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White Paper

Unidirectional vs. Bidirectional Fibers


By Dr. John W. Pan

Introduction
Both unidirectional and bidirectional fiber options are available when ordering the Loop-O9300 Fiber Optical Mux. Choosing the right option will make sure that you get the most value from your Loop products. The choice boils down to two fundamental issues distance and fiber direction. This paper will help you select the best options for your system.

Distance
Up to 20 km - There are two choices for this ranged depending on whether you will be using
unidirectional or bidirectional fiber. See the section below. If you will be using bidirectional fiber your choices are: SSM (single optical module with single bidirectional fiber Master) SSS (single optical module with single bidirectional fiber Slave) DSM (dual optical module with single bidirectional fiber Master) DSS (dual optical module with single bidirectional fiber Slave)

NOTES

1) SSM & SSS should be ordered together 2) DSM & DSS should be ordered together 3) Dual modes offer protection 4) SSM/SSS/DSM/DSS all have their CONF fixed at 1310/1550S C20 (1310 transmit / 1550 receive)

If you will be using unidirectional fiber choose either SD or DD with 1550SC20 CONF SD is a single module with 2 unidirectional fibers. DD (dual module with 4 unidirectional fibers) offers protection.

Up to 30 km - Choose SD or DD with 1310FC30 CONF


SD is a single module with 2 unidirectional fibers DD (dual module with 4 unidirectional fibers) offers protection

Up to 30 km - Choose SD or DD with 1310SC50 CONF


SD is a single module with 2 unidirectional fibers DD (dual module with 4 unidirectional fibers) offers protection

looptelecom.com

May 28, 2004

Unidirectional vs. Bidirectional Fibers White Paper

Unidirectional vs. Bidirectional Fiber


The following figure illustrates a typical unidirectional fiber application (unprotected). The signals are carried by two unidirectional fibers.

Two unidirectional fibers E1 E1

Loop-O9300

Loop-O9300

Unprotected Unidirectional Fiber Application The following figure depicts a bidirectional, unprotected fiber application. A Wave Division Multiplexer option built into this Loop-O9300 allows signals to travel in opposite directions on a single fiber.

E1

E1
Loop-O9300 Master with built-in WDM
TX 1310nm RX 1550 nm

1310nm 1550nm

TX 1310nm RX 1550 nm

Loop-O9300 Slave with built-in WDM

Unprotected Bidirectional Fiber Application If you desire to use unidirectional fiber, then you should select either the SD or DD (protection) option. If you will be using bidirectional fiber, your choices are master or slave units with single or dual (protection) modules. There are two main advantages to unidirectional fiber. One is a longer transmission range than bidirectional fiber. The other is that considerable cost savings if signals from many fibers are multiplexed into one unidirectional fiber for transmission purposes.

looptelecom.com

May 28, 2004

Unidirectional vs. Bidirectional Fibers White Paper


The following figure shows a unidirectional fiber application where an external WDM accepts the signals from many unidirectional fiber optic cables and multiplexes them for transmission onto a single unidirectional fiber. At the far end of the fiber another external Wave Division Multiplexer de-muxes them back into separate fibers. In this case, you invest more money into equipment now in order to obtain inexpensive expansion and lower fiber line transmission costs in the future.

In

Wave Division Multiplexer (mux)

Out uni-directional fiber

In

Wave Division Multiplexer (de-mux)

Out

......
Out
looptelecom.com

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Wave Division Multiplexer (de-mux)

In uni-directional fiber

Out

Wave Division Multiplexer (mux)

In

......

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Wave Division Multiplexing on Unidirectional Fiber

May 28, 2004