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Meet Jersey Citys

Mayor Steven Fulop


JSTANDARD.COM
2014 83
PURIM NEWS FROM THE JEWISH SLANDERED page 3
JEWISH FAMILY SERVICE GET NEW LEADER page 6
TACKLING ISRAELS FOOTBALL GAP page 10
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J e w i s h S t a n d a r d
1 0 8 6 T e a n e c k R o a d
T e a n e c k , N J 0 7 6 6 6
C H A N G E S E R V I C E R E Q U E S T E D
Marine.
Mayor.
Mensch.
page 22
MARCH 14, 2014
VOL. LXXXIII NO. 27 $1.00
2 JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014
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NOSHES ...................................................5
OPINION ................................................ 18
COVER STORY .................................... 22
GALLERY ..............................................44
TORAH COMMENTARY ................... 45
CROSSWORD PUZZLE ....................46
ARTS & CULTURE .............................. 47
CALENDAR .......................................... 48
OBITUARIES ........................................ 53
CLASSIFIEDS ...................................... 54
REAL ESTATE ...................................... 56
CONTENTS
Candlelighting: Friday, March 14, 6:43 p.m.
Shabbat ends: Saturday, March 15, 7:43 p.m.
LOCAL
Bridgegate
motives
revealed
Why did the Port Authority appointees of
Governor Chris Christie close down the
Fort Lee lanes to the George Washington
Bridge last year?
Documents recently obtained by the
New Jersey Jewish Slandered from the New
York New Jersey Port, Rum, and Tricor-
nered Treat Authority has shed new light
on the case.
The documents show that both Author-
ity chaplain Rabbi Mendy Carlebach and
Fort Lee Mayor Mark Sokolich failed to
deliver shalach manot to Governor Chris
Christie last year.
Christie supporters say the new inding
proves their contention that what was ini-
tially reported as a trafic study blocking
three lanes of trafic on the George Wash-
ington Bridge was simply a mishearing.
It was a truffle study, said a Christie
conidant.
Truffles, not trafic. Chocolate truffles,
of course.
We had heard that the shalach manot
may have fallen off the truck, so we dis-
patched policemen to look for them. We
knew people might be inconvenienced,
but it was a small price to pay to permit
the governor to enjoy a festive Purim, how-
ever belated.
Meanwhile, Democrats in the Assembly
said this discovery proved their contention
that the bridge closing was a malicious, not
a delicious, maneuver on the governors
part.
We know the stories of wanting to
punish a mayor for not endorsing him
didnt ring true. What did Christie need
that endorsement for? And why drag in a
rabbi? an Assemblywoman said.
But shalach manot? Everyone knows
the governor loves his hamentaschen.
Formerly the Port Authority of New
York and New Jersey, the bodys mandate
has been expanded from bridges, tunnels,
and airports to include all trafic in port,
rum, alchohol, hamentaschen, and other
shalach manot on both sides of the Hud-
son River.
While billed as a public service to the
Jewish community, whose members had
been exchanging Purim goodies in a cha-
otic, hand-to-mouth manner for millennia,
the new authority also was seen as a fund-
raiser by some.
As a government agency with a mandate
to mainly monitor manot (mostly shalach),
the Port Authority was able to access top
secret NSA wiretap data. Under the Its
only metadata and what do you have to
hide and should we tell your neighbor
how you never call your mother doctrine,
Port Authority oficials analyzed complete
records of shalach manot exchanges in the
tristate area.
There were some shocking lapses in
etiquette, not to mention taste, said a Port
Authority oficial.
Were you born in an airport or
something?
Yeshiva students call for renewed
focus on day school education
A petition signed by thousands of stu-
dents at Bergen Countys Jewish day
schools has taken their elders to task for
failing to support day school education.
While our teachers, principals, par-
ents, and rabbis frequently pay lip ser-
vice to the ideal of Jewish day school
education, says the petition, posted at
change.org, even more often they make
a mockery of the day school ideal.
Time and again, they assign home-
work with the clear expectation that
the assignments will be completed at
home, and often at night.
What part of day and school do our
elders not understand? Like, duh!
KEEPING KOSHER
CannaBissli
Just in time for Purim, one of Israels
leading snack food makers has come out
with a spliffy new flavor.
CannaBissli offers the traditional pro-
cessed snack feel youve come to love
with an herbal edge that will have you
floating, said a Bissli spokesman.
CannaBissli bears the joint kosher
supervision seal of the Israeli High Rab-
binate and the Colorado Rabbinical
Council.
Everything is totally kosher, man
said Rabbi Mary Jane Bernstein, head of
the rabbinical council and principal of
Denvers Rocky Mountain Yeshiva High
School.
These new snacks make for totally
awesome shalach manot, man, she
continued.
And its a double mitzvah if you
eat a few bags, you wont be able to tell
the difference between Haman and, you
know, whats his name.
SLI targets shuls with new pilotless project
In a revolutionary new pilotless pilot
project, the Synagogue Likabililty Ini-
tiative of the Jewish Federation of the
Northernmost Decile of New Jersey will
be deploying anti-drone drones in select
area synagogues.
During services, simchas, and board
meetings, the anti-drone drones will cir-
cle overhead unobtrusively until they
detect the telltale signs of a rabbi, shul
president, or father-of-the-bride droning
on and on.
In that case, the anti-drone drone will
swoop down and dispatch the droner.
According to the PEW Survey of Jew-
ish Population and Communal Angst,
young Jews are leaving our institutions
in droves, and a clear motivation is
the boring, repetitive dronings of too
many of our speakers, said a federation
spokesperson, speaking on condition of
anonymity for fear the Jewish Slandered
would misspell his name.
Our anti-drone drones are the opti-
mal high-tech solution to the dreary
droners that are driving droves away, he
said. We are running a pre-pilot unpi-
loted pilot project here at the Federa-
tion, and we couldnt be prouder.
At SLI, we want to emphasize the
value-added we provide by profession-
ally working with area thought leaders
to leverage existing virtual technoloy,
cutting-edge metrics, out-of-the-box
thinking, and collaboratively coordinate
strategic leadership skills to quickly con-
ceptualize proactive Jewish identity peo-
plehood continuity synergies.
And, continued the spokesman,
before being interrupted by a very loud
Zap! at which point the conversation
ended.
A PURIM NEWS PARODY BY LARRY YUDELSON
4 JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014
JS-4

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Noshes
JS-5*
Te Torah doesnt change. But every year we read it
we are different. Our lives have changed.
The late filmmaker Harold Ramis, describing the impact of his film Groundhog Day, which shows a
weatherman who lives the same day over and over
JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014 5
Want to read more noshes? Visit facebook.com/jewishstandard
Jake Tapper
Want to read more noshes? Visit facebook.com/jewishstandard
unnamed TV comedy.
Shell play an employee
of the Los Angeles police
department. A pilot is set
to be filmed, and while
most pilots dont become
TV shows, this one al-
most certainly will.
Steve Carrell is direct-
ing the pilot for TBS and
the talented Alfred Mo-
lina is set to play a recur-
ring or featured charac-
ter. The neatest thing:
Jones real life parents,
actress PEGGY LIPTON,
67, and legendary Afri-
can-American musician
Quincy Jones, 80, are
playing Rashidas char-
acters parents. (Rashida
was raised Jewish and
firmly identifies as Jewish
in a religious sense.)
DAVID MAZOUZ, 13,
has been cast as a young
Bruce Wayne the star
role in an upcoming
Fox series called Go-
tham. Its about Bruce
Wayne before he became
Batman. The official de-
scription of the Wayne
character says: Not a
playboy-by-day, vigilan-
te-by-night, but a preteen
who has been sentenced
to a solitary life after his
parents tragic mur-
ders. Born and raised
in Los Angeles, Mazouz
co-starred in the short-
lived Fox series Touch.
His family is Sephardi,
with roots in France and
Greece. Mazouz is the
first Jewish actor to play
the Caped Crusader, who
was created by the late
BOB KANE. N.B.
Maxim Chmerkovskiy
TV NEWS:
DWTS, Crisis,
Rashida, and a
kosher Batman
Halston Sage
Rashida Jones David Mazouz
The new season
of ABCs Danc-
ing with the Stars
premieres on Mon-
day, March 17, at 8 p.m.
BROOKE BURKE-CHAR-
VET, 42, the co-host of
DWTS since March
2010, has been replaced
by Fox sportscaster Erin
Andrews. Burke-Charvet
was kept in the dark
about her replacement
until the last minute: Ive
seen my fair share of
shocking eliminations in
the ballroom, but this one
takes the cake, she said.
She bravely added that
she could pursue other
opportunities now that
her obligation to DWTS
had ended.
On the plus side: pro-
fessional dancer MAXIM
CHMERKOVSKIY, 34, is
returning to the show af-
ter a two-year hiatus. His
brother, VALENTIN, 27,
who has been with DWTS
since 2011, also is return-
ing. The pros will be put
on their toes this season
by a new twist, called
the switch-up, where
a celeb will be switched
to a different pro for one
week during the season.
Audience votes will de-
termine the new pairing.
The only Jewish celeb
dancer this season is
JAMES MASLOW, 23,
a very cute guy who is
a member of Big Time
Rush, a popular boy band
that was created for the
Nickelodeon TV show
of the same name that
ran from 2009 to 2013.
Maslow, who grew up in
San Diego, was raised in
his Jewish fathers faith
and had a bar mitzvah.
Crisis premieres on
NBC on Sunday, March
16, at 10 p.m. The prem-
ise: a school van carrying
teen students who attend
an elite Washington, D.C.,
private school is stopped
on a secluded road, and
the students and their
chaperones are kid-
napped by terrorists. The
teens include the kids of
many powerful people,
including the presi-
dent. HALSTON SAGE,
20, plays Amber Fitch,
one of the teens. Am-
ber believes her mother
to be Meg Fitch (Gillian
Anderson), a powerful
CEO. Her mother really is
Megs sister, Susie Fitch,
an FBI agent assigned to
Ambers kidnapping. Also
in the cast as kidnapees:
MAX SCHNEIDER, 21, a
former model, musician,
and Nickelodeon series
actor, as Ian Martinez,
and JOSHUA EHREN-
BERG, 13, as Anton Roth.
Ehrenberg played a
young SETH ROGEN in
The Green Hornet in
2011.
Deadline.com reports
that RASHIDA JONES,
38, who recently left the
cast of Parks and Rec-
reation, will star in a yet
Z to A: Zweig to Anderson
The Grand Budapest Hotel opened to rave reviews in
New York and Los Angeles on March 6. Right now, it is set
to open in Paramus, Montclair, and Red Bank on Friday,
March 14. But, because of good reviews, more cities may
be added and runs may be extended. If you cannot catch
a theater showing, make a note of some kind to catch on
DVD/streaming video.
This comedy-drama is set in a mythical Central Euro-
pean country during the 1930s. Director Wes Anderson
says the ilms script was inspired by the novellas of Aus-
trian Jewish writer STEFAN ZWEIG (18811942).
Here a short summary: a very rich married woman
(Tilda Swinton) mysteriously dies at the hotel. In her
will, she leaves a valuable painter to Gustave, her recent
lover, who is the hotels concierge. Gustave (Ralph
Fiennes) is framed for her murder and jailed. His escape
and the relentless hunt for him is the subject of most
of the ilms second half. Those appearing in important
supporting parts include: ADRIEN BRODY, 40, JEFF
GOLDBLUM, 61, MATHIEU AMALRIC, 48, and HAR-
VEY KEITEL, 74. N.B.
California-based Nate Bloom can be reached at
Middleoftheroad1@aol.com
2014 CLA-CLASS
benzelbusch.com
31613 CLA-Class_StripAd.indd 1 2/21/14 4:11 PM
Local
6 JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014
JS-6*
Community service
Susan Greenbaum takes the helm of local Jewish Family Service agency
JOANNE PALMER
There are times when a persons back-
ground, training, aptitude, and passion
in fact, her entire life make her a perfect
fit for a job.
And there is a time when an agency has
to reevaluate, reorient, and perhaps even
reinvent itself.
When the person and the agency come
together, the future beckons.
In this case, the person is Susan Green-
baum, and the agency is Jewish Family
Service of Bergen and North Hudson.
As of March 5, Ms. Greenbaum, who
lives in Teaneck, is JFSs new executive
director.
The daughter of Holocaust
survivors, Ms. Greenbaum
grew up in Lynn, a crumbling
industrial town north of Bos-
ton. Her parents sent her to a
tiny little day school, which
is now called the Eli and Bes-
sie Cohen Hillel Academy, in
Swampscott, she said. And it
really was tiny her grade at
its peak had eight students, and
it was the schools largest. Once
she had graduated and moved
to the local public high school, she went to
the Prozdor afterschool program in what
was then called Hebrew Teachers College.
Growing up in a town with few Jews, she
made her deepest Jewish connections at
camp. Camp did it for me, she said.
Her next stop was Brandeis Univer-
sity. It was like going to camp, she said,
fondly. (To be fair, many students say that.
Many say it with great fondness. Others
dont.) Junior year was at the Hebrew Uni-
versity in Jerusalem. When she graduated
from Brandeis, she went to Yeshiva Univer-
sitys Wurzweiler School of Social Work on
a full scholarship. The terms of the scholar-
ship called for two years of work at a JCC.
Instead, she spent 36 years in JCCs.
Her experiences include a stint at the
Jewish Family Service agency in Boca
Raton in Florida foreshadowing! training
at the Karen Horney Institute in Manhat-
tan, and a private practice as a therapist.
She worked at the JCC outside Hollywood,
Florida, and then moved back to civiliza-
tion to Bergen County in 1996. She
now lives with her daughter, Sarah, who
is a junior at Muhlenberg College, and her
son, Yoni, a freshman at the Frisch School
in Paramus. I did not know what was on
the other side of the river, she said. She
loved what she found there, she added.
Her move was to take the job of assistant
executive director, in charge
of programming, at the
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades in Tenafly.
(Her name then was Susan Ferbank; she
since has returned to her own family
name.)
In 2004, Ms. Greenbaum became the
executive director of the Kings Bay YM-
YWHA in Sheepshead Bay, Brooklyn, and
two years of horrendous commute later
took the same job in Bridgewater.
I feel that Ive done my time in JCCs,
she said. It has been a very long and satis-
fying career, but I wanted to look for other
opportunities. So last year she left the JCC
and fell into a consulting position at the
West End Temple in Neponsit, a shul on
the Rockaway Peninsula in Queens that
was drowned, as she put it, during Hur-
ricane Sandy. After a year of strategic plan-
ning and practical work on the building,
negotiating with FEMA, and taking care of
the myriad tiny but necessary details that
such a task entails, the shul will be ready to
reopen in time for the High Holidays.
She plans to take her background in
social work and as a JCC administrator to
JFS. JCCs are heavily programmatic agen-
cies, which really connect with the com-
munity in a very dynamic way, she said.
Part of my vision for JFS is that it become
better known in the community, recog-
nized for the fine services it provides, and
also recognized by everybody as an agency
that everyone will need at some point.
Everybody can benefit at some point in
their lives, or their families lives, from the
services we offer.
She hopes for more and better collabo-
ration between the agencies that make up
the network of Jewish organizational life in
Bergen County. The JFS has staff that has
skills that the JCC does not have, she said.
There is tremendous potential for collab-
oration, and there is no dearth of needs.
There can be complete and total harmony
within the Jewish world.
There are models across the country,
across the Jewish world, that we can learn
best practices from.
My vision for the JFS is that it should
have much greater impact than it does
now. My vision is that it should be an
agency that serves every population in
need, or can refer any need it cannot
serve; that it be a convener and creator of
a complete system.
I want to have a direct connection with
every synagogue and every Jewish day
school. However they need us, in whatever
ways they want to work with us, we will
work with them, because we must inte-
grate into the broader Jewish community.
Even in a community that is perceived
to be as wealthy as Bergen County the
needs can be immense. Regardless of
socioeconomic strata, needs exist.
The perception is that we are seen as
only an agency for the poor, but really it is
an agency for everybody, Ms. Greenbaum
concluded.
Geoffrey Lewis of Tenafly, president of
JFSs board, agreed with Ms. Greenbaum
in her assessment of the agency as being
mandated to serve the entire community.
The boards long-term strategic goal is
to be the premier place in Bergen County
for people to go for family services, he
said. Right now there is a misunderstand-
ing in the community that most of what we
do simply helps people who cant afford to
go elsewhere.
Of course we help people in that situa-
tion, who cant afford to pay, but we want
to expand that. If you think of family ser-
vices, no matter what, you should go to
JFS, because you will get great service and
a great experience.
That, I believe, is fulfilling the agencys
mission. We are a family service agency.
We are here to help families, to treat them
with dignity, to help them to lead lives of
consequence.
The Jewish part of our name doing
this is consistent with the Jewish tradition,
with tikkun olam. We help everybody.
Some of the things that we help with are
not particular to the Jewish community,
and other things programs for Holocaust
survivors, for second-generation survivors
are more Jewish in nature. Others, like
programs about substance abuse or eating
disorders among teenagers, or the emer-
gency food pantry those are things that
affect everybody.
It is important to acknowledge that
funding for small agencies has changed,
Mr. Lewis said. Not-for-profits in general
are under a tremendous amount of pres-
sure from funding sources. You have to
reinvent yourself.
Thats why we think that Susan can
take us to the next level. With her back-
ground and her depth of experience in
JCCs and in managing big budgets, and
with her social-work background, we felt
that she was the ideal candidate for us.
Edwin Ruzinsky of Saddle River, who
has been involved with the JFS for 37 years
and now is its treasurer, looks back at his
experience in the late 1980s as chairman of
the board of Family Service America, the
umbrella organization for all family service
organizations in the United States.
I understood the difficulty that small
agencies face, and that was long before the
economy did what it did that is, before
it crashed in 2008 he said. Many of
them have adopted a corporate model, but
we have not. We still call our lead person
The JFS food pantry, above, is one of the resources of the agency
that the new director, Susan Greenbaum, left, will oversee.
Local
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an executive director, not a president, as
other agencies do. So I have a perspec-
tive that I bring to this discussion.
From that perspective, he said, I
believe that the agency must head in a
direction very different than where it has
been. The world is different, the needs
of the community are different, and we
have to think differently to accommo-
date it.
Echoing a common theme, he said
that it is necessary to serve the entire
community. Several years ago, we
started the Club Ed program. It pro-
vides after-school support for latchkey
kids. Its now in Cliffside Park, Fairview,
North Bergen, and most recently in Fort
Lee. We also provide counseling, when
appropriate, to children and families in
that program.
Still, he said, that he wants to provide
more services to our core constituency
the Jewish community.
I do believe that the agency has to
look more entrepreneurially down the
road if we are to continue doing what
were doing, Mr. Ruzinsky said. Grant
funds, federal grant programs a lot of
those monies are drying up.
The world has turned upside down for
social-service agencies. We couldnt con-
tinue down the path we were going if we
want to be what our mission requires us
to be in terms of serving the community.
Good-deed doing
Locals chip in for philanthropic fun
LARRY YUDELSON
They packed it in in Paramus last
Sunday.
They being the hundreds of
people who showed up at the head-
quarters of the Jewish Federation of
Northern New Jersey, to mark Good
Deeds Day.
It being enough nonperishable
food to fill hundreds and hundreds of
bags destined for area food pantries
a precise count was not available, but
volunteers gathered well more than
the 700 bags logged last year.
Most of the food had been collected
beforehand at 46 locations across the
region synagogues, schools, Jewish
community centers, social service
agencies, and even a dance studio.
After being bagged, it was delivered
to six community food banks.
(Some of the local synagogues that
are far away from Paramus cut out the
middlemen and delivered the food
they collected to their local food pan-
tries themselves.)
Good Deeds Day began in Israel in
2007, the brainchild of Carnival Lines
heiress Shari Aronson, as an annual
celebration of good, calling every-
one to come out together and give of
themselves for the benefit of others.
By this year, the event had spread to
the Bahamas and Costa Rica, as well as
to Oregon and Alabama.
In New Milford, Girl Scout Dai-
sies kindergarten and first grad-
ers at the Solomon Schechter Day
Schools Troop 5832 hosted neigh-
boring troops for a Purim-themed
Good Deeds Day. The Schechter girls
told the story of Purim, and then
set about four different Good Deeds
activities:
They baked hamantaschen and
then delivered them to the New Mil-
ford Police and Fire Departments;
they sorted and packed toiletries for
distribution at homeless shelters;
they packed candy bags with Hershey
Kisses and distributed them to the
New Jersey Veterans Home in Para-
mus; and they made Purim cards that
will be distributed to residents of Jew-
ish Home at Rockleigh.
The Good Deeds Days website
already is counting down to next
years event on March 15, 2015, though
good deeds are always welcome. As
Miriam Allenson of the Jewish Federa-
tion put it, The prevention of hunger
among the needy is something we
should do all year long.
Girl Scout
Daisies
participate
in activities
for Good
Deeds Day.
Local
8 JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014
JS-8*
Honoring Jose
Temple Israels head custodian, family member, recognized at dinner
PHIL JACOBS
T
heres a story that Rabbi Noam
Marans tells.
Rabbi Marans now is the
American Jewish Committees
director of interreligious and intergroup
relations, but for 16 years he headed Tem-
ple Israel and Jewish Community Center
in Ridgewood. One day, he said recently,
a small group of congregants took a break
from the services; they stood talking in
the lobby. Just then, another congregant
came rushing through the front door, late
for services.
That congregant asked, What are they
up to in the service?
Before anyone else could answer, a
voice with a Spanish-sounding accent sim-
ply answered Aleinu.
It was the voice of Jose Serna, Temple
Israels head custodian. And its not a sur-
prise that he knows it. After all, hes heard
it chanted for 25 years. He knew that the
Aleinu means that the service is near its
end, and the tables and chairs have to be
set up for whatever comes next, kiddush,
speaker, or luncheon.
Chances are good that if someone were
to ask for a Mr. Serna at the shul, not many
people would be able to answer. But ask
for Jose just about everyone there knows
him.
Mr. Serna is the Conservative congrega-
tions longest tenured staff member. Since
1989, he has set up for countless numbers
of bar and bat mitzvah celebrations, wed-
dings, annual dinners, honored guest
speakers, High Holiday services, seders,
Purim fests, and just about everything else
that happens at the synagogue.
But at last Saturdays Ways and Means
Dinner, more 200 people came to the shul.
This time, they were there to honor Mr.
Serna. He had 11 family members on hand,
and at least five flew in from his native
Colombia just to be with him at the dinner.
Shul officials said more people bought ads
in the dinner journal in Joses honor than
they had for any other journal in recent
memory.
It is not a surprise to hear a bat mitz-
vah girl or a bar mitzvah boy take the
opportunity offered by his or her speech
to thank Jose from the bimah for his help
and support.
Rabbi Marans said that there are so
many Jose stories because Mr. Serna has
touched so many lives.
He worked with Mr. Serna for about
12 years, and said he felt that his finest
moment came in 1999, when Hurricane
Floyd hit New Jersey on the Friday before
Yom Kippur, which began on Sunday eve-
ning that year. The buildings lower level
had flooded and the power was out. There
was a bat mitzvah scheduled for Shabbat.
When Rabbi Marans reached the syna-
gogue, Mr. Serna already was there, lifting
what he could out of the flooded areas.
Next, he helped the synagogue find a
temporary home at the nearby Benjamin
Franklin Middle School.
I do not need to tell you what it means
to move a 1,000-plus congregation with a
myriad of childrens programs, a bimah,
Torahs, and machzorim, holiday prayer
books, Rabbi Marans said.
Then, he added, everything had to be
moved out of the middle school on Mon-
day night, right after Yom Kippur ended.
The school had to be ready to open for its
students on Tuesday.
Mr. Serna made it happen, he said.
What impressed me the most about
Jose is the mutual embrace he and the
congregation have, Rabbi Marans added.
The relationship defies traditional dif-
ferences we often see between us, and
embraced the similarity of our humanity.
He added that he and Mr. Serna grew
up together in the synagogue as profes-
sionals. For every day-to-day challenge a
synagogue faced, Jose had a solution,
Rabbi Marans said.
Mr. Serna, who is 49 and lives in Engle-
wood, said that he is not comfortable
being the center of attention. He consid-
ered himself half Jewish, half Catholic,
he said. Everybody here is like my family.
The rabbi, everybody treats me like
an important person, part of the family.
They welcome me.
Mr. Serna also is proficient in Hebrew
prayers such as the blessings over wine
and bread. He said that the Ten Command-
ments familiar to Jews are the same ones
he observes as a Catholic.
We have the Ten Commandments, he
said. Psalm 23 is the same between Juda-
ism and Catholicism. Both religions teach
us the right way of being nice.
What moves Mr. Serna the most, he said,
was watching people he knew as children
grow into adult members and leaders
of Temple Israel. And the appreciation
always has been returned In 2004, an
anonymous donor named a kiddish room
in his honor.
Temple Israels president, Joshua
Holden, cant say enough about Mr. Serna.
He is as much a part of our community
as any one else, Mr. Holden said. When
the kids are giving their bar mitzvah thank
yous in their speeches they always thank
Jose. The reason is, Jose is part of their
growing up in the shul.
We want the children to be family
members and Jose is part of the family.
Mr. Holden remembers yet another
storm flooding the synagogue.
Jose came in and hooked up generators
and manned pumps and got the basement
pumped out and cleaned out, he said.
Then he came back and he repaired any
damage. When some kind of crisis hits
us, he is always the one who knows what
to do, and how to get things done. With-
out him, who knows how wed be?
Mr. Holden added that there are some
synagogue members who have known
From left, Temple Israels president, Josh Holden; Ridgewoods mayor, Paul Aronsohn; Jose Serna, and Rabbi David J.
Fine stand together at the dinner. ROBERT KERN PHOTOGRAPHY
When some kind
of crisis hits us,
he is always the
one who knows
what to do, and
how to get
things done.
Without him,
who knows how
wed be?
JOSHUA HOLDEN
Local
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Mr. Serna all their lives. Their synagogue experience
would be incomplete without him.
Jose is always looking out for our building and
also for every one of our members, Mr. Holden said.
He steps right up and does what needs to be done.
Rabbi David Fine, Temple Israels spiritual leader
for the last five years, said that he learned about Mr.
Serna right away.
When I was moving into the office, the compli-
cated mechanics of moving were made less compli-
cated because of Jose, he said.
Hes one of those people who defines the word
mensch, Rabbi Fine continued. He is always smil-
ing, and hes loved by everyone for his gentleness
and his humbleness. He is a person who contributes
to our sense of being a holy congregation. And he
comes from a different background.
He is a senior member of our staff, and he
deserves the outpouring of love he is getting.
Brian Della Torre, who chaired the evening, said
that when he and Rabbi Fine approached Mr. Serna
about the honor, he wasnt sure what to make of it.
But he was the obvious choice, Mr. Della Torre
said. He is so loved by everyone. He is the person
who makes everyones important day easier.
Mr. Della Torre said the event attracted past rab-
binic staff as well as rabbis from other congrega-
tions. Ridgewood Mayor Paul Aronsohn attended, as
did the towns superintendent of schools, Dr. David
Fishbein.
Its all so emotional for me, my heart is full, Mr.
Serna said. I cant find the words to describe every-
thing Im feeling.
Im overwhelmed and emotional and grateful.
Todah rabah, he said, as his Jewish Standard
interview ended. Thank you.
On Saturday night, the attendees started dancing
a celebratory hora around Mr. Serna.
They lifted up him in a chair.
Someone else set it up this time.
Jose Serna and his wife, Paula, dance together
at the gala. ROBERT KERN PHOTOGRAPHY
Local
JS-10*
American football goes to Israel
On visit to Bergen County, head of Israeli league talks tachlis, tackles
LARRY YUDELSON
A
re you still suffering from post-
Super Bowl football withdrawal,
even though its halfway into
baseballs spring training
schedule?
Maybe you should move to Israel, where
the Israeli Football Leagues regular sea-
son doesnt end until next Saturday night,
with the playoffs and championship sched-
uled for April.
And yes, thats American football, with
touchdowns and tackles and wide receiv-
ers, not the football known in Israel as
kadur regel and in America as soccer.
Heres another advantage of the Israeli
Football League over its American coun-
terpart: The league is strictly amateur, so
if you make aliyah this summer, you could
be on your way to playing for the Judean
Rebels or Haifa Underdogs next fall.
The league does have one paid
employee Betzalel Friedman, the
leagues 29-year-old director. Mr. Fried-
man was in New Jersey recently to pro-
mote and raise funds for the league. He
wants to promote American football into
Israels number three sport, behind soccer
and basketball. To get there, he will have
to climb past volleyball and handball.
Mr. Friedman grew up in Indianapolis,
Indiana, where young boys did not follow
soccer, let alone volleyball or handball.
He was a Colts fan. And when his family
moved to Israel when he was 10, he kept
following American sports. I never really
got into soccer, he said. Instead of football,
he followed American basketball, which
got more coverage in Israeli media. A few
years later, the Internet came around,
and it all became much easier to follow.
Mr. Friedman rediscovered football after
finishing his army service; he was an oper-
ations officer and platoon commander in
the paratroopers. (In the reserves, he now
commands a company.) For a year, he
played with the Gush Etzion-based Judean
Rebels as wide receiver.
It was a lot of running and blocking. Not
as much catching as people think, he said.
Overall, football offered the military offi-
cer the joy of applying tactics and strategy.
Its a physical game but there are very set
rules, he said.
And like the Israeli army, its a team
sport.
It doesnt matter how good you are
you need your teammates, he said.
After a year, he decided the game took
too much. But he was asked to continue
as a coach, which did for five years, before
being hired to head the league. A lot of
what he knows about coaching football
he learned from a coach from Texas who
coached the year he played; he picked up
more on his own.
This season, the league has 420 players
on 11 teams. It has one stadium of its own: Betzalel Friedman
In the end, the orange-
shirted Judean Rebels
beat the Ramat Hasharon
Hammers. RICK BLUMSACK
10 JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014
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Kraft Stadium in Jerusalem, built by Robert and Myra
Kraft, the owners of the New England Patriots. Mostly,
the teams play on soccer fields. Theres not enough
kicking in the games to justify lugging portable goal
posts to the fields particularly since, remember, the
players and coaches are amateurs and there is no bud-
get for roadies or shleppers.
But the players take it seriously. They come prac-
tice twice a week, plus the games. Its a serious hobby.
The leagues teams range from Haifa and the north-
ern Galilee south down to Beersheva, with many
teams in the Jerusalem and Tel Aviv regions.
Some of our teams could compete with a good high
school team. Maybe even a Division Three college
team, but Im not sure about that, Mr. Friedman said.
About two thirds of the players are sabras, he said;
about a third are American olim who grew up throw-
ing a football around. Some even had some high school
football.
He said that the concerns over player concussions
that are rising over Americas professional National
Football League arent having much of an impact on
his league.
Its very different because peoples jobs arent on
the line and they arent pressured to take another
hit, he said. People take their hobbies a little less
seriously than their livelihoods. Also, the physics are
different the force of an impact being much less
because the Israeli players have neither the mass nor
the speed of the Americans.
The league gets some support from the government
but very little. The New York consulate hosted an
event for Mr. Friedman during his recent visit.
And in Israel, the league has a small but growing
public profile, with local cable television reporting on
the finals.
Among other things its an issue of funding, but
well get there, Mr. Friedman said.
Hoping to expand and grow the sport, the league
has opened a youth league for high school-aged kids
and is starting a league for elementary school players.
Thats the future of the game: the kids.
Mr. Friedmans son is 4 years old.
He knows how to say hike, he has a little football,
and hell see a lot of football, thats for sure.
Will he play?
Hell get into whatever he wants.
Its been a good year for the Judean Rebels,
currently undefeated. RICK BLUMSACK
Local
12 JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014
JS-12*
Shabbat in the White City
Fair Lawn man aims for Guinness-record dinner in Tel Aviv
ABIGAIL KLEIN LEICHMAN
J
ay Shultz is determined to set a
new world record while promot-
ing Tel Aviv usually cited for its
nightlife and startup culture as a
great place to spend Shabbat.
The 37-year-old Fair Lawn native,
who has lived in Israel since 2006, has
earned a reputation as the International
Mayor of Tel Aviv after a series of grand-
scale initiatives geared at positioning his
adopted city as welcoming haven for
young professional immigrants.
His latest exploit: Through his popu-
lar White City Shabbat program, which
offers communal meals for young Israe-
lis and immigrants at local synagogues,
Mr. Shultz launched an Indiegogo crowd
funding campaign to sponsor the worlds
largest Shabbat dinner.
He hopes it leads to a Guinness world
record.
(To find it online, just google indiegogo
White City Shabbat dinner and follow
the link.)
The free kosher dinner, scheduled for
June 13 at Hangar 11 in the Tel Aviv port,
is expected to seat at least 1,000 diners.
Invited guests include Tel Avivs Mayor
Ron Huldai; its chief rabbi, Yisrael Meir
Lau, and Israels deputy minister of reli-
gious affairs, Rabbi Eli Ben-Dahan. Both
Mr. Huldai and Rabbi Lau have joined in
past White City Shabbat dinners, which
have attracted more than 10,000 people
in total and average about 200 at each
monthly meal.
But it was not enough for this colorful
entrepreneur to go public with his appeal
to raise $25,000 by April 9 to cover his
costs. Mr. Shultz enlivened the campaign
by starring in a tongue-in-cheek takeoff
of the Dos Equis Most Interesting Man
in the World commercials, dubbed The
Most Interesting Jew in the World.
The clip, made on zero budget thanks
to donated services, shows a debonair
Mr. Shultz with an unlit cigar in his hand
and a beautiful blonde model at his side,
inviting people to partake in the worlds
largest Shabbat dinner. I dont always
keep Shabbat, but when I do, I prefer
White City, he intones, keeping his face
straight.
Tel Aviv is nicknamed the White City;
its earned that sobriquet because of its
many white Bauhaus-style buildings.
Funny though the video may be, Mr.
Shultz is dead serious about this project.
He even secured a matching $5,000 grant
for it from the ROI Community, of which
he is an alumni.
Were not breaking, but setting, a
record, he emphasizes. We petitioned
Guinness to create a new category called
Shabbat, and it took months. They came
back to us with thick guidelines about
what makes a Shabbat dinner and what
rules and regulations we have to follow
to prove it. Were getting rabbinical guid-
ance on how to balance that with the laws
of Shabbat.
For example, they have figure out how
to have the event filmed without violating
Shabbat, and how to count participants
without writing down names or stamp-
ing hands.
But these details are not what float Mr.
Shultzs boat.
For us, what makes it interesting is
that we are highlighting to the entire Jew-
ish world that Tel Aviv is important for the
Jewish people today. It has always been
a mandate of White City Shabbat, since I
started it six years ago, to make Tel Aviv a
portal for religious life in Israel.
Its not turning sin city into something
holy, because Tel Aviv is already part of the
Holy Land. Its revealing the true DNA of
the city.
In fact, the next promotional video
for the mega international blockbuster
event will feature Rabbi Lau inviting
people to the meal and talking about the
history, beauty, and importance of Sab-
bath observance in Tel Aviv. Hes hold-
ing a copy of a 1933 poster that the first
mayor, Meir Dizengoff despite his own
secular leanings posted all over Tel
Aviv, teaching the value of keeping the
Sabbath holy.
Mr. Shultz and his committee of volun-
teers including Eytan White, a former
student at the Torah Academy of Bergen
County hope that Ashkenazim, Sep-
hardim, new immigrants, native Israelis,
and Tel Avivians ranging from the ultra-
Orthodox to the ultra-secular all will
feel welcome to attend at no charge. (Of
course, donations will be accepted with
dinner reservations.) Ordinarily, the din-
ners cost NIS 80 per person, or about $25.
At any given White City Shabbat din-
ner, youll hear about 10 languages spo-
ken, and the worlds largest Shabbat
dinner will be no exception, said Nata-
lie Solomon, a new immigrant from Ala-
bama who is one of the events organiz-
ers. We would like to see Jews from all
over the globe take part in this event,
either to come and enjoy this spectacu-
lar demonstration of Jewish peoplehood
in person or by donating to our fundrais-
ing efforts.
After all, Shabbat is the soul of the Jew-
ish people, and Tel Aviv is a focal point of
the Jewish world.
Mr. Shultz said that his umbrella group,
TLV Internationals, strives to be a light-
house to shine to Jews around the world to
come home, specifically to Tel Aviv, which
was the first Jewish city of modern times.
A proponent of observant proactive
Zionism something far more than eating
chicken soup and buying Israel Bonds,
Mr. Schultz graduated from Fair Lawn
High School, Rutgers University, and Ford-
ham Law School. He is the son of Howard
and Sabina Shultz of Fair Lawn.
UK Toremet is the fiscal sponsor of the
worlds largest Shabbat dinner. Other
partial sponsors include the Tel Aviv-Jaffa
municipality, Hangar 11, Golan Heights
Winery, and the Israeli Religious Affairs
Ministry.
Jay Shultz, in a spoof of a well-known advertisement, plays The Most Interesting Jew in the World. At least his friend
seems to be buying into the idea.
We petitioned
Guinness to
create a new
category called
Shabbat, and
it took months.
They came back
to us with thick
guidelines.
JAY SHULTZ
JS-13
JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014 13
100
%
cardiac bypass survival rate
words to live by.
Year after year, Englewood Hospital has achieved a 100
%
survival rate in heart bypass surgery.
Our top-rated cardiac surgeons are experts in a range of complex procedures and perform most
surgeries without blood transfusions, which helps
reduce risk of infection and speeds recovery.
For a physician referral, call 866.980.EHMC
or learn more at BestHeartDocs.com.
* New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services,
Cardiac Surgery in New Jersey report, June 2012
Patient portrayal
Local
JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014 14
JS-14*
TABC annual dinner
announces honorees
The Torah Academy of Bergen
County in Teaneck, a yeshiva high
school for boys, will host its 31st
annual dinner on March 30 at 5
p.m. at Congregation Keter Torah
in Teaneck.
The guests of honor are Wendy
and Isaac Shulman and Alisa and
Stephen Levy. Dr. Garry Katz will
receive the faculty award and Yaa-
cov Apfelbaum will be given the
alumni service award.
The Shulmans have lived in
Teaneck for 35 years. Isaac has
been on the TABC board for 18
years and has been involved in sev-
eral development projects, includ-
ing chairing an early building proj-
ect. He now chairs the committee
for TABCs new building. Wendy
and Isaac are founding members
of Congregations Rinat Yisrael and
Zichron Mordechai, where Isaac
ran the project for its new build-
ing. Isaac, who is retired, builds
synagogue furniture, including the
bookcases in the beit midrash, and
for other community, educational,
and charity projects. The Shul-
mans have five children, including
three TABC graduates.
Alisa Levy is chair of the inte-
ri or desi gn commi ttee. She
serves on TABCs board, helped
launch and manage the Teen
Learning Program, and chaired
the recruitment committee. She
also sits on the executive board of
the Teaneck Mikvah Association,
is involved in its management,
and co-chairs its annual womens
event. The Levys have three sons,
including one TABC graduate and
one who is a student there.
Dr. Garry R. Katz is complet-
ing his 40th year as an educator.
For the last 12 years he has been
a respected history teacher and
the director of college guidance
at TABC. He teaches AP honors
American history and AP U.S.
politics and government. Before
coming to TABC, Dr. Katz was
the principal of the Maimonides
School in Brookline, Mass., and
of the Rambam Mestiva in Law-
rence, N.Y. He and his wife, Gail,
have three children.
Yaacov Apfel baum gradu-
ated from TABC in 2001. During
his years at YU and continuing
now, Yaacov has coached both
the TABC JV and varsity hockey
teams. He and his wife, Aliza,
have two children.
The annual dinner funds TABC
scholarships. For information,
call Teri Normand at (201) 837-
7696, ext. 115, or email tabcdin-
ner@tabc.org.
Janet and Lior Hod
Linda Stock
Eden and Dr. Jeffrey
Aronoff
Avi and Becky Katz
Ari and Sharon Green
Murray and Renee Schneier
Yaacov Apfelbaum
Wendy and Isaac Shulman Alisa and Stephen Levy
Dr. Gary Katz
Seeking yarn and knitters
The Knitting Circle, a partnership between the
Jewish Home Assisted Living, Temple Emanuel
of the Pascack Valleys Community of Caring,
Pascack Valley Hadassah, Jewish Federation of
Northern New Jerseys Womens Philanthropy,
and the Bergen County YJCC is looking for yarn
and volunteers.
Members of the community and JHAL resi-
dents meet twice a month to knit, needlepoint,
and schmooze. All skill levels are welcome.
The next meetings are March 25 and April 8
at 10:30 a.m. Contact CommCare@tepv or call
Susan at (201) 666-6696.
Friends of Lubavitch event is March 23
Friends of Lubavitch of Bergen County will
hold its annual dinner on Sunday, March 23, at
the Woodcliff Lake Hilton at 5 p.m. Honorees
are Eden and Dr. Jeffrey Aronoff of Englewood
and Sharon and Ari Green and Janet and Lior
Hod, all of Teaneck. An ad journal will be pub-
lished in conjunction with the event.
The Aronoffs are active members of Con-
gregation Ahavath Torah in Englewood, where
Eden was a sisterhood president and Jeffrey
is a board member. The couple is involved
with many chesed programs with Chabad
of Teaneck. They have five children, Shelby,
Joseph, Isaac, Hyatt, and Charlotte.
The Greens participate in many programs
offered by Chabad of Teaneck and are active
in the community. They have three children,
Avigayil, Micha, and Nomi.
The Hods are active participants of Friends
of Lubavitch of Bergen County and volunteer
for many community organizations. The cou-
ple has four children, Samantha Orit, Jordan
Michael, Justin Roy Eliezar, and Tyler Yaniv.
For information on the dinner, visit www.
chabadhouse.com/annualdinner or email Rab-
biSimon@aol.com.
www.jstandard.com
NCJW offers scholarships to graduating seniors
National Council of Jewish Women Bergen
County Section will award several scholarships
to Jewish girls who are graduating from a public
Bergen County high school this year. Applicants
should be planning to attend a four-year col-
lege in the fall. Information is available in high
school guidance offices and deadline submission
is April 15.
Yeshivat Noam marks 13th year
by noting contributions of five
Yeshivat Noam will celebrate its 13th year at the
annual dinner on Tuesday, March 18 at Congre-
gation Keter Torah in Teaneck.
Becky and Avi Katz are the guests of honor.
The Community Service award will be given to
Renee and Murray Schneier and Linda Stock is
the Faculty Recognition awardee.
The schools annual campaign raises funds
for excellence and affordability for students that
attend.
To make a contribution or reservation, call
Amy Vogel, director of development, at (201)
261-1919, ext. 126, avogel@yeshivatnoam.org, or
online at www.yeshivatnoam.org.
JS-15
JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014 15
a magical
Friends of Lubavitch Bergen County Invites you to
Jewish Music provided by DJ David Ross from Shir Soul
Saturday, March 15
8:30pmMegillah Reading
Separate reading for children in adjacent room
9:00pmFull HUGE dessert buffet
9:30 Illusion & Magic show
THOMAS JEFFERSON MIDDLE SCHOOL
655 TEANECK RD
(parking lot on either side of school, doors will lead to the main theater from each).
$5 child, $10 adult, $36 family cap, $180 sponsor
To RSVP or for more information call
201-907-0686
RabbiSimon@aol.com
Magic, illusion, escape artistry, mind-reading and
humor with the AMAZING CARDONE!
SHAKE
& DONATE!
This year instead of just shaking
groggers lets shake boxes of food
to donate at local shelters. Bring
your box of food to shake at
the megillah reading. There will
be collection bins at the event
collecting for local
food banks.
O
U
R

B
I
G
G
E
S
T

A
N
D

B
E
S
T


P
U
R
I
M

C
E
L
E
B
R
A
T
I
O
N

E
V
E
R
!
Purim
16 JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014
JS-16*
1
3
4
5
A few weeks ago, we asked our readers to
send us Purim pictures; we were particu-
larly interested in photos of children. Many
of you responded here is a representative
sampling of the incredibly adorable pictures
we received.
n 1 Sisters at the JCC of Paramus/
Congregation Beth Tikvah.
n 2 Shimona Smith as Queen Cresther.
n 3 Julia and Jessica Baer at
Temple Emeth in Teaneck.
n 4 Kindergarteners at Lubavitch on
the Palisades pack mishloach manot.
n 5 The four older Birman chil-
dren as a barbershop quartet; the
youngest as their customer.
n 6 Shai Katz as a centaur.
n 7 A small ice-cream vendor plays with
glitter at the Helen Troum Nursery School
at Temple Beth Sholom in Fair Lawn.
n 8 Girls dress up in costume includ-
ing Glinda the Good Witch! at the
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades in Tenafly.
n 9 A young commando at Temple Emanuel
of the Pascack Valley in Woodcliff Lake.
n 10 Children from the Bergen
County YJCCs David Rukin Early
Childhood Center Nursery School.
n 11 Eli Rubin as Mordechai in Shushan.
n 12 Children make Purim costumes
at Ben Porat Yosef in Paramus.
2
Purim
JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014 17
JS-17*
6 7
8
9
10
11
12
Editorial
1086 Teaneck Road
Teaneck, NJ 07666
(201) 837-8818
Fax 201-833-4959
Publisher
James L. Janoff
Associate Publisher Emerita
Marcia Garfinkle
Editor
Joanne Palmer
Associate Editor
Larry Yudelson
Guide/Gallery Editor
Beth Janoff Chananie
Contributing Editor
Phil Jacobs
About Our Children Editor
Heidi Mae Bratt
Correspondents
Warren Boroson
Lois Goldrich
Abigail K. Leichman
Miriam Rinn
Dr. Miryam Z. Wahrman
Advertising Director
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Business Manager
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Jewish
Standard
jstandard.com
Founder
Morris J. Janoff (19111987)
Editor Emeritus
Meyer Pesin (19011989)
City Editor
Mort Cornin (19151984)
Editorial Consultant
Max Milians (1908-2005)
Secretary
Ceil Wolf (1914-2008)
Editor Emerita
Rebecca Kaplan Boroson
Purim its complicated
P
urim is not just a childrens
holiday.
In fact, despite the near-
irresistible cuteness of
miniature Queen Esthers and pint-
size Mordechais, and the lure of
hamantaschen (because really there
is nothing better than chocolate-cov-
ered chocolate ones), in some ways
its not a childrens holiday at all.
As much as it is about the Jewish
peoples strength and resilience, it is
also about masking and unmasking,
betrayal and abandonment, fear and
revenge.
Our tradition takes Purim very
seriously; we are told that it is like
Yom Kippur, or, more accurately that
Yom Kippur is like Purim. (Cpurim.
Kipurim. Yom Hakippurim.) The one
holiday that will be left after the mes-
siah comes will be Purim, we are told.
That might be why we are told to
drink until we can no longer differ-
entiate Hamans name from Morde-
chais. This holiday is all about us
about people, about what we do to
and for and against each other. Some-
times the truth behind the mask can
be hard to handle.
But drinking that much is not good
for us. It can be devastating when
we also drive and Purim is one of
the few Jewish holidays when we can
drive, whether or not we drink.
The Jewish Family Services of
Bergen County and North Hudson,
which just welcomed a new executive
director (see page 6), hosts a monthly
meeting of JACs, for Jews who are
addicted to alcohol, have other chem-
ical dependencies, or are related by
love or blood to anyone who does.
The group meets the first Wednesday
of every month, at 7:30 p.m., at JFSs
Teaneck offices. For information, call
(201) 981-1071.
We hope that no one will take
Purims liberation of the Jewish
people as a cue to further their own
enslavement to alcohol, but instead
will take the opportunity to think
about freedom, about masks, about
vengeance and of course about
adorable little kids and delectable
hamantaschen. We wish all our read-
ers a chag Purim sameach. -JP
KEEPING THE FAITH
Highlight
of the gods?
P
urim is upon us. All hail Marduk. All hail Ishtar.
Oy vey.
There are some decidedly Jewishly off-key
elements regarding Purim (aside from the fact
that pur means lot in Akkadian, not Persian). Uppermost
among them are its heroes, Mordechai and Esther.
We know Esther was not the good queens Jewish name,
because her book tells us her name was Hadassah. I pre-
fer her English name, Myrtle. (Hadassah derives from the
word hadas, which means myrtle, a symbol of righteous-
ness.) Esther has nothing to do with myrtles or righ-
teousness. The name derives from a Semitic deity, Ishtar,
or Astarte, she whom the
Greeks and later the Romans
adopted, calling her Aphro-
dite and Venus respectively.
In other words, Esther is
the personification of the
pagan goddess of love, and
she plays the role to perfec-
tion in Megillat Ester (the
Scroll of Esther). First, she
goes out on one date and
becomes queen of the Per-
sian Empire. Next, she defies
the rules of the Persian court,
yet has the king blubbering about giving her whatever she
wants, up to and including half of his empire. Such things
did not happen because she was better at Scrabble than
he was.
As for Mordechai, while the name appears elsewhere in
the Tanach (Ezra 2:2 and Nehemiah 7:7, both referring to
the same person, but not our hero), this does not prove
that the name is a Jewish one. Mordechai comes from
the Babylonian god of war, Marduk (it actually means
follower of Marduk). Our Mordecai leads a war of sorts
when he thwarts Hamans genocidal plan and obtains the
kings permission for the Jews to take up arms against their
attackers, killing 75,810 of them in two days of fighting.
Then there is the date for Purim Adar 14 for most of
us, Adar 15 for anyone living in a city that had a wall sur-
rounding it during the days of Joshua (meaning Jerusalem,
at least in current times). Adar 14 was Marduks day in
Mordechais day (see, for example, II Maccabees 15:36).
Shammai Engelmayer is rabbi of Temple Israel
Community Center | Congregation Heichal Yisrael in
Cliffside Park and Temple Beth El of North Bergen.
18 JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014
JS-18*
Drafts of wrath
Pour out Thy wrath upon the nations
that know Thee not, and upon the
kingdoms that call not upon Thy
name. For they have devoured Jacob,
and laid waste his habitation.
These lines from Psalm 79 are famil-
iar to us all from their recitation at the
Passover seder, added when our Fes-
tival of Liberation was transformed,
in Christian Europe, to a season of
pogroms and blood libels.
The psalm itself, of course, long pre-
dates Christianity and the diaspora; as
is clear from its opening verse, it tar-
gets the heathen who are come into
Thine inheritance; they have defiled
Thy holy temple.
These heathens presumably
Nebuchadnezzers Babylonians
have given the dead bodies of Thy
servants to be food unto the fowls of
the heaven, the flesh of Thy saints
unto the beasts of the earth. They
have shed their blood like water
round about Jerusalem, with none
to bury them.
Now, the psalm has been repur-
posed to pray for protection against a
new enemy that has arisen.
Not Iran. Not Hamas. Not Vladimir
Putin.
No, the new enemy, which hun-
dreds of thousands of self-styled fer-
vently Orthodox Jews gathered to pro-
test, in Jerusalem and New York, is the
government of Israeli Prime Minister
Benjamin Netanyahu, which planned
this week to pass a law that would
ostensibly require some yeshiva stu-
dents to serve in the Israeli army.
(We say ostensibly because the law
has been criticized as too little, too
late; its most dramatic sanctions dont
kick in until 2017, allowing time for a
new election and a more pro-charedi
coalition to form.)
50 Thousand Haredim March So
Only Other Jews Die in War is how the
Jewish Press concisely put it until, in
response to the ultra-Orthodox back-
lash, the article was pulled down from
the web and its author fired.
Most of those marching perhaps
believed they were protesting the
current incarnations of Pharaoh and
Haman, as one Agudat Yisrael Knesset
member at the New York rally put it.
For some, that may be a sincere inter-
pretation of a law that indeed would
have the effect of moving members of
the community from the cloisters of
kollel to a real world of employment.
Others, who have been fed only a diet
of rabbinically controlled media, may
really think that Israeli troops plan to
empty the yeshivot.
In truth, Torah study and army ser-
vices are not incompatible as has
been proved by decades of students
and soldiers who combine the two
at Orthodox hesder yeshivot. But it is
true that the iron grip of charedi rab-
bis on their followers may well be less-
ened as they enter the workforce and
the broader Israeli society.
Given the kind of hatred for most
Jews evinced at the anti-draft rallies,
that could only be a good thing. -LY
Shammai
Engelmayer
KEEPING THE FAITH
Highlight
of the gods?
P
urim is upon us. All hail Marduk. All hail Ishtar.
Oy vey.
There are some decidedly Jewishly off-key
elements regarding Purim (aside from the fact
that pur means lot in Akkadian, not Persian). Uppermost
among them are its heroes, Mordechai and Esther.
We know Esther was not the good queens Jewish name,
because her book tells us her name was Hadassah. I pre-
fer her English name, Myrtle. (Hadassah derives from the
word hadas, which means myrtle, a symbol of righteous-
ness.) Esther has nothing to do with myrtles or righ-
teousness. The name derives from a Semitic deity, Ishtar,
or Astarte, she whom the
Greeks and later the Romans
adopted, calling her Aphro-
dite and Venus respectively.
In other words, Esther is
the personification of the
pagan goddess of love, and
she plays the role to perfec-
tion in Megillat Ester (the
Scroll of Esther). First, she
goes out on one date and
becomes queen of the Per-
sian Empire. Next, she defies
the rules of the Persian court,
yet has the king blubbering about giving her whatever she
wants, up to and including half of his empire. Such things
did not happen because she was better at Scrabble than
he was.
As for Mordechai, while the name appears elsewhere in
the Tanach (Ezra 2:2 and Nehemiah 7:7, both referring to
the same person, but not our hero), this does not prove
that the name is a Jewish one. Mordechai comes from
the Babylonian god of war, Marduk (it actually means
follower of Marduk). Our Mordecai leads a war of sorts
when he thwarts Hamans genocidal plan and obtains the
kings permission for the Jews to take up arms against their
attackers, killing 75,810 of them in two days of fighting.
Then there is the date for Purim Adar 14 for most of
us, Adar 15 for anyone living in a city that had a wall sur-
rounding it during the days of Joshua (meaning Jerusalem,
at least in current times). Adar 14 was Marduks day in
Mordechais day (see, for example, II Maccabees 15:36).
Op-Ed
In his day, too, Adar 15 was a solar festival; Marduk, being
the creator god of Babylonian myth, had a central role in
that as well.
All of this suggests that the Purim story probably is an
adaptation of pagan mythology, as some scholars theorize.
That Marduk and Ishtar never appear together in ancient
pagan texts, however, would seem to work against such a
theory. If anything, the story would be a combination of
pagan myths.
Such a combination is not out of the question. Megillat
Ester has two separate ancient literary motifs a court
intrigue involving Mordechai, and a harem intrigue involv-
ing Esther. Each of those could have drawn on ancient
Marduk and Ishtar legends as well.
That such things troubled the sages of blessed memory
is indicated by a discussion in the Babylonian Talmud
tractate Megillah 7a a tractate dedicated to the rites and
rituals of Purim. In the discussion, we find the vestiges
of a debate about whether Megillat Ester even should be
included in the Tanach.
Other problems entered into this debate as well.
There are, for example, several glaring omissions in the
book. God is there to be found, albeit indirectly; prayer
is never heard, or even suggested; the Jews party hearty
after their victory, but are not seen thanking the God
who delivered them; the Jew Mordechai refuses to
bow to Haman because to do so would violate a Jew-
ish law that does not exist; and he appears to have no
qualms about turning over his cousin and ward, Esther,
to the harem of a non-Jew.
On the other hand ( Judaism always has another hand,
just ask Tevye), there are just as many indications that
pagan motifs were borrowed to retell biblical tales.
The story of Joseph comes to mind, for one. Joseph is
imprisoned on a false charge; the Jews in Esther are falsely
charged. Josephs life turns around because the king of
Egypts sleep is disturbed; the fate of Esthers Jews turns
around because the king of Persias sleep is disturbed.
Joseph is dressed in fine linen after his elevation; Mor-
dechai left the kings presence in royal robes of blue and
white. Joseph was led through the capital city in a royal
chariot, with a shouting runner before him; Mordechai
was led through the capital city on a royal steed, with a
shouting runner before him.
Another story that comes to mind is that of King Saul
and Agag, king of the Amalekites, in I Samuel 15. Morde-
chais ancestor is someone named Kish; Saul had a son
named Kish. Haman is called an Agagite, suggesting that
he is descended from Agag. In the original, Saul is ordered
to kill all the Amalekites, our bitterest and most danger-
ous foes, but spares Agag. For this, he has his kingdom
wrested from him. The Esther story thus would seem to
be a replay of the original Saul-Agag encounter, with the
intention of vindicating Saul.
In the end, none of this matters compared to the mes-
sage: The God of Israel keeps His promise. No matter what
they throw at us, we are here to stay.
Chag Purim sameach.
JS-19*
JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014 19
Other problems
entered into this
debate as well. There
are, for example,
several glaring
omissions in the book.
Not standing idly by
It is necessary to work to end the scourge of gun violence
I
t should be enough to be in the right, to have the moral
and religious high ground.
That often isnt enough, however, if what you want
is real, fundamental change. As legendary community
organizer Ernie Cortes teaches, there is no nice way to get
change. Real change happens only when enough tension is
created to force the change.
Dont take my word for it think about it. Make a list of all
the societal changes that have taken place purely because of
a good sermon from a charismatic preacher. I bet its a really
short list. The sermon might have moved people to action,
but the change only came once the action itself was power-
ful enough to create enough tension to help the people with
the power to make the change see it in their self-interest to
say yes.
The moral argument alone didnt work for our people in
Egypt. Never were more moving or resounding words uttered
by a prophet than those of Moses: Let my people go. And yet
it took 10 plagues and the deci-
sion of the Israelites to participate
in their own liberation before we
actually went free. As we soon
will say at our seders Dayenu.
It should have been enough. The
argument itself should have suf-
ficed. Pharaoh: 400 years of
slavery is enough. Let my people
go. But even Moshe Rabbeinu
couldnt muster the power to
liberate us with moral suasion
alone.
On the other hand, the power
of faith, when combined with the power of faithful people,
gives us the ability to make real and sustained change. It always
has, and it can again. Think again of the list of fundamental
changes weve seen in the last 100 years: womens suffrage;
workers rights, the civil rights movement, and more only took
place because of tension created by powerful people.
Never have powerful people been more needed than on
the issue of gun violence in America. The scourge has reached
epic proportions. If 30,000 Americans were dying in a war
each year, our streets would be filled by protests, and our reli-
gious convictions would move us to action. And yet, it seems,
we have grown so inured to gun violence that even the hor-
rifying murders of innocent children in Newtown, Connecti-
cut, more than a year ago havent driven our nation to action.
If the moral outrage we felt after that tragic day didnt move
us to change course on gun violence, what greater affirma-
tion can there be that moral arguments arent in themselves
sufficient?
My own father was gunned down 15 years ago. Some
400,000 Americans have died by gun since then the over-
whelming majority of them in murders that didnt make the
evening news or break into your regularly scheduled program.
Surely the cause reducing gun violence is the right
cause. This is true after each massacre in an elementary
school, movie theater, or supermarket. And yet, sadly, shock-
ingly, in each case, being right isnt enough to compel change.
Despite the work that so many organizations did to bring
gun sanity to our legislators, lawmakers actively decided to
violate a foundational principle of the Torah. Our government
decided to stand idly by as our neighbors continue to bleed
to stand by as the equivalent of a Newtowns worth of Ameri-
cans continue to be gunned down every day.
Many organizations continue to push Congress and the
administration to play their part in reducing gun violence by
passing a universal background check law that would close
the gun show loophole that allows thousand of guns to be sold
each year without those vital checks. I applaud these efforts.
But our congregation has joined people of faith across New
Jersey and across the country in taking a different approach.
Metro IAF, an organization of synagogues, churches, and
mosques in 10 states across the country, began to ask an
essential question. We began to ask ourselves: Who else has
the power to affect change on the issue of gun violence?
While there is no one solution to this multifaceted chal-
lenge, we believe that gun manufacturers also could do
meaningful things to address this scourge. They could invest
in research and development for safer gun technology, which
would help reduce accidental deaths and keep people from
being able to use guns that dont belong to them to do harm.
And they could help reduce gun trafficking by refusing to sell
their products through the 1 percent of dealers who sell a high
percentage of the guns used in crimes in America. They could
work as collaboratively with the ATF and law enforcement as
they do with organizations that seek to undermine every sen-
sible gun law in the United States. And they could do all of
this without there needing to be a single new law passed by a
Congress that seems determined to stand idly by on a whole
host of vital issues our nation faces.
Metro IAF knows that its not enough to be right on this
issue. We have to muster the power necessary to get gun man-
ufacturers to take these sensible steps none of which violate
the Second Amendment, and none of which will take guns out
of the hands of law-abiding citizens.
In order to gather that power, we have approached may-
ors and police chiefs in cities across the country. With our
taxpayer dollars, our police and military buy 40 percent of
the guns sold in America. We are asking these municipalities,
and the Obama administration as well, to use their purchas-
ing power to seek out manufacturers who will work collab-
oratively to reduce gun violence. As of this writing, 18 cities
across America have resolved to join us in this effort to use
the power of the mighty dollar to encourage better customer
service from the manufacturers of the guns our police pur-
chase. Mayors, police chiefs, county sheriffs, and governors
in cities and states small and large cities like Mahwah, Jersey
City, Paterson, Hoboken, and Newark in New Jersey, as well as
in Rockland and Westchester counties in New York and cities
in North Carolina, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Ohio, Wiscon-
sin, the State of Illinois. Just this past week, New York City has
come onto the list. All have joined us in issuing a Request for
Information addressed to gun manufacturers. These cities are
saying: Next time we buy weapons, well be looking not just
for technically excellent weapons, but also for companies that
take their corporate responsibility seriously.
And gun manufacturers already have begun to react in
the media, on the Internet, and even at Europes largest police
show last week, where I joined a group of clergy in engaging
with these companies.
We dont need to add a verse to Dayenu. We dont need
to say, If only we had the power to reduce gun violence,
Dayenu. We do have the power. This campaign, called Do
Not Stand Idly By, is gaining momentum, and we need more
partners. For more information, go to www.DoNotStandId-
lyBy.org.
As people of faith, we can do more than bury the dead and
lament the state of things. We can do more than wait on Con-
gress to act.
We can act powerfully now. Let us begin.
Finally.
Joel Mosbacher is rabbi of Beth Haverim Shir Shalom
in Mahwah.
Rabbi Joel
Mosbacher
Op-Ed
20 JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014
JS-20*
Defending Vashti
When the descendants
of nobl e Queen Vashti
approached me to undertake
her defense, I was, frankly,
dubious about the prospects.
After all, the eyewitnesses,
unreliable as their DUI testi-
mony may have been, have
long since left the scene, and
no DNA evidence survives.
Further, I have a reputation
as the Alan Dershowitz of
lost causes of historic pro-
portions to maintain.
Yet, as they continued to
importune me, the merits
of the case, the dimensions of this miscar-
riage of justice, and of my potential fee
became apparent. Despite the 2,500 years
that have elapsed, justice must be served,
along with the rest of the menu.
First, some context for those of you who
were not alive during the glorious reign of
Queen Vashti. Unfortunately, due to the
miscarriage of justice and the disappear-
ance of the queen, the only extant record
of her story is the one in that self-aggran-
dizing Jewish scroll of Esther, which hardly
can be trusted as an accurate record.
Vashti is reputed to have been the daugh-
ter of Belshazzar, the last king of Babylon,
whose final days in about 550 B.C.E. were
recorded, alas, only in that Jewish book of
Daniel. How can we give it credence when
it speaks in forked languages? Further,
Rembrandt, whose pictorial representa-
tion Belshazzars Feast was painted in
1635, was clearly not present.
Unlike her successor, that well-oiled Jew-
ish girl Esther, Vashti was of royal lineage.
I am sure that I dont need to tell you that
the story about the beauty contest must
have been composed by one of Ahasu-
eruss drunken guests. Queens were and
are chosen for their political usefulness,
not for their prowess, you will excuse me,
between the sheets. For that, in those glori-
ous days, there were harems.
The rabbis, in a flight of imagination
that is our only record, proposed that on
the night Belshazzar was killed Cyrus the
Persian and Darius the Mede were guests
at his table an improbable troika given
that they were enemies. The candela-
brum fell, killing Belshazzar. In the ensu-
ing chaos in the palace, Darius was named
to succeed Belshazzar and sat on his royal
chair. Vashti, Belshazzars young daughter,
confused by the palatial pandemonium,
sought comfort from her father. In the
dark she did not realize that the lap on the
royal chair belonged to Darius. This was
no lap dance. Taking pity on his orphaned
lap lady, Darius moved her from the lap of
fortune to marriage to his son Ahasuerus,
aka Xerxes.
A slightly more credible story, but, I
again warn you, only rabbinic in origin,
maintains that Ahasuerus,
who was in charge of the
royal stables, acquired regal
status by marrying the
princess. Which laps were
involved here is somewhat
obscure.
This fictional reconstruc-
tion goes some distance
in explaining the remark-
able disparity between this
unlikely king and his blame-
less queen. As the book of
Esther attests: on the sev-
enth day, when the king was
merry with wine in other
words, completely soused. Public inebriety
is not consonant with royalty.
Before moving on to the charges against
Vashti, allow me also to point out that this
royal match could have no spark. Accord-
ing to those rabbis, when the prophet Isa-
iah said instead of the nettle, the myrtle
shall rise he was predicting that Vashti
would be dethroned to make way for
Esther, whose Hebrew name, Hadassah,
means myrtle. Vashti was the sacrificial
queen, whose sole purpose was to pro-
vide an excuse for that beauty contest.
Of course, that prophecy of Isaiah was
made after the putative date of the occur-
rences recounted in the Esther scroll, aug-
menting its reliability.
CHARGES:
Disobedience
The first charge is that Vashti disobeyed
her husband when he ordered her to
come, wearing her crown, into the binge-
drinking party he was hosting. This charge
is groundless. What respectable woman
would enter such a scene wearing only
her crown? Besides, the custom was that
no respectable woman, even completely
dressed, would enter the scene of such
debauchery. The only women whose busi-
ness it might have been to be present were,
shall we say, in business in the worlds old-
est profession.
Some rabbinic traditions appear to have
had access to the transcript of the recorded
messages that flew between the drunken
commoner king and his lucid royal queen.
Here is the transcription.
When Ahasuerus sent his important
ministers, some of whom were eunuchs,
to bring Vashti, she gave her husband the
ritually mandated three opportunities to
withdraw his demand.
First she told him: If they see me and
think me beautiful, they will want to lie
with me, and they will kill you. And if they
see me and think me ugly, you will be dis-
graced because of me. Appealing to logic,
she tries to convince him that, as we say to
our children, actions have consequences.
Vashtis second attempt was: You were
my fathers stable steward, accustomed
to having naked harlots come before you.
Now that you have become king, you have
not mended your degraded ways!
Although she addresses his sense of
honor and self-respect, demanding that he
act as a king should, she also reminds him
that he did not come into this high office
on his merit, but on hers. Since it is her
authority he wields he cannot force her to
act against her will
There is an unexplained chai an
18-minute gap in the recording here. We
can only imagine what might have been
erased.
Finally she told him: You want me to
come naked. Even my father, when he
judged litigants in a trial, would not judge
them when they were naked. He would do
well to emulate her father.
Clearly we have ample evidence that
Vashti has the wisdom to appeal to Aha-
suerus using multiple intelligences. Aha-
suerus, on the other hand, acts rashly,
without thinking even one step ahead. She
should be vindicated and held up as a para-
gon of virtue, rather than punished.
CHARGES:
Fomenting Rebellion
Likewise the charge that Vashtis behavior
was contagious, modeling uxorial disobe-
dience that would be emulated by wives
everywhere in the 127 provinces of the Per-
sian Empire, is baseless. The only reason
that anyone outside the palace learned of
this domestic contretemps is that the king
stupidly publicized it. Vashti did not con-
trol the imperial records, the press, the
web, or even Wikileaks.
Let us recall that the kings idiotic mis-
advisers were eunuchs. What could they
know of the way that power is shared
in marriage? I hate to admit it, but those
rabbis had a much better perspective on
domestic tranquility. They argue that Aha-
suerus was stupid to think that a man can
impose his will upon his wife: If a man
wants to eat lentils and his wife wants to
eat beans, can he force her? Surely she
does as she likes.
CHARGES:
Mistreating workers
The Jews, who later became notorious as
supporters of liberal some might even
say socialist causes, indicated their
support of labor as early as the rabbinic
period. Supporting labor is fine, as long as
it does not become an excuse for malign-
ing management or raising taxes on the
rich. In this case spurious charges were
drummed up against Vashti, particularly
by those rabbis in Babylonia who had to
show that Jews were superior to the local
population.
They charged that Vashti had Jewish girls
work naked, so being ordered to appear
naked herself was, one might say, tit-for-tat,
or for tit. Another tit-for-t?t claims that her
punishment came on the seventh day of
the feasting because she forced Jewish girls
to work on their seventh day Shabbat.
Those rabbis even go so far as to sug-
gest that she refused to appear naked
because she suffered from leprosy. Their
over-active imaginations fantasized that
the angel Gabriel came and attached a tail
to her, making her unwilling to appear.
Thats clearly ridiculous, as it is well known
that Ahasuerus, when he finally came to,
looked all over the palace for his beloved
Vashti, having no memory that she had
been excised.
In a more valid midrashic depiction,
when Ahasuerus grew sober, he regretted
what he had done. He recalled Vashti and
her proper behavior, as well as how he had
improperly condemned her.
Yet another tradition has Ahasuerus
inquiring after his wife when the effects
of his intoxication wore off. He was told:
You killed her! Why? You said for her
to come before you naked and she did not
come. He admitted to them: I did not act
nicely. And who counseled me to kill her?
They told him: The seven ministers of
Persia and Media. He immediately killed
them. Consequently, the seven eunuchs
are not mentioned again in the Book of
Esther.
In fact, Ahasuerus regretted getting rid
of Vashti so much that he kept pictures of
her above his bed, which he would look at
any time he had a woman there, which was
generally at least once a day. Vashti contin-
ued to reign in his bedroom until he met
that commoner Esther, whose pictures
went up as Vashtis were torn down.
SUMMATION:
By now it should be clear to you that Vashti
is the blameless victim of this story. While
I here have been arguing for an official
reversal of her punishment and the resto-
ration of her portrait to the gallery of the
queens and kings of the Persians, what-
ever you decide is on some level irrel-
evant. After all, Vashti was not a happy
queen. She was not comfortable with the
licentiousness of the palace scene. All she
wanted was some quiet.
In those ancient times, she could not
achieve her goal by leaning in. She leaned
out and plotted her own escape from the
palace. She took her crown and enough
jewelry with her to live happily ever after in
a quiet corner of a neighboring kingdom,
surrounded by her beloved and caring chil-
dren and staff.
Dr. Anne Lapidus Lerner of Teaneck,
the Jewish Theological Seminarys first
woman vice chancellor, is an emeritus
member of the JTS faculty and a research
associate at the Hadassah-Brandeis
Institute at Brandeis University.
Dr. Anne
Lapidus
Lerner
Lead Counsel,
Vashti Restoration
Team
Letters
JS-21
JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014 21
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Kahn in Closter
I enjoyed reading about the artist Tobi
Kahn (Looking at Israeli art from the
inside, March 7). The article says that
his work is found in museums and galler-
ies around the world. Many of us living
in Bergen County feel blessed to appre-
ciate Mr. Kahns work close to home. In
2007, Temple Beth El of Northern Valley
commissioned Mr. Kahn to create sev-
eral one-of-a-kind pieces to be used in
our worship service. These ceremonial
objects are on permanent display in our
Elliot Binder Chapel.
Art lovers, we invite you to come for
a visit to view the work. Were certain
youll stay for the ruach elohim.
David Fischer
President, Temple Beth El
of Northern Valley
Closter
Wheres the sanctity?
In response to my letter of the previous
week, I very much appreciated the letter
from Rabbi Alex Freedman (Hands-on
approach to tefillin, March 7), clarifying
that the picture of Temple Emanuel stu-
dents wearing homemade tefillin was for,
as wed say chinuch purposes only.
However, I must take issue with him that
the way to introduce students to that mitz-
vah was to have the students make their
own, not halachically kosher, tefillin. If
Rabbi Freedman read Rabbi Menachem
Genack op-ed (Tzit, tefillin, and the hala-
chic process, February 28), he would have
learned that tefillin hold the same sacred
status as a sefer Torah, maybe even more
so. I doubt that Rabbi Freedman would
introduce his students to the Torah by hav-
ing them write one. Most likely, he would
bring in a learned, practiced sofer, who
would bring in all of the requisite materi-
als for producing a sefer Torah, and show
them how its done. By bringing in a sofer
to show the students how tefillin are made,
he would be showing them the sanctity of
tefillin. What the students were shown was
a nice arts and crafts project. But what
have they been taught about the sanctity
of tefillin by such a project?
Marsha Greenberg Motzen
Englewood
Like us on
Facebook
facebook.com/jewishstandard
We apologize
Last weeks issue quoted my personal Face-
book page without my permission (Noshes,
page 5). The quote lacked the appropri-
ate context for your readers to necessarily
understand that I was joking.
The quote identified me as the rabbi of
Temple Emeth, but I do not use my per-
sonal Facebook page to promote or com-
ment on Temple Emeth. Yet the way the
quote appears improperly conflates my
personal political affiliation with my non-
partisan role as the rabbi of a congregation.
As a citizen of New Jersey, I am closely
watching the allegations and investigations
that have arisen from Bridgegate, but I
have never been targeted or intimidated by
the Christie administration.
In the season of Purim, the Standard cer-
tainly has the right to tell jokes. But the jokes
should be their own, and they should have
enough context to be funny.
Rabbi Steven Sirbu
Teaneck
[EDITORS NOTE: Rabbi Sirbu is right. We
should not have taken his quote without
getting his permission, and we are sorry.]
Cover Story
22 JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014
JS-22
JOANNE PALMER
T
he story of the new mayor of Jersey
City is a goulash a rich, highly sea-
soned, aromatic stew, full of dispa-
rate ingredients that somehow blend
together.
This variant is kosher.
And for added authenticity, its Hungarian.
Steven Fulops story is both as deeply Ameri-
can and as fully Jewish as one persons story
could be it is our own 21st-century version of
the great American dream.
Cooking alongside it is the story of Jersey City,
the states second largest, with a century-long
history of corruption and bossism that Mr. Fulop
is well positioned to turn around.
Mr. Fulops story starts with his grandparents.
All four were born in Transylvania, the heavily
wooded, mountainous, lushly beautiful region
that has changed hands between Hungary and
Romania. As this story begins, it still was part
of Hungary. World War II came late there; his
mothers parents, the Kohns, were taken from
the ghetto toward its end. His grandfather, Alex-
ander, went to a transit camp, and his grand-
mother, Rosa, was on one of the last transports
to Auschwitz in April 1944.
Jersey
City
Boy
Mayor Steven Fulop tells his story
and his immigrant parents schep naches
Steven Fulop strides up to the
flag-bedecked podium outside
City Hall on his inauguration day.
Cover Story
JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014 23
JS-23
Mayor Steven Fulop tells his story
and his immigrant parents schep naches
Her story is so painful that when her
son-in-law, Arthur Fulop, tells it, his eyes
fill, even though it is a story he has been
telling for decades.
There were two lines at Auschwitz
when she got there, he said. One was
for the very young and the very old; the
other was for people who could work. In
between them, making selections, decree-
ing death, was Josef Mengele, radiating
evil.
Mrs. Kohn clutched her 20-month-old
baby, Eva, who was about to be sent to the
other line. What happens to them? she
asked a guard, the story goes; he pointed
up to the black smoke fouling the sky.
They are turned into that, he said. She
screamed and tried to run, and a guard
hit her on the head with a rifle, knocking
her out. She survived, and so did her hus-
band. The rest of the family, including Eva,
did not; Rosa Kohn went on to give birth
to Carmen Kohn Fulop, who was born in
Romania in 1954.
The family had been comfortable in
Transylvania, but under Nicolae Ceauescu
Romania went Communist, the family lost
what it had been able to reclaim, and Mrs.
Fulops father was badly beaten as goons
searched for gold coins they believed him
to have hidden.
In 1967, the family managed to flee
Romania for Brooklyn, where my parents
left everything they knew to better their
children, Carmen Fulop said.
Arthur Fulops family lived in Tg-Mures,
a small town about 120 miles from his
future wifes home, in a place so remote
that war never fully touched it. He was
born in 1947, right after its end.
In 1964, the Fulops, who had applied for
a passport, were given one and told that
it would be operational for just one week.
They left immediately, with almost noth-
ing. After a stop in a transit camp in Rome,
they decided to go to Israel. We had fam-
ily in the United States, but I said, No. I
want to go to my country, Arthur Fulop
said, and so they all headed east.
The familys time in Israel was not a suc-
cess. The nation was in a tough economic
bind, and it was not particularly welcom-
ing to newcomers the chadashim, whom
the old-timers, the vatikim, thought of
as competition, the Fulops said. Arthur
Fulops father, Bentsi, bought a truck,
but the loads that he hoped to haul rarely
materialized. After three years, he, his
wife, Elizabeth, and their younger son
gave up and moved to the United States,
where their lives finally grew roots.
Arthur, though, was 18, and had been
drafted into the Israel Defense Forces like
everyone else his age. Toward the end of
his stint, the Six-Day War broke out; he
was a sniper in the elite Golani Brigade
during that time.
When he talks about it now, the nor-
mally exuberant Mr. Fulop does not
become less vocal but the energy that
propels his words becomes almost visibly
darker. It was a very hard time; he saw
things that he wishes he had not seen but
cannot unsee. It left him with the strong
feeling that war comes from demonizing
your opponents rather than allowing your-
self to see them as human, and that very
little is worth the devastation that such
Mayor Fulop, center, cuts a ribbon in Jersey City.
Above, Steven Fulop as a
grade-school student at
the Rabbi Pesach Raymon
Yeshiva in Edison; elsewhere,
as a Marine.
Cover Story
24 JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014
JS-24
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hatred causes.
The Fulops live in a seemingly middle-size house
in Edison that opens up on both sides to reveal many
immaculately kept rooms once youre safely inside. That
is where they brought up their three sons, Daniel, Ste-
ven, and Richard. Arthur Fulop owns a deli in Newark,
down the street from the courthouse. He took it over
from his parents (They bought it in 1968, right after the
riots, when real estate there became affordable, Steven
said). Carmen Fulop runs a service bureau for immi-
grants next door.
They both work hard, they hold dear the values of
the country in which they could live free and prosper-
ous lives, and they are deeply connected to their Jewish
roots. They passed on these beliefs to their sons.
Steven Fulop, like his brothers, went to the Rabbi
Pesach Raymon Yeshiva in Edison, and then to the Solo-
mon Schechter School of Union and Essex, as todays
Golda Och Academy in West Orange then was named.
He left it in 11th grade for public school, where he could
play soccer more seriously. The family belonged to the
local Conservative shul, Neve Shalom, and the boys
went to Jewish summer camps and USY.
After high school, Steven Fulop went to Binghamton
University, part of New York States public college net-
work. He spent his junior year abroad at Oxford Univer-
sity, studying finance at New College. When he got back,
he took a job at Goldman Sachs in Chicago, where his
older brother already worked. I was hired into asset
management with mutual funds, then moved into equity
trading, he said.
Goldman moved him back to the New York office in
2000, and Mr. Fulop bought a condo in Jersey City. He
was not politically active I hadnt even registered to
vote, he said but Jersey City was perfect. It was back
in New Jersey, close to his parents, right across the river
from his job, and booming, so that any real estate deal
there was likely to be advantageous. Life was good.
Mr. Fulop was at work at 1 New York Plaza in lower
Manhattan on September 11, 2001. I felt the building
shake when the planes hit, he said. It shook something
inside him too. Soon I started talking to recruiters, he
said.
Thats as in armed forces recruiters.
I didnt know anything when I started, he said. I
was trying to do the research, to understand the differ-
ent branches. Do I have to shave my head? Can we figure
out some other way so that I dont have to do it? When
I asked the recruiters, they said no, it doesnt work that
way.
I went to the enlisted side, he continued. I didnt
have to I could have been an officer in the reserves,
but I didnt want to commit to what might possibly
become four years of active duty, and I was willing to
serve right away.
After considering his options, Steven Fulop enlisted in
the Marines, and soon he found himself in South Caro-
lina, in boot camp on Parris Island.
He was 25 years old.
I always thought that military service was impor-
tant, he said. But in the 90s, it didnt seem relevant. I
would always say to myself that if it ever were necessary
Arthur and Steven Fulop as the younger man gradu-
ated from Parris Island.
This was a target the Syrians used during the
Six Day War; fear and hatred, Arthur Fulop
believes, lead only to tragedy and bloodshed.
Carmen and Arthur Fulop at their son Stevens
inauguration.
Arthur Fulop was in the Golani Brigade
during the Six Day War.
Cover Story
JS-25
JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014 25
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Goldman moved him back to the New York office in
2000, and Mr. Fulop bought a condo in Jersey City. He
was not politically active I hadnt even registered to
vote, he said but Jersey City was perfect. It was back
in New Jersey, close to his parents, right across the river
from his job, and booming, so that any real estate deal
there was likely to be advantageous. Life was good.
Mr. Fulop was at work at 1 New York Plaza in lower
Manhattan on September 11, 2001. I felt the building
shake when the planes hit, he said. It shook something
inside him too. Soon I started talking to recruiters, he
said.
Thats as in armed forces recruiters.
I didnt know anything when I started, he said. I
was trying to do the research, to understand the differ-
ent branches. Do I have to shave my head? Can we figure
out some other way so that I dont have to do it? When
I asked the recruiters, they said no, it doesnt work that
way.
I went to the enlisted side, he continued. I didnt
have to I could have been an officer in the reserves,
but I didnt want to commit to what might possibly
become four years of active duty, and I was willing to
serve right away.
After considering his options, Steven Fulop enlisted in
the Marines, and soon he found himself in South Caro-
lina, in boot camp on Parris Island.
He was 25 years old.
I always thought that military service was impor-
tant, he said. But in the 90s, it didnt seem relevant. I
would always say to myself that if it ever were necessary
for me to do it, I would do it.
And then 9/11, and I thought OK. Here
we are. Its the crossroads.
I was young enough. I didnt have kids.
I was in good shape.
So he enlisted.
My parents were distraught, he said.
I was making good money, having a good
life. And they were scared.
But it was their values that attracted him
to service. I had and have a lot of appre-
ciation for this country, he said. Its my
familys sweat equity. I view my service as
a minor down payment on that.
It was very complicated emotionally, his
parents agree. When Steven first told me
that he wanted to join the Marines, I said
no, Arthur Fulop said. But then I said
Steven, you have to follow your heart.
If your heart tells you this is what you
must do, then you must do it.
His Jewishness accompanied Steven
Fulop to boot camp.
Parris Island which is notorious for
its toughness, and the toughness of the
Marines it turns out is very structured,
he said. Every second of every minute
of every day. The only respite from that
is religion, and the Marine Corps honors
other religions beyond the basic Christian
denominations. It goes above and beyond
to make sure that you can practice, he
said. The only time that isnt structured
is on Sundays, when you have religious
services. (OK, so they havent gotten this
whole Jewish thing down exactly right
yet) Thats also the time when recruits
are allowed to write letters.
There is no Jewish presence on Parris
Island, but they bring in a rabbi from
Mayor Fulop talks about the importance of reading with middle-school students.
Cover Story
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Buford, South Carolina, Mr. Fulop said.
I was the only one there. It was the only
time the drill instructors leave you alone.
We could have a conversation. The
rabbi asked how I was doing, and I
said that I was starving. He asked what
I wanted, and I said dessert. So he
brought in dessert every week.
I would come back to say to people,
Look, I have a good thing going on. So
some of these kids would come with me.
Theyre not Jewish but they wanted
the food. We ended up with about nine
or 10 kids coming. The drill sergeants
wanted to know what was going on but
they couldnt do a thing about it.
As for calling the other enlisted men
kids they were, at least relatively
speaking. I was old for boot camp, Mr.
Fulop said. Everyone else was 18 or 19
years old.
It really gives you a perspective on
who is in our armed forces.
Boot camp was 13 weeks long. My
parents were at my graduation. It was
the first time they really got to see that
culture, Mr. Fulop said. It was incred-
ibly foreign. His parents agree, but they
say as well that they felt extraordinary
pride.
After Parris Island, Mr. Fulop got to
experience culture shock in the other
direction, as he reentered Goldman
Sachs.
They put me on their homepage, he
said. The firm didnt know exactly what
to make of Mr. Fulop, but they did know
that he presented them with a pub-
lic relations bonanza; of course, given
that the firm had just suffered through
the terrors of 9/11, he also was given
real emotional support there. Later,
other employees enlisted or joined the
reserves, but he was the first. There
was no model yet for how to handle the
situation.
Three months later, in January 2003,
he went to Quantico, Virginia, for
reserve duty, and the commanding offi-
cers are going around, asking for all sorts
of personal information.
You could see where it was going.
They got us all together on Saturday
night and said, You are dismissed for
the weekend. Come back on Tuesday
with your powers of attorney and your
wills.
You are being deployed.
Youre in shock, he said. You know
its coming, but.
Carmen and Arthur Fulop had a mod-
est house in the Poconos, their son said,
and he went there on his way home from
Quantico. It must have been 2 a.m., but
they heard me come in, he said.
As soon as my mom saw me, she
started crying. She knew.
Remember, Mrs. Fulop said, the rea-
son for the American invasion of Iraq
was Saddam Husseins arsenal of weap-
ons of mass destruction. We know now
that the arsenal was a figment of over-
heated imagination, but then we did not.
As far as she knew, Carmen Fulop was
saying goodbye to a son who might be
gassed just as surely as the baby sister
she never had the chance to meet had
been.
Early that Monday morning, Mr. Fulop
went to his office. I go to my desk, and
I write an email to everyone I had ever
met in my life, he said.
Friends, family, co-work-
ers, everyone. I say that
I am leaving on Tuesday,
being deployed, and I want
to thank people for being
part of my life.
I have my jacket on
already before I hit send.
I start walking out, and
some people see me and
start clapping for me, and I
was crying, and they were
crying.
So I got my power of
attorney, and my will, and
on Tuesday we flew from
Delaware to Camp Pendle-
ton in California we got our gas masks
there and waited for three weeks for
our equipment. From there, we flew
to Kuwait. President George W. Bush
declared his Shock and Awe cam-
paign on March 17, and on March 18 Ste-
ven Fulop and his companions crossed
into Iraq.
He was in the 6th Engineer Support
Battalion, attached to the 1st Marine
Division; the battalions responsibility
was building bridges, purifying water,
and generally working on infrastructure.
Mr. Fulop was in Iraq for Passover.
The rabbi had a camouflage tallis, he
recalled.
He told a story that he said demon-
strates the lengths to which the U.S. mil-
itary will go to respect religion.
We were living in tents, he said. We
didnt shower for months. There was no
internet, no phones, not much of any-
thing. And I saw a note in our chow hall
that there was a religious service on an
Army base. I said that I wanted to go,
and of course they let me.
They gave me an escort and security.
I always thought that
military service was
important. But in the
90s, it didnt seem
relevant. I would
always say to myself
that if it ever were
necessary for me to
do it, I would do it.
Cover Story
JS-27
JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014 27
No other country would go to those lengths to make
sure that someone could get to a seder.
Mr. Fulops time on active duty was short but
intense.
We went all the way up to Baghdad, he said. We
were deployed six or seven months, then went back
to Kuwait, back to Pendleton, and then back home.
And then I was back at Goldman all within one year.
I look back and I feel that I got more out of the
Marine Corps as a person and as a human being than
it got from me, he added.
Mr. Fulop stayed at Goldman for a few years and
then moved on, pursuing what would have looked like
a normal upward career path, the journey someone
clearly smart and ambitious would be expected to
take. He continued to live in Jersey City, active in his
condo association but not involved in politics.
But remember that goulash? There was that other
dish stewing alongside it, this one made up of the
rather less appetizing congealed mess that was local
Jersey politics. Soon, they would come together on Ste-
ven Fulops plate, but first, lets look at the ingredients.
When he came back to Jersey City, Mr. Fulop said,
Robert Menendez, the Democrat who is now the
states senior U.S. senator, was his congressman. He
also was chair of the House Democratic caucus, the
most senior Hispanic federal legislator in the country,
and the states most senior House member.
New Jerseys Frank Lautenberg, then a U.S. senator,
resigned in 2001 he ran again and took the states
other seat in 2003 and everyone assumed that Mr.
Menendez would replace him. But Jon Corzine came
in out of the woodwork and bought the seat, Mr.
Fulop said. Menendez decided to get more involved
in local politics in Hudson County. He helped get
Glenn Cunningham elected mayor here Cunning-
ham was the first African-American mayor in the city.
The mayor of Jersey City always has been a very
powerful position, ever since the days of Frank
Hague, he added.
(Frank Hague was mayor from 1917 until 1947. He
was an old-style machine politician; he strong-armed,
threatened, blustered, and controlled. He was cor-
rupt, and he also was efficient. Potholes were filled,
snow was removed; the city worked.)
The friendship between Mr. Menendez and Mr.
Cunningham fizzled, though, and soon they became
nasty enemies, Mr. Fulop said.
Steven Fulop went to religious services dur-
ing his time in Iraq; here, the rabbi wears a
camoflage tallis.
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Cover Story
28 JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014
JS-28
28 JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014
JS-28
Remembering Jersey City
Rabbi Emeritus Kenneth Brickman talks
about the city he served for two decades
JOANNE PALMER
It might be hard to believe it now, but
in Jersey Citys heyday, it resembled
Teaneck today, Rabbi Kenneth Brick-
man said.
Rabbi Brickman, rabbi emeritus of
Temple Beth-El, retired from that Jersey
City pulpit in 2011 after 22
years. He remembers both
the city he knew and the
one his older congregants
described to him.
When I arrived there,
in 1989, there were many
senior citizens in my con-
gregation who were born
and bred there, and who
regaled me with stories
about what it had been
like, he said. They used
to talk about the number of
synagogues, kosher delis, kosher butch-
ers, kosher bakeries, and a yeshiva, the
Yeshiva of Hudson County. You could live
a full Jewish life there.
In fact, this newspaper, the Jewish
Standard, began in Jersey City.
It was not exactly like Newark or Pat-
erson, cities with insular Jewish com-
munities whose first generations headed
straight off the boat from Europe, not
stopping first on the Lower East Side, the
Bronx, or Brooklyn, and not commuting
to jobs in Manhattan. At least by the time
Rabbi Brickman got there, many of his
older congregants had geographically
mixed marriages.
Many of the born-and-bred families
did come straight from Ellis Island, he
said. If you look at a map, youll see
that Ellis Island actually is closer to New
Jersey than it is to New York. But a lot of
the people from Jersey City went to New
York to work, and brought back New
York City Jews, who joined them in Jersey
City. I had a lot of married couples with
one of them born and bred in Jersey City
and the other in New York.
The local JCC shut down just before he
arrived, Rabbi Brickman said, but it had
been legendary. It was the home of peo-
ple like Jerry Herman, who wrote Hello
Dolly, and Phyllis Newman, as well as
others whose names arent as
immediately recognizable,
he said. (Phyllis Newman
is the Tony-winning actress
and singer who was mar-
ried to the lyricist and play-
wright Adolph Green, and
Jerry Hermans other work
includes Mame and Milk
and Honey.) The JCC had
a vibrant theater program,
Rabbi Brickman added.
The JCC was central to the
community. People tell me
that if you were a young Jew in Jersey City
and you werent at home, your parents
knew that you were at the JCC, he said.
It was a city of neighborhoods, he
added. When I spoke to my older mem-
bers, they would say that they lived not
in Jersey City but in the Heights or Jour-
nal Square or downtown. In its heyday,
my congregation primarily drew people
from those neighborhoods; it was rare
for people from other ones to want a
Reform shul. Now, it is the only Reform
synagogue in Hudson County.
The Jewish community and the rest
of Jersey City flowered immediately
after World War II, although it can be
traced back far past that. I was told that
its decline began immediately after the
Newark riots, in 1967, Rabbi Brickman
said. Large numbers of Jews moved to
the suburbs then. The riots didnt affect
Jersey City directly, but it was too close
for comfort.
When I arrived, it wasnt a ghost
town. There was a group of mainly older
people. I used to joke that my youth
group president was 80. The bulk of
the congregation were senior citizens,
but they had stuck with the community,
unlike their friends, who had escaped
to Short Hills or Maplewood. They were
people of means, who could have fol-
lowed their neighbors out to the suburbs
but chose to stay.
They really wanted to see a revival,
and many of them were fortunate
enough to be able to be there for at least
the beginning of it.
The revival began in the late 1980s,
and it has been slow but steady, Rabbi
Brickman said. We had no Sunday
school or Hebrew school then, but we
began a nursery school.
Those kids, from the nursery school,
are in graduate school now. Many of
those families stayed. Some of them had
moved to Jersey City because of its prox-
imity to Manhattan, and as Manhattan
became more and more expensive Jersey
City became a more viable option.
Why does Jersey Citys neighbor,
Hoboken, get credit for a revival, while
Jersey City does not? Hoboken is a dif-
ferent world, Rabbi Brickman said.
The revival there came earlier. And
also, remember, Hoboken is a much
smaller area. It is just a square mile.
Jersey City, on the other hand, is the
states second largest city, trailing only
Newark; the 2010 census showed its
population as 247,597. Jersey City is a
big city, Rabbi Brickman said. It will
take time.
Right now, the city has only three
shuls Rabbi Brickmans Beth El and
two small Orthodox synagogues, one in
Journal Square and the other in Jersey
City Heights.
We used to have a reunion for Jersey
City Jews in Florida, he added. They
came in droves. The enthusiasm in their
voices showed how unique that commu-
nity was. Thats why so many of them
stuck it out.
There certainly is hope for the Jewish
community in Jersey City, he concluded.
I think that with time will come the reju-
venation of Jewish institutions there.
+brickman 0314+
940 words/3 pix plus brickman photo if we have one
Rabbi Kenneth
Brickman
Temple Beth-Els Rabbi Debra Hachen leads children at a recent tot Shabbat
celebration.
Soon afterward, Mr. Fulop was invited
to City Hall so he could be honored with a
proclamation acclaiming his war service.
That proclamation is hanging outside my
door now, Mr. Fulop said. It changed my
life.
Mr. Cunningham also was a war veteran.
He asked Mr. Fulop many questions about
his service, and about how he juggled it
with his work on Wall Street. He asked me
a lot of questions about the deployment,
but I didnt think anything of it, Mr. Fulop
said. People always asked.
Meanwhile, Mr. Fulop was working on
an M.B.A. from NYU and an M.P.A. a
masters in public administration from
Columbia. The work at his condo associa-
tion took some time, he had a full-time job,
and he still had a commitment to reserve
duty. He did not have spare time he was
trying to fill; he did not have any spare
time to breathe.
And then, about four months later
and I hadnt spoken to the mayor since
then I get a phone call from the dep-
uty mayor of Jersey City. He said, The
mayor would like to talk to you. I think its
strange. And then he gets on the phone
and says, Id like you to come in tomor-
row. I have a few things Id like to talk
about.
I had called the office to complain
about parking. I thanked him I was sur-
prised that hed handle it himself, and so
soon! But he didnt know what I was talk-
ing about. He said I really should come in
tomorrow, and I said OK, I would, after the
markets close.
We went into that office, and we sat
there, its me and him and some of his
political supporters and assembly people,
and he starts talking about getting involved
in politics when youre young, in your 20s.
Sometimes you lose before you can win,
he said, no matter what youre running for.
I was 26.
I had no idea what he was talking
about.
Then, Mr. Fulop said, Mr. Cunningham
started talking about his sour relationship
with Mr. Menendez. As it turned out, Mr.
Menendez planned on running a full slate
of officially approved candidates for local
offices, and Mr. Cunningham wanted a
slate to oppose it.
Even when Mr. Fulop grasped that he
was being asked to run, he assumed, logi-
cally enough, that he was being solicited
for a council seat, low on the slate.
But no. Mr. Cunningham said, I know
it wont be a winning proposal, but I will
help you. I want you to run for Congress.
It was the weirdest conversation I ever
had.
Cover Story
JS-29
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Then, Mr. Fulop said, Mr. Cunningham
started talking about his sour relationship
with Mr. Menendez. As it turned out, Mr.
Menendez planned on running a full slate
of officially approved candidates for local
offices, and Mr. Cunningham wanted a
slate to oppose it.
Even when Mr. Fulop grasped that he
was being asked to run, he assumed, logi-
cally enough, that he was being solicited
for a council seat, low on the slate.
But no. Mr. Cunningham said, I know
it wont be a winning proposal, but I will
help you. I want you to run for Congress.
It was the weirdest conversation I ever
had.
The more he thought about it, though,
the more Mr. Fulop was intrigued. He
discussed it with his family and friends,
and on Monday I called back and said,
OK, Ill do it.
(Although he now has what he calls a
great relationship with Mr. Menendez,
it took a long time, Mr. Fulop acknowl-
edges. I didnt know anything, he said.
Menendez now tells me that it was
youthful ignorance.)
Mr. Fulop, many of his friends, and
his family began an old-fashioned, active
campaign, meeting people, making con-
nections, ringing doorbells, shaking
hands, working hard. We knew noth-
ing, he said. We had this whole cocka-
mamie idea we actually convinced our-
selves that we could win. We had no idea
how it worked.
He and Mr. Cunningham grew close as
they strategized together, but one day,
about two weeks before the election, I
left him at 9 oclock and at 9:30 he had
a massive heart attack. He died the fol-
lowing week.
Mr. Fulop lost the election resound-
ingly, but he did not lose his interest
in politics. I realize that I like meeting
people, and I like the whole process of
running.
Mr. Cunningham was replaced by Jer-
ramiah Healy, who won both a special
election and then a regular one. Mr.
Fulop ran for City Council off the party
line. That is a notoriously difficult way
to win a seat, particularly in a city as
machine-ruled as Jersey City was then,
but he did it. By this point we had fig-
ured out some of this stuff this stuff
being the stuff of politics Mr. Fulop
said. We were really focused on con-
stituent services, and we slowly built a
constituent base.
In 2012, Mr. Healy ran again.
It was an odd race. Inside the city,
the incumbent was the head of a strong
organization dedicated to keeping him
in power and the organization in con-
trol, but outside he was a laughingstock.
Mr. Healy had been photographed lying
drunk and naked on a porch; he came
up with odd explanations about being
overcome by young Hispanic women.
The FBI visited him the day before a raid
that culminated in 44 arrests for cor-
ruption. In general, he appears to have
been Jersey Citys own homegrown Rob
Ford; he seems to represent the deca-
dent, played-out last gasp of the party
machine.
Mr. Fulop said that he thinks machine
politics in Jersey City lasted as long as
they did at least in part because New
Jersey lacks its own media it has news-
papers, of course, but no big broadcasts
that focus on local issues. Something
has to be really outrageous before it
breaks onto the news from New York or
Philadelphia, he suggested.
Because he was the institutional can-
didate, Mr. Healy was supported by
prominent Democrats, including Presi-
dent Obama, Senator Lautenberg, and
Mayor Cory Booker of Newark, and by
New York Citys partyless but powerful
Mayor Michael Bloomberg. The ads ran
on television. Mr. Fulop had been up in
the polls, but his numbers plummeted.
But still he won.
It was a volunteers race, he said. It
literally took me years to build the sup-
port; I was running with small donors.
Mr. Healy had big ones.
I think we ran a better campaign,
Mr. Fulop said. We ended up winning
in every community. It put us in a great
place.
Mr. Fulop is a progressive in a blin-
dingly multicultural city.
Down the street from City Hall, a shul
whose cornerstone reads 1920 stands
padlocked and shuttered. It had been a
mosque, but it seems abandoned now. In
the blocks all around it, small businesses
bustle; it is lively but does not look gen-
trified. Signs look more homemade than
artisinal.
City Hall is an imposing structure,
begun in 1894, finished two years later,
not particularly well maintained in the
years since. It has high ceilings, marble
floors, arched ceilings, spiral staircases,
extensive woodwork, and painted detail.
Its offices have the pebbled windows that
evoke images of black-and-white movies.
The transoms high above them are not
glass, as they must have been years ago,
but painted plywood.
The city clearly is in transition, and
Steven Fulop emits the kind of energy
and charm that can move it along.
One of the things that is so hard
about this job is that it is such a diverse
community, he said. It is one of our
greatest assets and also it is one of our
greatest challenges. We are one of the
only growing urban areas in the state;
the school district is growing quickly,
but at the same time other parts of the
city feel as if they are being displaced or
left behind.
In other words, he is grappling with
the problems posed by gentrification.
There is an old-time political guy in
Hudson County who told me eight years
ago what to do to get elected, back
when Mr. Fulop still was a city council-
man, and he told me the same thing
again just last week. Unfortunately, there
is some wisdom in it.
He said, Listen very closely. I lis-
tened closely. He said, What you have
to do is do nothing.
The reality of the situation is that if
you do nothing, people wont be upset
with you. When they go to the vot-
ing booth, theyll think, Oh, Fulop, he
wasnt so bad, and theyll pull the lever.
Needless to say, that is not a course
that Mr. Fulop will follow. I like a chal-
lenge, and I think that we have hit the
ground running. We have been very
aggressive, he said. We are changing
some things, and that bothers people.
For example, he said, he is trying to sell
the landmarked Loews Theatre, a movie
palace fallen on hard times. He also is try-
ing to fund pre-kindergarten classes. It is a
balance between oldtimers and newcom-
ers, between the vocal and the nonvocal,
he said.
Its a hard job Trust is very fragile. You
can do the right thing 99 percent of the time,
and its the other one percent that people
remember. There is very little wiggle room.
Still, he loves the job. I literally come to
work every day being excited about being
here, he said. Every day is entirely differ-
ent from the day before.
He is a special person, Carmen Fulop
said of her middle son. He has a big heart,
and he is determined to do good.
When he enlisted, he said he didnt want
to be middle-aged and sit at a desk and
regret that he had done nothing but been a
paper-pusher.
Both Carmen and Arthur Fulop acknowl-
edged that Jersey City has had its prob-
lems, but there were a lot of good people
around, Arthur said. But a handful of bad
people were running it.
Steve was able to mobilize and energize
the volunteers who all believe, as he does,
that you can make a change if you work for
it.
Carmen looked back at her life. When he
came to America, her father worked in a fac-
tory; to her own astonishment, she went to
Barnard on a full scholarship. When I fin-
ished, I felt that it was a tremendous accom-
plishment, and I felt a great deal of pride,
she said.
When my children got jobs at Goldman
Sachs, when I understood what that meant,
I had a feeling of awe.
I had that pride and awe very much when
Steven graduated from the Marine Corps. It
was very impressive and touching.
She felt overwhelming joy when her
other two sons got married, and when Ste-
ven came home from Iraq, she added. She
is fiercely proud of Daniel, who still is in
finance, and Richard, who is an entrepre-
neur about to launch his first venture.
But on the day of Stevens inauguration,
I felt like I was walking on a cloud, she said.
I couldnt believe this achievement. I just
kept thinking that I couldnt believe that it
was my child.
My boys didnt grow up with connec-
tions. They have no money behind them. We
just gave them good values and a good edu-
cation, and let them go out into the world.
30 JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014
JS-30
201. 820. 3900
www. j f nnj . or g/f i l mf est i val
Mar ch 22 - Apr i l 10
16th Annual
Israel Film &
Cultural
Festival
Sponsors
Saturday, March 22 | 8:30 PM
THE PRIME MINISTERS
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades 411 East Clinton Ave., Tenay
Director, Richard Trank | 114 minutes
Admission: $10 mem. / $12 non-members
The Prime Ministers takes the audience inside the ofces of Israels prime
ministers through the eyes of Yehuda Avner, who served as chief aide,
English language note-taker, and speechwriter to Prime Ministers Eshkol,
Meir, Rabin, Begin, and Peres. The lm focuses on Ambassador Avners
years working with Eshkol and Meir, and then US Ambassador Yitzhak
Rabin and reveals new details about the Six-Day War, the development
of Israels close strategic relationship with the United States, the ght
against terrorism, and the Yom Kippur War and its aftermath.
Discussion following the lm with Rabbi Steven Burg of the Simon
Weisenthal Center, which produced the lm.
Sunday March 23 | 6:00 PM
Art Exhibit Water: The Essence of Our Li ves
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades 411 East Clinton Ave., Tenay
Jewish Federation invites you to a traveling international art exhibit. The
culmination of a Partnership2Gether initiative between artists in northern
New Jersey and Nahariya, Israel.
Wine and cheese reception.
Admission: Free and open to the public.
Sunday, March 23 | 7:15 PM
UNDER THE SAME SUN
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades 411 East Clinton Ave., Tenay
Director, Sameh Zoabi | 84 minutes | Subtitles
Admission: $10 members / $12 non-members
Under the Same Sun imagines the origin of peace between Israelis and
Palestinians in the simple collaboration of two businessmen, Palestinian
Nizar and Israeli Shaul. The partnership is uneasy at rst but, as trust
grows, they become an efcient unit. Working together, they produce a
solar power breakthrough that provides energy to Palestinians in the West
Bank. Created by a Palestinian director and an Israeli producer, the lm
was made with the backing of Search for Common Ground.
Discussion following the lm with Jenn Lishansky and Emi
Acquafredda, representatives of Seeds of Peace.
Tuesday, March 25 | 7:30 PM
THE PRIME MINISTERS
Congregation Rinat Yisrael 389 West Englewood Ave., Teaneck
Director, Richard Trank
114 minutes | Admission: $9
(See Saturday, March 22 for synopsis)
Discussion following the lm with Rabbi Steven Burg of the
Simon Weisenthal Center, the producer of the lm.
Wednesday, March 26 | 7:00 PM
HUNTING ELEPHANTS
The Wayne Y One Pike Drive, Wayne
Director, Levi Reshef | Subtitles
107 minutes | Admission: $9
After losing his father in an accident, twelve-year-old Jonathan
is left with his grandfather, a bitter and stubborn old man. His
grandfather lives in a nursing home where Jonathan meets a
host of eccentric characters including his grandfathers friend,
Nick. He learns about their underground past as Lehi members
before 1948. Joining them is Jonathans uncle, an Englishman and
frustrated Shakespearean actor, played by Sir Patrick Stewart.
Together. the four mists set out on a mission of revenge against
the Establishment.
Discussion following the lm with Isaac Zablocki, Director of
Film Programs & Israel Film Center, JCC of Manhattan.
Thursday, March 27 | 7:30 PM
THE ATTACK
Ramsey Theatre 125 E Main St., Ramsey
Director, Ziad Doueiri | 102 minutes | Admission: $9 | Subtitles
The Attack was featured in the prestigious Telluride Film Festival
and was a winner of a Special Mention at the San Sebastian Film
Festival. The Attack is a taut, unsentimental, moral thriller about
an Arab surgeon in Tel Aviv, who discovers his newly-dead wife,
Siham, was a suicide bomber. Dr. Amin Jaafari, a pillar of the local
medical community, is horried to discover she was responsible for
a blast that killed 17 people, amongst them 11 children attending
a birthday party. As he works to uncover the motivations of the
partner he thought he knew, his conclusions lead him to question
the foundations of trust, tolerance, and harmony that had always
been his guiding principles. Discussion following the lm with Gil
Lainer, Consul for Public Diplomacy at the Consulate General of
Israel in New York.
Sunday, March 30 | 6:30 PM
THE ATTACK
Teaneck Cinemas 503 Cedar Lane, Teaneck
Director, Ziad Doueiri | 102 minutes | Admission: $9 | Subtitles
(See Thursday, March 27 for synopsis)
Discussion following the lm with Avi Melamed, Middle East
Expert, Educator and Strategic Intelligence Analyst.
ONE NI GHT ONLY!
Monday, March 31 | 8:00 PM
THE WONDERS
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades 411 East Clinton Ave., Tenay
Director, Avi Nesher | 112 Minutes | Subtitles
Admission: $15 mem. / $18 non-members
Inspired by a true story, this new lm mixes genres. The story
focuses on Arnav, a grafti artist and bartender, who lives near
Jerusalems Old City. He paints walls at night and hopes his former
girlfriend will come back to him. When Arnav sees a mysterious
stranger forced into an abandoned apartment by three men, he
becomes involved with a hard-boiled investigator, a gorgeous
mystery woman, and the mysterious stranger himself. As the plot
twists, loyalties shift and revelations ow, and Arnavs life gradually
becomes stranger than his art. Discussion following the lm with
Adir Miller, acclaimed Israeli actor, screenwriter and comedian.
Tuesday, Apri l 1 | 7:30 PM
BEFORE THE REVOLUTION
Fairleigh Dickinson University - Wilson Auditorium
140 University Drive, Hackensack
Director, Dan Shadur | 60 minutes | Admission: $9 | Subtitles
During the 60s and 70s, thousands of Israelis living in Tehran,
had a special relationship with the Shah. They enjoyed a wealthy
and luxurious lifestyle, but failed to note the rule of the corrupt
Shah was collapsing. By the time they understood their Iranian
Paradise was turning into hell, it was almost too late. They found
themselves in the middle of the Islamist Revolution. Using rare
archival footage and interviews, the director, whose family had
been part of the community, reveals a new perspective on the
revolution that changed the world. Discussion following the lm
with Avi Melamed, Middle East Expert, Educator and Strategic
Intelligence Analyst.
Wednesday, Apri l 2 | 7:30 PM
ZAYTOUN
Bergen County Y, a JCC 605 Pascack Road, Washington Twp.
Director, Eran Riklis | 110 minutes | Admission: $9
Beirut, 1982: a young Palestinian refugee helps an Israeli ghter
pilot escape from PLO captivity because he wants to visit his
ancestral family home. En route through war-torn Lebanon their
relationship develops into a close bond. Discussion following the
lm with Shlomi Avni, former Israeli Navy SEAL and founder of
the Nirim Foundation.
Wednesday, Apri l 2 | 8:00 PM
UNDER THE SAME SUN
United Synagogue of Hoboken
Director, Sameh Zoabi | 84 minutes | Admission: $9
(See Sunday, March 23 for synopsis)
Discussion following the lm with Liran Kapoano, Director of the
Center for Israel Engagement.
Saturday, Apri l 5 | 8:15 PM
UNDER THE SAME SUN
Barnert Temple 747 Route 208 South, Franklin Lakes
Director, Sameh Zoabi | 84 minutes | Admission: $9
(See Sunday, March 23 for synopsis)
Discussion following the lm with Susan Koscis, Director, Special
Projects, Search for Common Ground.
Sunday, Apri l 6 | 7:00 PM
HUNTING ELEPHANTS
The Jewish Community Center of Paramus/Congregation Beth Tikvah
E304 Midland Ave., Paramus
Director, Levi Reshef | 107 minutes | Admission: $9
(See Wednesday, March 26 for synopsis)
Discussion following the lm with George Robinson, Film Critic
of the Jewish Week and Washington Heights Film Society artistic
director.
Thursday, Apri l 10 | 6:00 PM
Art Exhibit Water: The Essence of Our Li ves
Belskie Museum of Art & Science 747 Route 208 South, Franklin Lakes
Jewish Federation invites you to a traveling international art exhibit.
The culmination of a Partnership2Gether initiative between artists in
northern New Jersey and Nahariya, Israel.
Wine and cheese reception.
Admission: Free and open to the public.
OF NORTHERN NEW JERSEY
Jewish Federation
Israel FilmFestival Double Spread.indd 1 3/12/2014 9:21:44 AM
JS-31
JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014 31
201. 820. 3900
www. j f nnj . or g/f i l mf est i val
Mar ch 22 - Apr i l 10
16th Annual
Israel Film &
Cultural
Festival
Sponsors
Saturday, March 22 | 8:30 PM
THE PRIME MINISTERS
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades 411 East Clinton Ave., Tenay
Director, Richard Trank | 114 minutes
Admission: $10 mem. / $12 non-members
The Prime Ministers takes the audience inside the ofces of Israels prime
ministers through the eyes of Yehuda Avner, who served as chief aide,
English language note-taker, and speechwriter to Prime Ministers Eshkol,
Meir, Rabin, Begin, and Peres. The lm focuses on Ambassador Avners
years working with Eshkol and Meir, and then US Ambassador Yitzhak
Rabin and reveals new details about the Six-Day War, the development
of Israels close strategic relationship with the United States, the ght
against terrorism, and the Yom Kippur War and its aftermath.
Discussion following the lm with Rabbi Steven Burg of the Simon
Weisenthal Center, which produced the lm.
Sunday March 23 | 6:00 PM
Art Exhibit Water: The Essence of Our Li ves
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades 411 East Clinton Ave., Tenay
Jewish Federation invites you to a traveling international art exhibit. The
culmination of a Partnership2Gether initiative between artists in northern
New Jersey and Nahariya, Israel.
Wine and cheese reception.
Admission: Free and open to the public.
Sunday, March 23 | 7:15 PM
UNDER THE SAME SUN
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades 411 East Clinton Ave., Tenay
Director, Sameh Zoabi | 84 minutes | Subtitles
Admission: $10 members / $12 non-members
Under the Same Sun imagines the origin of peace between Israelis and
Palestinians in the simple collaboration of two businessmen, Palestinian
Nizar and Israeli Shaul. The partnership is uneasy at rst but, as trust
grows, they become an efcient unit. Working together, they produce a
solar power breakthrough that provides energy to Palestinians in the West
Bank. Created by a Palestinian director and an Israeli producer, the lm
was made with the backing of Search for Common Ground.
Discussion following the lm with Jenn Lishansky and Emi
Acquafredda, representatives of Seeds of Peace.
Tuesday, March 25 | 7:30 PM
THE PRIME MINISTERS
Congregation Rinat Yisrael 389 West Englewood Ave., Teaneck
Director, Richard Trank
114 minutes | Admission: $9
(See Saturday, March 22 for synopsis)
Discussion following the lm with Rabbi Steven Burg of the
Simon Weisenthal Center, the producer of the lm.
Wednesday, March 26 | 7:00 PM
HUNTING ELEPHANTS
The Wayne Y One Pike Drive, Wayne
Director, Levi Reshef | Subtitles
107 minutes | Admission: $9
After losing his father in an accident, twelve-year-old Jonathan
is left with his grandfather, a bitter and stubborn old man. His
grandfather lives in a nursing home where Jonathan meets a
host of eccentric characters including his grandfathers friend,
Nick. He learns about their underground past as Lehi members
before 1948. Joining them is Jonathans uncle, an Englishman and
frustrated Shakespearean actor, played by Sir Patrick Stewart.
Together. the four mists set out on a mission of revenge against
the Establishment.
Discussion following the lm with Isaac Zablocki, Director of
Film Programs & Israel Film Center, JCC of Manhattan.
Thursday, March 27 | 7:30 PM
THE ATTACK
Ramsey Theatre 125 E Main St., Ramsey
Director, Ziad Doueiri | 102 minutes | Admission: $9 | Subtitles
The Attack was featured in the prestigious Telluride Film Festival
and was a winner of a Special Mention at the San Sebastian Film
Festival. The Attack is a taut, unsentimental, moral thriller about
an Arab surgeon in Tel Aviv, who discovers his newly-dead wife,
Siham, was a suicide bomber. Dr. Amin Jaafari, a pillar of the local
medical community, is horried to discover she was responsible for
a blast that killed 17 people, amongst them 11 children attending
a birthday party. As he works to uncover the motivations of the
partner he thought he knew, his conclusions lead him to question
the foundations of trust, tolerance, and harmony that had always
been his guiding principles. Discussion following the lm with Gil
Lainer, Consul for Public Diplomacy at the Consulate General of
Israel in New York.
Sunday, March 30 | 6:30 PM
THE ATTACK
Teaneck Cinemas 503 Cedar Lane, Teaneck
Director, Ziad Doueiri | 102 minutes | Admission: $9 | Subtitles
(See Thursday, March 27 for synopsis)
Discussion following the lm with Avi Melamed, Middle East
Expert, Educator and Strategic Intelligence Analyst.
ONE NI GHT ONLY!
Monday, March 31 | 8:00 PM
THE WONDERS
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades 411 East Clinton Ave., Tenay
Director, Avi Nesher | 112 Minutes | Subtitles
Admission: $15 mem. / $18 non-members
Inspired by a true story, this new lm mixes genres. The story
focuses on Arnav, a grafti artist and bartender, who lives near
Jerusalems Old City. He paints walls at night and hopes his former
girlfriend will come back to him. When Arnav sees a mysterious
stranger forced into an abandoned apartment by three men, he
becomes involved with a hard-boiled investigator, a gorgeous
mystery woman, and the mysterious stranger himself. As the plot
twists, loyalties shift and revelations ow, and Arnavs life gradually
becomes stranger than his art. Discussion following the lm with
Adir Miller, acclaimed Israeli actor, screenwriter and comedian.
Tuesday, Apri l 1 | 7:30 PM
BEFORE THE REVOLUTION
Fairleigh Dickinson University - Wilson Auditorium
140 University Drive, Hackensack
Director, Dan Shadur | 60 minutes | Admission: $9 | Subtitles
During the 60s and 70s, thousands of Israelis living in Tehran,
had a special relationship with the Shah. They enjoyed a wealthy
and luxurious lifestyle, but failed to note the rule of the corrupt
Shah was collapsing. By the time they understood their Iranian
Paradise was turning into hell, it was almost too late. They found
themselves in the middle of the Islamist Revolution. Using rare
archival footage and interviews, the director, whose family had
been part of the community, reveals a new perspective on the
revolution that changed the world. Discussion following the lm
with Avi Melamed, Middle East Expert, Educator and Strategic
Intelligence Analyst.
Wednesday, Apri l 2 | 7:30 PM
ZAYTOUN
Bergen County Y, a JCC 605 Pascack Road, Washington Twp.
Director, Eran Riklis | 110 minutes | Admission: $9
Beirut, 1982: a young Palestinian refugee helps an Israeli ghter
pilot escape from PLO captivity because he wants to visit his
ancestral family home. En route through war-torn Lebanon their
relationship develops into a close bond. Discussion following the
lm with Shlomi Avni, former Israeli Navy SEAL and founder of
the Nirim Foundation.
Wednesday, Apri l 2 | 8:00 PM
UNDER THE SAME SUN
United Synagogue of Hoboken
Director, Sameh Zoabi | 84 minutes | Admission: $9
(See Sunday, March 23 for synopsis)
Discussion following the lm with Liran Kapoano, Director of the
Center for Israel Engagement.
Saturday, Apri l 5 | 8:15 PM
UNDER THE SAME SUN
Barnert Temple 747 Route 208 South, Franklin Lakes
Director, Sameh Zoabi | 84 minutes | Admission: $9
(See Sunday, March 23 for synopsis)
Discussion following the lm with Susan Koscis, Director, Special
Projects, Search for Common Ground.
Sunday, Apri l 6 | 7:00 PM
HUNTING ELEPHANTS
The Jewish Community Center of Paramus/Congregation Beth Tikvah
E304 Midland Ave., Paramus
Director, Levi Reshef | 107 minutes | Admission: $9
(See Wednesday, March 26 for synopsis)
Discussion following the lm with George Robinson, Film Critic
of the Jewish Week and Washington Heights Film Society artistic
director.
Thursday, Apri l 10 | 6:00 PM
Art Exhibit Water: The Essence of Our Li ves
Belskie Museum of Art & Science 747 Route 208 South, Franklin Lakes
Jewish Federation invites you to a traveling international art exhibit.
The culmination of a Partnership2Gether initiative between artists in
northern New Jersey and Nahariya, Israel.
Wine and cheese reception.
Admission: Free and open to the public.
OF NORTHERN NEW JERSEY
Jewish Federation
Israel FilmFestival Double Spread.indd 1 3/12/2014 9:21:44 AM
Opinion
32 JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014
JS-32*
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Ukraine-invading Putin
plays anti-Semitism card
B
ack in 2004, Russian Presi-
dent Vl adi mi r
Putin accused his
regional rival Vik-
tor Yushchenko, who then
was the pro-western presi-
dent of Ukraine, of having
campaigned on the basis of
anti-Russian, Zionist slo-
gans. Putins invocation of
the Z word led some observ-
ers to briefly fear that Rus-
sia was reviving the spirit
of Soviet anti-Semitism
dressed up as anti-Zionism. But a
few hours later, Putins office clarified
that what hed meant to say was anti-
Semitic, not Zionist.
Was Putins office lying with this clari-
fication? Was the remark a Freudian slip?
We never will know for sure. Two factors,
though, do stand out. Firstly, there isnt
much in Putins record that marks him
out as an anti-Semite, and many Rus-
sian Jews speak positively of him, some
because they feel obliged to do so, oth-
ers because they genuinely believe in
what they are saying. Secondly, Putin
is quite happy to depict his enemies as
anti-Semites if it suits him tactically to do
so, which is essentially what hes been
doing in Ukraine this past fortnight.
Step back for a second, and you can
see the rich historical irony at work
here. One European nation with a long
and bloody history of anti-Semitism has
engaged in aggression against another
European nation, also with a long and
bloody history of anti-Semitism. When
this happened almost a century ago,
during the horrendous civil war that fol-
lowed the Bolshevik Rev-
olution of 1917, pogroms
wracked Ukraine; now,
while there have been
anti-Semitic incidents
and speeches reported
in Ukraine, there is cer-
tainly no state policy of
anti-Semitism on either
side, much less an event
that deservedly could be
called a pogrom.
At the same time, west-
ern intellectuals and activists who
instinctively scorn the charge of anti-
Semitism when it crops up in the con-
texts of Zionism and Israel actually are
arguing that we should take Putins
claims seriously. For example, theres
Professor Stephen Cohen of New York
University, a leading nostalgist for the
Soviet era, who compared Ukrainian
nationalists to the Nazis in an interview
with CNN. And then theres Michael
Lerner, whose Tikkun magazine and
its associated spiritual progressives
network are the closest thing we Jews
have to a cult, waxing lyrically about his
favorite bete noire: The neocons seem
all too willing to ignore the fascistic and
proto-Nazi elements in the coalition that
last week overthrew the democratically
elected and pro-Russian government.
No one would deny that Ukraine, in
common with nearly every other Euro-
pean country including Russia, has too
many anti-Semites. Its far-right parties
like Svoboda and Pravyi Sektor mirror
similar movements elsewhere in Europe,
Now-ousted Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych poses with Russian Presi-
dent Vladimir Putin in Ukraine in 2011. PREMIER.GOV.RU
Ben Cohen

JS-33
JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014 33
Opinion/Jewish World
21 Adar II/March 22, 2014
Congregation Ahavath Torah Annual Dinner, Honoring:
b

Dinner Event Committee: Roni and Yehuda Blinder - Cheryl and Evan Borenstein - Hannah-Jean and Bruce Brafman - Aimee and Daniel Ciment - Eileen and Steven David - Alison and Joseph Dyckman - RuthAnn and Kenneth
Eckstein - Eve and Heshy Feldman - Susan and Kenny Greif - Ahuva and Stu Halpern - Rachel and Daniel Heumann - Jonathan Kolatch - Sharon and Sol Merkin - Michelle and Mitchell Weitzner - Cheryl and Lee Lasher - Esther
and Paul Lerer - Jen and NachumLifschitz - Nancy and Norris Nissim- Deena and Gilad Ottensosser - Sarah and Yaacov Ottensosser - Joanna and David Parker - Toby and Michael Parker - Naava and Jerey Parker - Drorit and
Michael Ratzker Lori and Harry Reidler - Chavie and Ami Rosen - Sara and Richie Schlussel - Elisabeth and Avi Samuels - Lindsay and Daniel Setton - Debbie and Steven Siegler - Tami and Isaak Volodarsky - Tanya and Darren Wolf
Dinner Campaign Committee: Jason Eichenholz - Norris Nissim- Jerey Parker - Michael Parker - Steven Siegler Dinner Event Committee: Rachel Heumann - Esther Lerer - Joanna Parker - Drorit Ratzker - Chavie Rosen - Lindsay Setton - Tami Volodarsky
Careena & Drew Parker Abby & Scott Herschmann
Young Leadership Award
Rabbi Shimon Murciano
Harbatzat Torah Award Guests of Honor
FEATURING RENOWNED COMEDIAN, ELON GOLD
as Special Guest Host & Master of Ceremonies
Congregation Ahavath Torah Annual Dinner, Honoring:
like Jobbik in Hungary and Golden Dawn in Greece.
It also should be mentioned that anti-Semitic rabble
rousing has come from the pro-Moscow far left, too,
like the Progressive Socialist Party, which accused
Jews of being behind the protests on Kievs Maidan.
But Ukraines bid to free itself from Russian domina-
tion has not been driven by anti-Semitic ideology, as
many Ukrainian Jewish leaders have pointed out them-
selves. I categorically refute the statements appear-
ing in a number of foreign media outlets of facts of
massive anti-Semitism and xenophobia in Ukraine
that do not correspond to reality! declared Vadim
Rabinovich of the All-Ukrainian Jewish Congress. The
whipping up of the situation around this issue is of a
provocative nature and does not contribute to a calm
life for the Jewish community of Ukraine.
Why, then, the eagerness with which pro-Moscow
circles in America have embraced Putins cynical
manipulation of anti-Semitism? I dont think theres
a one size fits all answer to this curious question, but
Michael Lerner helpfully provides an insight. The
neocons, he says, are playing down anti-Semitism
in Ukraine because their primary goal is to protect
Israel and destroy all of its potential enemies a list
that grows longer and longer as long as Israel retains
its dominance over the Palestinian people and denies
them fundamental human rights.
This is insane stuff, not least because neoconser-
vatives arent actually running U.S. foreign policy at
the moment. Yet we need to pay attention, because,
as a cursory search of the Internet will show, there
are many people out there who subscribe to this
nonsense. And when we do pay attention, we realize
that the dots being connected here are reminiscent
of a Jackson Pollock painting: the Jewish state and its
allies in America are backing an anti-Semitic regime
in Ukraine in order to continue the persecution of the
Palestinians. Like I said, insane.
I therefore would advise American Jews to play
close heed to any anti-Semitic episodes in Ukraine.
(Apart from anything, Ukraine is one of the few gov-
ernments in the world over which the United States
still retains some leverage, so our efforts wont go to
waste.) At the same time, lets recognize Putins inva-
sion of Crimea and his threat to the rest of Ukraine for
what it is naked aggression in violation of the United
Nations Charter that, ultimately, poses a threat to all of
us, whether Jewish or not. JNS.ORG
Ben Cohen, JNS.orgs Shillman analyst, writes about
Jewish affairs and Middle Eastern politics. His work
has been published in Commentary, the New York
Post, Haaretz, Jewish Ideas Daily, and many other
publications.
Ukraines bid to free
itself from Russian
domination has
not been driven
by anti-Semitic
ideology, as many
Ukrainian Jewish
leaders have pointed
out themselves.
Riots erupt in Amman after shooting of Jordanian
who attacked Israeli soldier
Riots broke out in Amman following an incident on Mon-
day in which a Jordanian was shot and killed at the Allenby
Bridge crossing between the west bank and Jordan after he
apparently attacked an Israeli soldier.
According to the Israel Defense Forces, the attacker
charged at soldiers with a metal pole while shouting
Allahu akbar, and then attempted to grab a soldiers rifle.
After being shot in the lower part of his body, the attacker
began to strangle a soldier, prompting further fire that
resulted in the attackers death.
Jordanian media reported that the Jordanian who was
killed was Raed Alaa el-Deen Zaeiter, an Amman judge of
Palestinian origin.
JNS.ORG
Jewish World
34 JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014
JS-34
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 15, 2010 23
Enjoy your Pesach away from home
knowing your loved one is cared for at
CareOne at Teaneck.
A Glatt Kosher Facility (RCBC) Traditional Passover Meal
On-Site Synagogue Rabbi will ofciate at the Seders
March 28-April 10, 2010
Other Services Include:
Room and Board, Housekeeping, Medication consultation, Dietician
consult and Nutrition Management, Disease Education, Planning and resources given
for community support, Home Care or companion coordination, Long-term care
CareOne at Teaneck . 544 Teaneck Rd . Teaneck, NJ 07666
.
-
.
a
-
r
-
t
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 15, 2010 23
Enjoy your Pesach away from home
knowing your loved one is cared for at
CareOne at Teaneck.
A Glatt Kosher Facility (RCBC) Traditional Passover Meal
On-Site Synagogue Rabbi will ofciate at the Seders
March 28-April 10, 2010
Other Services Include:
Room and Board, Housekeeping, Medication consultation, Dietician
consult and Nutrition Management, Disease Education, Planning and resources given
for community support, Home Care or companion coordination, Long-term care
CareOne at Teaneck . 544 Teaneck Rd . Teaneck, NJ 07666
.
-
.
a
-
r
-
t
Enjoy your Pesach away from
home knowing your loved one is
cared for at CareOne at Teaneck.
A Glatt Kosher Facility (RCBC)
Included in the Passover Respite Program
From April 14-April 22
2 traditional Passover Seders per day, 1 early 1 later, offciated by our rabbi
Traditional Passover meals
1 complementary beauty appointment (reservations required, upon availability)
Lunch or dinner with family members in our private dining room
during Chol HaMoed (reservations required)
On-site synagogue
Please call admissions
201-287-8507 or 8505
JEWISH STANDARD JANUARY 15, 2010 23
Enjoy your Pesach away from home
knowing your loved one is cared for at
CareOne at Teaneck.
A Glatt Kosher Facility (RCBC) Traditional Passover Meal
On-Site Synagogue Rabbi will ofciate at the Seders
March 28-April 10, 2010
Other Services Include:
Room and Board, Housekeeping, Medication consultation, Dietician
consult and Nutrition Management, Disease Education, Planning and resources given
for community support, Home Care or companion coordination, Long-term care
CareOne at Teaneck . 544 Teaneck Rd . Teaneck, NJ 07666
.
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.
a
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r
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t
BRIEFS
Tel Aviv bus bomber sentenced to 25 years
The Tel Aviv District Court on Monday sentenced
20-year-old Tayibe resident Mohammed Mafarja to 25
years in jail for placing an explosive device on a Tel
Aviv bus in November 2012, an attack that wounded 24
people.
Mafarja placed the bomb on Bus 142, and got off near
the Diamond Exchange in Ramat Gan. Minutes later, an
accomplice detonated the device via cellphone as the
bus traveled west on Shaul Hamelech Street in Tel Aviv.
As part of a plea bargain, Mafarja was convicted of
attempted murder, carrying out actions with intent to
aid an enemy, and causing an explosion that resulted in
severe injuries.
JNS.ORG
Scribe restores Book of
Esther scroll for Catholic
nuns in time for Purim
Just in time for Purim, a collaboration between an
order of nuns and a British Jewish scribe to restore
an ancient scroll telling the story of the holiday is
drawing attention as a sign of progress in Catholic-
Jewish relations.
Scribe Mordechai Pinchas restored a megillah
(scroll) of the Book of Esther and returned it to the
Benedictine Tyburn Nuns at a London ceremony last
week.
The parchment was written in Venice in the 18th
century. It was donated to the order by Jordan and
Lorraine Cherrick of St. Louis, Mo. The scroll is a bib-
lical artifact symbolizing ever-deepening Jewish-Cath-
olic relations, said Mother General Xavier McMona-
gle, according to the British Catholic Herald.
According to Mother Xavier, the figure of Esther
has remained very powerful in Catholic Christian reli-
gion, devotion and spirituality as a symbol, an image
and a model of powerful intercession with God to
change the course of human events from bad to good.
The need for Esthers example is ever present in
our minds, whether we are Christians or Jews, she
said. Esther is a memorial, a living point of confi-
dence that God can change things for the better, and
he can do it even by working miracles.
JNS.ORG
Competition for $250K
inclusion prize launched by
Ruderman Foundation
The Ruderman Family Foundation on Tuesday
announced the opening of a global competition for
its third annual $250,000 Ruderman Prize in Inclu-
sion, to be split equally among five organizations
that have demonstrated their commitment to the
full inclusion of people with disabilities into the Jew-
ish community through innovative programs and
services.
It is our hope that by shining a light on the lead-
ers in inclusion in our community that we will
encourage other organizations to follow their lead
and effectuate lasting change, said Jay Ruderman,
president of the Ruderman Family Foundation,
which is headquartered in Boston and Israel. We
believe that a more inclusive Jewish community is a
fair and flourishing one for all.
Organizations in Russia, the U.K., the U.S., Mexico,
Israel, South Africa, and Argentina have received the
prize in the past. The foundation is accepting applica-
tions for this years award until April 7. More informa-
tion is available at www.rudermanfoundation.org.
JNS.ORG
IDF chief Benny Gantz
visits U.S.
Israel Defense Forces Chief of Staff Lt. Gen. Benny
Gantz arrived in the U.S. on Sunday for an official
visit.
Gantz was scheduled to hold a series of meetings
with U.S. defense officials during his visit, and to
take part in the Friends of the IDF annual gala din-
ner on Tuesday in New York.
Maj. Gen. Yaakov Ayish, Israeli defense attache
to the United States and Canada, is accompanying
Gantz throughout his visit. JNS.ORG
JS-35
JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014 35

Purim is a holiday of fun! Bring your children
in their favorite Purim costumes to the Rubach Family
Purim Carnival, where they can enjoy train rides;
inatables; crafts, games and prizes; character visits; a
dark room/tunnel experience, clairvoyant, cotton candy
and more. There will be a fabulous costume parade at
2:45 pm that will conclude with a Megillah show. For
more info, call 201.408.1484.
SUN, MAR 16, 1- 4 PM
Carnival opens at 12 noon for families with children
with special needs
Suggested entrance donation: $1 per person or
non-perishable food item to be donated to the
Center for Food Action. All ride & game tickets
sold on $25 cards for 30 tickets.
Step right up to the
Rubach Family
Purim
Carnival!
PURIM LOBBY PROJECT
Roll out some dough, and use our
llings to make tasty tashen that
you bake at home. For more info,
call 201.408.1426.
Wed, Mar 12, 2-5 pm,
$1 for 2 hamantaschen
PURIM COOKING
A fun cooking class in Hebrew
for parents and children. For
more info, call 201.408.1427.
Ages 3-7 with caregivers,
Sun, Mar 9, 11 am, $20/$25
ENGLISH-HEBREW STORY TIME
Get in the holiday spirit with
stories for young children. For
more info, call 201.408.1427.
Birth-Age 3 with caregivers,
Tues, Mar 11, 9:30 am, $5
MORE
PURIM
EVENTS
KAPLEN JCC on the Palisades TAUB CAMPUS | 411 E CLINTON AVE, TENAFLY, NJ 07670 | 201.569.7900 | jccotp.org
Purim
at the
JCC!
Jewish World
36 JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014
JS-36*
East Hill
Synagogue

Located in the Jewish Center of Teaneck Director: Chavie Hagler
chagler@sinaischools.org 201-345-1974 www.sinaischools.org/netivot.js
12 month
Day Habilitation
program for
young adults with
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NETIVOT is a qualied, approved provider of adult day services
in the State of New Jersey.
A Path to Independence
Individualized Goals
Life Skills
Vocational Preparation
Job Placement & Support
Educational Workshops
Jewish Life
Community Integration
Navigating Public
Transportation
Computer Skills
Social Growth
Fitness
Swimming
Let SINAI's
Netivot program create
a path easing the transition
from a structured
high school setting
to adulthood
Can Israeli-Palestinian business
coalition push leaders to make a deal?
BEN SALES
TEL AVIV Two years ago, Israeli super-
market mogul Rami Levy invited Pal-
estinian gas and oil magnate Munib al-
Masri to one of his grocery stores.
A working-class boy who had become
the West Banks wealthiest man, Mr. al-
Masri already had turned his attention
to a new challenge: encouraging a two-
state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian
conflict. But the partnership was not to
be.
Mr. Levy, the owner of the supermar-
ket chain Rami Levy Hashikma Market-
ing, has three stores in Israeli West Bank
settlements, and Mr. al-Masri decided
he could not work with him in good
faith. In Mr. Levys eyes, the West B ank
franchises advance peace by employing
Palestinians and fostering coexistence.
Mr. Al-Masri, however, saw them as an
impediment to the partnership.
Now the two men find themselves
together anyway, as part of a larger ini-
tiative of 300 Israeli and Palestinian
businesspeople hoping to nudge their
respective leaderships toward a peace
agreement. Mr. Levy and Mr. al-Masri say
they can coexist within the larger group,
known as Breaking the Impasse, or BTI,
despite the significant ideological gaps
between them.
The big picture is me convincing
them that they shouldnt be there, Mr.
al-Masri said, referring to Israels pres-
ence in the settlements. I will always
talk to them because if they agree
with me, well work together. This is a
win-win.
BTI was founded at the World Eco-
nomic Forum in 2012, but launched
its public campaign only recently. So
far, BTI has engaged in a mix of public
advocacy and quiet diplomacy, holding
off-the-record meetings with Israeli and
Palestinian ministers and placing large
billboards in Israeli population centers
touting the benefits of a peace deal.
Participants say their interest in the
initiative isnt strictly economic, though
a peace agreement surely would bring
substantial benefits to the business
community. In particular, they say a
deal would be key to curbing the boy-
cott, divestment, and sanctions move-
ment, or BDS, that seeks to punish Israel
economically for its treatment of the
Palestinians.
A lot of companies and states and
A billboard placed by the business group Breaking the Impasse urging
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to reach a peace accord with the
Palestinians. BREAKING THE IMPASSE
If we have an
opportunity [for
peace] and we
miss it, it will
have economic
and business
implications.
MOSHE LICHTMAN
Jewish World
JS-37
JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014 37
Annual Percentage Yield (APY) is accurate as of publication date and is subject to change without notice. Minimum deposit to open account is $500. New Money ONLY. Existing
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John Nichols
Saving the American Dream:
Restoring the Middle Class and Democracy
MARCH 20 7:30 PM
Fairleigh Dickinson University, Wilson Auditorium
800 University Plaza (Temple Drive) Hackensack, NJ
PROGRAMS ARE FREE AND ALL ARE WELCOME. FREE PARKING.
Seating is limited, pre-register today at: info@njppn.org
Visit: www.northjerseypublicpolicy.org
Nichols will address the money/media complexs impact on public policy,
winner take all politics, and ofer recommendations for change. Nichols
will illustrate his talk with examples from New Jersey events.
John Nichols, a groundbreaking journalist and speaker is Washington
correspondent for The Nation and author of acclaimed books including the
best-selling biography of Vice President Dick Cheney and more recently
Dollarocracy.
1245 Teaneck Rd.
Teaneck
837-8700
Tallesim Cleaned speCial shabbos Rush seRviCe
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WE OFFER REPAIRS
AND ALTERATIONS
academics want to invest, buy products,
and do joint academic research with
Israel, said Moshe Lichtman, former
president of Microsoft Israels research
and development center. If we have
an opportunity [for peace] and we miss
it, it will have economic and business
implications.
In February, BTI ran a series of bill-
boards featuring a large picture of Israeli
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and
slogans such as Only with an agreement
can we secure a Jewish and democratic
state, or Without a peace agreement
we wont be able to lower the cost of liv-
ing. Each statement concluded with a
message to Mr. Netanyahu: Bibi, only
you can do it!
A parallel effort is underway to
exert pressure on Palestinian Author-
ity President Mahmoud Abbas, but the
Israeli and Palestinian members of BTI
are operating independently in their
respective spheres, and the Netanyahu
billboards were arranged solely by the
Israeli side.
BTI members say that while they sup-
port a peace agreement that leads to two
states, they wont delve into the thorny
details of major issues such as Palestin-
ian refugees, the future of Jerusalem, or
final borders. Such questions, they say,
should be left to the negotiators.
Sticking to broad slogans allows BTI
to paper over substantial differences
among its participants, but it also could
present obstacles for the group should
the particulars of an agreement come to
light. U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry
is slated to propose a framework for an
agreement in the coming weeks.
We know there are disagreements
left and right, said Michal Stopper-Vax,
BTIs CEO. But if the prime minister
signs an agreement, the majority of the
group will be behind it.
The differences between Mr. Levy
and Mr. al-Masri point to the gaps even
between Israelis and Palestinians who
agree on the need for a two-state solu-
tion. Mr. al-Masri talks about a Pales-
tinian state in the 1967 borders, while
Mr. Levy wants to keep all of Jerusalem
under Israeli sovereignty. Mr. al-Masri
wants to offer each Palestinian refugee
Israeli citizenship, a non-starter for most
Israelis. And while Mr. Levy believes Pal-
estinians arent fully prepared for a final
deal, Mr. al-Masri believes Israel is mor-
ally responsible for the conflict.
Both men say that if their respective
leaders sign an agreement, and both
Israelis and Palestinians approve it in
referenda, they wont object. But the dif-
ferences between them may make for a
tenuous alliance. In February, some BTI
members took out a full-page ad in the
Israeli daily Yediot Aharonot touting the
groups message, but Mr. Levy chose not
to sign on because it didnt sufficiently
address Israeli security concerns.
We are not politicians, he said, echo-
ing several other BTI members. We
dont make the decisions. In a demo-
cratic state, the majority decides. No one
can come and dictate if the majority says
something else.
Even before the latest round of nego-
tiations began last July, skepticism
abounded among both Israelis and Pal-
estinians about the chances for a peace
agreement. The American negotiating
team appears to be struggling to bridge
gaps between the sides on several major
issues, but BTI participants say the talks
may be Israels last good opportunity to
end the conflict.
Netanyahu has had a certain change
of thought, that this is a historic deci-
sion, said Mr. Lichtman, the former
Microsoft executive. He needs to feel
that he has broad support. I think hes
skeptical. Theres a lot of justification to
be skeptical, but I think hes ripe to make
these decisions.
Promoting Israeli-Palestinian eco-
nomic cooperation has long been seen
in some quarters as essential to buttress-
ing a peace deal. But Bar-Ilan Univer-
sity political studies professor Shmuel
Sandler says that if Mr. Netanyahu does
push through to an agreement, it wont
be because of business interests.
A former finance minister, Mr. Netan-
yahu is aware of the potential economic
benefits of peace, Mr. Sandler says,
but security concerns remain his top
priority.
Up until now, businessmen havent
had influence, he said. Security offi-
cials are more influential. For Bibi, the
economy is important, but on the bal-
ance security is more important.
Mr. Levy thinks Mr. Netanyahu will
rise to the occasion. But if he doesnt,
Mr. Levy says BTI should keep advanc-
ing the same message.
When we talk about negotiations, Im
always optimistic, he said. Sometimes
I hear people say this is the last chance
for peace.
You can never say this is the last
chance for peace. You need to try your
whole life. JTA WIRE SERVICE
38 JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014
JS-38
visit www.jfnnj.org/gooddeedsday for more pictures
For other volunteer opportunities, contact Alice Blass, aliceb@jfnnj.org or 201-820-3948.
1,000 BAGS
200 VOLUNTEERS
6 FOOD PANTRIES
1 VERY PRODUCTIVE
GOOD DEEDS DAY!
OF NORTHERN NEW JERSEY
Jewish Federation
T
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A
N
K Y
O
U
!
Jewish World
JS-39*
JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014 39
Come to a free vein screening with our
board-certied vein specialists. Open
to men and women with visible varicose
or spider vein, leg pain or blood clots.
Englewood Hospital and Medical Center
Sat., March 22 10 am - 2 pm
Mon., March 24 10 am - 2 pm
Thur., April 3 2 pm - 5 pm
Pre-registration is required. Call 866.980.3462
or visit englewoodhospital.com and click
Classes and Support Groups.
This year,
dare to go bare.




100 State Street, Teaneck 201.837.3000
www.teaneckdentist.com
Richard S. Gertler, DMD, FAGD
Michelle Bloch, DDS Ari Frolich, DMD
Hockey Maven Stan Fischler
loves the game and Israel
HILLEL KUTTLER
UNIONDALE, N.Y. As the Boston Bru-
ins buzz the Islanders net throughout
the opening period of a game at the Nas-
sau Coliseum, Stan Fischler is standing
10 feet behind the Plexiglas to the left of
New York goaltender Kevin Poulin.
Fischler, a hockey broadcaster for four
decades, can feel the rattling boards of
forechecking Bruins.
Theres no place hed rather be.
Providing New York-area hockey fans
with a birds-eye view and expert analy-
sis is what Mr. Fischler, 81, has done on
broadcasts of Islanders, Rangers, and
Devils games. Hes had a love affair with
the sport since he was introduced to it
quite by accident as a 7-year-old growing
up in Brooklyn.
The hockey community in New York
has returned the fondness, notably when
the younger of his two sons, then a teen-
ager, was critically ill with a heart malady.
The Hockey Maven, as Mr. Fischler
long has been known, also has a love
affair with Israel. He and his wife, Shir-
ley, visit there each summer. And their
younger son, Simon, now 35, lives on
Kibbutz El Rom in the Golan Heights and
blogs on diplomacy while also writing for
his fathers hockey newsletter.
Simon, not surprisingly, taught the
sport to his children at the ice rink in
nearby Metulla.
He recalls his father asking him to find
Israel on an atlas when he was 8. The boy
couldnt, so his dad pointed it out.
That was one of my earliest memo-
ries: This is our land, said Simon, who
lives on the kibbutz with his wife and
three children. I thank him every day
for it because I am extremely proud of
my Jewish national heritage. Its why I
live in Israel.
Mr. Fischler says that his mother,
Molly, lost nearly all her relatives in
SEE STAN FISCHLER PAGE 40
Stan Fischler is flanked by producer Glenn Petraitis, left, and co-host Peter Ruttgaizer
at the Nassau Coliseum set of their pregame and postgame shows. HILLEL KUTTLER
Jewish World
40 JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014
JS-40
2014
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the Holocaust in the former Czechoslovakia. That helps
explain why his support of Jewish causes revolves around
the security of Israel.
It was his mother Malka Devorah, I love that name;
its very lyrical, he says who introduced 5-year-old Stan,
her only child, to spectator sports, a Brooklyn Dodgers
game they attended at Ebbets Field.
But two years later it was his father, Benjamin, who
would bring young Stan to his first hockey game. They
were planning to see Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs,
but when they emerged from the subway into torrential
rain at 50th Street and Eighth Avenue, where Madison
Square Garden then stood, their plans changed.
Forget it, said Benjamin, a big-time sports fan, Mr. Fis-
chler recalled. Well go to the game.
The Rangers minor league team, the Rovers, was tak-
ing on the Washington Eagles, and the bawling boy was
hooked. After each Rovers game, Mr. Fischler would write
a recap in his souvenir program. A hockey writer was
born.
Several years later, at 10, Mr. Fischler first saw the real
Rangers play. A sign in the Gardens rotunda touting
hockey as The Fastest Game in the World, along with
the magical brew of indoor ice, sticks, and skating, really
made an impression on me, Mr. Fischler said.
He would handle public relations for the Rangers, then
work for 20 years as a newspaper reporter before moving
into broadcasting, first for the World Hockey Associations
New England Whalers and then the New York-area
teams in the National Hockey League.
The opinionated broadcaster has won many Emmy
awards, and in 2007 he was awarded the NHLs Les-
ter Patrick Trophy for advancing American hockey.
His love and knowledge of the game are apparent
in the pregame and postgame shows he co-hosts for
the New York areas NHL teams on the MSG Network.
His producer, Glenn Petraitis, says Mr. Fischler has
retained the passion of a young person.
He obviously lives, eats, and sleeps hockey, Mr.
Petraitis said. Hes a passionate sports fan.
Mr. Fischler just had his 100th book on the sport
published. We Are the Rangers is an oral history
of the team that tugged at his heart when he was a
boy growing up in the Williamsburg neighborhood
of Brooklyn.
Some of the books were co-authored with Shir-
ley, with whom he lives on Manhattans Upper West
Side. (Their elder son, Ben, lives in Portland, Ore.)
His subjects have included such Hall of Fame players
as Gordie Howe, Bobby Orr, Stan Mikita, and Rod
Gilbert. Other books have been on coaches, teams,
great moments, and rivalries.
Fischler also has written well-received books on
New Yorks transit system and the old trolley lines
in Brooklyn.
The epilogue of the new book tells of when Simon
needed a heart transplant in 1993. Mr. Fischler
movingly writes of the Rangers then-coach and its
goalie, Mike Keenan and Mike Richter, visiting his
son a diehard fan of the Islanders, the Rangers
bitter rivals.
Unwritten was what Mr. Gilbert told JTA: He also
had come to the hospital, where he and Simon Fis-
chler, sitting alone, discussed hockey and prayer.
That evening, an emotional Mr. Fischler phoned
Mr. Gilbert, a friend since the players debut in
1960, with the news that a donor heart had become
available.
Call it coincidence, call it energy or whatever you
want, Mr. Gilbert said. I was very grateful that he
did successfully get a transplant.
Told of Mr. Gilberts comments, Mr. Fischler said
the visit came when Simons condition was dire.
I did attach something positive to Rod Gilberts
visit, he said. Rod was basically doing some
preaching, some talking about getting through his
own medical experiences. When youre in a situation
like that, you welcome any source of hope.
Another source was praying at the family syna-
gogue on West 110th Street.
The crisis wasnt discussed on-air.
Viewers tune in to hear Mr. Fischler opine and
inform on hockey.
Fans strolling the Nassau Coliseum concourse dur-
ing the Islanders-Bruins game stopped by the white
picket fence that marks the set where Mr. Petraitis,
Mr. Fischler, and the broadcasts other co-host, Peter
Ruttgaizer, ply their trade.
They seek out Mr. Fischler to banter, ask ques-
tions, and pose for photographs.
You turn on MSG and theres Stan, said Kyle Hall,
25, after taking a picture with Fischler. I only know
things are true if Stan says so. Hes knowledgeable.
Preparing for the pregame show, Mr. Fischler says,
It never stops being exciting because you never
know whats going to happen from game to game.
JTA WIRE SERVICE
Stan Fischler
FROM PAGE 39
www.jstandard.com
JS-41
JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014 41
TO REGISTER OR FOR MORE INFO, VISIT
jccotp.org OR CALL 201. 569.7900.
UPCOMING AT
SENIORS
KAPLEN JCC on the Palisades
ADULTS
Bring your children in their favorite Purim costumes where
they can enjoy train rides, inatables, crafts, games and
prizes, character visits; a dark room/tunnel experience, a
clairvoyant, cotton candy and more. Suggested entrance
donation, $1 per person or non-perishable food item for the
Center for Food Action. For more info, call 201.408.1484.
Sun, Mar 16, 1-4 pm, 12 pm for families with children with
special needs, $25 card for 30 ride & game tickets
Free Caregiver
Support Groups
The Alzheimers Associations support groups
provide an opportunity for caregivers, families and
friends to learn more about Alzheimers disease,
share their feelings and concerns, and support each
other in coping with the efects of the disease.
For more info, contact Judi Davidsohn Nahary at
201.408.1450
Groups meet monthly: 2nd Mondays, 7 pm,
2nd Tuesdays, 10:30 am, and/or 4th Thursdays 11 am
THE JEWISH FEDERATION OF NNJ
Israeli Film Festival
at the JCC
Enjoy new and prominent lms from Israel.
Purchase tickets online or call Aya at 201.408.1427.
The Prime Ministers
Written, produced and directed by Academy Award
winner Richard Trank and co-written and produced by
two-time Academy Award winner Rabbi Marvin Hier.
In English.
Sat, Mar 22, 8:30 pm, $10/$12
Under the Same Sun
Directed by Sameh Zoabi. Hebrew with English subtitles.
Sun, March 23, 7:15 pm, $10/$12
JUDAICS
The American Jewish Story
Through Cinema
WITH ERIC A. GOLDMAN, AUTHOR
The complex and evolving nature of the American
Jewish condition can be revealed by examining cinema
over the last century, where Jewish lmmakers and
producers have long inuenced the industry.
Made possible by James H. Grossmann Memorial Jewish
Book Month. For more info contact Esther Mazor at
201.408.1456.
Tues, Mar 25, 11 am, $8/$10
P
h
o
t
o
:

U
n
d
e
r

t
h
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a
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KAPLEN JCC on the Palisades TAUB CAMPUS | 411 E CLINTON AVE, TENAFLY, NJ 07670 | 201.569.7900 | jccotp.org
The Big Stage
HOMAGE TO BROADWAY
Acclaimed International Concert violinist, David Podles,
performs some of Broadways most memorable and
magnicent hits in this exhilarating show.
Mon, Mar 17, 11 am, $5/$8
Miriams Cup
FOR MOMS AND DAUGHTERS, AGE 8-18
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and then handcraft a ceramic Miriams
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Jewish World
42 JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014
JS-42
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BRIEFS
U.S. announces transfer of $429 million
to Israel for Iron Dome
The United States on Monday announced
the immediate transfer of $429 million
to Israel to continue manufacturing
and purchasing Iron Dome anti-rocket
batteries.
The decision to provide additional
Iron Dome funding was first reported
by Israel Hayom on Monday. The U.S.
Defense Department made the official
announcement later in the day.
The Defense Department hailed
the prowess of the Israeli-made aerial
defense system, saying the deal to pro-
vide the funding was signed last week
and represents the shared strategic
interests of both countries. Currently,
there are seven Iron Dome batteries in
operation, and the Israeli defense estab-
lishments goal is to have 14 batteries in
operation by the end of 2015. JNS.ORG
IDF displays missiles seized on Iranian ship
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netan-
yahu on Monday toured a display of
Syrian-made missiles that were recently
intercepted by the Israeli Navy on a Gaza-
bound ship from Iran. The missiles are
being displayed in the port of Eilat.
Iran, a brutal regime, has not aban-
doned its deep involvement in terrorism,
its systematic efforts to undermine peace
and security throughout the Middle East,
and its ambition to destroy the state of
Israel, Netanyahu said.
According to the Israel Defense Forces,
the weaponry on board the seized Iranian
ship included dozens of M-302 missiles,
which have a range of 62-124 miles. The
weapons were originally flown from Syria
to Iran. From Iran, they were shipped
by boat to Iraq. The shipment was inter-
cepted while it was being moved by boat
from Iraq to Sudan, from where the weap-
ons would have been smuggled to Gaza.
Ilan Berman, vice president of the
American Foreign Policy Council, told
JNS.org that while Irans nuclear program
is the fast mover in international discus-
sions, the Iranians are at the same time
working very diligently on expanding
the scope and lethality of their missile
program, which is a delivery vehicle for
nuclear weapons.
White House Spokesperson Jay Carney
told reporters that pursuing a diplomatic
resolution with Iran on its nuclear pro-
gram is still appropriate even after Israels
interception of a ship containing Syrian-
made missiles.
Even as we continue efforts to resolve
our concerns over Irans nuclear program
through diplomacy, we will continue to
stand up to Irans support for destabiliz-
ing activities in the region, in coordination
with our partners and allies, and make
clear that these illicit actions are unaccept-
able to the international community and
in gross violation of Irans U.N. Security
Council obligations, Carney said.
JNS.ORG
U.S. denying visas to
Israeli intelligence and defense personnel
The U.S. State Department has report-
edly begun a policy of denying visa
requests from members of Israels intel-
ligence and defense sectors.
Senior security personnel said they
have seen hundreds of cases in which
members of the Shin Bet, Mossad, and
Israeli defense industry workers have
been told they cannot visit the U.S.,
Maariv reported.
Additionally, Israeli security person-
nel working in the U.S. report being only
given short-term visas and being forced
to leave for Canada and then reapply.
Daniel Pipes, president of the Middle
East Forum, said the policy might be the
work of some within the State Depart-
ment who are attempting to undermine
U.S.-Israel relations.
Despite a generally flourishing U.S.-
Israel bond, there are those in the bow-
els of the bureaucracy who wish to derail
it and, at times, they achieve small victo-
ries, Pipes told JNS.org. JNS.ORG
Arab League head urges firm stand against
recognizing Israel as Jewish state
Nabil Elaraby, the head of the Arab
League, has called on Arab countries to
take a firm stand against recognizing
Israel as a Jewish state.
Elaraby made his remarks Sunday as
part of an Arab Foreign Ministers con-
ference in Cairo, the Associated Press
reported.
On Friday, Palestinian Authority Pres-
ident Mahmoud Abbas made similar
comments, saying there is no way he
would recognize Israel as a Jewish state.
U.S. State Department spokeswoman
Jen Psaki, meanwhile, told the PA-based
Al-Quds newspaper on Saturday, The
American position is clear, Israel is a Jew-
ish state. However, we do not see a need
that both sides recognize this position as
part of the final [U.S.-brokered peace]
agreement. JNS.ORG
Jewish World
JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014 43
JS-43*
Love or politics?
Putins Jewish embrace wins praise and criticism
CNAAN LIPHSHIZ
AND TALIA LAVIN
W
hen even Russian police-
men had to pass security
checks to enter the Sochi
Winter Olympics, Rabbi
Berel Lazar was waved in without ever
showing his ID.
Rabbi Lazar, a Chabad-affiliated chief
rabbi of Russia, was invited to the open-
ing ceremony of the games last month by
President Vladimir Putins office. But since
the event was on Shabbat, Lazar initially
declined the invitation, explaining he
was prevented from carrying documents,
among other religious restrictions.
So Mr. Putin ordered his staff to pre-
pare an alternative entrance and security-
free route just for the rabbi, according to
one of Rabbi Lazars top associates, Rabbi
Boruch Gorin.
It is unusual, but the security detail
acted like kosher supervisors so Rabbi
Lazar could attend, Rabbi Gorin said.
To him, the Sochi anecdote illustrates
Mr. Putins positive attitude toward Rus-
sian Jewry an attitude Rabbi Gorin says
is sincere, unprecedented in Russian his-
tory, and hugely beneficial for Jewish life
in the country.
Others, however, see more cynical
motives behind Mr. Putins embrace of
Russian Jewry.
Putin has been facing international
criticism for a long time now over human
rights issues, said Roman Bronfman, a
former Israeli Knesset member who was
born in the Soviet Union. He needs a
shield, and thats the Jews. His warm rela-
tions with Russias so-called official Jews
are instrumental.
In recent weeks, Mr. Putin has posi-
tioned himself as a defender of Jews as
part of his effort to discredit the revolution
that ousted his ally, former Ukraine Presi-
dent Viktor Yanukovych. During a March
4 news conference, Mr. Putin called the
anti-Yanukovych protesters reactionary,
nationalist and anti-Semitic forces.
While right-wing Ukrainian factions
including some that have embraced anti-
Semitic rhetoric in the past played a
prominent role in the opposition move-
ment, Ukrainian Jewish leaders have
sharply disputed Mr. Putins characteriza-
tion and condemned Russian incursions
into Crimea. Some individual Jews, how-
ever, have said that they agree with Mr.
Putins analysis and welcomed the inter-
vention by Russia.
Few would dispute that Mr. Putin has
been friendly to Jewish institutional life in
Russia especially to organizations and
leaders that belong to the Chabad chasidic
movement.
Rabbi Gorin, a Chabad rabbi and chair-
man of Moscows $50 million Jewish
Museum and Tolerance Center, credits
Mr. Putin personally for providing state
funding for the institution, which opened
in 2012. Mr. Putin also donated a months
wages to the museum.
Putin has facilitated the opening of syn-
agogues and Jewish community centers
across Russia, at the Jewish communitys
request. This has had a profound effect
on Jewish life, especially outside Moscow,
Rabbi Gorin said. He instituted annual
meetings with Jewish community leaders
and attends community events. His friend-
ship with the Jewish community has given
it much prestige and set the tone for local
leaders.
Mr. Putins relationship with the Jewish
community is consistent with his larger
strategy for governing Russia. His brand
of Russian nationalism extends beyond
just ethnic Russians to include the coun-
trys many minorities. Mr. Putin has care-
fully cultivated relationships with Russias
many subgroups and regions as a means
of projecting his governments authority.
Mikhail Chlenov, secretary general of
the Euro-Asian Jewish Congress, says Mr.
Putins pro-Jewish tendencies are part of
the reason that anti-Semitic incidents are
relatively rare in Russia. In 2013, the Rus-
sian Jewish Congress documented only 10
anti-Jewish attacks and acts of vandalism,
compared to dozens in France.
Under Mr. Putin, harsh laws have led to
a crackdown on ultranationalist groups
that once had flourished in Russia. At the
same time, anti-extremism legislation has
been used as well to prosecute political
protesters, including the punk rock col-
lective Pussy Riot.
Some Russian Jews recoil at Mr. Putins
authoritarian tendencies. Freedom of
expression has been severely restricted
and politically motivated prosecutions
remain widespread during his tenure,
according to Amnesty Internationals 2013
report on Russia.
Putin may be good for Jews, but hes
bad for Russia, said Michael Edelstein,
a lecturer at Moscow State University
and a journalist for the Lchaim Jewish
newspaper.
Mr. Putin traces his earliest connection
to Judaism back to his early childhood in
Leningrad, now St. Petersburg, when he
befriended a Jewish family that lived in his
apartment block. In his 2000 autobiogra-
phy, Mr. Putin wrote that the unnamed
family loved him and that he often spent
time with them.
They were observant Jews who did not
work on Saturdays, and the man would
study the Bible and Talmud all day long,
Mr. Putin wrote. Once I even asked him
what he was muttering. He explained to
me what this book was and I was immedi-
ately interested.
Another influential Jewish figure for Mr.
Putin was his wrestling coach, Anatoly
Rakhlin, who sparked the young Putins
interest in sports and got him off the rough
streets of Leningrad, where he would get
into fights while his parents worked. At
Mr. Rakhlins funeral last year, Mr. Putin,
reportedly overcome by emotion, ditched
his security detail and went on a short soli-
tary walk.
Mr. Bronfman calls Putins childhood
accounts a smokescreen and likens
them to the Russian leaders friendly ges-
tures toward Israel, which he last visited
in 2012.
Mr. Putin, who already led Russia to
sign a visa waiver program with Israel in
2008, said during his visit to Israel that
he would not let a million Russians live
under threat, referring sympathetically
to the regional dangers facing Israel and
its Russian-speaking immigrant popula-
tion. But at the same time Russia has criti-
cized European sanctions on Iran, a major
Russian trading partner, and negotiated
the sale of the advanced S-300 air defense
system to Syria.
Its all pragmatic with Putin, Mr. Bron-
fman said. He says he regards the million
Russian speakers living in Israel as a bridge
connecting Russia to Israel, but when it
comes to Russian interests in Syria or Iran,
this friendship counts for very little.
In Israel, Mr. Putin received a guided
tour of the Western Wall from Rabbi Lazar,
who joined Mr. Putins entourage, vividly
illustrating the presidents close ties to the
Russian branch of the Chabad movement.
Zvi Gitelman, a professor of Judaic
studies at the University of Michigan who
studies the relationship between ethnic-
ity and politics in the former Soviet Union,
said the relationship between Mr. Putin
and the Chabad organization in Russia is
one of mutual convenience.
Shortly after taking office, the Putin gov-
ernment clashed with several prominent
Jewish business moguls, including Vladi-
mir Gusinsky and Boris Berezovsky, both
of whom went into self-imposed exile.
When he went after these oligarchs,
Putin sensed that this could be interpreted
as anti-Semitism, Dr. Gitelman said. He
immediately, publicly, demonstratively
and dramatically embraced Chabad.
Chabad, meanwhile, has expanded
throughout Russia.
Chabad, with the help of Putin, is now
the dominant religious expression of Juda-
ism in a mostly nonreligious population,
Dr. Gitelman said.
Mr. Putin has not been shy about using
his good relations with Chabad to his
advantage.
Last year, he moved a collection of
books known as the Schneerson Library
into Rabbi Gorins Jewish museum in an
attempt to defuse a battle with the global
Chabad movement.
Chabads New York-based leaders had
demanded return of the library, which
had belonged to one of its previous grand
rabbis, but Russia has refused to surren-
der it. The compromise was rejected by
the chasidic movements headquarters but
defended by its Russian branch.
Putins suggestion came as a surprise
to us, and not a very pleasant one, Rabbi
Gorin recalled. We very much wanted
to stay out of the dispute. But, he added,
when the president of Russia makes a sug-
gestion, it is usually accepted.
Other Jewish groups, however, have
had less cozy relations with the Putin
government.
In 2005, Rabbi Pinchas Goldschmidt,
the chief rabbi of Moscow, suddenly was
denied entry into Russia for several weeks
before he was allowed back into the coun-
try, where he has lived since 1989. No
official explanation was given, but it was
rumored that his banning was part of a
power struggle that saw Chabad-affiliated
rabbis emerge on top.
Rabbi Goldschmidt declined to com-
ment on his brief exile, saying Google has
the whole story.
The Putins governments preferential
treatment of Chabad is creating a mono-
lithic Jewish institutional life and prevent-
ing grass-roots development, which is the
real key for Jewish rejuvenation, said
Michael Oshtrakh, a leader of the Jewish
community of Yekaterinburg.
JTA WIRE SERVICE
Russias President Vladimir Putin with
Israeli President Shimon Peres during
Peres official visit to Moscow in 2012.
MARK NEYMAN/GPO/FLASH90
Gallery
44 JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014
JS-44
n 1 Second-graders at Ben Porat Yosef receive their Chu-
mashim (Bibles) at a presentation on February 23. The chil-
dren, in costume, performed biblical scenes as part of the
celebration. Second-grade teachers, from left, are Michal
Paran, Aliza Strassman, Tamar Feman, Shani Farkas, and
Rav Eli Danziger. COURTESY BPY MICHAEL LAVES PHOTOGRAPHY
n 2 The curriculum of the Glen Rock Jewish Center He-
brew school includes study about lifecycle events. Every
year the gimmel class performs a traditional Jewish wed-
ding ceremony, including a celebratory lunch and danc-
ing for the participants and their families. Rabbi Neil Tow
and the schools principal, Rachel Blumenstyk, are with
class at the February 23 celebration. COURTESY GRJC
n 3 The Jewish Home at Rockleigh held a Senior
Olympics with participants from the Jewish Home
at Rockleigh, the Jewish Home Assisted Living, Gal-
len Adult Day Health Care Center, and the Bergen
County Health Care facility. Here, residents and staff
from JHR play snowball parachute. COURTESY JHR
n 4 The Hadassah Players of the Pascack Valley/
Northern Valley chapter performed The New View,
an original play they wrote, for residents at the Jewish
Home Assisted Living in River Vale and again for resi-
dents at the Jewish Home at Rockleigh. COURTESY JHR
n 5 Two members of the JCC of Paramus/Congre-
gation Beth Tikvahs new Taste of Hebrew School
program for 4- to 7-year-olds made Purim grog-
gers during the first class. COURTESY JCCP/CBT
1
2 3
4 5
Purim: Changing hands in leadership
E
xodus 17:8-13, the tra-
ditional Torah read-
ing for the morning
of Purim, tells the
story of the attack of Amalek on
the nation of Israel less than two
months after the Exodus from
Egypt. Amalek was a nomadic
group of tribes that inhabited the
Negev and Sinai Peninsula and
appears to have
relied on seasonal
mi grat i ons and
raiding expeditions
for sustenance. The
Amalekite attack
is unprovoked and
occurs in a loca-
tion called Rephi-
dim, in the vicin-
ity of Mount Sinai.
According to the
bi bl i cal t i met a-
ble, the war takes place shortly
before the Revelation on Mount
Sinai.
A close reading of the biblical
account reveals that the Hebrew
root yad, hand, is a key word in
the Amalek story. For example,
in Exodus 17:9, Moses charges
Joshua to fight Amalek in the
field while he ascends the hill
with the staff of God in his hand.
Later, the progress of the battle
is described in light of the experi-
ence of Moses hands.
And it came to pass, when
Moses held up his hand, that
Israel prevailed; and when he
let down his hand, Amalek pre-
vailed. But Moses hands were
heavy; and they took a stone,
and put it under him, and he
sat thereon; and Aaron and Hur
stayed up his hands, the one on
the one side, and the other on
the other side; and his hands
were steady until the going down
of the sun. (Exodus 17:11-12)
Why the emphasis on Moses
hands in the Amalek narra-
tive? And why the switch from
a description of Moses hand in
the singular in verse 11 to Moses
hands in the plural in verse 12?
In the initial stages of the
battle, Moses charges Joshua to
fight the enemy actively while he
ascends the hill with the staff of
God. Apparently, at this juncture
Moses saw two possible paths to
victory. Victory might come, as it
had at the splitting of the Red Sea,
through a supernatural miracle
brought forth by Moses extend-
ing the staff of God in his hand.
But victory might also come
through the military talents of
Joshua, the future conqueror of
the land of Canaan. And so, as a
prudent leader should, Moses
prepared for both possibilities.
He sent Joshua to the battlefield
while he Moses ascended
the hill with the
rod that had in
the past brought
forth supernatural
miracles.
Once the battle
began, Moses real-
ized that no mira-
cle was forthcom-
ing from the staff
of God in his hand.
But the raising of
Moses hand was
nonetheless affecting the course
of the war. The Talmud in Rosh
Hashanah 29a understands this
as follows:
And when Moses held up his
hand, Israel prevailed...
Now did the hands of Moses
make or break the war?
Not so. Rather, the text signi-
fies that so long as Israel directed
their thoughts above and sub-
jected their hearts to their Father
in heaven, they prevailed; other-
wise, they would fall.
The Talmudic conception of
Moses role as that of a human
leader who inspires his people
during a natural war rather than
as the performer of an overt mir-
acle is consistent with the text
as whole. In the war of Amalek
there is no command by God to
perform a miracle. Furthermore,
the text deliberately emphasizes
that Moses is subject to ordi-
nary human frailties. His hands
grew heavy. He needed to sit on
a stone. And he needed the sup-
port of Aaron and Hur on each
side so that his hands might
remain steady until sunset.
The Talmudic premise that
Moses hands symbolize his
inspiration may help us under-
stand the textual switch from
Moses hand in the singular to
his hands in the plural. This
change represents Moses
redefinition of his own lead-
ership role during the war of
Amalek. Moses realized that his
task was not to effect a miracle
by brandishing a rod with a
dramatic gesture but to draw
the thoughts of Israel consis-
tently toward heaven. And so,
he raised both hands, keeping
them steady until the sun set.
It is the ultimate challenge of
an effective leader not only to
prepare for all contingencies, as
Moses did in his division of labor
between himself and Joshua.
Rather, a successful leader is one
who adapts his intended course
of action as the demands of a sit-
uation crystallize. This is a criti-
cal lesson that emerges from the
changing hands of Moses leader-
ship in the Amalek narrative. In
the war of Amalek, Moses must
play the role not of a miracle
worker, as he had until that his-
torical moment, but of a leader
who inspires and a leader who
prays in the context of a natural
war.
In an essay called Leadership
at the Turn of the Century, John
Kotter distinguishes between
leadership and management.
Management, he suggests, is
about maintaining the status quo
but leadership is about coping
with change. Times of change
are moments of opportunity for
great leaders they demand
strength, initiative, vision, and
the ability to persuade others to
alter the status quo in response
to an urgent challenge. Indeed,
the essential quality of a leader,
as opposed to a manager, is to
acknowledge change in the envi-
ronment and lead change among
his followers.
This was the position in which
Moses found himself during the
Amalek episode. The Amalek
scenario did not fit neatly into
the current Israelite status quo.
The Israelites would have to fight
a naturalistic war without the
aid of overt miracles just as
they would soon have to learn
to conquer and defend the land
of Canaan through this worldly
means. Moses recognized that
the functional role of his staff was
no longer as a magic wand but as
a tool of guidance and motiva-
tion. Through his leadership, a
mass of weary slaves was trans-
formed into a victorious army.
Of course, in the real world,
no good leader can work alone.
And this is the message of the
Amalek narrative as well. Moses
needs Joshua to take charge of
the battle in the field. And Moses
needs Aaron and Hur to support
his arms so that he may guide the
warriors to victory. The picture
of Moses supported on each side
by two of his trusted confidantes,
Aaron and Hur, as he raises his
hands continuously to heaven, is
a perfect metaphor for the need
of a leader to recruit a core group
of supporters who share his val-
ues and vision. Only then will he
be able to persevere until the
setting of the sun that is, until
the job is done.
The story of Purim, like that of
the attack of Amalek on a fledg-
ling nation of Israel, is the story
of human response to a chang-
ing reality. The Megillah does
not even mention Gods name,
let alone tell of supernatural mir-
acles. God brings about Israels
salvation through the versatile,
creative leadership of Mordechai
and Esther. Though Mordechai
had earlier forbidden Esther
to reveal her Jewish identity to
King Ahashverosh, he changes
course and asks Esther to reveal
her ancestry to the king of Persia
because, who knows, Esther, if
it is for this very reason that you
have risen to royalty.
The stories of Amalek and
Purim mirror those of our lives
today. Unlike the Israelites of
the Exodus period, we no lon-
ger experience prophecy, rev-
elation, or overt miracles. It is
all the more important, there-
fore, that we choose leaders with
vision to guide us through peri-
ods of uncertainty. Whether like
Moses who recognizes that he
must guide the Israelites with
inspiration and prayer rather
than through overt miracles, or
like Mordechai who rescinds his
instruction to Esther about hid-
ing her identity, our leaders must
embrace an ever-changing reality
with both conviction and creativ-
ity. Like the Israelites fighting
Amalek, they must look to Moses
hands for inspiration. They must
remember that a great leader is
defined not only by unwavering
devotion, but by the ability to
adjust to changing realities, even
as his eyes are turned steadily
towards heaven.
Rachel Friedman is associate
dean and chair of Tanakh studies
at Drisha Institute for Jewish
Education. She lives with her
family in Teaneck.
Dvar Torah
JS-45*
JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014 45
Rachel
Friedman
Local
46 JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014
JS-46*
Crossword BY DAVID BENKOF
Project S.A.R.A.H. names
honorees for breakfast
St at e Senat e Maj or i t y
Leader Loretta Weinberg
of Teaneck is the guest of
honor at the 8th annual
Project S.A.R.A.H. (Stop
Abusive Relationships At
Home) breakfast on Sunday,
March 23, at 9:30 a.m. at
Congregation Rinat Yisrael
in Teaneck.
Senator Weinberg, who
has served in the New Jersey
legislature since 1992, has
worked tirelessly on behalf
of victims of domestic violence and to
impose more stringent restrictions on
those charged with domestic violence-
related offenses. She is on the Senate
Judiciary Committee, the New Jersey-
Israel Commission, the New Jersey
Historical Commission, and the State
Legislative Services Commission. She
has been a longtime friend of Project
S.A.R.A.H. and was instrumental in
its receiving a line item grant from the
2013 budget to continue providing ser-
vices to victims and survivors.
Rabbi Neil and Andrea Winkler will
receive the community service award.
Rabbi Winkler has been the spiritual
leader of the Young Israel of Fort Lee
since its founding in 1978. He is presi-
dent of the Rabbinical Council of Ber-
gen County and has been a steady
resource for Project S.A.R.A.H.s cli-
ents. Andrea Winkler has been a fac-
ulty member at Maayanot Yeshiva High
School for Girls in Teaneck since its
inception 17 years ago. She is a found-
ing member of the Project S.A.R.A.H
consortium and lectures about it to
local schools and organizations.
The Aleinu Hero award will be given
to Mollie Kidorf Fisch, another mem-
ber of Project S.A.R.A.Hs consortium.
She has been a supporter of Project
S.A.R.A.H. since 2004 and is working
to develop the fifth- through-seventh
grade Aleinu program for launch in
local yeshivot. Aleinu is designed to
increase child safety
and prevent child sex-
ual abuse.
Sara Schlussel is the
volunteer recognition
award recipient. As a
pediatric occupational
therapist, she volunteers
her services on behalf
of Project S.A.R.A.H.
She has helped coordi-
nate Project S.A.R.A.H.
breakf asts and has
developed support in
the Englewood community. She is train-
ing to be a volunteer for the Aleinu
program.
The keynote speaker will be Dr. David
Pelcovitz, the Gwendolyn and Joseph
Straus Chair in Jewish Education at the
Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Educa-
tion and Administration at Yeshiva Uni-
versity. Dr. Pelcovitz consults regularly
with communities all over the world on a
wide range of issues facing children and
adolescents. He has served as an advo-
cate of survivors and victims of domestic
violence and sexual abuse and regularly
shares his expertise and counsel with the
staff at Project S.A.R.A.H.
Project S.A.R.A.H. serves survivors
of domestic violence and sexual abuse
statewide. With a specific focus on the
Orthodox Jewish community, the orga-
nization enables survivors to overcome
the cultural, religious, and legal barri-
ers that would prevent them from gain-
ing access to needed services. In the
past year, Project S.A.R.A.H. has served
more than 100 clients in individual
therapy, with a range of services that
includes vocational counseling, psy-
chiatric care, legal referrals, group sup-
port for men and women, and specific
therapy services for children exposed to
domestic violence or sexual abuse.
The synagogue is at 389 West Engle-
wood Ave. For information call (973) 777-
7638, email e.stein@projectsarah.org, or
go to www.projectsarah.org.
Loretta Weinberg
Across
1. Man who says to a Jewish mother in an
old joke I havent eaten in three days,
upon which she replies Force
yourself!
6. Medical org. that recommends Jews get
screened for Tay-Sachs
10. South Africas Helen Suzman, as of 1989
14. Ein Gedi is one in the Negev
15. CNN show The Lead with ___ Tapper
16. The Sons of Pigs and ___:
Muslim Antisemitism and the
Conspiracy of Silence
17. 1959 Bernard Malamud baseball novel
19. The winepress is full, the ___ overflow
(Joel 4:13)
20. BNetanyahu@knesset.gov.il and
bobdylan@xmradio.com
21. Michael Jackson song by Somewhere
Out There singer James Ingram
22. Location of the Dublin Hebrew
Congregation
23. Torah portion thats Hebrew for
journeys
25. Yarmulke-wearing Northwestern
University basketballer Liberman
26. Actor Balfour (24, Haven)
30. Longtime senator from Alaska Gruening
32. First name of a key character in
Operation Thunderbolt
35. First word of a major number
in Leonard Bersteins Candide
39. Niddah phase
40. Frequent target of Qassam attacks
41. Jack Ruby or Yigal Amir
43. Movement from the sanctuary to the
kiddush, often
44. Mezuzah material, since the 1930s
46. 2012 Academy Awards foreign-lan-
guage film result for Footnote
47. Willy Lomans line of work
50. Mishnah, compared to Gemara,
more or less
53. How a meshuggah person might run
54. Dalet-Heh-Vav alternative
55. Paul Reisers production company
(based on a famous line of his from
Diner)
60. 1973 Lerner and Loewe musical set
in Paris
61. Author of The Closing of the American
Mind
63. Anti, to Al Capps Lil Abner
64. The JDLs Kahane
65. Balaam had one
66. Island of The Jewish Star and The
Jewish World newspapers
67. Pharaoh Ramesses VIs daughter
68. To love, Marc Chagall-style
Down
1. Schlep
2. Important Illinois Democrat
3. On a kosher cruise, perhaps
4. ___ Israel (tourist attraction)
5. The 23rd is especially famous
6. Loc. of the Ziegler School of Rabbinic
Studies
7. Kvetcher
8. Giving a hechsher to
9. Chocolate winter coins
10. Insomniac with ___ (comedy TV
series)
11. Are we ___? (Sondheim lyric)
12. ___-Goldwyn-Mayer
13. German hometown of Benno Schmidt,
inventor of stainless steel
18. Org. that has based some of its screen-
ing procedures on Israels
24. Sun Yat-___ (Chinese leader who sym-
pathized with Zionism)
25. Comment to the audience, as during
Angels in America
26. Hamsas ward off evil ones
27. 14th century Talmudic commentator
also known as Rabbenu Asher
28. Hes Just Not That ___ You (2009
Scarlett Johansson film)
29. Beautiful: The ___ Musical (2014)
31. Bohemian Berlin poet Lasker-Schueler
33. Outfits for Anna Sokolow
34. Rega! (Israelis Wait ___!)
36. Peter, Paul, and Mary, e.g.
37. Famous seder plate ___ of Exodus
38. Israels no. 1, no. 2, and no. 6 are very
well-traveled
42. Insult comedian Don known as The
Merchant of Venom
43. Jerusalems ___ Yehuda promenade
45. Tell Me a Riddle by ___ Olsen
47. Wait Wait... Dont Tell Me! radio host
Peter
48. Ladino friend
49. Get ready to use JDate
51. Larry Kings old network
52. ___ Bubba (KF-certified kosher gum)
54. Author Attenberg (The Middlesteins)
56. Filmmaker Claude Lanzmanns
57. Master of Malaprop Crosby
58. Part of an installation in Dimona
59. Torah portion discussing Jewish holi-
days
62. He performed Mrs. Robinson with Paul
The solution for last weeks puzzle is
on page 55.
Check weekly
for recipes at
www.jstandard.com
Cooking with
Beth blog
Arts & Culture
JS-47*
MIRIAM RINN
H
aving performed for six
years as Frankie Valli in
the Broadway hit musical
Jersey Boys, and now
creating the character of songwriter
Barry Mann in Beautiful: The Car-
ole King Musical, Jarrod Spector has
become an autodidact on the history
of early rock n roll.
He has brought many of those
insights to his cabaret show at 54
Below, where he is celebrating the
thrill and the trill of the high tenor and
tracing that glorious sound through
American popular music.
Mr. Spector introduces his thesis
with the explanation that the tenor
is the rock god of each generation,
and says that there is something spine-
tingling about those falsetto sounds
when they suddenly break through
in a song. Then he proves it, by chan-
neling singers from Little Jimmy Scott
to Billy Joel and Smokey Robinson
through to contemporary performer
Bruno Mars. He even sings a song of
Enrico Carusos in honor of an Italian
great-grandmother who came to see
him in Jersey Boys. While its safe to
say that opera is not in Mr. Spectors
future, and hell never be a great blues
singer, hes wonderful with pop songs,
and the great backup band supports
him all through the set. These are
songs that many generations grew up
with and loved, and almost all of them
hold up through Mr. Spectors joyful
interpretations.
Relatively few of the great rock n
roll performers were Jews, but many of
the songwriters and producers were,
from the Chess brothers in Chicago
to Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller in the
early 1960s to singer-songwriters Lou
Reed, Bob Dylan, and on to Carole King
herself, in the latter half of the decade.
In Beautiful, Mr. Spector plays one
half of the renowned songwriting
team Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil,
who wrote hundreds of songs, many
of which became major hits. In 1987,
they were inducted into the Songwrit-
ers Hall of Fame. Beautiful focuses
on the first decade of Kings legendary
singing and songwriting career, and
Mr. Spector said hes thrilled to return
to Broadway in another original role
that explores a different side of rock
and roll, the music made by a Jewish
girl from Brooklyn.
One of three children, Jarrod Spec-
tor grew up in rock-and-roll-loving
Philadelphia, listening to Motown
and Bobby Darin. When he was only
6 years old he appeared on TVs Star
Search, and his Broadway debut came
as Gavroche in Les Miserables. Mr.
Spector then took some time from per-
forming to attend Princeton University
and develop his acting at the Atlantic
Theater Conservatory. After opening
the Chicago company of Jersey Boys
as Frankie Valli, he was chosen to play
the singer on Broadway in 2008, and
fell into stardom. He performed in the
show an astonishing 1500 times.
The venue, 54 Below, 254 W. 54th
Street, is in the same location as the
old Studio 54. Cozily decorated, its a
comfortable spot with good views of
the stage from every table, and serves
a full menu of very good food.
The cabaret act is the basis of Mr.
Spectors new album, A Little Help
From My Friends: Live at 54 BELOW!,
which will be released on March 25.
According to Mr. Spector, if you can
sing Frankie Valli, you can also sing Lit-
tle Richard and Freddie Mercury and
George Michael and Bruno Mars and
the Beach Boys. And he sings them all.
He will perform A Little Help from
my Friends on March 23, 24, and 31
at 9:30 p.m.
Jarrod
Spector
Celebrating the thrill
and the trill
JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014 47
Calendar
48 JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014
JS-48*
Friday
MARCH 14
Shabbat in Washington
Township: Temple
Beth Or offers Shabbat
Hallelu, a musical family
service including singing,
clapping, and birthday
blessings for children,
7:30 p.m. 56 Ridgewood
Road. (201) 664-7422 or
www.templebethornj.org.
Saturday
MARCH 15
Shabbat in Ridgewood:
During services,
beginning at 9 a.m.,
Rabbi David J. Fine and
Cantor Caitlin Bromberg
of Temple Israel &
Jewish Community
Center will incorporate
special prayers from
the Jewish tradition
to raise awareness
of the problem of
gun violence. Bergen
County Freeholder and
congregant Tracy Zur
will speak at 11:30. Purim
tot Shabbat is at 11;
please wear costumes.
475 Grove St. (201) 444-
9320.
Purim in Woodcliff
Lake: Temple Emanuel
of the Pascack Valley
hosts a celebration with
a traditional megillah
reading and service.
A Name That Tune
segment for adults is at
7 p.m. 87 Overlook Drive.
(201) 391-0801 or www.
tepv.org.
Purim in Emerson:
Congregation Bnai
Israel presents its annual
Purimshpiel and megillah
reading, directed by
Cantor Lenny Mandel,
7 p.m. Hebrew school
students will perform
original song parodies
and tell the story of
Purim in a unique way.
Costumes encouraged.
Hamantaschen and
refreshments. Bring non-
perishable food items for
an ongoing food drive
benefiting local pantries.
53 Palisade Ave. (201)
265-2272 or www.bisrael.
com.
Purim in Leonia:
Congregation Adas
Emuno celebrates with a
Purim service, megillah
reading, and Purim play,
Shushan Idol, 7 p.m.
Also a costume contest
and hamantaschen
bake-off. 254 Broad Ave.
(201) 592-1712 or www.
adasemuno.org.
Purim in Closter: Temple
Emanu-El hosts Purim
Palooza, 6:30 p.m.
Megillah reading, puppet
show with Jonathan
Geffner, carnival games,
childrens raffle, and
prizes. 180 Piermont
Road. (201) 750-9997 or
ween@templeemanu-el.
com.
Purim in Glen Rock: The
Glen Rock Jewish Center
offers a childrens Purim
service with megillah
reading and costume
parade, 6 p.m. Full
megillah reading at 7.
Hamantashen. Costumes
encouraged. 682
Harristown Road. (201)
652-6624.
Purim in Maywood:
Reconstructionist Temple
Beth Israel hosts an
open mic Purim Poetry
Slam for children and
adults, led by Student
Rabbi Ellen Jaffe-Gill.
Maariv and reading of
Megillat Esther, 7:30 p.m.,
followed by childrens
poetry reading. Kids of all
ages are invited to recite
a favorite poem or one
they have written. Adult
slam begins at 9, after an
intermission of traditional
Purim songs and
hamantaschen. Come
dressed as a hipster of
any generation. 34 West
Magnolia Ave. (201) 845-
7550, ext. 1.
Purim in Teaneck:
Temple Emeth has
a megillah reading,
7:30 p.m. 1666 Windsor
Road. (201) 833-1322.
Purim in Fair Lawn:
Temple Beth Sholoms
festivities begin with
a megillah reading,
7:30 p.m. Costume
parade for adults and
children, followed by
refreshments and an
ice cream bar. Bring an
edible grogger a box
or bag of rice, pasta,
or other nonperishable
noisy-in-the-box food
item; it will be donated
to the Fair Lawn Food
Pantry after Purim. 40-
25 Fair Lawn Ave. (201)
797-9321.
Purim celebration:
Shaar Communities
hosts a megillah
reading, 7:45 p.m.
Location information,
JoAnne, (201) 213-
9569 or joanne@
shaarcommunities.org.
Purim in Wayne:
Congregation Shomrei
Torah has a megillah
reading, 7:45 p.m.,
followed by Passover
wine tasting and dessert
reception sponsored
by the mens club. An
original Purimshpiel
production of Hang on
Haman, the Adventure
follows at 9:30. 30
Hinchman Ave. (973)
696-2500 or office@
shomreitorahwcc.org.
Purim in Fort Lee:
Congregation Gesher
Shalom/JCC of Fort Lee
has Havdalah services
and megillah reading,
8 p.m. Refreshments.
1449 Anderson Ave. (201)
947-1735.
Purim in Tenafly: The
Chabad House hosts its
annual Grand Purim
Bash. Megillah readings
at 8 and 9:30 p.m. Live
music, kids and teen
programs. 11 Harold St.
(201) 871-1152 or www.
chabadlubavitch.org/
Purim5774.
Purim in Ridgewood:
Temple Israel & Jewish
Community Center
hosts a Queen Esther
Ice Cream Social
with megillah reading
and costume parade,
beginning at 7:30 p.m.
475 Grove St. (201) 444-
9320.
Purim in Teaneck:
Friends of Lubavitch of
Bergen County hosts
Magical Purim at
Thomas Jefferson Middle
School. Megillah reading
with separate childrens
reading at 8:30 p.m.;
dessert buffet at 9;
family illusion and magic
show with the Amazing
Cardon at 9:30. Music
by DJ David Ross from
Shir Soul. 655 Teaneck
Road. (201) 907-0686 or
RabbiSimon@aol.com.
Purim in Teaneck:
The Jewish Center of
Teaneck has two megillah
readings, one noisy,
one quieter, 8:30 p.m.
A Purim celebration
follows at 9:30 p.m., with
entertainment by Eitan
Katz, dancing, costume
parades, prizes, food
for sale. The concert
is hosted by Yeshivah
Heichal Hatorah and
the JCT. 70 Sterling
Place. (201) 833-0515,
ext. 200, or Purim@
Heichalhatorah.org.
Purim celebration
for LGBTQ teens
and friends: Shaar
Communities and the
Bergen County High
School of Jewish Studies
host the Unmasquerade
Ball, a Purim party
for LGBTQ teens and
their friends, 9:30 p.m.
Location information,
JoAnne, (201) 213-
9569 or joanne@
shaarcommunities.org.
Sunday
MARCH 16
Purim in Teaneck: The
Jewish Center of Teaneck
has a regular megillah
reading at 9:45 a.m.,
and a womens megillah
reading, by and for
women, at 11. 70 Sterling
Place. (201) 833-0515,
ext. 200, or Purim@
Heichalhatorah.org.
Purim in Washington
Township: Temple
Beth Or hosts its annual
Purim carnival with
games and crafts, 9 a.m.
Costumes encouraged.
56 Ridgewood Road.
(201) 664-7422 or www.
templebethornj.org.
Purim in Woodcliff
Lake: Temple Emanuel of
the Pascack Valley hosts
a carnival and family
megillah reading, 10 a.m.-
noon. Bounce houses,
arcade games, rides,
prizes, cotton candy, and
food. 87 Overlook Drive.
(201) 391-0801 or www.
tepv.org.
Purim in Teaneck:
Temple Emeth has a
carnival with games,
prizes, and food, 10 a.m.
1666 Windsor Road.
(201) 833-1322.
Purim in Fort Lee:
Congregation Gesher
Shalom/JCC of Fort
Lee has a carnival with
games, rides, and food,
10:30 a.m. 1449 Anderson
Ave. (201) 947-1735.
Purim in Wayne:
Congregation Shomrei
Torah has a family
friendly megillah
reading and carnival,
10:30 a.m. 30 Hinchman
Ave., Wayne. (973)
696-2500 or office@
shomreitorahwcc.org.
Purim in Fair Lawn: The
sisterhood and mens
progress club at the Fair
Lawn Jewish Center/
Congregation Bnai Israel
host the annual Purim
carnival with carnival
games, goldfish, bounce
house, activities, and
food, 10:30 a.m. 10-10
Norma Ave. (201) 796-
5040 or www.fljc.com.
Purim in Fair Lawn: The
Northern New Jersey
Jewish Academy hosts a
carnival at Temple Beth
Sholom, 11 a.m. Costumes
encouraged. NNJJA is
a collaborative school
joining five Conservative
synagogues: TBS in Fair
Lawn, Congregation
Beth Sholom in Teaneck,
Kol Haneshama in
Englewood, Temple
Emanuel of Northern
New Jersey in Franklin
Lakes, and Temple Israel
of Ridgewood. 40-25 Fair
Lawn Ave. (201) 797-9321
or Rabbi Sharon Litwin,
slitwin@synagogue.org.
Purim in Glen Rock:
The Glen Rock Jewish
Center offers a carnival
with games, prizes, and
balloons, 11 a.m. 682
Harristown Road. (201)
652-6624.
Toddler program in
Washington Township:
As part of the shuls
Holiday Happenings
program, the sisterhood
of Temple Beth Or offers
music, stories, crafts, and
snacks, all about Purim,
for children up to second
grade and their parents,
11:15 a.m. 56 Ridgewood
Road. (201) 664-7422 or
www.templebethornj.org.
Purim in Emerson:
Congregation Bnai
Israel has a carnival with
games, prizes, and food,
11:30 a.m. Costumes
encouraged. Also, cash
for gold and silver event,
9:30-11:45. 53 Palisade
Ave. (201) 265-2272 or
www.bisrael.com.
Purim in Paramus:
The JCC of Paramus/
Congregation Beth
Tikvah hosts a carnival
with games, moonwalk,
bounce house, kiddie
corner, prizes, and food,
noon. East 304 Midland
Ave. (201) 262-7691.
Purim in Tenafly: The
Kaplen JCC on the
Palisades hosts the
annual Rubach Family
Purim Carnival, 1 p.m.
Activities include train
rides, inflatables, crafts,
games, prizes, live
characters, and cotton
candy. Costume parade
at 2:45 leading to a
megillah show performed
by the Tzofim and two
activities centering on
a dark room/tunnel
experience and a
clairvoyant. Children with
special needs and their
families are welcome
from noon1 p.m., to
The Dirty Sock Funtime Band plays a
family concert at the Jewish Museum in
Manhattan on Sunday, March 16, at 2 p.m.
In honor of Purim, kids are encouraged to
come in costume. Fifth Avenue and 92nd Street. For
information, (212) 423-3337 or
www.TheJewishMuseum.org.
MAR.
16
Calendar
JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014 49
JS-49*
enjoy the carnival before
it opens to the general
public. Bring a non-
perishable food item to
be donated to the Center
for Food Action. Teen
volunteers welcome; call
Sara Sideman, (201) 408-
1469. 411 E. Clinton Ave.
(201) 408-1484 or www.
jccotp.org.
Purim in Fort Lee:
Chabad of Fort Lee
hosts the Purim in the
Shtetl themed-party
with the Bottle Dancers
USA, dinner, crafts, and
klezmer music, 4:15 p.m.
808 Abbott Blvd. (201)
886-1238 or www.
chabadfortlee.com.
Purim in Pompton
Plains: Chabad of
Passaic County hosts
Purim in NYC at
the Regency House-
Best Western Hotel,
5 p.m. There will be
a variety of food
representing Chinatown,
Little Italy, and other
neighborhoods.
Masquerade parade,
street performance show,
and prizes. 140 Route 23
North. (973) 694-6274 or
Chanig@optonline.net.
Purim in Tenafly: The
Chabad House hosts
Purim in Italy, 5:30 p.m.
Gourmet Italian cuisine,
fine Italian wines, and
masquerade in Italian
attire. 11 Harold St.
(201) 871-1152 or www.
chabadlubavitch.org/
Purim5774.
Monday
MARCH 17
Hadassah meets
in Teaneck: Aviva
Feldman, the director
of New Beginnings at
the Jewish Center of
Teaneck, presents an
autobiographical Yiddish
musical program with
Dr. Phil Yucht for the
Teaneck-Hackensack
chapter of Hadassah
and New Beginnings
at Congregation Beth
Shalom, 1 p.m. New
Beginnings, sponsored
by the Heilbronner family,
is a group for mature
and retired people.
354 Maitland Ave.
Refreshments. (201) 836-
4798.
Tuesday
MARCH 18
Caregiver training in
Tenafly: The Kaplen JCC
on the Palisades offers
a four-session course in
family caregiver training
for those caring for loved
ones with Alzheimers or
dementia, 11 a.m. 411 E.
Clinton Ave. Judi, (201)
408-1450 or jnahary@
jccotp.org.
Author in Teaneck: Dr.
Bernd Wollschlaeger,
author of A German Life
My Father Was a Nazi
speaks at a meeting
of National Council of
Jewish Women Bergen
County Section at
Temple Emeth, 12:30 p.m.
1666 Windsor Road.
(201) 385-4847 or www.
ncjwbcs.org.
Papercut demo in
Paramus: Dena Levie
of Teaneck gives a
hands-on demonstration
in the intricate art of
papercutting for Paramus
Bat Sheva Hadassah,
at the JCC of Paramus/
Congregation Beth
Tikvah, 7:45 p.m. East
304 Midland Ave. (201)
262-7691.
Wednesday
MARCH 19
Play group in Oakland:
Shalom Baby of Jewish
Federation of Northern
New Jersey offers a Purim
party with free play,
music, storytime, snacks,
and crafts newborns
through 3-year-olds with
their parents to connect
with each other and the
Jewish community, at
Gerrard Berman Solomon
Schechter of North Jersey,
9:30 a.m. Administered
by JFNNJs Synagogue
Leadership Initiative,
funded by the Henry and
Marilyn Taub Foundation.
45 Spruce St. (201) 820-
3917, or ellenf@jfnnj.org.
Thursday
MARCH 20
Sisterhood meets:
David Braun, a Yiddish
professor, speaks
to the sisterhood of
Congregation Gesher
Shalom/JCC of Fort Lee,
1 p.m. Refreshments.
1449 Anderson Ave. (201)
947-1735.
Jews in Australia: Lisa
Jacobson, wife of Rabbi
Paul Jacobson, the new
leader of Temple Avodat
Shalom, discusses
Jewish Life in Australia:
Up Close and Personal,
at a meeting of River
Dell Hadassah at the
synagogue, 1:15 p.m.
Dairy refreshments. 385
Howland Ave. (551) 265-
1573.
Shira Pruce
Women of the Wall
discussed in Closter:
Shira Pruce, director
of public relations for
Women of the Wall, talks
about the group and
its mission at Temple
Emanu-El, 7:30 p.m.
Closters Temple Beth
El of Northern Valley,
Teanecks Temple Emeth,
and Orangeburg, N.Y.s
Orangetown Jewish
Center are all partners
in the talk. 180 Piermont
Road. (201) 750-9997 or
www.templeemanu-el.
com.
Friday
MARCH 21
Shabbat in Washington
Township: Temple Beth
Or holds Mishpachah
Shabbat for very young
children and their
families, with songs
and Schmuley the Bear,
6 p.m. Regular services at
8. 56 Ridgewood Road.
(201) 664-7422 or www.
templebethornj.org.
Shabbat in Emerson:
Congregation Bnai
Israel holds its monthly
family program, 7 p.m. 53
Palisade Ave. (201) 265-
2272 or www.bisrael.com.
Shabbat in Teaneck:
Temple Emeth holds a
musical Shabbat service
with the Temple Emeth
Band, 8 p.m. 1666
Windsor Road. (201) 833-
1322 or www.emeth.org.
Saturday
MARCH 22
Shabbat in Emerson:
Congregation Bnai
Israel offers its monthly
family Shabbat, Elijah-
Palooza, with separate
groups for different ages,
10:30 a.m. Refreshments.
53 Palisade Ave. (201)
265-2272 or www.bisrael.
com.
Israeli film festival: The
Jewish Federation of
Northern New Jersey
begins its Israel Film
and Cultural Festival
at the Kaplen JCC on
the Palisades in Tenafly
with a screening of
The Prime Ministers,
8:30 p.m. Rabbi Steve
Burg, eastern director of
the Simon Wiesenthal
Center, is the guest
speaker. 411 E. Clinton
Ave. (201) 820-3909
or www.jfnnj.org/
filmfestival.
Sunday
MARCH 23
Author in River Edge:
Sammy Buck, a New
York Theater Festival
award-winning author,
comes to Temple
Avodat Shalom for a
discussion, Discovering
Jewish Roots in
Modern Storytelling,
9 a.m. Sponsored by the
temples religious school
board. Brunch served.
385 Howland Ave. (201)
489-2463 or school@
avodatshalom.net.
In New York
Saturday
MARCH 15
Purim in Montebello:
Congregation Shaarey
Israel hosts Purim
Mania, a Beatles-style
event, with megillah
reading, 8 p.m., Beatles
music, and celebration.
Costumes encouraged. 18
Montebello Road. (845)
369-0300.
Wednesday
MARCH 19
Film screening with
director: Duki Dror, an
award-winning filmmaker,
screens and discusses
his film, Shadow in
Baghdad, (Israel, 2013),
at the Museum of
Jewish Heritage A
Living Memorial to the
Holocaust, 7 p.m. Part of
the 17th NY Sephardic
Film Festival. 36 Battery
Place. (646) 437-4202 or
www.mjhnyc.org.
Singles
Monday
MARCH 17
Support groups in
Tenafly: The Kaplen
JCC on the Palisades
continues two six-session
groups with therapist
Judy Brauner: Widows
and Widowers: You Are
Not Alone at 6:15 p.m.,
and Uncoupling: Coping
With Divorce and
Separation at 8. 411 E.
Clinton Ave. (201) 408-
1456.
You had me at goodbye!
A laugh-out-loud original
musical about new chapters,
celebrating life and dancing
through self-discovery.
Concept, Lyrics & Choreography by
RUTHE PONTURO
Music by
JOHN THOMAS FISCHER
Directed by
MARK WALDROP
TilDivorceTheMusical.com
TELECHARGE.COM or (212) 239-6200
DR2 Theatre |103 East 15th Street, NYC
Premium Seats Available
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50 JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014
JS-50*
Yiddish Farm produces
first shmura matzah
The first-ever batch of Eretz Goshen Shmura Matzah
for Passover can be ordered from the Kaplen JCC on
the Palisades in Tenafly. The matzah organic, whole
wheat, and kosher for Passover will be baked at the
Yiddish Farm in Goshen, N.Y., under the supervision
of Rabbi Yechiel Steinmetz of Monsey and certified by
Rabbi A. Marmorstein. The Yiddish Farm is committed
to teaching Yiddish and sustainable farming. The mat-
zah will be available only if it is ordered in advance; it
can be picked up at the JCC the week after Purim. The
cost is $29.99 a box. To order, go to yiddishfarm.org/
ordermatzo.html.
National symposium addresses health care reform
Sharsheret, a national not-for-profit organization sup-
porting young women and their families from all Jewish
backgrounds who are facing breast cancer, will present a
free national symposium via teleconference and webinar,
Health Care Reform: How Does It Affect Me, on Tuesday,
March 18, at 8 p.m. An audio recording and written tran-
script will be posted online at www.sharsheret.org.
The symposium will feature presentations about
changes to health care as a result of the Affordable Care
Act. Panelists include lawyers Monica Bryant, the chief
operating officer of Triage Cancer, and Joanna Morales,
its chief executive officer. Shera Dubitsky, Sharsherets
director of clinical support, will discuss the opportunities
and challenges that health care reform presents for Jew-
ish women and families facing serious illness, particularly
for those women with concerns about breast and ovar-
ian preventive care, screening, treatment, and follow-up
care. A live question and answer session will follow the
presentations.
To register or for log-in instructions, go to www.
sharsheret.org or call (866) 474-2774. The symposium is
made possible with support from the Jewish Womens
Foundation of New York.
Teens can submit
poetry slam entries
The Kaplen JCC on the Palisades in Tenafly is accepting
submissions for the 2014 Abe Oster Holocaust Remem-
brance award, a living memorial to the six million Jewish
victims of the Holocaust. The contest is open to all high
school students who live in Bergen County or are enrolled
in a Bergen County public or private high school. Entries
from students of all backgrounds are encouraged.
This years contest will feature a poetry slam, challeng-
ing applicants to create an original videotaped poem or
narrative monologue that communicates the relevance of
the Holocaust in the 21st century.
Contestant winners and runners up will perform or
show their videotaped performances at the Yom HaShoah
commemoration at the JCC on April 27. The first place win-
ner will receive a $1,000 cash prize; second place, $500,
and honorable mention to additional winners.
The Abe Oster Holocaust Remembrance Award was
established in 2005 to honor the memory of Abe Oster.
Along with his wife, Ann, Mr. Oster worked selflessly to
encourage young people to study the Holocaust and to
inspire them to create works of art that demonstrate a his-
torical and moral understanding of the Shoah.
Submissions should be sent to Jessica Spiegel at the
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades, 411 East Clinton Ave., Tenafly,
NJ 07670. For information, call (201) 408-1426 or email
jspiegel@jccotp.org. Contest rules and applications can
be downloaded from the JCC website www.jccotp.org or
from the State Department of Education at www.state.
nj.us/education/holocaust/stawards.
Megile of Itzik Manger presented by NYC players
The Megile of Itzik Manger, presented
by the National Yiddish Theatre Folks-
biene will run through Sunday, March
16. The fun-filled, circus-themed musi-
cal production is in Yiddish with Eng-
lish and Russian supertitles displayed
throughout the performance.
The show, directed by Motl Didner,
stars Tony Award-nominee Stephen Mo
Hanan and Drama Desk Award-nominee
Avi Hoffman, along with Stacey Harris,
Andrew Keltz, Rebecca Keren, Alan
Schmuckler, Hannah D. Scott, Adam
Shapiro, and Teaneck resident Rachel
Arielle Yucht. Zalmen Mlotek, also of
Teaneck, is the artistic director of the
National Yiddish Theatre Folksbiene
and is the shows musical director. Visit
www.nationalyiddishtheatre.org. The
theater is at Lexington Avenue and 25th
Street. Call (212) 213-2120.
116 MainStreet, Fort Lee
201.947.2500
www.inapoli.com
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Jersey Media Group and may not
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replicated in a similar version,
without approval from North
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Purim papercuts
by local artist
In time for Purim, Teaneck papercut artist
Dena Levie has created these images. She has
been making Judaic papercuts for many years
and also works with clients to create person-
alized one-of-a-kind artwork. Each piece is
intricately cut from one piece of paper. The
artwork usually includes names in Hebrew
or English, as well as important symbols rel-
evant to the clients life. The backgrounds are
hand-painted in a color chosen by the client.
Ms. Levie is a member of the Guild of
American Papercutters, and has exibited in
New Jersey and New York. Her most recent
show was at the UJA Gallery in Manhattan.
Her work adorns private and public collec-
tions around the world. Some of the insti-
tutions that show her commissioned work
include the Jewish Federation of Northern
New Jersey, American Committee for Shaare
Zedek Medical Center in Jerusalem, Hadassah
Womens Zionist Organization of America,
Congregations Keter Torah and Rinat Yisrael
in Teaneck and Shomrei Torah and Ahavat
Achim in Fair Lawn, Young Israel of Teaneck,
Yeshivat Ohr Hatalmud and the Moriah
School in Englewood, Frisch High School
and Yavneh Academy in Paramus, Rosenberg
Yeshiva of North Jersey in River Edge, Torah
Academy of Bergen County in Teaneck, and
on the cover of Sonys BMG Matisyahu Youth
Dub CD. Go to www.judaicpapercuts.com.
JS-51
JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014 51
YES, I WOULD LIKE
A PASSOVER GREETING
#1 #2 #3
(or call 201-837-8818 for other sizes)
Wording ____________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
I want a shared greeting
Name _______________________________________________________________
Town _______________________________________________________________
Name ______________________________________________________________
Address ____________________________________________________________
Phone ______________________________________________________________
Credit Card # ________________________________________________________
Exp. date _________________________ Code _____________________________
Fax to 201-833-4959 or mail (with a check if you prefer) to:
The Jewish Standard 1086 Teaneck Rd. Teaneck, NJ 07666
DEADLINE APRIL 4
Wishing you a
Happy Passover
Mr. & Mrs. Mel Schwartz, Fair Lawn
Abby, Len, Rhea & Barry Roth, Teaneck
Dr. & Mrs. Steven Katz, Paramus
The Feingolds, Englewood Clifs
The Jewelry Place, Mahwah
Regal Realtors, Wayne
The Dental Group, Bergenfeld
Wish your family, friends,
Jewish Standard readers
and customers a
Happy Passover in our
PASSOVER
GREETING
SECTION
APRIL 11
You can have your
own personal greeting
(see samples above)
OR
Add your family or business
name and town to a shared
greeting for $18
SAMPLE SHARED GREETING PAGE
Happy
Passover
-NAME-
1w x 2d
#1
$36
A Zissen Pesach!
-NAME-
3
1
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$72
Warm wishes
for a Happy
Passover
-NAME-
5w x 2d #3 $135
T
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a
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itio
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!
Purim
52 JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014
JS-52*
This hamantaschen recipe works great.
The dough can be made up to five days
before and the cookies can be frozen
Hamantaschen
BETH JANOFF CHANANIE
DOUGH:
4 1/2 cups all-purpose flour (use a
fresh bag)
1 teaspoon salt
4 teaspoons baking powder
Sift the dry ingredients together and
set aside.
Then, take 1 cup of butter (or pareve
margarine)
2 cups sugar
1/2 cup orange juice
2 teaspoons vanilla
2 eggs
Cream together butter (or margarine)
and sugar on medium speed with
a mixer until nice and fluffy. On low
speed add eggs, orange juice, and
vanilla. Slowly add the sifted dry in-
gredients. Form the dough and put in
the refrigerator for 30 minutes.
Roll out the dough on a floured
surface to about 1/4 inch thick. Cut
circles with a glass.
Put desired filling in the center and
form the hamantaschen by folding up
the three sides.
Bake on cookie sheet sprayed with
baking spray for 375 degrees for 20
minutes, or until golden.
Suggested fillings: apricot, marma-
lade, chocolate chips, or prune.
Prune filling:
1 pound prune butter
1/2 cup nuts
1 orange (pulp and rind) cut into
quarters
1/2 cup raisins
Pour a cup of boiling water over the
raisins and let them plump. Drain well.
Chop the nuts and raisins, and then
put them in the blender with the or-
ange quarters. Mix in the prune butter.
With Purim around the corner, Israeli chef
Naomi Abeliovich suggests these Purim treats
Lamingtons
These delicious and fluffy dairy cake bites
are coated in chocolate and coconut. They
are wonderful counterparts to the tradi-
tional hamantaschen on Purim.
FOR CAKE:
2 cups of flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon of salt
1/2 cup butter, softened
3/4 cup of sugar
1 egg
1 teaspoon of vanilla extract
1/2 cup of milk
FOR ICING:
2 1/3 cup powdered sugar
1/3 cup cocoa powder
3 tablespoons butter
1/2 cup of milk
2 cups shredded coconut
Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line an
8x8 square baking dish with baking
paper.
In a bowl, mix together flour, baking
powder, and salt.
In a separate bowl, soften the butter
using a mixer. Add in the sugar and mix
together for 2-3 minutes. Add in the
egg and vanilla extract, and mix again.
Add 1/3 of the flour mixture into the
butter mixture and stir well. Then add
1/4 cup of milk into the mixture and stir
together. Repeat using the remainder of
the flour, butter, and milk, and mix well.
Pour the batter into the baking pan
and use a spatula to smooth out the
batter. Bake for about 25 minutes, until
the cake is golden brown. Test whether
the center is fully baked using a tooth-
pick; make sure the toothpick comes
out clean.
Let the cake cool for about 10 min-
utes. Then remove the cake from the
pan and set it upside down to fully cool
on a cooling rack.
Slice the cake into small cubes. Trans-
fer into an airtight container and store
in the refrigerator for several hours.
To prepare the icing, set up a double
boiler and heat up the powdered sugar,
cocoa, butter and milk, and mix them
together into a thick sauce. Remove
from heat.
Place shredded coconut into a shal-
low bowl.
Dip each piece of cake into the icing
and coat with shredded coconut. Place
the pieces onto a cookie sheet and re-
peat using the entire cake.
Enjoy immediately, or store for sev-
eral days in an airtight container.
Triple chocolate
truffles
This signature dessert is fun to prepare.
Decorate the truffles with festive toppings
and share.

INGREDIENTS:
3 1/2 ounces bittersweet chocolate
3 1/2 ounces white chocolate
1/2 cup of butter
9 ounces of plain cookies
2 containers of Tnuva Chocolate
Pudding Snacks
Toppings: Colored or chocolate
sprinkles, shredded coconut, crushed
nuts, or your favorite candy bits
Melt bittersweet chocolate, white
chocolate, and butter in a microwave
or double boiler on low heat. Stir until
formed into a smooth mixture and
transfer into a bowl.
Place the cookies into a food proces-
sor and pulverize into powder. Add to
the melted chocolate mixture in bowl
and mix well.
Blend in the Tnuva Chocolate Pud-
ding Snacks until smooth. Cover the
bowl and place in refrigerator for two
hours, or until mixture is firm.
Form 1 1/2-inch balls and roll into the
topping to coat chocolate balls. Store in
a covered container in the refrigerator.
P
H
O
T
O
S

C
O
U
R
T
E
S
Y

I
M
P

G
R
O
U
P
Homemade mishloach manot goodies
Wines for Purim
Persians and Canaanites were known
to have favored sweet wines. One
such wine, Yarden Muscat, whose
grapes are grown in the southern
heights of the Golan region, is consid-
ered to be one of the most popular
and beloved sweet wines in the mar-
ketplace. Those who are looking for
a rich, sweet, red wine can fill their
glass with the Yarden T2, a fortified
port wine style whose festive taste
can transport drinkers back to the
original feasts the Megillah describes.
PHOTOS COURTESY IMP GROUP
Happy 30th Birthday
Rachel Chananie Jay!
You are an incredible
daughter, sister,
granddaughter, niece,
wife, and this year,
MOMMY!
Wishing you all the best!
Obituaries
JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014 53
JS-53
327 Main St, Fort Lee, NJ
201-947-3336 888-700-EDEN
www.edenmemorial.com
Pre-Planning Specialists
Graveside and Chapel Services
Barry Wien - NJ Lic. No. 2885
Frank Patti, Jr. - NJ Lic. No. 4169
Arthur Musicant - NJ Lic. No. 2544
Frank Patti, Sr. Director - NJ Lic. No. 2693
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When someone you love
becomes a memory
that memory becomes a treasure
Unknown Author
Alan L. Musicant, Mgr., N.J. Lic. No. 2890
Martin D. Kasdan, N.J. Lic. No. 4482
Irving Kleinberg, N.J. Lic. No. 2517
Advance Planning Conferences Conveniently Arranged
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800-522-0588
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MEMORIAL CHAPELS
800-322-0533
402 PARK STREET, HACKENSACK, NJ 07601
Happy Purim to you and your family from the
members of the Jewish Memorial Chapel
841 Allwood Road Clifton, NJ 07012
973-779-3048 Fax 973-779-3191
www.JewishMemorialChapel.org
Vincent Marazo, Manager
NJ License No. 3424
COMMUNITY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 1921 NONPROFIT
Ahavas Achim Bloomfield
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Beth Am Verona
Beth El Rutherford
Beth Shalom Pompton Lakes
Shomrei Emunah Montclair
Daughters of Miriam Clifton
Farband Passaic
Hungarian Hebrew Men Pinebrook
Jewish Federation Clifton
Jewish War Veterans Post 47 Clifton
Knights of Pythias Memorial
Association Clifton
Pine Brook Jewish Center Montville
Temple Emanuel Clifton
Temple Ner Tamid Bloomfield
Tifereth Israel Passaic
Passaic Hebrew Verein Passaic
Young Israel Passaic
Established 1902
Headstones, Duplicate Markers and Cemetery Lettering
With Personalized and Top Quality Service
Please call 1-800-675-5624
www.kochmonument.com
76 Johnson Ave., Hackensack, NJ 07601
201-791-0015 800-525-3834
LOUIS SUBURBAN CHAPEL, INC.
Exclusive Jewish Funeral Chapel
Sensitive to Needs of the Jewish Community for Over 50 Years
13-01 Broadway (Route 4 West) Fair Lawn, NJ
Richard Louis - Manager George Louis - Founder
NJ Lic. No. 3088 1924-1996
Serving NJ, NY, FL & Israel
Graveside services at all NJ & NY cemeteries
Prepaid funerals and all medicaid funeral benefts honored
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Philip Bolton
Philip S. Bolton, 54, of
Allendale, formerly of Fair
Lawn, died on March 6.
A pastry chef, he was a
graduate of the Culinary
Institute of America.
Predeceased by his
father, Eugene, he is
survived by his wife of 27
years, Susan, ne Downey;
his mother, Marilyn; a son,
Gene; a sister, Suzie Bell of
River Vale; an aunt, Ilene
Morris-Birkitt (Steven) of
Fort Lee, and nieces and a
nephew.
Donations can be sent to
East Jersey Chapter Trout
Unlimited, HoHoKus,
or Guardian Angel Soup
Kitchen, Allendale.
Arrangements were by
Louis Suburban Chapel,
Fair Lawn.
Miriam Holzsager
Miriam Holzsager, ne
Sinofsky, 90, of Fair Lawn,
formerly of East Ruther-
ford, died on March 9.
She was secretary at
the Radburn School for 25
years, an active member of
National Council of Jewish
Women, and a volunteer
ESL teacher. She and her
husband established the
Miriam and Melvin Hol-
zsager Scholarship Fund,
benefiting the Fair Lawn
community.
Predeceased by her
husband, Mel, and siblings,
Ken Sinofsky (Doris) and
Bernice Russ (Harry), she
is survived by her chil-
dren, Gary, Kathi Packard
( Jeff ), and Fred (Denise);
six grandchildren, and
four great-grandchildren.
Arrangements were by
Robert Schoems Menorah
Chapel, Paramus.
Devora Horn
Devora Horn, ne Volat,
82, of Del Ray Beach, Fla.,
died on March 8.
Born in Buffalo, N.Y., she
was member of the Fort
Lee Jewish Center/Congre-
gation Gesher Sholom.
Predeceased by her hus-
band Leonard four months
ago, she is survived by her
children, Sharon Horn and
Donna Neuhaus, both of
Fort Lee; a brother Harvey
Volat of Brooklyn, and six
grandchildren. Arrange-
ments were by Eden
Memorial Chapels, Fort
Lee.
Jerome Ozer
Jerome S. Ozer, 86, of
Englewood, died on
March 3.
Born in New York City,
he was an Army veteran of
World War II. Before retir-
ing, he was a history pro-
fessor at Pace University
and Bergen Community
College and owned Jerome
S. Ozer Publishing Co. in
Englewood. He was a long-
time member of Temple
Sinai of Bergen County in
Tenafly.
Predeceased by his wife,
Harriet, he is survived by
sons, Joseph of California
and Ira of Westport, Conn.;
siblings, Edith Packer of
Florida, and Martin of
New York; four grandchil-
dren, and a companion,
former Tenafly Mayor Ann
Moscovitz.
Arrangements were by
Eden Memorial Chapels,
Fort Lee.
Louis Sherman
Louis Sherman, 89, of
Waldwick, formerly of
Jersey City and Hasbrouck
Heights, died on March 6.
A Navy veteran of World
War II and the Korean
War, before retiring, he
was the chief stationary
engineer at the Garden
State Shopping Center
Mall in Paramus. He was
a member of the Warren
Point Paramus Square
Club, Wyckoff Masonic
Lodge #287, and the Wald-
wick Golden Seniors Club.
He volunteered at the
Center for Food Action in
Mahwah.
Predeceased by his
wife, Carol, and sons-in-
law, Mike Dobroshi and
Richard Stevens, he is
survived by his children,
Susan, Steven (Chris),
Karen Levine, Neal (Rich-
ard Stevens), and Ellen
Danzis (Marc); a sister,
Gerti Radin; six grandchil-
dren, and a nephew.
Donations can be made
to Wyckoff Masonic Lodge
#287, in Wyckoff. Arrange-
ments were by Louis Sub-
urban Chapel, Fair Lawn.
Nathan Wayne
Nathan Nat Wayne, 91,
of River Edge, died on
March 6.
Raised in an orphan-
age, he was a U.S. Army
World War II veteran,
serving in the inva-
sion of Normandy. He
was awarded the Silver
Star, two Bronze Stars,
a Purple Heart, and the
Chevalier de la Legion
dHonneur. Before retir-
ing in 1984, he was a
mechanic/machinist in
factory production. He
was a member of the
Disabled Veterans of
America.
He is survived by his
wife, Shirley, sons, Gary
(Frances) and Richard
(Corinne); brothers,
Morris ( Janet), and Gene
Natunblut (Ellie); four
grandchildren; three
step-grandchildren; three
step great-grandchildren,
and nieces and nephews.
Arrangements were by
Louis Suburban Chapel,
Fair Lawn.
Classified
54 JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014
JS-54
(201) 837-8818
DUE to increased enrollment
YBH of PASSAIC
is excited to open additional classes for Sept 2014.
The following openings are available:
3rd grade Rebbe 1st & 5th grade Morahs,
Elementary & Middle School General Studies
Applicants for Rebbe position,
fax resume: 973-777-9477 or email: bleiner@ybhillel.org.
For all other positions fax resume as above
or email: gpersin@ybhillel.org
HELP WANTED
P R O G R A M M E R
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experience, excellent references
on request; caring, friendly, patient;
live-in/out. Drives own car.201-
945-3198 or 908-259-0169
EXPERIENCED BABYSITTER for
Teaneck area. Please call Jenna
201-836-2688
EXPERIENCED European woman
is looking for a job as
Caregiver/Companion for the elder-
ly. Live-in/Live-out, Friday, Satur-
day, Sunday. Bergen County. 845-
821-0599
SITUATIONS WANTED
EXPERIENCED, Private CARE-
GIVER/COMPANION with excel-
lent references. Live-out. Available
anytime. Caring, friendly, reliable;
drives own car. Call 201-334-8860;
Ft.Lee area
EXPERIENCED, reliable woman
with excellent references seeks
Full-Time, Part-Time, day/night,
live-out position to care for elderly.
Call 201-681-7518
I AM A CAREGIVER
for elderly
Weekends Live-Out or In
Dependable Honest
Own Car
Years of experience
Doctor Appointments
To/From Activities Meal Prep
201-641-6109
TOO busy to clean, Ill do it for you!
Experienced, reliable, speaks Eng-
lish. Please call Neiva 201-354-
7913
DAUGHTER
FOR A DAY, LLC
LICENSED & INSURED
FOR YOUR
PROTECTION
Case Management
Handpicked
Certified Home
Health Aides
Creative
companionship
interactive,
intelligent
conversation &
social outings
Lifestyle Transitions
Assist w/shopping,
errands, Drs, etc.
Organize/process
paperwork,
bal. checkbook,
bookkeeping
Resolve medical
insurance claims
Free Consultation
RITA FINE
201-214-1777
www.daughterforaday.com
CLEANING SERVICE
FANTASTIC
CLEANING SERVICE
HOMES APTS OFFICES
MOVE-IN MOVE-OUT
Great Rates!
Good references Free Estimate
201-978-4622
POLISH CLEANING WOMAN
- Homes, Apartments, Offices-
14 years experience, excellent
references.
Affordable rates!
Izabela 973-572-7031
Estates Bought & Sold
Fine Furniture
Antiques
Accessories
Cash Paid
201-920-8875
T U
NICHOLAS
ANTIQUES
CARPET CLEANING
JOHNS CARPET &
UPHOLSTERY CLEANING
25 years experience
Owner Operated
Special!! 2 rooms $60.00
Double Method Cleaning
201-87-1176
www.shampoosteam.com
CLEANING & HAULING
JIMMY
THE JUNK MAN
Low Cost
Commercial Residental
Rubbish Removal
201-661-4940
DRIVING SERVICE
MICHAELS CAR
SERVICE
LOWEST RATES
Airports
Manhattan/NYC
School Transportation
201-836-8148
FLOORING
American Oak
Hardwood Floors
25 Years of Experience
Installation of All Types of
Carpets, Floors & Borders
Staining & Refinishing
Complete Repair Service
Quality Products
Free Estimates
Fully Insured
Oakland Rutherford
201-651-9494 201-438-7105
HANDYMAN
Your Neighbor with Tools
Home Improvements & Handyman
Shomer Shabbat Free Estimates
Over 15 Years Experience
Adam 201-675-0816 Jacob
Lic. & Ins. NJ Lic. #13VH05023300
www.yourneighborwithtools.blogspot.com
Insurance and
Estate Appraisals
Reasonable Rates
By Appointment
201-836-5226
Florence Zelefsky
Graduate Gemologist
Formally of Macys Appraisal Service
JEWELRY APPRAISAL SERVICE
PARTY
PLANNER
Classified
JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014 55
JS-55
Solution to last weeks puzzle. This weeks puzzle is
on page 46.
SITUATIONS WANTED
APPRAISALS
MOHEL
Rabbi Gerald Chirnomas
TRAINED AT & CERTIFIED BY HADASSAH HOSPITAL, JERUSALEM
CERTIFIED BY THE CHIEF RABBINATE OF JERUSALEM
973-334-6044
www.rabbichirnomas.com
MOHELS
Jewish Music with an Edge
Ari Greene 201-837-6158
AGreene@BaRockorchestra.com
www.BaRockOrchestra.com
Free
Estimates
Roof
Repairs
201-487-5050
83 FIRST STREET
HACKENSACK, NJ 07601
ROOFING SIDING GUTTERS LEADERS
HACKENSACK HACKENSACK HACKENSACK HACKENSACK HACKENSACK
R RR RROO OO OO OO OOFING FING FING FING FING
C CC CCO OO OO. .. ..
INC. INC. INC. INC. INC.
ROOFING
ADD UP TO ADDITIONAL 10 PEOPLE For Permanent or
Temporary Use
Expanded by 2.5 feet on each end Original Table Size
Cohen

s
CALL NOW -
DONT WAIT!
OY! Pesach is almost here!
Do you have enough room at your table?
TABLE PADS & EXTENDERS
HOME IMPROVEMENTS
BEST BEST
of the
Home Repair Service
Carpentry
Decks
Locks/Doors
Basements
Bathrooms
Plumbing
Tiles/Grout
Painting
Kitchens
Electrical
Paving/Masonry
Drains/Pumps
Maintenence
Hardwood Floors
NO JOB IS TOO SMALL
24 Hour x 5 1/2 Emergency Services
Shomer Shabbat Free Estimates
1-201-530-1873
BH
General Repairs
PLUMBING
Complete Kitchen &
Bath Remodeling
Boilers Hot Water Heaters Leaks
EMERGENCY SERVICE
Fully Licensed, Bonded and Insured
NO JOB IS TOO SMALL!
201-358-1700 Lic. #12285
APL Plumbing & Heating LLC
RUBBISH REMOVAL
CHICHELO
RUBBISH REMOVED
973-325-2713 973-228-7928
201-704-0013
Appliances
Furniture
WoodMetals
Construction
Debris
Homes Estates
Factories Contractors
Call us.
We are
waiting
for your
classifed
ad!
201
837-8818
P.O. Box 96119 Washington, D.C. 20090 | (800) 813-0557 | mazon.org
We cant put off paying my moms
medical bills and her oxygen, so we
struggle to get enough to eat.
- Rhonda
Every day, hungry people have to make impossible choices, often
knowing that, no matter which option they choose, they will have
to accept negative consequences. It shouldnt be this way.
MAZON is working to end hunger for Rhonda and the millions of
Americans and Israelis who struggle with food insecurity.
Please donate to MAZON today.
2012 MAZON: A Jewish Response to Hunger/Barbara Grover
Real Estate
56 JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014
JS-56
Real Estate Associates
Ann Murad, ABR, GRI
Sales Associate
NJAR Circle of Excellence Gold Level, 2001, 2003-2006
Silver Level, 1997-2000, 2002,2009,2011,2012
Direct: (201) 664 6181, Cell: (201) 981 7994
E-mai l : anni eget si t sol d@msn. com
123 Broadway, Woodcliff Lake, NJ 07677
(201) 573 8811 ext. 316
Each Ofce Independenty Owned and Operated
ANNIE GETS IT SOLD
EQUAL
OPPORTUNITY
HOUSING EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
Orna Jackson, Sales Associate 201-376-1389
TENAFLY
894-1234
TM
TENAFLY EXQUISITE $3,350,000
Nantucket style colonial on 1+ East Hill acres, living room has adjacent study
which shares fireplace with family room, formal dining room with fireplace, kitchen
enjoys separate dining area & 2nd family room, finished lower
level opens to secluded yard with terrazzo pool & spa.
ENGLEWOOD CLIFFS
568-1818
TENAFLY
894-1234
CRESSKILL
871-0800
ALPINE/CLOSTER
768-6868
RIVER VALE
666-0777
www.jstandard.com
New Paramus
blood donor center opens
Community Blood Services Paramus Donor Center
on Monday started welcoming blood, platelet, and
plasma donors at its new home in the Bergen Medi-
cal Center, One West Ridgewood Avenue, Suite 208.
The previous donor center on Linwood Avenue is no
longer open for donations.
Employees and donors like the open flow and the
bright, cheery atmosphere in the new donor room,
which is lined with windows, said Karen Ferriday,
director of community affairs for Community Blood
Services. The new donor center is only a mile away
from the previous center, still conveniently located
near Route 17.
Eligible volunteer donors of all blood types and
products are invited to call (201) 251-3703 for dona-
tion hours and to schedule their donation appoint-
ments at the new center. They can schedule their
appointments online at www.communitybloodser-
vices.com.
For 60 years our Paramus Donor Center has been
welcoming our donors life-giving donations in Para-
mus and we will continue to do so at the new center,
Ms. Ferriday said.
She said there has been an ongoing need for all
types of blood donors and blood products this win-
ter season, including Type O negative, Type O posi-
tive, B negative, AB male plasma, and platelets.
Donors must be 17-75 years old (16 years old with
parental consent) and weigh at least 110 pounds.
All donors will receive health screenings with their
donations, including non-fasting glucose and choles-
terol screenings.
Community Blood Services, a not-for-profit orga-
nization, provides blood and blood products for
patients in 18-plus hospitals in New Jersey and New
York, including Hackensack University Medical
Center, St. Josephs Healthcare System in Paterson/
Wayne and The Valley Hospital in Ridgewood.
Policy Network to hear
talk on Dollarocracy
On March 20 at 7:30 pm, North Jersey Public Policy
Network will hear John Nichols speak on his most
recent book, Dollarocracy. Nichols will discuss
how money power and media influence increas-
ingly guides elections, decreasing Americas chance
at pure self-governance. A question and answer ses-
sion will follow his presentation.
The program will take place in the Wilson Audi-
torium/Dickinson Hall at Fairleigh Dickinson Uni-
versity Metro Campus in Hackensack (Use the main
entrance). For GPS directions, use 800 University
Plaza Drive (Temple Place) off Hackensack Avenue.
The program is free and open to all. Pre-registration
is recommended with an RSVP to info@njppn.org.
John Nichols is a groundbreaking journalist and
speaker who is frequently cited by media sources
such as the New York Times and Chicago Tribune.
He currently writes for The Nation magazine as its
Washington correspondent and is the author of
many politically-acclaimed books, including a best-
selling biography of Vice President Dick Cheney.
Real Estate & Business
JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014 57
JS-57
Need Help With
Your House Purchase?
We can help with a wide variety of
available programs, quick underwriting
and closings! Rates are still low, so call
us for a pre-approval or to look into
renancing into a 15-year xed,
ARM or for cash out!
Classic Mortgage, LLC
Serving NY, NJ & CT
25 E. Spring Valley Ave., Ste 100, Maywood, NJ
201-368-3140
www.classicmortgagellc.com
MLS #31149
Larry DeNike
President
MLO #58058
ladclassic@aol.com
Daniel M. Shlufman
Managing Director
MLO #6706
dshlufman@classicllc.com
TEANECK OPEN HOUSE
Sunday, March 16th, 1-4PM
BARBARA OSTROTH
Your Teaneck Realtor!
NJAR Distinguished Sales Associate
(201) 965-3105 cell
(201) 262-6600 x144
www.BarbaraOstroth.com
Mortgage pre-approval
1-888-538-5732
537 Kinderkamack Rd
Oradell, NJ 07649
2014 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Coldwell Banker is aregistered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real
Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Owned and Operated by NRT LLC
Magnificent 5BR, 3.5BTH Tudor on 135x130 Landscaped Property;
Huge Livingroom w/Vaulted Ceiling; Large Custom Kitchen;
Close to NYC Transport, Houses of Worship.
650 Queen Anne Road
(corner of Johnson Avenue)
Listing Price $875,000
For Our Full Inventory & Directions
Visit our Website
www.RussoRealEstate.com
(201) 837-8800
READERS
CHOICE
2013
FIRST PLACE
REAL ESTATE AGENCY
All Close to NY Bus/Houses of Worship/Highways
TEANECK OPEN HOUSES
260 Farrant Ter. $279,900 1-3 PM
Beaut Maintained Colonial. Ent Foyer, LR, DR, Mod Eat-In
Kit/Bkfst Counter. 2 Brms, Updated Bath. Semi-Fin Bsmt.
Oversized Gar + 4 Pkg Spc.
792 Hartwell St. $419,900 2-4 PM
Lovely Colonial in Country Club Sec. Liv Rm/Fplc, Form Din
Rm, Granite Eat In Kit/Bkfst Area, 3 Season Por. 2nd Flr: 3
Brms + Newer Full Bath. Part Fin Bsmt/Den & Full Bath.
Newer Wins & C/A/C. 1 Car Gar.
TEANECK VIC OPEN HOUSE
287 E Clinton Ave., Bergenfield $355,000 1-3 PM
Easy One Floor Living. 3 Brm, 1.5 Bath Ranch/Tenafly
Border. 80 X 110 Prop. LR open to Granite Kit/Bkfst Cntr,
Form DR. Knotty Pine Bsmt/Dry Bar. Cov Porch, Above Grnd
Pool. C/A/C, 1 Car Gar.
BY APPOINTMENT
Teaneck. $235K. Quiet Private Street. Close to Larch Ave/
Cedar Ln. LR, DR, Den. Eat In Kit. 2nd Flr: 2 Brms, Bath.
Walk up to Floored Attic. Bsmt. Gar. Priv Backyard.
Teaneck. $429,900. Spacious Colonial. Lg Liv Rm/Fplc,
Lg Fam Rm, Form Din Rm, Granite Eat In Kit/Dbl Sinks,
Full Pantry, .5 Bath. Master Suite/Bath/Dbl Closets, 2 More
Brms + 1 More Bath. Recroom Bsmt. H/W Flrs, Fenced
Yard, Att Gar.
Bergenfield. $675K. Absolutely Beautiful! 5 Yr Young.
Quality Throughout. CH Col w/ Palladium Wins, LR, Banquet
DR, Granite Island Kit/Bkfst Rm to Fam Rm w/ Fplc, Study/
5th Brm, .5 Bath. 2nd Flr: 4 Brms, 3 Designer Baths. Grnd
Lev: Tile Flrs, Full Bath, Att Gar. Paver Drvwy. C/A, C/Vac.
A Match Made in Englewood!
275 Hutchinson Road
Sold $1,575,000
Martha Aaron
(Malkie)
Broker
Associate
Heather Badner
(Laurie)
Realtor
Associate
240 Grand Avenue
Englewood, NJ 07631
201-568-3300
info@anhaltrealty.com
www.anhaltrealty.com
Specializing in all your
Real Estate Needs
Allan Dorfman
Broker/Associate
201-461-6764 Eve
201-970-4118 Cell
201-585-8080 x144 Ofce
Realtorallan@yahoo.com
FORT LEE - THE COLONY
1 BR Medium oor. Updated. $155,000
1 BR Just listed. Renovated. $176,500
2 BR Low oor. Full river view.
Renovated. $439,000
2 BR High oor. Totally redesigned.
Manhattan views. $530,000
2 BR Medium oor. Gut renovated. Two
terraces with New York view. $775,000
Rentals starting at $1,950 per
month. No Fee
Serving Bergen County since 1985.
The Provident Bank announces new Commitment to Giving initiative
The Provident Bank, New Jerseys first
and oldest community bank, marked
its 175th anniversary by announcing
a new Commitment to Giving ini-
tiative. The new year-long campaign
will support a local charitable effort
each month in which employees will
be invited to participate via volunteer
efforts or donations throughout New
Jersey.
Since its inception 175 years ago, The
Provident Bank has been fully commit-
ted to giving back and supporting the
communities it serves throughout the
year, said Chris Martin, The Provident
Banks president and CEO.
The Provident Banks partnership
with NJITs Spring Break Alternative
Program for Hurricane Sandy volunteer
recovery efforts kicks off its Commit-
ment to Giving initiative this month.
Like us on
Facebook
facebook.com/jewishstandard
Real Estate & Business
58 JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014
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F
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78 Franklin Street, Englewood
F
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173 Walton Street, Englewood
J
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620 Jones Road, Englewood
F
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360 Thornton Road, Englewood
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84 Lydecker Street, Englewood
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340 Lewelen Circle, Englewood
Meet Our Team!
Fern Malka
Judith Rosenblatt
Spiegel
Jana
Levine
Loren
Birk
Shelly
Gdanski
Nesya
Malka
Veronica
Billington
Royal Realty Services LLC
10 N. Wood Avenue, Suite B Linden, New Jersey 07036
201-281-6369 908-862-8100
Our Team Works For You!
EQUAL
OPPORTUNITY
HOUSING
SELLING YOUR HOME?
Call Susan Laskin Today
To Make Your Next Move A Successful One!
2014 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Coldwell Banker is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.
An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Owned and Operated by NRT LLC.
Cell: 201-615-5353 BergenCountyRealEstateSource.com
AYELET HURVITZ
Realtor
Direct: 201-294-1844
Alpine/Closter Ofce:
201-767-0550 x 235
www.ayelethurvitz.com
151 E. PALISADE - ENGLEWOOD 109 E PALISADE #5 - ENGLEWOOD
152 PIERMONT - NORWOOD
37 KING ST. - ENGLEWOOD
FOR SALE FOR SALE FOR RENT
20 HEDGEROW - ENGLEWOOD
S
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100 E. PALISADE C2 - ENGLEWOOD
NJAR

Circle of Excellence
Sales Award

, 2012-2013
Coldwell Banker Advisory
Council, 2013
Member of NAR, NJAR,
EBCBOR, NJMLS
Bilingual in English/Hebrew
Licensed Realtor
in NJ & NY
S
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Jeff@MironProperties.com www.MironProperties.com
Ruth@MironProperties.com www.MironProperties.com/NJ
Each Miron Properties office is independently owned and operated.
Contact us today for your complimentary consultation!
BAYONNE
2-story building. 37,740 sq. ft. $2,500,000
PARAMUS
Lovely Ranch. Wonderful property.
TEANECK
Beautiful Side Hall Colonial. Prime area.
TEANECK
Picturesque setting. Private oasis.
H
U
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E
W
A
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H
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J
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J
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S
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!
TENAFLY
Unique generously sized continental home.
TENAFLY
Old world charm. Timeless elegance.
TENAFLY
Sprawling Ranch on .97 acre w/babbling brook.
TENAFLY
One-of-a-kind manor. $3,748,000
S
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ENGLEWOOD
Spacious 3 BR/2.5 BTH townhouse. $659K
ENGLEWOOD
Quaint Colonial. Expansion possibilities. $758K
ENGLEWOOD
401 DOUGLAS STREET $1,270,000
ENGLEWOOD
Exquisite, state-of-the-art Col. $2,400,000
J
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P
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WILLIAMSBURG
Stylish building. Heart of Brooklyn.
UNION SQUARE
1 BR/1.5 BTH duplex w/loft. $699,000
SUNNYSIDE
Large L-shaped studio. Great location.
CHELSEA
Grand 3 BR/2.5 BTH. $3,750,000
S
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CHELSEA
Spacious ex 1 BR. Chelsea gem.
GREENWICH VILLAGE
Quintessential pre-war full-service co-op.
GREENPOINT
3,200 sq. ft. Greek revival details.
UPPER EAST SIDE
Continental Towers. 2 BR/2 BTH. City views.
U
N
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Jeffrey Schleider
Broker/Owner
Miron Properties NY
Ruth Miron-Schleider
Broker/Owner
Miron Properties NJ
NJ: T: 201.266.8555 M: 201.906.6024
NY: T: 212.888.6250 M: 917.576.0776
Remarkable Service. Exceptional Results.
New Mom 101 seminars offered by EHMC
The Childbirth Education Department at
Englewood Hospital and Medical Center
is launching Mom 101, a free educational
seminar series that will provide guidance
and support to new and expectant parents.
The first of six scheduled seminars
focuses on Total Pregnancy Wellness:
Health, Nutrition & Fitness, and will be
lead by holistic nutritionist Nancy Coo-
per and prenatal yoga instructor Arlene
Minoyan. The seminar will be held on
Monday, March 31, from 5:30 p.m. to 7
p.m. in childbirth education classroom
#4168 at EHMC.
Refreshments will be served. Seats are
limited. Registration is required for this free
event. To register, call (201) 894-3727 or 1
(866) 980-3462 or visit www.englewoodhos-
pital.com and click the Classes and Support
Groups tab.
www.jstandard.com
JS-59
JEWISH STANDARD MARCH 14, 2014 59
Jeff@MironProperties.com www.MironProperties.com
Ruth@MironProperties.com www.MironProperties.com/NJ
Each Miron Properties office is independently owned and operated.
Contact us today for your complimentary consultation!
BAYONNE
2-story building. 37,740 sq. ft. $2,500,000
PARAMUS
Lovely Ranch. Wonderful property.
TEANECK
Beautiful Side Hall Colonial. Prime area.
TEANECK
Picturesque setting. Private oasis.
H
U
G
E
W
A
R
E
H
O
U
S
E
!
J
U
S
T
S
O
L
D
!
J
U
S
T
S
O
L
D
!
S
O
L
D
!
TENAFLY
Unique generously sized continental home.
TENAFLY
Old world charm. Timeless elegance.
TENAFLY
Sprawling Ranch on .97 acre w/babbling brook.
TENAFLY
One-of-a-kind manor. $3,748,000
S
O
L
D
!
A
L
R
E
A
D
Y
S
O
L
D
!
S
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D
!
E
V
E
R
Y
L
U
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U
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Y
!
ENGLEWOOD
Spacious 3 BR/2.5 BTH townhouse. $659K
ENGLEWOOD
Quaint Colonial. Expansion possibilities. $758K
ENGLEWOOD
401 DOUGLAS STREET $1,270,000
ENGLEWOOD
Exquisite, state-of-the-art Col. $2,400,000
J
U
S
T
L
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T
E
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!
P
R
I
M
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A
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A
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O
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H
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S
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2
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4
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C
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T
I
O
N
!
WILLIAMSBURG
Stylish building. Heart of Brooklyn.
UNION SQUARE
1 BR/1.5 BTH duplex w/loft. $699,000
SUNNYSIDE
Large L-shaped studio. Great location.
CHELSEA
Grand 3 BR/2.5 BTH. $3,750,000
S
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!
J
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CHELSEA
Spacious ex 1 BR. Chelsea gem.
GREENWICH VILLAGE
Quintessential pre-war full-service co-op.
GREENPOINT
3,200 sq. ft. Greek revival details.
UPPER EAST SIDE
Continental Towers. 2 BR/2 BTH. City views.
U
N
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C
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R
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!
S
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U
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Jeffrey Schleider
Broker/Owner
Miron Properties NY
Ruth Miron-Schleider
Broker/Owner
Miron Properties NJ
NJ: T: 201.266.8555 M: 201.906.6024
NY: T: 212.888.6250 M: 917.576.0776
Remarkable Service. Exceptional Results.
JS-60
201.837.8110 | GlattExpress@gmail.com
1400 Queen Anne Road, Teaneck, NJ
Sun - Mon: 7am - 6pm | Tue: 7am - 7pm
Wed - Thu: 7am - 9pm | Fri: 7am - 4:30pm
At Gl att Express, were shari ng Pesach wi th you! For
every $100 you spend wi th us for Pesach, wel l gi ve
you a free whol e chi cken. I ts that si mpl e. Come
shop our l arge sel ecti on of qual i ty Pesach i tems &
wal k away wi th even more for your fami l y. Spend
$100, get more. Start Pesach at Gl att Express!
RCBC
Side! Sharing Express Your
get a free chicken!
SPEND $100 FOR PESACH,
Win a $100 Gift Certifcate! Like us on Facebook to enter!
* Offer good from 3/15/14 unti l 4/14/14. Cannot combi ne recei pts or parti al purchases.
Spend $200, get two. Spend more, get more. No limits. No hassles. Its the best way to start Pesach!