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Volume 126 Issue 90 kansan.com Monday, March 10, 2014
UDK
the student voice since 1904
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
All contents, unless stated otherwise, 2014 The University Daily Kansan
CLASSIFIEDS 2B
CROSSWORD 5A
CRYPTOQUIPS 5A
OPINION 4A
SPORTS 1B
SUDOKU 5A
Sunny skies. Winds
WSW at 5 to 10 mph.
To study for your midterms.
Index Dont
Forget
Todays
Weather
I want it that way.
HI: 71
LO: 38
REWIND
PAGES 4B - 5B Wiggins scores 41 points, Jayhawks fall to Mountaineers
A homicide reported Satur-
day makes the ffh reported
homicide in Lawrence since
July 2013.
Dustin D. Walker, 29, was
arrested on suspicion of mur-
der in the frst degree shortly
afer 9 a.m. on Saturday afer a
shooting occurred in the 2400
block of Cedarwood Avenue
earlier that morning. Te vic-
tim was identifed as Patrick
Roberts, 39.
Te shooting of Roberts is
the second homicide reported
in Lawrence in 2014.
Te frst homicide of 2014
was reported on Jan. 17, when
police ofcials found the body
of Harold Sasko, 52, inside
a residence at 2900 block of
West 26th Street afer respond-
ing to a missing persons call
regarding Sarah Brooke Gon-
zales McLinn.
Following the discovery of
Saskos body, Gonzales Mc-
Linn, who also lived inside of
the residence, was reported
missing but was later found in
possession of Saskos car in Ev-
erglades National Park in Flor-
ida on the morning of Jan. 26.
McLinn was named the sole
suspect in the case at a news
conference on Jan. 27.
Reported homicides in 2013
include the July 17 shooting
of Gary Edens, which Brittny
Marie Adams, 20, was sen-
tenced to nearly 13 years in
prison for the crime, according
to a report from the Lawrence
Journal World.
Other reported homicides
in Lawrence during 2013 in-
clude the shooting of Margaret
Hopkins and the stabbing of
Wayne Francisco.
Margaret Hopkins was al-
legedly shot in her sleep by her
husband, Larry Hopkins, on
TOM DEHART
news@kansan.com
GEORGE MULLINIX/KANSAN
The city of Lawrence experienced its fth homicide since July 2013 on the
morning of Saturday. The shooting of Patrick Roberts, 39, is the second
homicide reported in Lawrence in 2014.
GEORGE MULLINIX/KANSAN
Dr. Berl Oakley, left, and Dr. T. Chris Gamblin discuss their ndings that suggest some natural fungal products can inhibit buildup of tau, a protein linked to Alzheimers disease. Alzheimers is the sixth leading cause of death in
the United States.
Fifth homicide since July
reported in Lawrence
Murder of Patrick Roberts, 39, on the morning of March 8
Dustin D. Walker, 29, was arrested on suspicion of murder in the
rst degree shortly after 9 a.m. on March 8
The most recent report of a homicide prior to 2013 occurred in July 2008, according to Uniform
Crime Reporting Statistics on the City of Lawrences website
LOCAL
JULY 2013: 600 block of Michigan St.
NOVEMBER 2013: 1600 block of West 2nd Terrace
DECEMBER 2013: 4300 block of West 24th Place
JANUARY 2014: 2900 block of West 26th St.
MARCH 2014: 2400 block of Cedarwood Ave.
QUICK FACTS
HOMICIDE LOCATIONS
CAMPUS
GEORGE MULLINIX
news@kansan.com
SEE CRIME PAGE 2A
Check Kansan.com to hear more details about Dr. Oakley and Dr. Gamblins ndings
Its 2 p.m. on a Friday and
Harvey is on his way to visit
his wife, Mary. Harvey is let
in the locked doors and walks
into the naturally lit room
where Mary is sitting and
mumbling to herself about the
warmer weather or perhaps
about whats on TV. When
Harvey turns the corner, Mary
tilts her chin down for a kiss
on the forehead and Harvey
begins to ask Mary about her
day, knowing that hell only get
a few incomprehensible mum-
bles in reply.
Nine years ago, Dr. Mary
Steir, a 66-year-old Kansas
graduate and retired psycholo-
gy professor, was bothered by
how easily she was forgetting
things. She went to a neurol-
ogist to fgure out what was
going on and was told she was
just an absent-minded pro-
fessor and that nothing had
shown up on her brain scan,
MRI or spinal tap.
A year later, Mary was diag-
nosed with Alzheimers dis-
ease, a disease caused by the
buildup of plaques and tangles
in the brain, a disease that is
incurable and that is the sixth
leading cause of death in the
United States.
She was told she had six years
lef to live.
Te news hit her hard, but
was particularly tough on her
then 15-year-old daughter,
Katherine. Katherine was dev-
astated. Her mother, a phys-
ically healthy professor with
two Ph.Ds, only had six years
to live. Mary continued teach-
ing at Hartford University in
Connecticut, but had to retire
when the disease progressed.
Eight years afer Mary was
told she only had six years
lef, her doctors told Marys
husband, Harvey, that shed be
dead in three days.
Harvey described her condi-
tion as catatonic.
She was like a puppet, she
couldnt eat, she couldnt
drink, she couldnt do nothing
on her own, Harvey said.
He called Katherine, now a
23-year-old Ph.D student in
Boston, informing her of the
news. Katherine immediately
bought a plane ticket, hoping
to fnd her mother alive when
she arrived in Kansas City, Mo.
Harvey and Katherine went
through an incredibly difcult
couple of days.
We went through the whole
drama of her dying, Harvey
said. We were told she had
three days to live.
Miraculously, Mary made a
recovery and was discharged
SEE RESEARCH PAGE 2A

We went through the whole drama of her dying. We were told


she had three days to live.
HARVEY STEIR
Husband
Alzheimers research progresses while families cope
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MONDAY, MARCH 10, 2014 PAGE 2A
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weather,
Jay?
Whats the
weather.com
WEDNESDAY
HI: 48
LO: 31
Times of sun and
clouds. Winds N at 7
to 17 mph.
The sun is back, alright!
TUESDAY
HI: 68
LO: 30
Mostly cloudy. Winds
S at 10 to 15 mph.
Quit playin games
with my sun.
THURSDAY
HI: 63
LO: 39
Sunshine. Winds W at
8 to 11 mph.
You are my re,
my one desire.
Calendar
N
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
news
Monday, March 10 Tuesday, March 11 Wednesday, March 12 Thursday, March 13
Six executive members of
Student Senate returned from
Washington, D.C., last week
feeling energized and encour-
aged to fnish the semester
strong.
Members met with fve
Kansas delegators from the
House and Senate on Tuesday
to represent the state as part
of a Big 12 higher education
conference. Tey advocated
Pell grant reform, keeping
student loan interest rates
low, federal research fund-
ing and discussed Obamas
federal college rating system,
said Marcus Tetwiler, student
body president.
It was reassuring to our
entire staf to see on such a
federal and national level that
these legislators support us
and are behind us, said Mor-
gan Said, outreach director.
Tey let us know what were
doing matters, and that our
ideas and concerns are valid.
Te purpose of the trip was
to remind legislators to feder-
ally support higher education
with the perspective of a uni-
versity student.
Just because were under-
grads doesnt mean we should
be silent about our stories,
Tetwiler said. When stu-
dents have an issue that needs
to be heard, the impact of a
resolution or conversation
from a student voice to those
representatives is stronger
than a lobbyist.
Te student loan interest
rates will be reexamined by
the House and Senate, and
Treasurer Michael Graham
said the goal of the meetings
was to remind representa-
tives of the needs of students
across the country.
I think it helps put a face to
a cause, Graham said. We
want to keep Kansas relevant
in their minds.
Te executive staf said
representatives were person-
able and supportive. Kansas
Senator Pat Roberts made a
personal phone call to Tetwil-
ers grandmother and Kansas
Senator Jerry Moran took his
frst selfe with Said.
Tetwiler said there wont
be immediate results, but he
looks forward to future con-
versations, and in the mean-
time, the exchange of tweets
and emails.
Edited by Chelsea Mies
AMELIA ARVESEN
news@kansan.com
Student Senate executives travel to DC
AD ASTRA
What: Insights into North Korea:
Documentary Film Showings
When: 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.
Where: Strong Hall, Room 330
About: Jiso Yoon, assistant profes-
sor of political science, will lead a
discussion after the showing of two
revealing documentaries.
What: Google Digitizing Culture?
When: 7:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Where: Spooner Hall, The Commons
About: Piotr Adamczyk, program
manager at Google, will discuss the
Google Cultural Institute and the
companys relationship with cultur-
al institutions such as museums.
What: Proximity to Risk: Citizen
receptions and responses to nearby
environmental hazards
When: 4 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Where: Blake Hall, 114
About: A presentation by Justin
Tucker, KU alumnus and assistant
professor of political science at
University of California, Fullerton.
What: Philosophy Lecture: Markets,
Privatization and Corruption
When: 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.
Where: Kansas Union, Malott Room
About: Debra Satz, senior associate
dean for the Humanities and Arts,
Stanford University, will present a
public lecture.
What: University of Kansas Spring
2014 Grad Fair
When: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Where: Kansas Union Ballroom, level
5
About: Everything you need for spring
2014 graduation, including cap and
gown ttings, will be available in the
Kansas Union. Also takes place at
the same time and location on Thurs-
day, March 13.
What: Veggie Lunch
When: 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Where: Ecumenical Campus
Ministries
About: A free vegetarian meal on
Thursdays at the ECM.
What: Employment Topic Work-
shops for International Students:
Interviewing Tips for International
Students
When: 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Where: Burge Union, Room 149
About: University Career Center
staff will go over how to prepare
for a successful American-style job
interview.
CONTRIBUTED PHOTO
The members of the executive staff pose with Kansas Senator Jerry Mo-
ran in his ofce. The students talked to representatives about student
loan interest rates and Pell grant reform.
CONTRIBUTED PHOTO
Members of the Universitys executive staff pose in front of the United
States Supreme Court building. The six students went to Washington,
D.C., to meet with members of the Kansas Senate and House to represent
Kansas as part of a Big 12 higher education conference. From left to
right: Eric Hurtt, government relations director, Emma Halling, vice
president, Morgan Said, outreach director, Marquise Paige, development
director, Marcus Tetwiler, president, Michael Graham, treasurer.
Nov. 5, 2013. Larry plead not
guilty and will face a trial on
April 14, according to a Law-
rence Journal World report.
Marci DeShayna Cully was
charged with stabbing Fran-
cisco on the morning of Dec.
25, 2013.
According to statistics fled
through the Uniform Crime
Reporting Classifcation
on the City of Lawrences
website, the last report of
murder and non-negligent
manslaughter prior to 2013
was fled July 2008. Classi-
fcations for murder, homi-
cide or non-negligent man-
slaughter were not present
on the statistics for the years
of 2009-2012.
According to the Kansas
Bureau of Investigation, the
total number of homicides
since 2004 had decreased by
28 percent as of 2012, reach-
ing a peak number of homi-
cides in 2008 with a total of
79 murders.
Lawrence Crime Statistics
for 2013 are under review.
Sgt. Trent McKinley was
unavailable for comment on
Sunday, March 9.
Edited by Kaitlyn Klein
CRIME FROM PAGE 1A
from the hospital and was
moved into Windsor of
Lawrence Assisted Livings
Refections unit. Now, Mary
is sitting up and eating and
drinking, but Harvey recog-
nizes this as an end-of-life
decision, understanding
that Mary has little time lef.
Sharon Garrett, the units
primary caregiver, has cared
for Alzheimers patients for
23 years. She has seven kids,
which she said has taught
her the patience needed to
deal with Alzheimers pa-
tients. Her main job is to
keep her residents moving
and interacting with one an-
other.
Too ofen, Alzheimers pa-
tients are lef alone and for-
gotten about because they
cant remember conversa-
tions and can get frustrated
with others easily. Usually,
death occurs because pa-
tients forget how to eat or
how to say that theyre hun-
gry, resulting in a weakened
immune system and a body.
However, Sharon doesnt
let that happen because shes
seen what a little bit of love
and a little bit of nutrients
can do.
I ask them questions to
keep them motivated and
to keep them going so they
dont give up on life, she
said.
Debbie Green, a caregiver
for those with memory im-
pairment, said, Alzheimers
is the most brutal disease
Ive ever seen. We must fnd
a cure because the social and
economical costs are too
high to go unnoticed.
Te total cost for care in
2012 was valued at $216.4
billion in the United States,
equal to that of cancer care,
according to the Alzheimers
Organization. Additionally,
53 percent of Kansans more
than 65 years old have Alz-
heimers disease, resulting
in over $88 million worth of
care in Kansas.
Patients can be treated
with medications that slow
down the progression of
symptoms, but there is still
no form of medicine that
can break down the plaques
and tangles. Beta-amyloid
peptide and the protein tau
(rhymes with wow) are
two hallmark Alzheimers
brain abnormalities.
Dr. T. Chris Gamblin, a
University associate profes-
sor of molecular bioscienc-
es, said, What isnt known
is what relative contribution
each has. Tere are still a lot
of tests being done trying to
fgure out which one plays a
bigger role.
Just yesterday, researchers
at Georgetown found a new
blood test that can predict
with 90 percent accuracy if a
healthy person will develop
Alzheimers disease within
three years, according to a
study that will be published
in the April issue of Nature
Medicine.
Tis could potentially be
a big step forward for Alz-
heimers research because
it helps doctors plan for
and manage the disorder,
said Dr. Howard J. Federof,
the studys corresponding
author. Such a test allows
doctors to work with and
test patients who have the
disease and not waste valu-
able time on non-afected
patients.
At the University, Gam-
blin and Dr. Berl Oakley,
an Irving S. Johnson Dis-
tinguished Professor of
molecular biology, have dis-
covered an array of natural
fungus. According to Oak-
ley the fungi have the abil-
ity to produce a lot that we
didnt realized was possible a
few years ago.
Te fungi have been
promising in the lab break-
ing down tau aggregates, but
there is still a lot more for
them to learn.
Right now it requires
such a high concentration to
work, meaning its too hard
to work with [in animals],
Oakley said. If things work
well then if would still be a
few years because wed have
to go to animal testing,
which normally takes years
and years and costs billions
of dollars.
Whether its the caregiv-
ers, the patients, the re-
searches or the economists,
its evident that something
must be done to help cure
Alzheimers. Too little is
known about the disease
and more economic and
public support are needed
to allow people like Harvey
and Mary Steir to be mak-
ing retirement plans instead
of how theyll be spending
their last days together.
Edited by Kaitlyn Klein
RESEARCH FROM PAGE 1A
MONDAY, MARCH 10, 2014 PAGE 3A THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
Te University has created
an alliance with 10 other large
public universities to develop
and share innovative ideas to
help make college more af-
fordable and to help college
students succeed.
Te University Innovations
Alliance was established in
response to a proposal last
August by President Barack
Obama to establish a college
rating system that would al-
low students to compare col-
lege costs, graduation rates
and debt information, and tie
federal fnancial aid to college
performance. Presidents and
chancellors of the 11 univer-
sities have been invited to a
summit at the White House on
March 28 to discuss achieving
these goals. Ann Cudd, the
vice provost and dean of Un-
dergraduate Studies, will rep-
resent the University.
"I am excited to connect
with national leaders on how
we can improve access and
graduation rates for low-in-
come students," Cudd said. "I
feel honored to represent the
University of Kansas at this
event."
In addition to Kansas, the
other universities in the al-
liance are the University of
Texas at Austin, University of
Central Florida, University
of California Riverside, Iowa
State, Ohio State, Michigan
State, Arizona State, Georgia
State, Oregon State and Pur-
due University.
We are all going to be shar-
ing our best practices, sharing
our innovations and teaching
each other what works and
why it works on our campuses,
so that we can all lif each oth-
er up, Cudd said.
Chancellor Bernadette
Gray-Little has focused on
improving the Universitys re-
tention rate, which is now 79.9
percent for freshman-to-soph-
omore students, according to
the Universitys Ofce of In-
stitutional Research and Plan-
ning, and she acknowledges
that there is much room for
improvement. She wants the
retention rate of freshmen stu-
dents going into their sopho-
more year to be 90 percent and
the six-year graduation rate to
be 70 percent, from its now
61.6 percent.
Te University is currently
helping low-income students
stay in school by creating a
more fulflling frst-year expe-
rience as a part of Bold Aspi-
rations, implementing a new
core curriculum and using
MySuccess, which allows in-
structors to track student per-
formance. For fscal year 2013,
the University had 4,417 stu-
dents eligible for Pell grants,
which are need-based, non-re-
payable grants for undergrad-
uate students working toward
their frst degree, said Sara
Rosen, senior vice provost for
academic afairs. Tis year, the
maximum grant was $5,645.
We already know we need to
compete for as many qualifed
students as we can compete
for, Cudd said. So we need
to compete for low-income
students, frst-generation stu-
dents, as well as middle- and
high-income students. We al-
ready see this as our mission.
Obama has made higher ed-
ucation a primary focus in his
fnal years in ofce. He has said
college education should be a
right, not a luxury.
He proposed a govern-
ment-driven college rating sys-
tem to be in efect by the 2015
school year. He said the system
should let students know the
price of attending one college
over another, display retention
rates and show how much debt
the average student incurs.
With this proposal in mind,
Obama invited more than 100
college presidents and chan-
cellors to commit to helping
low-income students improve
access, retention and gradua-
tion rates at the White House
Summit on Jan. 16. In re-
sponse, the University Innova-
tions Alliance was created.
Te college rating system
I think will especially inspire
those institutions who have
gotten of of that path, of of
that mission to come back to
it, Cudd said.
Edited by Chelsea Mies
Public university alliance aims to increase affordability
CAMPUS

I am excited to connect with national leaders on how we can


improve access and graduation rates for low-income students.
ANN CUDD
Vice provost and dean of Undergraduate Studies
ASHLEY BOOKER
news@kansan.com

A BETTER BARGAIN FOR THE MIDDLE CLASS: MAKING COLLEGE MORE AFFORDABLE
Paying for Performance:
Tie nancial aid to college performance, starting with publishing new college ratings before the 2015 school year.
Challenge states to fund public colleges based on performance.
Hold students and colleges receiving student aid responsible for making progress toward a degree.
Promoting Innovation and Competition:
Challenge colleges to offer students a greater range of affordable, high-quality options than they do today.
Give consumers clear, transparent information on college performance to help them make the decisions that work best for them.
Encourage innovation by stripping away unnecessary regulations.
Ensuring that Student Debt Remains Affordable:
Help ensure borrowers can afford their federal student loan debt by allowing all borrowers to cap their payments at 10 percent of their
monthly income.
Reach out to struggling borrowers to ensure that they are aware of the exible options available to help them to repay their debt.
UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS
According to CollegeInsight Website:
Average student debt after graduation: $23,468
Average percent of graduates with debt: 51 percent
Average cost per year to go to Kansas: $9,222
According to University OIRP and Bold Aspirations:
Freshmen-to-sophomore retention rate: 79.9 percent, desired:
90 percent
6-year graduation rate: 61.6 percent, desired: 70 percent
According to Senior Vice Provost Sara Rosen:
4,417 students eligible for Pell grants for 2013 scal year
RECYCLE, RECYCLE, RECYCLE, RECYCLE, RECYCLE, RECYCLE
Major points in Obamas proposal, chart information from The White House
M
agazines,
television
shows and
advertisements show
women that are tall,
skinny and covered in
makeup. Our society
has set the standard that
women are not considered
beautiful without these
characteristics. So if you
dont look like the women
you see on television,
should you change
yourself?
I recently watched a
documentary on 28-year-
old Ukrainian model,
Valeria Lukyanova, a
human look-alike of the
popular childrens doll,
Barbie. Over the past year
she has gained a lot of
attention because of her
unnatural look. Her body
is disproportional, just
like one would imagine a
human Barbie doll looking,
and everything about her
seems fake. Lukyanova has
claimed multiple times
that the only surgery she
has had was for breast
enlargement, though
looking at before and
afer pictures you can see
diferences that wouldnt
be possible without plastic
surgery.
I watched Lukyanovas
documentary to see if she
could explain the reason
why she does what she
does. As a child, Lukyanova
claimed to have seen spirits
from other dimensions
and that she has been
reincarnated several times.
She believes that she has
been brought to this world
to be a spiritual guru and
explains that she looks
the way she does to gain
attention for her teachings.
She claims that no one will
pay attention to someone
that looks like a nun, but
that everybody will listen
to a nearly perfect human
being.
Te only message I get
from Lukyanova is that
people cant consider
themselves beautiful unless
they have a barely-there
waist and change every part
of them that is real.
As if she couldnt be more
ridiculous, Lukyanova
recently stated in an
interview with International
Business Times that she
no longer has a desire for
food and hopes to survive
on only air and light. She
follows Breatharianism,
a pseudoscience belief
where followers do not eat
or drink, instead they live
on cosmic micro-food.
To me, Lukyanova seems
insane, but unfortunately
there are a few who look
up to her and even want to
be her.
In a scene in the
documentary, Lukyanovas
sister, Olga, gets her
makeup done by Valeria.
Afer she is fnished,
Valeria tells her sister not
to smile because smiling
reveals her second chin.
Instead, she should look
as if she is in mourning.
Olga stated that at one
point she tried everything
she could to be just like
her sister, but afer a while
decided to be her own
person. Its common for
younger siblings to look
up to their older siblings,
but Lukyanovas message
to her sister and the rest
of society is troubling.
When will it be acceptable
for women to look the
way they are, without
changing everything about
themselves?
Lukyanovas lifestyle is
just a distraction and her
spiritual guidings are
basically ignored because
of her appearance. I feel
sorry for Lukyanova and
I feel sorry for women
who believe she is a role
model. Women of all ages
are subjected to criticism
when it comes to their
appearance, but society
needs to realize that you
dont need to look like a
Barbie, a supermodel or
anyone other than yourself
the natural you is
beautiful.
People like Lukyanova
are the reason that women
strive for something
that is not normal and is
unachievable. People going
as far as getting plastic
surgery to permanently
change the way they look
is unhealthy and sends
a dangerous message
to younger women. We
see celebrities who look
dramatically diferent when
they have no makeup on,
compared to what they
look like on the red carpet.
Many girls idolize their
favorite celebrities and
aspire to look like them.
Being beautiful seems to be
all people care about these
days, but women and even
men, should take a stand
and love the appearance
they were born with. If
people cannot learn to
accept themselves, more
women like Lukyanova
might start to surface.
I dont see why anyone
would want that.
Cecilia Cho is a junior
from Overland Park
studying journalism.
MONDAY, MARCH 10, 2014 PAGE 4A
Can you get high on the smell of
newsprint? #iloveit
I used to think I was really weird
for being super into gingers until I
started reading FFA. I think I made
the right choice by going to KU.
I am a grilled cheese sandwich.
Thanks, Buzzfeed.
To the other dude who is also
crushin on the Gonzalez twins...
Would it be weird if we became
buds and called ourselves the
Gonzalez Groupies?
Glad Student Senate is saving me
a whole 50 cents next year! I can
buy one sentence in a textbook
with that!
If texting causes you to swerve
all over the sidewalk, put your
phone away.
Im not opposed to turning the FFA
into a Tindr.
Has anyone else encountered the
man who lives in one of the quiet
zones of Anschutz?
Spent an hour perfecting a Linke-
dIn invite message. Thats more
time than Ive spent on homework
this entire semester.
Some people have self respect. I
have Panda Express at 9 a.m.
Its a beautiful day!!!!!! ... To go
inside and cry about midterms...
Did the rapture just happen?
Theres no one in the Underground
at noon!
This girl in the stall next to me
just crawled out...
The best feeling in the world is
when someone you hate tells a
joke and nobody laughs.
Paying over $1000 for a 500 level
class and they are making me
color maps... #geology
I was the one playing Phantom of
the Opera in the Campanile. Im so
glad you enjoyed it! More to come.
Editors Note: Do you take
requests?
I was feeling as invincible as
Beyonce until my wi went down
now Im nothing more than a mere
mortal in fetal position.
Dibs on the secret tunnel between
Spencer and the Union in case of
a zombie apocalypse.
Currently looking for an air
drummer, back up dancers, and a
lip singer. Im starting an air band
and I play a mean air guitar. Meet
you in Anschutz in 10 minutes.
Does anyone else try to
psychoanalyze people by how
they rip up their newspaper?
Text your FFA
submissions to
(785) 2898351 or
at kansan.com
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Katie Kutsko, editor-in-chief
kkutsko@kansan.com
Allison Kohn, managing editor
akohn@kansan.com
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larmendariz@kansan.com
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awenner@kansan.com
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THE EDITORIAL BOARD
Members of the Kansan Editorial Board
are Katie Kutsko, Allison Kohn, Lauren
Armendariz, Anna Wenner, Sean Powers
and Kolby Botts.
@BonjourCatie
@KansanOpinion the fact that studying
is now my full time job. 40 hours and
counting..
@lauwrenorder
@KansanOpinion Not enough delivery
places open at 3 am and the possibility
of having your dreams Hulk-smashed.
#midtermsyo
@RadioDJMJ
@KansanOpinion that its basically nals
week but when were done we have to
come right back.
The worst thing about midterms is...?
O
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
opinion
Follow us on Twitter
@KansanOpinion. Tweet
us your opinions, and we
just might publish them.
INTERNET
Barbie look-alike creates
harmful physical standard
B
reakups are hard and
whats even harder is
not knowing if you
made the right decision.
Weeks go by and youre still
wondering if it was best, and if
time apart means getting back
together with a fresh start,
or just fxing past problems.
And whats even worse than
breaking up once? Having to
go through it all again. But
as Cosmopolitan magazine
reported, with 44 percent of
young adults trying again afer
they breakup, its hard to know
whether you should be in that
percentage or not. Tey say
it isnt over until its over, but
how do we really know when
its over?
Te reason for breaking
up is the biggest factor in
deciding whether to get back
together with an ex. Cheating
is unforgivable in my opinion.
If the reason you broke up
the frst time was because
of character or trust, Id say
a second chance may be a
waste of time. Cheating is a
sign of immaturity and lack
of commitment two things
that wont be fxed with a week
or two away from each other.
If you do choose to walk
away from the commitment,
I would advise to not let
yourself believe that a simple
sexual relationship with an
ex could work out. Cosmo
also revealed that 53 percent
of young adults continue to
have sex with an ex afer a
breakup. If he or she isnt good
enough to be devoted to then
that person is no longer good
enough for you to sleep with.
If you broke up for reasons
that can be forgiven, and most
importantly forgotten, then
maybe the second times a
charm. If the feelings are still
there and changes have been
made, give things another try
sometimes we breakup and
makeup, and things are better
than you could have imagined.
But without making changes
youre bound to head straight
down the breakup road again.
Tough there is the saying,
You can never change a
man. I always hear it, from
my mom, in magazines and
movies, and I must say that
I strongly disagree. Maybe
the better way to put it is that
you cant change a man who
doesnt want to be changed.
If he wants the relationship
to work bad enough, he will.
Sometimes it does take time,
or a breakup, for someone to
realize how important change
is, but everyone is 100 percent
capable of changing. However,
just because theyre capable,
doesnt mean theyre willing.
Dont hold on to hope that
someone will change for you
if adjustments arent being
made.
Call me a hopeless romantic,
but if you really love someone
youll make it work and
that just might happen with
another attempt. So when it
comes to second chances, at
least give it a second thought.
Kayla Soper is a senior from
Junction City studying journalism
and political science.
RELATIONSHIPS
When to consider
second chances
T
his sentiment has
ridden under the
surface of most of
my columns for the past few
years. Its simple: Memes
are the single worst product
of the Internet and are
destroying popular culture.
Memes give the impression
of an inside joke. Back in the
day, when only a handful
of people could catch the
reference, that feeling of
being part of some club was
genuine.
Im not trying to say that
I hate memes because they
became popular. Im not
15 anymore. Im saying
that memes were always
good for a quick chuckle
and nothing more. When
they got co-opted by
parents, corporations and
every single person on my
Facebook feed, they lost their
charm, and fast.
Te infux of the same
joke, day in and day out, is
enough to drive even the
most tolerant to pulling out
their hair.
Te reason why I was
driven to fnally write this
column is that I think Ive
fgured out why people latch
onto memes. Teyre safe
and convenient comedy.
Its easy to post a link or
generate a meme yourself
on www.memevomiter.org.
You arent risking judgment
because you know its funny.
Memes dont become popular
unless people like them, so
this layer of cloned jokes and
prefab humor protects you.
And once you stop getting
laughs and likes out of
meme A, you move onto
meme B. Ad nauseam.
Remember Keep Calm
and Carry On? Everyone
and their mom had that
idiotic slogan (and its infnite
mutations) on a T-shirt or
poster. Greek organizations,
sports clubs, the school
bookstore, you name it, they
all hopped aboard.
Until, one day, it lost its
charm. Tat British war
propaganda line saturated
our popular culture to the
point of bursting and we
dumped it.
What worries me is that
each Gangnam Style and
Harlem Shake follows
the same trajectory: a
small group discovers and
shares it, it catches fre and
everybody feels entitled to
join in, everyone gets sick
of seeing it everywhere and
abandons it. Its like our
culture is a fat, gigantic baby
that gobbles up the next big
thing and burps it back up
the second it gets used to the
taste.
A society of memetics
doesnt appreciate new
contributions to culture. It
digs its chubby hooks into
it, beats it to death while
squeezing every ounce of
proft and comedy from it,
and then chucks the empty
husk into a dumpster.
Im convinced that this
process of rapid popularity
and saturation is going to
speed up. Well eat, digest
and poop out our culture so
fast that well lose our sense
of culture.
Take the next new thing:
A website that hosts live
streaming videos of games
is letting its viewers play
a game of Pokemon by
typing individual button
commands into the streams
chat. Tink of the Infnite
Monkey Teorem, where
if thousands of monkeys
slammed onto typewriters
for an infnite amount of
time, theyd eventually write
Te Complete Works of
Shakespeare.
Afer gaining rapid
popularity and spawning
a dozen new inside jokes,
the Twitch Plays Pokemon
crowd is already losing
its charm. Afer starting a
petition to make a national
holiday for their completion
of the game, the backlash
grew.
Soon enough, Twitch Plays
Pokemon will be the next
trashed piece of culture
blowing in the wind.
At least its good for a
chuckle while it lasts.
Wil Kenney is a sophomore from
Leawood studying English.
By Kayla Soper
opinion@kansan.com
By Wil Kenney
opinion@kansan.com
BODY IMAGE
Memes are the worst thing since unsliced bread
By Cecilia Cho
opinion@kansan.com
SEE MORE EXCLUSIVE CONTENT ONLINE AT KANSAN.COM/OPINION
MONDAY, MARCH 10, 2014
E
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
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We Deliver!
Aries (March 21-April 19)
Today is a 7
Discover a way to be more efcient
at home. Beautify your surround-
ings. Its a lucky moment for love;
you might as well pop the ques-
tion. Get creative in your approach.
Friends are there for you.
Taurus (April 20-May 20)
Today is a 7
Talk about your dreams. Develop
a particular aspect. Dress the
part. Imagine yourself in the role.
You can get whatever you need,
although it may not show up as ex-
pected. Take small steps forward.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)
Today is a 7
Increase efciency and save
money and resources. Stand up for
yourself. Dont make assumptions.
Abundance can lead to overload.
Listen to your partners concerns.
Discuss your future visions. Let
your imagination soar. The impos-
sible just takes longer.
Cancer (June 21-July 22)
Today is a 7
A dream shows you the way. You
have whats necessary. Theres
more work than you can do. Prior-
itize urgencies and reschedule or
delegate the rest. Postpone travel
and shipping for later. Watch and
learn.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)
Today is a 7
Put out res and handle urgencies
by delegating to experts where
possible. Get a technical coach.
Dispel confusion, which drains re-
sources. Ignore detractors. Family
comes rst... give your partner the
glamorous role.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Today is a 6
New responsibilities cause chang-
es at home. Creativity is required.
Stay condent and patient, one
step ahead of the eight ball. Allow
some exibility. Let others solve
their own problems. Friends help
out when you ask.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Today is a 7
Track details and dont apply
new work skills yet. Get the ball
rolling by reminding others of the
game. Reassure someone whos
concerned. Review your routine to
drop time-sucks. Dress for power.
Take a risk.
Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
Today is a 6
Work your magic on the home
front. Begin a new friendship.
Create something exotic. Think
about all the angles before launch-
ing into action. Research the best
deal when shopping. Study the
possibilities around a dream.
Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
Today is a 7
You see solutions for all the worlds
problems. Keep to the philosoph-
ical high road. Gather and share
information. Beware of an offer
that seems too good. Listen to your
partner. Compromise, including
their preferences. Evening suits
you.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Today is a 7
A problem develops. Friends are
there for you. Some xing up is
required. The allies you depend on
keep a secret. Handle it together
and soak in victory. Take a break to
savor spiritual rewards. Everything
seems possible.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
Today is a 7
Imagine yourself in the future and
how youd like it to be. Ask for more
and get it. Stay in rather than
going out. Give in to sweet tempta-
tion, without spending much... the
nancial situations unstable.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)
Today is a 7
Dream big dreams with your
friends. An abrupt change in
attitude is possible; conditions are
unsettled. Keep your objective in
mind. Intuition nudges you in the
right direction. Get set for some
serious competition. Think fast.
Historical chant holds
meaning for students
TRADITION
CORRINE DORRIAN
entertain@kansan.com
Rock Chalk Jayhawk has
been cheered throughout the
world for decades, creating
both meaning for students and
history.
In 1886 a chant was created
that would make the Universi-
ty of Kansas stand out from ev-
ery other school in the world,
and would do so for decades.
Chemistry professor E.H.S
Bailey formed the phrase for
his science club and it was a
little diferent than how we say
it today.
According to the Kansas tra-
ditions website, the chant was
rah, rah, Jayhawk, KU re-
peated three times. Te rahs
were later replaced by Rock
Chalk, relating to chalk rock,
the name for the limestone
found on Mount Oread.
Te chant stuck and has been
famous ever since. Te tradi-
tions website also states that
troops used it in 1899 while
fghting in the Philippines, in
World War II and in Chinas
Boxer Rebellion. When the
king of Belgium asked for a
typical American college yell
at the 1920 Olympic games,
athletes agreed on the Rock
Chalk chant and performed
it for him. According to a
Bleacher Report blog by Jen-
nifer Taglione, the Universi-
tys cheer was the best college
chant President Teddy Roos-
evelt had ever heard.
Te unique phrase has
caused students to create their
own meaning of what being a
Jayhawk is all about.
Being a Jayhawk means be-
ing surrounded by a group of
people that are passionate and
are united by the tradition of
being a KU student, said Kas-
sandra Valles, a freshman from
Mission.
Valles went on to say that she
chose Kansas because of the
schools reputation.
Tere are really good pro-
grams all around, education
and really good opportunities
for the students to get involved
and actually make a difer-
ence, she said.
Kristin Efurd, a senior from
Abilene, has spent four years at
the University and says that be-
ing a member of the University
means a lot to her. Troughout
her four years here shes no-
ticed that the one thing that
separates Kansas from oth-
er schools is the community
aspect. Teres no doubt that
shouting the chant creates one,
big Jayhawk family.
Ashlyn Hazard, a sophomore
from Sioux Falls, Iowa, said,
When I hear the chant, I get
chills.
Te slow, eerie-sounding
chant can be heard echoing
throughout the world, mak-
ing known who the Jayhawks
are and uniting a community
of people by the words, Rock
Chalk Jayhawk, go KU!
Edited by Callan Reilly
In promotion of his 2013 al-
bum Because the Internet,
musician Childish Gambino is
bringing Te Deep Web tour
to Kansas City, Mo., on March
17 in the Arvest Bank Teatre
at the Midland.
Donald Glover is one of the
most talented men in enter-
tainment. Not only does he rap
under his stage name Child-
ish Gambino, but hes also a
comedian, writer and actor.
Hes best known for starring as
Troy Barnes in NBCs Com-
munity and formerly wrote
for the comedy 30 Rock.
When Glover frst began to
rap most didnt take him seri-
ously. Because of his comedic
background, people expected
him to be a gimmick similar to
Saturday Night Lives comedic
music group Te Lonely Is-
land. Afer releasing a slew of
projects, people fnally under-
stood that he was a serious and
credible rapper. In 2013, Glov-
er released Because the Inter-
net, which is ofen regarded as
his best work. Te album tells
a story and theres a screenplay
written by Glover to accompa-
ny it. With the album, Glover
created an entire universe;
characters from the screenplay
even have their own Twitter
accounts. His debut album,
Camp, was released in 2011.
Glover is one of the most en-
ergetic live performers in rap.
UC Santa Barbaras Te Daily
Nexus called Gambinos en-
ergy a spectacle in itself and
said complimented the shows
visuals, which included cur-
tains of rain. Te rapper is also
known to use a live band.
Te Deep Web tour is Glov-
ers most innovative tour yet.
Teres even an app that goes
along with the show called
Deep Web. Te musician is
encouraging fans to use it to
get the full experience. During
his performances there will be
a screen behind the stage and
the app is used like a message
board for people to chat with
each other before the show.
Glovers upcoming perfor-
mance has fans across cam-
pus enthusiastic. Josh Florez,
a sophomore from Wichita, is
a huge fan of Donald Glovers
music, acting and comedy.
Ive seen him live before and
hes great, he said. I cant wait
to see him again.
Tickets for Te Deep Web
tour are still available and can
be purchased on the tours
website.
Edited by Callan Reilly
RYAN WRIGHT
entertain@kansan.com
Childish Gambinos tour
heads to Kansas City
CONCERT
RockChalkLiving.com
SEARCH DONT SETTLE STUDENTS PREMIERE HOUSING SITE
GEORGE MULLINIX/KANSAN
Rock Chalk dancer Emily Burkett performs the Rock Chalk chant during a basketball game.
NEW YORK Te shirtless
warriors of the "300" sequel
"Rise of an Empire" ravaged
the post-Oscars box-ofce
weekend with a domestic de-
but of $45.1 million, but an
even bigger international haul
of $87.8 million.
Seven years afer the original
"300" became an unlikely, ul-
tra-stylish, blood-soaked sen-
sation, Warner Bros.' 3-D fol-
low-up showed considerable
might at the box ofce. While
"300: Rise of an Empire" didn't
come close the North Amer-
ican debut of Zack Snyder's
2007 original ($70.9 million
and without the beneft of 3-D
ticket prices), it performed like
a blockbuster overseas.
"Rise of an Empire," which
with fexed torsos and R-rat-
ed bloodshed further chron-
icles the ancient battles of the
Greeks and Persians, led a
busy box-ofce weekend that
also saw an Academy Awards
bump for "12 Years a Slave"
and one of the highest per-
screen averages ever for Wes
Anderson's European caper
"Te Grand Budapest Hotel."
Tough "300: Rise of an Em-
pire" is excessively macho, Eva
Green the flm's fercest
presence may have drawn
females for what was always
going to be a male-centric re-
lease. Whereas the female au-
dience for the frst "300" was
only 29 percent, it was 38 per-
cent for "Rise of an Empire."
"Talk about female empow-
erment," said Jef Goldstein,
head of domestic distribution
for Warner Bros., of the "Casi-
no Royale" actress.
Noting the popularity of 3-D
and IMAX screenings for the
movie, Goldstein credited the
visual panache of producer
Snyder (Noam Murro took
over directing), who drew
directly from Frank Miller's
graphic novels: "He brings a
lot to the screen that mesmer-
izes you."
Paul Dergarabedian, senior
media analyst for box-ofce
tracker Rentrak, said the "300"
franchise "translates to virtual-
ly every culture. Every country
can appreciate the visuals of
these movies."
Te week's other new wide
release, 20th Century Fox's an-
imated "Mr. Peabody & Sher-
man," opened in second with
$32.5 million. Tough the
performance was better than
some expected, it's a relative-
ly low total for a flm that cost
about $140 million to make.
Te flm is based on the car-
toon about a time-traveling
boy and his brilliant dog from
"Te Rocky and Bullwinkle
Show." Some of the family
flm market was likely taken
by Warner Bros.' hit "Te Lego
Movie," which added $11 mil-
lion in its ffh weekend.
Te Liam Neeson thriller
"Non-Stop" slid to third place
with $15.4 million in the Uni-
versal release's second week-
end afer topping the box ofce
last week.
In limited release, "Te Grand
Budapest Hotel" made an as-
tounding average of $200,000
on four screens in New York
and Los Angeles. Fox Search-
light will expand the flm by 65
to 75 theaters next week.
Te specialty studio also cel-
ebrated the best picture Oscar
win for "12 Years a Slave" with
a notable bump of $2.2 million,
even though it was released on
DVD and video-on-demand
Tuesday. Tat was up 123 per-
cent on the prior weekend for
the flm, which frst opened in
November.
"12 Years a Slave" drew even
more international interest,
where it made $9.1 million as
moviegoers focked to see the
Academy Award winner.
MONDAY, MARCH 10, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 6A
Remember to be smart.
Jayhawks ACT.
A: Agree to stay with your buddy.
C: Check in with your buddy regularly.
T: Take charge to return home together.

BUDDY UP
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at @KUJBS.
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ASSOCIATED PRESS
This image released by Warner Bros. Pictures shows Eva Green in the lm: 300: Rise of an Empire.
300 sequel rules box ofce with $45.1M debut
FILM
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SALT LAKE CITY Te
newest Utah polygamous fam-
ily featured in a reality TV
show says sharing their story
with a wide audience has been
liberating.
Brady Williams and his fve
wives were a bit apprehensive
ahead of the airing of a pilot
episode in September, but they
said this week an interview
with Te Associated Press that
it felt liberating to be open
about who they are and what
they believe.
"It really is like coming out
of the closet," said Brady Wil-
liams, 43. "It's very liberating."
His wives feel the same way,
including his second, Robyn
Williams, 40, who said, "I feel
more free to just be who I am
and not be so afraid."
Te frst of nine episodes of
the show, "My Five Wives," airs
Sunday on TLC. It chronicles
the life of Brady Williams, his
fve wives and their 24 children
who live in a small rural com-
munity outside of Salt Lake
City dominated by a branch of
the fundamentalist Mormon
church.
Te family once belonged to
the group, known as the Ap-
ostolic United Brethren, but
withdrew during the mid-
2000s afer re-evaluating their
core beliefs. Now, they practice
polygamy not because they
think they must to get to heav-
en, and avoid hell, but because
they prefer the lifestyle.
Teir show begins airing in
a social and political climate
that has sofened signifcantly
toward plural families in re-
cent years.
A federal judge in Utah
struck down key parts of the
state's polygamy laws in De-
cember, marking a victory for
the Williams and hundreds of
other polygamous families in
the state. Te ruling decrimi-
nalizes polygamy, making only
bigamy holding marriage
licenses with multiple partners
illegal.
Te family that brought that
lawsuit against the state of
Utah, Kody Brown and his
four wives from TLC's "Sister
Wives," is credited with help-
ing create greater acceptance
for plural families. Teir show,
which debuted in 2010 with
footage of the family at their
house in northern Utah, was
ground-breaking in demon-
strating to viewers across the
country that not all polyga-
mists are child predators like
Warren Jefs, the imprisoned
leader of a polygamous sect on
the Utah -Arizona border.
Te Williams family mem-
bers said they don't expect
viewers to be surprised by
much, other than maybe how
similar they are to non-po-
lygamous families. It's normal
times fve, the family jokes.
Viewers will see tears, joy and
quarrels, they said.
TLC is banking on viewers
being fascinated by the unique
dynamics of a plural family:
regular family sit-down meet-
ings among the adults where
Brady Williams follows an
agenda written on a notepad;
side-by-side multiplexes where
they live and nightly family
dinners where the children
line up like kids in a school
cafeteria to get their food.
Ten there's the always-in-
triguing dynamic among the
wives who share a husband.
"Tere haven't been any overt
acts of disapproval," Brady
Williams said. But he add-
ed,"We want to be able to feel
comfortable in our own skin."
Polygamous Utah family feels
liberated by TV appearance
TELEVISION
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Brady Williams ve wives, from left to right, Robyn, Nonie, Rhonda, Rosemary and Paulie, live in a polygamous
community outside Salt Lake City. The newest Utah polygamous family are featured in a reality TV show.
WASHINGTON It's not
just colleges and universities
that are shifing their fnan-
cial aid from lower-income to
higher-income students.
Tuition tax credits and other
tax breaks to ofset the cost
of higher education nearly
invisible federal government
subsidies for families that send
their kids to college also
disproportionally beneft more
afuent Americans.
So do tax-deductible savings
plans and the federal work-
study program, which gives
taxpayer dollars to students
who take campus jobs to help
pay for their expenses.
Te tax credits alone cost
the government a combined
$34 billion a year, or $1 bil-
lion more than is spent on Pell
Grants, the direct government
grants for low-income stu-
dents.
And even though only one-
ffh of American households
earn more than $100,000 per
year, that group got more than
half of the deductions for tui-
tion, fees and exemptions for
dependent students, according
to the Tax Policy Center, an
independent research group
run jointly by the centrist, and
sometimes center-lef Brook-
ings Institution and Urban
Institute.
Tis has occurred despite
research showing that 13 out
of 14 students whose families
received tax breaks on tuition
would have gone to college
anyway.
"We might be sympathetic
to those upper-income folks
who are struggling with what
are yes extremely expen-
sive private colleges," said Julie
Strawn, a former senior fellow
at the Center for Law and So-
cial Policy, which advocates
for greater access to college
for the poor. "But do the tax
credits really need to go to the
wealthiest ffh of American
households, which is what's
happening now?"
A new coalition of advoca-
cy organizations, supported
by the Bill & Melinda Gates
Foundation, is pushing for the
tax credits to be streamlined
and redirected to the poor. Te
Gates Foundation is among
the funders of Te Hechinger
Report and the Education
Writers Association, which
co-produced this story.
And a bill in the U.S. House
of Representatives sponsored
by Democrat Danny Davis of
Illinois and Republican Diane
Black of Tennessee, co-chairs
of the Tax Reform Working
Group on Education, would
gradually lower the income
eligibility to $86,000 from the
current $180,000.
"In general, federal fnancial
aid was created to help low-in-
come students go to college
and the purpose of the tax
credits was to make college
more afordable for middle-in-
come students," said Stephen
Burd, a senior policy analyst at
the New America Foundation.
"Te problem is that the tax
credits are going beyond the
middle class."
But even supporters say the
prospects of Congress low-
ering the income eligibili-
ty are dim, even at a time of
belt-tightening in Washington.
"It's defnitely an uphill fght,"
Burd said. "It's politics. Up-
per-income families tend to
vote more than lower-income
families."
Te higher-education lobby
also opposes lowering the in-
come eligibility for tuition tax
credits.
"We think it's important to
have mechanisms in place to
help those students go to col-
lege who otherwise wouldn't
go to college, but it's also about
being able to help all students
pay for college, including mid-
dle-income students," said
Steven Bloom, director of fed-
eral relations for the American
Council on Education, the
preeminent association of U.S.
colleges and universities
Bloom said even families
that earn more than $100,000
annually can be hard-pressed
to pay for college without
help, depending on how many
children they have enrolled at
one time, for instance, and at
which institutions.
"We just don't buy the argu-
ment that there isn't enough
room in the federal budget
to help diferent families in
diferent income brackets in
diferent ways," said Sarah
Flanagan, vice president for
government relations and pol-
icy at the National Association
of Independent Colleges and
Universities.
And higher-income families,
Flanagan said, "bring money
to the table to keep the colleges
going so they in turn can give
more support to low-income
students."
Te university associations
"have a point," said Deborah
Santiago, co-founder and chief
operating ofcer of Excelencia
in Education, which advocates
for Latino and other under-
represented students. It can be
a stretch these days even for
wealthy families to pay for col-
lege, she said.
MONDAY, MARCH 10, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 7A
ATTENTION:
EXOTIC DANCERS
1.866.309.9441
WWW.MBRADYLAW.COM
If you are a current or former EXOTIC DANCER who was
paid only by customers tips so that you were not paid
minimum wage BY THE CLUB where you performed, you
may be entitled to unpaid wages and compensation.
CALL TO LEARN YOUR RIGHTS.
BRADY & ASSOCIATES
ALL CALLS ARE STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
10901 Lowell, Suite 280
Overland Park, KS 66210
Michael F. Brady, Principal
(Licensed in Missouri and Kansas)
Disclaimer: The choice of a lawyer is an important decision and
should not be based solely on advertisements.
Higher-income students get more public money for education
NATIONAL
STATE
MCCLATCHY TRIBUNE
ASSOCIATED PRESS
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Kansas woman seeks leniency for fake goods sales
WICHITA A Wichita busi-
ness owner has asked a federal
court to spare her from serv-
ing prison time for trafcking
in counterfeit luxury items,
arguing publicity the case has
received serves as a deterrent
to future criminal conduct.
Te court fling Friday came
days before Glenda Sue Mor-
gan is due Monday in U.S.
District Court in Wichita for
sentencing on one count of
trafcking in goods bearing
counterfeit trademarks.
Morgan and her Wichita
business, Te Fabulous Store
LLC, were indicted in April
on charges of conspiracy and
trafcking. In exchange for
Morgan's plea in October,
prosecutors agreed to drop
at sentencing the remaining
charges against her and dis-
miss the indictment against
the store.
"Ms. Morgan is sorry for her
actions. Prior to these events,
she had no criminal history.
She knows that she exercised
poor judgment and made a
horrible mistake," her attor-
ney, Sylvia Penner, wrote in
the court fling. "However, she
has demonstrated regret, ac-
ceptance of responsibility, and
amenability to probation."
Prosecutors allege Morgan, 55,
sold handbags, wallets, sun-
glasses and jewelry bearing
trademark designs and brand
names that were not made by
the companies.
Morgan faces a fne of up to
$2 million and up to 10 years
imprisonment, although she is
likely to receive far less, if any,
prison time under federal sen-
tencing guidelines. Prosecu-
tors agreed in the plea deal to
recommend a sentence at the
low end of the guideline range,
including a low-end monetary
fne.
Morgan did not proft substan-
tially from her conduct, receiv-
ing a modest income of $1,200
a month from the store's sales,
according to the court fling.
"Moreover, the details of the
ofense conduct and this case
have appeared on television,
in newspapers and online," her
attorney wrote. "Te publicity
the case has received afords
deterrence from any repeat
conduct by Ms. Morgan."
Morgan has also been sued civ-
illy by Coach, Inc., for alleged-
ly selling phony items bearing
its brand name. Penner told
the court that settlement nego-
tiations are proceeding in that
case, and her attorney argued
that the civil lawsuit and any
judgment ultimately imposed
in it will further serve to deter
her client from criminal be-
havior.
In April, two undercover
agents bought about $500
worth of items at the store,
including a fake Chanel brace-
let and sunglasses, a pair of
counterfeit Ugg boots as well
as several purses bearing the
counterfeited trademarks of
Michael Kors, Coach, Luis
Vuitton and Prada.
Investigators raided the store
nearly two weeks later, seiz-
ing 400 replica items with a
retail value of $14,000, accord-
ing to a court document. Te
goods would have been worth
$140,000 had the trademarks
been genuine.
Te store's business practices
frst came to light in 2009 af-
ter a postal carrier assigned
to the store's route told the
Department of Homeland Se-
curity the shop received about
six to seven packages a month
from China, according to a
DHS afdavit. Agents eventu-
ally seized nearly 2,600 items
that would have been valued
at about $1.5 million had they
been authentic.

She knows that she exercised poor judgment and made a horrible
mistake.
SYLVIA PENNER
Attorney
MONDAY, MARCH 10, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 8A
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GEORGE MULLINIX/KANSAN
The directors of Pi Kappa Phi and Delta Gammas Gone With the Weeds pose with the nine awards their cast won, including Best Show and Best
Costumes. Rock Chalk Revue featured ve total musicals that performed on Thursday, Friday and Saturday. Proceeds beneted Douglas Countys
Big Brothers, Big Sisters program.
CONTRIBUTED PHOTO
Actors from Pi Beta Phi dressed as soap suds and shampoo bottles perform onstage in A Soapy Opera during the 65th annual Rock Chalk Revue.
This year, the theme of the performances was Let The Good Times Roll.
ROCK CHALK REVUE
AMHERST, Mass. An ear-
ly St. Patrick's Day celebration
around the University of Mas-
sachusetts' fagship campus
known as "Blarney Blowout"
spun out of control Saturday
as police ofcers in riot gear
arrested more than 70 peo-
ple while dispersing massive
crowds, including unruly stu-
dents throwing beer cans and
bottles.
Police said early Sunday that
73 people had been arrested
and four ofcers sufered mi-
nor injuries afer police spent
the day attempting to disperse
"several" large gatherings.
Amherst Police Capt. Jenni-
fer Gundersen said in a state-
ment that police remained
busy through Saturday night
handling numerous reports of
fghts, noise and highly intox-
icated individuals.
"It is extremely disturbing
and unsafe. Perhaps one of
the worst scenes we have ever
had with drunkenness and un-
ruliness," Gundersen told Te
Republican in Springfeld. "It is
extremely upsetting. It is very
dangerous."
Most of the arrests came at
an of-campus apartment com-
plex, where large crowds began
gathering Saturday morning
for the annual event, which
was started by bars to allow the
students to celebrate the holi-
day before their spring break
begins this week.
Police from the city, univer-
sity and state troopers in riot
gear converged on a crowd of
about 4,000 people at an apart-
ment complex shortly afer
noon, police said in a state-
ment Saturday night. Police
said party-goers were involved
in destruction of property and,
as ofcers began to disperse
the crowd, they were pelted
with glass bottles, beer cans
and snowballs.
Afer handling the distur-
bance at the apartment com-
plex, police say several thou-
sand people assembled near a
frat house and near an inter-
section. Authorities said they
determined that the gathering
became dangerous and out
of control, and when ofcers
tried to clear the crowd they
again faced people throwing
bottles, rocks, cans and snow-
balls.
Police say pepper spray was
used to disperse the crowds
because of the size and "assaul-
tive behavior."
Tree ofcers were hurt
when they were hit by bottles
and one was injured while at-
tempting to make an arrest,
Gundersen said. None of the
injuries required serious treat-
ment.
Police say charges ranged
from inciting to riot and fail-
ing to disperse to disorderly
conduct, liquor law violations
and assault and battery on of-
fcers. Tey said Sunday some
have been released on bail
while others have been held,
depending on charges.
Afer police arrested sever-
al people at last year's "Blar-
ney Blowout," the university
warned students earlier this
week that police would have
an increased presence around
town Saturday. Letters were
also sent directly to students
disciplined in the last year for
alcohol-related misconduct.
UMass denounced the "un-
ruly behavior" Saturday and
spokesman Ed Blaguszewski
said students who were arrest-
ed will be reviewed under the
school's code of conduct and
that sanctions could include
suspension or expulsion.
Amherst Capt. Christopher
Pronovost described the day as
"mayhem" to the Daily Hamp-
shire Gazette.
"Tis can't be in any way,
shape or form be characterized
as a party," he said. "Tis is
destruction of property (and)
assaultive behavior."
Collecting bottles and cans
around the scene of the may-
hem Saturday night, Amherst
resident Raul Colon told the
Gazette that the day's events
looked like "a revolution, like
in the countries that have rev-
olutions between the students
and the government."
Gundersen said that numer-
ous participants in the revelry
were also injured.
Blarney Blowout
results in arrests
NATIONAL
ASSOCIATED PRESS
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Police surround participants in the pre-St. Patricks Day Blarney
Blowout near the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, Mass., on
Saturday.
MONDAY, MARCH 10, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 9A
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2300 Louisiana St,
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Topeka family returns
home from Ukraine
STATE
ASSOCIATED PRESS
TOPEKA A Kansas couple
and their four newly adopted
children have made it home af-
ter a month in Ukraine, where
they were stranded amid vio-
lence and civil unrest.
Topeka residents Don and
Lisa Jenkins arrived in Ukraine
on Feb. 2, where they hoped to
fnalize the adoptions of their
four children by Valentine's
Day, the Topeka Capital-Jour-
nal reported.
But when thousands of peo-
ple took to the streets of Kiev
to protest the government's
movement toward Russia and
away from possible ties to the
European Union, those plans
were put on indefnite hold.
"It's great to be back in Amer-
ica," Don Jenkins, 50, said
minutes afer he and his family
arrived around 9 p.m. Saturday
at Kansas City International
Airport. "We're excited to be
home."
Te family lef Kiev at 6:30
a.m. Saturday, few to Munich,
Germany, before traveling to
Chicago and then on to Kan-
sas City, Mo. When their jet
touched down at Chicago's
O'Hare Airport on Saturday
afernoon, the four adopted
children Tatiana, 17; Ange-
la, 16; Natalie, 15; and Roman,
8 ofcially became Ameri-
can citizens.
It took a couple hours for the
children to go through cus-
toms in Chicago and nearly
caused the Jenkinses to miss
their fight to Kansas City. By
the time they arrived in Mis-
souri, the family was running
on adrenaline, said Lisa Jen-
kins, 46.
When their trip ended Sat-
urday, the family had crossed
eight time zones and few
5,409 miles.
"Everybody's really exhaust-
ed," she said. "At the same
time, we're all so excited to f-
nally be home."
Te grueling 22-hour trip
was a small price to pay for
getting out of the international
hot spot that Ukraine had be-
come.
Much of the fghting in Kiev
captured on television cameras
and beamed around the world
took place less than a mile
from the apartment where the
family was staying.
Tough the fghting died
down afer about a week, the
Jenkinses faced a seemingly
never-ending series of delays
in getting paperwork from the
Ukrainian government that
was required before they could
leave the country.
Te fnal passports and visas
needed for the children were
obtained Friday morning.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Sarah Ditch, left, and Angela Jenkins hug each other as Don and 8-year-old Roman Jenkins exit their gate at
Kansas City International Airport on Saturday. Lisa and Don Jenkins went to Ukraine to adopt Tatiana, Angela,
Natalie and Roman but got stuck in the country with riots only blocks away.
Follow
@KansanNews
on Twitter
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MONDAY, MARCH 10, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 10A
Volume 126 Issue 90 kansan.com Monday, March 10, 2014
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
sports
S
ANDREW WIGGINS
Big 12 Freshman of the Year
JOEL EMBIID
PERRY ELLIS
WAYNE SELDEN JR.
NAADIR THARPE
Big 12 Defensive Player of the Year
All-Big 12 Third Team
All-Big 12 Honorable Mention
All-Big 12 Honorable Mention

I dont want to disappoint you, but


Im not.
Rick Barnes in November
on whether he was worried
about his job security,
Sportingnews
This week in athletics
?
TRIVIA OF THE DAY
THE MORNING BREW
Q: How many times have both the
No. 1 and No. 2 seed made the
championship game?
A: Seven
CBSsports
!
FACT OF THE DAY
Kansas has entered the Big 12
tournament as the No. 1 seed 10
out of 18 years.
CBSsports
Big 12 teams will excite fans in the tournament
QUOTE OF THE DAY
W
hile Selection Sunday is
less than a week away,
starting Wednesday in
Kansas City, Mo., theres something
that takes larger precedent for now.
Te Big 12 Conference has arguably
contained the most depth this season.
Joe Lunardi of ESPN currently has
eight Big 12 teams making the NCAA
Tournament. Tats 80 percent of the
league, which would be higher than
the Big East when they had 11 out of
16 teams in 2011.
Te Big 12 Tournament begins at the
Sprint Center this week with many
crazy stories and coaches who know
how to handle them.
Tis year the National Coach of the
Year has been a heated discussion
with a plethora of names up for con-
sideration, but two in the Big 12 have
done as remarkable a job as anyone
with their rosters.
Lon Kruger, whose Oklahoma
squad was picked to fnish ffh in the
conference afer losing its top three
scorers last season, has done much
better than anticipated. Te Sooners
fnished second in the conference with
an identical overall record to Kansas
with a seemingly depleted roster.
Kruger recognized the strength of
the Big 12 and said that its unpar-
alleled in comparison to the other
leagues.
Kansas has separated themselves a
little bit, but two through eight [seeds]
theres not any diference, Kruger
said. I dont know any other confer-
ence that can say where two through
eight theres no diference.
More importantly, Rick Barnes who
was picked to fnish second-to-last
place in the Big 12 has worked won-
ders with even less talent this year.
Barnes, who was seen as a coach on
the hot seat by many, has propelled
himself into the National Coach of the
Year discussion with ease. Texas is the
No. 3 seed in the Big 12 Champion-
ship and has been a steady competitor
all year in the Big 12.
Some teams will get an added chance
to prove their resiliency afer some
hefy losing streaks that could have
derailed their season.
Baylor is the No. 7 seed afer starting
the conference season 2-8,
which lef many thinking it
was out of the equation.
Oklahoma State is the No. 8
seed afer plummeting down
the standings with Marcus
Smart. If OSU can beat Texas
Tech on Wednesday, it will
have the chance to play
Kansas in the semifnals to
decide the season series.
If any team can match
talent with the No. 1 seed
Kansas, its OSU, which
handled Kansas in Stillwater,
Okla., just a week ago.
Te range of teams that can compete
in this tournament is unmatched
from other tournaments in recent
memory.
It features frst-round matchups that
may as well be semifnals, including
the Kansas State versus Iowa State
game.
While the value of conference
tournaments is obviously diminished
from the regular season, the tourna-
ments still provide a chance for more
excitement, which fans are always up
for.
On one side of the bracket this year
is Oklahoma, Kansas, Kansas State
and Iowa State, which would be good
enough for a whole conference, but
from
there the
drop-of
doesnt
wane much.
Fair or not,
for now the
NCAA tourna-
ment rewards
teams that are
able to bolster
their rsum
through winning
their conference
tourney. It creates
incentive for teams trying to
fnd the right matchup in the NCAA
tournament.
While there was a little drama in
trying to thwart Kansas from winning
its 10th straight title, that excitement
dwindled of in the end when Okla-
homa and Texas werent able to topple
the perennial power in the last few
games as Kansas held on to the title.
Te table is now reset. So is the
drama.
Kansas City will garner attention
from the entire college basketball
world. Its known as one of the biggest
hubs in college basketball TV ratings
and this weekend will be no diferent.
Edited by Chelsea Mies
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Friday Saturday
Mens Golf
Louisiana Classics
All day
Lafayette, La.
Mens Golf
Louisiana Classics
All Day
Lafayette, La.
Softball
Northern Illinois
3:30 p.m.
Lawrence
Womens Golf
Insperity Lady Jaguar
Intercollegiate
All day
Augusta, Ga.
Womens Golf
Insperity Lady Jaguar
Intercollegiate
All Day
Augusta, Ga.
Womens Golf
Insperity Lady Jaguar
Intercollegiate
All day
Augusta, Ga.
Womens Tennis
Iowa State
3 p.m.
Ames, Iowa
Womens Tennis
West Virginia
11 a.m.
Morgantown, W. Va.
Baseball
Texas
6 p.m.
Austin, Texas
Baseball
Texas
1 p.m.
Austin, Texas
Baseball
Texas
1 p.m.
Austin, Texas
Track
NCAA Indoor Championships
All day
Albuquerque, N.M.
Track
NCAA Indoor Championships
All day
Albuquerque, N.M.
Softball
Jackson State
10:30 a.m.
Lawrence
Softball
Nebraska
1 p.m.
Lawrence
Womens Rowing
Louisville Invite
Day one
Oak Ridge, Tenn.
Womens Rowing
Louisville Invite
Final results
Oak Ridge, Tenn.
Mens Basketball
TBD
Kansas City, Mo.
Mens Basketball
TBD
Kansas City, Mo.
Mens Basketball
TBD
Kansas City, Mo.
Mens Basketball
TBD
Kansas City, Mo.
Softball
South Dakota State (DH)
1 p.m.
Softball
South Dakota State (DH)
3 p.m.
Baseball
Oral Roberts University
3 p.m.
Lawrence
Thursday
MONDAY, MARCH 10, 2014 PAGE 2B THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
By Connor Oberkrom
sports@kansan.com
Naismith Hall, a private student resi-
dence hall serving the University of
KS, is accepting applications for-
Summer Resident Advisors: Apply
in person at 1800 Naismith Drive,
Lawrence, KS
Full/Part time workers needed for
vegtable farm. Call 842-7941 leave
message with your experience.
Naismith Hall, a private student resi-
dence hall serving the University of
KS, is accepting applications for
Resident Director and Summer Res-
ident Director: Apply in person at
1800 Naismith Drive, Lawrence, KS
Sunfower State Games seeks ener-
getic and responsible summer in-
terns to assist in event planning
and promotions for Olympic Style
Sports Festival. Email sunfow-
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W
hen Andrew Wig-
gins chose to come
to Kansas, there
was excitement and anticipa-
tion because of the unknown.
Would he be able to score at
will? Can he set any freshman
records? Whats his highlight
dunk going to look like?
Whats his career high going
to be?
It wasnt so much a ques-
tion of would it happen? as
when would it happen?
On Saturday we got our
answers.
Yes, he can score at will.
Yes, hell certainly hold a few
freshman records, his high-
light dunk is going to look
something like him foating
over the paint at West Virgin-
ia. His career-high is 41.
Good luck remembering if
Kansas won that game or not.
Not that it makes a difer-
ence either way. Tere were
numerous reasons why a loss
didnt matter at West Virginia.
But the most important
answer that most Kansas fans
received had nothing to do
with individual accomplish-
ments.
It did have everything to do
with Andrew Wiggins.
Now we know just how far
he can be pushed.
I just tried to play very ac-
tive because we were down the
whole game, Wiggins told the
media afer the 92-86 loss.
NCAA Tournament teams
be warned, this is the Andrew
Wiggins you were looking for.
Tis is why every school in
the nation wouldve traded its
roster to get the Canadian pro
prospect. Tis is whats going
to give Kansas its best chance
to win a National Champi-
onship.
With Andrew Wiggins on
the foor, the Jayhawks are
seldom out of game.
Not when theyre far from
home, not when they are
down by 20 points and not
when the rest of the team is
having an of night.
And there will be of nights.
No team in America wins six
in a row without fnding a way
to win a game it shouldnt
its a staple of coach Bill Self s
philosophy.
Te actualization of Wig-
gins takeover was in some
ways the missing piece for
these Jayhawks. Sure he was
counted on to make it happen
before, see Texas Tech, Kansas
State and Florida for further
examples, but he had never
been able to do it with so
much stacked against him.
But then the shots kept
falling, his confdence kept
growing and his team kept
coming back.
Whether or not Joel Embiid
will be healthy enough for the
Jayhawks to play him signif-
cant minutes in the next few
weeks suddenly seems a little
less troublesome.
Teres nobody in America
that will have a better game
than what Andrew had, Self
told the media.
It took the entire regular sea-
son for Te Andrew Wiggins
Game to materialize. And
really there couldnt have been
a better time for it to happen.
And no one is going to re-
member if Kansas won or lost
at least not against West
Virginia.
Edited by Amber Kasselman
MONDAY, MARCH 10, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 3B
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Pitching was the theme in
yesterdays fnal game between
Kansas and Stanford. Fresh-
man Cal Quantrill got the start
for the Cardinals while Kansas
senior Frank Duncan looked
to keep his strong start to the
season going.
Te game was scoreless until
the Cardinals broke the tie in
the fourth inning when fresh-
man outfelder Alex Dunlap
drove in senior frst baseman
Danny Diekroeger with an RBI
single.
Duncan had another strong
outing, pitching eight innings
and allowing only one run. He
allowed four hits while strik-
ing out four and only walking
one. Duncans strong eforts
came up short as he recorded
his frst loss of the 2014 season.
Im just flling up the zone,
Duncan said. Im putting
myself in good positions and
throwing strikes.
Quantrill threw a complete
game shutout allowing only
four hits while striking out
seven.
He was throwing his slid-
er for strikes, senior catcher
Kaiana Eldredge said. Any-
time their guy is throwing his
of-speed stuf for strikes, hes
hard to hit.
Te freshman entered the
game with a 6.75 ERA and a
1-2 record in four appearanc-
es. Quantrill was able to neu-
tralize the strong Jayhawk line-
up, handing them their third
loss on the season.
He was dominant, coach
Ritch Price said. We had a
chance late and just couldnt
get the clutch hit. He was as
good as advertised.
Kansas ofense was silenced
at the plate yesterday, as they
were only able to rack up four
hits. Te Jayhawks entered the
series against Stanford with
one of the more high-powered
ofenses in the country. Tey
were batting .335 and scored
108 runs on 141 hits.
Junior outfelder Connor
McKay is tied for the Big 12
lead in home runs (four) and
leads the conference in RBIs
(24). Te slugging outfelder
combined for fve RBIs and
fve hits in the frst two games
of the season, but was held hit-
less in yesterdays game.
Te Jayhawks entered the se-
ries with four players in the top
fve in runs scored amongst
the 10 Big 12 teams this sea-
son. Sophomore infelder
Tommy Mirabelli lead the way
with 15 while fellow infeld-
er Justin Protacio entered the
weekend series with 14. Prot-
acio crossed home plate twice
this weekend and passed his
double-play partner for num-
ber one on the list.
Te whole team feels good,
Duncan said. We feel like
were in a great position and
we can beat any team in the
country.
Te weekend series against
Stanford was a tiring one. Kan-
sas won its frst game of the
series, which was a 13-inning
thriller that ended in the early
hours of the morning.
Saturday, the Jayhawks ral-
lied from fve runs down only
to come up short and fall 5-4.
Te Jayhawks were not able
to get the big hit they needed
on Sunday. Kansas lef eight
men on base throughout the
game compared to only three
by Stanford.
We were one or two big hits
away from a win, Eldredge
said. Te whole weekend
went that way, we could have
came out with a sweep.
Sundays loss gave Kansas
their frst series loss of the sea-
son and dropped their record
to 12-3.
Kansas will play their frst
home game of the season to-
morrow against Oral Roberts
University. First pitch is at 3
p.m., and the forecast fnally
calls for playable weather.
Were excited to play in front
of our home crowd, Duncan
said. Weve been on the road
for so long, and were ready to
come back home.
Edited by Kaitlyn Klein
Jayhawks face their rst series loss of the season
BEN FELDERSTEIN
sports@kansan.com
BASEBALL
GEORGE MULLINIX/KANSAN
Senior catcher Kaiana Eldredge braces for the impact at the plate during last years game against Texas. Kansas suffered its rst series loss of the season this weekend against Stanford. Anytime their guy is throwing his off-
speed stuff for strikes, hes hard to hit, said Eldredge, referring Stanfords Quantrill who threw a complete game shutout yesterday.
Wiggins proves himself, earns career high
MENS BASKETBALL
By Blake Schuster
sports@kansan.com
KANSAS 38 48 86
50 42 92 West Virginia
UNSUNG HERO
Traylor
Jamari Traylor, forward
In the last half of the season no player has made as
drastic an improvement as the Chicago sophomore.
Since conference play began, Traylor is shooting 76
percent from the eld (33 of 43) and has become
a notable force in the paint and in transition. His
hustle has led to plays, such as his monster block on
Juwan Staten late in the rst half on Saturday.
GAME TO REMEMBER
Wiggins
Andrew Wiggins, guard
Good luck remembering what the nal score of the
West Virginia game was when you tell your friends, or
relatives, or kids about this game years from now. All
youll remember is all Wiggins everything. The fresh-
man had his most impressive performance to date
with every facet of his game working to perfection.
Wiggins nished with 41 points, eight rebounds, ve
steals, four blocks and two assists before fouling out.
GAME TO FORGET
Tharpe
Naadir Tharpe, guard
Tharpe played 16 minutes on Saturday but its hard
to remember a single one. Hopefully for Kansas fans,
he feels the same way. The junior missed all three of
his eld goal attempts while scoring zero points with
one steal and one turnover. The sooner he can move
past this game, the better off the Jayhawks will look
heading into tournament season.
KANSAS STAT LEADERS
Wiggins Selden Jr. Wiggins
REBOUNDS ASSISTS POINTS
MONDAY, MARCH 10, 2014 PAGE 5B PAGE 4B
WEST VIRGINIA
PLAYER PTS FG-FGA REBS A T0s
Eron Harris 28 8-14 1 3 4
Juwan Staten 24 5-11 5 9 4
Devin Williams 22 8-10 13 1 2
Remi Dibo 6 2-3 1 0 0
Gary Browne 5 1-6 5 1 2
Terry Henderson 4 2-4 1 0 0
Nathan Adrian 3 1-3 1 0 0
Brandon Watkins 0 0-0 2 0 1
Other Players 0 0-0 8 1 0
TOTAL 92 27-51 37 15 13
KANSAS
PLAYER PTS FG-FGA REBS A T0s
Andrew Wiggins 41 12-18 8 2 4
Perry Ellis 14 5-10 5 1 0
Frank Mason 10 3-4 0 2 2
Wayne Selden Jr. 8 3-9 3 2 2
Jamari Traylor 6 2-4 7 0 1
Brannen Greene 3 1-2 1 1 0
Tarik Black 2 1-4 4 1 0
Landen Lucas 2 1-1 2 0 0
Other Players 0 0-10 1 0 2
TOTAL 86 28-62 31 9 11
BASKETBALL REWIND
Kansas 86 West Virginia 92
10/29/2013 Pittsburg State Lawrence 7 p.m. W/97/57
11/5/2013 Fort Hays State Lawrence 7 p.m. W/92/75
11/8/2013 Louisiana Monroe Lawrence 7 p.m. W/80/63
11/12/2013 Duke Chicago 8:30 p.m. W/94/83
11/19/2013 Iona Lawrence 7 p.m. W/86/66
11/22/2013 Towson Lawrence 7 p.m. W/88/55
11/28/2013 Wake Forest Bahamas 2:30 p.m. W/87/78
11/29/2013 Villanova or USC Bahamas 8:30 or 2:30 p.m. L/59/63
11/30/2013 UTEP Bahamas 7 p.m. W/67/63
12/7/2013 Colorado Boulder, Colo. 2:15 p.m. L/72/75
12/10/2013 Florida Gainesville, Fla. 6 p.m. L/61/67
12/14/2013 New Mexico Kansas City, Mo. 6 p.m. W/80/63
12/21/2013 Georgetown Lawrence 11 a.m. W/86/64
12/30/2013 Toledo Lawrence 7 p.m. W/93/83
1/5/2014 San Diego State Lawrence 3:30 p.m. L/57/61
1/8/2014 Oklahoma Norman, Okla. 6 p.m. W/90/83
1/11/2014 Kansas State Lawrence 1 p.m. W/96/60
1/13/2014 Iowa State Ames, Iowa 8 p.m. W/77/70
1/18/2014 Oklahoma State Lawrence 3 p.m. W/80/78
1/20/2014 Baylor Lawrence 8 p.m. W/78/68
1/25/2014 TCU Fort Worth, Texas 8 p.m. W/91/69
1/29/2014 Iowa State Lawrence 8 p.m. W/92/81
2/1/2014 Texas Austin, Texas 3 p.m. L/69/81
2/4/2014 Baylor Waco, Texas 6 p.m. W/69/52
2/8/2014 West Virginia Lawrence 3 p.m. W/83/69
2/10/2014 Kansas State Manhattan 8 p.m. L/82/85(OT)
2/15/2014 TCU Lawrence 3 p.m. W/95/65
2/18/2014 Texas Tech Lubbock, Texas 7 p.m. W/64/63
2/22/2014 Texas Lawrence 6:30 p.m. W/85/54
2/24/2014 Oklahoma Lawrence 8 p.m. W/83/75
3/1/2014 Oklahoma State Stillwater, Okla. 8 p.m. L/65/72
3/5/2014 Texas Tech Lawrence 7 p.m. W/82/57
3/8/2014 West Virginia Morgantown, W. Va. 11 a.m. L/86/92
SCHEDULE
First Half
6:27 - Andrew Wiggins blocks a Juwan Staten jump shot, runs the oor and takes off from just outside the paint
before gliding through the air for a one-handed slam. Kansas trails 34-28 with 6:27 left in the rst half.
4:49 - Running back in transition, Jamari Traylor skies for a monster block on Juwan Staten. Kansas trails 40-30
with 4:49 left in the rst half.
Second Half
3:53 - Andrew Wiggins knocks down a 3-pointer, immediately steals the inbounds and goes up for a one-handed
dunk. Kansas trails 85-73 with 3:53 remaining in the second half.
3:09 - Coming out of a timeout, Wiggins connects on another jump shot for his 41st point of the game. A career
high for the freshman. Kansas trails 85-75 with 3:09 remaining in regulation.
PRIME PLAYS
KEY STATS
Points scored by Andrew Wiggins
Combined points by the rest of the Kansas team
Wiggins 41 points were the most by a Kansas player since Terry
Brown scored 42 points in a game 23 years ago, in 1991.
41
45
23
Wiggins breaks Kansas record with career high despite loss
ASSOCIATED PRESS
West Virginias Juwan Staten, left, looks to pass as Kansas Frank Mason, Jamari Traylor and Tarik Black defend during the second half of an NCAA col-
lege basketball game Saturday in Morgantown, W.Va. West Virginia won 92-86.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Andrew Wiggins shoots a free throw after a technical foul during the second half of the game against West Virginia on Saturday in Morgantown, W.Va.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Andrew Wiggins drives to the basket during the rst half of the game against West Virginia on Saturday in
Morgantown, W.Va.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
West Virginias fans storm the court after West Virginia defeated No. 8 Kansas 92-86 in an game on Saturday in
Morgantown, W.Va.
Blake Schuster
Coming away with four
straight wins, the Jayhawks
(15-7) slugged their way
through the Under Armour
Classic in Tampa, Fla.
Te frst game of the tourna-
ment was the only loss of the
weekend for Kansas. Kansas
faced Northwestern (15-5) and
was up with an early lead in the
bottom of the frst inning. Te
Wildcats came back swinging
in the fourth inning, taking
a 3-2 lead over the Jayhawks.
Kansas tried for a comeback
in the seventh, but couldnt
cross the last runner to force
extra innings. Kansas lost 4-3.
Te only Kansas batter to have
multiple hits was junior utility
player Maddie Stein.
I like the fght [from our
team], coach Megan Smith
said. Northwestern punched
us with four runs, but we kept
fghting back and just kind of
ran out of time.
Afer the loss to Northwest-
ern, Kansas didnt look back.
In the second game of the day,
Kansas faced of against Uni-
versity of South Florida (16-7),
a team that has played many
ranked opponents. Kansas
didnt let that phase them as
they delivered a 9-3 rout of the
Bulls. Leading the Jayhawks
were sophomore infelder
Chaley Brickey and freshman
catcher Harli Ridling. Both
Brickey and Ridling ham-
mered a home run, having
three RBIs each. Te home
runs were the third of the sea-
son for both Jayhawks.
Ofensively, we were locked
in at the beginning and had a
lot of intensity at the plate and
got really good at bats, Smith
said. Te diference in this
game was that we kept putting
pressure on them which was
good to see our ofense do.
Letting the momentum from
Friday carry them into Satur-
day morning, Kansas took on
St. Johns (7-11). Sophomore
pitcher Kelsey Kessler (8-5)
allowed only four hits while
striking out 10.
[Kelsey] looked great, said
Smith. She gave up two big
hits [on Friday] and then
bounced back and just domi-
nated. She threw the ball really
well. She moved the ball and
kept them of balance.
Leading the way for Kansas
batters were Brickey and Ri-
dling, as they both posted in-
dividual home runs. Ridling
had two RBIs, with Brickey
accounting for one.
Tose two and Maddie Stein
are going to lead our ofense
and they are doing a great job
for us, Smith said.
In the second game of the
day, Kansas faced Utah (9-7).
Junior pitcher Alicia Pille (5-
2) allowed just four hits, one
run, and committed one error
on the day. Pille also account-
ed for six strikeouts in the con-
test.
Pille came out determined,
Smith said. She threw ex-
tremely well and had that
mental lapse in the last inning.
Today she came out in the last
inning and was ready to go,
mentally tough and went right
at them.
Brickey recorded her third
consecutive game with a home
run, giving her two RBIs that
evening. Junior infelder Ch-
anin Naudin added a hit and
two RBI for the Jayhawks for
the 4-1 win over the Utes.
Chanin is very poised up at
the plate and battles, Smith
said. Shes really good at not
taking one at bat to the next.
She was locked in and came
through for us.
In the fnal game of the tour-
nament, Kansas took on LIU
Brooklyn, a game that was
long overdue. Earlier in the
season, the Jayhawks were to
take on the Blackbirds, but the
contest was rained out.
Te game against LIU Brook-
lyn was the second shutout of
the tournament for Kansas,
winning 6-0. Kessler pitched
in both shutout games, record-
ing two straight, her ffh of the
season, and 12th of her career.
Our pitchers have been
dominant the last two days
to only give up one run,
Smith said. Kelsey kept them
of-balance and just went right
at them.
Brickeys home run streak
came to an end, but she still
recorded two hits on two runs
and a base on balls. Stein also
had two hits and added two
RBIs.
[Maddie] is just a poised hit-
ter, Smith said. She is really
good at doing her job and her
job is to drive in runs. She gets
up there and she is confdent,
has good at bats and she exe-
cutes for us.
Kansas will return to action
on Tuesday when they host
the 2014 season opener with
a double header against South
Dakota State at Arrocha Ball-
park. Te opening pitch is
scheduled for 1 p.m.
Edited by Sarah Kramer
MONDAY, MARCH 10, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 6B
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It was clear that Baylor hadnt
quite shaken the image of Kan-
sas celebrating Baylors unlike-
ly upset on Jan. 19. Te Jay-
hawks mobbed each other at
mid-court of Allen Fieldhouse
while the Bears walked of the
court with their frst confer-
ence loss.
I guess we knew we had to
come out with more intensity,
Baylor freshman guard Imani
Wright said. We still remem-
ber the loss that we took, so we
felt like we needed to start fast
and keep it going.
Baylor (27-4, 16-2 Big 12)
handily defeated the Jayhawks
(13-19, 5-13 Big 12) 81-47 on
Saturday in the quarterfnals
of the Big 12 womens tourna-
ment. Te 34-point loss was
their worst of the season.
Kansas couldnt get much of-
fense going afer falling behind
by 16 afer only eight minutes
of play. Te Jayhawks were ice
cold from the foor, shooting
only 26.5 percent (9-34) as the
Bears limited clean opportuni-
ties.
Te Jayhawks were fairly ef-
cient in the paint; their guard
play was what ultimately cost
them a shot at a second upset.
Of the Jayhawks four starting
guards, only two converted a
feld goal, combining to shoot
12 percent (2-17) in the frst
half. It would prove too much
for coach Bonnie Henricksons
squad to overcome.
Weve got to shoot the ball
better to get Chelsea [Gard-
ner] some room, Henrickson
said. Weve got to give her
some room to play.
Gardner was Kansas only
legitimate ofensive threat; she
fnished with 11 points and
converted its only free throw
in the frst. But, the junior for-
ward was again limited by ear-
ly foul trouble and her team-
mates inefciency as the Bears
began keying in on taking her
out of the game.
Forward Nina Davis, the Big
12 Freshman of the Year, was
dominant for Baylor, scoring
18 points and grabbing fve re-
bounds in just the frst half. Se-
nior guard Odyssey Sims, Big
12 Player of the Year, contrib-
uted 11 points as well, creating
several chances for teammates
in the process. Te Bears held
a 46-20 lead entering halfime.
It frst started with Odyssey
pressuring the defense and we
just followed her lead, Baylor
sophomore guard Niya John-
son said.
Tings werent much difer-
ent in the second half. Kansas,
possibly exhausted from its
87-84 overtime victory against
Kansas State on Friday night,
showed a visible lack of en-
ergy out of the locker room.
Te Jayhawks were never able
to mount a serious run, man-
aging a meager 22 feld goal
attempts afer the second half
despite trailing by double dig-
its.
Tey turned the ball over 20
times as well, 10 in the frst, 10
in the second, in surely one of
their most disappointing per-
formances of the year.
[Baylor] just looked at us
and said, Were going to rip it
and drive on you and ofensive
rebound and get you in transi-
tion, Henrickson said. Tey
came out and ran a buzz saw
and we didnt have an answer
defensively.
Gardner fnished with 21
points and nine rebounds,
falling just short of her 14th
double-double of the season.
Senior guard CeCe Harper
scored no points on 0-6 shoot-
ing in her last game as a Jay-
hawk.
Afer losing three 1,000-point
scorers from last season, not
much was expected from Kan-
sas in 2013-14, but the loss is
disheartening for Henricksons
squad nonetheless. It showed
promise at times throughout
the year, but never was quite
able to put it all together on a
consistent basis.
Edited by Amber Kasselman
KYLE PAPPAS
sports@kansan.com
Jayhawks lack of energy
leads to loss against Baylor
WOMENS BASKETBALL
SOFTBALL

They came out and ran a buzz


saw and we didnt have an
answer defensively.
BONNIE HENRICKSON
Coach
I like the ght [from our team]. Northwestern punched us with
four runs, but we kept ghting back and just kind of ran out of
time.
MEGAN SMITH
Coach
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Junior forward Chelsea Gardner shoots between Baylor point guard Kristina Higgins and forward Nina Davis in
the rst half of an NCAA college basketball game in the quarternals of the Big 12 Conference womens college
tournament in Oklahoma City on Saturday. Kansas lost 81-47.
Jayhawks pick up four more wins at Florida tournament
AMIE JUST
sports@kansan.com
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ENROLL NOW!
Kansas prepares for
Louisiana Classics
The Kansas Mens Golf team
will head south on Monday and
Tuesday to Lafayette, La., for the
Louisiana Classics Invitational.
The team will hit the links just
a few weeks after its 15th place
nish in Palm Desert, Calif., at
the University of Wyoming Desert
Intercollegiate.
The Jayhawks will be led by
sophomore Ben Welle, fresh off
shooting (+2) overall at the
tournament in Palm Desert,
and 4-under par 68 on the nal
round.
Freshman Chase Hanna from
Leawood should also provide the
Jayhawks with some good holes.
He led the team at Palm Desert
with a three-round 213 (-3).
Ben Welle and Chase Hanna
have played really well, said
coach Jamie Bermel. But we
need to get some better help from
our fourth and fth spots.
It is crucial for players such
as sophomore Connor Peck, and
juniors Logan Philley and Jack-
son Foth, to shoot well if Kansas
hopes to make the podium Tues-
day evening.
Daniel Harmsen
MENS GOLF
DORAL, Fla. Patrick Reed
felt he belongs among the best
in the world. He beat them all
Sunday in the Cadillac Cham-
pionship.
Dressed in a red shirt that
he always wears in the fnal
round with Tiger Woods
in the group ahead of him
Reed made back-to-back bird-
ies early on the front nine to
build a big lead and showed of
a great short game when the
pressure was building on the
new Blue Monster at Doral.
Equipped with a two-shot
lead, the 23-year-old Texan
wisely played the fnal hole
conservatively. He two-putted
for bogey and closed with an
even-par 72 for a one-shot vic-
tory over Bubba Watson and
Jamie Donaldson of Wales.
Reed became the youngest
winner of a World Golf Cham-
pionship, his third win in his
last 14 tournaments.
Woods, only three shots be-
hind going into the fnal round
in his best chance this year to
win a tournament, said his
back fared up afer an awk-
ward shot out of the bunker
on the sixth hole. He failed
to make a birdie in the fnal
round for the frst time in his
PGA Tour career, and his 78
was his worst Sunday score
ever.
Reed is expected to go to No.
20 in the world ranking. In his
own ranking, he feels he be-
longs in the top fve.
He cited an amateur career
that includes going 6-0 in
matches to lead Augusta State
to two NCAA titles, followed
by three PGA Tour wins in
seven months.
"I don't see a lot of guys that
have done that besides Tiger
Woods and the legends of the
game," Reed said. "I believe
in myself, especially with how
hard I've worked. I'm one
of the top fve players in the
world. I feel like I've proven
myself."
He joined some exclusive
company. Since 1990, only
Woods, Phil Mickelson, Rory
McIlroy and Sergio Garcia had
three PGA Tour wins before
turning 24.
Tis was not an accident, ei-
ther.
Reed has had a share of the
lead going into the fnal round
of all three of his victories
the Wyndham Championship
last August, the Humana Chal-
lenge in January and a World
Golf Championship at Doral
that featured the strongest feld
so far this year.
His last two wins were wire-
to-wire, including ties.
Watson, who won at Riviera
three weeks ago, went bo-
gey-free over the fnal 27 holes,
a strong performance on the
overhauled Trump National
Doral. He closed with a 68, fn-
ishing with par afer blasting
through the palms, into the
grandstand and back into the
rough.
Donaldson wasn't so fortu-
nate. He hit into a foot on the
17th for his third birdie on the
back nine to get within one
shot of the lead. From the 18th
fairway afer watching Mi-
guel Angel Jimenez go through
the green and into the water
he blocked his approach away
from the fag and into the back
bunker. Donaldson blasted
out to just inside 15 feet and
missed the par putt. He closed
with a 70.
Reed fnished at 4-under 284,
matching the highest winning
score at Doral. Mark Mc-
Cumber won at 284 in 1985.
Reed, Donaldson and Wat-
son were the only players to
fnish under par.
Dustin Johnson, who lost
momentum around the turn,
made double bogey on the
18th hole for a 72 and tied for
fourth with Richard Sterne
(71).
Woods went into the fnal
round with a chance to win for
the frst time all year.
It didn't last very long.
He beaned and bloodied a
spectator on the opening hole
and missed a 10-foot birdie
putt. He beaned another spec-
tator on No. 3, kicking the ball
back into the fairway, only he
followed that with a shot into
the water and made bogey.
Woods made two more bogeys
over the next three holes and
was an aferthought. He said
the pain intensifed afer his
bunker shot on the sixth.
Woods had his lef foot in the
sand and his right foot fexed
against the lip of the bunker.
"Tat's what set it of and
then it was done afer that," he
said. "Just see if I could actually
manage ... keep the spasms at
bay."
Te results are not very
promising on his short road
to the Masters. Woods has
played only four tournaments,
and only twice went 72 holes.
He missed the 54-hole cut at
Torrey Pines, tied for 41st in
Dubai and withdrew afer 13
holes in the fnal round of the
Honda Classic last week.
He is scheduled to make only
one more start Bay Hill in
two weeks before Augusta
National.
PGA
Patrick Reed wins Cadillac
Championship in Florida
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Patrick Reed celebrates his win at the Cadillac Championship golf tournament on Sunday in Doral, Fla.
Kansas falls
short in Tulsa
TENNIS
TORI RUBINSTEIN
sports@kansan.com
No.19 Tulsa handed the
No.33 Kansas womens ten-
nis team its third straight loss
on Saturday, dominating the
Jayhawks 6-1. Te Jayhawks
are now 8-3 on the season.
Te fght for the doubles
point was a tough one. Tulsa
jumped ahead on court three
with an 8-5 victory over
senior Claire Dreyer and
freshman Morgan Barnhill.
Kansas tied it up on court
two with an 8-5 win from
sophomore Maria Cardona
and junior Maria Luduea.
Tere was a hard-fought bat-
tle on court one from seniors
Dylan Windom and Paulina
Los, but the pair eventually
fell to their opponents with
an 8-6 loss, giving the Tulsa
the doubles point.
On the singles courts, the
Hurricanes proved to be too
much for the Jayhawks, win-
ning fve out of six matches
on the day. Te only Kan-
sas win came from Los who
downed her opponent 7-5,
6-3. On court one, No. 70
nationally ranked Samantha
Vickers of Tulsa gave Car-
dona a tough time, sweeping
the match 6-0, 6-0.
Over on court three, Lu-
duea battled with No. 109
ranked Yelena Nemchen in
a tough match that eventu-
ally led to a tiebreaker. Nem-
chen would get the best of
Luduea, who won the tie-
breaker 11-9.
Te Jayhawks will look to
recover from Fridays defeat
this weekend at Iowa State in
their frst Big 12 Match of the
year. Te Cyclones come into
Fridays match with a record
of 8-5 and are looking to
bounce back from this week-
ends loss to Drake. Matches
begin at 3 p.m. this Friday in
Ames, Iowa.
Edited by Chelsea Mies
ASSOCIATED PRESS
FRANK WEIRICH/KANSAN
Kansas senior Paulina Los returns a serve. The pairs team of Los and
Winhom led their UMKC opponents 3-1 before the match was called.
SPRI NG 201 4
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MONDAY, MARCH 10, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 8B