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Linguistic

Semantic

Structural

Cultural

Specific textual examples of what youve observed when reading at this levelcited in MLA format. (You may use numbers or bullets here to take notes)

- You are too hasty, sir, she cried (93). - I am not now to learn, replied Mr. Collins, with a formal wave of the hand, that it is usual with young ladies to reject the addresses of the man whom they secretly mean to accept (93). - Indeed, Mr. Collins, all praise of me will be unnecessary (93).

- And you may be certain that when I have the honour of seeing her again I shall speak in the highest terms of your modesty, economy, and other amiable qualifications (93). - I am therefore no means discouraged by what you have just said, and shall hope to lead you to the altar ere long (93). -Upon my word, sir, cried Elizabeth, your hope is rather an extraordinary one after my declaration (93).

- I do assure you that I am not one of those young ladies (if such young ladies there are) who are so daring as to risk their happiness on the chance of being asked a second time (93). - You could not make me happy, and I am convinced that I am the last woman in the world who would make you so (93). - I am not now to learn, replied Mr. Collins, with a formal wave of the hand, that it is usual with young ladies to reject the addresses of the man whom they secretly mean to accept (93).

- I do assure you that I am not one of those young ladies (if such young ladies there are) who are so daring as to risk their happiness on the chance of being asked a second time (93). - I am not now to learn, replied Mr. Collins, with a formal wave of the hand, that it is usual with young ladies to reject the addresses of the man whom they secretly mean to accept (93). - You could not make me happy, and I am convinced that I am the last woman in the world who would make you so (93).

Austens writing in this passage is mostly dialogue. Elizabeth uses shorter, more concise sentences compared to Mr. Collins, who rambles on in long, flowery speeches. Elizabeths speech tags are all denoted with cried to describe her tone during her replies. Both styles of dialogue are characteristic of the Regency era, though Mr. Collins is excessively so.

Austens word choice for each of the characters highlights satirical commentary at Mr. Collins. Elizabeths speech tags denotes the tone of outrage and ridiculousness at what she has heard. Mr. Collins excessive vocabulary when praising Lady Catherine emphasizes his groveling at those with a higher social status as well as the pompousness of his proposal towards Elizabeth.

Elaborating on the various sentence lengths of Elizabeth and Mr. Collins, this distinguishes them as two sides of society. Elizabeth is clear about her desires to marry for love, while Mr. Collins rambles in representation of societys expectations of marriage. This shows a bias in Austens viewpoints towards marriage, seen through the sentence lengths. Also, Elizabeth chooses to use unexpected punctuation in her dialoguedashes and parentheses. These are also present to emphasize her stance on marriage as well as to mock Mr. Collins behind his back.

Demonstrate the development of complexity of thought at each level by writing a descriptive response to what youve written in the row above. (Analyze your thought patterns when observing the examples youve listed abovethese may also be in notetaking form)

The interaction between Elizabeth and Mr. Collins can then be seen as a dividing mechanism between Elizabeth, who embodies Austens views, and Mr. Collins who embodies social expectations of the time. Austen uses satirical humor to poke fun at Mr. Collins in order to condemn what he represents and makes it clear, through Elizabeth that marriage should be for love and happiness instead of money and social status.