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Referncias Graham, G. D. (2002). Reverie and Interpretation. Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 71(3), 589-592. <!--Outras informaes: Link permanente para este registro (Permalink): http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx? direct=true&db=pph&AN=PAQ.071.0589A&lang=pt-br&site=ehost-live&scope=site Fim da citao-->

Reverie and Interpretation Review by: Gregory D. Graham; (Houston, Tx) Review of: Thomas H. Ogden , M.D. Northvale, NJ/London: Aronson , 1997. 296 pp Reverie and Interpretation comprises eight essays addressing the way in which language can be employed to convey/capture the interplay of the aliveness and deadness of human experience in the psychoanalytic process. Seven of these essays are based on previously published articles, and the book also draws on four earlier books by Ogden.1 , 2 , 3 , 4 Ogden's psychoanalytic work elaborates and transforms key elements in the thought of Freud, Klein, and writers in contemporary object relations. His personal psychoanalytic purview, discerning eye, and poetic sensibility, however, claim definitive roots in the self-reflective experience of the subject. For Ogden, the subjective experience of knowing and not knowing involves not only the experience of self and other; it also involves the experience of the analytic third, a concept introduced in his earlier works. By means of the analytic third, Ogden intends to reach conceptually and experientially beyond Cartesian dualities, Kleinian oversimplifications, and high abstractions of ego psychology. He delves into and lingers with subjective and intersubjective experienceas it wells up and is sought out in the interstices of awareness, takes shape and substance in the mind, includes the compelling presence of self and others, and devolves meaning as it comes to be apprehended, known, and shared. Ogden emphasizes the role of language in this formative process of subjectivity. He states that the attempt to use language to capture and convey the delicate interplay of aliveness and deadness
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in human experience represents a major challenge to contemporary psychoanalysis (p. 4). For Ogden, meaningful consideration of language draws upon a variety of traditional intellectual perspectives in analysis, as well as upon elements of contemporary existentialism and phenomenology. More specifically, he gives special attention to the voices of Freud, Klein, Winnicott, William and Henry James, Frost, and Goethe, among others. In the end, however, Ogden speaks in (and from within) his own terms. In the second chapter of Reverie and Interpretation, Analyzing Forms of Aliveness and Deadness, Ogden offers a context for the essays that follow. Here he addresses the specific expressive and defensive roles patients take within their internal object world and in their object relations, as he pays attention to the sense of aliveness and deadness in the transferencecountertransference landscape. In this realm, Ogden defines the goal of analysis as that of opening the experience of aliveness in the process of recognizing, symbolizing, understanding, and interpreting the leading transference-countertransference anxiety. In The Perverse Subject of Analysis, Ogden discusses ways in which an illusory subject for analysis may be created by the patient and the analyst during treatment. This perverse subject can be employed, he indicates, by way of subverting (substituting for) the recognition of the sense of deadness in the experience of patient and analyst, the unencumbered experience of the intersubjective analytic third, and the relationship of conscious awareness to fantasied parental intercourse. Privacy, Reverie, and Analytic Technique is the title of the fourth chapter of the book. Here Ogden discusses the meaning of the analytic third, the role of the couch, and the necessity for and use of reverie and privacy by patient and analyst in the analytic process. He reconceptualizes and recasts the fundamental rule in a way that he feels allows for greater richness in working with the subjective multiplicity of the I's of patient and analyst in the analytic situation. In Dream Associations, Ogden shows how the personal reveries of both patient and analyst serve as part of the intersubjective context in which primary process can be carried in analytic work with dreams. His approach is distinct from a more familiar and traditional one, in which dreams, from a distance, are thoughtfully deconstructed, translated, and interpreted. Reverie and Interpretation serves as the keynote chapter in this volume. Here Ogden discusses the meaning, significance, and use of reverie in the interplay of the unconscious life of patient and analyst and in the unconscious constructions generated by the two. In On the Use of Language in Psychoanalysis, the author focuses on the life of words and the life in words. He speaks of what it feels like as words are employed by patient and analyst in an attempt to construct sentences and express/create thoughts and feelings in writing, in reading, and in listening during the process of their being together. In this chapter, Ogden pays particular attention to lifelessness in language. He encourages a use of words in which the confines of contentcentered language can be broken. Ogden tells us that he wrote the final chapter of Reverie and Interpretationfor the sheer pleasure
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of reading and writing about poetry (p. 235). In his discussion of Frost's The Silken Tent, Home Burial, and I Could Give All to Time, Ogden brings to bear many of his earlier thoughts from this volume. As he considers the three poems, he highlights the reader's experience as being the living human event that each poem addresses. In this sense, the poems do not represent objects of experience; they are the experience of feeling and being alive. It is in the spirit of writing for life that Ogden concludes this book. While I have not been exhaustive in summarizing Reverie and Interpretation here, I have tried to note some important points that are in keeping with Ogden's contribution to the analytic literature. In my estimation, Ogden's work is indeed original. I do not mean this in the sense that the work represents a de novo creation of Ogden's solitary but original mind, but rather that the work itself conveys living speechspeech that is a step apart from that of any other speaker. It is speech that calls on each of us to respond in our own voice and time, supported by the energy of our own living contradictions and inspired by our own epiphanies. In doing so, we may draw upon our subjective experiences as we attempt to conceptualize them, perhaps in terms of conflict in structural theory, the unconscious and conscious aspects of self and object relations, the self psychology of Kohut, the desire of Lacan, the intentionality of Husserl, or in many others. In the context of this plurality of conceptual approaches, Ogden's personal subjective work cannot be precisely replicated, but his subjective work as analytic interlocutor and proponent can be engaged. His work can challenge and disclose. It can inspire and mystify. It can touch experiences that seem wholly part of us and touch experiences that may be part of a subjective whole not yet brought into being. Finally, it can speak to us in ways that have exquisite personal meaning and significance far beyond any experience that Ogden himself (as stranger to each of our private worlds) could imagine. As Ogden presents it, the living human dialogue of subjects and subjectivity, as well as the language that informs and is created by it, offer a promising vision of a psychoanalytic context rife for exploration and kindled with a new sense of exciting abundance. Footnotes
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Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 2002; v.71 (3), p589 (4pp.) PAQ.071.0589A

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