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June 08

34

Gender based violence – making the invisible visible Since independence, Botswana has made Work has
Gender based
violence
– making the
invisible
visible
Since independence, Botswana
has
made
Work has already started on counselling for
women
significant
progress
in
alleviating poverty
and
children, assertiveness
and gender
sensitisation
training
for
prospective
women
candidates
to
and
improving the
standard of living.
prepare
them for the 2009
national
general
However,
the
problem
of
gender-based
elections, community dialogues, legal support
and
violence (GBV) still
represents a
significant
strengthening of Students
Against
Rape clubs in
challenge
and threat to further
progress.
schools
within
Maun.
A
UNIFEM study
in 2002
indicates that
60%
of women
Two counsellors have been
employed at Bana
ba
in
Botswana
have been victims of domestic
violence
Letsatsi
as
part
of this project and
started this
(including incest,
assault,
rape and refusal to
use
March.
They have both
had
previous experience of
condoms). In many
cases, women and
girls
return to
NGOs and have
worked
extensively
with children.
these abusive situations
for
several reasons,
that
“Previously
we
only
had
one counsellor
for over 240
include patriarchal attitudes,
women’s economic
children. With
more counsellors we are able to
dependence
on
men, lack of
viable
options
for women,
work more
routinely with the children
and
also
to
and
the
fear of public humiliation. GBV
can
lock
hold group
sessions
weekly.
We
are
also able to
women
and
girls
into poverty. To break this
cycle
spend more time in
the
field getting to
know the
women
need support to
gain access
to
new
children’s family members
and
also
involving them
opportunities and education
independence.
to
facilitate
their financial
in the project,”
explained a spokesperson at Bana
Khwezi Mbonini, Skillshare
International
Country
ba
Letsatsi.
Director
in Botswana,
is managing this GBV project
Since December
2007 Skillshare International has been
working
with
partner
organisations –
Emang
Basadi,
a gift
to
Skillshare
International
to
help fund
work
like
this.
Women
Against Rape and Bana
ba Letsatsi,
on a
three-
You can give
Simply visit
www.skillshare.org and
click on the
donate
now button.
year project
75%
funded
by
the
European Commission,
Challenging
Abuse Against Women
and
Children.
JARGON
BUSTER
--
Gender Mainstreaming
These partners have the common aim of addressing
GBV and
related
challenges
and
have the capacity to
Mainstreaming
a gender
perspective is
the
process
of assessing
the
implications for
women and
address
the
problem
of
GBV
from a
holistic
approach
men
of
any planned
action,
including legislation, policies or
programmes, in
all
areas and at
all
through
their experience
in
counselling,
rehabilitation,
levels. It
is a
strategy for
making
women’s as well as
men’s concerns and experiences an integral
campaigning
and networking.
dimension of the design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of policies and programmes
Khwezi Mbonini,
Country Director in
Botswana,
is
in all
political, economic
and societal spheres so
that women and men
benefit
equally
and
managing the project, which
she
hails as
“a
life saver,
inequality is
not
perpetuated. The ultimate
goal
is to achieve gender equality. (UN
Economic and
the long awaited
liberator for long suffering abused
Social Council formally
defined
concept).
women
and
children”.
Source:
Wikipedia
©Skillshare/Claire Lewis-Armes

Empowering

women

©Skillshare/Julie George
©Skillshare/Julie George
Lewis-Armes Empowering women ©Skillshare/Julie George Peter with trainees and staff at KMS Kairali Mahali Samajam

Peter with trainees and staff at KMS

Kairali Mahali Samajam (KMS) literally means women’s group. KMS was set up in 1980 by Ms Crystal Steven in a village called Chemmannuvila in the state of Kerala to help predominantly tribal women improve the quality of their lives through mutual and self help.

KMS has set up more than 40 self-help groups for women, who benefit from loans and run small businesses such as stone-crushing, tailoring and dairies. KMS offers training and technical support to the groups. It also runs two nursery schools and a primary school.

The Kairali Primary School (KPS) borders the forest areas, enrols children of

all religious faiths and actively encourages girls to stay in full-time education

for as long as possible. About 120 students are now enrolled at KPS and the school employs six primary and two nursery teachers, who are all local women, funded solely from self-generated income.

Skillshare International development worker Peter Warner has been working with KMS for over a year. His work there involves training the teachers in new techniques and training methods centred more towards the student, such as Child Centred Learning and Peace Teacher - Peace Methods.

teachers

in

Kerala

Peter explains: “getting the teachers to consider these new ideas, which are quite alien to them, can be difficult at times, but I have written a course which the staff appreciate and the debates that take place can be fun for all concerned. For such a long time students have not been treated as the most important person in the classroom, which of course they are.”

Some of the topics Peter is raising as part of his placement include, equality of opportunity, preparing the children for a lesson, raising achievements and the physical environment. Another part of Peter’s role at KMS is to organise surveys about primary education in the forest areas and work with tribal communities to find out how primary education can be most effective.

Peter is also trying to get funding to build a new school because the structure of the school he is working in now is in need of major refurbishment. Peter stated: “one of the problems facing this project is that funding agencies do not consider KPS a priority because Kerala as a whole has a good educational standard, however the forest and rural areas often do not benefit from this. There is still plenty of work to do but I am optimistic that more can and will be achieved.”

©Skillshare/Julie George
©Skillshare/Julie George
more can and will be achieved.” ©Skillshare/Julie George Peter with the trainee teachers     In

Peter with the trainee teachers

©Skillshare/Julie George Peter with the trainee teachers     In this issue: Julie’s work on
   

In this issue:

Julie’s work on trafficking

   

Women vote for women

   

Prince Harry makes visit

   

Women teachers in Kerala

   

Development Workers

   

NEW PLACEMENTS

   

Ekomenzoge Metuge Regional Coordinator, Project Hope, Namibia

Barbara Dockalova Capacity Builder, ANGOZA (Association of NGOs in Zanzibar), Tanzania

James Urwick Director of Academic Planning, Lesotho College of Education, Lesotho

Monique Janssens Research and Communications Officer, COPA, Kenya

Liberty Shelton Training Adviser, Permaculture Trust, Botswana

Abel Mubvekere Appropriate Technology Adviser, KOMEHO Namibian Development Agency, Namibia

Rebecca Young Development Adviser, Tanzania House of Talents, Tanzania

Katrine Musgrave Business Adviser, Botshello, Botswana

 

Katrine Musgrave NGO Liaison & Letsema Development Manager, Sentebale Charity, Lesotho

Wilfred Oirere Orenge Social Reintegration Officer, AMIMO Mozambique Miners Association, Mozambique

Anna Burnett Development Manager, Manzini Youth Centre, Swaziland

John Burnett Project Manager (Honey Business), Manzini Youth Centre, Swaziland

Beullah Muchira Clinic Project Coordinator, Swaziland Breast Cancer Network, Swaziland

 

Boniface Olubayo Business Adviser, Gantsi Brigade Development Trust, Botswana

 

Ian Kaayo Fundraising & Communications Officer, MAAP, Kenya

Daniel Carter Lecturer in General Medicine, UCM Beira Medical School, Mozambique

 

COMPLETED PLACEMENTS

 

Dr Dinesh Baliga Programme Officer, HIV and AIDS Mainstreaming, Skillshare International, India

Verdiana Malanguka Resources Mobilisation Officer, Various Partners, Botswana

Katrine Musgrave Marketing & Mobilisation Adviser, Lesotho Planned Parenthood Association (LPPA), Lesotho

 

Rebecca Sanchez Business Adviser, Botshello, Botswana

Lesotho Planned Parenthood Association (LPPA), Lesotho   Rebecca Sanchez Business Adviser, Botshello, Botswana
Lesotho Planned Parenthood Association (LPPA), Lesotho   Rebecca Sanchez Business Adviser, Botshello, Botswana
Lesotho Planned Parenthood Association (LPPA), Lesotho   Rebecca Sanchez Business Adviser, Botshello, Botswana

Email Skillshare news editor at: editor@skillshare.org

March 08

news editor at: editor@skillshare.org M a r c h 0 8 N ews in brief Skillshare

News in brief

Skillshare International

a in

a

in

SSM student wins prize

Alex Hillman, a student at

Leicester Medical School, has won

prize for writing the best essay

the Skillshare International

Health and Development Special Study Module (SSM). The module provides opportunities for

students to learn about important issues in global health and how uneven development results in a high disease burden on the poor.

Alex’s essay discussed the degree to which political freedom results in more favourable health outcomes in countries with similar levels of economic development. His conclusion was that a commitment to providing equitable access to health care was more important than whether a country was led by a democratically elected government.

©Adrian Hastings

The essay prize was sponsored by the Just Fair Trade organisation in Leicester. Alex received a Just Fair Trade hamper and gift vouchers.

Julie’s work on trafficking

In May, Skillshare International’s Regional Director for Asia, Julie George, held a talk on Human Trafficking: inhibiting the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals. The talk was at the University of Leicester Medical School and primarily to students taking the Health and Development Special Study Module (SSM).

Julie explained that human trafficking is an issue that several organisations in Asia are working hard to create awareness about, especially in India and Nepal. There was an overview of the issues, initiatives and the non-funded programmes that are tackling this problem. Students also watched a short video documentary on trafficking. Julie also advised the students that the University of Leicester Medical School will be offering electives with Skillshare International’s partners in India.

Prince Harry visits St. Angela Cheshire Home

This April, HRH Prince Harry visited St. Angela Cheshire Home for disabled children as a beneficiary of the Sentebale charity. Sentebale (Forget Me Not) is a new charity founded by Prince Harry and Lesotho’s Prince Seeiso to help vulnerable children and young people in Lesotho, particularly those orphaned by AIDS. Skillshare International is working in partnership with St. Angela Cheshire Home through the Lesotho disability project and has also placed a development worker with Sentebale.

©Skillshare/Justice Kalebe

©Skillshare/Justice Kalebe
Prince Harry with children from St. Angela Cheshire Home for disabled children

Prince Harry with children from St. Angela Cheshire Home for disabled children

Virtual becomes face to face for Rebecca

The Masaai pastoralists of Ngorongoro are among Tanzania’s most marginalised people and they have little influence or control over policies which directly affect them. Skillshare International's partner organisation the Irkiramat Foundation (RAMAT) has an ultimate goal; to improve quality of life for the Masaai and alleviate their extreme poverty. Skillshare International development worker Rebecca Young had been working with RAMAT

for six months in an innovative online placement

where she used technology to share skills remotely from the UK. Rebecca subsequently started another placement with another Skillshare partner organisation, the Tanzania House of Talents. This placement was based in Tanzania and so she was able to visit the Masaai people she had been working with through RAMAT on International Women’s Day.

The women of the ward had established a village banking system and had saved 19 million Tanzanian shillings (over £8,000). They gathered under an acacia tree and were eager to begin income generating projects with their community money box. Rebecca’s role was to assist and expand their jewellery project so that they could ultimately build a better life for their community. Rebecca showed the women her tool-kit of ideas. The Masaai women tried on the different accessories; belts, necklaces, earrings and bags and looked through fashion magazines Rebecca had brought with her from the UK. Rebecca said, “I was humbled and privileged to be given the opportunity to work alongside one of Africa’s most famous yet vulnerable communities.” Rebecca explained that when she was speaking with the Masaai women, “they displayed acute awareness of the poverty that they were living in and the fact that sharing the education and knowledge that others already possessed could help change their situation.”

©Skillshare/Rebecca Young
©Skillshare/Rebecca Young
help change their situation.” ©Skillshare/Rebecca Young Masaai woman at the jewellery workshop  

Masaai woman at the jewellery workshop

 
 
 
 
©Skillshare/Amanda Mukwashi
©Skillshare/Amanda Mukwashi

Editor’s Note

Welcome to our June edition of Skillshare News. The focus this time is gender, including articles about our new gender based violence project in Botswana and our gender advocacy work in Swaziland.

Please feel free to address your comments about this edition and suggestions for future articles to me at the UK office in Leicester, or by email to editor@skillshare.org.

Best wishes

Women vote for women at Swaziland elections

Women vote for women at Swaziland elections

This year Swaziland will have the eighth elections since their independence in 1968 and women are waiting in great anticipation to vote.

Civil society is advocating for women to vote for women for parliamentary representation because gaps within the constitution do not accord Swazi women equal rights to men in terms of citizenship, acquiring land, marriage and inheritance. Full representation of women will enable parliament to query such issues and lobby for legal reforms to address the gaps that currently exist.

TV programmes have also been aired as part of this project, they are run as panel debates and address the various gaps in terms of women’s rights that exist within the constitution. Staff from Skillshare’s partner organisations SWANNEPHA and SWAGAA have both been panellists on these programmes.

Claire Lewis-Armes

Editor

panellists on these programmes. Claire Lewis-Armes Editor Already the Constitution in Swaziland has had their first

Already the Constitution in Swaziland has had their first female Deputy Prime Minister, Senate President and an increased representation of female cabinet ministers, senators and members of parliament. They have also had their first female judge in high court. Swaziland is looking to build on these successes to bridge the inequalities between genders. With the forthcoming elections it would be empowering to all women of the world to see Swaziland have equal representation. Who better to represent and advocate for women’s rights than women who have been affected, directly or indirectly, by inequality in women’s rights as citizens.

women’s rights than women who have been affected, directly or indirectly, by inequality in women’s rights

Skillshare International 126 New Walk, Leicester. LE1 7JA UK

Tel: +44 (0)116 254 1862

Fax: +44 (0)116 254 2614 Email: info@skillshare.org

 

www.skillshare.org

This publication has been produced with the assistance of the European Union. The content of this publication is the sole responsibility of Skillshare International and can in no way be taken to reflect the views of the European Union.

sole responsibility of Skillshare International and can in no way be taken to reflect the views

Currently the Skillshare International country office in Swaziland is running a USAID funded programme that addresses women’s rights within the Constitution of the Kingdom of Swaziland and CEDAW (Convention on the Elimination of all forms of Discrimination against Women). Awareness raising training has been held in eight constituencies around the country where women are encouraged to vote women into parliament.

Chief Executive - Dr Cliff Allum. Chair - Wendy Tabuteau. Vice Presidents - Bill Morris. Richard Caborn. Patrons - Richard E Grant. Trevor McDonald OBE. Registered Charity No. 802576. A company limited by guarantee No. 2447107. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information within is accurate. This newsletter has been printed on recycled paper. Please recycle by passing it on.