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VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, DECEMBER 2013 PAGE 1
1
M A G A Z I N E
Ride
a
n
d
S
ki
Mt. Ellen!
Freeskiing champ Devin Logan
is back for more!
A classic peak celebrates its
50th with a 60s party
and a $6.50 lift ticket!
The Secret of
Lessons
Yes, youll ski better, but
check out the wild deals!
Holiday
Guide!
A dozen-plus gifts
all made in Vermont!
How t o buy
BOOTS
that fit!
Plus: Vermont Slope Posse in the limelight Brews, Spirits & Wine Events not to miss!
FREE! December-January 2014
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PAGE 2 VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, DECEMBER 2013
Okemo FP
OKM-W13/14-073 // Vermont Ski & Ride // Okemo // Full Page // Trim: 10.25 x 13 // 4 color // Winter Campaign // VT/NH Only Lift Tickets Deals
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VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, DECEMBER 2013 PAGE 3
6-7 Mt. Ellen turns 50!
In 1963, the lifts at Glen Ellen started
spinning. Fifty years later, there are
stories to share and a celebration not
to miss not to mention $6.50 lift
tickets.
10-11 Backcountry
As more and more skiers and riders are
exploring the backcountry, there are
issues of access, safety and image. A
statewide discussion begins.
22 Why lessons save $$
Lessons not only pay for themselves in
any cost-per-run analysis, but they make
the sport a lot more fun. Find out how.
24-25 Hermitage Inn
Owner Jim Barnes has a novel approach
to reviving the once-defunct Haystack
Mt. by making it a private club.
19 Gift Guide!
We name a dozen great gifts made in
Vermont to make your shopping that
much more special - and easier.
38-39 Q&A: Devin Logan
This freeskiing champ from West Dover
is recovering from a knee injury with
sites on Olympic competition at Sochi.
Amazing On-line
Ticket Deals!
Learn more
Contributing Editor Assistant Editor
Christy Lynn Evan Johnson
Contributing writers
Polly Lynn, Candice White
Graphic Artist/Production
Jill Leduc
For news tips or to advertise call 802-388-4944
or email: info@vtskiandride.com
Advertising & Editorial Ofce:
Vermont Ski & Ride Magazine
58 Maple Street, Middlebury, Vt. 05753
802-388-4944 (also offces of the Addison
Independent)
Vermont Ski & Ride Magazine is owned and
operated by Addison Press Inc., a Vermont
company locally owned since 1946. Vermont
Ski and Ride Magazine is published monthly
November through March.
M A G A Z I N E
Ride
a
n
d
Ski
Editor/Publisher, Angelo Lynn
angelo@vtskiandride.com
Cover photo by Brian Mohr/Ember Photography
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PAGE 4 VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, DECEMBER 2013
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snowshoe tours, bonfres with free cookies and hot
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movies. Dont miss the torchlight parade and fre-
works on New Years Eve followed by a Teen Dance
Party in the Indoor Amusement Center.
BOLTON
AFTER DARK
HOLIDAY WEEK
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VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, DECEMBER 2013 PAGE 5
P
u
b
lish
ers D
esk
Early training
Members of the Middlebury College Nordic team got some early training runs on a sunny and warm Nov. 15 at the Rikert Touring Center in Ripton thanks to early snows
and cold weather that allowed the snowmaking facilities at Rikert to lay down some groomed tracks. Wasnt lengthy, but a 1,000 meter loop with a decent incline was
plenty to get the heart beating and the adrenaline fowing in anticipation of another year on the snow.
Photo by Phil McLaughlin
Winter in Vermont started fast and furious.
Killington opened the frst week of November, and skiers were hiking to the tops of
peaks a couple weeks before that. Mild snowstorms came and went, but the key was
cold temps, allowing the states snowguns that cover 80 percent of the groomed runs
to work their magic. By pre-Tanksgiving week, nine areas were up and running, and
Okemo had fve runs open top-to-bottom by mid-November.
Tat same week, Rikert Touring Center in Ripton (10 miles from Middlebury, which is usu-
ally in Vermonts banana belt), opened a 1K loop for those Nordic skiers itching to get of their
skate skis and onto the real stuf. It wasnt much, but it was 50 degrees and a sunny, blue-bird
Saturday and the throng of us thought it was spring skiing in November! Te photo below is
testimony to that glorious day, and, hey, you dont need a big loop to work up a sweat.
As Im writing this, the Middlebury College Snow Bowl opened Dec. 11, which honestly
means that almost every area in the state has a reasonable base by now and is close to full-on
operation! Sugarbush reported a foot of new snow in the past couple of days.
What does that mean for you? Well, we know local skiers and riders who have posted 40-plus
days this season, so the message is: Get those skis to the shop, tune them up, and get out there.
December can ofer some of the best skiing of the year the ice has yet to form, the air is cold
and when it dumps, the snow is light and fufy and the crowds are minimal.
Now, just give us one storm of two feet and youll hear us hollering all the
way to Brooklyn.
**********
Once those skis are tuned and ready to go, this year do yourself a favor:
take a lesson.
Even if youve skied for 40 years.
Youll be surprised what you learn, what youve forgotten, why you might
be of-balance on a double fall-line, and, as importantly, how to fnesse those
bumps to keep the ride a little smoother for your lower back and stif knees.
And kids? For heavens sake, if you havent already, treat yourself and give
them to lessons.
We all know that lessons will help you ski better, faster. We all know it
helps families with kids to have a vacation focused on fun times, not frustra-
tion. But it also makes fnancial sense.
Heres why: Lesssons with a pro can cut learning times signifcantly. In
lessons, you can advance from beginner to intermediate to advanced in a
single year. Try to teach yourself, or your kids, or learn through your bud-
dies, and the same progression could take years. Now, if youre the teacher
and having to go their pace, youre missing a lot of runs per day. On a cost-per-run
analysis, thats a losing deal.
If youre 20-35, say, and new to the sport, lessons are still a bargain.
Figure a days ticket is $75 and youre a beginner just managing to get 6-7 runs in a
day (taking 30-45 minutes to get down from the top). Take lessons for three half-days
and heres what will happen: Youll double your runs per day. Itll be easier. Youll have
more fun. Youll be pysched youre learning so fast, and youll focus on form and tech-
nique thus setting up the basis for learning more each time you ski a run.
Now, do the math: At 7 runs for $75, thats roughly $10 a run. Double that number
(after lessons) and youll do 14 runs for the same $75, or about $5 a run. Times that
by a single season, and youve gotten a lot more for your ski ticket value each day than
those frst few lessons cost you.
Heres the sweet part: ski resorts across the state are starting to ofer surprising deals connected
to lessons. At Sugarbush, their First-Timer to Life-Timer program ties a three-day lesson (cost at
$255) to a free season pass for the rest of the year! No kidding. In Killington, theyve set up a four-
day lesson program that once completed ofers a free pair of skis, half prices on day tickets for the
next two years and other discounts on equipment.
And it makes sense. Vermonts ski areas want you to enjoy the sport, and they know youll
enjoy it more if you know how to ski or ride better. Check out the story on Page 22-23, then check
out the programs at your favorite resort.
**********
In other news, Mt. Ellen (originally called Glen Ellen) turns 50 this year and the folks at
Sugarbush are celebrating in style. Read the story and recall the roaring 1960s in Vermont when
Sugarbush was known as Mascara Mountain, those cute gondola cars were
schussing folks up the mountain, and feasts with day-long parties were the
weekly norm. Candice White tells that story with style (pages 6-7) and con-
nects the current ties that bind the two resorts and the half century of good
times and great skiing.
Hermitage Inn owner Jim Barnes takes a novel approach in his plan to
revitalize the former Haystack Mountain ski area in southern Vermont by
making it a private club. Its an ambitious project that ties in with the hun-
dreds of other lost or defunct ski areas throughout Vermont and
New England.
**********
Lastly, the photo within the column says it all. It is an endearing moment
captured as father (Howard Zinman) and son walk toward Spruce Peak at
Stowe Resort. Its a life-long sport that bridges generations in a way few
others can. Its about riding with friends and family. Its about good times,
adventure, precious moments.
Tanks to Howard, who rides at Stowe, for sending it to us and may
be the peace of this holiday season grace all your days here, and at home.
Angelo S. Lynn, publisher
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PAGE 6 VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, DECEMBER 2013
50 years of joy!
Mt. Ellen celebrates a birthday!
By Candice White
Cynthia Greenfeld remembers it well.
Walt came home in December of 1961, and informed
me that he was going to build a
ski area.
Really? Cynthia responded at the time. What does that
mean for me?
It means were moving, Walt replied.
To Warren, Vermont. And youre going to love it.
Greenfeld was skeptical. Raised in New York City, Green-
feld was an urbanite living in Connecticut and expecting
her frst child. Her husband, Walt Elliott, had spent time in
South Africa in his youth, and had then gone on to earn an
engineering degree from Cornell. Tey had met at Gustin-
Bacon Manufacturing, an acoustic tile company based in
New York where Walt still worked. But not for long.
What seems to have been more infuential to Elliott than
his urban existence was his presidency of the Stamford Ski
Club. During his tenure, Elliott had been involved in build-
ing a ski lodge in Killington, Vermont, just an hour south of
what would become the Glen Ellen Ski Area.
Greenfeld remembers the drive up to her new home in
Warren. Te town was not much diferent in the early 1960s
than it is todaya post of ce, a library, a fre station, an inn,
and a general store. Elliott had rented a house next door to
the post of ce.
In those days, I drove a sports caran Austin-Healey. I
drove up in January, and it was snowing, Greenfeld remem-
bers. Te foors [of the house] went downhill. And the
people were not that friendly Where was Fifth Avenue?
Te change from New York City to Warren wasand still
isstark. And the closest Cynthia Greenfeld would get to
Fifth Avenue would be Sugarbush, a ski resort just south
of Glen Ellen that had opened a few years before and was
already a weekend retreat for New York models, editors and
socialites. Walt Elliott, however, was founding a new and
diferent ski mountain, one that would never aim to achieve
the glamour of neighboring Mascara Mountain.
A Family Mountain
Te ski area that Elliott conceived in the early 1960s would
be, above all, a family mountain. Purchased from a private
landowner with funds raised by Elliott and a small group
of investors, Glen Ellen opened for business in December
1963, with twenty-eight trails, three chair lifts, and a T bar.
Greenfeld remembers that individual shares of the moun-
tain were sold for $1,500 and included twenty years of free
skiing; family shares sold for $4,500. Bud Lynch, who hailed
from Stratton Mountain, designed the original trails. Area
loggers cleared the land and sold of the wood. Greenfeld
oversaw food and beverage sales and, as she says, watched
the money. Neil and Zip Robinson moved up from Brom-
ley to run the ski school.
Elliotts training as an engineer was a useful background
for running a ski area, and people who worked with him
remember him being very hands-on. He could do just
about anything, recalls Barbara de Lima, who was hired as
his marketing assistant in 1969 and worked on and of for
Glen Ellen and Sugarbush until 2009.
Tat man never asked you to do anything he wouldnt
do, adds Bill Bozack, who joined Glen Ellen as an assis-
tant ski patroller in 1965. (Bozack went on to become the
national professional director of the National Ski Patrol and
was named NSP Outstanding Professional Ski Patrolman in
1972. His wife, Mary Ann, became the second woman in
the nation to be certifed by the NSP.)
Walt and Cynthias daughter Tracie Condon recalls riding
the school bus to the mountain every day after school along
with her younger sister, Dawn. Much of her childhood was
centered there.
And despite Cynthia Greenfelds early impressions of
Warren, Vermont, she, too, grew to embrace the new ski
area. I always felt it was a lot of fun, she says, and never
minded working seven days a week after getting two kids of
to school.
Having Fun
Most people who were part of the early Glen Ellen years
mention the cowbell, a gift to Elliott from Stadeli-Lifts. Te
cowbell hung in the bar on the second foor of the base lodge,
then called the Golden Tistle. Elliott would end many of
his days here, not unlike resort owner-operators today.
Walt would pull out the champagne, Greenfeld remem-
On the fiftieth anniversary of the development of Mt. Ellen,
a look back at the carefree early days of a family mountain with a few adult traditions
Photo by Sandy Macys
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VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, DECEMBER 2013 PAGE 7
bers. Youd stand behind the bar and pull the cork. If it hit
the cowbell, you didnt pay for your drinks that night.
I remember one night opening a bottle, the cork hitting
the [ceiling] beam, then the bell, and then falling right into
Walts champagne glass, recalls de Lima.
Aprs-ski gatherings in the bar were a fundamental part
of the scene back then. So too were the Sunday afternoon
brunches, which Greenfeld still remembers vividly. In
those days, wed have a Sunday brunch, she recalls, a big
bufet upstairs from noon until eight p.m. It was famous for
the seafood Newburg with scallops and shrimp scram-
bled eggs, bacon, rolls and cofee.
Te weekend visitors would have a hearty meal before
loading up their cars to return to Connecticut, Massachu-
setts or New Jersey, and the seats would then fll with staf
coming of the mountain for the day, with big appetites and
visions of pinging the cowbell.
Te Golden Tistle hosted a New Years Eve dinner dance
each year, and Condon remembers folks riding their snow-
mobiles up the mountain to watch the freworks from the
Glen House, and then skiing down afterward. Te Fasching
Costume Ball, a party honoring the German Carnival season
held around Fat Tuesday each year, was yet another opportu-
nity for the mountain and its skiers to celebrate.
Tony Egan, who had moved up from New York City in
the early 60s and managed public relations for Glen Ellen,
recalls another tradition, the Gelandesprung Championship.
(Te title comes from the German word for jump.) Wed
build a takeof area right of the base lodge, and watch a lot
of people with no brains and big balls go of, Egan says.
Tere were lots of spills. It was a great spectator event.
Another spectator sport, Pond Skimming, was held in the
early days of Glen Ellen, and rumor has it that, along with
the six-foot-three Walt Elliott skimming (and coming up
short), one of the ski patrollers participated in the event in
the nude. Races were held between the ski patrol and the ski
school each year, as well as slalom races pitting local restau-
rant waiters and waitresses against one another.
Internationalism
Over at Sugarbush, Norwegian Olympian Stein Eriksen
promoted his signature style of skiinggraceful, and with
a narrow stancefollowed by Austrian ski racer Sigi Grot-
tendorfer. Glen Ellen set itself apart in December 1968 by
hiring French National and Olympic team member Pierre
Stamos. Earlier that year, Stamoss teammate Jean-Claude
Killy had made a clean sweep of medals in the Olympics
in Grenoble, thus drawing considerable attention to the
somewhat unorthodox wide-leg stance of the French tech-
nique. Stamos brought with him a small group of French ski
instructors and a bit of international intrigue. According to
the Glen Ellen Reports, a 1968 brochure for the mountain,
Stamos was a handsome and charming 27-year-old bach-
elor.
He certainly was Mr. Smooth, recalls Tony Egan.
Walt Elliott had been an early proponent of ski racing,
and Pierre Stamoss arrival furthered Elliotts interest. Glen
Ellen was one of the frst Eastern resorts to adopt National
Standard Race (NASTAR) ski racing, and it is said that
Stamos may have been the NASTAR national pacesetter
shortly after his arrival. In 1970, Glen Ellen won the privi-
lege of hosting the USSA National Championships, plan-
ning to stage the downhill event on F.I.S., the slalom on
Clifs, and the giant slalom on Inverness. After the frst two
events went of without a hitch, the Inverness lift sufered a
mechanical problem before the giant slalom race; neighbor-
ing mountain Mad River Glen stepped in to host the event,
one of several examples of longtime collaboration between
the two mountains.
Elliotts early support of the racing culture provided a wel-
come environment for the nascent Green Mountain Valley
School (GMVS). Started in 1973, GMVS frst began train-
ing at Mad River Glen, but soon moved to Glen Ellen. By
the late 1970s, the school had started a relationship with the
mountain management that would serve to fund and build
necessary facilities for student training well into the future.
Al Hobart, one of GMVSs founders, recalls a deal over
snowmaking: Glen Ellen was looking for money. I gave
them a loan to put in snowmaking on the top of Inverness
so we could use the trail. (Elliott was an early pioneer of
snowmaking, installing his frst guns on the number 4 lift,
now the Sunny Double, in the late 1960s.)
In 1982, GMVS helped fund the installation of a Poma
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Minutes from Mad River Glen & Sugarbush
Home of American Fla tbread
Hearty farmhouse breakfast included
Children & pets can be accomodated
Great rates from $90 to $135
mt. ellen
(See Mount Ellen, page 8)
Norwegian ski legend Stein Eriksen, Austrian ski racer Sigi Grottendorfer, center at a lesson, both at Sugarbush,
and Glen Ellens Pierre Stamos, a French ski racer, were three of the world-class skiers who settled in the Mad
River Valley in the 1960s and helped create a star-studded scene. Opposite page, bottom, a classic style of the
late 1960s; opposite above, Mt. Ellen and Braggs Farm.
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PAGE 8 VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, DECEMBER 2013
lift specifcally for student training on
Inverness. And as recently as 2011, GMVS
and Sugarbush co-funded the purchase of 40
energy-efcient Snow Logic guns for addi-
tional snowmaking on Inverness.
A New Era
Cynthia Greenfeld returned to New York
in the late 1960s with her two daughters,
leaving Walt to run the mountain with the
team he had built. Walt and Cynthia divorced
shortly after her departure. In 1973, Elliott
sold the mountain to Fayston resident Jenna
Van Loon. Elliott remained in Vermont,
but died tragically in a plane crash in 1978.
Van Loons ownership was brief, ending
with a bank intervention. Former Canadian
Olympic team member and Stratton Moun-
tain manager Harvey Cliford bought the
mountain from the bank and returned it to
solid footing. Ten, in 1979, Roy Cohen
who had purchased Sugarbush the previous
yearmade an ofer to Cliford and took
over Glen Ellen, changing the name of the
mountain to Sugarbush North. Te moun-
tain was referred to as both Sugarbush North
and Mt. Ellen going forward; since 2001, it
has been called Mt. Ellen at Sugarbush.
While Lincoln Peak at Sugarbush has
benefted from an investment strategy that
includes development of a slope-side hotel,
private town homes, and an upgraded base
lodge and skier services buildings, little has
changed at Mt. Ellen. Te base lodge is
much as it was in the Golden Tistle days.
Pond Skimming has moved to Lincoln Peak,
as have the New Years Eve celebrations,
but Mt. Ellen remains true to Walt Elliotts
original mission: the mountain is a family
ski (and ride) area, ofering afordable season
passes, a variety of discounted ski days, and
an aprs-ski bar scene that some claim is the
best at Sugarbush.
Tis season, Mt. Ellen turns 50, with a
weekend-long celebration scheduled for Jan-
uary 912. Tere will be discounted skiing as
well as on- and of-slope events throughout
the weekend that give a nod to the moun-
tains past. It will be a time for veteran skiers
and newcomers to come together and cel-
ebrate Walt Elliotts visionone that is still
alive and well today. And with any luck,
the mountain will have an opportunity to
welcome characters from its storied past
owners, employees, pass holders, racers, and
perhaps even the hallowed cowbell.
mt. ellen
(Continued from page 7)
BY BIDDLE DUKE
Until my mom stopped skiing a few years ago, I would
get messages every now and again that a big winter storm
had hit Manhattan, dumping enough for her to ski from
her apartment through the streets of New York.
I remember one letter in particular from the mid 90s,
rhapsodizing about skiing in the city in a blizzard. Te
snow was so deep there was no trafc in the streets
none and the city was silent under the white blanket,
as silent as it gets. Perfect was the word she used to
describe it.
Mom taught everyone in our family to ski my dad
and four children. It changed our lives. Anyone who skis
or rides, particularly learning as we did on whatever hill
we could fnd, understands.
Mom wasnt a great skier, but she loved it, from her
start as a teenager until the last day we skied together
behind the Stowefake Resort on Stowe. She was 85.
She learned about skiing while working at the 1939
Worlds Fair in Flushing, Queens. She bought boots
and skis from the Polish delegation, which was selling
everything because, thousands of miles away, the Nazis
were at that very moment marching into their country.
She was 16.
In the ensuing decades, she skied everywhere she could,
trekking all the way to Gulmarg in the Indian Himalayas
in the 1980s where she was working at the time. Tere,
she climbed up and skied down, and pronounced it great
terrain. Tere are lifts there now and a ski complex.
She and Dad headed right up the middle of First
Avenue in that blizzard in the 90s. Heading north, the
avenue climbs up to 57th. At the top, they turned around
and went back down. Tey made a few laps. People brave
enough to be out in the storm stopped to watch.
I was working far away at the time and I remember
reading Moms letter and thinking: I missed out. Warren
Miller should have been there.
Watching United We Ski recently, brothers Elliot
and Tyler Wilkinson-Rays documentary movie, recalled
that letter for me, and my own lifelong relationship
to skiing. Te flmmakers (and their dad and creative
partners) have made a simple, wonderful movie that does
what good art should: it captures the intangibles in life.
In other words, a feeling.
United We Ski, which opens tonight in Burlington,
is the story of three tiny Vermont ski areas HardAck
in St. Albans, Cochrans in Richmond and Northeast
Slopes in East Corinth and two private Vermont
tows Gebbies Tow and Chapman Tow and the
communities behind them.
Te story the brothers tell is as much about places and
people as it is about the magic of the sport.
Te Wilkinson-Rays know something about the
subject. Tey grew up skiing at Cochrans, and Elliot
went on to attend the Mt. Mansfeld Winter Academy
and race at the highest levels out of Stowe. Skiing and
coaching the sport has taken them all over the globe, and
they are living proof that the sport transforms lives. But
shrinking afordability and accessibility to the sport is
putting that out of reach.
Skiing used to be part of the very fabric of life in New
England. Te region once had more than 700 ski areas,
many of them village tows and T-bars. About 80 remain,
and only a few of those have kept it simple and inexpensive.
Ski and snowboard movies these days grab you with
stunning footage of elaborate backcountry skiing and
adventures in the most outrageous and obscure places and
extreme conditions imaginable. Tere is some spectacular
skiing in this flm, and the wish-you-were-there feeling
exists, but its the anti-ski-movie ski movie. Money cant
buy what this flm conveys.
Te brothers went out to document the existence of fve
cool, small afordable, fun hills. What they found and
what they reveal is unquestionably the very soul of
skiing.
I left thinking Northeast Slopes is on my hit list for
the winter. But the sweet image that kept replaying in
my mind was of the kid skiing all the way home no
narration, no explanation. Just a perfect run. Like that
day in the blizzard on First Avenue.
Biddle Duke is the publisher of the Stowe Reporter.
The soul of skiing
From the top of Mt. Ellen, two boys look West over the farmland of Addison County, to Lake Champlain and the Adirondacks in
the distance.
Photo by Sandy Macys
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VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, DECEMBER 2013 PAGE 9
BY FRANCESCA WHYTE
Ofcials from Vermont Adaptive Ski and
Sports and Pico Ski Education Program wel-
comed over 100 people to the grand opening
of the Andrea Mead Lawrence Lodge at Pico
Mountain on Friday, Nov. 8.
Te $1.3 million, 6,000 sq. ft. building is
a frst-of-its-kind facility in Vermont and a
new permanent home for Vermont Adaptive
Ski and Sports and its partner Pico Ski Educa-
tion Foundation.
Tom Aicher, Secretary of Pico Ski Educa-
tion Foundation opened the celebration on
Friday, thanking the community for their
support. If we dream big, we create great
citizens, great community leaders, and world-
class competitors. All should have the oppor-
tunity for mountain life, he said, continuing
to publicly recognize Ed Clarke, from N.B.F
Architects of Rutland, who made the new
building look as though it had always been
there, and Brent Wilbur, from Naylor &
Breen Builders, Inc.
Pico Ski Education foundation is a non-
proft organization that supports and enables
young athletes to pursue their dreams. Ver-
mont Adaptive Ski and Sports is the largest
non-proft orga-
nization in Ver-
mont to ofer
daily, year-round
sports pro-
grams to people
with disabilities
from Vermont
and around
the world. Te
building is spe-
cifcally designed
for participants
in Vermont Adaptives programs, providing
easy accessibility for all, regardless of ones dis-
ability.
Erin Fernandez, the executive director of
Vermont Adaptive, thanked a lot of new friends
and donors, What we thought was impos-
sible has been brought to fruition through our
partnership with Pico Ski Club. Tank you for
sharing this proud moment in Vermont Adap-
tives history. Fernandez added, Tis is phase
one of a three-phase plan (to create state-of-the-
art Vermont Adaptive homes) and I feel conf-
dent moving for-
ward.
Te crowd on
Friday drew vol-
unteers, partici-
pants, donors,
sponsors, part-
ners and com-
munity mem-
bers. Sarah Will,
a U.S. Paralym-
pic skier, helped
raise $60,000 for
the new lodge. She hails from Pico and is a Pico
Ski Club alumnus. Will made the transition
from able-bodied skier to a mono-skier and
became one of the most decorated U.S. winter
sports athletes of all time, winning a record 12
gold and one silver medal.
Pico is the most accommodating and
friendly mountain, Will said. And this lodge
shows how much care, commitment and
thought has gone into building exactly what
the adaptive community needs.
Te President of Killington and Pico
Resorts, Mike Solimano, cut the ribbon and
acknowledged how much this new building
will do for disabled athletes, All of us have a
common goal to support the sport of skiing,
and whether able or disabled, all should have
the opportunity to enjoy winter sport.
During the ceremony, a $50,000 dona-
tion from John Cumming, CEO of Powdr
Corp, was presented, leaving approximately
$100,000 still to be raised to complete this
portion of fundraising. More than $900,000
has been raised in donations and pledges in
about a year and a half.
As part of the celebrations, a public open
house was held on Saturday, Nov. 9, where
150 volunteers began their adaptive and
team-building training. On-snow training
will begin in December once volunteers have
decided on a specifc discipline. More than
500 volunteers will now work primarily from
the new Vermont Adaptive Headquarters at
Pico, while keeping bases at Sugarbush Resort
in Warren and Bolton Valley Resort in Bolton.
A crowd opened the Andrea Mead Lawrence Lodge at Pico in early November with Killington President Mike Solimano doing the honors. The $1.3 million, 6,000-square-foot
facility is the frst of its kind in Vermont for Vermont Adaptive Ski & Sports. Two more such lodges are planned in Vermont.
First-of-its-kind adaptive ski and sport lodge opens at Killington-Pico
The Swimming Hole 75 Weeks Hill Road Stowe, VT
802.253.9229 www.theswimmingholestowe.com
The Swimming Hole is a non-prot community pool & tness center that welcomes community support.
Fun for all, under one roof!
Competition-sized Swimming Pool Toddler & Child Pool Water Slide Diving Board
Swim Lessons Swim Club Masters Swimming Personal Training
Group Fitness Spinning Classes Kranking Classes Yoga
MEMBERSHIPS & DAY PASSES AVAILABLE
The soul of skiing
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PAGE 10 VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, DECEMBER 2013
BY EVAN JOHNSON
Te thrill of the undiscovered is a constant allure
for skiers in the Northeast and as long as there have
been skis; people have cut their own tracks on the
hillsides and through the woods in search of that
perfect line or secret stash of untracked powder.
Fortunately, Vermont has plenty of space for
both skiing on trails and of-piste exploring. While
Vermont was the frst, and continues to be the only
state in the country that leases public land to private
ski resorts, the land leased to those seven resorts
Killington, Okemo, Jay Peak, Burke, Bromley,
Stowe and Smugglers Notchtotals less than 2
percent of the total acreage available to the general
public. Te Vermont Association of Snow Travelers
trail system is more than 1,800 miles of maintained
trails connecting towns from Bennington to
Newport, snaking its way through most of the
state. Te Catamount Trail system runs the length
of Vermont and has ample resources and clinics
available for people looking to explore. Skiers can
use these trails and others to access their own secret
stashes or simply get around.
According to a 20-page document published
by Vermont Department of Forests, Parks and
Recreation, backcountry skiing is classifed as
an allowable use in the national forest, meaning it is not
confned specifcally to trails. Holly Knox, recreation and trails
coordinator for the Green Mountain National Forest, says that
while backcountry skiers can use any of the networks of trails on
public property, there are few policies dictating how land should
be managed for backcountry skiing.
Its something that we are trying to fgure out and its raising
a lot of management questions that we are trying to answer,
she told the Rochester gathering. Were contemplating should
our designation be as trails or something that we can show on
a map. Were trying to meet what our users want and also meet
our standards.
To be clear: backcountry skiing is not illegal, but it has
become a hot button issue for both skiers and the owners or
managers of the land on which they ski. In recent years, it has
evolved into a discussion thats produced more questions than
answers, blurred the lines separating public and private property
and clashed the interests of resorts like Killington, Jay Peak,
Stowe, Mad River Glen, Sugarbush, Mount Snow and Stratton,
with both novices eager to get into the woods and longtime
veterans stubbornly trying to protect their secret spots.
Satisfying all of those interests can be even more difcult
when some take matters into their own hands. While skiers are
permitted to use public lands, the priority for land management
agencies is balancing skiers desire to enjoy the wilderness with
the stability of the ecosystem. Fragile environments like high
elevation areas or areas trying to rebound from disturbances are
particularly vulnerable.
Failure to maintain this balance can have disastrous efects.
Te most alarming example in recent memory was in 2009
when two skiers used chainsaws to cut nearly 1,000 trees and
create a 40-foot-wide by 2,000 feet long swath on Big Jay
Mountain. Te two men later pleaded no contest to federal
charges of unlawful mischief, but the incident, many agree, was
a black eye for the entire community.
Since then, local skiers and appropriate ofcials
are quick to temper any enthusiasm about
attracting a larger number of backcountry skiers to
the state with caution.
Lost skiers and cut trees
After the disastrous cut at Big Jay and a rash of
lost skiers, notably at Killington Resort in the past
year or two, the backcountry community fnds
itself lumped together with chainsaw-wielding
outlaws or down-country wannabes ducking ropes
to ski out of bounds.
Its an image problem that some attribute to
steroid-injected ski publications or flms that raise
expectations of what a ski experience should be.
But from the resorts perspective, its a mishmash of
experiences that yield a unique policy at each resort.
With the seven resorts that have leased land on
state forests, areas like Stowe have been somewhat
lenient in the past, allowing limited access during
specifc times to the top of Mount Mansfeld and
surrounding areas.
Other resorts, like Mad River Glen, which is built
in its entirety on private land, has seen a change in
attitude over the years because of past abuse. MRGs
Vice President of Communication Eric Friedman
says the resort used to be more tolerantselling single ride
lifts for a nominal fee, for examplebut had to stop because
too many skiers were taking multiple rides on their single ride
ticket. It was just too difcult to enforce, he says. It wasnt
worth the aggravation.
Te resort community in Vermont as a group does not have a
formal policy on backcountry skiing, according to Vermont Ski
Area Association President Parker Rhiele, who would say only
that the association and ski resorts would likely keep an open
mind on the issue and try to address upcoming discussions
with fexibility.
What all agree on, however, is that the actions of a few have
afected the entire community. Last year, a bill presented to the
Vermont Legislature by Killington-area representatives last year
would have charged skiers for the cost of their own search and
rescue missions.
Backcountry skiers organize for access
(See Access, page 11)
A skier on Stowes Mount Mansfeld carves down the upper reaches of the mountain. Mansfeld can be particularly appealing because of its stature, but its also fraught with
high winds, cold temperatures and a steep descent into the Smugglers Notch canyon that is flled with strewn with cliffs. Backcountry skiers are responsible for their own
safety and rescue.
Photo by Brian Mohr/Ember Photography
At a recent gathering in Rochester, more than 150 skiers and riders attended
a meeting to discuss backcountry access and the idea of creating a statewide
organization.
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VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, DECEMBER 2013 PAGE 11
It failed for several reasons, with state police
and backcountry rescuers both opposed to the
law, based on the likelihood the victims and
their families would be hesitant to call for
help sooner and might, therefore, put more
peopleand rescuersin danger. David
Goodman, a writer from Waterbury Center
and the author of several guidebooks on
backcountry skiing in New England, says the
law was misguided.
When they proposed the law, I dont think
they were even thinking about backcountry
skiers, he says. Tey were thinking about
kids from New Jersey ducking out-of-bounds
and getting lost. Te only thing is, in that big
net that they threw out, the real thing they
pulled in when the net came up was us.
Image Control
Even though the bill failed, many view it
as a warning. With that in mind, groups of
skiers began to discuss ways of cleaning up
the image of of-piste enthusiasts and policing
themselves.
Weve lost the public relations battle,
says Oliver Blackman, a backcountry skier,
instructor and ski patroller at Smugglers
Notch. Other users of backcountry land are
assumed to be virtuous hikers, are wonderful
stewards of the environment, (while) skiers
are dirtbag criminals. We need somebody to
change that.
Amy Keley, Executive Director of the
Catamount Trail Assocciation, points to the
lists of standards ranging from the Snowsports
Industry of Americas Backcountry Code to the
Vermont Trail Ethic from the Vermont Trails
and Greenways Council. Te Catamount
Trail Association encourages users to practice
Leave-No-Trace ethics and to respect private
landowners.
I think a lot of the basic elements are
already there, she says. We just need to fnd
a way to share them in a unifed way with a
broad audience.
Some are advocating for a backcountry
skiers advocacy group that would act as a
unifed representative body. Jason Duquette-
Hofman, co-founder and owner of Vermont-
based ski company Worth Skis, says a dialogue
between policymakers and the trail users is
necessary.
What I hear from people that have access
to policy development is that they dont
understand what we need and they dont
understand how to translate it into policies
that make sense on a statewide basis. What we
really need to do is help them. Tis (meeting)
gives them a sense of who we are, but we really
need to step up and give them that advisory
capacity.
As a hopeful answer to these concerns,
the Rochester Area Sports Trail Alliance,
(RASTA) is a nonproft founded last winter
with the intention of promoting backcountry
skiing access to both public and private lands.
Founding member Dean Mendel has lived in
Rochester (population 1,139) for 40 years and
says the valleys and hills along scenic Vermont
Route 100 ofer unparalleled potential for
outdoor recreation. An organization like
RASTA, he says, would act as an representative
on behalf of backcountry skiers as well as
a resource, providing local knowledge and
advice to people looking for a place to start.
While much of the discussion around
backcountry has revolved around policy
decisions and the fner details of the discussion,
Mendell maintains the way forward for skiers
and other backcountry enthusiasts is much
more simple:
Everyone needs to step up and
communicate what we all do, he says. We
love what we do and that communication is
key. Do we want to keep it in our back pocket
or do we want to share it with someone? Its
not a secret, its all about the fun.
Few of Vermonts 18 ski resorts have a
formal, stated policy on backcountry skiing,
but many do have general guidelines they
follow. Heres the response from 10 ski areas
on the issue of accessing the backcountry via
their ski resorts.
MAGIC MOUNTAIN
With the former Timber Ridge ski area
on the backside of Magic, there is backcoun-
try access here with an old trail system that
still exists and is maintained by the owner
of the former ski areas property. Most fnd
plenty of tree-skiing opportunities on the
front side of our hill and see no need to go
backcountry.
But for backcountry adventurers, there is
that opportunity and there are no ropes at
Magic restricting access.
Tere is also no transportation provided
back to Magic once someone goes of to
the Timber Ridge side, so skiers are solely
responsible for themselves once they head
of Magics property. We recommend skiing
in groups of at least three and making sure
others know when and where they are head-
ing in the backcountry. Also bring along
plenty of food, water, medical and com-
munications equipment in case of trouble.
We often have backcountry skiers ask us for
routes to access the Timber Ridge side and
we provide that information.
Geof Hatheway, Vice President of Mar-
keting.
BROMLEY:
Our location on a national forest means
it really isnt our policy so much as its the
policy of the national forest. As of now,
Bromley doesnt have that policy.
Michael van Eyck, Director of Market-
ing.
SMUGGLERS NOTCH:
Skiers and boarders can access the back-
country from our area as long as they have a
valid lift ticket. Once they are beyond the
ski area boundary we are not bound to pro-
vide any search or rescue services. Any such
services provided may be billed per Vermont
State Law.
Karen Boushie, Public Relations Direc-
tor.
BOLTON VALLEY:
At Bolton Valley we actually have back-
country skiing as part of our 100km of
Nordic and backcountry terrain; 15km of
this terrain is groomed for traditional skate
and classic skiing, the other 85km is back-
country. You need to have a valid trail ticket
or season pass to access the terrain. Maps are
available at the Nordic Center. Best of all this
terrain is located next to the lift-served ter-
rain. You can even access part of it from Wil-
derness Lift.As far as people accessing other
backcountry areas that are not on this map,
we discourage it.
Josh Arneson, Director of Sales and
Marketing
KILLINGTON:
Killington Resort clearly marks boundar-
ies with fags, ropes and signage, and skiing
out of bounds is not allowed. For skiers and
snowboarders in search of fresh snow between
the trees, Killington ofers 475 acres of Natu-
ral Woods terrain in-bounds, which is open
for exploration by resort guests. While it is
not illegal to ski out of the ski area boundary
in Vermont, like it is in some western states,
Vermont law does state that skiers/riders are
liable for all expenses of search and rescue if
you ski or ride beyond the ski area boundary
and a search is conducted.
Michael Joseph, Public Relations at Kil-
lington
MAD RIVER GLEN:
We allow folks to earn their turns when
MRG is not open (both pre and post season
as well as after operating hours in-season).
In regard to stuf near our area we dont
have any policies at all. Folks certainly access
the side-country here at MRG, but we dont
patrol it. We do have signs warning folks
they are leaving the ski area boundary.
Eric Friedman, Marketing Director
STRATTON
Mountains like Stratton are within the
national forest, where no restrictions apply.
Teir comment is simple: Aticket is required
Backcountry policies are vague, or developing, at many state ski areas
access
(Continued from page 10)
(See Backcountry, page 13)
A skier takes a leap into deep powder in the Green Mountains. Gaining access to such areas and sharing some of that infor-
mation is at the heart of a discussion in Vermont on backcountry access.
Photo by Brian Mohr/Ember Photography
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PAGE 12 VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, DECEMBER 2013
GROCERY
MEATS AND SEAFOOD
beer and wine
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Formerly JohnnyBoys Pancake House
Same Great Breakfast Menu Same Great Breakfast Menu
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our famous 3 egg omelette
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Add: Home-made Corned Beef Hash, VT sausage/bacon, Canadian Bacon, Taylor Pork
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All served with Pure Vermont Maple Syrup
PANCAKES
Buttermilk or Multigrain or Pumpkin
WITH ANY COMBINATION of Blueberries, Strawberries, Bananas, Cranberry Walnut,
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Daily BackCountry Specials
BREAKFAST SANDWICHES,
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**COFFEE BY LOCAL
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BackCountry Tavern
stayed tuned to Mountain Times
OPEN 7:30 A.M.
923 KILLINGTON RD. 802-422-4411
Open Daily
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Located above The Phat Italian 2384 Killington Road
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VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, DECEMBER 2013 PAGE 13
RACE GEAR
SPECIALISTS
LOCATED @ THE TOP OF THE KILLINGTON ROAD ON YOUR RIGHT,
1/2 MILE BEFORE SNOWSHED
802.422.9447
SHOP ONLINE AT PEAKSKISHOP.COM
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to ride the lift and we do not require a ticket
to hike uphill.
Craig Panarisi, VP of Mt. Operations
JAY PEAK
Our Patrol and Operations staf work
with members of the Green Mountain Club
to determine when to open the gate to Big
Jay. Tose who choose to make the trip out
know that they are leaving the resort and
are on their own. Teyre strongly encour-
aged to ski in teams of three, have a whistle
and some sort of communication device,
have water, and to notify someone of their
expected time of return.
As to accessing the backcountry routes,
if you do it from the top of the resort, you
have to have a lift ticket. Were working
on an uphill route policy now, but have to
work through the safety issues of having
two-way traf c on trails where the major-
ity of people are not expecting to see some-
one skinning up and collisions can become
a concern. Even accessing the trails before
or after the lifts spin can be sketchy as cats
and snow mobiles are zipping around the
hill and winch cables can be set right at knee
height and go unseen by someone skiing
down during the times the lifts are closed.
JJ Toland, Director of Communica-
tions/Events/Partnerships
SUGARBUSH
Basically, we are supportive of backcoun-
try skiing as a winter sport. We point back-
country enthusiasts to Slide Brook Wilder-
ness area, a 2,000-acre area between our
two mountains, which is out of bounds,
not patrolled, and not maintained by our
mountain operations crew. When back-
country skiers/riders want to access Sugar-
bush terrain within our boundaries, they
then must follow the rules of our Winter
Uphill Travel Policy below.
We have a policy for Winter Uphill Travel
published on our website. Tis policy is in
efect before and after our mountains open
for the season, as our machinery is operat-
ing well before and afterwards in prepara-
tion for the winter season. We also allow
skinning on several designated trails during
operating hours, but those skiers must have
a lift ticket, and must check in with guest
services beforehand to fnd out which trails
are permitted.
Candice White, communications
director

MOUNT SNOW
Any time anyone rides a chairlift they
need to be wearing a valid lift ticket or
season pass. We do not actually have a
policy for accessing terrain beyond the
resorts boundaries, but from the summit
much of that area is public land managed
by the National Forest Service as part of the
Green Mountain National Forest. Since it
is public land, citizens use it at their own
risk. If they access it using a chairlift at
Mount Snow they need a valid lift ticket
or season pass; or if they access it via uphill
travel using Mount Snows terrain they need
to get an uphill travel pass and read the
uphill travel policy before setting of.
Dave Meeker, Communications Manager
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(Continued from page 11)
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PAGE 14 VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, DECEMBER 2013
NORTHERN SKI WORKS
2089 Killington Road, Killington, VT 05751 (802) 422-9675
10 Main Street, Ludlow, VT 05149 (802) 228-3344
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BY EVAN JOHNSON
After a lengthy process of hearings, the
District #1 Environmental Commission has
the information it needs to begin deliberations
on two applications for development in the
Killington area. Te Commission has received
hundreds of pages of related information for
both the Killington Village Master Plan and
the new Resort Parking Project.
SP Land Company LLC, has requested
a permit to subdivide 15 lots throughout
the Killington Mountain area and seeks to
consolidate another 10 lots. Additionally, Te
Killington Village Master Plan would develop
approximately 2,300 individually occupied
residential units; a replacement skier services
building and associated commercial space.
Meanwhile, Killington/Pico Resort seeks
a permit to authorize the construction of
replacement parking lots, realignment of a
portion of Killington Road and reconfguration
of the Killington Grand Resort Hotels parking
lot.
Te approval of either plan hinges on the
criteria of the Land Use and Development
Act, known as Act 250. Te Commission will
evaluate each plan as they comply with each of
the Acts stipulations.
Te Commission has raised concerns
with both projects. SP Land faces the issue
of increased traf c, specifcally during
construction, while Killington/Pico Resort
risks building on areas deemed to be of
historical importance. If the applicants cannot
ofer suitable alternatives or contingency plans,
neither proposal could be approved.
Progress continues for Killington
Village plans at base of mountain
Passion for Snow, a flm detailing the
contributions to skiing by Dartmouth College
students and staf produced by former Museum
board member Lisa Densmore and current
director Rick Moulton, is on the schedule of
the Vermont International Film Festival in
Burlington, Vermont on Sunday October 13,
2013 at 4 PM. Based on the comprehensive
book Passion for Skiing by Stephen Waterhouse
and additional authors, the flm was released
last winter.
Te flm will be followed by a reception
where participants in the flm, Olympians,
both Dartmouth and non-Dartmouth, and
other ski legends present will be introduced.
Also to be screened at the event there
will be White Rock, the of cial flm of the
1976 Innsbruck Olympics, introduced by
its producer, Adrian Wood, the curator of
Olympic flms for the International Olympic
Committee, who is coming from England.
Both the book, Passion for Skiing and the
flm, Passion for Snow, are available in the
Museums online shop.
Film on Dartmouth skiers debuts at Vt. Film Festival
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VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, DECEMBER 2013 PAGE 15
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Te Trapp Family Lodge cross country
complex includes man-made snow when
needed, warming huts, and full service
equipment rentals and sales. Te world-
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For more information, contact Chair-
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Brews, spirits & wines
Te locals guide to Aprs
By Katie Nichols
Tens of thousands of New Englanders love to escape to the
mountains of Vermont as soon as the snow starts sticking. We
ski all day, aprs at the best bars, savor the local eats and then
out for drinks. Tomorrow, we wake up and do it all over again, weekend after weekend and
love it!
I dont know about you, but I have this nostalgia for the winter season where no matter
where you go, ski hats, hoodies, spandex, and the most bomber winter boots are proper
dress. You sit by the freplace at the local bar comparing stories of the day over a nice cold
beer because, hey, youre thirsty and a nice cold Vermont brew is just the fx. Life is good.
Here are some of my favorite winter libations to accompany you this season.
From old breweries to brand new ones there is a wide spectrum of local breweries in
Vermont to fulfll your aprs needs.
Me? I favor the wheat beers, saisons or ales, like my new favor of the season the Lost
Nation Saison Lamoille. Marrying spice and fruit in the classic farmhouse style of saisons,
with a lower alcohol content of 5.9 percent, it is a delicious beer to sit by the fre with and
watch it snow.
In the tried-but-true category, Switchback is a great beer all year long, but even more
perfect while you thaw out your toes. But when in Vermont, you can get whichever style you
desire from any of several regionally renowned breweries, such as Te Alchemist in Waterbury,
Hill Farmstead from Greensboro, Lawsons from Warren, Lost Nation from Morrisville,
Drop-In Brewery in Middlebury, or fnd them on tap at most local bars in many of Vermonts
ski communities or outlier communities like Montpelier and Waterbury (hey, we all ski
here so you have to be pretty remote not to be considered a ski town in Vermont!)
**********
Cider is on the prowl. Everywhere you go the newest thing seems to be about the local
ciders, and in Vermont they are making headway from hard cider to ice cider. Ofering
great options for gluten free drinkers, as well as lower alcohol contents, ciders are refreshing,
bright and great to mix and match. Simply add a touch of ginger and lemon to give it a
little oomph, like the Dirty Mayor from Citizen Cider, or just enjoy it as is like I do. And
dont overlook Woodchuck Cider, produced at its new headquarters in Middlebury. With 60
percent of the nations hard cider market, they market specialty brews on occasion, and always
have their staple of varieties in six packs to accompany any party.
Ice Cider, what is it? Derived originally from the French Canadians, you harness the sheer
cold of Vermont winters to freeze the apple juice and concentrate cider with an optimum
balance of acidity and sweetness. A dessert wine in its simplest form, Ice Cider can be used in
many other ways from a topping on ice cream (yum!), or mixing into a cocktail.
Mix it with a prosecco and a twist of lemon and you will fnd a delicious concoction to
enjoy. You may also fnd something called Orleans, a local aperitif cider infused with herbs
that are based on European traditions of infused wines such as Vermouth or Campari, perfect
for blending into creative cocktails. Just ask your bartender.
**********
Bring on the cocktails. Vermont also has a growing list of nationally known spirits. While
micro-breweries and wineries catch the interests of visitors, keep a watch on local spirits like
Green Mountain Distillers and Smugglers Notch Distillery, as well as Saxon River Distillery,
Whistle Pig (near Middlebury), and Caledonia Spirits (near Hardwick), which was recently
lauded for its internationally acclaimed Barr Hill Gin. Check out the brewery pages in this
issue for more about Vermonts wineries, breweries and spirits.
**********
Vermonts excellent restaurants serving locally grown food pair well with several varieties of
wines local, domestic and foreign, red, white and bubbles. Take your pick. Each month
well pick a favorite based on small producers, eclectic varietals, and just great wines for the
season.
Tis months featured wine is Atteca because of its seasonally hearty notes of spice, cocoa
and blackberry. Rich old vines of Garnacha from Spain warm you up on those brutal winter
days and pair perfectly with braised pork shoulder or even carnitas. Look for it at your local
wine shop (at Cork in Waterbury it sells at $18).
If you prefer white wines, try to fnd the Ontanon Vetiver, which is from the region of
Rioja. Made up of a grape called Viura this wine imparts a creamy and rich quality flled with
citrus notes. Forget the chardonnay, this wine is your new best friend for any kind of menu or
for just a glass after work, skiing or relaxing anytime.
No matter what your style, check in next month and well explore more libations, some of
which are sure to become your new favorites.
**********
A Vermont native, Katie returned to Vermont after college at CU (Boulder) to manage Cork
Wine Bar & Market in Waterbury. Finding a passion for wine at Cork, Katie has recently become
a part of the wine Bottega in the north end of Boston.
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PAGE 16 VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, DECEMBER 2013
1
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authentic taste
Guinness Harp Smithwicks Longtrail On Tap
Serving Lunch and Dinner
The M
c
Grath Family
Innkeepers Since 1977
Q
A
N
D
A
Ski&Ride: What sparked your imagination
to create a book about skiing squirrels?
Ray: We see many squirrels in the Con-
necticut woods, and one beautiful snowy day
my wife told me she saw a squirrel glide down
a slope, as if he were on a pair of skis! Tat
image stayed with me, and the story of Squir-
rels on Skis took of from there.
S&R: Did you originally write it as part
of the Beginner Book series or did that come
about after?
Ray: I didnt think about categories, but I
knew I wanted this book to be a classic that
kids would demand to hear again and again. I
felt there was an interesting story to tellpart
mystery, part comedyand when the frst line
By Polly Lynn
Squirrels on Skis, written by J. Hamilton
Ray and illustrated by Pascal Lemaitre,
is the newest addition to the best selling
Beginner Books series, which originated
with Te Cat in the Hat in 1957.
Squirrels on Skis is a humorous story
geared toward young readers, ages 48,
that tells of an idyllic snow-clad town
that is overrun by squirrels on skis. Tis
imaginative infestation takes place in a
small mountain village that resembles many
in Vermont with church steeples, a local
grocery store, B&Bs, a town green, village
hall, arts gallery, and quirky residents that
get vocal at a town assembly.
An intrepid young reporter named Sally
Sue Breeze speaks up above the rest and
ultimately resolves the town-wide dilemma
with imagination and fnesse, just before
the town pest-controller, Stanley Powers,
sucks them up in his vacuum device. Her
charming solution makes both her town
and the squirrels happy.
With delightfully whimsical illustrations
by Pascal Lemaitre, this is the perfect book
for beginning readers and its clever rhymes
also make it a fun book to read out loud.
Te author, J. Hamilton Ray, has a
distinguished background in animating
beloved childrens books to video, particularly
those of Teodore Seuss Geisel (better known
as Dr. Seuss.) Among his distinctions, Ray
has won two national Emmy Awards for
Outstanding Writing for Children. Hes
written and produced for the hit PBS kids
television series Between the Lions, and hes
created many animated videos of picture
books, including those of P. D. Eastman, Stan
and Jan Berenstain and, of course, Dr. Seuss.
We called for a quick interview:
came to me, I knew that it would be a rhym-
ing book. When I was done, I read the book
aloud to Random House Childrens publisher,
Kate Klimo, and to Dr. Seuss own art direc-
tor, Cathy Gold- smith. Tey
immediately said
it would make a
wonderful classic
Beginner Book,
and they bought
it on the spot!
Kate said she
liked Squirrels
on Skis because
it was written
in an original
voice in the
Seuss vein,
yet it was not
an imitation
of Seuss
which they
apparently
get all
the time.
She told
me she
thought
Ted Geisel
would have absolutely loved it.
S&R: How did you choose Pascal Lemaitre
as the illustrator for this story?
Ray: My publisher, Random House, sug-
gested Pascal, and I thought his characters had
a lot of personality, so I agreed. I am a pro-
ducer/director, so I was very involved in direct-
ing the artwork. I gave my publisher a full sto-
ryboard, in which I drew sketches of the entire
book, and made decisions of page layouts and
scenes. Pascal brought a lot of his own talent
and humor to the book, so it was a very suc-
cessful collaboration.
S&R: Can you tell us about your experi-
ence writing your frst childrens book?
Ray: It was a won-
derful experience!
Once I got going,
my mind kept work-
ing out the story and
rhymes all the time
in the shower, in the
garden, while cooking.
Id get very excited when
a new idea or verse came
to me, and Id run to fnd
a pen and paper before I
forgot it. And as the book
took more shape it became
like music to me, like a
song I was trying to fgure
out.
S&R: How does being
the author difer from your
other roles as producer and
animator of childrens books,
movies and T.V. program-
ming?
Ray: TV is lights, camera,
act i on! Whereas in writing a book, you
sit alone in a quiet place and create a world
that you live in for a whileso its just you
and your charactersyoure the entire engine
of this train! Fortunately my wife is also an
author (the novelist, C.A. Belmond) so we
can communicate and encourage each other
whenever we each come up for air!
With author
J. Hamilton Ray
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VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, DECEMBER 2013 PAGE 17
Winner of The Best
of New England Area
Snowboard Shop
(802) 422-3931
www.surftheearthsnow-
boards.com
AWESOME CLOTHING,
EQUIPMENT & ACCESSORIES
RENTALS & SEASONAL LEASES
DEMO & TUNING PROGRAMS
FRIENDLY CUSTOMER SERVICE
SALES & IN-STORE SPECIALS
Bolton Nordic Trail
Improvements Underway
BOLTON Bolton Nordic and backcoun-
try skiers will enjoy signifcant trail improve-
ments this winter season.
A partnership between the Vermont Depart-
ment of Forests, Parks and Recreation, Te
Friends of Bolton Valley Nordic and Back-
country (FOBVNBC) and Bolton Valley Ski
Resort has resulted in signifcant trail work.
Since the property was acquired in June,
around $40,000 has been invested into the
trails located on state land.
Te property was conserved by Te Ver-
mont Land Trust and transferred to the state
after a 1.8 million dollar fundraising campaign
which utilized grants funding as well as hun-
dreds of individual donations by the Bolton
skiing community and others.
Te Nordic Trails are operated by Bolton
Valley Resort, as in past years, through a license
agreement with the state.
For information on Nordic Trail tickets or
season passes, visit www.boltonvalley.com. For
more information on Te Friends of Bolton
Valley Nordic and Backcountry, visit www.
boltonfriends.org.
Rossignol teams with
Ski Vermont for 2014
MONTPELIER Mountain lifestyle
brand Rossignol will headline the 2013-14
skiing and snowboarding season as the Of -
cial Ski Partner of Ski Vermont. Te brands
will combine eforts to reach millions of winter
enthusiasts and to introduce skiing to a new
audience.
Rossignol has been a leading snow sport
brand for over 100 years, committed to
expanding and improving on skiing and snow-
boarding, Ski Vermont marketing director
Kyle Lewis said. A partnership between strong
brands like Vermont and Rossignol only makes
sense as we both look towards the future of
mountain sports. Were particularly excited
about combining our learn-to eforts and
introducing new people to the sport together.
After spending more than 30 years head-
quartered in Vermont, Rossignol enjoys strong
ties to eastern skiing and snowboarding still
today, said Jason Newell, Director of Market-
ing, Rossignol Group NA and a Middlebury,
Vt. resident.
Vermont alone boasts 19 resorts, giving it
one of the largest concentrations of ski resorts
in the country; not to mention incredibly pas-
sionate skiers and riders. Te fact is its never
been a better time to ski or snowboard. Te
latest innovations in construction and design
have made skiing and snowboarding easier,
GOSHEN After
40 years of providing
groomed Nordic
skiing opportunities,
Blueberry Hill Inn in
Goshen has turned in its
grooming equipment
and is returning to
a simpler model of
providing recreation
opportunities to
outdoor enthusiasts.
For the 2013-2014
season Blueberry
Hill will provide
ski and snowshoe
opportunities on
trails that will remain
ungroomed.
Te wide, well
marked trails take
winter outdoor lovers over a variety of
terrain in the mixed hardwood forest of the
Moosalamoo region of the Green Mountains,
including the popular Hogback and Romance
mountains. No trails fees will be charged
but donations are gratefully accepted to help
support year-round maintenance and provide
a warm place to return to and gather with
friends. Soup and other lunch items will be
available, as will snowshoe rentals.
It is simply a matter of economics,
Blueberry Hill of cials said. Te majority of
the trails are part of a special use permit with
the U.S. Forest Service. Many of the bridges
were wiped out in recent storms, especially
Irene, and the
replacement of the
bridges which meet
specifcations required
of the Forest Service is
just out of reach and is
not sustainable.
Blueberry Hill Inn
began a relationship
with the Forest
Service in 1972, and
has developed and
maintained a 50K
network of trails that
have provided some of
the best cross-country
skiing in the east for
42 years. Blueberry
Hill Inn will continue
to work with the
U.S. Forest Service
to determine the best way to continue to
maintain and secure the use of these trails for
future generations to enjoy.
Blueberry Hill of cials say feedback has
been good, as people seem to appreciate the
diversity of winter recreation opportunities
available in the Moosalamoo Recreation Area.
With nearby Rikert Nordic Center having
recently invested in 5K of snowmaking and
improved trail systems, Blueberry Hills
ungroomed trails for skiing and snowshoeing
will complement the outdoor recreation
oferings in the area.
Blueberry Hill will host an open house on
Saturday, Jan. 4.
more accessible, and more fun than ever before.
We look forward to working closely with Ski
Vermont as we communicate this message to
the masses throughout the coming season.
Blueberry Hill touring center
changes to backcountry trails
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PAGE 18 VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, DECEMBER 2013
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A non-prot organization representing
the absentee property owners of the
Killington and Pico Regions, giving a
voice to second homeowners in local,
Resort and State discussions and decision -
making. If you are not a member, call the
number listed below for information and
pick up your members discount card.
Renting & Managing
Private Homes, Edgemont,
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KPOA Mcmacns
DiscouNTco Hcnc
www.killingtongroup.com | 802.422.2300
A non-prot organization representing
the absentee property owners of the
Killington and Pico Regions, giving a
voice to second homeowners in local,
Resort and State discussions and decision -
making. If you are not a member, call the
number listed below for information and
pick up your members discount card.
Renting & Managing
Private Homes, Edgemont,
Highridge, Pico Village,
Pinnacle, Trail Creek,
Whifetree,Winterberry,
The Woods, and other
condominiums in the
Killington Region.
HOTEL/CONCIERGE SERVICES
for owners who rent
themselves through VRBO.
Check In/Check Out
usekeeping
urity Deposit
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Providing professional services to the Killington/Pico vacation home owner.
Renting & Managing
Private Homes, Highridge,
Edgemont, Pico ViIIage,
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representing the absen-
tee property owners of
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Regions, giving a voice
to second homeowners in local, Resort and
State discussions and decision - making. If
you are not a member, call the number listed
below for information and pick up your
members discount card.
Renting and Managing
Private Homes, Pinnacle,
Whifetree, Trail Creek,
Edgemont, Pico Village Square
and other condominiums in
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www.killingtongroup.com | 802.422.2300
A non-prot organization representing
the absentee property owners of the
Killington and Pico Regions, giving a
voice to second homeowners in local,
Resort and State discussions and decision -
making. If you are not a member, call the
number listed below for information and
pick up your members discount card.
Renting & Managing
Private Homes, Edgemont,
Highridge, Pico Village,
Pinnacle, Trail Creek,
Whifetree,Winterberry,
The Woods, and other
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Killington Region.
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DiscouNTco Hcnc
www.killingtongroup.com | 802.422.2300
A non-prot organization representing
the absentee property owners of the
Killington and Pico Regions, giving a
voice to second homeowners in local,
Resort and State discussions and decision -
making. If you are not a member, call the
number listed below for information and
pick up your members discount card.
Renting & Managing
Private Homes, Edgemont,
Highridge, Pico Village,
Pinnacle, Trail Creek,
Whifetree,Winterberry,
The Woods, and other
condominiums in the
Killington Region.
HOTEL/CONCIERGE SERVICES
for owners who rent
themselves through VRBO.
Check In/Check Out
usekeeping
urity Deposit
check/refund
RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL
CLEANING
Carpet and Upholstery Steam Cleaning;
Tile/Grout and Restoration Work;
Property Energy Audits and Repairs
The Killington Group Offices
Providing professional services to the Killington/Pico vacation home owner.
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KiLLiNcToN7Pico OwNcns AssociATioN
KPOA Mcmacns
DiscouNTco Hcnc
www.killingtongroup.com | 802.422.2300
A non-prot organization representing
the absentee property owners of the
Killington and Pico Regions, giving a
voice to second homeowners in local,
Resort and State discussions and decision -
making. If you are not a member, call the
number listed below for information and
pick up your members discount card.
Renting & Managing
Private Homes, Edgemont,
Highridge, Pico Village,
Pinnacle, Trail Creek,
Whifetree,Winterberry,
The Woods, and other
condominiums in the
Killington Region.
HOTEL/CONCIERGE SERVICES
for owners who rent
themselves through VRBO.
Check In/Check Out
usekeeping
urity Deposit
check/refund
RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL
CLEANING
Carpet and Upholstery Steam Cleaning;
Tile/Grout and Restoration Work;
Property Energy Audits and Repairs
The Killington Group Offices
Providing professional services to the Killington/Pico vacation home owner.
Renting & Managing
Private Homes, Highridge,
Edgemont, Pico ViIIage,
PinnacIe, TraiI Creek,
Whifetree, The Woods, and
other condominiums in the
KiIIington Region.
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.VTKPOA
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r
g
8
0
2.422.230
0
Killington/Pico Owners Association
KPOA Members
Discounted Here
www.killingtongroup.com | 802.422.2300
A non-prot organization
representing the absen-
tee property owners of
the Killington and Pico
Regions, giving a voice
to second homeowners in local, Resort and
State discussions and decision - making. If
you are not a member, call the number listed
below for information and pick up your
members discount card.
Renting and Managing
Private Homes, Pinnacle,
Whifetree, Trail Creek,
Edgemont, Pico Village Square
and other condominiums in
the Killington Resort Region.
Residential and Commercial Cleaning; Carpet
and Upholstery Steam Cleaning; Tile/Grout
and Restoration Work; Property
Energy Audits and Repairs
Home of these businesses:
w
w
w.VTKPOA.o
n
c
BD2.A22.23DD
KiLLiNcToN7Pico OwNcns AssociATioN
KPOA Mcmacns
DiscouNTco Hcnc
www.killingtongroup.com | 802.422.2300
A non-prot organization representing
the absentee property owners of the
Killington and Pico Regions, giving a
voice to second homeowners in local,
Resort and State discussions and decision -
making. If you are not a member, call the
number listed below for information and
pick up your members discount card.
Renting & Managing
Private Homes, Edgemont,
Highridge, Pico Village,
Pinnacle, Trail Creek,
Whifetree,Winterberry,
The Woods, and other
condominiums in the
Killington Region.
HOTEL/CONCIERGE SERVICES
for owners who rent
themselves through VRBO.
Check In/Check Out
usekeeping
urity Deposit
check/refund
RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL
CLEANING
Carpet and Upholstery Steam Cleaning;
Tile/Grout and Restoration Work;
Property Energy Audits and Repairs
The Killington Group Offices
Providing professional services to the Killington/Pico vacation home owner.
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VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, DECEMBER 2013 PAGE 19
BY EVAN JOHNSON
Its that time of year again and to make your holiday
season a little less hectic, weve compiled the best gifts of the
year in one easy list, from sweaters to spirits, so youll spend
less time shopping and more time doing the important stuf,
like skiing and riding. Heres what youll fnd on our wish list:
Ibex Outerwear,
$50 - $400
Located in White
River Junction, Ver-
mont, Ibexs base of
operation is a con-
verted car dealership
with a small, laidback
staf. Ibexs goods
are made of 100%
merino wool, which
is imported from
New Zealand and
manufactured state-
side into the fnest quality woolens that are machine wash-
able, moisture-wicking, non-fammable, wont stink like your
synthetic base layers or itch like your granddads sweaters.
Te imported wool is third party certifed to be ecologically,
socially and economically sustainable. Shop locations are in
Boston and Seattle, but you can fnd the full line of their
goods at www.ibex.com, and in many Vermont retail ski and
ride stores.
Gift Card,
Vermont
Country
Store, $25 -
$500
If you want to play it
safe, get them a gift card. If you want to get
them a one-of-a-kind gift card, pick one from the Vermont
Country Store. Founded by Vrest and Ellen Orton 1945, the
operation began with a 12-page catalog featuring 36 items,
mailed to friends on their Christmas card list. To comple-
ment the mail-order business, the pair openedTe Vermont
Country Store in Weston, Vt., in 1946, the frst restored rural
general store in the nation. With two locations in Weston
and Rockingham, Te Vermont Country Store prides itself
as purveyors of the practical and hard-to-fnd, and with a
catalog spanning everything from Bag Balm to peppermint
sticks to the original Stormy Kromer hat, anyone should be
able to fnd something, no matter how picky they may be.
Cutting boards and
serving trays, J.K.
Adams Co., $10
- $100
Since its found-
ing over 65 years
ago, J.K. Adams has
supplied cooks and
home entertainers with
the innovative and functional
cutting boards, bowls, utensils, wine and knife racks available,
all handcrafted in Vermont. Teir materials include New
England-sourced materials including ash, hickory, and slate.
Shop online at www.jkadams.com
Flannel, Vermont Flannel
Company
If youre in need of anything warm and plaid, this really
is a no-brainer. Owned and operated by a husband and wife
team in Barre, Vt., Te Vermont Flannel
Company has been producing fne
fannel goods for over 20 years.
Stop by locations in Burlington,
Ferrisburgh, and Woodstock for
fannel pants, pajamas, robes,
shirts, shorts, jackets and other
necessities like dog jackets and
scrunchies.
A Lifetime of
Vermont People,
By Peter Miller,
$49.95, hardcover.
Vermont Photographer
Peter Millers latest book is an
intimate and insightful glimpse
into the lives of Vermonters. Te idea for the book came in
1988, after Miller had quit his job at Life Magazine. Orig-
inally turned away by 13 publishers, Miller went it alone,
remortgaged his house, and traveled the state in search of
subjects. Te result is a beautiful book encapsulating 60 years
of photography. Printed in duo tone in Verona, Italy, this
elegant cofee table book is 208 pages long with 200 pictures
and 60 Vermonter profles.
Whistle Pig Whiskey, $68.99;
Barr Hill Gin, a bargain at
any price
If youre looking for holiday season liba-
tions and have someone with a discerning
taste for rye on your list, look no further
than Whistle Pig. Based in Shoreham, the
100-proof straight rye whiskey is aged for at
least 10 years through a double barrel process.
Tis rye has received 96 points
from Wine Enthusiast, their high-
est rating ever for a rye whiskey, a
highest recommendation from
Spirits Journal, as well as accolades
from Te Wall Street Journal, GQ,
Forbes, Imbibe Magazine, and
many others. Meanwhile, Barr
Hill Gin near Hardwick recently
received an international award in
Hong Kong as the best gin in the
world. Hard to beat that recom-
mendation! Enjoy responsibly!
Darn Tough Socks,
$20
Finally, somebody made
socks people enjoy receiving.
Darn Tough Socks is a three-
generation-old hosiery business in
Northfeld, Vermont, that special-
izes in making arguably the most
comfortable, most durable, and
best ftting socks in the world.
Featuring high-density knit-
ting (114 stitches per inch!),
quality merino wool and all the
technical specs you expect from a pair of performance socks,
these are lovingly made to last. If you somehow wear out a
pair, send them back to CEO Ric Cabot and hell send you a
replacement. Teyre guaranteed for life!
Worth Skis, $700 - $800
With only four models of skis, Worth is the underdog ski
manufacturer, but this company proves that size isnt every-
thing. Tis staf of three ofers partial custom designs includ-
ing choice of two core construction options, two composite
layup options and customize-able fex to match the feel and
performance of the shape you choose to your individual char-
acteristics and style. Finished with extra-thick edges and the
fnest 4001-sintered base material, these skis are built to take
what the East dishes out. Google them for specs.
Vermont Peanut
Butter
Chris Kaiser has already
been on our radar as the guy
who did for peanut butter what
Ben & Jerrys did for ice cream,
but his latest creation goes
one step further. Forget Gu
or Hammer Gel, this energy
booster is all natural and tastes
a lot better too.
Filson X Burton
Sentry Snowboard
Jacke, $324.95
Tis recent collaboration
between two foremost out-
ftters from the East and
West coasts combines all
the technical features you
expect from an all season-
Burton shell, with a practical and stylish fnish from legend-
ary Filson. No matter the task ranching or running quad
laps this is one jacket to keep you warm and dry.
Holiday
Chocolate
Assortment,
15 pieces, Lake
Champlain
Chocolates, $32
Forget the candy canes and
marzipan these gift boxes
from the Burlington chocolate-
maker are some of the fnest.
Tis set features luxurious favors like Cappuccino, Cham-
pagne, and French Roast as well as traditional favorites like
Hazelnut Praline, Peanut Butter Cup, and Evergreen Mint.
(Tere are lots of smaller local chocolate-makers as well with
some terrifc product. Check out Laughing Moon Chocolates
in Stowe, or
Assorted neckwear, Cerebella
Design, $65
Founded by Middlebury College graduate, Arielle Faber,
these slick options for neckties, bowties and scarves are inspired
by microscopic views of living tissues of plants and animals.
Faber views samples under
a microscope, photographs
what she sees and then con-
verts the image to patterns
she can print onto fabric.
Patterns so far include
tapeworms, starfsh eggs,
frog skin, whale skin, a sec-
tion of human trachea, and
more a surefre conver-
sation starter.
Vermont Holiday Gift Guide
2013
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PAGE 20 VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, DECEMBER 2013
december/january events 2013 december/january events 2013
After a record number of resorts opened by Thanksgiving,
the best of winter 2013/14 is yet to come with events and
promotions around the state for the whole family. While every
resort in Vermont has dozens of activities and events going on
each week, here are some of what we see as the highlights:
DECEMBER
Vermont Holiday Festival at Killington
Dec. 13-14
The 2013 Vermont Holiday Festival meets for two days of holiday
fun and entertainment for all ages. A portion of the proceeds
from the festival will go to the Vermont Foodbank. The Vermont
Chamber of Commerce named the Vermont Holiday Festival a
Top Ten Winter Event in 2010 & a favorite Pick for Kids in 2011.
Opening weekend and
International Womens
Ski Day at Magic Mountain
Dec. 14
Depending on conditions,
SheJumps and the K2 Alliance
begin Magics season with
International Womens Ski
Day. All levels and all ages are
welcome. 3 pm-4:15 pm.
NATO Telemark Primer at
Bromley Mountain
Dec. 14-15
The North American Telemark
Organization will offer
intensive one-day on-snow
technique clinics for beginners
to expert skiers. The Telemark
Primer covers basic Telemark
and cross-country downhill
turns.
Troops Ski and Ride Day
at Jay Peak
Dec. 14
Jay Peak and Q Burke will host
a Troops Ski and Ride Day on
Saturday, December 14. All
active duty personnel and their
immediate family members
will receive a $20 lift ticket
when presenting their military
IDs.
Season Pass holder party at Jay Peak
Dec. 14
Jay Peak honors season pass holders with a complimentary
party, featuring drinks, appetizers and live music. Location:
International Room, 4 PM to 6 PM
Winter Tri #1 at Craftsbury Outdoor Center
Dec. 15
Another winter of Keith Woodward favored multi-sport
madness kicks off on Sunday, 11 am. This event will be run/
bike/ski, at approximate distances of 4/8/6k. In the event of
limited terrain, the run and bike legs may be on dirt.
Killington Test Fest
Dec. 17-18
Killingtons two-day gear expo features over 30 reps touting
the latest gear. The demo area will be open from 9 AM to 4
PM each day.
Demo Day at Mount Snow Resort
Dec. 21
Demo Day at Mount Snow will feature brands with the best
of this seasons hard gear. Registration is at the new demo
center, located at the Cape House. All the demos are free
to try, but a credit card and drivers license are required for
deposit. Once signed up, you can demo any skis from the
reps located in the Main Base Area, at the base of the Blue
Bird Express. Registration and demos for snowboarders will
be outside Backside Snowboards.
Intro To Ski and Ride at Bromley Mountain
Dec. 21
Bromley Ski & Snowboard School in Bromleys newly sculpted
Terrain Based Learning Zone. Package includes a Learning
Zone lift ticket, rental equipment and instruction from 10:30
am to noon. Industry representatives will be available on site
for ski & snowboard deals. Lift ticket and equipment rental
is good all day.
Stateside Hotel Opening Weekend at Jay Peak
Dec. 20-21
Jay Peak celebrates the opening of the new Stateside Hotel
and Day Lodge with two nights of live music, lodging
packages, drink specials and giveaways.
World Snowboarding Day at Okemo Mountain
Resort
Dec. 22
Last year 160 resorts in 37 countries participated in this
yearly tradition. This year, Okemo Mountain Resort will
offer discounted Learn To Ride packages for a day of
snowboarding. Park Rangers will host impromptu contests
all day and distribute free stuff at will. Okemo also will be
offering discounted Learn To Ride packages and free board
demos in our Clocktower snowboard shop. Finally join us at
the summit at 2 PM for a record-breaking snake run.
NENSA Eastern Cup Opening Weekend at Craftsbury
Outdoor Center
Dec. 21-22
For the 4th year in a row, Craftsbury will kickoff off the NENSA
Eastern Cup series with two FIS racesa skate sprint and
classic mass start distance. Saturday, December 21: 1.4k
Skate Sprint with heats. Qualifying round, interval start at
9:30 AM for all categories. Offcial Sprint Heats will begin at
1:00 PM. Awards ceremony at 4:30 PM. Sunday, December
22: Mass Start Classic, racing starts at 10 am with the J2s,
5km; Women, 10k; Men, 15 km; BKL 2k. Note: There will
be a separate optional Masters wave 5 minutes after the
regular start for both the mens and womens races. Awards
ceremony at 2:00 PM.
Okemos Family New Years Eve at Okemo Mountain
Resort
Dec. 31
Midnight arrives early for friends and family enjoying a
whole host of activities.
New Years Eve Celebration and Dog Parade
at Sugarbush Resort
Dec. 31
Bark in the New Year at the 4th Annual Dog Parade with
your canine friend in his/her most festive costume. The $10
registration fee goes towards PAWSitive Pantry. Keep the
night rolling with a New Years Eve Celebration that includes
a torchlight parade,
freworks, live music and
more.
JANUARY
January is Learn to
Ski and Snowboard
Month at Vermont
Resorts
month of January
2014
Beginners get a $29 lift
ticket for the beginner
area, lesson/ and
equipment rental. Some
restrictions apply, must
reserve in advance:
skivermont.com/learn.
Burke Mountain
Academy Winter
Training Camp
Jan. 3-5
Attending athletes ages
12-15 will sleep in the
dorms, eat in the dining
hall, and train on the
BMA Nordic trails.
Athletes will work with
BMA Head Coach Kate
Barton and current BMA
Nordic team members.
Training will include on
snow sessions, indoor gym training, video sessions and
classroom instruction on training methods and practices.
Specialty Food Days at Vermont Resorts
January through April 2014
Sample delicious Vermont food while skiing and riding
Vermont slopes. Ski Vermont, the Agency of Agriculture
and the Vermont Maple Foundation join forces to promote
Vermont specialty foods at area ski resorts. Vermont Specialty
Food Days offer skiers and riders the opportunity to sample
tasty treats from a variety Vermont food companies while
visiting resorts.
College Days at Bolton Valley
midweek from Jan. 1-17
$19 lift tickets for college students.
Bolton After Dark at Bolton Valley
Every Saturday starting in January, 2014
$19 night skiing and riding for all ages, plus $2 fatbread
slices, $2 sodas and draft beer specials. Plus, a free screening
of a ski or snowboard movie.
$30 Thursdays at Mt. Ellen at Sugarbush Resort
Non-holiday Thursdays starting January 9
Ski and ride Thursdays at Mt. Ellen all day for just $30 during
non-holiday periods and then join the aprs party at the
Green Mountain Lounge featuring live music, free appetizers
from local sponsors and beer specials.
BullWheel Bar at Jay Peaks new Stateside Hotel. Photo courtesy of Jay Peak
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VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, DECEMBER 2013 PAGE 21
december/january events 2013 december/january events 2013
Free Alpine Demo Day at the Nordic Barn, Topnotch
Resort & Spa
Jan. 9
Try the latest and greatest alpine equipment free including
any adult high performance ski package or choose skis only.
Mount Ellen 50
th
Celebration at Sugarbush Resort
Jan. 9-12
Mt. Ellen turns 50 this year! Join Sugarbush time-honored Mt.
Ellen customs such as: a 1963 priced ski day on Thursday,
on and off mountain events throughout the weekend and a
traditional Sunday brunch buffet.
Tour De Trapp 30K/15K Skate Marathon (Zak Cup)
at Trapp Family Lodge
Jan. 18
A great season opener for distance racing. The two or four
lap, mass start skate race will occur on a thrilling and newly
updated FIS racecourse.
14th Annual Nationally Sanctioned Ice Carving
Competition at Stowe Mountain Resort
Jan. 25
The countrys best amateur and professional Ice Carvers
compete by creating frozen masterpieces in the Spruce Peak
Plaza at the base of Stowe Mountain Resort.
Wounded Military Heroes Weekend at Bromley
Mountain
Jan. 25-26
The Bart Center for special needs will host the eighth
annual Wounded Military Heroes weekend. This weekend
is dedicated to veterans who have been wounded in action.
Roll Back the Clock Day at Mad River Glen
Jan. 28
The last Tuesday in January is always Roll Back the Clock
Day at Mad River Glen. To celebrate lift ticket prices are
rolled back to the 1948 rate of $3.50.

FEBRUARY
USSMA Sugarbush and Mad River Glen Randonnee
Race
Feb. 2
Join us for one of the biggest and best Randonnee races in
North America, right here in the Mad River Valley.
Free Ladies Winter Adventure Day at the Nordic
Barn, Topnotch Resort & Spa
Feb. 6
Snowshoe or cross country ski adventures with free rentals
and refreshments. Space is limited, reservations required.
Moms Day Off at Bromley Mountain Resort
Feb. 7
Bring a picture of your kid and ski or ride all day for a $15
donation to the Southwestern Vermont Regional Cancer
Center.
The Annual Skier/Border Cross Challenge at Jay
Peak Resort
Feb. 8
Test your skills and agility as you careen at mach speeds
through gates, banked turns and table tops. Open for skiers
and riders of all abilities.
50+ Years of Magic Retro Day at Magic Mountain
Feb. 8
Magic is said to be old school and this is the day to faunt
it on the slopes! There will be aprs ski trivia contests, best
retro outft awards and buffet dinner and dancing to music
since the 60s.
Cloud Nine Nuptials Resort at Mount Snow Resort
Feb. 14
Couples are invited to renew their vows or tie-the-knot for
the frst time at 3,600-feet during Mount Snows Cloud Nine
Nuptials on Valentines Day.
Feb Fest! at Bromley Mountain Resort
Feb. 15
Starting 7p.m. watch a torchlight parade followed by
freworks. Then its dancing in the Wild Boar, the silent
auction, vacation raffe, and dessert tasting in the base
lodge.
Torchlight Parade & Fireworks at Quechee Ski Area
Feb. 16
Participants meet at the base of The Ski Hill, with fashlights,
for a winter dance down the hill. Fireworks and hot chocolate
top the night of festivities.
FamilyFun Winter Carnival at Smugglers Notch
Resort
Feb. 20
Smugglers teams up with FamilyFun magazine to host the
Winter Carnival, an afternoon of games, giveaways, face
painting, music, free barbecue and lots of family fun on the
snow!
Middlebury College Winter Carnival/EISA Ski
Championships at the Snow Bowl
February 21-22, 2014
Dont miss some of the best collegiate skiing in the country as
the Middlebury Panthers take on UVM, Dartmouth, Williams
and other ski powerhouses of the East.
Magic WinterFest 2014 at Magic Mountain
Feb. 22
The biggest winter celebration at Magic with the Black Magic
Extreme Challenge, Alpine Club Silent Auction and aprs ski
party, buffet dinner and Torch Light Parade with freworks!
Triple Crown Unconventional Terrain Competition at
Mad River Glen
Feb. 22
The Mad River Glen Triple Crown Competition Series kicks off
with the Unconventional Terrain Competition. Competitors
are challenged by the Ski It If You Can steeps, cliffs, jumps,
and rocks, as they plunge down the relentless Lift Line course.
Cardboard Box Derby at Quechee Ski Area
Feb. 22
Kids design and build their own cardboard box sleds and
race them for prizes. Creativity abounds in the design of the
participating vessels.
Hope on the Slopes Vertical Challenge at Jay Peak
Resort
Feb. 23
Every foot of vertical you rack up equals dollars going to the
fght against cancer. Fight as a team or on your own.
Stowe Derby at Stowe Mountain Resort
Feb. 23
The Stowe Derby is the oldest and original downhill Cross-
Country race in North America - a race from the top of Mt.
Mansfeld, Vermonts highest peak to the historic village of
Stowe.
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PAGE 22 VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, DECEMBER 2013
By Evan Johnson
An introduction to snow sports at any
age is a thrilling experience and if done
right, can mean the difference between a
skier or rider just for the weekend and a
skier or rider for life.
Kevin Harrington, director of the Mount
Snow Ski School, knows exactly what thats
like.
Ive met people that say, Yeah, I went
skiing once, and I always say, What do
you mean once? So many first experiences
are ruined by bad first experiences.
The image of the hapless brand-new
skier or rider is a fixture at almost every
mountain. Stand at the bottom of the
slope, look up the hill and youll be able
to pick them out; the ones sporting gear
purchased at a yard sale or hunched over
their rental skis, knees together, twisting
and contorting themselves as they struggle
to link turn after turn at what seems like a
painful, crawling pace.
Whats even sadder about these situa-
tions is more often than not the person has
enlisted the help of a family member, friend or significant
other to teach them. Will they want to continue skiing or
riding after a first experience like this? Not often.
Any number of the things wrong with the above image
could have easily been fixed with proper instruction and
Vermont resorts have developed programs to assess and help
everyone from novice to advanced get the most out of their
winter sport of choice be that skiing, riding or Nordic.
Lessons, of course, cost money, and as the cost of skiing
rises, there is the temptation to cut costs.
But the untold story of ski and riding lessons is why they
make economic sense and are, in every way, worth the money
spent.
Novice skiers, novice mistakes
For a novice, small initial mistakes can have an impact on
their success of the lesson. Jeff Spring and Harley Johnson,
Operations Director and Director at the Snow Sport Univer-
sity at Smugglers Notch, respectively, are quick to point out
three mistakes people commonly make that keep
them from having a best possible first experience.
Sometimes its terrain, says Johnson. Its the
classic example of when the guy takes his girl-
friend up Sterling lift (which accesses the most
advanced terrain), thinking hes going to teach
her how to ski. Then it takes them two hours to
get to the bottom and by the time they get down,
their relationship is pretty strained.
Other times, the error is in the equipment
and preparation. Showing up wearing jeans and
a cotton sweatshirt in subzero temperatures can
only make for a miserable day on the hill. Out-
dated or improperly tuned equipment will likely
prove an unnecessary obstacle when learning the
basics, and is also unsafe.
Both skiing and riding emphasize using effi-
cient movements to make turns to control
speed. Using incorrect movements, results in
what Spring describes as the herky-jerk-ies,
where the skier or rider, unaware of how their
body should properly move, does anything from
wildly flailing arms to bizarre positions.
If your back is sore after a day on the snow,
you should probably be in a lesson, he says.
A ski lesson ensures that the skier or rider is on
terrain appropriate for their level and suitable for
the skills the teacher is trying to develop. Instruc-
tors also commonly check students equipment
and clothing to make sure theyre ready for the
day in the snow.
We have one coach that routinely sits down
with his group right at the beginning and checks
the students equipment making sure theyre
only wearing one pair of socks and that
their ski pants arent tucked into the
tops of their boots. Small things like this
can have a big draw on the success of the
students, says Spring.
Importance of teachers
Harrington is quick to embrace the
value of snow sports to families, but just
as quick to issue a word of caution.
Skiing is something you do for the
rest of your life, he says. Its multi-gen-
erational, something that you can really
do together with your kids that they
can continue to share But dont try
to teach anyone you love or care about.
It may sound callous, but as he
explains, it means a world of difference
in the experience of the students.
As parents, we rush it because we
always want to move faster than they
do, he explains. When you learn
from friends or family, the patience isnt
always there.
Spring agrees. With parents, [kids]
have routines and expected behaviors and they come with
those expectations a little more readily when the parent is the
one teaching the lesson, he says. Those expectations can
mean any number of things, and many of them arent good
for teaching a new sport like skiing or riding.
Theres always an element of fear that comes with learn-
ing, Spring says. And that fear can manifest itself in differ-
ent ways. They may not have fallen before in this kind of situ-
ation and some of the movements that we commonly make
can be scary. The teachers job is to get the fear out [of the
equation].
An instructor often has more experience in helping stu-
dents confront those anxieties and there is a different kind
of a dynamic between teacher and student. Having someone
unfamiliar be the teacher puts a student in a different mindset
where they are more receptive to the material the teacher is
providing.
Harrington uses his own daughter as an example.
At the age of three, she spent her first experiences on skis in
the programs at Mount Snow Ski School, practicing moving
in ski boots, getting used to the sensation of wearing and get-
ting around in skis and easing her way down gentle slopes.
Her introduction to the sport, he says, was done gradually
by teachers who know the sport and how different kinds of
students learn at different ages.
Now, at the age of four, when she rides up the lift with her
dad and follows him the whole way down, people ask what
his secret is.
I tell them every time ski lessons. It was nothing I did,
he says.
Smuggs Johnson says when she skis with her own kids,
she doesnt have to remind them to turn or to stay in control
theyve learned proper technique and trail etiquette from
their lessons.
Also, while the kids receive the help and instruction they
need, parents can focus on their own skiing.
At Stratton Mountain, Ian Bruso has been working in the
ski industry for nearly 20 years and meddling in the summer-
time frustration known as golf for the past four years. After
taking golf lessons, Bruso says he began to see a difference in
his game, and how much the old habits he created when he
was hacking away still affected his performance.
Bruso says its the same way with learning to ski.
Why ski lessons are the best bargain
Learning right early on can reap big rewards; works for parents, too
(See Ski Lessons, page 23)
Ski instructors at Mount Snow get the day started.
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VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, DECEMBER 2013 PAGE 23
ski lessons
GROCERY
MEATS AND SEAFOOD
beer and wine
DELICATESSEN
Take-out convenience
BAKERY PIZZA CATERING
VT PRODUCTS MAPLE SYRUP
802-422-7736 Deli 422-7594
www.killingtonmarket.com
Open daily 6:30am.
2023 Killington Rd.
BREAKFAST, LUNCH
& DINNER
to-go
Killingtons On-Mountain
Grocery Store
A
T
M
Formerly JohnnyBoys Pancake House
Same Great Breakfast Menu Same Great Breakfast Menu
MTN BREAKFAST
eggs
served any way you like
our famous 3 egg omelette
3 EGGS, SERVED WITH HOME FRIES & TOAST
Add: Home-made Corned Beef Hash, VT sausage/bacon, Canadian Bacon, Taylor Pork
VERMONT-style FRENCH TOAST,
BELGIAN WAFFLEs
All served with Pure Vermont Maple Syrup
PANCAKES
Buttermilk or Multigrain or Pumpkin
WITH ANY COMBINATION of Blueberries, Strawberries, Bananas, Cranberry Walnut,
Coconut Almond, and even Peanut Butter & Chocolate Chip
Daily BackCountry Specials
BREAKFAST SANDWICHES,
WRAPS AND BURRITOS
**COFFEE BY LOCAL
VERMONT ROASTERS**
BackCountry Tavern
stayed tuned to Mountain Times
OPEN 7:30 A.M.
923 KILLINGTON RD. 802-422-4411
But if that sounds like too much of a sale,
lets do some math: A full-day ski lesson for
a 7-14 year old at Mount Snow costs $99.
This, plus the cost of a youth full-mountain
lift ticket ($65) brings the total before taxes
or applicable discounts or offers to $164
dollars.
But often, the price of a lift ticket is
included in lesson prices. An adult lesson at
Stratton, for example, costs $99 midweek and
includes the cost of a lift ticket.
Letting us be the teacher allows the family
to have that family relationship, Johnson
says. Parents can relax and develop their own
skiing while their kids progress. If the family
constantly has to buy day lift passes and works
on the same skills every time, they may not see
the progress they want.
A lesson is a one-time purchase and when
the student completes the lesson, theyll have
a number of things that they can work on and
improve on their own time (instructors will
tell them). The alternative is to continually
buy lift tickets in order to work on the sport
often remaining at the same ability level
for years.
Great Incentives
This year, a number of attractive packages
have been developed at resorts throughout
the state to bring in new skiers. Here are two
examples:
Sugarbushs First-Timer to Life-Timer Pro-
gram includes a three-lesson series over three
days, which includes lift tickets for all three
days and equipment rental. The program,
which comes with a free season pass for the
remainder of the 2013-2014 winter season,
costs $255. The resort has been offering this
special deal for the past several years with
great success and participation in the program
continues to rise year after year.
Our First-Timer to Life Timer Program
is one of our more popular programs, says
Candice White, Vice President of Marketing
and Communications at Sugarbush. When a
person is just starting in the sport, the stakes
are extremely high. This program has been
demonstrated to be popular with beginner
skiers of all ages.
White cites two testimonials that speak vol-
umes about the value of lessons.
Paul was a first time skier who started
skiing with his new wife. He was 64, she was
younger and neither had skied before. They
signed up for the First-Timer-to-Life-Timer
Program and wrote to chief executive of Sug-
arbush, Win Smith, after their stay:
I must tell you just how successful you
have been in making me into a late blooming
skier, he wrote. I simply have fallen in love
with it.... I dont know whether I like skiing
because Im picking it up pretty fast, or if Im
picking it up so well because I like it so much.
Either way, Im now a skier for life, and I
believe that I have you and your program to
thank....
Carter was a 30-year-old who decided to
try snowboarding for the first time. He wrote
to Smith and said the patient instruction of a
teacher made a huge difference in his ability
to improve. Your staff was just as excited as
I was to be there, he wrote, and even more
so to see another person who was brand new
wanting to learn the sport.
Meanwhile at Killington, the resort has
launched a four-day adult Learn To Ski pack-
age this year. The package includes a two-hour
lesson, rental equipment and lift ticket each of
the four days. Upon completion, participants
will receive a new pair of Killington Resort
branded Elan eRise skis and bindings (MSRP
$499) along with a discount voucher for new
boots and poles. Participants also will receive
50 percent off all lift tickets and lessons for
the remainder of the 2013-14 season and all
of the 2014-15 season. The four lessons do
not need to be consecutive and are valid any
day during the 2013-14 winter season. The
package costs $249.
In the long-term these programs are going
to make sure youre not only getting a good
introduction to the sport, but youre also
more likely to stick with it.
Theres more to skiing than just turning
right and left, says Strattons Ian Bruso. The
lesson gives you the opportunity to set up
yourself for your first real experience with the
sport. The goal isnt just to develop your skills,
its about developing the relationship with the
sport that will endure for hopefully as long as
possible.
Flashing a smile at Okemo Mountain, a hallmark of ski instructors.
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PAGE 24 VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, DECEMBER 2013
BY EVAN JOHNSON
WEST DOVER At the top of Hogback
Mountain, if you look hard enough, you just
might be able to catch a glimpse of history.
In 1946, Hogback Mountain opened as
the biggest little area in New England with
500 feet vertical rise, four T-bars and one
Pomalift. Lift tickets were $4.
Today, the trails are overgrown with
young trees and the lift towers stand idle and
rusting. Further southeast, near Brattleboro,
it is a similar scene in the parking lot of
what had been Maple Valley, with a massive
A-frame lodge sitting empty in front of
wide-open slopes.
Tere are more than 100 abandoned,
canceled or defunct ski resorts in Vermont.
Closed for reasons ranging from fnancial
insolvency to lack of snow, many are relics of
a bygone era and most are doomed to decay.
Miles away in West Dover, next door to
Mount Snow Resort, trucks grumble uphill
to the foot of Haystack Mountain hauling
tons of concrete, lumber, roofng materials
and equipment for installing electrical and
plumbing infrastructure. In progress is a $31
million re-development of a once defunct ski
area.
Slated for completion this coming
February, Te Hermitage Club hopes to
bring new visitors and their money to
the Deerfeld Valley as Vermonts premier
private club. Te 80,000-square-foot base
lodge, two-lane lap pool, movie theater,
gym, teen recreation headquarters, 1,500
lockers, salon and spa can all be yours for a
membership fee of $65,000, starting when
the club opens next year.
What were providing is something thats
really not available anywhere else. Its really
that simple, says Jim Barnes, founder and
president of the club. Te people who are
joining are really falling in love with skiing
all over again.
Barnes noted that interest in the club is
from people who have been skiing the
Northeast and theyre used to crowded
lodges, food [thats] not great, huge lines
and skied of conditions in a half hour,
particularly in states other than Vermont
and closer to urban centers. Te clientele of
the Hermitage Club clearly want a diferent
skiing experience.
Owner Barnes frst skied Haystack while
on trips through his elementary school,
visiting other area resorts on weekend
outings. One of the frst times he visited the
Hermitage Inn on Handle Road was on a
snowy day with the woman who would later
be his wife.
She was a teacher and it was a snow
day, he recalls. I called her and I said, I
know youre not working today. Want to go
snowmobiling in Vermont?
Te two rode through the woods to the
inn for lunch.
Barnes bought the Hermitage Inn in
2007 from then-owner Jim McGovern and
proceeded to develop the area, gradually
buying real estate when it became available
and developing private homes. In 2011,
he had the chance to purchase Haystack
Mountain and the adjacent golf course. He
jumped at it.
It made sense for us because people
believed in the product and service that
we delivered, he says. Its a four star
accommodation and when we decided to do
this club and do it right, people believed in
us.
At the presentation of the Clubs master
plan in August, Barnes said he hopes to take
in 1,500 more members over the next four
years, with 200 to 300 new members every
year. Te Hermitage Club had 30 members
the frst year and 200 the next. Barnes says
400 members are signed up for this season.
Te club has also bought 55 town-owned
lots on the East Tract and High Peaks areas.
Tis real estate is expected to give access to
the nearby Deerfeld Valley Airport, where
weekly service fights from Teterboro,
N.J., and Westchester, N.Y., will begin in
December.
AN UNPRECEDENTED CONCEPT
Originally opened in the 1960s as an
alternative to crowded ski areas, Haystack
marketed itself as the upscale sister resort to
Mount Snow, located along the same ridge.
In 1991, S-K-I Ltd., then-owner of Mount
Snow, bought Haystack. Te two were never
connected other than a Nordic ski trail across
the ridge and S-K-I Ltd. would later merge
with LBO Enterprises, to form the American
Ski Company in 1996.
As the American Ski Company lost its grip
on the regions ski industry in the late 1990s
and into the new millennium, operations at
Haystack were scaled back. Starting in 2001,
the mountain was only open for weekend
and holiday periods. In 2007, in a wave of
sell-ofs, the American Skiing Company sold
both Mount Snow and Haystack; Mount
Snow, along with New Hampshire resort
Attitash, were sold for $73.5 million to
Peak Resorts International while Haystack
went for $5 million to a group of investors
organized as Tyringham Ridge Inc. on the
condition that it be developed into a private
resort.
Initial membership sales were slow, but
Resurrecting Haystack Mtn.
Hermitage Inn owner takes ski area on a new venture
The former Haystack ski area, which sits just down the ridge from Mount Snow Resort, has a few great runs for a mid-size mountain, particularly on its
steeper backside.
Photo provided
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VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, DECEMBER 2013 PAGE 25
the stock market crash in 2008 brought
them to a screeching halt. Te mountain sat
untouched for two winters until 2011, when
Jim Barnes acquired the Haystack Club for
$6.5 million.
Jeremy Davis, curator of the New England
Lost Ski Area Project which is dedicated to
compiling the history of ski areas since the
twentieth century, says the idea of creating a
private club can be a good one, particularly
if the area has been historically unable to
compete with nearby areas that draw larger
numbers.
Tere are these areas that are caught in
the middle that are too big to close and too
small to be open. Haystack was kind of in
the middle of that. It was right next to a
huge resort and never really ran on its own.
Sometimes having a private owner come in
and refurbish it and make it private for the
owners or guests is the only way the place
would ever be open again.
With Mount Snow just up the road and
Stratton a little further beyond that, a private
resort at the smaller Haystack could prove
worthwhile. But he says the development of
small, closed areas being reopened for private
ownership, is a rare phenomenon.
Davis says he wishes all resorts could stay
open to the public, but says hes also realistic.
Its better to have an area operating than
have it closed up and abandoned, he says,
noting that the opportunity to redevelop is a
risk that few are willing to take.
BIG VENTURES
Barnes, however, is no stranger to risk and
big ventures.
In 1995, he started his frst company,
Oakleaf Waste Management, with just
$40,000 in capital. Since that beginning,
the company took on national customers
like Wal-Mart, Target, General Electric and
United Technologies with sales approaching
$700 million annually.
In 2004, he purchased from the ENRON
bankruptcy the facilities management
company rebranded as FM Facility
Maintenance and expanded it to become
the largest integrated facilities maintenance
contractor in the country, ofering over 45
trades of service ranging from plumbing
and electrical to air conditioning, signage
and pest control to every corporate-owned
McDonalds, Burger King, 7-Eleven, Exxon
Mobil and Outback Steak House in North
America. Barnes sold the company in 2011
to its largest competitor, Waste Management.
With that money in hand, a love afair
with the area and new-found time, Barnes
embarked on the project.
OTHER SKI AREA COMEBACKS?
Jeremy Davis at NELSAP says he fnds
the Haystack concept similar to that of the
intended club at what had been Round Top
Ski area, which opened in 1965, just south
of Killington. It closed after fve years and
was bought and subsequently renamed Bear
Creek in 1997.
Te area sufered the same efects of the
real estate market slump in 2009, and
closed before construction of a snowmaking
development could commence. A group of
developers who intended to build it into
a private resort titled Plymouth Notch
bought it in 2010, but the area sufered
signifcant damage in 2011 from Tropical
Storm Irene and the area has been closed
since.
At another formerly defunct ski area,
this one in Winhall, Vt., a public meeting
was held in August to discuss the potential
reopening of Snow Valley a local ski hill
that operated from 1938 until 1982 as
a gated community. Current plans call for
the refurbishment of the ski area, including
reclaiming fve trails following the original
trail design, a multi-purpose building at
the summit, and a ski patrol building at
the bottom. A helipad (reportedly for ski
patrol) is also planned. No snowmaking or
night skiing is planned, and the 1977 Borvig
double chairlift is to be refurbished, rather
than replaced.
In November, Ascutney Mountain Resort,
which had been closed since 2010 due to
bankruptcy, was sold at auction for $1.5
million. Te sale is still pending litigation
and will be fnalized by the end of the
month. No word publicly as to what the
buyers intend do with the property.
Meanwhile, other areas have taken a
diferent route to keeping skiers on the trails:
Some areas, like Cochrans and Northeast
Slopes have moved in the nonproft direction.
Mount Eustis in Littleton, N.H., had been
one of the hundreds of lost ski resorts until
October 1, 2013, when it reopened as a
nonproft ski area.
Te space for development both the
nonproft and for-proft models is certainly
available, but Barnes says he remains
unconvinced as to whether more private clubs
like the Hermitage are likely to be on the way.
Te Hermitage Club alone has required
massive amounts of capital to get it to where
it currently stands, he notes, and thats a rare
luxury. Te money Barnes has invested as
well as that of the areas previous owner
has put a massive operation into place and
as his fulltime job, he works seven days a
week, making sure his latest investment goes
according to plan. To create that same amount
of momentum at another time at another
place would be a massive task.
Te decision to develop, he says, has to be
a prudent one, one that cant be taken lightly.
Its not easy convincing people that youre
going to do all these things until you actually
do them, he says. Fortunately for me, my
track record has proven I follow through
what I project. Until you actually do it again,
no one really believes you.
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PAGE 26 VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, DECEMBER 2013
How to buy the best ski boots? Ask a pro
Better Bootftters of America know their stuff and get to know your feet
BY EVAN JOHNSON
Buying your ski boots is not like buying a pair of loaf-
ers, and you dont want a ski shop in a giant mall to say
that it is.
But how can you be certain the ski boot youre trying on
will ft snug as a glove a year from now, still feel good, and
do its job on the hill holding
your foot frmly and ground-
ing your ski to the snow?
Its a question many
people had sought to answer
and like a few other great
ideas, an answer came while
sitting in a hot tub.
Te story goes like this:
In 1994, Steven Cohen, then
managing editor at Ski Maga-
zine, was relaxing in a Jacuzzi
with some buddies at Deer
Valley. On the fight West
a few hours earlier, Cohen
had seen an ad in the in-
fight magazine for accredited
steakhouses.
Simultaneously, we had also been seeing ads for all
these shops that said they specialized in boots and bootft-
ting, he said in a recent interview with Ski & Ride, bring-
ing the conversation back to the tub. We started thinking,
wouldnt it be great if shops could be accredited as well?
Te solution was a no-brainer and the beneft for skiers,
they realized, could be huge.
Great steak, good boot ft, what more could you ask
for? he jokes.
Enter Americas Best Bootftters, an international orga-
nization of top independent ski shops that specialize in
custom bootftting. Bootftters certifed by ABB are good
at what they do, meaning theyre not just going to throw
a pair at you and send you on your way theyre gong to
make sure the boots they ft you with are suited to your
needs and abilities.
Americas Best Bootftters ofers four levels
of certifcation through the afliated Master
Fit University at clinics in Europe, Austra-
lia and the United States. Te levels range
in their depth, going from the fundamen-
tals all the way to what Cohen calls the
dark arts. Depending on their experi-
ence, participants work on ftting one
another and experiment with ftting
and manipulating the boot shell.
Cohen says the point is for students
to see the range of possibilities in
boot customization.
Its like crash test dummies,
he says. Until you push it to the
max, you dont know what can be
done.
Every spring, on the slopes
of Mount Bachelor, Oregon,
ABB tests the next seasons boots
in one of the most organized,
extensive and rigorous tests in
the world, featuring boots from
every major alpine boot manu-
facturer. Last year, 60 diferent
testers performed a minimum
of eight tests on 250 pairs of
boots in 12 days.
Any schmo can test skis,
he says. You click in and go ski for a few runs. But boot
testing is like putting together a puzzle. You have to be
willing to ski through some discomfort to know how the
boot is going to perform.
In addition to fnding the seasons best, ABB also mon-
itors the industry. Massive brands like Tecnica, Dalbello,
Head, and Atomic continue to domi-
nate, but Cohen says there have been
more brands introduced in the past
four to fve years than there were in all
the 80s and 90s.
Before then, he says, the market was
stagnant.
Every couple years, it seemed like
someone else was calling it quits, he
says.
Today, with the widespread popu-
larity of injection molding, smaller
companies are able to establish a foot-
hold and continue to build momen-
tum.
But Cohen says the jurys out on
whos got the staying power.
Cohen admits he does a good deal
of talking the talk of bootftting, but says the bootftters
themselves are the real sources.
**********
Maurie Geake has been ftting boots for 10 years and
presently fts boots at Te Boot Pro in Ludlow, Vt. Geake
says proper ftting starts and ends with the customer, more
specifcally, the customers feet. Te bootftter starts by
measuring all dimensions of the foot, the height, width,
instep height (the tallest point in the foot), dorsal fex-
ion (ability to fex the toes upward toward the shin) and
then they take into consideration any previous injuries the
client may have had.
Its a process that requires as much nuance as technical
skill, and equal parts salesmanship and customer support.
Geake says even though the shop moves a fair amount
of volume, bootftters attention to detail remains con-
stant.
We do our own in-house training and we go over the
stuf that you run into every day. A lot
of the time its very by-the-book, but
theres going to be something every
time that sets them apart. If you
want a pair of boots you can go to
any shop, but if you want to be ftted,
go to someone who knows boots.
Like all footwear, new boots are going
to need to be broken in. Right out of
the box, they will feel stif or tight, but
that, as guys like Geake will tell you, is no
reason to despair.
Of course, youre still going to have
to do the hard work, yourself, Geake says.
And that can take a varying amount of
time, depending on how often and how
aggressively you ski.
An aggressive skier who
skis frequently might break
in a pair of boots in fve
or six days, Geake
says, but a novice
to moderate skier
will take up to
ten. During that
time, he says, the
ft will change as
the
l i n e r s
become com-
pacted.
Were ftting it to feel perfect when
[the boots] are broken-in, he says.
Once a customer has picked out a pair of boots, any
number of customizations is possible to make those boots
ft and perform their best.
**********
Hal Karabots, bootftter at Northern Ski Works in
Killington, took his own pair of Lange boots and heated
and stretched the toe box to allow for more room, inserted
an arch-supporting insole, and expanded the shell around
the ankle to obviate pressure points or painful hot spots
where blisters can develop.
Karabots insists these kinds of customization are more
than just enthusiastic tinkering they make sense.
While the market for boots is very diverse, were talk-
ing about much more variance in peoples feet, he says.
To think that one kind of boot is going to ft thousands
of people perfectly just wouldnt work.
Of course, some prefer to take that concern for ft and
performance one step further. Skiing at Magic Mountain
presents Geake with diferent terrain and he likes to have
the right boots for the job.
Geake personally uses three diferent pairs of boots: a
pair of Atomic Redsters, a pair of Lange RS 110s, and a
third pair by Full Tilt. Each pair performs diferently, and
each is customized to ft his feet perfectly, he says. While
cruising the glades, he prefers the Langes but the stifer
and more aggressive Atomics are for carving wide, giant
slalom turns.
Tey give you that extra performance, he says. But
you have to work harder for it.
Te Full Tilt boots feature original, three-piece con-
struction and a custom liner ftted not only to his foot, but
the interior of the shell. Teyre not just anyones boots;
theyre completely his own.
**********
For the rest of us who prefer a more moderate approach,
Steven Cohen at Masterft Inc. has three cardinal rules for
the best possible boot ft:
1. Wear only one pair of socks
2. Dont tuck the cuf of your pants into the top
of the boot
3. Dont buy your boots too big
Cohen also says its important to know when its time
to retire a pair of boots, and to gradually transition into
your next pair. He keeps a piece of a broken pair of Munari
boots from the early 80s next to his desk as a reminder
after seeing them literally fall apart.
Im transitioning into my next pair, he says. I dont
plan on waiting as long as that guy did.
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VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, DECEMBER 2013 PAGE 27
Come Home To The Heart Of Stowe
Mountain Rd., Stowe 800-253-2232 www.stoweflake.com
150 Spa
Treatments
Aprs Ski Nightly
If youre looking for a way to stretch your
budget on ski outings this winter, most Ver-
mont resorts ofer money-saving packages
that combine lodging with on-mountain
experiences and create unique incentives and
discounts for groups, families and individu-
als.
Heres a resort-by-resort preview of how
you can save dollars this winter when hitting
the slopes.
Bolton Valley: Ski and stay packages in
the slopeside Inn at Bolton Valley start at
just $84 per person. Package includes ski-to-
your-door lodging, lift tickets, breakfast, and
unlimited use of the on-site Sports Center,
including indoor pool, sauna and hot tub.
Every Monday is 50/50 Monday and folks
age 50+ can take 50 percent of All Access
Lift Tickets. On Saturdays, enjoy Bolton
After Dark where night lift tickets are just
$19 and fatbread slices are only $2.
Bromley Mountain: Bromley.com is a
good source for catching special one-time
deals on the cash saving e-coupons, plus
Family Fridays this winter allow each paying
adult to purchase kids lift tickets for just $15
per kid. For a full list of deals at Bromley
Mountain visit www.bromley.com.
Jay Peak Resort: You would think that after
investing over $300 million in new hotels,
chairlifts, an ice arena, an indoor waterpark,
snowmaking equipment, restaurants, pubs, a
Nordic Center and a spa, things at Jay Peak
would be a bit pricey, no? Wellno. Last year
the resort dropped the price of its single-day
lift ticket to $65, and this season a family of
four will be able to ski and stay in the Hotel
Jay for just $359/night. Want to add in daily
access to the Pump House Indoor Waterpark
in addition to the lift tickets? Tat same family
is just $429/night.
Killington Resort: Killington Resort
launches a 4-day adult Learn To Ski pack-
age for $249 that includes a two-hour lesson,
rental equipment and lift ticket each of the
four days. Upon completion, participants
will receive a new pair of Killington Resort
branded Elan eRise skis and bindings (MSRP
$499) along with a discount voucher for new
boots and poles.
Participants also will receive 50 percent of
all lift tickets and lessons for the remainder of
the 2013-14 season and all of the 2014-15
season. Te four lessons do not need to be
consecutive and are valid any day during the
2013-14 winter season.
Mad River Glen: Te Ski Te Valley+ Pass-
port lets you ski Mad River Glen, Sugarbush
and Oles Cross XC anytime, on this exclusive
universal passport. Its available in 2-7 day
packages for adults and children with addi-
tional values throughout your stay at valley
restaurants, attractions and activities. And did
you know kids under 12 can get a free season
pass with the purchase of a Family Mad Card
or any adult season pass? Yup, but it has to be
purchased by mid-October of each year. If you
missed it this year, plan ahead for 2014. Keep
abreast of Mad River Glens on-line ticket
deals at madriverglen.com.
Magic Mountain: Magics Holiday White-
Out Pass allows you to ski during the most
popular holidays for less. Enjoy 20 days of
holiday skiing for only $279. To save before
the season starts, check out the Unrestricted
3-Pack for $139. It provides 3 lift tickets, good
anytime, and is 100% transferable.
Mount Snow Resort: Sneak away midweek
and enjoy a day of skiing and a night of lodg-
ing at the resort for about the cost of a one
day adult lift ticket. Te Ski and Stay Pack-
age is just $85 per person, based on double
occupancy at Snow Lake Lodge.
Okemo Mountain Resort: Okemos new
partnership with Killington, Pico and Suna-
pee Mountain resort, called 4.0 Te College
Pass, is one of the best priced college passes
anywhere in the country. Available to all full-
time college students, the season pass is just
$369 and is valid every day of the season
with no blackout dates at all four resorts.
Quechee Ski Area: Te Friday Solution is
$25 adult lift tickets and $20 childrens lift
tickets. Both include $5 lunch vouchers at
the Quechee Base Lodge. Quechee Ski Area
also has a family season pass for a family of
four for just $625.
Smugglers Notch Resort: Smugglers
Learn-to-Ski-or-Snowboard Week on Jan.
5-12, 2014, includes free rental equipment
and group lessons for guests staying three
nights or longer on the resorts ski and stay
package. Entry and beginner level skiers or
riders are invited to learn to ski or ride for
$119 per night for adults and $89 per night
for children 3-17 years old.
Stowe Mountain Resort: For a truly one-
of-a-kind experience this winter, visit Stowe
Mountain Lodge and enjoy the Spa and
Wellness Center with Spa & Stay packages
that include luxury accommodations and a
50-minute massage per night, per adult.
PIZZERIA & LOUNGE
1899 MOUNTAIN ROAD, STOWE PIECASSO.COM 253.4411
SLICES CREATIVE ENTRES LIVE MUSIC LUNCH TRIVIA NIGHT
GLUTEN-FREE MENU RAW BAR HEALTHY KIDS MENU
CRAFT BEERS GAME ROOM DELIVERY
BEST LUNCH BEST RESTAURANT, IF YOURE PAYING
BEST PIZZA RESTAURANT & BEST DELIVERY
2013 SEVEN DAYSIES WINNERS
Day tickets from $6.50, lessons deals, top the bargains
For statewide deals at resorts,
here are three to remember:
1. January is Learn to Ski and Snowboard Month: New to snow sports?January is Learn
to Ski and Snowboard month, where Vermont alpine resorts ofer beginner programs for
just $29!Te package includes a beginner lift ticket, rentals and a lesson by a professional
ski or snowboard instructor.Visit www.skivermont.com/learn in December for details.
2. Fifth Grade Passport: Fifth graders ski for free!When is a better time to fall in love
with winter in the mountains than when youre 10-11 years old?Te Fifth Grade Passport
is a great gateway to the slope with proceeds going to Keep Local Farms, a non-proft
organization dedicated to connecting consumers with healthy, locally food grown and
supporting local dairy and food farmers.
3. Ski Vermont: Check In to Win: Ski Vermonts check in program rewards you for
skiing around the state and getting social. Track your turns at diferent Vermont resorts via
Alpine Replay to be eligible to win free lift tickets! For more info, go to: Skivermont.com/
checkin.
Stratton Mountain Resort: Lodg-
ing packages at Stratton include the One-
Nighter with a night of lodging and two days
on the slopes for the time-strapped skier and
rider. Or get the long weekend getaway that
adds a free day of skiing or riding with three
nights lodging. You can also get two nights
of midweek lodging free with the purchase
of a three-day lift ticket, and sign up for the
popular Kids Stay Free packages, available
early season and during select peak periods.
Sugarbush Resort: Starting January 9,
2014, in celebration of Mount Ellens 50
th

anniversary, you can ski Mount Ellen for just
$30 every Tursday (non-holiday). And on
Jan. 9, prices revert to 1963 for one day at
just $6.50! For more deals and packages, go
to Sugarbush.com.
Suicide Six and Woodstock Inn &
Resort: Woodstock Inn guests ski free
midweek, non-holiday with complimentary
lift tickets at Suicide Six, complimentary trail
fees at the Nordic Center, and discounted
rentals at both locations. Children 14 &
under staying at the Woodstock Inn receive
complimentary lift tickets 7 days a week,
non-holiday.
Trapp Family Lodge: Visit www.trap-
pfamily.com for details on special deals and
season passes.
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PAGE 28 VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, DECEMBER 2013
For a skier or snowboarder looking for an
authentic Vermont experience, there is no
better venue to explore.
The Middlebury College Snow Bowl is the
3
rd
oldest ski area in the state, with the rst
trails cut in 1934. With a legacy steeped in col-
legiate racing as well as a cozy family-friendly
attitude, the Snow Bowl feels like a home
away from home and is lled with memories
and tradition.
Rikert Nordic Center is situated at Middle-
bury Colleges beautiful Breadloaf Campus,
just down the road from the Snow Bowl. With
42 kilometers of trails as well as ve kilometers
of snow blowing, and some of the most pic-
turesque rolling hills in the Green Mountains
Rikert is an incredible gift not to be missed.
Blueberry Hill is a backcountry ski desti-
nation in Addison County with over 40 years
of history. Located in the remote Moosalamoo
National Recreation Area of the Green Moun-
tains and with over 70 kilometers of trails,
skiers can nd a genuine sense of calmness
and quiet at this classic site. Blueberry Hill
Inn is located onsite and offers a healthy relief
from the typical bustle of life.
Middlebury village bustles with unique
shops, locally run and sourced restaurants,
high quality theater and live performances, and
character-lled inns, offering a balance to the
outdoor adventures planned for winter.
Addison County is quickly building a repu-
tation around locally-made and internationally
recognized craft beer, wine and spirits. Otter
Creek Brewery along with Shed, Wolavers,
and Long Trail make their home in Middle-
bury, as does Vermont Hard Cider and the
Drop In Brewery.
Lincoln Peak and Shoreham Vineyards are
two local wine producers in the county, and
Champlain Orchards is another neighbor craft-
ing hard and iced cider from locally grown
apples. Whistle Pig whiskey touts itself as one
of the nest whiskeys in the world and makes
its start on the farm in Shoreham.
Drop -In Brewing
610 Route 7 South, Middlebury, VT
802-989-7414
www.dropinbrewing.com
Tasting Room & Growler Shop
Middleburys authenic charm
For more information about Middlebury
contact the Better Middlebury Partnership
802-388-4126
www.bettermiddleburypartnership.com
info@bettermiddleburypartnership.com
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VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, DECEMBER 2013 PAGE 29
Fire & Ice Restaurant
reandicerestaurant.com 26 Seymour St. Middlebury, VT 802.388.7166
VERMONTS LARGEST SALAD BAR
HAND-CUT STEAKS
FRESH SEAFOOD
SLOW ROAST PRIME RIB
VEGAN/VEGETARIAN OFFERINGS
GLUTEN -FREE MENU AVAILABLE
DAILY DRINK SPECIALS
KIDS MENU
Vermonts Destination Dinner House
Located at the Breadloaf Campus, Rt 125 in Ripton, VT
802-443-2744 rikertnordiccenter@middlebury.edu
Open 7days a week 8:30 - 4:30, November March
Cross Country Skiing
Snowshoeing
Snow Bike Rental
Pulk Rental
Day Passes
Snowmaking on 5km
Private lessons
Group lessons
PSIA Instructors
Join Us!
Rikertnordic.com
www.middleburysnowbowl.com
Te Snow Bowl has some
of the best skiing
& riding in the state!
500+ acres of trails, glades &
woods with a border-to-
border all-access terrain
policy
Lowest day rates to be found
weekday passes only $30
Family-friendly atmosphere
includes FREE access to our
Sunkid Wonder Carpet, a
cozy lodge with wireless inter-
net, great food, and warm
drinks.
Come visit Vermonts 3rd
oldest ski area and learn why
the Snow Bowl is beloved to
all who know it!
Middlebury goes mobile
Featuring all of
Addison Countys nest
Restaurants & Shops
Events & Attractions
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Nearby Locations

Go with it!
or, with any
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PAGE 30 VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, DECEMBER 2013
A new exhibit that
documents the story of
six friends following their
passion for snowboard-
ing and in the process
helped propel the fedging
sport into an international
phenomenon opened in
October at the Vermont Ski
& Snowboard Museum in
Stowe and will be featured
through the winter and
summer.
A celebration helped kick
of the exhibits opening on
Oct. 4, which focuses on
the founding members of
VTSP. Friends and family
were on hand as members
of the posse were inducted
into the Hall of Fame.
Inducted were: Jef Brushie,
Cole, Bouchett, Josh
Brownlee, Matt Lawrence,
Greg Manning and Kris
Swierz. Each contributed
artifacts and photographs
from their personal archives
as part of the exhibit.
Museum Board mem-
bers Lance Violette and Todd Kohlman organized the event
and the exhibit, and for me, a novice snowboarder, the evening
confrmed a statement that Violette made in his introduc-
tion: Snowboarding is about friends and forming bonds
with the people you ride with.
Here is the inductees remarkable story:
Today, they would reverently be referred to as outli-
ers, yet three decades ago, the individuals who pioneered
snowboarding in the Green Mountains were, for the most
part, considered outcasts. Te handful of hills that wel-
comed these non-conformists became ground zero for a
movement that would eventually be celebrated for saving
the winter sports industry.
In 1985, a group of high school students from north-
ern Vermont saw advertisements for snowboards in their
BMX and skateboarding magazines and soon started
schussing the toboggan hills and golf courses of the Cham-
plain Valley standing sideways on shred sleds.
Once resorts like Straton, Sugarbush, Jay Peak, Stowe
and Bolton Valley opened their doors to riders, this pas-
time transitioned into a lifestyle and a brotherhood was
born. To many in the alpine establishment the accep-
tance of snowboarding was largely probationary. From
the liftline to the cafeteria to the cat track launches that
provided the sought after opportunity to get some air,
every riders actions were scrutinized and the only respite
from this judgment came from ones fellow snowboard-
ers.
Inspired by the Mount Baker Hardcore on the West
Coast, one of the group, Josh Brownlee, hand drew Ver-
mont Slope Posse, a moniker that merged hip-hop with
riding, on sweatshirts and the crew forever had their
colors.
Other lettermen joining Josh to fll out the VTSP ranks
were Cole Bouchett, Matt Lawrence, Greg Manning,
Kris Swierz and Jef Brushie. Traveling up and down
Route 100, the VTSP became renowned for their tech-
nical skills and new school style. Te crews fame soon
spread across New England and eventually the world on
the pages of International Snowboard Magazine, Tran-
sworld Snowboarding and Snowboarder Magazine.
In addition to consistently having a presence on the
podium at the US Open, the New England Cup and the
PSTA Pro Tour, the VTSP alongside four-time US
Open Champion Andy Dog Coghlan held several camps
a year at resorts like Killington, Bromley and Bolton, in turn
intimately raising the level of local riding talent beyond their
core group.
Putting words and letters together made the VTSPs ties
something tangible. Tough snowboarding is a personal
endeavor, it is also a social one. Just as the Vermont Slope Posse
and Te Mount Baker Hardcore acknowledged the common
ground they shared with their on-hill community, by creating
close-knit cliques future generations of snowboarders would
also band together as witnessed
by Te Farmington Crew, Te
SFK, Te Frends, Te Gren-
erds, Te Wildcats, RK1, Te
CoBrahs, Te ARA, Lick Te
Cat, Te Trulli Clan, Aesthetiker,
Te Skids, Te Gremlins and
more.
While snowboarding is no
longer the outlaw fraternity it
was once considered, there is still
a desire to celebrate the intimate
bonds sown on the cold slopes
in a way that only insiders can
know.
In the early 1990s while pro-
fessional half-pipe riding was
still in its infancy, Vermonts Jef
Brushie, of Hinesburg, was liter-
ally head and shoulders above the
pack. With his uncanny ability
to maximize airtime, seemingly
efortless trick execution and
stylish fair both on and of the
slopes, Brushie put Vermont on
the freestyle snowboarding map
and signaled the arrival of skate-
inspired new school trickery to
the top of the podium.
Brushies fuidity was infectious
and kids from coast to coast would crouch, sprock and poke of
every bump they could fnd in homage to him. Winning the
overall World Cup for half-pipe in 1990 solidifed his place
as a snowboarding superstar. Iconic pro model boards soon
followed, only adding to how immensely infuential he was
to the snowboarding scene.
PATRICK BRIDGES HONORED
Accepting the Paul Robbins Journalism Award at the
same induction ceremony on Oct. 4 was Patrick Bridges,
who said when he received the honor that it represented
snowboarding having a place, a concept he has been
defning through his snowboarding and his journalism
career.
Bridges was born in Rutland in 1973 and grew up in
Killington, the son of ski bums. Having skied since the
age of fve, Bridges began snowboarding in 1985 at Son-
nenberg Ski Area in Barnard, Vermont. During his junior
year of high school, he wrote an award-winning essay about
snowboarding and realized the pen could provide a path to
fulflling his riding dreams.
After a short stint as a competitive snowboarder and later
a coach, Bridges became a full-time snowboarding scribe
in the late 1990s as a partner in the Burlington-based EI
Snowboard Magazine, which highlighted the infectious
draw of snowboarding in New England.
In 2000, he became Senior Editor of SNOWBOARDER
Magazine, the largest media outlet in the world of snow-
boarding at the time, and has now been the Editor-in-
Chief of the magazine for the past decade.
Tough Bridges now calls San Clemente, California
home, the Green Mountains are part of the fabric of who
he is and a place he continues to visit and cover routinely,
with the most recent instance being a feature he wrote
about riding 12 Vermont Ski Areas in one 24-hour period
last March.
Te exhibit is up through October 2014. In thank you
notes received from the Waitsfeld Elementary School after
a November tour, all mentioned a highlight of their visit
was seeing Brushies dreadlock. Dont miss it!
Te Vermont Ski and Snowboard Museum is a 501 (c)(3)
non-proft organization whose mission is to collect, preserve
and celebrate Vermont skiing and snowboarding history. Te
museum is located at the corner of Vermont Routes 100 and
108 in Stowe village and is open 12-5 daily, except for Tuesdays.
Events such as the Annual Hall of Fame induction, donations
and tax deductible individual and business memberships allow
the museum to fulfll its mission. Visit vtssm.com for more
information on exhibits, membership, and upcoming events.
Six guys, one legendary group, ride into hall of fame
ermont
Sk
i M
u
se
u
m
V
BY MEREDITH SCOTT
Members of the Vermont Slope Posse were inducted into the Ver-
mont Ski & Ride Museums Hall of Fame.
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VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, DECEMBER 2013 PAGE 31
BY EVAN JOHNSON
Te now-popular concept of ski-tourism
took root in the 1950s and 60s, says Blake
Harrison, author of Te View from Vermont:
Tourism and the Making of an American Rural
Landscape and a professor who taught histori-
cal land use and environmental history courses
from 2003 to 2010 at Southern Connecticut
State University, Quinnipiac, Yale and Mon-
tana State. He
also worked for
fve years as a lift
mechanic at Hay-
stack from 1992
until 1997.
Harrison notes
that ski tourism
was initially driven
by postwar eco-
nomic and pros-
perity that allowed
families to travel
easily, thanks to the
development of
the interstate high-
way system, the
growing popularity
of car ownership
and a new cultural
emphasis on recre-
ation and leisure. Te rope tow, which some
claim was frst invented in Woodstock, V.T.,
in 1934 on Suicide Six, gave way to other
technological advances like T-bars, J-sticks
and eventually modern chairlifts, gondolas
and tramways which allowed greater trafc
uphill and became the now-classic icons of
Vermont skiing at its height.
Meanwhile, dozens of smaller ski areas
around the state ofered an alternative to the
larger and more crowded resorts. At one time,
anyone with a cable and an old truck could
turn a nearby hill into a skiable slope. At
Hardack in Saint Albans, a truck was driven
to the top of the hill and placed on blocks.
Te front wheel was removed and the cable
was run down the hill through the wheel. At
the end of the season, the tire was replaced and
the truck driven back downhill for use during
the summer. Te rope tow brought skiing to
the masses, making it an accessible and demo-
cratic sport.
Tyler Wilkinson-Ray and his brother Elliot
coached ski racing at Cochrans for six years.
After producing their frst feature-length doc-
umentary, United We Ski, which explores
the role of smaller ski areas on Vermonts cul-
ture and history, Tyler says he favors measures
that bring more people into the sport not
obstruct them.
[Skiing] survives on bringing in new
people and creating those passionate ski bums
of the next generation, he says. And thats
why these really small places are really impor-
tant, because they get people involved in the
sport and a sport that you can only do if you
have a lot of money is not going to be sustain-
able.
Insurance costs, lawsuits, expensive inspec-
tions of equipment, increased necessity of
snowmaking and access to larger areas gradu-
ally ate away at the popularity of the smaller
areas, however some were able to sustain them-
selves with the help of volunteers and support
from the communities that used them.
At all these places, you can point to a few
individuals who kept them going, who went
out and ran the lifts, even if almost nobody
was there, Tyler says. Tere was always a
hardcore group of volunteers who went out
and kept them going. It was traditional Yankee
ingenuity and com-
munity support.
Wilkinson-Ray
says he understands
the appeal of open-
ing these kinds of
high-end, exclusive
clubs, but cautions
that they come at
the cost of access
and afordability.
Its an interest-
ing model for keep-
ing some of these
places going, but
theyre obviously
not accessible to 99
percent of Vermont
residents just by
how expensive they
are. Youd rather see
them operating privately than going out of
business, but theyre not providing the aford-
able skiing that small ski areas were ofering
(in the past), he says.
With more people coming to Vermont at
the height of ski tourism in the 1960s and
1970s, the tourism industry had produced an
entire sector of seasonal work for lift mechan-
ics, housekeepers, snowmakers, and instruc-
tors.
Te idea of a private ski resort, Harrison
says, is a previously unexplored concept in
Vermont. But he also says a developer, no
matter where they may be, can learn from the
successes and failures of the past.
One of the only certainties in the indus-
try is that ski resorts will fail and thats been
proven over and over again, he says. I dont
know if the past is any indicator of the future,
but it probably wont be easy. It never was.
Since the early days, Harrison says resorts
have tried any number of gimmicks and
promotions, but an emphasis on the basics
remains: housing, lift capacity and trail sys-
tems.
All of that stuf needs to be in place, he
says. Any new developer has the beneft of
maybe some of that already being there, or
knowing what they have to provide.
Te important thing, Harrison says, is to
remember the reason most of the areas in
Vermont opened in the frst place to turn
a proft.
Te developers arent providing it never
did provide it to provide skiing. It was an
investment. So any developer thats redevelop-
ing a Haystack or any other place isnt doing it
to be benevolent, theyre an investor so theyve
fgured out some kind of calculus thats show-
ing that this may be the way for that scale of
operations to survive for the future and in the
end it may be good for the state.
A few abandoned ski areas
seeing renewed investment
[Skiing] survives on bringing in
new people and creating those
passionate ski bums of the next
generation. Tats why these
really small places are important,
because they get people involved
in the sport and a sport that
you can only do if you have a
lot of money is not going to be
sustainable.
Tyler Wilkinson-Ray,
United We Ski documentary
Lost ski areas series:
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PAGE 32 VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, DECEMBER 2013
VBA
and Vermont
Grape & Wine
Council initiate
Passport
programs for
guests who
visit Vermonts
breweries and
wineries.
If youre a lover of micro-
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Breweries & Wineries
brews and wines,
the Vermont Brewers
Association and Vermont
Wine and Grape Council
have developed Vermont
Passport Challenge
prgrams for guests who
visit breweries and wineries
in the state.
Tose who visit four
breweries, get a Drink
Vermont Beer bottle opener;
those who visit 10 breweries earn a
Drink Vermont Beer t-shirt; and
those who visit all the breweries
get the grand prize: a Collectors
Set of Vermont Beer Gear.
Te rules are simple: Visit a
brewery or brewpub that is part of
the challenge (listed on the Vermont
Brewers Association website (www.
vermontbrewers.com); enjoy a glass
or pint and get your passport
stamped at that brewery with their
of cial VBA symbol. (Te passport
card is available on the VBA website
or at most of the breweries.)
Prizes are given out when
the passport is mailed into the
Vermont Brewers Association, 142
Kirk Meadow Rd., Springfeld, Vt.
05156. (Be sure to indicate your
shirt size if you qualify. Te ofer is
valid while supplies last and is good
only for breweries & brewpubs,
not at wineries or cideries.)
A similar program is being run
through the Vermont Grape & Wine
Council. For info on rules go to www.
VermontGrapeandWineCouncil.
com.
LOCAL
1. Lawsons Finest
The Warren Store
284 Main St.
Warren, Vt 05674
802-496-3864
www.warrenstore.com
Lawsons Finest Liquids
Warren, VT 05674
802-272-8436
www.lawsonsnest.com
The Warren Store is open 7 days/week, 8
a.m. 6 p.m, bringing in a rotating line-
up of bottles delivered every Friday.
Straight from the Green Mountains to your
head! The Warren Store is the best loca-
tion to fnd Lawsons beer, a small batch
artisanal microbrewery. Lawsons goal is to
provide local brews of the highest quality
and freshness, while crafting unique new
recipes and emulating the best of widely
appreciated styles.
2. Shelburne
Vineyard
6308 Shelburne
Road
Shelburne, Vt
05482
802-985-8222
www.shelburnevineyard.com
Open 7 days/week, 11 a.m. 5 p.m.
Tastings and Tours
Taste our internationally recognized,
award-winning red, white, rose and des-
sert wines; tour our state-of-the-art winery;
picnic & stroll through our vineyard and
discover how we make world-class wines
from regionally grown grapes.
3. Harpoon Brewery
336 Ruth
Carney
Drive
Windsor,
Vt 05089
802-647-5491
www.harpoonbrewery.com
Open daily, Sun-Weds 10am-6pm,
Thurs-Sat 10am-9pm.
We started the Harpoon Brewery in 1986
becauselike todaywe loved beer and
wanted more quality choices, and we have
spent as much time spreading the joy of
beer drinking as we have focusing on reci-
pes, ingredients, and brewing equipment.
Hopefully our sense of gratitude is refected
in both the quality of the beer and the spirit
of fun and enjoyment surrounding our beer
and breweries. We invite all of you to visit
our beautiful brewery in Windsor, Vermont.
4. Boyden
Valley
Winery
64 Vt Route 104
Cambridge, Vt
05444
802-644-8151
www.boydenvalley.com
Open May December, 7 days/week, 10
a.m. 5 p.m.
Jan April, Friday Sunday, 10 a.m. 5
p.m.
Wine Tasting ($6+tax) all day, Tours
(FREE) 11:30am & 1:00pm, French Gour-
met Cheese Plates ($19.95+tax) season-
ally 10am-4pm
Boyden Valley Winery, a fourth generation
family farm, produces international award-
winning Vermont wines; bold red wines, el-
egant white wines, light and favorful rose
and fruit wines, Vermont Ice: the premier
line of Vermont ice wines, and the NEW Ver-
mont Ice Apple Crme and Vermont Ice Ma-
ple Crme liqueurs. We offer tastings daily
from 10am-5pm, French Gourmet cheese
plates seasonally from 10am-4pm, and
FREE tours daily at 11:30am and 1:00pm.
5. Vermont Pub
& Brewery
144 College St.
Burlington Vt,
05401
802-865-0500
www.
vermontbrewery.com
Open 7 days/week, 11:30 a.m. 1 a.m.
(Thu-Sat open until 2 a.m.)
Vermont Pub & Brewery is Vermonts origi-
nal brewpub. Opened in 1988, it continues
to be a celebrated landmark and produce
world-class beer selections, which are all
unfltered with no preservatives.
6. Otter Creek
Brewing Company
793 Exchange St.
Middlebury, Vt 05753
802-388-0727
www.
ottercreekbrewing.
com
Open 7 days/week , 11 a.m. 6 p.m.
Offers self-guided window tours and great
food. Founded in 1991, Otter Creek is one
of the oldest craft breweries in the State. We
brew all of our beers in small batches to
ensure freshness, using Vermont water, the
best domestic malts and hops, and our own
top fermenting yeast. Otter Creek is also
home to Wolavers Fine Organic Ales and
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VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, DECEMBER 2013 PAGE 33
The Shed. Wolavers was the frst USDA-
certifed brewer, leading the industry since
1997. The Shed has been a Vermont staple
for generations and a local secret that is
now available region-wide.
7. Long Trail
Brewing Company
5520 US Route 4
Bridgewater Corners,
VT 05035
802-672-5011
www.longtrail.com
Open 7 days/week,
10 a.m. 7 p.m.
Sales and sampling and self-guided tours
at the visitor center. Enjoy Vermonts #1
selling craft beer at one of the most popular
destinations in the state, the Long Trail Visi-
tors Center. Whether you are interested in
enjoying some of our year-round, season-
al, cask-conditioned or limited pilot brew
releases, you will fnd there is a favor for
everyone!
8. Rock Art
Brewery
632 Laporte Rd./Rt.
100
Morrisville, Vt 05661
802-888-9400
www.
rockartbrewery.
com
Open Monday Saturday, 9 a.m. 6 p.m.
Tasting daily until 5:30 p.m. (with pur-
chase of $4 souvenir glass)
Tours run at 2 & 4 pm daily and you are
welcome to watch from the viewing win-
dow on your own ANYTIME!
We are celebrating 15 years! Enjoy sam-
ples of our beers during your visit and have
a growler flled to take home and enjoy lat-
er. We have the best selection of our bottled
beers and we also have several local Ver-
mont foods and cheeses to pair nicely with
the beers.
9. Zero Gravity
American Flatbread
115 St. Paul St.
Burlington, VT 05401
802-861-2999
www.
americanatbread.com
Zero Gravity Craft Brewery is located in-
side American Flatbread Burlington Hearth
where you will fnd 10-15 house brews on
tap all year long. Beers that are brewed for
food are our main focus and German and
Czech-style lagers and a variety of Belgian
styles are usually well represented. Our TLA
I.P.A. is a crowd favorite as is our medieval
style Gruit ale, released twice a year on the
summer and winter solstices.
10. Grand View
Winery
Max Gray Road
E. Calais Vt 05650
802-456-7012
www.
grandviewwinery.
com
Open May October 7 days/week, 11
a.m. 5 p.m.
Tours, tastings and retail store
Grand View Winery specializes in non-
grape wine produced with character and
not sweet. It won a double gold award for
its Cranberry wine, gold for its Strawberry
Rhubarb wine, and silver for its Pear wine
this year at the Finger Lakes Intl Wine Com-
petition among other awards.
11. Magic Hat
Brewery and
Artifactory
5 Bartlett Bay Road
South Burlington, Vt
05403
802-658-BREW
MagicHat.Net
Winter Hours: Winter Tours Mon-Thurs
10-6, Thurs-Fri 3,4,5; Fri-Sat 10-7,
Sat 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, Sun 12-5, Sun 1:30
Where ancient alchemy meets modern-day
science to create the best tasting beer on the
planet. Come watch our spores dance and
play! Visit the Artifactory for FREE samples,
FREE Tours and the most unusual shopping
experience!
12. Woodchuck Cidery
153 Pond Lane,
Middlebury, VT 05753
802-388-0700
www.woodchuck.com
Facility not set up for pub-
lic tours
Cider can be purchased in
all 50 states
The Vermont-based, independently owned
and operated cidery is now leading Ameri-
cas fastest growing alcohol beverage cate-
gory, through its visionary mix of innovation
and tradition. Their signature high quality
production is naturally gluten-free, which is
something that sets them apart.
13. Fresh Tracks Farm
Vineyard & Winery
4373 VT Route 12
Berlin, VT 05602
802-223-1151
www.freshtracksfarm.
com
Come visit our beautiful and
sustainable tasting room just 3 miles south
of Montpelier. Sit and enjoy sampling and
sipping our selection of wines all grown and
produced on premise here at the farm. We
also offer delicious local cheese plates to
enjoy with the wines as well as unique and
locally selected gifts. Check our website for
hours and different events like live music,
sushi, and yoga happening throughout the
year. Open Wed-Fri 11-7, Sat & Sun 11-6.
14. Lincoln Peak Vineyard
142 River Rd
New Haven VT 05472
802-388-7368
www.
lincolnpeakvineyard.
com
Nov-Dec: Wed-Sun 11-5
Jan-May: Sat 11-5, M-F by chance or
appt
Jun-Oct: Daily 11-5
Tastings; wine by the glass
We-- the Granstrom family-- grow 12 acres
of grapevines, make wine right here from
our own grapes, and love to share how
grapes grow in Vermont. Come taste our
wines, enjoy a glass by the cozy wood stove
or on the winery porch, and walk around
the vineyard. Our wines have won three
best-in-show awards at the Intl Cold Cli-
mate Wine Comp in recent years. 3 miles
north of Middlebury, just off Rte 7.
15. Champlain Orchards
3597 Route 74 West
Shoreham, VT 05770
802-897-2777
www.
champlainorchards.
com
Open daily 10-4 No-
vember-June
Open daily 9-6 July-September
Please call ahead if possible. We offer
guided tastings of our Pruners Pride, Prun-
ers Promise, Semi-Dry, and Cranberry Hard
Ciders, as well as our Sparkling and Hon-
eycrisp Ice Ciders - all made onsite with
our ecologically grown apples. Picnic or
take a short walk for stunning views of Lake
Champlain and the Adirondacks.
16. Saxtons
River Distillery
485 West River Rd.
Brattleboro, VT
05301
802-246-1128
www.
saplingliqueur.com
Tasting room hours: Tues-Friday 9-5, Sat-
urday 10-5.
Saxtons River Distillery is the home to Sap-
ling Vermont Maple Liqueur. We will be
adding new products soon, so stop by and
see what has just been bottled!
17. Jasper Murdocks
Alehouse at The Norwich
Inn
325 Main Street
Norwich, VT 05055
(802) 649-1143
www.norwichinn.com
Yearly Hours: Monday
5pm-9pm
Tuesday - Thursday 11:30am - 9pm
Friday & Saturday 11:30am - 9:30pm
Sunday 12pm - 9pm
Jasper Murdocks Ales are crafted from fne
English malts, with hops grown in England,
locally, and in our own hop garden at the
Inn. Our beer is pumped underground from
the beer cellars to our pub at the Inn. Our
brewery is not open for tours but the Ale-
house is open for you to wet your whistle
during the above hours.
Our ales have won 4 silver medals and 1
gold medal in the last three years at the
Great International Beer Competition and
are sold only at The Norwich Inn.
18. East Shore Vineyard
Sugarbush - Lincoln Peak
Sugarbush Access Rd.
Warren, VT 05674
and 28 Church St
Burlington, VT 05401
877-ESV-VINO
www.eastshorevineyard.com.
Sugarbush Tasting Room: Open Friday-
Sunday Noon to 6PM.
Burlington Tasting Room: Open Everyday
except Tuesday - Noon to 6PM, open later
weekends Call for details.
Wine tasting ($7+tax) receive compli-
mentary glass.
Join us at our two premier tasting rooms
for tastings and pairings with some of Ver-
monts fnest chocolates and cheeses. East
Shore Vineyard produces a variety of in-
ternational award-winning Vermont made
wines including: Traminette, Summer Snow,
Cab Franc, Marquette, and Vidal Ice Wine.
19. Trapp Lager
Brewery
700 Trapp Hill Road
Stowe, Vermont 05672
802-253-5705
www.trappfamily.
com
The Trapp Lager Brew-
ery offers a selection of
authentic Austrian la-
gers. Stop by for a pint
and enjoy our moun-
taintop views in our Del-
iBakery, lounge, or dining room. The Trapp
Family Lodge is a mountain resort in the Eu-
ropean tradition by the family that inspired
The Sound of Music
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PAGE 34 VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, DECEMBER 2013
Cross Country Ski Areas
NRTHERN VERMNT
Bolton Valley XC
Nordic and backcountry skiing are hallmarks of
Bolton Valley Ski Resort. The highest elevation of Ver-
monts cross-country ski areas ensures great snow,
usually from early November well into April. With
over 100 km of Nordic trails, Bolton is considered by
many to be the best backcountry in Vermont. The
Nordic Center offers both Classic and Skate skiing
lessons as well as guided tours and ski clinics. Snow-
shoeing is another popular activity; the resort uses
Tubbs Snowshoes as rentals. Nordic ski and snow-
shoe packages with lodging are available.
CONTACT:
4302 Bolton Valley Access Rd., Bolton Valley, VT 05477
Main phone: 802.434.3444
Phone 2: 877.9BOLTON Fax: 802.329-6871
nordiccenter@boltonvalley.com
STATS:
Typical season: .............. December - early April
Total Terrain............................................... 88 km
Machine-tracked ....................................... 26 km
Skating Terrain .......................................... 26 km

Burke XC/Kingdom Trails


Two centers located on Darlng Hill and near Burke
Mountain offer something for everyone. At Kingdom
Trails the atmosphere is noncompetitive, our focus is
the quality of skiing and your awareness of the sur-
rounding countryside. Eight main loops make up 50
km of trails to accommodate all skiing abilities. At the
two Nordic centers on Darling Hill and Burke XC you
can warm your feet and enjoy the splendid views.
CONTACT:
PO Box 204, East Burke, VT 05872
Main phone: 802.626.0737
Phone 2: 802.535.5662
info@kingdomtrails.org
STATS:
Typical season: .............. mid December - March
Total Terrain............................................... 80 km
Machine-tracked ...................................... 50 km
Skating Terrain ......................................... 35 km

Catamount Family Center


All year long enjoy recreating on our trails as you
discover the four corners of our beautiful family farm.
You can pull off the trails at scenic points to soak up
memorable views of Mt. Mansfield or Camels hump
to the east or Lake Champlain and the Adirondacks
to the west. This farm is rich in history. The first gover-
nor of Vermont, Governor Chittenden, built the main
house in 1798 for his son Giles. It has since passed to
our family and is in its 6th generation of ownership.
CONTACT:
592 Governor Chittenden Rd, Williston, VT 05495
Main phone: 802.879.6001
Phone 2: 888.680.1011 Fax: 802.879.6066
www.catamountoutdoor.com
STATS:
Typical season ............... mid December - March
Total Terrain............................................... 35 km
Machine-tracked ...................................... 35 km
Skating Terrain ......................................... 35 km

Craftsbury Outdoor Center


For over 35 years, this year-round resort in the North-
east Kingdom on over 400 private acres has offered
outdoor activities for the whole family. In 2008, it was
re-organized as a non-profit entity. Guests can enjoy
85k of groomed nordic ski trails, snowshoeing, orien-
teering, ice-skating, backcountry tours, biathlon pro-
gramming, and more.
The Center has space for up to 90 houseguests in its
trailside accommodations. Choose from private cab-
ins to comfortable lodges - all room prices include
your meals in their Vermont Fresh Network Mem-
ber dining hall. If youre ready for some indoor time,
guests have access to amenities such as free wifi, mas-
sage therapists, sauna and fitness room - plus homey
public spaces. Babysitting can be arranged with ad-
vance notice.
CONTACT:
535 Lost Nation Rd, Craftsbury Common, VT 05827
Main phone: 802.586.7767 Fax: 802.586.7768
www.craftsbury.com
STATS:
Typical season ............... mid December - March
Total Terrain ............................................ 135 km
Machine-tracked ...................................... 85 km
Skating Terrain ......................................... 85 km

Hazens Notch
Located at the top of Vermont in the Covered Bridge
Town of Montgomery near Jay Peak Resort, Hazens
Notch is on the western edge of the snowy Northeast
Kingdom. 70 Kilometers of groomed and marked
trails pass through mixed maple, birch and evergreen
forest and across gentle, open meadows. 30 trails for
all abilities provide loops of different lengths for clas-
sical cross-country skiing and or snowshoeing. Trail
difficulty is evenly divided between easy, moderate
and difficult.
CONTACT:
P.O. Box 478, Montgomery Center, VT 05471
Main phone: 802.326.4799 Fax: 802.326.4966
www.hazensnotch.org
STATS:
Typical season ........................ December - April
Total Terrain .............................................. 70 km
Machine-tracked ...................................... 60 km
Skating Terrain ......................................... 20 km

Highland Lodge & XC Center


Ski through fields and valleys, delineated by rows of
trees and sugar bushes, with stunning views over open
pasture lands of Mount Mansfield to the west, Burke
Mountain to the east, the Lowell Mountain Range to the
north and Caspian Lake below. There is no finer place
for spring skiing and picnics.
CONTACT:
Caspian Lake, 1608 Craftsbury Rd., Greensboro, VT
05841
Main phone: 802.533.2647 Fax: 802.533.7494
www.highlandlodge.com
STATS:
Typical season ...................... December - March
Total Terrain .............................................. 60 km
Machine-tracked ...................................... 60 km
Skating Terrain ......................................... 40 km

Jay Peak Nordic and Snowshoe Center


The Jay Peak Nordic and Snowshoe Center is located
in the Golf Clubhouse and offers 20km of groomed
and tracked terrain for beginners and experts alike.
Snowshoers are welcome to experience the back-
country by day or be guided in the evenings on our
fireside tours. A true destination resort, Jay Peak also
Enjoy 60km of groomed trails, rated as some
of the nicest trails in New England!
Enjoy lunch at the Ski Center and stay in one of
Vermonts most scenic and historic inns tucked in the
heart of Robert Frost country with exquisite dining.
For more information go to www.blueberryhillinn.com
Blueberry Hill Ski Center
Goshen, Vermont 802-247-6755
Enjoy 25km of groomed trails, rated as some
of the nicest trails in New England!
Enjoy lunch at the Ski Center and stay in one of
Vermonts most scenic and historic inns tucked in the
heart of Robert Frost country with exquisite dining.
For more information go to www.blueberryhillinn.com
Goshen, Vermont 802-247-6735
Enjoy 25km of backcountry trails, rated as some
of the nicest trails in New England!
Enjoy lunch at the Ski Center and stay in one of
Vermonts most scenic and historic inns tucked in the
heart of Robert Frost country with exquisite dining.
For more information go to www.blueberryhillinn.com
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VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, DECEMBER 2013 PAGE 35
Cross Country Ski Areas
offers ice skating, curling, lodging , dining, an indoor
water park and plenty of night life.
CONTACT:
830 Jay Peak Road, Jay, Vermont 05859.
Main Phone (802) 988-2611 x4653
Reservations 1-800-451-4449 Fax (802) 988-4049
info@jaypeakresort.com.
STATS:
Typical season ............ Thanksgiving - mid-April
Total Terrain............................................... 25 km
Snowshoeing trails.......................................5 km

Morse Farm Ski Center


Visit Vermonts newest, family friendly cross-country
touring center, with views of Camels Hump and the
Hunger Mountain range. Professionally designed
scenic trails offer a diverse choice of terrain, through
softwood forests, sugarbush and across gently roll-
ing open pastures. Suitable for all skill levels, from
first-timers to seasoned experts, who will appreciate
the banked turns on our many challenging downhill
slopes.
CONTACT:
PO Box 1200 1168 County Rd., Montpelier, VT 05601
Main phone: 800-223-0090
www.skimorsefarm.com
STATS:
Typical season ...................... December - March
Total Terrain .............................................. 20 km
Machine-tracked ...................................... 20 km
Skating Terrain ......................................... 15 km

Sleepy Hollow Inn & Bike Center


Come cross-country ski or mountain bike with us! Our
trails are challenging and great fun. Visit Butternut
Cabin, with a stunning view of Camels Hump and Ver-
monts rolling Green Mountains. Our eight bedroom
newly renovated country inn is gaining a reputation
for great service and hospitality. We offer skiing, ice-
skating, night skiing, snowshoeing, single-track moun-
tain biking, and hiking. Our full line of rentals will
surely make your visit hassle-free and memorable.
CONTACT:
1805 Sherman Hollow Rd, Huntington, VT 05462
Main phone: 802.434.2283
Phone 2: 866.254.1524
info@skisleepyhollow.com
www.skisleepyhollow.com
STATS:
Typical season ...................... December - March
Total Terrain .............................................. 40 km
Machine-tracked ...................................... 30 km
Skating Terrain ......................................... 25 km

Smugglers Notch Cross Country


Smugglers Notch Nordic Ski and Snowshoe Adven-
ture Center is conveniently located at the center of
this year-round resort, providing a host of exciting ac-
tivities for every member of the family. PSIA-Certified
instruction in both classical and skate skiing; daily
guided snowshoe treks and night tours on 24 kilo-
meters of dedicated snowshoe trails; ice skating on a
natural outdoor rink. With over 100 pair of Red Feath-
er Snowshoes and plenty of skis, boots, poles and ice
skates, Smugglers can outfit age 5 and older.
CONTACT:
4323 VT Route 108 South,
Smugglers Notch, VT 05464
Main phone: 802.644.1173
Phone 2: 800.451.8752 Fax: 802.644.2713
smuggs@smuggs.com www.smuggs.com
STATS:
Typical season ........................December April
Total Terrain .............................................. 34 km
Machine-tracked ...................................... 23 km
Skating Terrain ......................................... 28 km

Stowe XC
Stowe Mountain Resorts 35 kilometers of groomed
and 40 kilometers of backcountry trails are the high-
est in Stowe. Also available are 5 kilometers of trails
specifically for snowshoeing. Theyre all part of the
largest connected cross-country trail network in the
East... a nordic skiers dream, that also connects with
the Trapp Family Lodge XC Center, Topnotch and Ed-
son Hill ski touring centers.
CONTACT:
5781 Mountain Rd., Stowe, VT 05672
Main phone: 802.253.3688
Phone 2: 800.253.4754 * Fax: 802.253.3406
info@stowe.com www.stowe.com
STATS:
Typical season ..................December - late April
Total Terrain .............................................. 70 km
Machine-tracked ...................................... 35 km
Skating Terrain ......................................... 35 km

Trapp Family Lodge Cross Country Cen-


ter
Located on the spine of the Green Mountains, they are
blessed with good snow conditions all season long.
The center offers 55 km of groomed trails that are in-
terconnected to the Stowe Mountain Resort, Topnotch
and Edson Hill ski touring centers, making a trail net-
work of 120 km groomed trails and another 100 km of
back country trails. The center has a complete retail
store with accessories, clothing and equipment, a re-
pair shop, a ski school and rentals of all kinds.
CONTACT:
700 Trapp Hill Rd, Stowe, VT 05672
Main phone: 802.253.8511
Phone 2: 800.826.7000 Fax: 802.253.5757
info@trappfamily.com www.trappfamily.com
STATS:
Typical season ........................December April
Total Terrain ............................................ 100 km
Machine-tracked ...................................... 55 km
Skating Terrain ......................................... 55 km
CENTRALREGION
CENTRAL VERMNT
Blueberry Hill
Blueberry Hill Blueberry Hill has switched from
groomed runs to a backcountry skiers and snowsho-
ers paradise. The ski lodge sits at just over 1,600 feet,
ensuring a fair dumping with any snowstorm. 65 kilo-
meters of wilderness trails spread across the beautiful
Vermont countryside, with connections to the Cata-
mount Trail and Vermonts Long Trail. The Halfdan
Khlune Trail climbs to 2,800 feet, making it the highest
maintained ski trail in Vermont. The rental shop offers
snowshoes for both adults and children.
CONTACT:
RFD 3, Goshen, VT 05733
Main phone: 802.247.6735
Phone 2: 800.448.0707 Fax: 802.247.3983
info@blueberryhillinn.com
www.blueberryhillinn.com
STATS:
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PAGE 36 VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, DECEMBER 2013
Cross Country Ski Areas
Typical season ............. December to mid-March
Total Terrain .............................................. 65 km

Blueberry Lake
The Snow Bowl of Sugarbush. For the last two years,
we have skied everyday of the season after open-
ing. The ski area offers 31 km of trails all of which are
groomed. Some of the trails are lit for night skiing.
CONTACT:
424 Robinson Road, Warren, VT 05674
Main phone: 802.496.6687 Fax: 802.496.5198
STATS:
Typical season ............. December to mid-March
Total Terrain .............................................. 31 km
Machine-tracked ...................................... 31 km
Skating Terrain ......................................... 31 km

Catamount Trail Association


The Catamount Trail is a 300-mile public cross coun-
try ski trail that spans the length of Vermont. It of-
fers a mixture of ungroomed backcountry terrain
and groomed trails - a ski experience for everyone.
Guidebook available. Maintained by the member-
supported nonprofit
Catamount Trail Association.
CONTACT:
Main phone: (802) 864-5794
info@catamounttrail.org
www.catamounttrail.org

Mountain Meadows XC Area


Located in the heart of the Green Mountains, Moun-
tain Meadows cross-country ski area has been at-
tracting skiers from all over the world for the past 35
years. Snowmaking, new trail marking system, im-
proved trails through spectacular meadows and hard
woods.
CONTACT:
209 Thundering Brook Rd, Killington, VT 05751
Main phone: 802.775.7077
Phone 2: 800.221.0598 Fax: 802.747.1929
www.xcskiing.net
STATS:
Typical season ........................ November April
Total Terrain .............................................. 57 km
Machine-tracked ...................................... 57 km
Skating Terrain .......................................... 57 km

Mountain Top Inn and Resort


Eleven miles from Killington, 60km trails (40km
groomed) classic, skate and pristine backcountry for
skiing or snowshoeing on 350 of acres at elevation up
to 2,100 ft. Varied terrain for all skill and age levels.
Private or group lessons, rentals, snowmaking, daily
grooming, ski shop (Rossignol demo equipment &
rentals, Tubbs snowshoe rentals), snack bar. Desig-
nated pet friendly trails. Nordic ski and other season-
al packages available.
CONTACT:
195 Mountain Top Rd, Chittenden, VT 05737
Main phone: (802) 483-2311
Phone 2: (802) 483-6089
Reservations: (802) 483-2311 Fax: (802) 483-6373
stay@mountaintopinn.com
STATS:
Typical season ..............................late Nov.-April
Total Terrain .............................................. 60 km
Machine-tracked ...................................... 40 km
Skating Terrain ......................................... 60 km

Okemo Valley Nordic Center


Okemo Valley Nordic Center features 22 km of tradi-
tional Nordic track trails and skating lanes that wind
their way through pristine meadows and Nordic hill-
sides and along the Black River.
The Nordic Center also has an additional 13 km of
dedicated snow-shoe trails. Okemo Valley features
modern trail grooming and terrain ideally suited for
all ability levels. Cross-country ski and snowshoe
rentals are available, along with group and private
lessons.
CONTACT:
77 Okemo Ridge Rd, Ludlow, VT 05149
Main phone: 802.228.1396
Phone 2: 800.78.OKEMO Fax: 802.228.7095
info@okemo.com www.nordic.okemo.com
STATS:
Typical season ........................December April
Total Terrain .............................................. 22 km
Machine-tracked ...................................... 22 km
Skating Terrain ......................................... 22 km

Oles Cross Country Center


The combination of snow and scenery at Oles Cross
Country Center in the Mad River Valley is perfect for
skiing and snowshoeing. Discover 30 miles (50K) of
moderately rolling trails groomed for classic skiing
and ski skating. All abilities can ski to panoramic
views of Sugarbush or into the rare quiet of the deep
woods. Rent cross country ski gear and snowshoes at
Oles, including skating skis.
CONTACT:
PO Box 1653, Waitsfield, VT 05673
Main phone: 802.496.3430
Phone 2: 877.863.3001 Fax: 802.496.3089
www.olesxc.com
STATS:
Typical season ........................ November April
Total Terrain .............................................. 50 km
Machine-tracked ...................................... 50 km
Skating Terrain ......................................... 45 km

Rikert Nordic Center


Located 12 miles east of Middlebury on Route 125 in
Ripton, VT - 2 miles west of the Middlebury Snow Bowl.
Situated on the Bread Loaf Campus of Middlebury
College bordered by the Green Mountain National
Forest and the Robert Frost Homestead, the center
offers 50 km of carefully groomed trails for classic
and skate skiing and snowshoeing for all abilities.
Included in this terrain is a new world class 5km FIS
sanctioned race course that was built two years ago
and features snowmaking around the entire course!
The newly renovated shop offers rental equipment,
repairs and maintenance and is fully ADA accessible.
A staff of instructors offer both private and group les-
sons.
CONTACT:
Route 125
Middlebury College Bread Loaf Campus, Ripton,VT
Phone: 802 - 443- 2744
mhussey@middlebury.edu www.rikertnordic.com
STATS:
Typical Season: ................... December - March
Total Terrain: ............................................ 50 km
Machine Tracked: ......................................50 Km
Skating Terrain:.......................................... 40 km

Three Stallion Inn Touring Center


Come and enjoy the Sporting Life on 35 km of x-c
skiing and snowshoeing trails that criss-cross our
1,300 wooded acres and open pastures.
CONTACT:
Three Stallion Inn, Randolph, VT 05060
Main phone: 802.728.5656
Phone 2: 802.728.5575 www.3stallioninn.com
STATS:
Typical season ...................... December March
Total Terrain .............................................. 50 km
Machine-tracked ...................................... 35 km
Skating Terrain ......................................... 17 km

Woodstock Nordic Center


Just out from the ski center are 10 km of gentle mead-
ow skiing that connect to our fitness center and the
20 km of woodland trails on Mt. Peg. There are also
30 km of trails located across the village green on Mt.
Tom. Skiing or snowshoeing Mt. Tom puts you on cen-
tury old carriage roads in the midst of Vermonts first
tree farm and Vermonts first National Park site.
CONTACT:
Route 106, Woodstock, VT 05091
Main phone: 802.457.6674
Phone 2: 800.448.7900 Fax: 802.457.6699
email@woodstockinn.com www.woodstockinn.
com
STATS:
Typical season ...................... December March
Total Terrain .............................................. 60 km
Machine-tracked ...................................... 50 km
Skating Terrain ......................................... 20 km
SOUTHERNR
EGION
S UTHERN VERMNT Brattleboro
Outing Club
The BOC Ski Hut is the place to cross-country ski in
Brattleboro. Just two miles from town, the Ski Hut is
where friends and family gather to make the most of
winter. Learn-to-ski programs after school, ski and
snowshoe rentals on weekends, special events that
celebrate the gift of winter. In fields adjacent to the
fairways, our Hunde-loipes (Hound loops) for dog-
lovers and their pets are groomed regularly.
CONTACT:
348 Upper Dummerston Rd. PO Box 335
Brattleboro, VT 05302
Main phone: 802.254.4081
Contact our web page at BrattleboroOutingClub.org
xc@brattleborooutingclub.org
STATS:
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VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, DECEMBER 2013 PAGE 37
Cross Country Ski Areas
Typical season ...............mid December March
Total Terrain .............................................. 33 km
Machine-tracked ...................................... 25 km
Skating Terrain ......................................... 20 km

Grafton Ponds Outdoor Center


Grafton Ponds focuses on cross country skiing, snow-
shoeing, ice Skating (no ice skating) Biathlon, and
tubing on a 600-foot hill. There are 15 km of Nordic
trails groomed with a snow-cat and a tiller (which in-
cludes 5 km with snowmaking) and 15 km of back-
country trails, along with another 10 km of snowshoe
trails. They offer a wide variety of terrain and a full
service cross country center including rental, retail
and snacks. A series of winter activities, including
family and kids programs, demos, clinics and races,
take place throughout the season. Grafton Ponds is
part of the Grafton Inn, which offers special ski & stay
packages.
CONTACT:
783 Townshend Road, Grafton, VT 05146
Main phone: 802.843.2400
Reservations: 800.843.1801 Fax: 802.843.2245
info@graftonponds.com www.graftonponds.com
STATS:
Typical season .............. December Mid-March
Total Terrain............................................... 45 km
Machine-tracked ....................................... 15 km
Skating Terrain .......................................... 15 km

Hildene, The Lincoln Family


Home
Hildene is a historic house built by Rob-
ert Todd Lincoln primarily as a summer
home. It is open year-round and includes
the mansion and gardens, farm and re-
stored Pullman palace car. In the winter
months, we offer ski and snowshoe rentals
for children and adults, and lessons by ap-
pointment.
CONTACT:
1005 Hildene Rd, Manchester, VT 05254
Main phone: 802.362.1788 Fax:
802.362.1564
www.hildene.org
STATS:
Typical season ...........................................
December March
Total Terrain...............................................
14 km
Machine-tracked .......................................
14 km
Skating Terrain ..........................................
0 km

Prospect Mountain Cross Coun-


try Ski Center
Prospect Mountain Cross-Country Ski
Center is located on Route 9 in Wood-
ford, Vermont, just 7 miles east of Ben-
nington. As the highest base elevation of
any ski area in the state, Prospect Moun-
tain has earned its reputation of being the
snow magnet. Prospect has over 35 km of expertly
groomed ski trails. The full service ski shop includes
a heated waxing room and a professional waxing ser-
vice. Adult and childrens skis, snowshoes and baby
sleds are available for rent. The spacious Base Lodge
Restaurant is open 7 days/week. Open everyday
from 9 am to 5 pm.
CONTACT:
Route 9, Woodford, VT 05201
Main phone: 802.442.2575
STATS:
Typical season ........................ November April
Total Terrain .............................................. 35 km
Machine-tracked ...................................... 35 km
Skating Terrain ......................................... 30 km

Stratton Mountain Nordic Center


Stratton Mountain Nordic Center is located out of the
Sunbowl Lodge at Stratton Mountain Resort. We offer
10 km for cross country skiing and for snowshoeing.
The beautiful wooded trails are groomed for both
classical and skate skiing. The terrain offers some-
thing for novice to advanced skiers. Inside the base
lodge we have a full service rental and retail shop.
Open daily from 8-5. Lessons available.
CONTACT:
RR 1 Box 145, Stratton Mountain, VT 05155
Main phone: 802.297.4114
Phone 2: 800.STRATTON www.stratton.com
STATS:
Typical season ...................... December March
Total Terrain .............................................. 10 km
Machine-tracked ...................................... 10 km
Skating Terrain ......................................... 10 km

Timber Creek Cross Country Ski Area


Across from Mount Snow, cradled by the Green
Mountains, is Timber Creek a very high quality
cross country ski area. With a dependable mountain
climate and a high elevation, an abundance of snow
becomes a way of life at Timber Creek.
CONTACTS:
Route 100 North, West Dover, VT 05356
Main phone: 802.464.0999
Fax: 802.464.8308
www.timbercreekxc.com
STATS:
Typical season ...................... December March
Total Terrain............................................... 14 km
Machine-tracked ....................................... 14 km
Skating Terrain ......................................... 14 km

Viking Nordic Center


Viking Nordic Centre is one of the oldest cross-coun-
try ski centers in North America. With 40 kilometers
of trails we offer something for every skier. After a
long day of skiing you can enjoy a hearty cup of soup
in our Olympic Caf; or bring your
own lunch for a picnic at our warm-
ing hut overlooking Vermonts Stratton
Mountain.
CONTACT:
615 Little Pond Rd, Londonderry, VT
05148
Main phone: 802.824.3933
Fax: 802.824.4574
www.vikingnordic.com
STATS:
Typical season December March
Total Terrain ...................... 40 km
Machine-tracked ............... 35 km
Skating Terrain .................. 30 km

Wild Wings Ski Touring Cen-


ter
Classic skiing at its best. Family skiing
or ski to train. Tracks set with Piston
Bully they last longer. Ski through
the woods or along the brook. The ani-
mal tracks we see regularly include
bobcat, rabbit and deer. Rental and
lessons available.
CONTACT:
Box 132, Peru, VT 05152
Main phone: 802.824.6793
wwxcski@sover.net www.wild-
wingsski.com
STATS:
Typical season December March
Total Terrain ...................... 25 km
Machine-tracked ............... 25 km
Skating Terrain ....................0 km
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PAGE 38 VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, DECEMBER 2013
By Evan Johnson
Growing up on the slopes at Mount Snow, Devin Logan spent much of her childhood
challenged to perform at the same level as her two older brothers. Te efort has clearly paid
of.
After attending Mount Snow Academy for three years, Logans debut onto the international
freeskiing scene was explosive. In 2011 her frst full competition season, she made her X
Games debut at the age of 16 in both halfpipe and slopestyle, and collected her frst X Games
medal with a halfpipe bronze at the European X Games. Later that year, she capped her
rookie season with the Association of Freeskiing Professionals Overall Champion at 17. In
2012, the West Dover native continued to dominate with 12 podium appearances, including
two X Games medals, earning her another AFP Overall Championship title.
But in August 2012, Logan sufered a blown knee at a competition in New Zealand. She
spent 5 months in rehab, and by April of this year, she was back on the hill, skiing gently
groomed slopes before spending as much time on-snow as possible during the summer.
In May, she practiced rails at Mammoth Lakes before coming east for trampoline training
at Waterville Valley, N.H., practicing her tricks and landing on an infatable airbag. After
regaining her air-awareness and her muscle-memory, she transitioned back onto the snow,
practicing halfpipe in July at Whistler with the US Freeskiing Team.
After making a full recovery, she took frst in halfpipe at the World Cup in Cardrona in
August, her frst competition since her recovery. Te victory, combined with a ffth place
fnish in slopestyle, helped secure her a spot on the US Team. Her recovery puts her at the
edge of qualifers for the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia, the frst year freestyle
skiing will be an Olympic sport.
Logan is presently skiing at Breckenridge and Keystone, developing new tricks and
regaining comfort on snow before attempting to qualify for the Olympic team in a series of
events in early December the Dew Tour and the U.S. Grand Prix. She joins Gus Kenworthy
of Telluride, Colorado as the other skier hoping to double-down on Olympic gold in both
halfpipe and slopestyle.
Logan spoke from Breckenridge with Ski and Ride Assistant Editor Evan Johnson about
her introduction to the slopestyle and halfpipe, her nearly career-ending injury, and the road
to recovery.
Ski & Ride: Describe for me your style of skiing when you frst were introduced to the
sport.
DL: I started skiing at Mount Snow when I was two years old. When I was six I was put
into the weekend freestyle program with my brothers. It kind of went on from there. I did
moguls and big air growing up and just following my brothers around in the park. Ten in
seventh grade, I attended Mount Snow Academy and moved my interest over to halfpipe and
slopestyle. Tree years later and everything just kind of blew up on me. I started traveling
the world and skiing.
S&R: Would you consider six to be an early start for freestyle?
DL: [Laughs] Yeah, thats really young. I was traveling around with my brothers anyway
and going to all the local events with them and I think my mom got sick of me bugging her
so she kind of threw me into the program and had the coaches watch me.
It was a little bit intimidating because I was so young, but I always wanted to be doing the
Q
A
N
D
A
With Olympic hopeful
Devin Logan
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VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, DECEMBER 2013 PAGE 39
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things my brothers were doing and
I think they wanted another little
brother, themselves. So they treated
me that way and took me under
their wing and made me progress
a lot faster than I would have if I
didnt have them.
S&R: Clearly you progressed
very well because youre in the
qualifying rounds and may be
heading to Sochi.
DL: Yeah, hopefully. We have
our Olympic qualifers starting
early in early December, the frst
one being the Dew Tour. We have
fve qualifers to hopefully make
the team before Sochi.
S&R: Until then, what have you
been up to in Colorado?
DL: Ive been out here for a week
and Ive been skiing at Breckenridge
and Keystone Mountain, just getting back on my skis and trying to work on some tricks in the
park. Im trying to feel comfortable on my skis again before the competition season starts. Its
pretty mellow. Actually, after talking to you, Im going up to Breckenridge. My brother actually
lives out here now, so Im going to be skiing park with him and trying to get all of my tricks
back since I was injured last season. Teres a three-jump line here of smaller jumps and Im
working on getting all of my tricks back.
S&R: Last season, you were out because of an injury. Could you describe your recovery?
I got injured last August in New Zealand, so last season I was rehabbing a knee injury. I
started to get back on groomers in April, so I skied groomers for about a month and a half.
Ten I tried to be on snow as much as possible this summer. I went to Mammoth Lakes to ski
around on some rails with the US Ski Team and then in June I went back East because I grew
up going to trampoline camp in Waterville Valley, N.H. .
Tey have a trampoline set up and a summer dry-set up air bag. I went back there in June
and did all my tricks into a bag just trying to get the muscle memory back and my air-awareness
before I took my skis back on snow. I spent all of July in Whistler, BC, on the glacier with the
US Freeskiing Team doing some halfpipe at Momentum Ski Camps.
I went to New Zealand to compete in my frst competition since the injury, which went really
well. I took frst in the world cup halfpipe down there, which was a great confdence booster,
being my frst competition back. Tat was real nice heading into the season, but I also had to
get a quota spot for my slopestyle. I ended up getting ffth in slopestyle. I was really excited
about that.
Ive been getting myself ready for competitions since then. I went back to Park City in
September, training again in the gym to get strong and then in October I went back down
to New Zealand for another spring training camp they held for the US and a bunch of other
national teams for about ten days. And then I came back to Utah and now Im here in Colorado.
S&R: After your injury last year, and having to climb back on that horse, so to speak, is
learning these tricks like riding a bicycle? Does it all come back?
DL: Teres a little hesitation in the frst run you do, just because youre like, Is my knee going
to hold up? But once you get the frst one down, its just like riding a bike. Its actually pretty
sneaky, because I get the adrenaline rushes back with doing frst tricks, feeling really good and
excited. Its always a little nerve-wracking doing the frst one, but in my head, I just know I have
the confdence and that Ill land it. Its just easy. Im back and my body knows what its doing.
S&R: Moving into the qualifers, what are some of the strengths you have going for you?
DL: Im feeling pretty consistent in both halfpipe and slopestyle. Im the only woman who
competes in both so it does get pretty tricky and dif cult trying to balance the two, but I feel that
one helps me with the other. If Im training for one, Im getting some practice with the other at
the same time. A 360 of a jump is a 540 in the halfpipe. One helps the other and I try to be the
best overall skier I can be.
S&R: Tis is the frst year that freeskiing will be featured at the winter Olympics. What are
your thoughts as you move into the qualifying stage? Whats your mindset?
DL: Compared to snowboarding, I know Kelly Clark were from the same town and skied
at Mount Snow together itd be nice to have another Mount Snow native competing and
hopefully get on the podium as well. Im a little nervous. I think its mostly butterfies in my
stomach, like an excited nervous. I feel pretty confdent in myself, how capable I am in my
events and I know I can pull through and get something done. Im excited to get back on my
skis and show everyone what kind of skiing Im capable of.
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PAGE 40 VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, DECEMBER 2013
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