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STRUCTURAL CONDITION ASSESSMENT REPORT EXTERIOR BRICK WALLS, FOUNDATION, AND FLOOR FRAMING

Smith Hall
University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, NC

Prepared for: UNC-CH Architectural & Engineering Services Facilities Condition Assessment Program Prepared by: Atlas Engineering, Inc. 2245 North Hills Dr., Suite I, Raleigh, NC 27612 919-420-7676 May 29, 2003

May 29, 2003 University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Architectural & Engineering Services 103 Airport Drive, Campus Box 1800 Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 Attention: Subject: Mr. Geoffrey Lee Structural Condition Assessment WRN 558578 Exterior Brick Walls, Foundation, and Floor Framing Smith Hall Building No. 128 UNC-CH Main Campus Atlas Engineering Job No. J0708

Dear Mr. Lee: Atlas Engineering is pleased to provide this report on our structural condition assessment of the exterior brick walls, foundation, and floor framing for Smith Hall. Our work has been completed in accordance with our revised proposal dated March 5, 2003, and letter of authorization from UNC dated March 17, 2003. The purpose of our work was to provide a structural evaluation of the building to compare the current condition to recognized standard performance criteria. This report presents an executive summary, introduction, project information, review of documents, and our observations of the structure. We have provided general recommendations for repairs and a cost opinion for the repairs. Photographs of significant structural observations and a list of drawings and reports reviewed are included at the back of this report. If you have any questions regarding this report, please contact us at (919) 420-7676. Sincerely, ATLAS ENGINEERING, INC. Electronic Copy Original hard copies are signed and sealed. Philip C. Lambe, P.E. Senior Engineer D. Chris Coutu, P.E. Senior Engineer

1.0 Executive Summary


Atlas Engineering, Inc. performed a structural survey to assess the condition of Smith Hall on May 9, 2003. As part of the survey, we identified areas of damage and deterioration, assessed the floor live load rating for code compliance, and made general recommendations for structural repairs to the building. We compared the current condition with established criteria based on the North Carolina State Building Code, 2002 Edition Chapter 16. The exterior brick has minor stair-step cracks at the two exterior stairways, and between the basement and first floor windows near each of the four building corners. These masonry cracks are not structurally significant but should be repointed. One interior stairway at the basement level shows wood damage, reportedly by termites, that is severe enough to be a structural hazard. Water leaks near the northeast entrance have likely damaged several floor joists at the first floor level, through long-term decay. A wood-framed doorway in the basement has also been damaged by decay. These areas of isolated framing damage are shown on the attached drawing. None of the floor framing members could be inspected due to the heavy plaster ceiling finishes. Based on our review of the original plans and our capacity calculations, we believe that the floor framing at the corridors and offices meet the code-required live load capacities. However, we could not locate any design information on the support for the second and third floor areas above classrooms 107 and 202. The 1960s renovations removed loadbearing walls in these rooms that supported the floor areas above. We were not able to observe the replacement supports or make capacity calculations, and cannot confirm that the floor areas above classrooms 107 and 202 meet the Code criteria for floor live load capacity. We recommend immediate repair of the termite-damaged stair and water-damaged doorway in the basement. We strongly suspect floor framing decay at the first floor near the northeast entrance, and recommend selective demolition of the basement ceiling to inspect and repair these first floor joists. The foundation wall in this area should be waterproofed. We recommend selective demolition of ceiling areas in classrooms 107 and 202, to expose the supports for the floor framing above. This will be required if the floor live load capacity is to be confirmed in the areas above 107 and 202. We estimate the cost of the above repair work at $33,800. The Smith Building should be re-inspected at intervals of two to three years.
Report on Structural Condition Assessment WRN 558578 Exterior Brick Walls, Foundation, and Floor Framing - Smith Hall Building No. 128 Prepared for University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill - Facilities Condition Assessment Program Prepared by Atlas Engineering, Inc., 2245 North Hills Dr., Suite I, Raleigh, NC 27612 May 29, 2003 Page 1

2.0 Introduction
The purpose of the structural survey was to assess the condition of the brick veneer, foundation, and floor framing of the Smith Building, and to compare the current condition with established baseline criteria. Additionally our goal was to identify areas of damage or deterioration, evaluate the safety and durability of the structure, assess the floor live load rating for code compliance, and recommend repairs to the structure. We first obtained available copies of drawings pertaining to the construction of the building and any subsequent repair work. We reviewed the drawings to determine the type of construction, structural layout, and to identify specific structural members critical to the walls, floors, and foundations. A Professional Engineer, familiar with typical building distresses, made structural observations at the site on May 9, 2003. Basic documentation included photographs and written notes. Clearly damaged structural components were documented, as well as less obvious indications of structural distress, such as damaged finishes, patterns of cracks, and excessive deflection. Our survey included visual observations by an experienced engineer, and included only structural-related issues. No finishes were removed or excavations made to reveal hidden conditions, and no material or load tests were conducted as a part of our current scope. The survey did not include inspection of electrical systems, egress, fire-suppression or fire rating of building components, or review of handicap accessibility. Our cost opinions for repairs must be considered as preliminary, as no repairs have been designed and no material quantity take-off has been performed at this time.

3.0 Testing Program


No testing was performed as part of this structural assessment. Based on our observations, and the lack of sufficient information regarding the floor framing systems above rooms 107 and 202, we recommend selective demolition of the ceilings in these rooms to verify the structural supports.

4.0 Data Collection And Documentation


The information collected regarding this structure included copies of the original structural drawings for this building. A list of drawings and reports reviewed are presented at the end of this report. Copies of the drawings were made from the 1901 record drawings on file at the UNC Facilities Services Plan Room located in the Giles Horney Building.

Report on Structural Condition Assessment WRN 558578 Exterior Brick Walls, Foundation, and Floor Framing - Smith Hall Building No. 128 Prepared for University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill - Facilities Condition Assessment Program Prepared by Atlas Engineering, Inc., 2245 North Hills Dr., Suite I, Raleigh, NC 27612 May 29, 2003 Page 2

Observed field conditions were documented with both digital photographs and written notes. The notes were recorded by the inspecting engineer in a bound field book.

5.0 Description of Structure


Smith Hall currently houses the Academic Technology & Networking Service in the basement, Statistics Department on the first floor, and Operations Research on the second and third floors. Originally constructed in 1901 for use as a student dormitory, it was converted to office and classroom use in the 1960s and most recently renovated in 1996. The Smith building is a four-story brick and timber building measuring approximately 45 by 130 in plan with the long dimension running perpendicular to East Cameron Avenue. The building construction includes load bearing exterior and interior brick masonry walls, load-bearing stud walls, timber floor joists, and a steep-sloped hipped slate-covered roof. Details regarding the structural system supporting floor loads over the classrooms 107 and 202, which were created during renovations performed during the 1960s, were not shown on available plans and could not be determined from inspection. Selective demolition at plaster walls and ceilings would be required to confirm the floor framing arrangements. The brick masonry walls are three wythes (layers) thick. The interior and exterior masonry walls extend from the floor slab to the third floor level. Original design drawings indicate that all the masonry walls bear on footings of widened brick masonry construction. The floor framing consists of 2 by 12 wood floor joists spaced 16 on-center and spanning front to back across the central hallway and right to left over the rooms that flank the hall. Span lengths are typically 11 to 16 feet in offices and classrooms and 7 to 9-6 in the hallways. At the exterior walls, the joists bear in beam pockets. The basement floor plan located at the end of this report is based on the current floor plan. The roof is a steep slope hip roof formed by 2 by 8 rafters spaced 20 on center with 1 by 8 horizontal tension member fixed 5 down from the ridge line. Vertical loads are carried by 6 by 8 purlins supported on stud walls and by the exterior masonry walls. Floor finishes include carpeting and vinyl floor tiles. The interior walls consist of painted plaster over metal lath and painted gypsum wallboard. The ceilings are insulated acoustical panels with metal grid suspended below the original plaster ceiling. The load paths for this structure are conventional. Vertical roof loads are collected by the purlins and delivered to the interior stud walls and upper courses of the exterior masonry walls. Floor loads are collected by the timber floor framing systems and delivered to interior stud walls and pocket or corbel bearings at the interior and exterior masonry walls. The un-reinforced masonry walls deliver loads to shallow footings running along
Report on Structural Condition Assessment WRN 558578 Exterior Brick Walls, Foundation, and Floor Framing - Smith Hall Building No. 128 Prepared for University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill - Facilities Condition Assessment Program Prepared by Atlas Engineering, Inc., 2245 North Hills Dr., Suite I, Raleigh, NC 27612 May 29, 2003 Page 3

each wall. It is possible that steel girders were added during renovations performed in the 1960s that combined smaller room into classrooms 107 and 202. Lateral wind and seismic loads are resisted by the diaphragm action of the floor levels and the shear wall capacity of the interior and exterior masonry walls. For overall building stability, the critical members include the interior and exterior masonry walls, and wood floor and roof members.

6.0 Site Observations


Exterior Brick Walls Photos 1 to 3 show exterior views of the east, west, and south walls of the building. Weather exposure has faded some brick and roof drainage has stained some brick. The exterior brick wall had stair step cracks near the building corners, located between the basement and first floor windows. Photos 4 and 5 show the cracks located on either side of the southwest corner. Probing the mortar joints with a small knife, we encountered areas of soft tan mortar adjacent to areas of hard mortar. In addition, at several windows the mortar finish used to provide the appearance of stone lintels was cracked. Foundations The spread footing foundations are buried more than 5 below exterior surface grade and could not be inspected from either inside or outside the building. Cracks near the building corners were likely caused by differential settlement but have widths less than without any evidence of recent movement. The concrete exterior stairways located at the southeast and northeast corners appear to have settled more than the building causing them to separate slightly from the building. Photo 6 shows the exterior stairs located at the northeast corner. The section of downspout pipe shown missing in photo 6 has reportedly been removed for repair. Interior Termite and Water Damage Photo 7 shows water damage to the first floor wall located near the northeast entrance, and photos 8 and 9 show water damaged ceilings and walls located in the basement adjacent to the northeast entrance. We could not directly inspect the structural framing members in the vicinity of ceiling damage shown in photo 8, but it is likely joists been damaged sufficiently by decay to decrease their structural capacity. Photo 10 shows a water damaged basement doorway. A small area of similar damage was also observed in the exterior basement doorframe. Photo 11 shows water damage observed on the ceiling of room 203, which was apparently caused by a roof leak. Photo 13 shows the stairway from basement to the first floor, which has reportedly been damaged by termites. While we understand exterminators have eliminated the termites,
Report on Structural Condition Assessment WRN 558578 Exterior Brick Walls, Foundation, and Floor Framing - Smith Hall Building No. 128 Prepared for University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill - Facilities Condition Assessment Program Prepared by Atlas Engineering, Inc., 2245 North Hills Dr., Suite I, Raleigh, NC 27612 May 29, 2003 Page 4

no repairs have been made to the damaged stairs. The basement floor plan drawing at the end of this report shows the locations of termite and water damage. Floor Framing The 1st, 2nd, and 3rd floors appeared fairly level and felt firm under foot traffic. Photos 14 and 15 show views down the 2nd and 3rd floor hallways. While the 3rd floor appeared depressed along the left wall, tile was uncracked. The depression is likely the result of long-term creep (or set) of the wood members.

7.0 Analysis
We analyzed the floor framing capacity performance criteria using live loads given in the North Carolina State Building Code, 2002 Edition, Table 1607.1. The specified minimum uniformly distributed floor live load for the first floor corridors is 100-psf, and for 2nd and 3rd floor corridors is 80-psf. The required minimum floor live load for offices is 50-psf, and for classrooms is 40-psf. From the record drawings, we were able to determine the original floor framing systems and connection details in corridors and offices. Based on our analysis and the observed condition of these floors, it is our opinion that these floor structural systems meet the NC Building code requirements. The renovations in the 1960s included removal of load-bearing stud walls in classrooms 107 and 202. The stud walls had supported the joists in the floor framing above these rooms. The renovation work had to include installation of new support girders, possibly steel beams, to replace the support of the stud walls. No plans could be located to show this work, and the new supports are hidden from view by the plaster ceilings. We were not able to confirm the live-load capacity for the floor areas above these rooms. Load capacity calculations cannot be made for these floor areas, without exposing, measuring, and inspecting the support members added in the 1960s. This will require selective demolition of the plaster ceilings.

8.0 Conclusions and Recommendations


In the basement, termite damage has structurally damaged the stair to the first floor, and water infiltration has caused plaster damage at walls and wood decay at doorways. Water infiltration has likely caused decay damage to several first-floor joists near the northeast entrance, as well. These damaged parts should be repaired. The water leaks at the foundation wall near the northeast entrance should be found and repaired. Brick cracks at the exterior are minor and are not structurally significant, but should be repointed to prevent water entry and future damage to the interior. Soft mortar near these cracks should be raked out and repointed.
Report on Structural Condition Assessment WRN 558578 Exterior Brick Walls, Foundation, and Floor Framing - Smith Hall Building No. 128 Prepared for University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill - Facilities Condition Assessment Program Prepared by Atlas Engineering, Inc., 2245 North Hills Dr., Suite I, Raleigh, NC 27612 May 29, 2003 Page 5

We recommend selective demolition of the plaster ceilings at classrooms 107 and 202, to expose the floor joist supports installed during the 1960s renovation. Once these are exposed, the supports can be measured and inspected, and the floor live load capacity can be confirmed for the floor areas above these rooms. We recommend a structural re-inspection of the building every two to three years. Recommended Repairs Priority Item Unit Cost Replace wood stair from $1,000/day 1 basement to first floor $1,000/day Selective demolition of 2 basement ceiling to inspect and repair probable decay damage at first floor joists adjacent to NE entrance $4,000 Selective demolition of 3 ceilings @ 107 & 202, and engineering assessment of floor load capacity Waterproof foundation wall $21.00/sf 4 adjacent to NE entrance Replace 2 basement doorways $1,000/day 5 Repoint brick near corners $3.50/sf 6 Subtotal Overhead (10%) & Profit (10%) Contingency Design Fee Total These costs must be considered preliminary in nature. 20% 20% 20%

Quantity 2 days 3 days

Total $2,000 $3,000

$4,000

240 sf 3 days 714 sf

$5,040 $3,000 $2,500 $19,540 $3,908 $4,690 $5,628 $33,766

Report on Structural Condition Assessment WRN 558578 Exterior Brick Walls, Foundation, and Floor Framing - Smith Hall Building No. 128 Prepared for University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill - Facilities Condition Assessment Program Prepared by Atlas Engineering, Inc., 2245 North Hills Dr., Suite I, Raleigh, NC 27612 May 29, 2003 Page 6

Photo 1: Overview of the building looking west.

Photo 2: Overview of the building looking east.

Report on Structural Condition Assessment WRN 558578 Exterior Brick Walls, Foundation, and Floor Framing - Smith Hall Building No. 128 Prepared for University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill - Facilities Condition Assessment Program Prepared by Atlas Engineering, Inc., 2245 North Hills Dr., Suite I, Raleigh, NC 27612 May 29, 2003 Page 7

Photo 3: View of buildings south side.

Cracks

Photo 4: Photo of south wall at southwest corner showing cracks in brick wall indicating settlement.

Report on Structural Condition Assessment WRN 558578 Exterior Brick Walls, Foundation, and Floor Framing - Smith Hall Building No. 128 Prepared for University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill - Facilities Condition Assessment Program Prepared by Atlas Engineering, Inc., 2245 North Hills Dr., Suite I, Raleigh, NC 27612 May 29, 2003 Page 8

Crack

Photo 5: Photo of west wall at southwest corner showing cracks in brick wall indicating settlement.

Photo 6: Photo of Entrance at Northeast Corner showing area of water leaks (arrow).

Report on Structural Condition Assessment WRN 558578 Exterior Brick Walls, Foundation, and Floor Framing - Smith Hall Building No. 128 Prepared for University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill - Facilities Condition Assessment Program Prepared by Atlas Engineering, Inc., 2245 North Hills Dr., Suite I, Raleigh, NC 27612 May 29, 2003 Page 9

Photo 7: Photo of water damage on interior wall at Northeast entrance.

Photo 8: Close-up view of water damage in basement wall below Northeast entrance.

Report on Structural Condition Assessment WRN 558578 Exterior Brick Walls, Foundation, and Floor Framing - Smith Hall Building No. 128 Prepared for University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill - Facilities Condition Assessment Program Prepared by Atlas Engineering, Inc., 2245 North Hills Dr., Suite I, Raleigh, NC 27612 May 29, 2003 Page 10

Photo 9: Photo of water damage in basement housekeeping room below Northeast entrance.

Photo 10: Photo of water damage to cased opening in basement.

Report on Structural Condition Assessment WRN 558578 Exterior Brick Walls, Foundation, and Floor Framing - Smith Hall Building No. 128 Prepared for University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill - Facilities Condition Assessment Program Prepared by Atlas Engineering, Inc., 2245 North Hills Dr., Suite I, Raleigh, NC 27612 May 29, 2003 Page 11

Photo 11: Photo of ceiling water damage in room 203.

Photo 12: Photo showing roof and gutter above room 203.

Report on Structural Condition Assessment WRN 558578 Exterior Brick Walls, Foundation, and Floor Framing - Smith Hall Building No. 128 Prepared for University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill - Facilities Condition Assessment Program Prepared by Atlas Engineering, Inc., 2245 North Hills Dr., Suite I, Raleigh, NC 27612 May 29, 2003 Page 12

Photo 13: Photo of basement stair with termite damage.

Photo 14: Photo showing carpeted 2nd floor hallway.

Report on Structural Condition Assessment WRN 558578 Exterior Brick Walls, Foundation, and Floor Framing - Smith Hall Building No. 128 Prepared for University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill - Facilities Condition Assessment Program Prepared by Atlas Engineering, Inc., 2245 North Hills Dr., Suite I, Raleigh, NC 27612 May 29, 2003 Page 13

Photo 15: Photo showing tiled 3rd floor hallway.

Report on Structural Condition Assessment WRN 558578 Exterior Brick Walls, Foundation, and Floor Framing - Smith Hall Building No. 128 Prepared for University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill - Facilities Condition Assessment Program Prepared by Atlas Engineering, Inc., 2245 North Hills Dr., Suite I, Raleigh, NC 27612 May 29, 2003 Page 14

List of Drawings and Reports Reviewed


List of Drawings 1. Mary Ann Smith Dormitory Building; Frank P. Milburn, Charlotte, NC; undated; located at UNC-CH Facilities Plan Room Vault No. 6. 2. Current floor plans transmitted electronically. Indicates As-Built drawing set.

List of Reports 1. No previous reports were found regarding this building.

Report on Structural Condition Assessment WRN 558578 Exterior Brick Walls, Foundation, and Floor Framing - Smith Hall Building No. 128 Prepared for University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill - Facilities Condition Assessment Program Prepared by Atlas Engineering, Inc., 2245 North Hills Dr., Suite I, Raleigh, NC 27612 May 29, 2003 Page 15