t
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24 www.ppmag.com
Simple steps for senior
portrait success
BY BETH FORESTER
out four to eight images and say, Have Beth
design something for me. Clients want
something original, unique. The photography
is only part of the process. How you apply
those images in the creation of an art piece
is essential to making yourself indispensable.
DELIVER THOSE MEMORIES IN
A PROFESSIONAL FORMAT. I do not
sell digital files. There is no artistry or
customer service in doing that. While Im
photographing the subject, I talk about
my vision for the images and how theyll
relate to the final products. Oh, this one
would look great printed on pearl-coated
metal. We work with the best professional
labs to produce the finest metal art pieces
youve ever seen. I talk about having a
different vision for every image and how
printing it on a particular medium will
give it the most impact. We are artists,
and clients should trust our vision. Again
with the education!
This model provides not only super
service, but it opens the potential to maxi-
mize sales to each and every client. My
average senior sale is $1,950. And last year,
two seniors spent nearly $5,000 each. I
earned those sales by opening the door to
professional service and inviting them to
walk through.
Beth Forester, M.Photog.Cr., CPP, owns
Beth Forester Photography in Madison,
W.V. (foresterphoto.com). She is a Studio
Management Services mentor for
Professional Photographers of America.
April 2013 Professional Photographer 25
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Enter the
International
Photographic
Competition
by June 28, 2013!
Dont Miss the Judges Workshop!
If you want to become an approved juror, the
Judges Workshop will teach you how to recognize
merit-quality imagesand you will learn
competition from the inside out.
July 29-31, 2013, Atlanta, GA
8.78.277 ppc.ccn/jucgesvc|kshcp
Dont let good enough be good enough.
While your clients probably dont know what
makes an award-winning photograph, you can
bet they recognize excellence when they see it.
So refne that quality in every image you
produce by competing in the industry gold
standard of photographic competitions and
grab up those invaluable critiques!
Mark your calendar
Entries open: April 15, 2013
Submission deadline: June 28, 2013
.com/IPC
R E ADY F OR AN E DU CAT I ON I N E XCE L L E NCE?
Dawn M. Muncy, M.Photog.Cr., CPP
April 2013 Professional Photographer 33
Professional Photographer P RE S E NT S Business, Marketing, and Sales Strategies
What I think
Beth Forester puts
her house in order
What do you wish youd known when you
were starting out? How to price myself. I
didnt calculate my time and talent. As a stu-
dio owner, would you rather be valued as eco-
nomical or priceless? Ill take the latter, please.
Whats the toughest business lesson you ever
learned? I spend my life in business trying
not to get burnedagain. As a business
owner, you will get taken advantage of at some
point in your career. You have to have thick
skin and be tough at times. The key is to learn
from your mistakes and make the necessary
changes to ensure it doesnt happen again.
How do you prioritize your to-do list? First
and most important, create that list. Set goals.
I have many goals: daily goals (a to-do list),
monthly goals, yearly goals, and long-term
goals. Without goals we have no direction and
no path to success.
Whats one of your goals for 2013? Same
goal every year: Keep advancing in both my
photography and business skills. My motto
is, If youre not moving forward, youre get-
ting left behind. Each and every year I try to
be better than the Beth Forester of last year.
IMAGE BY BETH FORESTER
FORESTERPHOTO.COM
Q. How do you tactfully tell people who
contact you that youre taking a break from
photography for personal reasons without
losing your customer base?
A. Taking a break from photography can be
risky when you have a client base. Take care of
your clients by telling them as soon as you can
and offering an opportunity for them to sched-
ule a portrait session before your sabbatical.
Remember that your clients chose you not
only for the quality of your work but also
because they enjoy you as a person. Be hon-
est about your reasons for stepping back and
taking a leave of absence. Let them know you
want to hear about whats going on in their
lives. While youre on break, consider doing a
day of photography monthly or quarterly, and
outsource the image processing to lessen
your workload. With careful planning, you can
continue to work with the clients you love
while taking a break from the daily routine of
doing business. If you truly need to step away
100 percent, then keep in touch with your
clients electronically by newsletter and blog.
Youll need to be prepared to renew your
networking and re-grow your business when
you step back in. Use the time away to think
about what is and isnt working for you. Why
did you start a photography business? What
led to your need to take time off? What will
you do differently when you return? Some-
times taking a step back and reorganizing
your schedule and workflow to include time
off can be rejuvenating.
Lori Nordstrom, M.Photog.Cr., CPP
Q. Ive been trying to put together a selec-
tion of products for my clients, but I get
overwhelmed by all the choices. How do I
choose? Once I have selected the products,
should I list them in a book or brochure?
A. When Im looking for new products to offer
at my studio, I assess the items by three criteria:
1. Marketability. A marketable product
attracts both new and existing customers. The
best products are those that customers can
carry with them at all times, thereby show-
casing your work whenever they walk out the
door. Think mobile phone photo covers, photo
jewelry and accessories, totes, mini albums.
2. Salability. Does the product fit with our
brand and portrait lines, and is it something my
target customer would buy? You cannot offer
high-end customers a cheap or flimsy product.
3. Profitability. The problem with so many
trendy products is that theyre not as prof-
itable as photographic prints. We have ways
of combating that in our pricing, like offering
special prices on these types of items when
the purchase of wall portraits and gift prints
reaches a certain amount. We offer special
sales throughout the year on less profitable
product lines, such as photo jewelry. During
the sale, we might mention that in April well
offer a 15 percent discount on photo jewelry, and
that if the customer is interested in a particu-
lar item, he might want to take advantage of
the sale. That separates the purchase of less
profitable items from the original sale, thus
increasing the overall sales from that session.
Once youve decided what to sell, its impor-
tant to showcase the products in an organized
and effective manner. Have samples of each
product on display in the studio. Customers
like to see beautiful examples of products
before they decide to buy them. Its selling
without speaking.
As for a brochure or menu, yes, its impor-
tant to list your products and their prices. You
can kill a sale by having to go look up a price.
Our profitable items are listed in our regular
pricing menu, while less profitable ones go on
promo pieces only. An example is our photo
handbags. I dont want the sale of a purse,
which could be as much as $350, to influence
or interfere with the portrait sale. If the cus-
tomer expresses interest in a handbag, we
pull out the 5x7-inch promo piece with prices.
I want the sale of items that garner only 25
percent profit to come at the close of the
main sale or as a separate purchase entirely.
Beth Forester, M.Photog.Cr., CPP
Q. My partner and I have been in business for
a little under two years shooting mostly
family portraits. We did two high school sen-
ior sessions last fall and really enjoyed them.
Wed love to book more but need guidance.
Are lead lists a good way to market to this
segment? Are there any other good mar-
keting ideas to attract high school seniors?
A. High school senior portraits can be a great
product line. This niche can be extremely profit -
able and lead to family portrait sessions as well.
Direct mail is one way to attract business
to your studio. However, you may find a mailer
to be costly. In addition, such pieces are
sometimes lost in the sea of postcards that are
mailed out during senior portrait season.
Reach out to your existing family portrait
clients. Tell them about your new senior portrait
product line and ask for referrals to rising sen-
iors. Ask your clients to send possible senior
models your way. This is a low-cost, high-
impact way to attract seniors in the beginning.
You may want to offer the models a complimen-
tary session or some other type of incentive. And
you can also encourage their engagement by
giving them senior rep cards to refer their friends.
Getting them in early is one key to success.
Mary Fisk-Taylor, M.Photog.Cr.,
CPP, ABI, API
Have a question for our experts? Email it to
Jane Gaboury, jgaboury@ppa.com.
Ask the experts
Taking a time out, knowing what to sell, adding senior sessions
STUDIO MANAGEMENT SERVICES PROFIT CENTER
Remember that your clients chose you not only
for the quality of your work but also because they
enjoy you as a person. Be honest about your reasons
for stepping back and taking a leave of absence.
GURUS FROM PPA STUDIO MANAGEMENT SERVICES ANSWER YOUR BUSINESS,
MARKETING, AND SALES QUESTIONS. FOR INFO ON WORKSHOPS, GO TO PPA.COM.
34 www.ppmag.com
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Sell Images Online | Digital Brag Books | FREE Design Software | Albums & Books | Professional Printing | Metal Prints
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Increase referrals, sales, and
book more sessions
Give your customers another
way to share your work and
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Life of hosting images
and bragging rights!
PROFIT CENTER: STARTING OVER
BY KALEN HENDERSON,
M.PHOTOG.MEI.CR., CPP, API
With all the discussion among photogra-
phers about professional versus part timer,
its nice to see we hardly have an exclusive
on this problem.
As Americans scramble to fill out their
tax returns, the accounting industry is airing
its dirty laundry for everyone to see. A few
months back, TurboTax, a product and a serv-
ice of Intuit Inc., launched TV ads showing
people in various occupations who were also
working as part-time tax professionals. In
one, a man looking quizzically at his plumber
asks, Havent I seen you somewhere before?
Of course, says the plumber. I prepared
your tax return last week. The commercials
tagline says that, unlike those other guys
read H&R Blockall TurboTax preparers
are true professionals.
You might remember my writing about
my neighbor Glenn. A certified public
accountant, Glenn is another type of player
in this fierce competition. He has a college
degree in accounting and is the owner of a
small accounting business that relies on con-
sumers within a 50-mile radius of his rented
office space. He has one or two employees
and works 50 to 60 hours a week to provide
for his family. He is a member in good
standing in state and national professional
accounting organizations.
Mind you, Glenns services arent cheap.
But he is thorough, accurate, and professional,
and his knowledge in his field is certified.
Moreover, his customer service includes such
enhancements as taking as much time as
necessary to ensure his clients understand
everything. I hire Glenn to prepare my taxes
each year. Instead, I could use the services of
TurboTax or H&R Block and save quite a
bit of moneyin the short term. But I worry
what would happen if the IRS came knocking
at my door for an audit in two or three years.
Would I get assistance from TurboTax? If not,
I would lose time and business while I tracked
down every receipt and document requested
by the IRS. And would I even be able to
answer all of the questions asked of me?
I see so many parallels here to the photo-
graphic profession. We need to launch our own
educational campaign about true professional
photographers versus weekend warriors. If
you do not quite know how to get the message
across and are a member of Professional
Photographers of America, help awaits on
ppa.com. Log in, click Membership & Benefits,
then select See the Difference. Youll find links
to educational videos customized for the
clientele of wedding, senior portrait, and family
photographers. Add the links to your web-
site for prospective clients to see, or use the
information to create your own campaign.
We may be hesitant to expose certain
harsh truths to the public. However, if con-
sumers cut corners now, those cherished
photographs may not be available at a time
when theyd be truly valuable. An invest-
ment not made cannot pay interest or be
available for payout later on. Frankly, an
appropriate but all too harsh tagline for our
campaign might as well be, Youll be sorry.
If I have to face the IRS, it wont be with-
out my CPA and neighbor at my side. His
service is worth every cent I pay him. And if
Glenn should experience a loss in his family
death, fire, theftyou can bet his invest-
ment in my skills as a professional photogra-
pher will pay off. I can replace his images
because I do this for a living. The time has
come for us to put it out there to the general
public, or someday well be sorry. I
Kalen Hendersons Studio K/Henderson
Photography is located in Mt. Pleasant, Iowa.
A taxing time for pros
Whos sorry now?
36 www.ppmag.com
Veer
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Post Production Services | Press Printed Cards | Gallery Wraps | StoryBlocks | Studio Selling Tools
Photo Credit: ABM Wedding Photography. 2013 Collages.net Inc. All rights reserved.
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To build a successful marketing plan and
corresponding calendar, you must first know
your numbers. How many sessions do you
need to do at a given sales average to reach
your financial goal? If you havent yet deter-
mined that data, stop, drop, and calculate.
You can find assistance in my earlier columns
or by contacting PPAs Studio Management
Services department (sms@ppa.com).
Once you have the data, begin preparing
a SWOT analysis of your studio by writing
down strengths (S) and weaknesses (W).
Prioritize each item and weed out those that
are less important. Focus on the strengths
that differentiate your studio. Address
weaknesses with a plan to turn them around.
Next, look outward to determine oppor-
tunities (O) and threats (T) to your studio.
Many of these items may be beyond your
control but predictable. Opportunities can
include new targets and products. Dont
overlook trends that could potentially
enhance your business. Threats include
competition and technology. We all have
competition; the key is turning perceived
threats into opportunities. Technology is
constantly changing, and your ability to
stay abreast of it is crucial. A studio owner
recently told me technology just isnt her
thing. About 800 million Facebook users,
500 million Twitter users, and 100 million
Instagram users are uploading 40 million
photos every day and liking at a rate of
8,500 per second, so shed better make it
her thing quickly.
Identifying new targets begins with
assessing clients and potential co-vendors.
Gain an understanding of your ideal client
in terms of the retail establishments they
connect with, from home decorating to
clothing for their children to family dining.
Identify the hospitality brand they connect
with (such as the Ritz or W Hotel). Such
insights will not only help define your
brand but also dictate the level of customer
service you should strive to provide.
Ideal co-vendors are those with clientele
similar to what youre seeking. Combining
efforts with them can increase your mar-
keting target area while reducing the costs
to reach them. Brainstorm ways you can
work together. Business owners love to talk
about their businesses, so listen and gain
insights about how you might co-market.
Ask them how they have maintained their
business in light of financial challenges,
best practices theyve used to stay in front
of the competition, how they market, the
kind of charitable work theyre engaged in.
Next, understand how your studios
strengths and weakness intersect with your
opportunities and threats. Basically, estab-
lish your marketing strategy, aligning who
you are, your identity, with your target
client. Try using a chart (Figure 1).
Then go back to the numbers and assess
your marketing efforts. You should have a
chart that depicts how many sessions you want
Plan to market
The basis of a good strategy is knowing your numbers
PROFIT CENTER: MAKING MONEY
BY BRIDGET JACKSON
PRODUCT LINE TARGET CLIENT SOCIAL MEDIA CO-VENDOR CHARITABLE PROMO
CHILDREN Two-income family Blog, electronic Childrens boutique, Private school Annual discounted
with at least one child newsletter, pediatrician, interior auction, local sessions for
Facebook decorator childrens current clients
hospital gala benefiting a charity
consistent with
our brand
SENIORS High school juniors/ Facebook, Teen boutique, High school Model program
seniors and parents Twitter, locally owned auction, charity
looking for artwork Instagram, Keek coffee shop, with senior/junior
dance school involvement
38 www.ppmag.com
Figure 1. Example of a basic marketing strategy
to do per month. Design your marketing to
be launched three months prior to when
you want those sessions and follow the first
promo with one or two quick hits to that
same audience. Figure 2 illustrates this.
To generate 15 portrait sessions in Feb-
ruary, mail a promo in November of the
preceding year followed by an email
newsletter and maybe a Facebook post in
late December. Apply the same process to
all product lines and corresponding
monthly session projections.
Finally, track how you did against your
projections. Tracking includes not only
how many sessions you did compared
to what you projected but also how well
your marketing strategy per product line
performed. The more data you gather
over time, the better your future market-
ing results can be. I
Bridget Jackson is PPAs Studio
Management Services Manager. She is
a certified public accountant. Reach
her at bjackson@ppa.com.
PRODUCT LINE JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. DEC.
CHILDREN 15 10 10 10 20 20
SENIORS 15 15 15 15
Figure 2. Session projection by month
CLARIFICATION
See Feedback (p. 14) for a clarication of
Bridget Jackson's February column, "Pricing
Wedding Commissions."
April 2013 Professional Photographer 39
Sarah & MpixPro Products:
Keeping Seniors Smiling
As one of the countrys leading senior photographers, Sarah looks for products that are not only high-quality
but that are innovative and stylish. She says, MpixPro makes it easy to offer such products
to clients and we appreciate the timely delivery as well!
PROFIT CENTER: MASTERING MARKETING
BY ANGELA POINTON
When I consult with photographers on mar-
keting, one of the first questions I ask is,
What is your financial bliss?
Can the words financial and bliss be
used in the same sentence, and what do they
have to do with marketing? Financial bliss
is part of your vision, which goes into your
mar keting strategy. For most of us, money
is a critical part of our vision. Give yourself
permission to dream about having the best
life you can imagine. Maybe your dream
doesnt include being supremely wealthy,
but you certainly want enough to live com-
fortably (which includes income for investing,
having fun, and some occasional spontaneity).
Making and executing a marketing plan
correctly will propel you toward financial
bliss. First, though, lets talk about market-
ing done wrong. If you cant judge how well
a marketing campaign is doing, youre not
marketing successfully. Thats one of the
most costly mistakes you can make in busi-
ness, almost as costly as inappropriately
pricing your services.
You cannot measure marketing based on
gut feelings. You need a system for ensuring
your investment is working. When you plan
your marketing right, you:
Have defined your target market thor-
oughly and are aware of the free marketing
opportunities you have to attract those cus-
tomers. Free opportunities include cultivat-
ing vendor partners who allow you to leverage
their exposure in exchange for yours.
Know how much and where youre
going to invest in marketing in the next 12
months. Once you budget and spend that
sum, youre finished spending. If promising
new marketing avenues appear, you can note
them on your list for next year. Of course,
free marketing is always welcome.
Know how to measure and shift market-
ing dollars as you go. For me, marketing has
always been a game. Call me a nerd, but I enjoy
watching my marketing dollars daily to see
what theyve delivered. I believe that people
only say, I just need to get my name out there
when they dont know what else to do. You
do not need to get your name out there. You
do need marketing dollars to advance you
toward your financial bliss every single day.
The secret to making your marketing
dollars work hard is measurement. Start by
making a list of every marketing effort you
plan to do in your business and the cost of
each. Ask every new inquirer how he or she
heard about you. Was it a referral, an ad you
placed, a Web search? Note it next to each
marketing effort on your list. Do the same
with each inquirer who becomes a client.
Every month, do the math to determine
your cost per inquiry and per client. Its
this simple.
Compare your per-client costs, and elimi-
nate the marketing methods that are most
expensive. In this example, the photographer
should consider doing less direct mail and
find additional local blogs that could be suc-
cessful to advertise on. Dont assume other
blogs will be as successful as the first, and
dont assume that all direct mailings will be
costly. Perhaps the mailing list wasnt as tar-
geted as it should have been, or maybe the
printing of the mailer cost too much. Examine
the effectiveness of your marketing messages,
too. Repeat this evaluation continually.
Numbers tend to scare photographers.
But now you know theres nothing to be
afraid of if you make a plan, budget your
costs, and measure the effectiveness of each
effort. You can figure out how to make your
marketing dollars work so that you arent
spending money on things that arent mov-
ing you toward financial bliss.
When youre winning the game, youve
got your cost per inquiry and cost per client
at a level where theyre delivering clients for
the lowest possible expense. Thats some-
thing to be proud of because for as long as
you continue measuring your marketing
dollars, youll create sustainable, propelling
motion toward your goals. I
Angela Pointon offers advice to photogra-
phers through Steel Toe Images. She hosts a
blog at steeltoeimages.com and tweets
@steeltoeimages.
Measure your way to success
Find nancial bliss by knowing your numbers
42 www.ppmag.com
PROMOTION Wedding blog ad: $250 Direct mail piece: $1,500
RESULT 5 inquires; 1 client 10 inquires; 2 clients
COST TO DATE $50/inquiry; $250/client $150/inquiry; $750/client
Example of measuring your marketing eforts
44 www.ppmag.com
Indigo Photographic Inc.
Batavia, Ill.
PROFIT CENTER: MY STUDIO
BY MICHAEL BARTON, M.PHOTOG.MEI.CR., CPP, F-ASP
Indigo Photographic was founded in 2006
with the belief that photographic portraits are
more than paper. They are studies of charac-
ter and preserve memories of the emotions
behind them for generations to come. Our
gallery is designed to be a place where clients
can relax and we can plan their session.
The front half of the studio is a gallery
displaying prints the way we would like clients
to hang them. The 9.5-foot stretched canvas in
the center of the wall was completed in-house.
It wows clients and also gives the other prints
a sense of scale. The benches invite clients to
linger comfortably as they view the images
while we are occupied with other clients.
Weve begun to produce handmade frames
in the studio, and we display a variety of sur-
faces and printing techniques. Small prints
serve as references for sizing. These sizes are
often purchased as accents and add-ons to col-
lections, and the display helps clients envi-
sion their own arrangement. The century-old
tin ceiling in our historic building is illuminated
at night and gives the studio a warm aesthetic.
The simply outfitted viewing area features
a high-definition screen and a Mac Mini. This
section is part of the gallery and allows clients
to see their own images featured in the collec-
tion. Handmade and press-printed books on
the coffee table become interactive displays.
The aesthetic of Indigo is simplicity,
even in the camera room. There are no props
and only two backdrops. This gray wall, 26
feet wide, appears in the vast majority of our
work. I need to be able to change lighting
quickly and with little thought so I can focus
on my clients instead of my gear. A cluttered
studio makes me an unhappy photographer.
The dressing room stocks a range of hair
products and creature comforts. Hollywood-
style lighting adds a certain ambience and
gives clients an accurate view of how theyll
look under the studio lighting as they do
their hair and makeup.
We transformed the back hallway into a
sitting area complete with a non-alcoholic
mini-bar and tea service. Keeping this area
simple makes a clear statement and gives
comfort to our clients.
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April 2013 Professional Photographer 45
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Steven Smith
As an equine photographer, I need every advantage to stay above
the competition. Thats when I discovered the real value of my
certifcation. My clients will never know how many hours I spent studying
for the exam or how many times I changed my images before submitting
my portfolio, but they certainly know that the images they receive from
me are of a consistently high quality. And Ive been teaching them to raise
their standards to expect nothing less from a certifed professional.
Heather Smith, Cr.Photog., CPP
Sporthorse Images / San Diego, CA
Think youre done learning? Thats crazy talk! Polishing your technical knowledge
and artistic skills keeps your art fresh and the quality fresher, which is just what the
Certifed Professional Photographer (CPPj program pushes you to do. Oh, and like
Heather Smith says, being certifed also helps assure your clients that you know
what youre doing and are consistently good. Youre a true professional with a
credential they understand!
Take the frst step toward certifcation today:
CertifedPhotographer.com
PPCC@certifedphotographer.com r 888.772.2780
GET
CERTIFIABLY
GOOD.
April 2013 Professional Photographer 47
Professional Photographer P RE S E NT S Products, Technology, and Services
What I like
When Gary Hughes takes to the road
Whats the best equipment investment youve ever
made? My Pelican Case 1510 carry-on. I dropped my
gear down some stairs once and the Pelican saved
the day.
What hot new product are you going out of your way
to use? The Ice Light from Westcott. This portable
handheld daylight source is one of the best lighting
tools on the market for wedding photographers.
Little thing, big difference When shooting on loca-
tion with an off-camera light source, having a reflec-
tor underneath can save you a lot of time in
postproduction.
When you need to move fast, whats your most valu-
able piece of gear? Speedlights. These little guys are
so versatile. We use them on weddings, portraits,
commercial work, just about everything. Great if you
travel a lot; they fit in any bag.
On location, what item do you find indispensable?
An assistant! Its hard to be my best if Im trying to
keep track of things while shooting. An extra set of
hands frees me up to do my job.
It may be old school, but it gets the job done A gray
card. I hate postprocessing. Custom white balance on
location saves me time and even looks fancy to clients.
IMAGE BY GARY HUGHES
HUGHESFIORETTI.COM
THE GOODS
48 www.ppmag.com
VINTAGE ACCORDION ACTION
Showcase a number of senior images in a vintage-
inspired 4x8-inch accordion book you create with
the Scarlets Notebook template. With the
books subtle elements and neutral backgrounds
your images take center stage. The templates are
layered, customizable Photoshop files compatible
with Millers Lab and MpixPro accordion books.
EW Couture Collection; $20; ewcouture.com
ROUNDUP BY ROBYN L. POLLMAN
School yourself
Engage your teen clients
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PIN-TASTIC
People love the online network Pinterest. Take advantage of Pinterests
simple, effective, free marketing opportunities by positioning your
images for easy pin-ability. Pin Me! blog boards are equipped with
layouts and branding banners that ensure your pinned work has a
credit with your name and website. Use the boards on your blog or
your own Pinterest boards. Design Aglow; $50; designaglow.com
BEJEWELED
The pewter Hannah Jewelry Collection shows off your work
in necklaces and lockets with interchangeable magnetic images,
etched pendants and charms, birthstone beads, and multiple
necklace designs. This unique convertible necklace can be worn
as a 36-inch single strand or an 18-inch double strand. Each
piece is handcrafted. HH Color Lab; from $53; hhcolorlab.com
April 2013 Professional Photographer 49
MEMORY KEEPER
The Nostalgia Collection Kit keepsake box lets you
work together with your client to tell a story. There are
vials for mementos such as confetti from a celebration
or flowers from the prom. Included in the handcrafted
wooden box is a designer wrap to hold 4x6-inch images
and Loktah paper letters and envelopes for cherished notes.
H.H. Boogie; from $199; hhboogie.com
Jeremy Kester
SUBLIME METAL
Images on these WHCC metal prints are imprinted by a dye sublimation
process to ensure longevity. Mounting options include an easy-to-hang gator-
board block for the floating-from-the-wall effect and sleek, contemporary metal
posts. Add 1/4- or 1/2-inch acrylic to create an even more striking display.
WHCC; from $12 for 4x6 inches (available up to 30x40 inches); whcc.com
POSED TO APPEAL
Michelle Moores Posing & Moore Guide covers many aspects of
working with teens, including how to help them relax for the camera and how
to stage natural looking poses. The 60-plus-page guide will help photog-
raphers with any level of experience get those shots that seniors love and
parents want to buy. Michelle Moore; $149; michellemoore.com
Q.: When is a photo session like camping?
A.: When you use a Chimera Studio System
kit. Thats what it felt like the first time I
set it up. To assemble the kit, you put
together frame sections and cover them
with the appropriate fabric. The kits alu-
minum frame sections are linked with an
elastic cord running through them like a
tent frames and assemble just as quickly.
Chimera makes two Studio System kits.
Im reviewing the Plus kit, which, save for
light stands, includes all the grip equipment
you need to do portrait or still life photogra-
phy in studio or on location. And it all
breaks down for storage in a heavy-duty duf-
fle bag thats included in the kit.
As with all of the Chimera lighting acces-
sories Ive used, this kit is so well designed
and built that it should give years of service.
Alignment pins and cutouts ensure the
frame sections snap securely together. The
fabric covers are mounted to the frames
with sturdy elastic straps at the corners.
The completed frames fasten together with
clips, and the individual panels become a
freestanding V-wall.
Setup is fast. Each frame takes about a
minute to assemble and cover. Constructing
a headshot studio takes about 10 minutes,
including the lighting. Changing panels for
new setups is equally fast but best done by
two people if the panels are joined together.
For portraiture, the lighting possibilities are
endless. The Plus kit includes four 42x82-inch
frames and six fabric coversfour white panels
with black on the reverse side, one silver panel
with black on the reverse, and one shoot-
through diffusion panela 42x42-inch frame
with a white/black fabric panel cover, and a
silver-gold zebra/soft white fabric cover.
Because rearranging the panels can be
done so quickly, my assistant and I fit in more
than a half-dozen different lighting setups
with our model in less than an hour, including
the time it took the model to shave and change
outfits. We began with a dramatic headshot
THE GOODS: PRO REVIEW
Smart, robust design makes this studio kit a winner.
BY STAN SHOLIK
The fast and the functional
CHIMERA STUDIO SYSTEM PLUS KIT 5645
The diffusion panel lit from the side provides a
range of options in combination with other
panels. Here I used a black panel as a back-
ground and blocked spill light with another
panel. The flash through the diffusion panel
creates a dramatic portrait.
50 www.ppmag.com
Backlighting the diffusion panel behind the subject
adds a soft glow. With a beauty light on a boom
directly above and in front of the subject, a black
panel on camera right adds some dimension to
the left side of his face.
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www.tamron-usa.com
Picture Perfect. Telephoto That Delivers.
SP 70-200mm
F/2.8 Di VC USD
Effortless Performance,Outstanding Resolution, A Class Apart.
Tamron`s SP (Super Performance} 70200mm F/2.8 |ens de||vers h|gh reso|ut|on and
high performance to cater to the needs of experienced amateurs or professionals who
demand the best standards. Whether youre preserving a special moment, capturing
the right image to communicate a feeling, or shooting to make a cover photo,
Tamron`s 70200mm F/2.8 br|ngs photographer and camera together |n f|aw|ess
unison. Tamrons proprietary USD (Ultrasonic Silent Drive) combined with VC
(Vibration Compensation) captures action in high-speed without distracting from
the momentand without camera-shake. This compact, full-size telephoto zoom
lens offers serious photographers the power to capture the moment from afar
while preserving it in high fidelity.
Model A009
Di (Digitally Integrated) lens designed for digital APS-C and
full-size SLR cameras, with flower-shaped lens hood.
Compatible mounts: Canon, Nikon, Sony*
* The Sony mount does not include VC, as Sony digital SLR bodies include image stabilization functionality. The Sony lens is designated as SP 70-200mm F/2.8 Di USD.
Focal length: 200mm Exposure: F/10 1/60 sec ISO1000

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against the black side of a large panel, lit by
a single AlienBees flash unit shining through
the diffusion panel. Another large panel blocked
light from reaching the camera, and all three
were clipped together. The first attempt spilled
too much light on the black panel behind
the model and showed the crease marks in
the fabric. We solved the problem by angling
the black panel away from the light.
Then we moved in the small frame that
wed mounted on a light stand with a grip
head from the kit and used both the silver-gold
zebra side and the soft white side as reflectors.
That provided different, less contrasty looks.
Satisfied with the photos, we unclipped the
black fabric panel behind the model and turned
it around to the white side. Unfortunately, no
matter how we angled it, we couldnt elimi-
nate the apparently permanent crease marks
in the fabric. We could have moved the
panel further back to throw the marks out of
focus; instead, we moved the diffusion panel
behind the model with the AlienBees unit
shining through and lit the model with a beauty
dish. We did two setups with the diffusion
panel behind for a background glow, one with
large white panels on the sides and one with
one white and one black panel on the sides.
Removing the diffusion panel to shoot
full-length poses against the cove, we built
reflectors by connecting two panels on either
side of the model and shot with the white,
black, and silver sides in various combinations
to slightly alter the look without changing
the lighting. By angling the panels in differ-
ent ways, the possibilities seemed endless.
Days later I had an idea for shooting one
of my orchids to illustrate a technique for
the macro photography book Im working
on. Usually, Id shoot through a 4x8-foot
sheet of Plexiglas for backlighting, but
rather than struggle with that for such a
small subject, I decided to use the Chimera
frame with the diffusion panel. I clamped it
THE GOODS: PRO REVIEW
PROS
Quick setup and takedown
Versatile
Packs well for location
Lightweight
CONS
Difficult to use for backdrops due
to visible fold lines
The smaller panel clamps to a light stand with
the grip head included in the kit for use as a
reflector. The silver/gold zebra side of the small
frame adds a warm, contrasty fill.
Connecting panels and using them as reflectors,
we shot full-length portraits against the cove.
Using a large black panel to camera right added a
bit of dimension to the otherwise flat lighting
from the beauty light.
52 www.ppmag.com
to a light stand with a grip head, set up my
lighting, and was quickly done.
For other still life photos, you could mount
the diffusion panel on two light stands with
the two grip heads and suspend it over the
set with a boom light above. That would
create some falloffthe amount of which
would depend on the distance between the
light and the diffusionand achieve a
much more interesting lighting effect than
youd get with an overhead soft box or
umbrella. I just wish there were a 42x108-
inch frame and diffusion fabric to suspend
over my 4x8-foot table. For now I need a
smaller table and narrower seamless.
I am impressed by the quality of the kit
and the versatility it provides, particularly
valuable when you have limited time with a
portrait subject and want to do several looks
quickly. I also liked that it was versatile enough
to use for an occasional still life photo.
The street price of the Chimera Studio
System Plus Kit 5645 is about $1,380.
The Basic Kit 5640 sells for about $765.
More information is available at
chimeralighting.com. I
Stan Sholik is a commercial/advertising
photographer in Santa Ana, Calif.
KIT INCLUDES
4 42x82-inch frames
1 42x42-inch frame
6 sets panel frame clips (sets of 3)
4 42x82-inch white/black panel fabrics
1 42x82-inch shoot through Chimera
cloth panel fabric
1 42x82-inch reflective silver/black
panel fabric
1 42x42-inch white/black panel fabric
1 42x42-inch reflective silver gold
zebra/soft white panel fabric
2 grip heads
1 duffle bag
Cleverly designed
snap-on frame clips
(left) join the pan-
els where there are
alignment pins and
cutouts on opposing
sides of each frame.
The entire kit packs
into the single duf-
fle bag (below) that
is included in the kit.
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BUT ARE YOU LOVING WHAT YOU EARN?
With many LED light panels, it isnt the
quantity of light thats lacking, its the qual-
ity of both the light and the device itself that
are inadequate. Two LED panels introduced
last year by South Korean-based DMLite
address the issue. These panels are the 88-
LED Lumos 100, reviewed here, and the
288-LED Lumos 300MK. The number of
individual LEDs in a light panel is what
determines the amount of light it produces.
LED is the preferred lighting of videogra-
phers, who often use lower light levels than
still photographers and record at f/4 to f/5.6
at high ISO. LEDs offer low power con-
sumption and high light output with low
heat output. They can be arrayed to shine
directly outward or mounted along the bor-
der of the lighting device to bounce light
against a panel to produce output. The
Lumos 100 and Lumos 300MK feature high
color rending index (CRI) LEDs that shine
directly out of the lights behind a diffuser.
Film photographers know they need a light
source with a CRI greater than 90 and a color
temperature of about 5,500 Kelvin (K) to
produce accurate color with daylight-balanced
film. Without the proper CRI, color renders
decidedly green or magenta. Because you can
white balance with digital capture, the CRI
is less of an issue except when you need to
balance different light sources. The high-
CRI Lumos LED panels allow you to balance
the light with daylight, HMI, full-spectrum
fluorescents, 3,200K tungsten lights, and
for still photographers even electronic flash.
The Lumos 100 is available in both day-
light and tungsten models. Manufacturer
specs for the daylight-balanced unit claim a
color temperature of 5,600K with a CRI of
90 and maximum light output at 4 feet of
THE GOODS: PRO REVIEW
Compact size and color-correct
high output are ideal for hidden
lighting or on-camera fill light.
BY STAN SHOLIK
Panel with
purpose
DMLITE LUMOS 100
LED LIGHT
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I used electronic flash for the top light on
the ring and the Lumos 100 to add fill from
the front and sparkle to the pave diamonds.
(Jewelry courtesy Frederick Schuster)
280 lux. (By way of comparison, 280 lux is
about three-quarters of the light level at a
desk in an average office.) Color temperature
of the tungsten model is 3,200K with a CRI
of 97 and maximum light output of 250 lux
at 4 feet. Both models include a dimmer to
vary light output and a separate rechargeable
lithium-ion battery and charger as well as a
transformer to provide power if AC is avail-
able, and the necessary connecting cables.
The Lumos 100 LEDs 15x9-centimeter
light panel surface is close to the 16:9 ratio
for HD video. Using a Sekonic L-478DR
meter, I measured the output to be 250 lux
at 4 feet, slightly less than the specified 280
lux. The color temperature measured only
4,750K at full power, not 5,600K. Though I
could use 82C and 6M filters to cor rect the
light perfectly to 5,500K, I used the Lumos
as a fill light without filters when shoot ing with
electronic flash, and it worked fine, with no
green or magenta cast on the product. At
minimum power, the color temperature
dropped only 150K to 4,600K. There should
be no problem using the Lumos 100 in any
near-daylight lighting situation.
The small overall size, high output, and
battery power make the Lumos 100 ideal as a
main light for video in areas that are other-
wise difficult to light. These would include auto
interiors, particularly rear seat areas, where
it is difficult to hide the lighting. It would be
even easier if the battery were contained within
the light or attached to the back rather than
connected by a wire. The battery is about the
same size as the light itself and can power it
for two hours at maximum output.
Mounting the light is facilitated by the
presence of 1/4-20 threaded mounts on each
side, but you will need an adapter to attach
it to a cameras hot shoe, but theres still that
battery cable to deal with. Of course, mounting
the light in your cameras hot shoe produces
the same flat lighting as on-camera flash.
The difference is that an LED light at full
output is very bright, shrinking your subjects
pupil size in portraits and causing them to
experience an after-image of multiple points
of light. Other Lumos LED lights include a
means to mount a heavier diffuser to the
light, but not the 100. While the Lumos 100
can be used on or slightly off camera as a main
video light for talking-head interviews if no
other lighting is available, it functions better
as a fill light or dim catch light on camera.
Unlike many LED light panels on the
market, the build quality of the Lumos 100
is very high. The body is aluminum with a
matte black finish. The connectors on the cables
between the Lumos 100 and its battery and
its AC power transformer snap on and remain
securely fastened until disconnected by
pulling on the outer sleeve of the connector.
It looks and feels indestructible.
The Lumos 100 is versatile in its way. I used
it to light a short macro video for a medical
device client and as a fill light for photograph -
ing jewelry. With its small size, high light out-
put at maximum, excellent color rendering, and
cool operation, still photographers and video-
graphers could find many additional uses.
The MSRP of the Lumos 100 daylight or
tungsten model, including battery, charger, and
AC adapter sells for $840. The more powerful
Lumos 300MK with adjustable color tempera -
ture, bracket, and AC adapter sells for
$2,400, and its battery is an additional $420.
More information on these and other Lumos
LED lights is available at lumosusa.com. I
Stan Sholik is a commercial/advertising
photographer in Santa Ana, Calif., specializing
in still life and macro photography. His latest
book is Lightroom 4 FAQz (Wiley Publishing).
PROS
Excellent build quality with aluminum body
Near-daylight color balance with high CRI
Little change in color temperature when dimmed
Can be mixed with other daylight sources
Battery, AC adapter, and cables included
CONS
Cost
Battery not integrated
Measured slightly off spec
The Lumos 100 mounted on the camera hot shoe.
The hot shoe adapter must be purchased separately.
April 2013 Professional Photographer 55
All images Larry Lourcey
Ive always handled
seniors the same as any
other portrait. Im trying
to create the best image
ever taken of that person.
My portrait business
has always been based
around the image,
getting the personality,
no matter who it is.
LARRY LOURCEY
Whether hes working with seniors or other portrait clients,
Larry Lourcey documents their personalities by minimizing his own
BY STEPHANIE BOOZER
OUT OF THE PICTURE
F
or Larry Lourcey, M.Photog., CPP, a portrait is a
portrait. He doesnt mean that in a blas waybut in
an impassioned, give-every-subject-the-creative-detective-work-it-deserves
way. Whether hes photographing a high school senior, an executive, or a
child, Lourcey believes he should portray the subjects unique personality.
Ive always handled seniors the same as
any other portrait, says Lourcey from his
Dallas studio. Im trying to create the best
image ever taken of that person. My portrait
business has always been based around the
image, getting the personality, no matter who
it is. Perhaps thats why Lourceys body of work
doesnt fall into one definable style. Richard
Sturdevant [M.Photog.MEI.Cr.] is a very
good friend, and he has a very identifiable
style, says Lourcey. Thats what his clients
want, and thats what works for him. But me,
I bounce all over the place. In Lourceys brand
of storytelling, the artists hand is invisible.
PUSHING THROUGH
You have to go beyond documenting what
that person looks like, he says, which is easier
said than done. Clients often come in with an
idea of what theyre looking for, and the sen-
iors, he says, are generally pretty well clued in.
In any case, Lourcey will talk with the client
to find out what he or she is into, what
drives a day-to-day life. He doesnt have any
secrets to drawing out a subject, he just hap-
pens to be good at it.
Witness the senior portrait in which the
subjects face is streaked with paint. It just
made sense for her because she wants to be
an artist, he says. Senior girls are attuned to
their expectations for portraits, he says, but
not so the boys. They generally come in
with a checking-this-off-the-list attitude.
But the guy in the Superman shot was
totally gung-ho. I bleed green he said at
some point about his school color.
Along with those seeking a conceptual-
ized portrait come the quieter folks, the sen-
iors and parents who simply want a good,
honest portrait. When they dont know what
to do with themselves, Lourcey throws them
in front of a white background and politely
but firmly pushes them to fight through
their nervousness. With little to no warning,
he tells them to strike a pose every time he
counts to 10, and then he fires the shutter.
Its just wearing them down through
those static poses until they loosen up, he
says. I tell them they have to pose each time,
whether its silly or crazy or just pretending
theyre in a fashion show, whatever. You just
steamroll through it. Usually halfway through,
they run out of ideas, shrug, and laugh. They
have no choice but to let their guard down
even the most hardcore senior boys will start
laughing. They always love it afterwards. Moms
see the baby they no longer have; everybodys
happy. Their wall is gone at that point.
Lourceys staunch belief in capturing the
individuals personality makes him wary of
popular trends, though hes not above trying
his hand at a clients request.
I like to think that looking at my images,
you couldnt tell if they were done in the 70s
or now or 20 years from now, he says. They
dont scream of a certain era because I try to
be timeless. That separates me a little bit; not
everybody likes it. From an artistic stand-
point, I dont mind if someone wants me to
copy a certain style. But once were done with
that, I always want to go on and try some-
thing different, something more them.
Lourcey laughs as he thinks back to his
own senior portrait, about his lack of wardrobe
consultation and the dated posing. It was
the hokiest looking picture, he says. No
way would I ever put that up anywhere.
Thats why I dont like capturing the trendy
look. Ill do a little of it if they want it, but
my goal is to always walk away with one key
image that theyre going to be proud of their
whole lives. Whether thats a formal painted
portrait, a stark black-and-white portrait, or
something else just as timeless, the key is
that it doesnt go out of style.
Though Lourcey says his lack of a single
signature look could be construed as diffi-
cult from a marketing standpoint, one could
also argue that its exactly what sets him
apart. Its great to be able to plan every-
thing out, he says, but its also a matter of
just talking to them. I love talking to
teenagers. You have to figure out what
theyre not saying, what they cant or wont
articulate. Once you get that and they trust
you, its easy.
UNIQUE DELIVERY
While Lourcey is protective of his images
(nothing goes on the Internet unless some-
one has purchased it), he isnt overly con-
cerned about the accessibility of high-quality
digital imaging and its convergence with
social media.
Instagram could really raise the bar for
senior photographers, he says. If youre
doing the unposed, unlit photography thats
very popular right now, its only a matter of
time until kids realize they can do their own
senior portrait with their phone. But if youre
creating something with complex lighting
patterns or a painted image, theyre not
going to be able to do that. It actually gives
me a little job security because I can deliver
something they cant do on their own.
The new photographers entering the
marketplace dont bother Lourcey much
either. When I started out, I had a million
questions, says Lourcey. I was lucky to be
in Dallas, where there are so many talented
photographers. I got my feet under me and
felt obligated to help out and give back.
Lourcey started producing free online
video tutorials for basics such as exposure
64 www.ppmag.com
and Adobe Photoshop. Photographers took
notice, and Lourcey now has about 50 instruc-
tional videos and 8,000 subscribers. The
videos led to teaching and speaking, which
come naturally to Lourcey, who had planned
to become a teacher when he was in college.
Hes also working with a middle school,
teaching a darkroom class to eighth graders.
No matter what Lourcey gets up to, hes a
portrait artist at heart. The girl with the paint,
the Superman guy with the letter, these por-
traits reach the core of those kids. Thats what
Im good at. There are a million things Im
bad at, but this is what I really do best. I
See more work and catch up on Lourceys
blog at lourceyphoto.com.
Stephanie Boozer is a writer in Charleston, S.C.
When I started out, I had
a million questions. I was
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40
All images Gary Hughes
Attitude
adjuster
Having reconciled his
misconceptions
about photography,
Gary Hughes calls
on the profession to
overcome differences
and grow toward a
more positive future
BY STEPHANIE BOOZER
M.Photog.Cr., CPP, API, and
Peter Hughes, owners of the
Abbey of London studio in
Stuart, Fla., he was schlep-
ping camera bags at weddings
at age 11 for the hefty remu-
neration of five bucks.
Hughes earned a degree in
sociology, which he admits he
has yet to put to professional
use. Hes waited tables, worked
as a musician, owned then
sold a construction business,
and gone back to school to
learn information technology.
Insert nerdy things here,
he laughs. It was that jaunt in
IT that brought him back to
photography. While employed
to repair computers at a
Circuit City store, Hughes was
well positioned to take advan-
tage of the Black Friday sale,
and he bought a Canon Digi-
tal Rebel to play with. That
entry-level digital SLR took
him by surprise.
I discovered photography
in a new light, almost like
people who find their way back
to religion, he says. Right
away I loved it. I realized I had
never experienced photography
as fun before. It had seemed
like misery for me previously.
Somewhat sheepishly,
Hughes called home to tell his
parents he might want to make
his living with photography.
Elated, they hired him to
work on weekends, and this
time he paid attention.
My mother is an amazing
photographer and a big PPA
member, but I realized I didnt
want to do business the way
they did, which was high vol-
ume, says Hughes. Learning
this, Julie Hughes directed
her son to Curt Littlecott,
ary Hughes, M.Photog.Cr.,
CPP, of Orlando, Fla., jokes
that he did just about everything he could
to avoid going into the family business.
The son of photographers Julie Hughes,
70 www.ppmag.com
72 www.ppmag.com
Cr.Photog., and Stephanie Rounds, who had
just lost a photographer at their studio, Nu
Visions in Photography. Hughes worked
there for about 20 hours a week learning
Nu Visions approach, which gave him the
practical and technical experience he needed.
Hughes found a kindred spirit in photog-
raphy when he met Julie Fioretti, now Julie
Fioretti-Hughes, CPP, who had cut her
teeth photographing bands and music per-
formances. One thing led to another, and in
2008 the couple started their own studio,
Hughes Fioretti Photography.
Looking back, it was probably a terrible
idea, in the middle of the worst recession, to
start this luxury business, says Hughes. But
we found a hole in our market that made
sense. That gap was in the film and televi-
sion industry, which was thriving in Orlando.
There were only two photographers in the
area specializing in head shots and comp cards,
while the market for wedding and baby pho-
tographers was saturated. The duo analyzed
the competition and came up with a strategy.
You had one guy doing about 80 percent
of the head shot work, but everything looked
pretty similar, and the guy took a month to
get clients images back to them, according to
Hughes. We solved two problems. We created
a business where the work looked different,
had that extra pop, and we were the first head
shot photographer in central Florida to do an
online gallery, so there was fast turnaround
time. That was how we started with success,
and weve just branched out from there.
Today, Hughes Fioretti Photography
continues to specialize in head shots and
commercial work, and has a sideline in wed-
dings and portraits as well.
You have to do what will balance out the
market, says Hughes. If youre trying to shoot
babies and weddings, you might have a hard
time because the market is flooded. A lot of the
new photographers are going after babies and
weddings. You have to concentrate on the
Whats the most common advice Gary
Hughes and Julie Fioretti-Hughes dish out
to newcomers? Heres what they told us:
WORRY ABOUT YOURSELF. Stop
worrying about what everyone else is
doing. Wayne Gretzky said it, and Steve
Jobs quoted it: I skate to where the puck
is going to be, not to where it was. Dont
chase what everyone else is doing. Get
ahead of the market. Find the people who
want you and what you do. Youll be hap-
pier and more successful.
LISTEN TO YOUR CLIENTS. Listen
to their ideas, even on album design or
during the session. Dont be stuck on
your own creative vision. Not all great
ideas have to be yours, and sometimes cre-
ativity is recognizing it in another person.
DO SOMETHING YOUVE NEVER
DONE BEFORE. Every time you go into
a photo shoot, do something new; whether
its rear curtain sync, off-camera flash or
using only ambient light, try one thing.
Dont pay attention to what other people
are doing; instead, compete against
yourself.
NEVER STOP LEARNING. There
is always more to learn in this industry,
and education outside of is crucial as
well. Take a business class, a marketing
class, a design class. Never stop growing
intellectually or creatively. If youre
not evolving, then youre just being
left behind.
ADVICE FOR NEOPHYTES
things other photographers are not going after.
Im going to go to the shallow end of the pool
where no one else is trying to make a living. Im
a photographer, but Im also a business person.
Hughes has nothing against new photog-
raphers on the scene. In fact, he says he wishes
more of the established photographers were
open to mentorship and would support new-
comers working to succeed. He believes it
would ultimately elevate the industry as a
whole. Its a topic he often speaks about, calling
for an industry-wide attitude adjustment.
Our biggest problem isnt how many
photographers there are, he says. Its how
much theyre charging. The best way to help
is to plug them into PPA. This is a fad, fueled
by ease of access to equipment coinciding
with a recession where people lost their
jobs and tried to turn photography into a
job. There actually are too many photogra-
phers. But as things improve, and photog-
raphers educate themselves and learn to
price and shoot better, it will right itself.
The photography business is going to be OK.
Hughes feels he got a head start due to his
parents support and his and their involvement
in PPA. We have to make new photographers
feel welcome, not ostracize them, he says.
People forget why they fell in love with pho-
tography in the first place, and for most people,
its pretty similar to what a lot of these newer
photographers feel when they have children,
get a camera, and start taking pictures. Its the
same love. Its a changing marketplace, and you
have to keep up. I believe theres an economic
Darwinism that will sort everyone out, and
thats been true since the beginning. If you
cant keep up, you will go out of business.
You have to know what kind of business
you are, adds Fioretti-Hughes, who does the
majority of the studios marketing. There are
so many kinds of clients out there, from those
who really value what you do to those that
just need a wedding photographer, no matter
who it is. Figure out who you want your client
to be. Figure out how to run your business. Be
one step ahead. The business is always chang-
ing, and theres always something to learn.
Both photographers are committed to
their local and state affiliates and avid pro-
moters of continuing education. Participat-
ing in image competitions alone is what
many new photographers need in order to
make the move from hobbyist to profes-
sional photographer, says Fioretti-Hughes.
Facebook has been great and terrible
for photography, she says. Everyone wants
to like what you put up there, and no one puts
anything up for critique. Its so easy to get a
license and say youre a pro photographer and
that youve got this business. But really, as
scary as it is, competition and putting your
work out there is what people need. Unless
you get pushed out of your comfort zone,
youre not going to get better and grow. I
See more of the work by Hughes Fioretti
Photography at hughesfioretti.com.
Stephanie Boozer is a freelance writer in
Charleston, S.C.
SOUND
FOUNDATION
Andy Ryan amasses a notable catalog
BY WILL POLLOCK
All images Andy Ryan
I
managing architect at Wallace Floyd Design Group, a subcontrac-
tor for Bostons Central Artery Projectalso known, perhaps pejo-
ratively, as the Big Dig. Kindsvatter was seeking a temp who was
handy with a copy machine and possessed one additional skill.
If the worker knew how to take pictures, that would be a plus,
Ryan recalls. He grabbed it. Boston was researching an effort
that would eventually involve 150 cranes, 3.8 million cubic yards of
concrete, hundreds of separate construction contracts, and many
thousands of workersall in an effort to bury I-93, the citys pri-
mary artery, 90 feet below ground. The project included second-
ary tunnels, parks, green space, and other municipal changes,
which would balloon the Big Dig from the initial budget of
n 1988, Andy Ryan needed to catch a break. An out-of-
work filmmaker, Ryan had returned to his hometown
of Boston and found himself down on his luck and behind on rent. At the behest of a
friend, he applied to a temp agency, a humbling scenario for any artist with delayed
dreams. Midway through the interview, the agents phone rang. Don Kindsvatter,
$2.8 billion to a projected $22 billion.
When the call came in, the massive proj-
ect was still in the planning stages. The job
entailed photocopying stacks of books and
articles on urban planning. Ryan got the gig
because the engineers didnt want to have to
wade through the stack of photographer
resumes they had received.
The potential impact of this project, both
on the city and on his career, was not lost on
Ryan: The word got out to the 800 people
working on the project that there was a photog -
rapher on the ground. There was a huge need
for in-house and public outreach photogra-
phy. I just started doing it, and I got to the
point where I was working seven days a week.
By the time Ryan left the Big Dig in 1996,
his portfolio had grown from some 200 trans-
parencies to more than 15,000 slides, trans-
parencies, and prints. He had retained all rights
to his shots, too, which would later turn out to
be lucky when a book publisher came calling.
The volume of work Ryan received through
the Big Dig was perhaps less important than
RIGHTS, ROYALTIES
AND A DEBT TO
NEIL SIMON
Agreeing to usage contracts brimming with
legalese can feel akin to promising your
first-born child. Any contract that involves
restricting the photographers copyright is
cause for concern. Andy Ryan faced this pro-
fessional dilemma when he emerged as the
photographer of record for Bostons Big Dig
project, having amassed a vast library of
images documenting a historic achievement.
In 2003, Barnes & Noble acquired Sterling
Publishing and contacted Dan McNichol, a
Big Dig project leader and former colleague
of Ryans, in an effort to launch a book
series. The new division was under the direc-
tion of a notoriously hard-nosed former
Readers Digest executive. When it came
down to negotiating the rights for the pho-
tography, things got dicey.
Her view was, the photographer is no
different than the copy editor, says Ryan.
She wanted all this photography Id done
for free. There was no way I was going to
let that happen.
I didnt fully realize it at the time, but I
had a lot of leverage because I had been
covering the project since the late 1980s,
he says. He gained a valuable insight when
he heard a radio interview with Neil Simon.
The playwright was discussing his hit play,
then movie, then TV show, The Odd
Couple, which generated very nice income
for everyone except its creator. Simon sold
the play and all rights for $3,000. The
experience ruined his first marriage, Simon
said, and gave him an ulcer for 20 years.
Ryan entered negotiations with the pub-
lisher with that story fresh in my mind. I had
just spent 12 years documenting this project,
and she didnt want to pay me anything!
As we got close to the deadline, I was
very nice, but I was not going to let her have
the imagery for the price she wanted. Finally,
she caved. I wound up getting the best roy-
alty deal of any book Ive ever had published.
The Barnes & Noble rep had downplayed
the marketability of the book, predicting
only 16,000 or so would be sold. Ryans
response: Deal. He negotiated a rate for the
16,000 print run and a bonus fee for every
10,000 books beyond that. To date,
80,000 copies have been sold.
I really, really owe Neil Simon,
Ryan notes.
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the overall lessons imparted. So much of what
I do now has its roots in that time, he says.
After 12 months on the Big Dig, Ryan
boldly told his boss he was taking a five-week
vacation in China. He arrived in Beijing in
June 1989, just as the student-led Tiananmen
Square protests had begun. I showed up
Friday night totally jet-lagged, and the next
day, the soldiers were in the street, he says.
He shot stills of the uprising for NBC News.
I was fighting my way to get into the square,
and that night I was photographing the crack -
down. I only slept for a few hours the whole
five days, and it was intense. You know, I
just really learned a huge amount about
myself and about photography and about
how events unfold, how things happen.
The experience in Tiananmen Square
transformed me. I understood the impor-
tance of history, photography, and how to be
in a situation where its just utter chaos and
insanity. Thats when I realized that this is
what I really loved. It was an extraordinary
experience, and it all opened up for me.
PICTURE IN PICTURE:
LET THE STAR SHINE
The grandest preparation doesnt guarantee
compelling portraits. Sometimes the best
shots are spontaneous, as in Ryans por-
trait shoot with actress Scarlett Johansson
for US Weekly. Despite her larger-than-life
personality, Johansson has a petite, even
ordinary appearance, Ryan says.
Ryan felt it was a lackluster shoot and
that hed blown the job for the client. I was
in a disappointed state, feeling like Id missed
it, he says. I wanted something extraor-
dinary. You dont have many opportunities
to photograph someone of her stature, so
you want to really make the most of it. I
was really disappointed, he says.
But he did get the money shot after all.
It was during the March scouting round
before the main shoot on her tour of Har-
vard University. I was there to size her up,
get into a groove with her before our shoot
and to see how receptive to me and my cam-
era she would be. Ryan drew on his knowl-
edge of architecture, and how the March sun
would be bouncing hard off nearby build-
ings. He made sure the light was behind
Johansson, giving her a luminescent glow.
That image stunned him later in the studio.
Sometimes you make a great shot and
you see it at 100 percent, and your focus was
on the bridge of the nose and the eye isnt
sharp, he says. When I clicked on 100 per-
cent on the eye and looked, I couldnt believe
I nailed it. It was tack sharp, right there.
And it was the best feeling in the world.
MORE SHOT DETAILS
LOCATION: Harvard Yard,
Harvard University
CAMERA: Nikon D2x
LENS: 70-210, f2.8
OTHER FACTORS: Mid-morning sun,
March, intense depth of field
82 www.ppmag.com
SPECIAL GENERALIST
Today, Ryan shoots architecture and other
projects for the Massachusetts Institute of
Technology, and he has amassed a clientele
for food, celebrity portrait, advertising, and
editorial photography.
Tamar Kaprelian was among the celebri-
ties he shot for Interscope Records. He
remembers a long day of shooting and sensing
something novel was to come. I was trying
not to get in the way of her sound engineers
because she was recording. We worked really
hard to make shots, but what really hap-
pened was that magic moment, Ryan says.
At the end of the shoot, the hot, bright sun
setting behind them, they got in Kaprelians
car. Ryan grabbed his camera and started
directing poses with the light behind her. Its
the kind of unplanned opportunity Ryan
urges other photographers to be alert to.
Its like if you go bodysurfing. You catch
the wave, and youre in it, and now the wave
is taking you. Its about how you recognize
where the waves are, how you need to go to
grab them and have the strength and ability
to swim into them. Tamar and I were
laughing about it because we had just spent
a whole day shooting, and the photo shoot
ended up happening in her car, he says.
In a profession in which specialization is
encouraged, Ryan urges photographers to
seek their own path. Its seen as a weakness
to have versatility, to specialize in more than
one type of photography, he says. But thats
a very American view. My photographer
friends in Europe dont hold that opinion at
all. You have to follow your own path. There
are no rules about specializing. The truth is,
if you love doing something and youre doing
it well, thats what you should do. Only you
can write your own history, he says. I
Andy Ryans online portfolio is at
andyryanphotography.com.
Will Pollock of Stone Four Media is a freelance
journalist and photographer based in Atlanta.

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Page 1

AF Flashes
SB-400 ................. SB-700 ...... 326.95
SB-910 .......................................... 546.95
R1 Wireless Twin Flash ...............................
R1C1 Wireless Twin Flash System ...............
DX ED-IF Lenses for Digital Only
10.5/2.8 Fish-Eye ......................................
35/1.8 G AF-S (52) ....................... 196.95
40/2.8 G AF-S Micro (52) .............. 276.95
85/3.5 G ED VR Micro (52) ............ 526.95
10-24/3.5-4.5 G AF-S (77) .......................
12-24/4 G AF-S (77) ................................
16-85/3.5-5.6 G AF-S VR (67) ..................
17-55/2.8 G AF-S (77) .............................
18-55/3.5-5.6 G AF-S II (52) ....................
18-55/3.5-5.6 G AF-S VR (52) ....... 196.95
18-105/3.5-5.6 G AF-S VR (67) ..... 396.95
18-200/3.5-5.6 G AF-S VR II (72) ......... 846.95
18-300/3.5-5.6 G AF-S ED VR (77) ....... 996.95
55-200/4-5.6 G AF-S (52) ........................
55-200/4-5.6 G AF-S VR (52) ........ 246.95
55-300/4.5-5.6 G AF-S VR (58) ..... 396.95
D-Type AF Lenses
14/2.8 D ED .......... 24/2.8 D (52).......
16/2.8 D (39) with Hood ...........................
24/3.5 D ED PC-E (77) .............................
28/1.8 G AF-S (67) ....................... 696.95
28/2.8 D (52)....... 35/2.0 D (52).......
45/2.8 D ED PC-E Micro (77) ....................
D-Type AF Lenses
50/1.8 D (52)....... 50/1.4 D (52).......
50/1.8 G AF-S (58) ....................... 216.95
50/1.4 G AF-S (58) ..................................
60/2.8 D Micro (62) (1:1) .........................
60/2.8 G AF-S ED Micro (62) ....................
85/1.8 D (62) with Hood ...........................
85/1.8 G AF-S (67) ....................... 496.95
85/1.4 D IF (77) ........ 85/1.4 G AF-S (77) .....
105/2.8 G AF-S ED-IF VR Micro (62) .........
105/2.0 DC D with Hood (72) ...................
180/2.8 D ED-IF (72)................................
200/4 D ED-IF Micro w/Case (62) .............
200/2 G AF-S ED-IF VR II (52) ...................
300/4.0 D AF-S ED-IF (77) .......................
14-24/2.8 G AF-S ED-IF ............... 1,996.95
16-35/4.0 G AF-S ED VR (77) ...................
17-35/2.8 D AF-S ED-IF (77) ....................
24-70/2.8 G AF-S ED-IF (77) ...... 1,886.95
24-85/2.8-4.0 D IF (72) ...........................
24-120/4.0 G AF-S ED VR (77) ......... 1,296.95
28-300/3.5-5.6 G AF-S ED VR (77) .... 1,046.95
70-200/2.8 G AF-S ED-IF VR II (77)...... 2,396.95
70-300/4.5-5.6 G-AFS VR (67) ...... 586.95
80-200/2.8 D with Collar (77) ...................
80-400/4.5-5.6 D VR (77) ........................
200-400/4 G AF-S ED VR II (52) ................
TC-14E II (1.4x) Teleconverter .....................
TC-17E II (1.7x) Teleconverter .....................
TC-20E III (2x) Teleconverter .......................
EOS Flash System (USA)
270EX II ................
320EX ...................
430EX II ................
580EX II ................
600 EX-RT................................................
MR-14EX Ringlight ....................................
MT-24EX Twin Flash ..................................
EF-S Lenses for Digital Only (USA)
(Not compatible with full frame cameras)
60/2.8 USM Macro (52) ...........................
10-22/3.5-4.5 USM (77) .........................
15-85/3.5-5.6 IS USM (72) .....................
17-55/2.8 IS USM (67) ............................
17-85/4-5.6 IS USM (67) ........................
18-135/3.5-5.6 IS (67) ...........................
18-200/3.5-5.6 IS (72) ...........................
55-250/4.0-5.6 IS USM (58) ...................
EF Lenses (USA)
20/2.8 USM (72) .....................................
24/2.8 IS USM (58) .................................
28/2.8 IS USM (58) .................................
35/2 (52) .............
35/2 IS USM (67) ....
50/1.8 II (52) .......
50/1.4 USM (58) ..
100/2 USM (58) ...
135/2.8 (52) ........
50/2.5 Macro (52)...................................
85/1.8 USM (58) .....................................
100/2.8 USM Macro (58) .........................
28-135/3.5-5.6 IS USM (72) ...................
70-300/4-5.6 IS USM (58) ......................
70-300/4.5-5.6 DO IS USM (58) ....................
75-300/4.0-5.6 III (58) ............................
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TS-E MF Lenses (USA)
17/4.0 L ................
45/2.8 ..................
24/3.5 L II .............
90/2.8 ..................
EF L Lenses (USA)
14/2.8 USM II ........ 24/1.4 II (77) .......
35/1.4 USM (72) .....................................
50/1.2 USM (72) .....................................
85/1.2 USM II (72) ..................................
100/2.8 IS USM Macro (67) .....................
135/2.0 USM (72) ...................................
180/3.5 USM Macro (72) .........................
200/2.0 IS USM (52) ...............................
300/4.0 IS USM (77) ...............................
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400/5.6 USM (77) ...................................
8-15/4.0 Fish-eye USM .............................
16-35/2.8 USM II (82) .............................
17-40/4.0 USM (77) ...............................
24-70/4.0 IS USM (77) ............................
24-70/2.8 USM II (82) .............................
24-105/4 IS USM (77) .............................
28-300/3.5-5.6 IS USM (77) ...................
70-200/4.0 IS USM (77) ..........................
70-200/2.8 USM (77) .............................
70-200/2.8 IS II USM (77) .......................
70-300/4.0-5.6 IS USM (67) ...................
100-400/4.5-5.6 IS USM (77) .................
1.4x III Tele ............ 2x III Tele ...............
C ll Call Call Call Call Call ffor for for for for AAva Ava Ava Ava Avail b ilab ilab ilab ilab ilabl R le R le R le R le R le R b ebat ebat ebat ebat ebat & es & es & es & es & es & PPro Pro Pro Pro Pro i moti moti moti moti motions ons ons ons ons
S on S l elec B t Bodi dies L , Lenses d and Fl Fla h shes!!
C ll Call Call Call Call Call ffor for for for for AAva Ava Ava Ava Avail b ilab ilab ilab ilab ilabl R le R le R le R le R le R b t ebat ebat ebat ebat ebat & es & es & es & es & es & PPro Pro Pro Pro Pro ti moti moti moti moti motions ons ons ons ons
S on S l elec B t Bodi dies L , Lenses d and Fl Fla h shes!!
EOS-60D DSLR
1920 / 1080 HO V|dec Cap|u|e
O||C 4 |rae P|c:ec|
SO/SOHC/SO/C Ca|d S|c|
wc|| W||| a|| Ca|c| E| & E|-S |e|e
Va||-A||e C|ea| V|eW 8.0" |||p-0u| |CO
b.8 |p Cc||||ucu S|cc|||
|S0 G400 - E/pa|dao|e |c 12800
HO|| 0u|pu| |c HOTV
Body Only................................................... #CAE60D 18
Mega
Pixels
EOS-5D Mark II D-SLR
Re:c|d HO V|dec 1080p |c.|e |cde
21.1 |eap|/e| |u||-||are Se|c| 8" H||
Re. |CO S|R .|eW|||de| ||.e V|eW |cde
Ue Ca|c| E| |e|e C|, |O Ca|d S|c|
Ou| & wea||e|-Re||a|| USB 2.0
Se|| C|ea||| Se|c| 8.9 |p Bu|| |cde
9-pc||| A| Se|c| A||a] |S0 b0-2bG00
Body Only..................................................#CAE5D2
Kit with 24-105mm IS ...................... #CAE5D224105 21
Mega
Pixels
EOS-7D D-SLR
Re:c|d HO V|dec 18 |eap|/e| Se|c|
8.0" |CO 100 V|eW|||de|
Ue Ca|c| E| |e|e C|, |O Ca|d S|c|
Ou| & wea||e|-Re||a|| 8 |p Bu|| |cde
Se|e:|ao|e V|dec E/pcu|e a|d ||are Ra|e
\eW 19-Pc|||, A|| C|c-T]pe A| S]|er
|S0 100-G400 (e/pa|dao|e |c 12800,
Body Only............................................... #CAE7D
Kit with 28-135mm IS ................... #CAE7D28135 18
Mega
Pixels
EOS-5D Mark III D-SLR
8.2" C|ea| V|eW H|| Rec|u||c| |CO
O||C b+ |rae P|c:ec| G1-Pc|||
H|| Oe|||] A| Ue Ca|c| E| |e|e
Oua| C|, SO Ca|d S|c| Up |c G.0 |PS
Ou|ao|e |a|e|ur-A||c] Cc|||u:||c|
|u|| HO 1080/80p a|d /20/G0p |c|ra|
Bu|||-|| HOR a|d |u|||p|e E/pcu|e |cde
Body Only..............................................#CAE5D3*
Kit with 24-105mm L IS ................ #CAE5D324105 22
Mega
Pixels
EOS-1Dx D-SLR
Oua| O||C b+ |rae P|c:ec|
|a|e|ur A||c] Bcd]
E]e-|e.e| Pe||ap||r V|eW|||de|
8.2" |CO |c|||c| Ue Ca|c| E| |e|e
Oua| C| :a|d |c|
1920 / 1080 HO V|dec Cap|u|e
||.e V|eW S|||| a|d V|dec Re:c|d||
G1-Pc||| H|| Oe|||] Au|c |c:u
Body Only.............................................. #CAE1DX* 18
Mega
Pixels
Digital Rebel T4i DSLR
ST| |e| Suppc|| |c| 0u|e| A| || |c.|e
O||C b |rae P|c:ec|
8.0" Va||-A||e Tcu:| S:|ee| |CO
Ue Ca|c| E| |e|e (1.G/ |a:|c|,
SOHC/SO/C Ca|d S|c|
|S0 100-12800, E/pa|dao|e |c 2bG00
|u|| HO |c.|e |cde W||| Cc||||ucu A|
Body Only............................................... #CAEDRT4I
Kit with 18-55mm IS............................. #CAEDRT4IK 18
Mega
Pixels
Lumix DMC-G5 Mirrorless Digital Camera
|u|| HO 1080 G0p V|dec ||:|c 4/8 |e| |cu||
Rede||ed Ve|u E|||e |rae P|c:ec|
8.0" Tcu:| S:|ee| T|||ao|e-Rc|a|ao|e |CO
SO/SOHC/SO/C Ca|d S|c|
||.e V|eW |||de| W||| E]e Se|c|
E|e:||c||: S||e|| S|u||e| |cde
14 Ad(u|ao|e ||-:are|a ||||e|
Cc|||a| A|, Tcu:| A| a|d |||| Speed A|
Kit with 14-42mm G Vario Lens ..... #PADMCG5KB 16
Mega
Pixels
E-PL5 Mirrorless System Camera
8.0" |||p Pc|||a|| |CO Tcu:|:|ee|
T|ueP|: V| |rae P|c:ec|
4/8 |u|| ||are Zu||c |e|e
SO/SOHC/SO/C Ca|d S|c|
||-Bcd] |rae S|ao|||/a||c|
|u|| 1080| HO V|dec |.A.S.T. Au|c |c:u
12 ||-:are|a A|| ||||e| |S0 2bG00
A.a||ao|e || B|a:|, S||.e| c| w|||e
Kit with 14-42mm II Lens .................... #OLEPL51442* 16
Mega
Pixels
18-200/3.5-5.6 DX G
AF-S ED-IF VR II Digital Lens
t&YDMVTJWFMZEFTJHOFEGPS%JHJUBM4-3T
8brr e(u|..
27-300mm
VR || V|o|a||c| Redu:||c|
Sw| (S||e||
Wave Motor)
8.b-22 |/S|cp Ra|e
|c:u 1.G' |c ||||||]
we||| 19.8 c/
10-22/3.5-4.5
EF-S USM Digital Lens
t&YDMVTJWFMZEFTJHOFEGPS%JHJUBM4-3T
8brr e(u|..
16-35mm
8 ap|e||:a|
lens elements
8.b-2/ |/S|cp Ra|e
||||rur |c:u 9.b"
//rr |||e| d|are|e|
we||| 18.G c/
SB-910 Speedlight
i-TTL Shoe Mount Flash
Tu||e| & ||uc|e:e|| ||||e| ||:|uded
u|de \c. 111.b'
S|rp|||ed |ap||:
User Interface (GUI)
Bcu|:e, SW|.e|
& Zccr Head
(17-200mm)
w||e|e Cc|||c||e|
we||| 14.8 c/
600 EX-RT
Shoe Mount Flash
Ou| a|d Wa|e| |e||a|:e
u|de \c. 19/'
w||e|e Rad|c
Multiple Flash System
Bcu|:e a|d
Swivel Head
Zccr Head (20-200rr,
18 Cu|cr |u|:||c|
we|||. 1b c/
042013
Page 2
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Flash System
FL-300R Flash .........169.95
FL-600R Flash .........299.95
FL-50R Flash ...........499.95
RF-11 Ring Flash .....249.95
Zuiko 4/3 System Digital Lenses
35/3.5 Macro ED (52) ............................................ 229.95
50/2.0 Macro ED (77) ............................................ 499.95
7-14/4.0 ED (72) ................................................ 1,799.95
11-22/2.8-3.5 ED (72) ........................................... 799.95
12-60/2.8-4 ED SWD (72) ...................................... 999.95
14-42/3.5-5.6 ED (58) ........................................... 249.95
18-180/3.5-6.3 ED (62) ......................................... 499.95
EC-14 1.4x Teleconverter ......................................... 439.95

AF Flash System
AF-360FGZ ........................................................................
AF-540FGZ ........................................................................
SMCP-DA Digital AF Lenses
21/3.2 AL Limited Pancake (49) ......................................
40/2.8 Limited Pancake (49) ...........................................
70/2.4 Limited Pancake (49) ...........................................
10-17/3.5-4.5 ED IF (77) ..................................................
16-50/2.8 ED AL IF SDM (77) ............................................
18-55/3.5-5.6 AL II (52) ....................................................
50-135/2.8 ED IF SDM (67) ...............................................
50-200/4-5.6 ED WR (52) .................................................

Flash System
HVL-F20AM .............149.99
HVL-F20S................149.99
HVL-F43AM .............349.99
HVL-F58AM .............499.99
Digital Lenses
24/2 Carl Zeiss (72) ............................................ 1,399.99
50/1.4 (55) ............................................................ 449.99
100/2.8 Macro (55)................................................ 799.99
16-80/3.5-4.5 DT Carl Zeiss (62) ........................... 999.99
11-18/4.5-5.6 DT (77) ........................................... 799.99
18-200/3.5-6.3 DT (62) ......................................... 549.99
70-200/2.8 G APO (77) ....................................... 1,999.99
75-300/4.5-5.6 (55) .............................................. 249.99
D7000 DSLR
E/PEEO 2 |rae P|c:ec| 8" |CO |c|||c|
1080p HO V|dec Cap|u|e 89-pc||| A| S]|er
RAw + JPE S|||| |rae Cap|u|e
A::ep| \||c| A| |e|e (1.b/ |a:|c|,
TW|| SO/SOHC/SO/C Ca|d S|c|
RB 8O |a|||/ |e|e||| S]|er
|-TT| ||a| + Speed|||| Ccrpa||o||||]
\||c| ||:. ||r||ed Wa||a||] ||:|uded
Body Only #NID7000 ........................... 1,196.95 16
Mega
Pixels
D4 DSLR
RAw, T|||, JPE, RAw+JPE |||e 8.2" |CO
W||| ||.e V|eW |/-|c|ra| (|u||-||are, C|0S
Se|c| 1080p HO B|cad:a| 0ua|||] V|dec
E/PEEO8 |rae P|c:ec| 100-12800 |S0
Ccrpa||o|e W||| |c| \|||c| 0p||:
|a|||/, Ce||e|-we|||ed, Spc| |e|e|||
C| T]pe 1 & /0O Ccrpa||o|e
\||c| ||:. ||r||ed Wa||a||] ||:|uded
Body Only...................... #NID4 .................. 5,996.95 16
Mega
Pixels
D800 D-SLR
8b.9/24rr C|0S |/ |c|ra| Se|c|
8.2" |CO |c|||c| \||c| | |cu|| |e| |cu||
C| & SO Oua| Ca|d S|c| 0p||:a| |cW-Pa ||||e|
E]e-|e.e| Pe||ap||r V|eW|||de|
1920 / 1080/80/2b/24p HO V|dec Cap|u|e
|a|||//Ce||e|-we|||ed/Spc| |e|e|||
Bu|||-|| ||a| + |-TT| ||a| Cc|||c|
\||c| ||:. ||r||ed Wa||a||] ||:|uded
Body Only............................ #NID800 ........................ $2,996.95 36
Mega
Pixels
Alpha SLT-A99 DSLR
Sc|] Oua| A| S]|er & T|a||u:e|| ||||c|
|u||-||are E/rc| C|0S Se|c|
/A 0|EO E|e:||c||: V|
8.0" T|uB|a:| T||||| |CO
Ue Sc|] A|p|a |e|e |S P|c Ouc/
H-Ouc & SO/SOHC/SO/C Ca|d S|c|
|||e||a| S|ead]S|c| |rae S|ao|||/a||c|
|u|| HO 1920/1080 O0p V|dec Re:c|d||
Body Only.........................................#SOSLTA99V* 24
Mega
Pixels
Alpha NEX-6 ||||c||e S]|er Care|a
|a| H]o||d A| W||| P|ae-Oe|e:||c| A|
8.0" |CO Ue Sc|] E-rcu|| |e|e
/A 0|EO T|u-|||de| EV|
SO/SOHC/SO/C & |S P|c Ouc/P|c H-Ouc
Ca|d S|c| Cap|u|e 1080 HO V|dec
w|-|| Capao|e |a| 10|p Bu|| S|cc|||
P|a]|erc||e Care|a App
with 16-50mm Lens .............................#SONEX6L* 16
Mega
Pixels
D600 DSLR
|/-|c|ra| (|u||-||are, C|0S Se|c|
Ue \||c| A| |e|e E/PEEO 8 P|c:ec|
8.2" |CO SO/SOHC/SO/C Ca|d S|c|
1080p HO V|dec Cap|u|e 89 w|de-A|ea A|
|c:u Pc||| 100-O400 |S0, E/pa|dao|e |c
b0-2bO00 \||c| ||:. ||r||ed Wa||a||] ||:|uded
Bcd] 0||] #NID600 ..................................................2,096.95
||| W||| 24-8brr VR |e| #NID6002485 ................2,696.95 24
Mega
Pixels
285HV Professional
Auto S|ce |cu|| ||a|
u|de \c. 120'
Au|cra||: e/pcu|e
|a|e |c /0'
4 au|c |/|cp e||||
Rerc.ao|e e|c|
Bcu|:e Head
Zccr Head (28-10b, we||| 14.9 c/
#VI285HV .....................................85.00
Qfash TRIO
Pa|aoc||: Re1e:|c| ||a|
u|de \c. 110'
Bcu|:e a|d
SW|.e| Head
Bu|||-|| ||ee/W||e
Rad|c w||e|e TT|
H|| Speed S]|:
USB Pc|| TT| :crpa||o|e
=0U0|8 ....................................875.00
622 Super Pro TTL
Ha|d|e |cu|| ||a|
Re(u||e Head
TT| W||| app|cp||a|e rcdu|e
u|de \c. 200
Bcu|:e & W|.e|
Au|c |/S|cp |/2.0, 2.8,
4.0, 8.0, b.O, 11 & 1O
Va||-PcWe|
=SUO22S ..................................196.95
58 AF-2 TTL
S|ce |cu|| ||a|
u|de \c. b8'
|u|| TT| |cde
Zccr Head (24-10b,
Bcu|:e & SW|.e| Head
Upda|e .|a USB Pc||
we|||. 12.8 c/
=|Eb8A|2 .............................. 399.99
Octacool Light Kit
W||| 29.b" 0:|coc/
0:|a:cc| O c| 9
|arp ||/|u|e
Rerc.ao|e
A|ur||ur
Re1e:|c|
28W |arp
|||e||a| O|||u|c| Ba|1e
Octacool-6 =||0COSB ........................................ 199.95
Octacool-9 =||0C9SB ........................................ 259.00
Octacool-6
Front
Octacool-9
Ba:|
Background System
Background Stands
E:c|cr] ..............................74.95
Port-A-Stand .................... 109.95*
|u||| 8 Pc|e.au|| ..............217.99
Paper Backgrounds
Available in 48 Colors
b8" / 12 ]d.........................24.95
10/" / 12 ]d W/Cc|e ...........45.95
* FREE!
Roll of
White Paper
w/ Purchase
SpectroLED Light Kits
Oa]|||| Ba|a|:ed b,O00|
Bear Pa||e||.
60 Flood
AC c| OC 0pe|a||c|
10 - 100
Dimming Control
||:|ude 8/4 S|cp
O|||u|c| Sc:|
SpectroLED 9 500 LEDs #GESPAD35 ............... 249.00
SpectroLED 14 1144 LEDs #GESPAD75 ........... 499.00
LED 14
LED 9
1 J3 Mirrorless Digital Camera
|||e|:|a|eao|e 1 \|||0R |e| S]|er
|c||c| S|ap|c| a|d ||.e |rae Cc|||c|
SO/SOHC/SO/C Ca|d S|c| 8.0" |CO
|u|| HO 1920 / 1080/O0| V|dec
S|ru||a|ecu HO |c.|e a|d S|||| Cap|u|e
\||c| ||:. ||r||ed Wa||a||] ||:|uded
1 J3 Kit W||| 10-80 & 80-110rr VR #NI1J32LK* .......846.95
1 J2 Kit W||| 10-80 & 80-110rr VR =\|1J21080| ..796.95
1 J1 Kit W||| 10-80 & 80-110rr VR =\|1J11080..... 746.95 14
Mega
Pixels
D5200 DSLR
|u|| HO V|dec W||| |u||-T|re Se|.c A|
8.0" Va||-A||e |CO ||.e V|eW
Ue \||c| A| |e|e (1.b/ |a:|c|,
SO/SOHC/SO/C Ca|d S|c|
A.a||ao|e || B|a:|, B|c|/e c| Red
\||c| ||:. ||r||ed Wa||a||] ||:|uded
D5200 ||| W||| 18-bbrr VR #NID52001855* ............896.95
D3200 ||| B|a:| W/18-bbrr VR #NID32001855* .......696.95
D3100 ||| W||| 18-bbrr VR #NID31001855 ..............646.95 24
Mega
Pixels
BY ERIC MINTON
hotojournalist Erika Larsen
was assigned to photograph
inside a coal mine. She does
not use flash, and she didnt
intend to change her M.O.
The editors were going, Are you sure you
want to go there without light? And I said,
Yep. There is more light than you can imag-
ine, says the New York City-based photog-
rapher. I believe theres light everywhere. Its
just a matter of how to capture and harness
and bring it in and celebrate it. The photo-
graph, she adds, Ended up really beautiful.
Two major factors have led Larsen to a
successful photojournalism career. One is
her ability to become attuned to environ-
ments and the people in those environ-
ments. (To wit: Larsen spent the bulk of
four years with the Sami, the reindeer-herd-
ing people of Swedens Arctic northland).
Which points to factor No. 2 in the 36-year-
olds career: Rather than trying to expand
into many styles to chase after multiple mar-
kets, she has instead focused on Erika
Larsen, a life. The markets54 magazines,
17 books and catalogs, and three organiza-
tions, so farcome to her.
Its a life that since Larsens childhood
has been inextricably entwined with a love of
nature and of photography. Shes taken her
camera on adventures from the Amazon to
the Arctic, fully immersing herself in a wide
variety of cultures, landscapes, and languages.
She sees herself as a storyteller. Its not about
making images, its about learning, and I
learn through the image-making process,
Its only natural
Erika Larsen goes where the story takes her
All images Erika Larsen
P
P HO T O J O U R N A L I S M
she says. I try to be as open to the area as I
can and let that come through as opposed to
imposing my visual style on where I am
capturing the moment versus creating the
moment. The woman who makes images of
people in close communion with the earth
was first turned on to photography by images
captured by a camera that was out of this world.
Larsens father worked on the Hubble Space
Telescope project at NASAs Goddard Space
Flight Center in Maryland, and he brought
home some of the orbiting telescopes pictures.
I just remember seeing those images, quite
fantastical and quite magical, Larsen recalls.
At 15, she begged her dad to let her take a
photography class: She would pay if he would
drive. She was the only female and the only
person younger than 50, she says. A couple
of courses later, she asked her teacher how she
could make a living from photography. He
directed her to the Rochester Institute of
Technology in New York.
Larsen graduated from RIT in 1997,
when photography was approaching the
crossroad of film and digital. Anticipating
the digital future, she went on to earn a master
of fine arts degree at RIT, studying computer
graphics, animation, film, and video. Working
as part of a large team didnt appeal to her,
though, so the self-described lone wolf
returned to photography. Telling stories,
communicating with people, and learning the
worldI wanted to do that as an individual.
She also reverted to basic forms of photog-
raphy, shooting with 4x5-inch film for a half-
dozen years. Not until digital SLRs hit the mar-
ket did she leave behind the darkroom. Today,
she shoots whatever the publication requires,
but most of her work is done with large-format
film. Her equipment includes a Wista 4x5 tech -
nical field camera, a Mamiya C330 Twin Lens
Reflex camera, and a Canon EOS 5D camera.
COUNTDOWN TO IMPACT
Larsen moved to New York City and spent a
year assisting every photographer she could.
Fashion, business, editorial, catalog,
advertising, still life: It wasnt about names,
it was whoever could give me different
types of experiences. Her off-time efforts
photographing her roommate proved equally
valuable. Pushing your own vision is really
important while transitioning from assist-
ing. You can get burned out just assisting. I
think it was important to work on my own
vision and recognize what that was.
With a portfolio highlighting her vision,
she mailed promotional cards every month
to the 50 places she wanted to work for and
Cases & Bags
Lenses
Take a virtual reality tour of Digital HT
lter effects at tiffen.com
s Digital Ultra Clear
s Haze 86
(with 86% UV absorption)
s Circular Polarizer
s 812

Warming Filter
s ND 0.6
s ND 1.2
s Soft/FX

3
s Star 4 Point 2
s Color-Grad

ND 0.6
Tiffens Digital HT lters are available as:
In sizes 52mm-82mmwith
distinctive soft pouch for storage.

Digital HT

A Major Breakthrough
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D800
36.3MP professional HDSLR
that breaks new ground in
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Full 1080p HD broadcast
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View simultaneous Live View
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SLR Digital Cameras
5D Mark III
22 megapixel CMOS sensor
ISO range 100-25600,
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Shutter speeds 1/8000-30
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iFCL Metering, 61-point high-
density reticular AF with up to
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LCD fnder with 1.04 million
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OM-D E-M5
16.1Mp, TruePic VI Image
Processor, 3.0 Tilting OLED
Monitor, M.Zuiko Digital ED
12-50mm F3.5-6.3 Lens, Eye-
Level viewfnder, RAW + JPEG
Still File Formats, 200-25,600
ISO Sensitivity, TTL Flash
Compatibility, 1920 x 1080 HD
Video Capture
Fu[i|m X-PRO1
16.3 Megapixels, APS-C
X-Trans CMOS Sensor,
3.0 LCD Monitor,
Hi-Speed USB 2.0
APS-C 23.6 x 15.6mm Fujiflm
X Mount Lens Mount
XF Lens Series Compatibility
Hybrid Multi viewfnder
1920 x 1080 HD Video w/
Stereo Sound
SD/SDHC/SDXC Memory
Card Compatibility
SD-1M
World's frst full color image
sensor: Foveon X3
46 Megapixel image sensor
Splash proof design pre-
vents dust and water from
getting inside the camera
body
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STARTlNG AT
$3499.00
STARTlNG AT
$2999.95
STARTlNG AT
$999.00 $1399 .00
$2299.00
85mm
f/1.4 Telephoto
Manual Focus Lens
for SLR Cameras
14mm
f/2.8 Aspherical
Wide Angle Lens
for SLR Cameras
8mm
f/3.5
Manual Focus,
Fish Eye Lens
$
349.00
$
279.00
$
279.00
DSLR SLT-A99V Body
Digital SLR Camera Body,
Full Frame 24 MP,
14-bit RAW Output,
Full 1080p
HDMI Output,
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cold-called publishers, including such giants as
Time, Sports Illustrated, and Newsweek. I
either looked up their portfolio policies or just
tried to arrange meetings. Looking back now,
that was probably nerve-wracking. Within
two months she was landing meetings as the
promotional cards started generating calls.
It was Larsens approach to photography
more than the subject matter that made the
greater impact. My portfolio was of my family
and friends, not what I thought magazines
wanted to see. One of my first assign ments
was for Time magazine. They said, Can you
do what youre showing me in your book?
Magazines started calling me to go into inti-
mate family situations or photograph teenagers.
All I was doing was following what I felt
was most honest to me, and I think thats
how my entire career has played out. My
pictures were true to who I was at that point
and what my vision was, and the publishers
found where that fit in.
Larsen is editorially represented by
Redux Pictures, and she has pursued grants
and fellowships to help finance some of her
long-term photography projects. She
worked as a housekeeper while chronicling
the Sami, a project that appeared in National
Geographic and resulted in her book, Sami:
Walking with Reindeer. Shes about to
embark on a similar sojourn in Peru.
Melding with her childhood-rooted
interest in photography is Larsens experi-
ence with nature while she grew up on
Marylands Eastern Shore. It informs much
of her work, including an ongoing docu-
mentation of hunting. I grew up with
hunting, and I was intrigued with it. Being
in nature fine-tuned me to learn different
things and hear different things and get
interested in our connection to the natural
world and to the cycle of life. Thats part of
why she says she can feel the color around
her and knows how to herd light in dark
places. The technical aspects are ingrained,
she says; tuning in to her environment is
the variable. I dont go out thinking, Im
going to do f/2 and get this light. That
should be the absolutely last thing that Im
thinking. I should be fully engaged in the
people and the story Im telling.
Larsens distinctive style, then, is a life:
hers, her subjects, and her viewers. I freeze
a moment and create a stillness so that per-
son can live and breathe in that moment,
she said. I want the viewer to get a little
silent and reflect on what that image means
to their own lives. I
See more of Erika Larsens work at
erikalarsenphoto.com.
Eric Minton is a writer and editor with more
than 35 years of experience.
94 www.ppmag.com
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secured to the stands.
hen Ben Shirk, M.Photog.,
had a son eight years ago,
his wife took the boy to a
mall photographer for baby portraits. Shirk
was disappointed with the images and dis-
appointed that he wasnt the one to take his
childs first pictures. Armed with an art
degree and an artists eye, Shirk had envi-
sioned himself the family photographer,
even though he had no real experience with
portrait photography.
The gauntlet was thrown down, Shirk
says. So I borrowed a camera and started tak-
ing pictures of family and friends. I was deter-
mined to learn photography quickly and well.
Shirk was soon enjoying portrait-making
enough to turn it into a business. For the
next few years, he built his business as a side
gig, establishing a client base and mastering
his craft. In 2007 he went into it full time,
working out of his home in Wilton, Iowa.
Not just another job
Ben Shirks custom team sport posters bring in the senior business
BY JEFF KENT
All images Ben Shirk
W
S E N I O R S
Three years later, he bought and renovated a
nearby retail space for his studio.
Today hes among the premier portrait
photographers in Iowa, but the trajectory
was far from smooth. There was, for exam-
ple, a flaw in his business plan. When I
started out, I was one of those photographers
that other photographers hate, he says. I
was super cheap, and I gave away too much.
I charged $2 for a 4x6. I handed out free cus-
tom albums from senior sessions. I did tons
of sessions and provided too much for too
little. I was just so happy that people liked
my art. It didnt occur to me at that time that
I could charge more, that there was a higher
value in the marketplace for my work.
Bordering on burnout from the high-
volume, low-income model, Shirk attended
photography seminars and formed profes-
sional relationships with established pros.
He learned that pricing was about more
than covering printing costs; it was about
charging for time, training, and the costs of
running a business. He also learned that he
could raise his prices, work fewer hours, and
make as much money or more. He bumped
up his prices over the course of a year and
has continued to increase them every year
since. His work volume slowed yet his overall
revenue increased as he attracted more dis-
cerning clients who were willing to make an
investment in portraiture. Hes now added a
catalog of specialty products to appeal to
that high-end clientele.
After going through this process, the
biggest difference I noticed was an increased
quality of work, he says. When he was selling
a high volume of prints inexpensively, he didnt
have much time to spend on each one, he notes.
These days he can be much more meticulous
about the work he produces because the sell-
ing price justifies the additional labor.
I came to realize that this is my art, and
its worth money. Being able to charge more
money is a direct result of educating clients
about what youre doing. Most clients dont
realize the amount of work and equipment
that goes into a session as well as all the
other costs of running a business. If you
explain and show them, they are more
appreciative and more willing to invest.
One of the biggest market differentiators
for Shirks studio is his specialty work in senior
portraits. He focuses on students who are
heavily invested in sports and other extracur-
ricular activities. They make significant com-
mitments of time and money to those activi ties,
and they and their parents are likely to want
to document their accomplishments with
something special. These clients are recep-
tive to products such as wall groupings, albums,
large framed prints, gallery wraps, and cus-
tom collages. By targeting this specific mar-
ket segment and continually innovating new
products and styles, Shirk has increased his
senior portrait sales average more than
eightfold over the past five years.
Shirk comes to the attention of many
new clients through sports team posters.
Through networking and good customer
relations, he was hired to create sports
posters for many local high school sports
teams. He requires the entire team to come
to the studio, where he photographs the indi-
vidual against a green screen, optimizing the
posing and lighting for every subject. When
hes photographed the entire team, he com-
posites the images onto a custom back-
98 www.ppmag.com
100 www.ppmag.com
ground and adds graphics. Having the
entire team come to my studio is invalu-
able, says Shirk. The athletes see all my
custom products, they hang out on couches
and look through my custom albums, and
they are wowed by the entire experience.
This poster work, while not tremen-
dously profitable, presents a fantastic mar-
keting opportunity. Some of the team
members return for full portrait shoots, and
the posters are widely displayed around
town in schools, offices, and other venues.
The kids love to show them off. Those ath-
letic team posters are a huge marketing
item, says Shirk. For me, theyve replaced
all the mailers and mall displays and other
promotions that other photographers run.
And because I already have the most visible,
most influential kids coming through my
studio for the shoots, its like running a suc-
cessful senior model program without the
trouble of running a senior model program.
Other kids see these star athletes in the
posters, and they want something similar.
That desire opens the door for all manner
of sales-boosting custom products. When
seniors come in for their sessions, Shirk dis-
cusses products that would work well for
each of their outfits. He talks to them about
what they want and what theyre envisioning
in terms of displaying their images. Since his
work is visible in the community, the seniors
often have ideas when they arrive. And to
nudge the process along, Shirk has product
displays that spark ideas.
Shirk aims to sell a custom album, wall
grouping, and a large montage with custom
graphics to every senior portrait client, and
he comes close. He tends to produce more
images with more unique poses and back-
grounds, and more outfit changes than the
typical senior portrait photographer, he says.
Sessions often yield upwards of 60 unique,
album-worthy images.
I see each senior portrait session as an
opportunity to do something fun and
unique, as opposed to just banging out the
sessions, says Shirk. I accept a max of two
senior sessions a week. That way I can
spend more time with them and do some-
thing special. That gives me more options
for products, and even more important, it
helps me enjoy the work more. Ive created
the demand and Ive set prices for profit,
but all of that is nothing if I am not enjoy-
ing what I do. I am in photography because
I want to have fun with it, not because its
just another job. I
See more from Ben Shirk at
shirkphotography.com.
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SUCCESSWARE.NET | 800.593.3767
What do top studio
owners use to manage?
These owners have all chosen SuccessWare to help them manage their
businesses. Other software may track your business but they all fall short
when it comes to managing your business. SuccessWare is the only studio
management software that will assist you with; creating a business plan,
pricing your products, preparing financial reports and tracking client
information. SuccessWare manages all your day-to-day operations giving
you the knowledge to make solid management decisions necessary to
achieve your goals and take your studio to the next level. You cant get that
with just tracking software.
TRACK. PRICE. PLAN. PROFIT. MANAGE.
Dont just take our word for it, see what Jed, Vickie and other successful
photographers have to say at: www.successware.net/success_stories
Having a nancial management program that lays everything out in front
of you so that you can get the information you need, when you need it
to make good business decisions is vital...the bottom line for us is that
SuccessWare puts us in control.
Jed & Vickie Taufer | VGallery | Morton, Illinois
L
agniappe! Dont worry,
I havent started speak-
ing another language
(not really) and you wont need
a translator to read this message.
Lagniappe (lan-yap) is just a
great New Orleans word that I
think we photographers should
all know something about. It
means to give a little extra,
something like a bakers dozen.
Do you do a little extra for your clients? It might be an
extra outft or pose. It could be an extra print or wallets for a
good order. It might be having water or a great cup of coffee
available for your clients. It could be as simple as sending
special thank you cards. Those extras could be the difference
that sets you apart from your competitors.
In fact, your PPA membership includes lagniappe that is
unparalleled in our industry; its that something extra that
appeals to the businessperson in us. Through the PhotoCare
coverage that PPA now offers, your membership includes
up to $15,000 worth of equipment insuranceand your
membership dues didnt go up to make that happen.
Now, you may think that things like PhotoCare, the
Indemnifcation Trust, copyright assistance and other PPA
benefts are extraneous items you'll never need. Let me share
two scenarios that have made me forever grateful to partici-
pate in these programs.
A few years back, the sheriff of a local municipality was
running for re-election, a man wed photographed for his
frst run some 16 years prior. Imagine the shock when I saw
an image we photographed defaced on a political billboard
by his opponent. All it took was one phone call to the PPA
Copyright 8 Government Affairs offce and within fve days,
that billboard was down. Without knowing that PPA was there
to protect me, I would have spent a lot of time and quite a few
dollars getting that situation resolved. But because PPA cares
about our industry and those things important to us as artists,
the situation was handled.
In addition to that little experience, I've had frsthand
knowledge of the truth to the saying, It isnt if a hard drive
will fail, its when a hard drive will fail. Once again, thanks
to the benefts of PPA membership and the Indemnifcation
Trust, the claim paid out was worth more than four years of
membership dues. Now thats a little more than lagniappe!
In 2012, PPA handled 972 issues on behalf of members
through our copyright affairs offce, while additionally paying
out $173,000 in claims through the Indemnifcation Trust.
Stuff happens, and its nice to know weve got the support
we need to get through it! So make sure you take the time to
understand all the values of your membership by exploring
the new PPA.com.
Stay tuned for more exciting benefts that your staff and
board of directors are working on. Its going to be a great year!
PPATODAY
APRIL 2013
PRESIDENTS MESSAGE
Ralph Romaguera Sr., M.Photog.Cr., CPP, API, F-ASP. :: 2013-2014 PPA President
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Not your typical one-size-fts-all education
program. Its a true-to-your-needs program based
on you and your business.
Nowhere else can you get a personalized program
with 150+ HD online courses, accessible 24/7.
Its PPAs latest membership beneft for you to use
wherever, whenever!
.com/ppaedu
PPAedu
A brand-new approach
to photographic education
Im taking things to
a whole new level!
Beta edition
launches
in April
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PROTECT YOUR
BUSINESS
PPA MEMBERS SHARE
HOW PPA BENEFITS HELP
By Angela Wijesinghe
T
heres a lot you might not anticipate dealing with when
you enter the photography world. Like rst-time puppy
owners, we get hypnotized by the cute, fun side and then
smacked in the face with the amount of work involved. And that
doesnt even count the unexpected situations you may nd your-
self in as a photographic business owner, from copyright disputes
to Bridezilla!
While youre juggling the day-to-day work to keep your
business running, how can you protect yourself from those
unpleasant issues? You might rst look to your PPA benets.
(When we say weve got your back, its not just talk.)
Protect Yourself from Data Loss Fallout
With the gadgets and gizmos of today, your artistic reach feels
limitlessuntil your card gets corrupted, lightning fries your
hard drive (or you accidentally reformat it), or some other disaster
strikes. Its devastating enough when it happens to your personal
work and you lose those memories or the time youve invested.
When clients are involved, it can get even worse.
In fact, PPAs Indemnication Trust benet (like malpractice
coverage) often helps member photographers deal with data loss
fallout, from helping cover the cost of recovery to soothing rufed
client feathers. Bob Conroy of Communication Links in Minne-
sota found this quite the valuable benet, even though he luckily
didnt have clients involved.
He had been working on books and an app for iPhones
and iPads about the churches around the walls of Rome when
his portable hard drive fell off his desk to a not-so-pleasant end.
While I still had most of my original CompactFlash drives, I had
three months of European images and countless hours invested
in Aperture organization and processing on that drive, Conroy
recalls.
The Trust took the information Conroy provided (dates and
receipts) and reimbursed him for the amount hed paid to recover
as much data as possible, which was the majority of his images
and projects. I now have a new backup system with various
drives, but I know that the Indemnication Trust is still there if I
ever need them againGod forbid!
Protect Yourself from Bullies in the Studio
Data loss may be one of the most common issues PPAs Indemni-
cation Trust helps with, but dont forget to turn to them for help
with unsatised clients. All too often such clients can become
bullies, threatening not with a st, but with your reputation or even
a lawsuit hanging in the balance.
Jay Guttveg of Creative Focus in Florida had the un-pleasure
of working with two such clients. A hurricane interrupted one
brides wedding, and though Guttveg was willing to reschedule
the wedding photography for her without charge, all she wanted
was her money back. Another bride (an attorney) was just
difcult to please. She had very specic wants so Guttveg worked
with her, thoroughly explaining what they would do. During the
wedding, they dealt with a changed photographic timeline, family
difculties, you name it. On top of that, Guttveg found out six
months later that she still wasnt satised, and she eventually
demanded all of her money back.
That client was an attorney, so I really got nervous, says
Guttveg. She had more legal knowledge than me; but I had a
partner in PPAs Indemnication Trust! Ive had these two disputes
in my whole career, and both times the Trust has helped me save
that career. In fact, he makes sure that every photographer who
works with him is a PPA member and part of the Trust.
Protect Yourself from Copyright/Legal Quandaries
Copyright and other types of legal questions crop up quite often
if youre a pro photographer. And if you dont know the correct
answer, you could stumble into yet another unpleasant situa-
tion. Do you know what images you can legally use to promote
your business? Whether or not you need a visa for a destination
wedding shoot? What you need in your contract to protect your-
self?
These are tough questions, but PPAs got a dedicated Copy-
right & Government Affairs team waiting for you. As Guttveg
says, I wouldnt ask my plumber for legal advice. These folks
know the photography eld and what we deal with.
Jill Harrelson, CPP, of Jills Family Photography in Georgia
recently beneted from that know-how. Often hired by venues
to capture professional images of their room setup for different
events, she shoots the event details, food and dcor. That led to a
confusing situation in which a venue was using detail images she
took during a wedding at their location. The bridewho didnt
hire Harrelsonwanted the images taken off the venues website
(even though neither she nor any guests could be identied) and
eventually got the county commissioner involved.
When that bride kept calling me, I didnt panic because I
knew the resources available to me, Harrelson notes. I contacted
PPAs copyright team and they unraveled the issues, gave me
advice on how to handle it from my end, and even ended up
helping my client (the venue) by explaining what they could add
.com
YOUR SUCCESS IS OUR BUSINESS
to their contracts to prevent this going forward.
But the important part was that Harrelsons contract (which
PPA helped with) would have protected her against being sued
even if her client (the venue) didnt do their homework. If I
didnt have these PPA resources, I could really get myself in
trouble with knowing what I have the right to use or not.
Protect Yourselffrom Yourself
While part of running a strong photography business is handling
issues caused by unexpected outside inuences, sometimes you
need to know how to protect your business from yourself. We are
not geniuses in all we do! We need to recognize when we need
help, such as with nancial management.
Kim Hartz, CPP, saw that need in herself when she was
bringing the clients but not the money to her Kim Hartz Photog-
raphy studio in Texas. I know that most people dont want to
deal with the nitty-gritty of their businesses, but if you dont know
whats going on, its difcult to be successful, she explains.
When Hartz turned to PPAs Studio Management Services (SMS),
she learned that because her expenses were so out of control, she
was only bringing home $0.08 of every dollar she made. But as
she implemented what she learned in the SMS workshops and
consultations, she grew her protability to 32 percentand is on
track to hit 31 percent in 2013!
Its amazing that my business has made that big of a
turnaround in under two years! says Hartz. Her mentors showed
her how she could trim expenses, from advertising to admin and
overhead. She even made the move from a retail studio to a home-
based one, and it turns out her clients are just as happy. Shes
learning to understand her numbers, new marketing ideas, how to
improve her pricing and product offerings, and so much more.
My mentor meetings are invaluable, and Im continuing
with SMS via the quarterly consultations, adds Hartz. Not only
am I getting my business in order and staying accountable, but I
also have someone I can talk to about anything that goes into my
studio. I cant recommend it enough!
As Hartz says, its much, much easier to focus on your
photography and leave the business details behind; its just neither
protable nor safe. The devil is in the details, as the old saying
goes. Whether those details involve legal questions or irksome
nances, you need to be prepared to deal with them so nothing
interrupts your business growth. And PPA may have just the tools
you need to prepare and protect yourself.
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Jay Guttveg owns Creative Focus Inc.
in Parkland, Florida.
creativefocusinc.com
Bob Conroy owns Communication
Links in Minneapolis, Minnesota.
sacredplacesitaly.com
Kim Hartz, CPP, owns Kim Hartz
Photography, LLC, in Houston, Texas.
kimhartz.com
Jill Harrelson, CPP, owns Jills Family
Photography in Cumming, Georgia.
jillsfamilyphotography.com
PPA CHARITIES 2012 RECAP
PPA Charities presented a check for $70,000 to Operation Smile (operationsmile.org) at Imaging USA
this year, bringing their total donation to almost $600,000 which equates to almost 2500 childrens lives
being changed with the gif of a smile.
TOP DONORS
Mike & Diana Hanline,
Ann & Jim Monteith, Mary Fisk-Taylor,
Ryan & Erica Manthey,
Angie & Matt Weedon, Je Ebert,
Susan Hoermann, Vicki Hultsman,
Mark & Krish Kiefer, Zaida Parkes,
Laurie Weaver, Meredith Wilcke,
Twin Cities PPA, Kentucky PPA,
Arrowhead PPA, Northern Lights PP,
Rice Studio Supply, WHCC,
Marathon Press, Texas School
2012 VENDORS IN
PARTNERSHIP (VIP)
WHCC
Wild Sorbet
Animoto
AfterDark
Rice Studio Supply
SuccessWare
Marathon Press
PPA AFFILIATE PARTNERS
Texas School
Dallas PPA
Twin Cities PPA
Florida Professional Photographers
Kentucky PPA/PhotoProNetwork
New Hampshire PPA
WHAT TO DO WHEN
IT GOES KAPUT
HOW A PPA
BENEFIT CAN HELP
By Angela Wijesinghe
W
hen you think about protecting your business,
you usually think about security alarm systems,
locks and data backups. You might even have a
disaster plan, like what to do during a re or earthquake. But
are you prepared for those heart-sinking times when your
pricey new toy goes kaput (or bam, crash and crack)?
You should be. Just take a look inside your camera bag
and start counting: main camera body ($3,000), three good
lenses ($1,300 $2,000 $2,000), backup body ($600), two
ashes ($600/each), memory cards ($300). Now imagine
carrying around a bag with over $10,000 cash stuffed
insideyoud be pretty careful, right? Youd have it under
lock and key most of the time! Yet as a pro photographer, you
cant keep your gear locked up; you use it basically every
day. Thats why its smart to be prepared.

Check Your Warranties
Some extended coverage warranties might actually cover
repairs or replacement if you drop the equipment; some dont.
So dont assume said warranty will save you. Read up on it to
see exactly what would be covered for how long. (You may
even need to send some paperwork to the manufacturer in
order to activate the warranty.) It wouldnt hurt to call up the
manufacturer and ask their customer support your questions,
eitheryou might learn something that surprises you!
Find a Good Repair Shop
There are auto body shops all over the place, but you prob-
ably only go to onethe one that either had the best reviews
or was recommended to you by a family member or trusted
friend. Same is true for getting your camera gear repaired
if something happens to it. Before that happens, though,
its smart to do your research so you know where to send
it without wasting time. For instance, youll probably want
to pay attention to turnaround times, whether or not they
specialize in your equipment brand, and if that shop itself
is insured!
Get Equipment Insurance
Good equipment insurance can be priceless to pro photogra-
phers, as Joy Vertz, CPP, found out. In the midst of changing
her 24-70 2.8 Nikon lens, she set it on a ledge in her studio
near where she stands to shoot. The young child she was
photographing lunged forward and grabbed at the lens,
knocking it to the oor where the lens lter broke and the
mechanism inside the lens actually cracked.
Its a sickening feeling. (You probably winced in
empathy, didnt you?) But on a more cheerful note, Vertz had
equipment insurance. She had PPAs free PhotoCare Equip-
ment Insurance as a backup policy to her larger paid policy,
but PhotoCare became the hero in her eyes that day.
My other insurance requires that I keep an updated list
of equipment on le, but this was a fairly new lens that I had
forgotten to add to my list of covered items, explains Vertz.
Needless to say, I was really happy to have the free insur-
ance coverage included in my PPA membership! Theres no
need to list items with them; its super easy!
Super easy, literally. Vertz had already sent in her
lens for repair and had the notice from the shop saying her
equipment was inoperable. So she was able to submit her
PhotoCare claim form online (took about 10 minutes) and
attach a copy of that repair letter. Within 24 hours, I had a
response to my claim; less than a week later, I had a check in
hand to replace my equipment.
Now, its important to note that Vertz (and all the other
PPA members who sing the PhotoCare praises) took an
important step before her lens broke. She activated that free
PhotoCare Equipment Insurance policy. Because she took
that preparation step, she was covered and her gut-wrenching
moment wasnt painful on the pocketbook.
Are you prepared for when your gear takes a nose-dive?
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Joy Vertz, CPP, owns Shoot the Moon
Photography in Mequon, Wisconson.
joyvertz.com
ACTIVATE YOUR
FREE PHOTOCARE
EQUIPMENT
INSURANCE
r Log in to PPA.com with your email & password
r Click on theLoop (main nav)
r Click Yes, I would like to activate my PhotoCare Equipment
Insurance. (It will automatically appear if you are eligible)
All PPA Professional Active and Life Members in the U.S. and Puerto Rico are eligible if
they activate their coverage. See all the details on ppa.com/insurance.
LabTab
April 2013 Professional Photographer 107
WHERE THE PROS GO FOR THE BEST IN REPRODUCTION SERVICES
108 www.ppmag.com
LabTab WHERE THE PROS GO FOR THE BEST IN REPRODUCTION SERVICES
LabTab 2013 ad rates:
AD SIZE: 3
1
2 X 2
1
2
12X RATE: $510 PER MONTH
6X RATE: $650 PER MONTH
Sign a 12x contract and receive a double size feature ad twice
during your contract year at no extra charge.
For more information, contact your advertising representative:
TARA TRUITT, Eastern Region
404-522-8600, x230; ttruitt@ppa.com
MARINA ANDERSON, Central Region
937-902-8217; manderson@ppa.com
AMY WALLS, Western Region ,
404-522-8600, x279; awalls@ppa.com
April 2013 Professional Photographer 109
110 www.ppmag.com
WHERE THE PROS GO FOR THE BEST IN REPRODUCTION SERVICES LabTab
2013 Affiliate Schools Schedule
PPA members receive both merits
and the best published prices.
April 28-May 3
Texas School of Professional
Photography, Dallas, texasschool.org
May 5-10
Mid-Atlantic Regional School of
Photography, Cape May, N.J.,
marsschool.com
June 2-6
Florida School of Photography, Daytona
Beach, Fla., fpponline.org
June 2-6
Mid-America Institute of Professional
Photography, Cedar Falls, Iowa,
maipp.com
June 16-19
Winona School of Photography,
Nashville, Ind., winonaschool.org
June 16-21
West Coast School, San Diego, Calif.,
www.westcoastschool.com
July 21-25
Image Explorations, Shawnigan Lake,
British Columbia, imageexplorations.ca
July 21-26
PPSNYS Photo Workshop, Geneva,
N.Y., ppsnysworkshop.com
Send additions to affiliates@ppa.com.
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April 2013 Professional Photographer 111
112 www.ppmag.com
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April 2013 Professional Photographer 113
n 2009, photographer Katie Norris founded
Katie Norris Portrait Arts in Dallas. She loved
her work, particularly the process of captur-
ing stories for her clients. Wanting to share
her passion for storytelling with charitable
causes, she started researching volunteer
opportunities at photo-based nonprofits. As
she pored over her findings for a good fit, she
felt the inkling of an inspiration.
She could launch her own charitable ven-
ture and create an outlet to help people who
might not otherwise have a way to preserve
their memories.
While pondering her next steps, Norris
got a phone call from a distraught mother
whose child had just been diagnosed with a
brain tumor. She wanted his portrait made
before he started treatment. It was as if the
stars aligned: The timing was perfect and
provided inspiration for Norris to make her
charitable project a reality.
Norris founded the nonprofit Fotolan-
thropy in 2011. Its mission is to build a com-
munity of professional photographers who
use their cameras to tell the stories of families
and individuals facing a life crisis. She launched
a website, fotoanthropy.com, where people
can submit their stories. Fotolanthropy vol-
unteers review the submissions and select
the most inspiring to tell through a portrait
session. At no charge to them, the recipients
get a portrait session with a professional
photographer, publication of their story on
fotolanthropy.com, and a video of their ses-
sion slideshow. The organization selects
some of the stories for full video tributes.
These videos are professionally made mini
movies of their stories. Fotolanthropy is cur-
rently producing five to seven films a year
along with three to four portrait sessions per
month.
Fotolanthropy selects recipients solely
based on the energy of their stories. We are
looking for any kind of inspiring story, says
Norris. We look for stories of people who
are at crossroads in their lives and choose to
persevere. Were looking for that spark, for
people who have been through something
and are trying to make an impact on their
community.
Fotolanthropy worked with a military
serviceman who lost his limbs while stationed
in Afghanistan and was learning to make a
new life after that traumatic event. Another
story was that of a couple who longed to have
children but could not, eventually fulfilling
their dream of becoming parents through
adoption. One Fotolanthropy family lost
their house in a fire and endeavored to
rebuild their life as a family.
Norris financed Fotolanthropy from her
own pocket until she developed a product
to fund the organization. Along with
Fotolanthropys director of operations,
Brooke Moore, Norris designed a leather
camera strap available in 13 trim colors.
The product, called Fotostrap, can be mono-
grammed for personalization or branding. All
proceeds from the sales fund Fotolanthropy.
The organization is adding support people
and photographers, and people interested in
being part of Fotolanthropy can apply to
become volunteers. Find more information
at fotolanthropy.com and fotostrap.com.
114 www.ppmag.com
good works |
Images wield the power to efect change. In this monthly feature,
Professional Photographer spotlights professional photographers
using their talents to make a diference through charitable work.
Celebrating stories
KATIE NORRIS REVEALS THE INSPIRATIONAL
Share your good works experience with us
by emailing Joan Sherwood at
jsherwood@ppa.com.
Image courtesy of Fotolanthropy
I
Moshe Zusman and Profoto D1.
Moshe Zusman
Profoto.com/US 914 347 3300
Distributed by MAC Group
See Moshe in action at : Profoto.com/US/Zusman