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1. Introduction a.

PappaRich Malaysian delights profile


PappaRich Group was established in 2005 with its 1st outlet in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Its emerging as a formidable player in the local and international food and beverage industry. There are currently 6 outlets in Australia at the moment. For Melbourne QV (CBD), Doncaster, Chadstone, Nunawading and Glen Waverley. The latest outlet is located in Chatswood, Sydney. For Australia, inter-state expansion will be the groups main focus in 2013. The popularity of PappaRich internationally, is attributed largely to the introduction of its high quality food offerings such as freshly-made roti canai, traditional Hainan bread with kaya and butter, satay, nasi lemak, fried kuey teow, curry laksa, asam laksa, chicken rice, prawn mee, mee goreng, ice kacang and many more! The use high quality ingredients to bring out the best in Malaysian Delights. Beside a wide range of delicious food, it has also created more than 60 types of beverages, from PappaRich range of specially blended local coffee and tea to organic soya milk and juices. The concept is, you are able to see the Pappa white coffee, roti canai being prepared on the spot, adding a whole new dimension to your dining experience. Our outlets are decorated in earthy colours to give a cozy, clean and comfortable ambience that suit the needs of those who want either a quick bite or a relaxing leisurely meal. PappaRich Australia PappaRich Australia, a joint-venture with PappaRich Malaysia, opened its first outlets in QV, Doncaster and Chadstone in March, April and May 2012 respectively. 2 more outlets, such as Nunawading and Glen Waverley, were launched in December 2012. The first outlet in Sydney, which is located in Chatswood, has opened its doors to customers since April 2013. Mr. Saw, the managing director of PappaRich Australia, found the need for a truly authentic Malaysian home cuisine in Australia. This opportunity serves well within the growing Asian community.

Our Future Plans Looking forward, it continues to seek strategic opportunities for building our core business and activities. This also means a continued investment of resources and money to improve our human capital, production process and product quality. With a total of 5 outlets in Melbourne and 1 outlet in Sydney so far, our focus has now shifted into expanding to the various other states in Australia. PappaRich aspires to provide good Malaysian food all over the world.

b. Induction policy statement and objectives


Policy Statement PappaRich believes that all new employees must be given appropriate induction training. This is a vital aspect of assisting new staff members to understand and feel part of the company Purpose The purpose of induction is to ensure: a. A smooth transition into the company for new staff members. b. That new entrants understand PappaRichs vision, culture and ethos, and their role in promoting and maintaining these. c. That new employees are provided with an understanding of the function of the company, their role in it, and matters related to practice and service provision. d. This policy applies to all staff directly employed by PappaRich and for those for whom involved has legal responsibility. Roles and Responsibilities Line managers / supervisors All line PappaRich managers are responsible for ensuring that new staff within their supervision received a comprehensive induction. This will involve either; 1) arranging for staff to attend an HR induction, or 2) the direct delivery of induction training. New employees All new staff are encouraged to participate in identifying their own needs during the induction process. This should be verbally communicated as part of the process.

Induction Process a. A checklist is provided to guide the induction process. This is useful in helping the new employee avoiding overload, whilst ensuring that all the relevant areas are covered. b. A typical induction programme for a new employee should consist of: i. A general description of the overall company ii. Health and safety information, including specifically: 1. The policy and approach of the company 2. Emergency arrangements, exit routes and the assembly point. 3. A review of health and safety related training or further information needs, including; (sharps disposal, first aid etc). 4. A copy of / or access to the safety statement and where this can be accessed within the building. iii. An overview of the companys structure, its divisions and the work of the new employees team or section. iv. The key strategies and policies of the company. The staff member should receive a copy of the staff handbook and receive information on where other policies are located within the project. The supervisor should set out the policies which should be read by the new staff member and agree a schedule for this. While there is an expectation that staff will know the companys policies, initially a list of core policies will be prioritised. These will be: Code of Conduct, Confidentiality, Inclusion, Key Working, other). It is the responsibility of the manager to ensure that staff sign to confirm that they have read the policies and understand them. A time should be provided following this for the new staff member to ask any questions relating to the service delivery. v. A general introduction to the main terms and conditions of employment. vi. Information and communications strategies used in the company vii. A clear outline of the job/role requirements.

viii. If the new staff member will be shadowing or will be paired with another staff member as part of the induction process this should be explained. ix. Any other aspects of the indication process or initial work related goals or outcome expectations should be explained. c. Once fully completed the checklist should be signed by the new entrant and the line manager, and a copy kept in the personnel file. The checklist should be completed within one week of starting employment.

2. Induction program
a. Induction program
The induction program lists suggested activities to be covered from day one through to the end of probation.

SESSION Introduction to the University and work area


Person Responsible Line Manager

SUGGESTED CONTENT OF SESSION


Mission, Vision, Objectives of work area How the work area fits in to the wider University All key operational and social areas to be visited. (e.g. Offices, Labs, Catering Facilities, Bank, Library)

Introduction to other members of staff


Person Responsible Line Manager

Go through organisation chart Discuss roles and responsibilities of staff in general terms. May also want to extend time to allow visits to key contacts outwith work area.

Introduction to the other teams within the Work area (if appropriate)

Purpose/Activities of the other teams/work areas How the team fits in to the work area How the work area fits into the University

Person Responsible Line Manager

Terms and Conditions


Person Responsible Line Manager

Ensure new start has viewed and understood information contained in the Information for New Employees this contains important information on terms and conditions.

Performance Standards
Person Responsible Line Manager

Outline specifics of job role (job description) Define goals, objectives, and expectations Review probation and performance and development review/ ADR/ appraisal process.

Culture of the Work area


Person Responsible Line Manager/Nominee

Make new start aware of local arrangements regarding hours of work, holiday requests, sickness procedure, after hours working, dress code, lunch arrangements, etc. Other University procedures e.g. internet and e-mail usage, transportation and parking, etc.

Office Systems
Person Responsible Line Manager/Nominee

Review processes for using office equipment such as: computer, telephone, voicemail, fax, printer, photocopier, etc. Review processes for using other university equipment/systems such as: libraries, laboratories, open access computers, etc. Review computer security, and software usage. Consider environmental efficiencies (waste, recycling, energy)

Job Specific Training and Development


Person Responsible Line Manager/Nominee

Role specific development needs should be reviewed and a suitable programme of training should be planned that aligns the individuals skills to their core duties. Staff with line management responsibilities should be clear as to their duties and attend any relevant training. Outline the use of annual performance and development reviews/ ADR as one method for determining ongoing role specific development needs. Introduce University wide training and development opportunities available to staff. Review use of personal development planning tools (i.e.

PDP) Physical fire exits, fire alarms, fire evacuation procedure, fire-training arrangements, manual handling, first-aid arrangements, VDU usage, and other arrangements as required.

Health and Safety


Person Responsible Health & Safety Co-ordinator/ Line Manager

Monitoring and Evaluation


Person Responsible Line Manager

It is important that the Induction programme is monitored and reviewed. Throughout the period regular review meetings should be held and any adjustments made. See sample templates to support this process: Checklists, Evaluations.

Probation
Person Responsible Line Manager

For new staff the Probation Policy will apply

b. Induction toolkit contents checklist Contents Section 1: Pre-joining information Tool 1.1: The importance of induction and pre-induction Tool 1.2: Pre-induction information for employees Section 2: Welcome to the company Tool 2.1: Who are we and what do we do? Tool 2.2: Companys structure Tool 2.3: Important information Tool 2.4: The culture of the company Tool 2.5: Sources of support and advice Section 3: Statutory information an initial overview Tool 3.1: Health and safety legislation Tool 3.2: Data protection Tool 3.3: Environmental management

Tool 3.4: Equal opportunities and diversity Tool 3.5: Sickness absence procedures Section 4: Introduction to the companys policies, practices and processes Tool 4.1: Terms and conditions of employment Tool 4.2: Training and development Tool 4.3: Performance appraisal Tool 4.4: Discipline and grievance Tool 4.5: Administrative processes Section 5: Job-specific information Tool 5.1: Department and team structures Tool 5.2: Departmental and team induction Tool 5.3: Roles and responsibilities Tool 5.4: Using IT and other equipment Section 6: Evaluating the induction process and moving forward Tool 6.1: Question time Tool 6.2: End of initial induction evaluation Tool 6.3: Moving forward Tool 6.4: Second evaluation of the induction process Section 7: Supporting atypical workers Tool 7.1: Supporting graduates Tool 7.2: Supporting new international employees Tool 7.3: Supporting workplace returners Tool 7.4: Supporting workers returning after a long period of ill health or injury Tool 7.5: Supporting temporary workers Tool 7.6: Helping homeworkers Section 8: Enhancement resources for trainers Tool 8.1: Induction after the first week Tool 8.2: Maintaining momentum over the first two months Tool 8.3: Enhanced evaluation tools Tool 8.4: Reviewing existing induction processes

c. Induction process checklist


This checklist is to be initiated, and tailored to the work unit and employee's requirements, by the employee's supervisor. After each step in the checklist is completed, the person responsible for that induction activity should initial and date the checklist. Completed checklists are to be returned to the work unit's Admin Officer.

Employee's name: .................................................................................................................................................... Proposed start date: ........................................................ Work unit: ....................................................................

BEFORE START DATE


Induction task Person responsible Initials & date of Completion

Signed contract received Phone arranged Ext: Work space and desk organised Computer/Laptop & IT access arranged Other: Casual employees: signed copy of contract sent to HR

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1ST DAY
Induction task Person responsible
Employee

Initials & date of Completion

Modules 1 & 2 of the Corporate SCU induction completed IT access and systems:

computer setup & network access available access and training arranged for required systems (eg Finance
One E-trans Student One Aurion CRM Elluminate Blackboard)

Security and access:

photo ID key and building access telephone directory


complete Online Directory details Facilities and services:

mail arrangements location of toilets stores and stationery other facilities


Forms & documents sent to HR:

Completed forms as required in Step 2 of the employee's


induction If applicable:

Confidentiality Agreement Prohibited Employment Declaration Employee Relocation Assistance Agreement Remember: See original documents make sure documents show a clear link between any name changes take copies note 'Original Sighted' and sign the copies before forwarding them to HR Services

1ST DAY (CONTINUED)


Induction task Person responsible Initials & date of Completion

Employment information discussed: Code of Conduct emergency contacts and procedures Work Unit WHS Induction Checklist completed and Specific WHS requirements Forms, completed if required chemical safety procedures (where applicable) notification of absences, including reporting requirements SCU website resources HR contacts and website Continuing & fixed term academic employees: workload allocation attendance on campus Continuing & fixed term professional employees: hours of work (incl. start & finish times) attendance records/pay claims Casual employees: pay calendar pay claims

Position: people and relationships introductions handover position description and context of position probation priority projects/duties equipment and tools Other:

..................................................................................... .....................................................................................

............................................ ............................................

............................ ............................

1ST WEEK
Induction task Person responsible Initials & date of Completion

Meet with Manager/Team Leader:

overview of SCU, Cost Centre and work unit the employee's role & induction program role specific staff contacts and issues key duties and priority projects
Meet with team members: Role of staff in team key projects for other team members challenges for the team team communication Meet with work unit admin staff: office systems & processes

Campus facilities: eg gym, food outlets, medical centres etc: Library:

register for borrowing privileges


(photo ID required) Module 3 of the Corporate SCU Induction completed: Other: New supervisors: leave conditions (approving & recommending leave absences & training requests PMDR & probation responsibilities Academic employees: make an appointment to meet the campus Liaison Librarian TLC contact & services Online teaching resources/access. Employee

...................................... ......................................

......................... .........................

..........................................................................

...................................... ......................... .......................................................................... ..................................................................... 1ST MONTH


Induction task Person responsible Initials & date of Completion

Book into Induction Workshop Follow up uncompleted tasks Meet with Manager/Team Leader:

key HR and finance responsibilities


Work unit planning and reporting Professional learning:

identified training needs procedures, forms, website, access


Performance measures PMDR/Probation

PMDR processes, requirements and training. Probation process and any specific requirements.
Relevant SCU policies, procedures and delegations:

location of SCU policies and delegations on the website


Business cards (if relevant)

Induction completed: Employee's signature: .................................................................................... Date: ........................... Supervisor's signature: ................................................................................... Date: ...........................

d. Evaluation form

I am a:

Area Supervisor

Waitstaff

Bartender

Please indicate your impressions of the items listed below. Strongly Agree Neutral Disagree Agree 1. The training met my expectations. 2. I will be able to apply the knowledge learned. 3. The training objectives for each topic were identified and followed. 4. The content was organized and easy to follow. 5. The materials distributed were pertinent and useful. 6. The trainer was knowledgeable. 7. The quality of instruction was good. 8. The trainer met the training objectives. 9. Class participation and interaction were encouraged. 10. Adequate time was provided for questions and discussion. Strongly Disagree

11. How do you rate the training overall? Excellent Good Average Poor Very poor

10. What aspects of the training could be improved? 11. Other comments? THANK YOU FOR YOUR PARTICIPATION!

e. Induction training and support


Induction is the process of introducing and orienting a new recruit to the company Staff induction activities are designed to provide new staff with information they need to get them up and started in the new organisation leading to quicker productivity. Induction should be a key component of any companys management policies and procedures yet often it is not done properly, relying on new staff just to learn as they go. This approach to induction can prove frustrating and unproductive not only to new staff but to existing staff who "don't understand why the new person just doesn't get it!" Induction should include a managed approach to the following generic topics:

Company goals and objectives - how does this position contribute to these goals? Company profile - what is the history of the company? What sets it apart from other companys? What is its brand? Companys structure - Who works here? What are the departments? How do they work together? Companys policies including OSH, EEO and other workplace policies including breaks, leave security, privacy etc f. Objectives based on organization policy
Business policies may begin as brief statements which demonstrate a company's commitment to providing a product or service to its public. Top management generally devises a quality system based upon specific policies. Policies may also deal with company commitment to continuous improvement toward effective business systems. For example, an organization may develop a "quality policy," to ensure that staff adhere to the highest level of integrity when designing products and providing services in the company's name. Business objectives can be developed based upon a company's production and service policies. Management creates policies which establish and review company objectives that are relevant to its business needs. Business objectives may include the ideal that the success of any company system involves participation by all levels of employees in order to be reach their goals.

g. Training tasks
New employee training programs give employees the information they need to protect themselves and others at work and to efficiently manufacture quality feed. Feed mill employees must receive formal training to comply with Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations. Training is also required to attain most third-party certifications. The training program must document and verify that the employee understands the material and is competent in the subject matter. In addition to being required by government agencies, training programs are a good business practice.
The first step in developing a training program is to identify all of the topics required by the company and specifically by the feed mill. Topics generally fall into the following broad categories:

Employee Handbook Position Requirements Safety Training Quality Assurance Regulatory Compliance Employee Development and Certifications Preventive Maintenance and Housekeeping Standard Operation Procedures

h. List of staff and methods for training staff Cooks The most important factor to consider when hiring a cook is experience. Preferably, experience in the style of food you will be serving. Cooking candidates should express an enthusiasm for the food you plan to serve. Wait Staff If you are expecting a high paced, quick turnover rate each day, you need someone who can move fast. However, if the view of your restaurant is quiet, intimate, and slow-paced, such as fine dining, then you need someone who is comfortable that type of atmosphere. Host

The general job of a restaurant host is to meet, greet, and seat customers. Therefore it is an excellent entry-level job for someone without a lot of restaurant experience Bartender This position is often tops on the front-of-the house job ladder. To be a great bartender (and that is the only type you should hire) a person must have a wide knowledge of mixed drinks, be friendly to both customers and staff and be a good listener. Dishwasher This is usually an entry-level position in the business. While dishwashing isnt the most desirable job in a restaurant, it is one of the most important. Busboy (also referred to as a Busser) Often, the first promotion a dishwasher gets is to busboy. This position is ideal for a high school student. Method for training
i. Demonstrating Shadowing Instructing Supervised Performance Role-Playing

Checklist for facilitating training 1. Facilitators should realise that it may take as long to prepare for as to actually present/facilitate the training. It is important that cofacilitators work together to build the agenda and are clear who is responsible for what and how they will work together. 2. Be realistic about the amount of time allotted for each section. Don't give in to the pressure to do the training quickly if it can't be done. Start the training with introductions. Break the ice with introductory exercises. If the group members know each other well, ask a question so people learn something new about each other.

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If trainers don't have enough information about people's experiences, use non-competitive ways to ask. Set a tone, explaining that the trainers need the information but that it is not an exercise in identifying who is 'better'. Early in the training, have exercises that will encourage participation, such as a simple hassle line. Balance activity in pairs or trios with activity in larger groups. Mix discussion with moving exercises; provide regular breaks. Keep track of time, and mark possible cuts if you get behind schedule. But don't cut the last items as they may be some of the most important, such as the scenario role play. Always leave time for evaluation, and use different forms of evaluation. Write on wall charts 'what went well' (+) and 'what could have been better' (>). Ask a series of questions to solicit comments; use a go around or a brainstorm method. Written evaluation forms are very helpful for long trainings.

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