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Linda Hawkins

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EDITORIAL
Director of Publications
JANE GABOURY
jgaboury@ppa.com
Love springs eternal
A TIME TO BLOSSOM
Every year the earth shrugs off winters quiet mantle and gathers the
energy to throw on a dazzling cape of color. All these years of
watching spring burst forth, and still it enters my conscious as a
delightful surprise. (Look at that: daffodils!) Im thankful thats the
case. It reminds me what a rich life this is to enjoy. Astonishing
transformations paired with rock-solid certitudes.
Longer days, warmer evenings, and the
burst of tender blooms. If spring hasnt found
your corner of the world just yet, itll be there
soon. What better way to celebrate vernal
renewal than to revel in young love? Not for
youth alone, young love is a period of abun-
dant joy. A time when the heart beats with
the excitement of having found its true
complement. When we cant bear to be sepa -
rated from our beloved for even a day. When
all our waking thoughts are spoken for. Its
a fleeting experience that poets, artists, and
writers have tried to capture and convey for
millennia. Because who wouldnt want to be
able to uncork a bottle of that effervescent bliss every now and then?
With the entrance of spring, betrothals are on our minds. This
month, were sharing the lovely engagement portraiture of Linda
Hawkins (Keeping it Real, p. 56). Hawkins has witnessed the
transformation in this business from simple portraiture that was
considered an add-on to the big-day wedding planning to whats
become an event in its own right for many couples. Just because
snapshots are ubiquitous doesnt mean that many people arent
looking for the photography experiencenot just the photograph
that only a professional can give them.
March also marks the start of a new PPA Board of Directors, with
Susan Michal, M.Photog.Cr., CPP, ABI, taking the helm as president.
She shares thoughts about what that means, and we introduce the
new Board in PPA Today (p. 97). Theres no professional association
with more dedicated, cohesive, and forward-thinking leadership
than PPA. This diverse group of longtime members has been there,
seen that, and photographed it. Theyve weathered the storms
typically encountered by entrepreneurs, and they have experience
aplenty to share. Never pass up an opportunity to speak with one of
them when you get the opportunity. I
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journal of the Professional Photog raphers of America, Inc., is the oldest exclusively professional
photographic publication in the Western Hemisphere (founded 1907 by Charles Abel,
Hon.M.Photog.), incorporating Abels Photo graphic Weekly, St. Louis & Canadian
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Circulation audited and verified by BPA Worldwide.
Contributing Editors
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JANE GABOURY, DIRECTOR OF PUBLICATIONS
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KEEPING IT REAL
Linda Hawkins finds a groove in
creative engagement sessions
by Jeff Kent
BEHIND THE MASK
John David Pittman seeks an inner truth
in commercial and editorial portraiture
by Jeff Kent
COMMERCIAL: CAKE WALK
Joe Glyda makes commercial work
look like a picnic
by Pete Wright
EDITORIAL: COOL CUSTOMER
Layne Kennedy treks the world with
amateur photographers in tow
by Robert Kiener
ENGAGEMENTS: WILD AND WONDERFUL
Tracey Buyce captures some of her best
engagement work in the company of animals
by Stephanie Boozer
IMAGE BY TRACEY BUYCE
84
76
90
56
66
Features
CONTENTS
MARCH 2014
DEPARTMENTS
16 Folio
97 PPA today
106 Good works
CONTAC T S HE E T
22 Making the most of Burning Man
24 Processing raw files in Lightroom
24 Giveaway of the month
26 Picturesque travels
PROFI T CENTER
29 What I think:
Joe Glyda
30 Ask the experts
34 Start at Square One
by Bridget Jackson
36 Give to get
by Angela Pointon
38 Playing it up
by Michael Barton
42 An education of merit
by Kristin Hartman
THE GOODS
45 What I like: John David Pittman
46 Pro review: Epson Exhibition
Watercolor Paper Textured
by Andrew Darlow
48 Roundup: Baby set pieces
by Joan Sherwood
50 Technique: 7 tips for rocking
the wedding rings shot
by Steven Jamroz
52 Pro review: Zoom H6 and
Capsule Mics
by Ron Dawson
ONLI NE
ppmag.com/tryedu
Video: Processing raw files
in Lightroom
by Prem Mukherjee
ppmag.com/win
Enter to win this months giveaway
ppmag.com/profit-center
25 ideas: Giveaways that entice clients
by Angela Pointon
8 www.ppmag.com
PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHER | MARCH 2014 | WWW.PPMAG.COM
CONTENTS
76
IMAGE BY JOE GLYDA PHOTOGRAPHY INC.
ON THE COVER
Linda Hawkins created the merited image Things We
Love in the fall of 2012. It was made during a 1940s
styled engagement session, photographed in natural light
in the late afternoon. She captured it with a Canon
EOS 5D camera using a 70-200mm f/2.8L lens, exposed
for 1/500 second at f/3.5, ISO 160. The bride helped
select the location and props involved in the shoot. We
went all out shooting at a farm located in Milford,
Mass., complete with barns, a grist mill, antique cars,
antique typewriters, vintage Coke machine, chickens, and
even an old bull who was trying to get into the shoot,
says Hawkins. There were so many vintage props
available to us that we could have spent days there!
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Professional Photographers
of America
229 Peachtree St., NE, Suite 2200
Atlanta, GA 30303-1608
404-522-8600, 800-786-6277
www.ppa.com
2014-2015 PPA board
President
*SUSAN MICHAL
M.Photog.Cr., CPP, ABI
smichal@ppa.com
Vice President
*MICHAEL E. TIMMONS
M.Photog.M.Artist.Cr., CPP, F-ASP
mtimmons@ppa.com
Treasurer
*LORI CRAFT
Cr.Photog.
lcraft@ppa.com
Chairman of the Board
*RALPH ROMAGUERA SR.
M.Photog.Hon.M.Photog.Cr.,
CPP, API, F-ASP
rromaguera@ppa.com
Directors
ROB BEHM,
M.Photog.Cr, CPP
rbehm@ppa.com
STEPHEN THETFORD
M.Photog.Cr., CPP
sthetford@ppa.com
AUDREY L. WANCKET
M.Photog.Cr., CPP
awancket@ppa.com
MIKE FULTON
Cr.Photog.
mfulton@ppa.com
GREG DANIEL
M.Photog.Cr., CPP, F-ASP
gdaniel@ppa.com
MARY FISK-TAYLOR
M.Photog.Cr., CPP, ABI, API
mfisktaylor@ppa.com
BARBARA BOVAT
Cr.Photog.
bbovat@ppa.com
STEVE KOZAK
M.Photog.Cr., CPP
skozak@ppa.com
Industry Advisor
LOU GEORGE
lgeorge@ppa.com
PPA Staff
DAVID TRUST, CAE
Chief Executive Officer
trustd@ppa.com
SCOTT KURKIAN, CAE
Chief Financial Officer
Chief Operating Officer
skurkian@ppa.com
JULIA BOYD
Senior Manager of
Certification
jboyd@ppa.com
JANE GABOURY
Director of Publications
jgaboury@ppa.com
KRISTEN HARTMAN
Director of Membership
khartman@ppa.com
FIONA HENDRICKS
Director of Events
fhendricks@ppa.com
WAYNE JONES
Director of Sales &
Strategic Alliances
wjones@ppa.com
ANGELA KURKIAN,
M.Photog.Cr.
Director of Education
akurkian@ppa.com
SCOTT MORGAN
Director of Information
Technology
smorgan@ppa.com
WILDA OKEN
Director of Administration
woken@ppa.com
CARLA PLOUIN
Director of Marketing
and Communications
cplouin@ppa.com
SANDRA LANG
Executive Assistant
slang@ppa.com
*Executive Committee
of the Board
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folio|
Showcasing images selected from the files of the PPA Loan Collection, Folio is a monthly sample of
award-winning photography from the most recent International Photographic Competition (IPC),
which is open to all professional photographers. The current Loan Collection is a select group of more
than 600 photographs chosen for distinction by the IPC jurors. ppa.com/IPC
SIMBA
Simba is the work of Kelly Willis of Modello Fine Portraits in Deer Park, Texas.
I had the wonderful experience of going behind the scenes with these wild
cats/kittens but only had a point-and-shoot camera, notes Willis. I wanted
to document life for big cats when they arent allowed to be in their natural
habitat. Willis specializes in conceptual and pet portraiture, nature and
wildlife photography, and infrared photography. modellofineportraits.com
CAMERA: Canon PowerShot camera with built-in lens
EXPOSURE: f/2.7, 1/100 second, ISO 80
LIGHTING: Available light
POST-CAPTURE: In Photoshop, the image was prepped and a
background was added. It was then painted in Corel Painter 12.
Kelly Willis
Michael R. Anderson
WIND POWER
Michael R. Anderson of West Linn, Ore., was driving through the Columbia River
Gorge when the lighting drew his attention. I couldnt resist the temptation and
pulled off the freeway, he says. He drove several miles on frontage roads to
capture Wind Power, photographing across the Columbia River from Oregon
into Washington. Andersons studio, Artistic Photo Expression, specializes in
fine-art, landscape, travel, and infrared photography. artisticphotoexpression.com
CAMERA & LENS: Nikon D700, Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8G VR II lens
EXPOSURE: f/11, 1/200 second, ISO 400
LIGHTING: Natural Light
POST-CAPTURE: The image was captured in one file and processed with
Photomatix Pro using the Detail Enhancer feature. The resulting file was
processed and enhanced using Nikon Capture NX2 and Nik Color Efex Pro
filters. Borders, cropping, and digital matting were done with Photoshop CS5.
THE PRAYER NOOK
The subject of The Prayer Nook caught the eye of Nancy
Bailey-Pratt, M.Photog.Cr., while she was traveling in India.
Bailey-Pratt does portrait work as well as travel photography
through Nancys Photography in Anderson, Ind. She simply
asked the subject to step back into the door opening to
eliminate the harsh sunlight that was bouncing all over the
place, she says. nancysphotography.com
CAMERA & LENS: Canon EOS 5D Mark III camera,
Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM lens
EXPOSURE: f/4, 1/50 second, ISO 400
LIGHTING: Natural light. The cement below the
subject reflected light onto his face.
POST-CAPTURE: All processing was done in Adobe Bridge
and Photoshop. The image was cropped and parts of the
doorframe were copied and pasted on either side of the white
entryway to keep the viewers eye on the subject rather than
following the light edges out of the image.
18 www.ppmag.com
Nancy Bailey-Pratt
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Whats New, Cool Events, Interesting People, Great Ideas, Etc.
In a remote desert
location 100 miles
north of Reno, Nev.,
68,000 people gather
for a week-long art
festival like no other.
Burning Man enables
a unique culture of
friendship, acceptance, giving, and creativ-
ity. As a photographer, it was an adventure
beyond my wildest dreams. I spent eight
days in the desert with a camera in my hand
for most of it, and I captured only a small
amount of the dramatic art created for
the event and the unique people who make
it. Spanning about 3 square miles, the festi-
val presents images worth capturing at
every turn.
Photographing at Burning Man comes
with very strict rules, particularly with regard
to who and what you photograph and how
the images are used. If you plan to attend for
that purpose, do your research prior to going,
and register with event organizers.
Everyone at Burning Man is there to have
fun and express themselves. For photogra-
phers, this means exceptional opportunities.
Just honor the rules, and you will be
rewarded with incredible images.
Ask permission and obtain a model
release from anyone you would like to photo-
graph. I found it handy to carry books of 3x5-
inch cards with a model release printed on
them. Include the frame number on each
model release, along with a space for the per-
sons email address. This helps you figure out
whos who and allows you to share the images
with your subjects.
Dust is a constant. Dont take the lens off
your camera except in a clean, covered space,
like an RV or car, and then only after youve
completely cleaned the camera and lens.
The festival is huge. I got around on a
bicycle and carried my camera in a small case
to protect it from the elements.
Much of Burning Man takes place at
night. Bring a sturdy, lightweight tripod for
those limited-light situations. I also carried
my Nikon SB-910 AF Speedlight with a Gary
Fong diffuser for use at night or as a daytime
fill flash.
See more from David Bever at dblaphoto.com.
All images David Bever
Burning Man
Making the most of
BY DAVID BEVER, CPP
22 www.ppmag.com
March 2014 Professional Photographer 23
You'll be amazed
by the art at
Burning Man as
well as the
expressiveness
of festival goers.
Keep an open
mind. You'll be
rewarded with
unique and
dramatic images.
CONTACT SHEET
Processing raw les in Lightroom
Adobe Photoshop Lightroom users have so
many options at their fingertips
that its easy to become over-
whelmed. In the video tuto-
rial Processing Raw Files in
Lightroom, Prem
Mukherjee breaks the
process down into bite-size,
step-by-step pieces. Mukherjee
approaches Lightroom based on the types
of images youre working with, demonstrat-
ing tools and tricks as he discusses wed-
dings, portraits, and landscapes. He also
shows how to manage and back up files.
Some of Mukherjees top tips:
Make a new catalog for every job and
place it in the clients folder. By doing this
you can back up the catalog along with the
job, keeping everything together and mak-
ing it easier to find later.
When using multiple cameras, such as
at a wedding, go to the metadata and change
one of the fields to each cameras serial num-
ber. Then you can sort images by camera.
Looking at your images in sets that are similar
allows you to make adjustments more quickly.
Using the adjustment brush, make selec-
tive adjustments on images. You can use your
favorite presets and paint the effect on or off.
Create presets. Using your favorite
actions as presets will help you work
quickly and define your style.
Got a color balance issue? In the HSL
tab, grab the target tool, click on the color
youd like to diminish (think blue window
light), and change the color saturation. Its a
quick way to remove unwanted color tints.
Watch the video for free during the month
of March: ppmag.com/tryedu.
24 www.ppmag.com
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Giveaway of the month
Prai se from Pros
Featured in our November 2013 issue (A
Photographer Abroad), Jim Chamberlain,
M.Photog.MEI.Cr., API, is a photographic
artist who specializes in old world-style
landscapes. His works fetch top dollar as art
pieces for home and commercial dcor, and
theyve been licensed for media use around
the world. Creating the images is a process:
one that begins with an extended trip to
Europe. While abroad, Chamberlain
explores, photographs, and teaches work-
shops in Tuscany and Provence. To help his
students and others interested in journeying
abroad for photography, Chamberlain
shares these pointers:
BEFORE THE TRIP
Research. Dig deep into the places you want
to go. What are the typical weather patterns
and the light at that time of year?
Understand how sunrise, sunset, and the
daily pattern of life will affect your images.
Plan. Sort out accommodations and other
details ahead of time. Set a loose itinerary
and be open to serendipitous opportunities.
Gear up. Travel light with a short list of
essential gear. My travel bag includes two
Nikon D800 bodies and three Nikon lenses:
14-24mm, 24-70mm, and 70-200mm f/2.8
lenses, plus a 1.7X teleconverter. I use two
cameras when photographing on dusty
roads with a 2470mm zoom on one camera
and a 70-200 zoom on the other. This pre-
vents dirt from getting into the camera by
not having to switch lenses.
Pack light and tight. Secure your gear as
if youre checking bags even if you plan to
carry them on. I use a Pelican hard shell
rolling case and bring a collapsible Domke
F-2 for a day bag.
DURING THE TRIP
Standardize your exposures. Once on loca-
tion, youll want to focus on the scenes
around you, not the camera settings. I shoot
90 percent of my travel and landscape work
with a shutter speed between 1/250 and
1/500 second, and an ISO between 400 and
800, though I may go up to ISO 1600 when
I use long lenses and a faster shutter speed
and for sunrise photography. This allows my
aperture to stay between f/8 to f/16 for
sharper images and great depth of field.
Most lenses are at peak performance for
sharpness in this range.
Turn around. In my classes, we often
walk through a scene for three or four blocks,
then stop, turn around, and retrace our steps.
Its amazing to see how the light and the
scene change from the different perspective.
Shoot all day. Many old villages are best
photographed when the high, mid-day sun
can get down to the street level between the
tall, tightly packed buildings. By 3 p.m.,
everything in an old village is in shadow. So
I do my village shooting at mid-day, saving
the mornings and evenings for landscapes.
Delay the download. I dont download
any camera files during a trip. I dont bring a
laptop or any external drives. Instead, I
bring about 250GB of solid-state media
cards, and I leave everything on them until I
get home. My files are safer on the solid-
state cards, which wont break if I drop
them. Also, at the end of a long day of shoot-
ing, the last thing I want to do is spend a
couple of hours downloading images.
To see more from Jim Chamberlain, go to
chamberlainphoto.com.
26 www.ppmag.com
CONTACT SHEET
Picturesque travels
Jim Chamberlains lessons for staging the ideal photography journey
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Professional Photographer P RE S E NT S Business, Marketing, and Sales Strategies
What I think
The food looks great
to Joe Glyda
Whats the biggest challenge your busi-
ness has faced in recent years? When I
moved from Chicago to Tulsa, Okla., I
needed to introduce myself to an area
not needing as much commercial pho-
tography, especially in my area of ex-
pertisefood. Once youre committed
to changing your business location and
environment, you need to have pa-
tience in re-establishing your name.
Greet everyone you meet with a firm
handshake and a smile, anticipating
that they could be your next client.
What is the most tedious business task
you do? The toughest is the expense
reports. Getting them done in a timely
fashion and organizing my receipts
has always been a daunting task. Since
much of my work is on location, ex-
pense reports are needed to recoup
travel costs.
Do you have any employees? I depend
on assistants and food stylists when
needed. Not using the proper freelancers
can result in re-shooting and doubling
the cost of doing the job. Having the
right people on the photography team
will produce exceptional results.
IMAGE BY JOE GLYDA
PHOTOGRAPHY INC.
JGLYDA.COM
Q. Three new hotels are being built in the
town where my studio is located. I would
love to get some tips from you about how
to get my work on the walls of these busi-
nesses. Any suggestions would be greatly
appreciated.
A. This is a great question given there are
many benefits that would come from having
your work so visibly displayed. In looking to
see what type of work you do (as this would
affect my answer), I found that you work
mostly with kids, families, and high school
seniors. I imagine you are hoping to have
some of your favorite sessions framed as art
for the hotel.
There are many factors to consider in this
scenario. For instance, are these boutique or
chain hotels? If they are boutique hotels,
youll have a much greater chance of devel-
oping a relationship with someone who has
decision-making authority, and your work
could really add to the boutique feel. If they
are chain hotels, youll have a lot more red
tape to work through. Most chain hotels
have strict guidelines they must adhere to in
order to keep the corporate brand consistent
across all locations. They typically work with
an art buying company that makes purchases
in bulk, so this would be a much more diffi-
cult deal to strike.
Either way, there are questions you need
to consider. Are you planning on footing the
bill for the artwork or are you hoping to be
reimbursed for some or all of it? How is this
relationship going to be a win-win for the
hotel and you? What are you going to offer
to incentivize them to show your artwork?
Given that the work you do is very per-
sonal, you need to imagine ways to involve
the hotel in this relationship beyond simply
displaying your images. A few suggestions:
You could use their grounds for portraits or
photograph some of their key personnel. If
they have a kids club, you could create a
program to photograph children (for a fee)
while theyre there. Another idea would be to
ease into the relationship and see if the hotel
would allow you to give their guests a card
when they arrive. It could, for example, wel-
come them to the hotel and offer a discount
on a session with you while theyre in town.
This could be promoted as a thank-you gift
from the hotel to the guest, which makes the
hotel look good.
To get the ball rolling, find the decision
maker at each hotel. Think everything
through so you have a clear plan to present.
Whatever the deal is, it has to help make the
hotel shine brighter in order to be attractive
to the decision maker. You just might land
yourself a sweet deal. Good luck!
Kimberly Wylie, M.Photog.Cr., CPP
PPA Studio Management Services helps photog-
raphers build more profitable businesses. Email
questions to Jane Gaboury, jgaboury@ppa.com,
to get answers from SMS mentors.
STUDIO MANAGEMENT SERVICES PROFIT CENTER
30 www.ppmag.com
Ask the experts
Opening up hotel deals
MENTORS FROM PPA STUDIO MANAGEMENT SERVICES ANSWER YOUR BUSINESS,
MARKETING, AND SALES QUESTIONS. FOR INFO ON WORKSHOPS, GO TO PPA.COM.
Veer
To get the ball rolling, find the decision maker at
each hotel. Think everything through so you have
a clear plan to present. Whatever the deal is,
it has to help make the hotel shine brighter in order
to be attractive to the decision maker.
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Ive reiterated Stephen Coveys advice many
times: To be successful, you must begin with
the end in mind. That holds true regardless
of your definition of success. Photography
business owners are as diverse as the images
they create. But the most successful studios
have at least one thing in commona clear
vision of where they want to go.
But beginning with the end in mind
demands that you define some parameters
before setting goals. In the case of photogra-
phy studio success, you need to know your
target net income, sales goals, average sale
per session, and the number of sessions you
want to photograph.
If this sounds a bit intimidating, fear not.
PPA has just introduced a tool to aid members
in reaching their goals. Its called Square One.
The tool provides studio owners with infor-
mation, and it will also generate more ques -
tions. Dont worry, thats part of the process.
To help you understand Square One, Ill
give you an example. I met with a PPA mem-
ber today who has several goals: work less,
earn more per session, and relocate from a
home-based to a retail studio. I directed her
to Square One to start the process. This tool
would help her see what her business could
look like in terms of sessions, sales averages,
and overall expenses to reach those goals.
First, she determined how much she
needed to make this year (net income before
owners compensation). Second, she counted
how many sessions shed photographed in
each product line over the past two years.
Third, she determined her sales averages
for each product line for the past two years.
With the collected data, we followed the
link on ppa.com/squareone.
To get started with the calculation on
Square One, she entered four variables: net
income goal, the product lines she wants to
offer, whether shes planning for a home-based
or retail studio, and whether she wanted to
enter her session count goal or sales average
goal. Since she was trying to figure out how
moving to a retail space would affect her ses-
sion and sales averages, she chose retail studio.
After reviewing her session history and know-
ing she wanted to cut back on the number,
she decided to see what reducing her sessions
by 20 percent would look like. She knew it
would change her required sales average and
wanted to see what that number would be.
The first aha moment came when she
saw that shed have to increase her sales
average from $800 to $1,200 to achieve her
goals of reducing the number of sessions she
photo graphed, earning a net income of
$42,000, and moving into a retail studio.
More revelations followed.
With some concrete information in front
of her, we were able to start creating a plan,
concentrating on her marketing strategy and
sales plan in particular since the main require-
ment for reaching her goal is to increase her
sales average from $800 to $1,200 per session.
After reviewing her price list and discussing
her overall sales strategy, we determined that
increasing prices was not the answer. Given her
market, modifying her collection offerings
and implementing a sales plan to achieve the
increase in sales was a more logical strategy.
Visit Square One (ppa.com/squareone)
and play with it. Get comfortable using the
tool, and then revisit it occasionally to track
your progress. You can achieve your goals if
you prepare for success. I
Bridget Jackson is manager of PPA Studio
Management Services, which helps photog-
raphers make their business profitable.
Reach her at bjackson@ppa.com.
Start at Square One
Arm yourself with a powerful new tool
34 www.ppmag.com
PROFIT CENTER: MAKING MONEY
BY BRIDGET JACKSON
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Continuing on the topic of new marketing
techniques, Im now going to convince you
to give something away for free.
No, not free photography. Im referring
to creating a piece of educational digital
content that future clients will find valuable.
The majority of your marketing is probably
done to an audience you dont own. If you
primarily promote offers through marketing
vehicles such as Facebook, print ads, and
partnerships with other vendors, you dont
own those contact names, addresses, or
emails. The party youre marketing with
does, and those contacts can be taken away
from you at any time.
By creating free content and requesting
website visitors contact information in
exchange for it, you can build your own con-
tact database.
FREE CONTENT WORKS
A person who does an online search for
the type of photography you offer will typi-
cally visit a number of websites before
theyre ready to buy. This means that when
they visit your website, theyre likely to
exit the browser or continue researching
other photographers.
This doesnt mean your website was bad;
it might just mean the person isnt quite
ready to hire you (or another photographer).
If a website visitor exits the browser or
continues his research, theres no way for
you to keep in contact with him. And thats
where a piece of free content comes in.
Offering free content in exchange for a
users contact information is your ticket to
staying in touch with prospective clients.
Without that simple exchange of giving
valuable tidbits of helpful information in
return for contact information, your busi-
ness misses out on potential opportunities.
TOOLS
Most email marketing software platforms let
you create Web forms for your website. Build-
ing it inside the email platform benefits you
because any time a user completes a form on
your site, that contact information is auto-
matically entered into your email software.
GetResponse is one such tool, and Profes-
sional Photographer magazine readers may sign
up for a free 30-day trial to see how it works
(getresponse.com/create_free_account.html).
Not only can you build a web form that inte-
grates with your email database, but autore-
sponders allow you set up the system to
email the contact whatever educational con-
tent they requested from you.
If you already own studio management or
email marketing software, check to see if what
you use offers similar functionality before
investing time or money in something new.
WHAT TO GIVE
Mike Allebach of Allebach Photography
specializes in weddings for tattooed brides
and grooms. He offers website visitors a
free PDF for tattooed brides titled Six
Mistakes to Avoid When Planning Your
Wedding, geared to brides who will appre-
ciate his offbeat advice.
Wondering what kind of information
you should give for free? Download my
list of 25 ideas, grouped by different
types of photography disciplines, at
ppmag.com/profit-center. I
Angela Pointon advises photographers
through Steel Toe Images. Visit
steeltoeimages.com and click to add
her on Google+, Facebook, and Pinterest.
36 www.ppmag.com
Give to get
Let potential clients take helpful tips from your website
PROFIT CENTER: MASTERING MARKETING
BY ANGELA POINTON
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Photographer Mike Allebach offers a free PDF to visitors on his tattooedwedding.com website.
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Like many of you, I didnt start out in pho-
tography. I began playing musical instru-
ments at the age of four and earned a
masters degree in music from the University
of North Texas. Then I became a full-time
working musician. Somewhere along the way,
my photography hobby turned into a big
challenge. Although I was only in my mid-
20s when my career as a professional photog-
rapher began, it was clear that a long road
stretched ahead of me. Its tough to think
about starting a new discipline, a new career
path, from scratch. Fortunately, as it turns
out, we dont.
The study of music offers a multitude of
parallels to the study of photography. It
seems absurd to imagine a musician who
doesnt practice, for example. Early on, stu-
dents are taught scales and exercises to help
them refine the fundamentals and build a
strong foundation of technique. The conse-
quence of poor practice habits is poor per-
formance ability.
THE MUSICAL PARADIGM
As a musician will be limited by poor technique,
so will a photographer. Let me offer a solution
that is not only productive but also fun. Its
something photographers at all levels can learn
from and one that brings us together: play.
Play is fun. Who doesnt like to play?
Imagine a job where you are not only
allowed to play, but you are rewarded for it.
Good news: You have that job!
None of us got into photography
because we thought it was a great business
venture. Many of us, perhaps most of us,
got hooked on it as an art and could no
longer think of doing anything else with
our lives. Photography seeped into our
bloodstream. This is a romantic vision, one
that sounds a lot like falling in love. And
truth be told, it is a type of falling in love.
Musicians thrive on trying new ideas and
working on new concepts. Many musicians
study a wide range of styles. Knowledge of
other genres is not only essential for great
musicianship, but its also a blast. The more
we understand, the more depth we are able
to express. Musicians are literally rewarded
for exploration and joy. Its even in the job
description: playing music.
BY MICHAEL BARTON, M.PHOTOG.MEI,CR., CPP, EA-ASP, F-ASP PROFIT CENTER: MASTER CLASS
Playing it up
Photography is work, but playtime is also essential
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HOLDERS OF THE PPA MASTER OF PHOTOGRAPHY DEGREE SHARE ESSAYS AND IDEAS IN SERVICE TO THE INDUSTRY
Photo by: Ann Naugher, M. Photog., CPP previous Sunset Award winner, Southeast PPA District
Recognized!
Get
The Sunset Print Award
Awarded at select PPA events and other
competitions with a national recipient
chosen from among the winners.
Learn more at: sunsetprint.com
PEAK PERFORMANCE
To me, photography is performance art. As
long as Ive had a camera in my hands Ive
been playing, practicing, refining, and work-
ing out ideas. Its an approach similar to my
music process. With that in mind, these are
some techniques I use to help stay sharp.
Self-assignments. If you want to rekindle
passion for your art, pick a new muse and
get lost in it. Select one day each week to
block out some time and shoot for the sheer
enjoyment of it. If your images arent differ-
ent from year to year, your odds of success
drop off dramatically. Make time for these
exercises because you cant afford not to.
Discomfort. The more constraints one
imposes, the more one frees ones self. And
the arbitrariness of the constraint serves only
to obtain precision of execution, said composer
Igor Stravinsky. To paraphrase: Photograph
things you know little about and learn how
to make it work. Youll make mistakes. Youll
also find beautiful images in places you could
never imagine. Henri Cartier-Bresson photo -
graphed using a 35mm camera and a fixed
50mm lens. He would frequently print images
with the edge of the film showing to display
that they werent croppeda self-imposed
restriction that changed the world.
Competition. Through PPA and other
organizations, there are many opportunities
to put your work out there. Competitions
enforce deadlines. They make you learn to
refine and present work with precision. They
offer an opportunity to try new things. The
rules and protocol of competition can serve
as your constraints and help you be freer in
your work. As an added bonus, competitions
let you celebrate your ideas and creativity
through accolades and awards. Competition
can be a great aid in growing your business.
Range. Clients enjoy seeing your range of
work and your interests. By displaying your
self-assignments, you give them an opportu-
nity to appreciate your unique vision. Never
underestimate the value of the time you set
aside for yourself.
New avenues. There are times we find a
hobby or career in unexpected places. Every-
thing we love today was once a first. There
are first times waiting for you out there. Go
find them. There will be more mistakes than
victories and more dead ends than beginnings.
I have made a career out of playing
around and wouldnt trade it for anything.
Care to join me? I
Michael Barton is the 2013 recipient of the
PPA Grand Imaging Award for his album
The Curious World of Cone Flowers. He
was awarded the ASP Bronze medallion for
the same work and was named a 2012 PPA
Diamond Photographer of the Year.
michaelbartonart.com
40 www.ppmag.com
M.Photog. Cr. M.Artist. Youve seen the alpha-
bet soup that follows many a PPA members
name. Maybe youve wondered about these
acronyms. The designations are credentials
earned in PPAs degree program, the longest-
running professional degree program for pho-
tographers in the United States. Since 1937,
PPA has recognized professional photogra-
phers for sharing their knowledge, excelling
in photo graphic competitions, and volun-
teering their expertise to educate others
while elevating their own skills.
PPA offers three degrees representing
three types of expertise. Each degree is earned
by accumulating merits, which are like points.
Merits are received for accomplishments
that include succeeding in photographic
competition, attending workshops or semi-
nars, and sharing knowl edge as an instruc-
tor. Each degree is attained after amassing
a specific set of 25 merits. Photographers
must be PPA members to earn degrees.
Photographic Craftsman (Cr.Photog.)
The Photographic Craftsman degree is awarded
for service as an orator, author, or mentor.
This degree signifies that the recipient has
gone beyond the creation of images by dedi-
cating time to move the industry forward and
encourage the education of other professionals.
Requirements:
13 speaking merits
12 additional merits
Master of Photography (M.Photog.)
The M.Photog. is awarded for superior
photographic skills demonstrated through
the PPA International Photographic Com-
petition, advanced education, and service to
the industry.
Requirements:
13 exhibition merits
12 additional merits
Master Artist (M.Artist)
The Master Artist recognizes superior photo-
graphic skills demonstrated through the Artist
Exhibition category of the PPA Interna-
tional Photographic Competition (with
images evaluated for computer-applied
techniques and proficiency), advanced edu-
cation, and service to the industry.
Requirements:
13 artist exhibition merits
12 additional merits
In the coming months, well explore each
degree in greater detail.
EARNING MERITS
Merits are awarded for completing various
activities. Speaking merits are granted to
instructors who contribute to the PPA and
PPA Affiliate photographic community.
PPA Affiliates are a rich training ground
for photographers who aspire to speak at a
national level. And because affiliates have a
recurring need for talented speakers in
their geographic area for conventions, sem-
inars, and workshops, the opportunities are
plentiful. Many PPA members begin earn-
ing merits toward their Craftsman degree
by taking advantage of these local opportu-
nities. Working as an instructor at the
Affiliate level sets the stage for photogra-
phers who would eventually like to be
speakers and educators at a national level,
perhaps to be invited as an Imaging USA
presenter or a PPAedu instructor.
Exhibition merits are earned by success-
fully competing in PPAs International
Photographic Competition. Images can
merit at the district level by earning a Seal
of Approval or at the international level by
ranking highly at the International Photo-
graphic Competition. As many as eight
exhibition merits can be earned each year.
BY KRISTIN HARTMAN PROFIT CENTER: PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
An education of merit
Professional degrees acknowledge skill and service
42 www.ppmag.com
(Next month, look for a complete explana-
tion of PPAs International Photographic
Competition.)
Artist exhibition merits are similar to
exhibition merits and are awarded to pho-
tographers who successfully compete in the
Master Artist competition category. Like
exhibition merits, artist exhibition merits
can be earned at both district and interna-
tional levels.
Service merits are granted by PPA and
PPA Affiliates. They are awarded for volun-
teering time to the organization by serving
on a committee, attending a workshop, or
taking a leadership role.
A complete list of opportunities to earn
merits can be found at ppa.com/degrees.
CREATIVE & BUSINESS BONUS
Degrees are a way for professional photog-
raphers to improve their creative and pro-
fessional skills, and theyre also an aid in
promoting your business. Savvy profession-
als make the most of their degrees by edu-
cating potential clients about how their
commitment to the profession and their
continued education improves their skills.
Many degree holders report that theyre
able to more easily market their services
and show confidence in their prices because
theyve given clients a context they can
relate to for understanding professional
skill and commitment.
Pursuing my degrees has improved
my photography, says Mary Bortz,
M.Photog., CPP, of Fusion Edge Photogra-
phy in Robins, Iowa. You learn so much by
participating in print competitions. Ask the
judges for feedback on your prints no mat-
ter what the score was. It will push you to
be a better photographer. Your customers
will appreciate it, too.
Earning a degree isnt easy, but its never
too early or too late to start. In fact, you
could already have merits to your name by
virtue of maintaining your PPA member-
ship. Find out by logging in at ppa.com and
clicking My PPA. I
Kristen Hartman is director of member
value and experience at PPA.
March 2014 Professional Photographer 43
EVERY LOVE
STORY IS EPIC.
REALLY TELL IT.
Photos + Story + Mementos
The Photo Storybook.
psi l oveyoubooks. com
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BE MORE
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Professional Photographer P RE S E NT S Products, Technology, and Services
What I like
John David Pittman loves his nifty 50
Whats the best equipment investment youve ever made?
Probably my Nikon D800. Im not a gear nerd at all, and I be-
lieve you can make great images regardless of the camera you
are using, but I do love the details Im able to capture in my
portraits with that camera.
Any new gear youve got your eye on? I am experiencing a little
bit of gear lust over the new Nikon Df. Im intrigued by it.
I couldnt get through the week without Talking to my
mom. She gets me.
Little thing, big difference White and black foam core from
my local art supply store. I have stacks of this stuff in all sizes.
So many uses.
Whats your go-to lens? I absolutely love my nifty 50. My Nikkor
50mm f/1.8D is my all-time favorite, and with a $150 price tag,
it cant be beat. I had a colleague laugh at my use of this lens
until I convinced him to try it. Now he uses it all the time.
Aside from Photoshop, whats your fave creative imaging soft-
ware? I recently began using Alien Skin Exposure 5, and I am
really enjoying it.
IMAGE BY JOHN DAVID PITTMAN
JOHNDAVIDPITTMAN.COM
Watercolor papers have been manufactured
and used by artists for more than 500 years.
Photographers have embraced printing on
specially coated watercolor papers because
they can transform a digital image into a long-
lasting work of art with the crispness and
hyper-realism that photography can provide.
Sometime in the 1990s, Epson introduced
a product called Textured Fine Art by Crane
that I loved. I used it for many projects, includ-
ing a series of brightly colored floral prints.
It was later discontinued, but in February
2009, Epson announced a line of fine-art
coated watercolor papers under the Signature
Worthy brand. The papers are still available,
and they include Hot Press Bright (smooth),
Cold Press Bright (textured), Hot Press Natural
(smooth), and Cold Press Natural (textured).
Ive found all of them to be outstanding
papers and very distinct from one another.
Epson Exhibition Watercolor Paper Tex-
tured is the latest addition to the Signature
Worthy line and differs from the other
papers in a few ways. Apart from its texture,
which is considerably stronger than Epsons
Cold Press offerings (thanks in part to a
mold-made process), its base color is more
neutral in tone than Epson Hot Press Natural
and Epson Cold Press Natural. Like Epson
Hot Press Natural and Epson Cold Press
Natural, Exhibition Watercolor Paper Textured
is OBA-free (that is, it contains no optical
brightening agents). Thats an important
feature for many artists who prefer non-
brightened papers. The more neutral tone
means that colors will generally be a bit
brighter than prints made on a warmer paper,
and black-and-white images will have fewer
warm tones in the highlights and non-printed
areas than warmer OBA-free fine-art papers.
The papers feel reminds me of ultra-fine
sandpaper, with a visible, random texture.
The surface stands out visually from virtually
all other papers in its class, both in the printed
and non-printed areas of the sheet. Its weight
is substantial but not so heavy that it wont
fit through the standard feed tray of many
desktop printers. It moved easily through the
standard feed of an Epson Stylus Pro 3880
and an Epson Stylus Photo R3000. (The rear
manual feed is another option on these and
other printers.) The paper was also extremely
flat right out of the box, which is another big
plus because that helps to avoid small or large
head strikes, which can result in ink splatter
on the sides or other areas of a sheet.
I printed from both Photoshop CC and
Lightroom 5 using Epsons ICC profile from
epson.com. I started with a standard cali-
bration image and then printed a few other
types of both color and black-and-white
photographs, including flowers, pet por-
traits, and people. The color saturation,
sharpness, and black density with the sup-
plied profile were exceptional in all the color
prints. For the black-and-white prints, the
overall look and feel was fantastic, with deep
shadows, excellent sharpness, and notably
smooth transitions. The comparatively
cooler base helped keep the image looking
close to neutral from highlight to shadow
with no adjustments to the images.
Pet portraits looked great overall, but
portraits of people showed too much tex-
ture in the skin for my taste. If youd like to
use a textured paper for images that
THE GOODS: PRO REVIEW
Epsons Signature Worthy watercolor paper brings a distinct new look to the line
BY ANDREW DARLOW
Distinguished exhibition
EPSON EXHIBITION WATERCOLOR PAPER TEXTURED
A 13x19-inch print on Exhibition Watercolor Paper Textured in the output tray of an Epson Stylus Pro
3880 after being printed via the top-loading feeder.
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include peoples faces, consider the two
Epson Cold Press papers instead.
When I brushed my finger across the
printed paper, there was no flaking off of the
coating. This is a huge plus. Some other tex-
tured papers on the market suffer from this
issue, which can manifest as tiny spots. This
is especially an issue for papers that will be
bound in books or used in portfolios that will
be handled a lot. Still, do not stack multiple
prints of this paper or any matte watercolor
paper and travel with them in a portfolio box.
Use an interleaving paper between them
instead. Something smooth, lightweight,
and acid-free like Acid-Free Permalife
Buffered Paper (Watermarked) from uni-
versityproducts.com will work well.
One side of the paper is indicated for print-
ing, but I was happy to find that the non-print
side also reproduced images beautifully. In
fact, the other side shows a bit less texture,
so you essentially have two papers in one
(see Get the Most from Textured Paper).
Smaller prints may benefit from this more
subtle texture, which you can clearly see if
you compare the darkest areas of a print.
Also, be aware that an online search for the
words Epson watercolor paper will probably
bring up results for a different paper called
Epson Watercolor Paper Radiant White.
Epson has hit a home run with its Exhi-
bition Watercolor Paper Textured. It is not for
every type of image, but when paired with
the right photographs, it will definitely stand
out in a crowded field. The MSRP for a 25-
sheet box of 13x19-inch paper is $129. Mul-
tiple sizes and rolls are available. I
Andrew Darlow is a photographer, author,
and consultant based in the New York City
area. imagingbuffet.com
1. Brush the paper before printing. All
watercolor papers are susceptible to lint-
ing or dusting, which means that pieces of
lint or dust can shed off the paper before,
during, or after printing. To help reduce
this potential problem, lightly brush the
surface of each sheet with an artist brush
(aka dusting brush). Ive had success with a
popular soft horsehair brush called the
Alvin Draftsman Duster. Look for one with
tufts that are about 2 to 3 inches long and
with a 7- to 12-inch-wide brushing area.
2. Adjust the platen gap (paper thick-
ness adjustment). Many printers have a
setting that allows you to raise the height
between the print head and the paper to
accommodate thick papers. It not only
reduces the chance of head strikes, but it
also helps optimize sharpness. On the
3880, I used the top-loading feeder (the
main paper feed), then selected
Advanced Media Control and typed 5 in
the Paper Thickness box because the
thickness of the paper is 22 mil. A Google
search for 22 mil in mm returned an
answer of .558 mm, which means that 5
or 6 would both be fine to use.
3. Test multiple print resolutions. Even
though a print driver may have a Super
resolution option such as 5,760 dpi, its
best to do a few tests of a small image at
multiple resolution settings because a
lower print resolution such as 1,440 will
often produce results indistinguishable
from prints made at higher resolutions
when viewed with the naked eye. You can
download a sample image for free at
andrewdarlow.com/calib.html.
4. Try printing on the other side of
the paper. Even though Epson Exhibition
Watercolor Paper Textured is not mar-
keted as a two-sided paper, I found that
both sides can reproduce images
extremely well. When youre testing the
non-printable side of a paper, print
only on a small area initially, just in case
the ink runs (very possible with some
glossy or semi-gloss papers). There are
a number of advantages to having a
paper that can be printed on both sides,
including more surface area for print
testing as well as double-sided printing
for books, art cards, etc.
March 2014 Professional Photographer 47
This image shows the differences in paper tex-
tures among Exhibition Watercolor Paper Tex-
tured (Top), Epson Cold Press Natural (Middle),
and Epson Hot Press Bright (Bottom). For scale,
the height of the white margin of the top paper is
slightly broader than a nickel.
The Advanced Media Control section of the
Epson driver (Mac OSX, in this case) allows you
to adjust a number of parameters. I set the paper
thickness to 5 because I found it best to select
Ultra Premium Presentation Paper Matte as the
media type, which is a thinner paper (there is no
Watercolor Paper Textured media type). By set-
ting this number properly based on paper thick-
ness, sharpness will be optimized and head strikes
can almost always be avoided (see Tip #2).
GET THE MOST FROM TEXTURED PAPER (AND SIMILAR FINE-ART PAPERS)
THE GOODS: ROUNDUP
Adorable infant embellishments
BY JOAN SHERWOOD
Take a look at some irresistible elements for
your newborn and baby settings. We found
all of them at Imaging USA 2014.
COM-FUR-TABLE
This soft, custom-made Faux Fur line was
named The Baby Whisperer by Custom
Photo Props clients. It comes in multiple
colors and sizes and is machine washable.
Its perfect for newborn photo shoots and
looks spectacular in layers. Priced by size
from $13.75 to $80. customphotoprops.com
HEY SAILOR
This adorable Hudson anchor hat is just one
of the fabulous creative clothing designs at
The Blueberry Hill. Its hand knit in soft
navy 100 percent Icelandic acrylic yarn with
an embroidered white anchor. Sizes range
from extra-small for newborns to medium.
$28. theblueberryhill.com
GET SET
The Spring Harper Set from Intuition Back-
grounds is the perfect little scene for spring.
The versatile backdrop can be used for any
gender or age. The handmade stump is
crafted from aspen. Plus you get a flokati
rug, ivory wrap, and headband. Prices vary
with backdrop size, starting at $384.
www.intuitionbackgrounds.com
1
2
3
Spring sweetness
BABY SET PIECES
1
3
48 www.ppmag.com
2
Shannon Bower Photography
UrbanAlli Photography
Jennifer Nace
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When it comes to photographing rings on
the wedding day, I enjoy the opportunity to
be creative and make an image that stands
out. Lighting ring photographs with either
flash or hot lights gives them greater impact.
Yes, available light is quick and easy, but
images will be more dynamic with some
simple preparation and an understanding of
off-camera lighting techniques. Here are a
few gear, lighting, and background tips to
take your ring photographs to the next level.
1. Use a macro lens. While many lenses
are suitable for photographing rings, I pre-
fer a 100mm f/2.8 macro. It enables me to
get in close, capture fine detail in the stones
and settings, and fill more of the frame
with my subject, which creates visual impact.
2. Stop down. Its difficult to get a tack-
sharp macro image when handholding the
camera, and you increase the challenge when
you try to use a large, wide-open aperture in
an attempt to achieve a shallow depth-of-
field with selective focus. In practice, a tighter
aperture like f/5.6 or f/8 generally yields
better results. Proper exposure will require a
higher ISO settinggenerally 1600with a
slower shutter speed around 1/125 second. If
you use a lens with image stabilizing tech-
nology, you can stop down even further for
greater sharpness while still making crisp
images with a slow shutter speed.
3. Make it shine. Lets face it, every bride
loves showing off her new ring. To make sure
I capture the shine, I carry a small set of lighting
tools in my camera bag that I use specifically
for ring shots. This includes a small, variable-
powered LED light, two small flashlights, and
a 12-inch white/silver reflector. For nearly
every ring shot, I use a combination of these
tools to achieve the depth that makes rings
look more three-dimensional and stunning.
4. Light from the side, rear, top, or bottom.
To give ring photographs greater punch, avoid
lighting from the front. Instead, light rings
from the rear or side with one or multiple con-
stant lights. You can also aim light from over-
head or underneath if you have a glass surface.
When I position the main light behind the
rings, I typically use the small reflector to
provide a subtle amount of fill to open the
shadows slightly and make the rings sparkle.
5. Dark is OK. There is an axiom in pho-
tography that if you want to make an image
more interesting, dont light all of it. This
principle guides my ring photographs, and I
rarely try to create an evenly lit image. High
contrast between bright shiny metal and a
dark background can help focus attention
right where you want iton the gemstones.
6. Watch the background. In addition to
the lighting style, the background surface you
select for the ring photograph plays a signifi-
cant factor in the success of the shot. When
scouting out a location to place the rings,
look for dark, natural surfaces like wood or
granite. Glass always offers additional creative
lighting opportunities that can be dramatic.
7. Go low. For maximum impact, posi-
THE GOODS: TECHNIQUE
Make the bling sing by using the right lens, lighting, and skills
BY STEVEN JAMROZ, CPP
7 Tips: Rock the ring
Strong backlight from a window makes this wooden surface more interesting. I used books as gobos (off
camera right) to create the black streaks that add contrast and impact. I placed an LED light at camera
left to fill in the shadows and create dimension.
All images Steven Jamroz
50 www.ppmag.com
tion the camera at a very low angle to the
rings. This will create a heroic look. A low
camera angle enhances the reflection of the
rings on a glass surface, adding interest to
the image. Bringing the camera directly over
the top of the rings can also create an inter-
esting perspective, so dont automatically
assume that the best angle will be straight on
from the front. Experiment and give yourself
several choices to ensure that you deliver the
best possible result to the client. n
Steven Jamroz, CPP, of Bluewave Photo is a
wedding and engagement photographer in
Raleigh, N.C.
Reflective surfaces such as glass and granite offer opportunities for creative ring photos. To maximize
the reflection, shoot from a very low camera position and light from the sides instead of the front. This
can be done with flashlights, an LED, or a speedlight triggered with a radio device.
PROFOTO RFi
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An essential component of DSLR filmmaking
is high-grade audio capture. In addition to a
quality microphone, you need a digital audio
recorder. One of the most popular recorders
among DSLR filmmakers is the Zoom H4N
because of its compact body, relative ease of
use, flexibility, and comparatively affordable
cost. Zoom recently released the H6, and its
a huge improvement over its predecessor.
SIX INPUTS. Whereas the H4N allowed
for up to four channels, the H6 delivers (you
guessed it) six. Zoom advertises it as the worlds
first six-track portable recorder. You get four
XLR/TRS inputs on the side and a stereo
mic input at the top. The X/Y mic that comes
with the unit adds a 1/8-inch stereo line-in
input to the mix. The TRS combo allows you to
use 1/4-inch connectors for line level input.
Each of the inputs comes with its own
gain control, which is a physical knob. This
is one improvement on the H6 that I really
love. The H4N has a digital gain control that
uses buttons, which requires that you push
the button of the mic you want to adjust and
then use the side gain control button to
increase or decrease the audio. The knobs
make life so much easier.
Its also worth pointing out that each of
the four H6 inputs comes with a -20db pad.
This allows you to reduce that audio level
significantly if youre plugged into a system
with a really loud signal, which can often be
the case at weddings and events where you
have no control over the signal coming from
the DJs mixing board.
MODULARITY. While the H4N had a
built-in X/Y mic, the H6 has a modular capsule
system that lets you switch the kinds of mics
you attach. Just press the two small buttons
on either side to attach or remove the mic.
The main unit comes with an XYH-6
X/Y capsule mic, which feels sturdier than
the H4Ns built-in X/Y mic, and a mid-side
(MS) capsule.
The X/Y capsule is a unidirectional mic that
gives you the ability to record a cardioid polar
pattern at either a 90-degree or 120-degree
angle. Essentially that means the mic is less
sensitive to audio coming from the sides;
instead, its focused on audio directly
in front of it at either of the two angles.
This mic is great when you want to cap-
ture audio from a group of people directly
in front of you. I used it on a shoot where I
was recording audio during a discussion
between people sitting in a circle. It pre-
dominantly recorded whomever I aimed it
at and the one or two people who were also
in the line of sight.
The MSH-6 MS capsule mic, on the other
hand, captures audio directly in front of and
to the sides of the mic. There are two mics
THE GOODS: PRO REVIEW
The new Zoom H6 brings a volume of
desirable features and improvements
BY RON DAWSON
Clear gains in
audio capture
ZOOM H6 AND CAPSULE MICS
The X/Y capsule mic features two matched high-quality unidirectional microphones that can be set at 90
or 120 degrees. This covers a wide area but captures the sound sources in the center with clarity and definition.
52 www.ppmag.com
built into the unit: one unidirectional mid
mic capturing the audio in front, and a side
mic. So when I used the MS mic in the circle
discussion setting, it picked up more ambient
sound from the other people in the circle.
For the purposes of this review, I also
tried the SGH-6 Shotgun capsule (sold sepa-
rately). I love this shotgun mic. I used it on
an in-studio shoot along with a separate
shotgun mic on a boom pole and windscreen
(the Sennheiser MKH 416) connected to
one of the four XLR inputs and the modular
H6 shotgun. Using the 1/4-20 hole on the
bottom of the H6, I attached the mic to a
small tripod I could set directly beneath the
people speaking. I was able to position the
H6 Shotgun in such a way that the audio
from that H6 mic was more clear and
recorded less ambient sound than the shot-
gun mic on the boom.
The H6 shotgun mic is best used when
you can hold it in your hand or place it on a
tripod, as I did. Youre not going to put it
on a boom. It would be a great mic for wed-
dings and bar mitzvahs.
But lets say youre recording a small
band and you need more XLR connections.
Theres also an optional XLR/TRS capsule
for two additional XLR connections. Like
the other capsules, it too has the gain control
knobs and the -20b pad.
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PHONE (973) 822-1300, profoto.com/us






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Though it looks like a single mic, the mid-side (MS) capsule mic contains two elements: one unidirec-
tional mic and one bi-directional. Because the bi-directional element is separate, you can adjust the
width of the stereo image after it has been recorded, giving you variable room sound.
The Shotgun capsule mic, sold separately, gives
you a hyper-directional microphone, useful when
you cannot position a microphone directly in
front of your sound source.
POWER. If youve used the H4N, youre
going to love how the H6 handles power,
especially the improvement in how long it
takes to power on. One of the most frustrat-
ing aspects of the H4N is how long it takes
to power on completely. Ive never timed it,
but I would conservatively guess it takes 15
to 20 seconds, which seems like forever
when time is of the essence. The H6 powers
on in roughly 4 seconds.
The H6 does take four AA batteries com-
pared to the H4Ns two, but you can get up
to 20 hours of recording time. I found it odd
that the H6 does not come with an AC
adapter while the H4N did, but it can be
purchased separately with the accessory
pack. Given the battery life of the H6, you
may never need an adapter, but be prepared.
If your batteries die or you lose power in the
middle of a recording, you lose that audio
file. So if youre not using an AC adapter,
make sure you have plenty of battery power
left before recording a long presentation.
Last, if you connect mics that require power,
you can supply +12, +24 or +48v of phan-
tom power to selected inputs on all of them.
RECORDING. Heres another H6 fea-
ture that H4N users will love. When you hit
record, it starts recording. On the H4N,
when you hit record, it goes into standby
mode. You have to hit record again to start
recording. But because you can hear the
audio in standby mode, its easy to forget to
hit it again to start recording. I know many
a videographer (myself included) who has
missed recording audio because he or she
forgot to hit record that second time.
Both units can record to SD cards, and the
Zoom H6 can also record to the newer SDHC
or SDXC cards. Another odd aspect of the H6
is that it ships with a micro-SD card and SD
adapter. My guess is that this was done so
you could use the H6 interchangeably with
the companys H1, a smaller two-channel
mini-recorder that takes only microSD cards.
DISPLAY. The H6 has a full-color LCD
display that can be read in low light and
even dark environments. During playback,
the light above the respective track displays
green. When recording, the respective track
lights show red, making it easy to monitor.
USB CONNECTION. The H6 has a
USB output, allowing you to offload clips
directly from the unit to a computer. The
last menu is the USB menu. Select SD Card
Reader, then plug it into your computer. It
will mount as if you were attaching a card
reader. Make sure you eject the device before
you exit the SD card reader mode.
Using the USB connection, you can also
use the H6 to record directly to your computer.
In the USB menu, select Audio Interface
instead of SD Card Reader. Then select
PC/Mac, as opposed to PC/Mac using bat-
tery power. This will conserve your batteries
by powering the unit with the computer.
When I tested this feature using WireTap
Studio and Skype, it was recognized as one
of the microphone options.
54 www.ppmag.com
THE GOODS: PRO REVIEW
The H6 with X/Y capsule mounted and (left to right) the XLR/TRS, MS, and Shotgun capsules
Skype preferences window
Once youve connected the H6, be sure to
hit the button of the mic youre using (the
L/R button if youre using one of the cap-
sules or one of the four buttons if youre
using another attached mic).
FILE STRUCTURE. The last thing I
want to address is the file structure. This is
one aspect of the H6 I did not like.
Like the H4N, you can select one of 10
different folders to which you record your files.
On the H4N, each folder on the card contains
only the audio files. On the H6, however,
each audio file itself has a separate folder.
Within each of those folders is both the
audio file and a corresponding metadata file.
I dont know why they did this. When the
files are copied to your computer, you now
have to navigate through all those subfolders.
This can be a pain if you want to batch rename
the files or if youre in an editing program
and want to import the audio files. Its an
annoying feature of the H6. Im hoping they
get rid of it in a future firmware upgrade.
SO MUCH MORE. As was the case
when I reviewed the Zoom H4N a few years
ago (http://ppm.ag/r), there are far more
features than I can discuss here. For instance,
you can record in all the popular audio for-
mats (44.1k to 48k, 16-bit to 24-bit, mp3 or
WAV); you can also add compressors or lim-
iters while recording (to cut out a low-level
noise such as a refrigerator, for example).
What I love most about the H6 is the
fidelity and clarity of the sound (particularly
when I got a feed from a sound board), the
new display, the gain control knobs, and the
modularity. The shotgun mic is a strong rec-
ommendation if youre doing any kind of
event or electronic news gathering work.
The retail price is $399 (the H4N is
$299), and its well worth the investment.
Search for other Zoom H6 reviews and youll
find a plethora of filmmakers as ecstatic over
this recorder as I am. I
Ron Dawson is producer and creative
director at Dare Dreamer Media,
daredreamer.net.
My one disappointment with the H6 is its file structure. The recorder pairs each audio file into its own folder
along with a metadata file within one of up to 10 parent folders. As you can see, these are all in Folder 02.
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PHONE (973) 822-1300, profoto.com/us


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L N U E S P A H S
O F O R H P T I W
L B I S P A L L O C
S R O T C E L F RE
m t r o s s r a u o o n t o i t i d d t a s e t a e l h T
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Keeping
it real
Linda Hawkins finds a groove
in creative engagement sessions
BY JEFF KENT
All images Linda Hawkins
ngagement photography
has changed dramatically.
Once a basic add-on used for
announcements, engagement
portraits have evolved into
a significant part of the wedding experience.
In some cases, they take on a life of their own.
Linda Hawkins initiation into profes-
sional photography came at a time when
these changes were starting to take place.
About 10 years ago, her longtime photogra-
phy hobby became something more. People
started to notice her work and asked her to
make portraits or photograph their wed-
dings. As she picked up more jobs,
Hawkins got serious about photography.
She went back to school at the Rhode
Island School of Design to study photogra-
phy and hone her skills. Within a couple
years, she was ready to launch a photo stu-
dio in Greenville, R.I., though she would
keep her day job for several more years to
ease the financial transition.
With a focus on wedding photography,
E
engagement sessions were a natural adjunct.
Since that type of work was evolving at the
same time Hawkins was initiating her busi-
ness, she needed to evolve as well, keeping
pace with the demands of her clients and the
most recent trends in the field. The end
result, a decade later, is an approach that
treats the engagement sitting as a distinct
production, a full session that is related to
the wedding but often quite different in
theme and style. It is an opportunity to cre-
ate unique images without the pressures of
the wedding day bearing down on everyone.
It affords a chance to have fun, to craft
something that is as creative and individual
as each couple.
THE ICEBREAKER
Perhaps the most valuable function of the
engagement session is as an icebreaker. For
people who arent used to being in front of a
camera for hours at a time, wedding photog-
raphy can add to the stress of an already
hectic day. Hawkins uses her engagement
sessions to set a tone, to get to know her
60 www.ppmag.com
clients, and to help them relax about the pho-
tography process in preparation for their wed-
ding day. Doing an engagement session builds
a relationship, she explains. My clients get
to work with me on a non-threat day. There
is no outside pressure on an engagement
session, so its a great time to help everyone
be more comfortable with each other. That
way, on the wedding day, they know me and
I know them. Im not some stranger that
shows up and puts a camera in their faces.
In particular, Hawkins has found that
engagement sessions put the groom at ease.
In her experience, guys tend to be a little more
nervous about having their picture taken, so a
no-pressure session ahead of the big day
helps them loosen up. My engagement ses-
sions are very relaxed, she says. I tell the
guys that were just going to go out, have fun,
and let them enjoy each other. Sometimes I
tell them a little story or set them up and tell
them to talk to each other and relax. I put
them in situations that are comfortable, and
then I let them interact. Afterward, they
always say that they enjoyed the session, and
it really sets the scene for the wedding.
Hawkins also uses her engagement sessions
as a research opportunity. She learns about
the couples tastes, likes, and dislikes, maybe
some inside info about their families. I take
everything I learn at the engagement session
and apply it to the wedding day, she says.
Maybe the bride doesnt like her nose or the
groom has a favorite uncle or the brides sis-
ters dont get along. Learning all those things
gives you a leg up on the wedding day.
BEGINNING WITH
CONVERSATION
Hawkins starts out every wedding client rela-
tionship with a consultation. She likes to host
couples at her studio, where they can meet
her, see her work, view product options, and
talk in an interruption-free environment.
This is where she starts to learn about
clients personalities and begins to piece
together ideas for their engagement por-
traits and their wedding.
During this time, she asks a lot of ques-
tions: Where did they meet? Where do they
like to go out? What movies do they like?
What are their favorite colors, music, food?
What do they do in their free time? The con-
versation that leads out of those questions
usually inspires ideas. Im always looking
for something that we can use to personalize
the session, says Hawkins.
Hawkins conducts all of her engagement
sessions on location. Though she has a studio
thats equipped for portrait photography, she
prefers to get couples out and about, into a
space where they can interact and relax. Based
on their consultation, she develops a theme,
which could be as simple as a picnic in a field
or as complex as a vintage production com-
plete with an antique car and period outfits.
Working with Canon cameras and her
two favorite lenses, an 85mm f/1.2L and
a 70-200mm f/2.8L, she shoots mostly with
natural light. However, since she does a lot
of sessions in the late afternoon or early
evening, sunlight can fade fast, so shes pre-
pared with a Westcott Ice Light and an
AlienBees portable strobe. She likes to back-
light subjects and expose for the shadow to
bring out detail in the subjects.
In keeping with her emphasis on an easy-
going session, Hawkins doesnt pose subjects,
but she doesnt leave them up to their own
devices, either. A total lack of direction, shes
discovered, can make people uncomfortable.
When people arent used to being in front of
a camera, they usually crave guidance as well
as a healthy dose of reinforcement. So
Hawkins puts the couple in a situation,
directs them a little, and then steps back. If
she needs to step in and make a few adjust-
ments, she willlittle things, like moving a
hand or tweaking the angle of a head.
Once shes created the images, Hawkins
presents a range of product options, from
albums to customized guest books to large
matted prints that can be signed at a wed-
ding reception. She also designs save-the-
date cards for clients and offers a digital
package for couples who want to build their
own wedding website.
GETTING STARTED
To others interested in adding engagement
sessions to their product roster, Hawkins
suggests building a solid portfolio to show-
case your work, even if it means doing a few
early sessions for free. Shes had success
packaging her engagement sessions in
higher-end wedding packages or including
them with a wedding booking as a special
promotion. She also positions them sepa-
rately, using engagement portraits to pro-
mote her wedding work and introduce
her to potential wedding clients. And she
62 www.ppmag.com
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sometimes does sessions for couples who
are using another wedding photographer.
The dynamic is a little different, but theyre
still a lot of fun, she says.
You really want your wedding clients to
book an engagement session, even if you
need to discount it or throw it into a promo-
tion, she says. Engagement sessions bene-
fit everyonethe photographer and the
clients. The photographer gets to know the
clients, which makes the wedding images
better. And the clients get excited about the
images, and really excited about their wed-
ding photography after that.
Engagement portraits are just one part
of the puzzle, but professional studios need
to take advantage of every opportunity to
separate themselves from the masses in
todays highly competitive photography
market, says Hawkins. You always need to
provide the best service and the best prod-
ucts. Clients need to know the difference
between you and the other guy. Sometimes
if you dont show them the difference, they
wont know. All theyll see is the price. They
might not know that youre insured, that
you have all this education, that you have
years of experience, that you know how to
handle many different situations. People
dont understand those things. And they
often dont realize the difference in image
quality until they see it. Engagement ses-
sions offer another opportunity for you to
show them the difference. I
To see more photos by Linda Hawkins, visit
lindahawkinsphotography.com.
64 www.ppmag.com
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All images John David Pittman
John David Pittman seeks an inner truth
in commercial and editorial portraiture
BY JEFF KENT
BEHIND
THE MASK
eally, you could say
this whole thing is
all my wifes fault.
So says John David Pittman,
tongue-in-cheek, when characterizing
his wild ride into professional photog-
raphy. Born and raised in Arkansas, the
Little Rock editorial and commercial
portrait photographer contracted the
photo bug as a kid watching his mother,
an accomplished amateur, create
images. Like many people who even-
tually become professionals, he drifted
away from the art for many years.
Then about four years ago his wife
bought him a DSLR for his birthday.
The camera rekindled his dormant
passion, and Pittman began making
images again. He started with some
behind-the-scenes stills for his
employer, a video production company,
and expanded into personal projects,
and then marketing photography for
his wifes dance studio. Clients of the
studio started noticing his work and
asking him for portraits. As interest
grew, Pittmans wife nudged him to
study the art and technique in more
detail, even to consider turning his
passion into a profession.
68 www.ppmag.com
R
By August 2012, Pittman was leasing a
studio in downtown Little Rock and pursu-
ing his dream job as a professional photog-
rapher. Initially, he practiced a hodgepodge
of work, shooting anything people would
pay him to do. Then he discovered headshot
and portrait specialist Peter Hurley, learned
some techniques, and felt empowered to
focus on what he truly loved, portraits.
Pittman started pursuing corporate head-
shots, profile portraits for actors, and editorial
and commercial portraits for a range of media
and agency clients. He reached out to a cou-
ple of magazines, got noticed by some local
agencies, and the jobs grew. He now works
with a trade magazine publishing company,
a local theater, and a variety of other clients.
Its been an absolute roller coaster, he says,
but its been a lot of fun.
Whether working for a corporate client
or a regional magazine, Pittman emphasizes
real human emotion in his portraits. There
is a soulfulness to his work, something that
speaks to the truth behind the faade. How-
ever, he understands that his personal artistic
emphasis cant dominate every portrait,
especially when hes working for editorial
and commercial clients that need to use the
images as part of a larger project. There
must be a balance, a recognizable vision
paired with an ability to work within the
clients initiatives.
Early in your career, its important to be
adaptable, he says. As you advance in your
career, you become better known for a par-
ticular style. The challenge is developing a
style that can be adapted to the needs of the
project. Look at the work of someone like
Gregory Heisler. There is a distinct style that
runs across his photographs, but every image
is different. Early on, I struggled with how to
balance style and adaptability. I wanted to
make everything look really cool and have
this very distinct style, but then I realized
that wasnt the end purpose for the image.
Yes, it needed to come from my point of
view, but ultimately it needed to serve the
needs of the client.
To create that all-important balance,
Pittman practiced a creative adaptability
built around a common thread that could be
traced through every job, every image. That
thread became what he calls the human
quality, an element of genuine emotion that
makes you look at a portrait and know
theres a deeper story. We all walk around
with a mask on, he says. And that mask
70 www.ppmag.com
shows how we see ourselves. Often, its an
uglier version of who we really are. As a por-
trait photographer, its your job to break
down those barriers and get out of your sub-
ject the story that you were hired to tell.
Thats why I love portraiture so much: Its
about finding a distinct look for each indi-
vidual, which is more about whats inside.
Capturing that deeper level of persona is
difficult. Pittman concedes that some subjects
are easier than others, but the key is contin-
uous effort. You have to put in the time, not
necessarily in the shooting but in the overall
process, he says. You have to do the
research and the mental preparation to know
how to get what you need out of your subject.
For Pittman, getting what he needs from
a subject often means putting that person in
slight psychic discomfort. At the same time,
he tries to create a comfortable environment
for them to relax and be themselves. Those
two actions may sound counterintuitive, but
theyre not. The goal, he says, is to make
people feel like they are in a safe, supportive
space, and then turn their perceptions about
the portrait shoot upside down.
For example, most people think a busi-
March 2014 Professional Photographer 71
ness portrait session is going to be a very
businesslike exchange. Theyre going to walk
in, stand up straight, and put on their best
business faces. Theyre looking for quick and
easy and expecting something that doesnt
challenge them. In those situations, I never
start off by directing my subject, says
Pittman. Instead, I just tell the subject to
stand in front of the camera and smile. That
shot is always horrible. Its clearly the person
standing there with his mask on. I show it to
him and show him how bad it is. Then I give
him a little direction, take another photo-
graph, and show him how much better it is.
Right away, he can see the difference. He
might be knocked out of his comfort zone
because Ive asked more of him than he was
prepared to give me; Ive challenged him a
little. But the result speaks for itself, and he
begins to trust me and understand that Im
there to help him look better.
Essentially, you have to get people to
drop their guard, to let go of the act, adds
Pittman. If you allow people to just be them-
selves, they will just act like who they think
they are, and youre not going to get their
real personality. I view it as my job to break
down that wall, even just a little bit, to get at
something deeper. I dont want to simply
photograph their personas.
Pittman points out that different photog-
raphers with varied personalities can accom-
plish this goal in unique ways. Some
photographers are wacky, others direct and
authoritative. Pittman often chooses to be
quiet, simply not speaking any more than
necessary. When theres an awkward
silence between two people, it can create an
emotion, especially in the person who is not
in control of the situation, he points out.
And that emotion can be pure portrait gold.
That portrait gold is what will ultimately
sustain the art of portraiture, says Pittman.
All the technological advancements and eco-
nomic fluctuations in the photography
industry havent changed the simple fact
that people are fascinated by pictures of
other people. We enjoy looking at powerful
images of other humans, says Pittman. For
that reason, portraiture will be here forever.
Yes, the business will continue to evolve, but
it will be an exciting place to be, as long as
we continue to look for new ways to tell sto-
ries and to tell them through imagery. I
See more of John David Pittmans work at
johndavidpittman.com.
72 www.ppmag.com
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Famous wedding Photographer Moshe Zusman spent a day
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at Profoto.com/US/Zusman

M
o
s
h
e

Z
u
s
m
a
n
oe Glydas life has always involved pho-
tography. The son of a photography
buff, Glyda spent hours working with his
father in a bathroom-turned-darkroom.
I grew up with a set of tongs in my hand,
says Glyda. My father was meticulous in
making sure I knew which chemicals couldnt
mix and in what order to process things.
In 1978, an adult Glyda was working in
the mailroom of Kraft Foods when he was
offered an opportunity to join the photog-
raphy department. He jumped at the chance.
Glyda became a sponge, absorbing every bit
of information he could from the staff pho-
tographers he worked with. At one point,
Glyda was given a view camera to experi-
ment withan opportunity to expand beyond
his typical darkroom duties. The next morn -
ing, Glyda shared the three images he
had taken. Krafts photographers were so
impressed they encouraged him to join
PPA and enter its International Photo-
graphic Competition. I didnt know it at
the time, but my co-workers suggestion
had been a practical joke, he says. The
laugh was on them. Glydas images did
so well that one was selected for the cover
C O M M E R C I A L
Cake walk
Joe Glyda makes commercial work look like a picnic
BY PETE WRIGHT, M.PHOTOG.CR.
J
All images Joe Glyda Photography Inc.
March 2014 Professional Photographer 77
78 www.ppmag.com
of a 1978 issue of Professional Photographer
magazine.
In his 32-year career at Kraft, Glyda
honed his skills as a food photographer
and developed rigorous work habits. In
2009, he retired from Kraft, moved to
Oklahoma, and became an independent
commercial photographer.
The most important element in com-
mercial photography to remember is that it
isnt about your vision, its about the prod-
uct, advises Glyda. So many people, espe-
cially in portrait photography, have their
own style and think theyre going to carry
that over to commercial work. They need to
remember that theyre interpreting a vision
that an art director has sold to the client.
Glyda stresses the necessity of leaving per-
sonal feelings at the door: The product
comes first. If you dont like the color purple,
you cant turn down a job because it involves
shooting a purple bottle of perfume.
But adaptability never comes at the
expense of integrity. I wont put my name
on something that isnt the highest quality,
explains Glyda. If a client asks you to take
shortcuts or not do something that you
know is going to result in work that is sub-
standard, then you need to be prepared to
stick to your guns and know there is a possi-
bility you will not get that job. Ultimately,
ones reputation for producing great work is
worth far more than maintaining a client
relationship that results in photography
youre not happy with, he says.
Glyda says his most reliable source of
new work is word of mouth. And his most
reliable tactic for repeat work is service. It
really comes down to the way I treat my
clients and how I am during all of my inter-
actions with them, says Glyda. The things
you say as well as your actions have a lot to
do with the confidence clients have in you.
His advice: Pay attention to details, anticipate
problems, listen to clients, and find ways to
deliver what they need. When I started shoot-
ing more for Kraft, I was viewed as the kid
who would try anything, so the older pho-
tographers would give me the jobs they did-
nt want to deal with, Glyda says. It turned
out to be great training for dealing with clients
who have varied and demanding needs.
Patience is also key when it comes to
commercial work, says Glyda, since dead-
lines are constantly in flux. Throw your cal-
endar out the window. Youre at the mercy
of the client based on when they want or
need something shot. Its not uncommon
for him to be thrown a curve ball when he
arrives for a session.
The bidding process demands its own
forms of flexibility and patience. Glydas
rules of thumb: Give estimates instead of
quotes and dont talk money over the
phone. Hes found that offering an estimate
instead of a quote gives him the flexibility to
meet client needs that may evolve over the
course of the project. And having a face-to-
face meeting about pricing is a better way to
discuss issues such as image rights, equip-
ment and staff that will be needed for a
photo session, and how the image will be
used in the final layout, which will help dic-
tate photo constraints.
Glyda says that commercial photography
is all about being organized and shooting
methodically. You will spend more time
80 www.ppmag.com
setting up the shot and getting everything
exactly the way you want than you will
actually taking the photo, says Glyda
Accuracy is key. For example, if there are
16 pieces of pepperoni on a pizza then there
has to be 16 pieces in the photo. You have to
create the food so it looks like you just put it
on the plate. Making a good commercial
image is much like creating a portrait with
a candid appearance. You spend a lot of
time creating moments that look like they
just happened and your camera was there
to capture it, says Glyda. I
Joe Glydas online portfolio is at jglyda.com.
Pete Wright and his wife, Liliana, own PW
Photography in Richmond, Va.
March 2014 Professional Photographer 81
Prices, specifcations, and images are subject to change without notice. Manufacturer rebates are subject to the terms and conditions (including expiration dates) printed on the manufacturers rebate forms. Not responsible for typographical or illustrative errors. 2000-2014 B & H Foto & Electronics Corp.
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18-200/3.5-5.6 IS (72) ................ 699.99
55-250/4.0-5.6 IS USM (58) ........ 299.99
EF Lenses (USA)
20/2.8 USM (72) .......................... 539.99
24/2.8 IS USM (58) ...................... 599.99
28/2.8 IS USM (58) ...................... 549.99
35/2 (52) ................................................
35/2 IS USM (67) ......................... 599.99
50/1.8 II (52) ............................... 125.99
50/1.4 USM (58) .......................... 399.99
50/2.5 Macro (52)........................ 299.99
85/1.8 USM (58) ............................ 419.99
100/2 USM (58) ........................... 499.99
100/2.8 USM Macro (58) .............. 599.99
28-135/3.5-5.6 IS USM (72) ........ 479.99
70-300/4-5.6 IS USM (58) ........... 649.99
70-300/4.5-5.6 DO IS USM (58) ....................
75-300/4.0-5.6 III (58) ................. 199.99
75-300/4.0-5.6 III USM (58) ....................
TS-E MF Lenses (USA)
17/4.0 L ...2499.00
45/2.8 .....1399.00
24/3.5 L II ..2199.00
90/2.8 .....1399.00
EF L Lenses (USA)
14/2.8 USM II .............................. 2359.00
24/1.4 II (77) ............................. 1749.00
35/1.4 USM (72) ........................ 1479.00
50/1.2 USM (72) ........................ 1619.00
85/1.2 USM II (72) ..................... 2199.00
100/2.8 IS USM Macro (67) ........ 1049.00
135/2.0 USM (72) ...................... 1089.00
180/3.5 USM Macro (72) ............ 1579.00
200/2.0 IS USM (52) ...............................
300/4.0 IS USM (77) .................. 1449.00
300/2.8 IS USM II (52 rear) ......................
400/5.6 USM (77) ...................... 1339.00
8-15/4.0 Fish-eye USM ................ 1499.00
16-35/2.8 USM II (82) ................ 1699.00
17-40/4.0 USM (77) .................... 839.99
24-70/4.0 IS USM (77) ............... 1499.00
24-70/2.8 USM II (82) ................ 2299.00
24-105/4 IS USM (77) ................ 1149.00
28-300/3.5-5.6 IS USM (77) ...................
70-200/4.0 IS USM (77) ............. 1349.00
70-200/2.8 USM (77) ................ 1449.00
70-200/2.8 IS II USM (77) .......... 2499.00
70-300/4.0-5.6 IS USM (67) ...... 1599.00
100-400/4.5-5.6 IS USM (77) .... 1699.00
1.4x III Tele ..499.99 2x III Tele ....499.99
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* xcIusiveIy designed fcr 0igitaI 5LBs
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VR || V|o|a||c| Redu:||c|
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Wave Motor)
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10-22/3.5-4.5
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8brr e(u|..
16-35mm
8 ap|e||:a|
lens elements
8.b-2/ |/S|cp Ra|e
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//rr |||e| d|are|e|
we||| 18.G c/
SB-910 Speedlight
i-TTL Shoe Mount Flash
Tu||e| & ||uc|e:e|| ||||e| ||:|uded
u|de \c. 111.b'
S|rp|||ed |ap||:
User Interface (GUI)
Bcu|:e, SW|.e|
& Zccr Head
(17-200mm)
w||e|e Cc|||c||e|
we||| 14.8 c/
600 EX-RT
Shoe Mount Flash
Ou| a|d Wa|e| |e||a|:e
u|de \c. 19/'
w||e|e Rad|c
Multiple Flash System
Bcu|:e a|d
Swivel Head
Zccr Head (20-200rr,
18 Cu|cr |u|:||c|
we|||. 1b c/
Lumix DMC-GH3 Mirrorless System Camera
|a|e|ur A||c], wea||e|-Sea|ed Bcd]
|u|| HO 1080p V|dec a| G0|p
8.0" ||ee-A||e |CO
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Body Only........................................... #PADMCGH3B 16
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EOS-60D DSLR
1920 / 1080 HO V|dec Cap|u|e
O||C 4 |rae P|c:ec|
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wc|| W||| a|| Ca|c| E| & E|-S |e|e
Va||-A||e C|ea| V|eW 8.0" |||p-0u| |CO
b.8 |p Cc||||ucu S|cc|||
|S0 G400 - E/pa|dao|e |c 12800
HO|| 0u|pu| |c HOTV
Body Only #CAE60D .........................................899.99 18
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Pixels
EOS-70D DSLR
Oua| P|/e| C|0S A| W||| ||.e V|eW
O||C b+ |rae P|c:ec|
SO/SOHC/SO/C Ca|d S|c|
Ue Ca|c| E| & E|-S |e|e
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|u|| HO 1080p V|dec
Body Only #CAE70D ........................................ 1199.00
Kit with 18-55mm STM #CAE70D1855 ........... 1349.00 20
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EOS-7D D-SLR
Re:c|d HO V|dec 18 |eap|/e| Se|c|
8.0" |CO 100 V|eW|||de|
Ue Ca|c| E| |e|e C| Ca|d S|c|
Ou| & wea||e|-Re||a|| 8 |p Bu|| |cde
Se|e:|ao|e V|dec E/pcu|e a|d ||are Ra|e
\eW 19-Pc|||, A|| C|c-T]pe A| S]|er
|S0 100-G400 (e/pa|dao|e |c 12800,
Body Only #CAE7D .......................................... 1499.00
Kit with 28-135mm IS #CAE7D28135 .............. 1699.00 18
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Pixels
EOS-5D Mark III D-SLR
8.2" C|ea| V|eW H|| Rec|u||c| |CO
O||C b+ |rae P|c:ec| G1-Pc|||
H|| Oe|||] A| Ue Ca|c| E| |e|e
Oua| C|, SO Ca|d S|c| Up |c G.0 |PS
Ou|ao|e |a|e|ur-A||c] Cc|||u:||c|
|u|| HO 1080/80p a|d /20/G0p |c|ra|
Bu|||-|| HOR a|d |u|||p|e E/pcu|e |cde
Body Only #CAE5D3* ......................................3399.00
Kit with 24-105mm L IS #CAE5D324105 .........3999.00 22
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EOS-1Dx D-SLR
Oua| O||C b+ |rae P|c:ec|
|a|e|ur A||c] Bcd]
E]e-|e.e| Pe||ap||r V|eW|||de|
8.2" |CO |c|||c| Ue Ca|c| E| |e|e
Oua| C| :a|d |c|
1920 / 1080 HO V|dec Cap|u|e
||.e V|eW S|||| a|d V|dec Re:c|d||
G1-Pc||| H|| Oe|||] Au|c |c:u
Body Only #CAE1DX*.......................................6799.00 18
Mega
Pixels
EOS-6D DSLR
|u||-||are C|0S Se|c| 8.0" |CO
O||C b+ |rae P|c:ec|
Ue Ca|c| E| |e|e
SO/SOHC/SO/C Ca|d S|c|
Bu|||-|| w|-|| a|d PS Cc||e:||.||]
|u|| HO 1080p W||| |a|ua| Cc|||c|
Bu|||-|| HOR a|d |u|||p|e E/pcu|e |cde
Body Only #CAE6D .........................................1899.00
Kit with 24-105mm f/4 L #CAE6D24105 .........2499.00 20
Mega
Pixels
OM-D E-M1 Mirrorless System Camera
8.0" T||||| |CO Tcu:|:|ee|
||:|c |cu| T|||d S]|er
SO/SOHC/SO/C Ca|d S|c|
|u|| HO 1080p V|dec
Bu|||-|| w||e|e Cc||e:||.||]
Ou|/Sp|a|/||ee/ep|cc|
Magnesium Alloy Body
#OLEM1* 16
Mega
Pixels
032014
Page 2
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Flash System
FL-300R Flash .........169.95
FL-600R Flash .........299.95
FL-50R Flash ...........499.95
RF-11 Ring Flash .....249.95
Zuiko 4/3 System Digital Lenses
35/3.5 Macro ED (52) ............................................ 229.95
50/2.0 Macro ED (77) ............................................ 499.95
7-14/4.0 ED (72) ................................................. 1799.95
11-22/2.8-3.5 ED (72) ........................................... 799.95
12-60/2.8-4 ED SWD (72) ...................................... 999.95
14-42/3.5-5.6 ED (58) ........................................... 249.95
18-180/3.5-6.3 ED (62) ......................................... 499.95
EC-14 1.4x Teleconverter ......................................... 439.95

AF Flash System
AF-360FGZ ........................ AF-540FGZ ........................
DA Digital AF Lenses
21/3.2 AL Limited Pancake (49) ......................................
40/2.8 Limited Pancake (49) ...........................................
70/2.4 Limited HD (49) ......................................................
10-17/3.5-4.5 ED IF (77) ..................................................
16-50/2.8 ED AL IF SDM (77) ............................................
50-135/2.8 ED IF SDM (67) ...............................................
50-200/4-5.6 ED WR (52) .................................................
55-300/4-5.8 ED (58)........................................................

Flash System
HVL-F20M ............... 149.99 HVL-F20S ................ 149.99
HVL-F43M ............... 398.99 HVL-F60M ............... 548.00
Digital Lenses
24/2 Carl Zeiss (72) ............................................. 1399.99
50/1.4 (55) ............................................................ 449.99
100/2.8 Macro (55)................................................ 799.99
16-80/3.5-4.5 DT Carl Zeiss (62) ........................... 999.99
11-18/4.5-5.6 DT (77) ........................................... 799.99
18-250/3.5-6.3 DT (62) ......................................... 649.99
70-200/2.8 G APO (77) ........................................ 1999.99
75-300/4.5-5.6 (55) .............................................. 249.99
D4 DSLR
RAw, T|||, JPE, RAw+JPE |||e 8.2" |CO
W||| ||.e V|eW |/-|c|ra| (|u||-||are, C|0S
Se|c| 1080p HO B|cad:a| 0ua|||] V|dec
E/PEEO8 |rae P|c:ec| 100-12800 |S0
Ccrpa||o|e W||| |c| \|||c| 0p||:
|a|||/, Ce||e|-we|||ed, Spc| |e|e|||
C| T]pe 1 & /0O Ccrpa||o|e
\||c| ||:. ||r||ed Wa||a||] ||:|uded
Body Only...................... #NID4 ................... 5996.95 16
Mega
Pixels
D800 D-SLR
8b.9/24rr C|0S |/ |c|ra| Se|c|
8.2" |CO |c|||c| \||c| | |cu|| |e| |cu||
C| & SO Oua| Ca|d S|c| 0p||:a| |cW-Pa ||||e|
E]e-|e.e| Pe||ap||r V|eW|||de|
1920 / 1080/80/2b/24p HO V|dec Cap|u|e
|a|||//Ce||e|-we|||ed/Spc| |e|e|||
Bu|||-|| ||a| + |-TT| ||a| Cc|||c|
\||c| ||:. ||r||ed Wa||a||] ||:|uded
Body Only............................ #NID800 ............................2996.95 36
Mega
Pixels
Alpha NEX-6 ||||c||e S]|er Care|a
|a| H]o||d A| W||| P|ae-Oe|e:||c| A|
8.0" |CO Ue Sc|] E-rcu|| |e|e
/A 0|EO T|u-|||de| EV|
SO/SOHC/SO/C & |S P|c Ouc/P|c H-Ouc
Ca|d S|c| Cap|u|e 1080 HO V|dec
w|-|| Capao|e |a| 10|p Bu|| S|cc|||
P|a]|erc||e Care|a App
with 16-50mm Lens .............................#SONEX6L* 16
Mega
Pixels
285HV Professional
Auto S|ce |cu|| ||a|
u|de \c. 120'
Au|cra||: e/pcu|e
|a|e |c /0'
4 au|c |/|cp e||||
Rerc.ao|e e|c|
Bcu|:e Head
Zccr Head (28-10b, we||| 14.9 c/
#VI285HV .....................................79.95
Qfash TRIO
Pa|aoc||: Re1e:|c| ||a|
u|de \c. 110'
Bcu|:e a|d
Swivel Head
Bu|||-|| ||ee/W||e
Rad|c w||e|e TT|
H|| Speed S]|:
USB Pc|| TT| :crpa||o|e
=0U0|8 ....................................875.00
622 Super Pro TTL
Ha|d|e |cu|| ||a|
Re(u||e Head
TT| W||| app|cp||a|e rcdu|e
u|de \c. 200
Bcu|:e & W|.e|
Au|c |/S|cp |/2.0, 2.8,
4.0, 8.0, b.O, 11 & 1O
Va||-PcWe|
=SUO22S ..................................196.95
58 AF-2 TTL
S|ce |cu|| ||a|
u|de \c. b8'
|u|| TT| |cde
Zccr Head (24-10b,
Bcu|:e & SW|.e| Head
Upda|e .|a USB Pc||
we|||. 12.8 c/
=|Eb8A|2 .............................. 399.99
Octacool Light Kit
W||| 29.b" 0:|coc/
0:|a:cc| O c| 9
|arp ||/|u|e
Rerc.ao|e
A|ur||ur
Re1e:|c|
28W |arp
|||e||a| O|||u|c| Ba|1e
Octacool-6 =||0COSB ........................................ 199.95
Octacool-9 =||0C9SB ........................................ 259.00
Octacool-6
Front
Octacool-9
Ba:|
Background System
Background Stands
E:c|cr] ..............................74.95
Port-A-Stand .................... 114.95*
|u||| 8 Pc|e.au|| ..............217.99
Paper Backgrounds
Available in 48 Colors
b8" / 12 ]d.........................24.95
10/" / 12 ]d W/Cc|e ...........45.95
* FREE!
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D5200 DSLR
|u|| HO V|dec W||| |u||-T|re Se|.c A|
8.0" Va||-A||e |CO ||.e V|eW
Ue \||c| A| |e|e (1.b/ |a:|c|,
SO/SOHC/SO/C Ca|d S|c|
A.a||ao|e || B|a:|, B|c|/e c| Red
\||c| ||:. ||r||ed Wa||a||] ||:|uded
D5200 Kit with 18-55mm VR #NID52001855* ............896.95
D3200 ||| B|a:| W/18-bbrr VR #NID32001855* .......599.95
D3100 Kit with 18-55mm VR #NID31001855 ..............429.95 24
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Pixels
D7100 DSLR
|a|e|ur A||c] Bcd] |c||u|e Re||a||
E/PEEO 8 |rae P|c:ec| 8.2" |CO
1080p |u|| HO V|dec Cap|u|e
A::ep| \||c| A| |e|e (1.b/ |a:|c|,
Oua| SO/SOHC/SO/C Ca|d S|c|
Bu|||-|| ||a| W||| Ccrra|de| |u|:||c|
\||c| ||:. ||r||ed Wa||a||] ||:|uded
Bcd] 0||] #NID7100 .................................................. 1199.95
Kit with 18-105mm VR #NID710018105 .....................1599.95 24
Mega
Pixels
1 J3 Mirrorless Digital Camera
|||e|:|a|eao|e 1 \|||0R |e| S]|er
|c||c| S|ap|c| a|d ||.e |rae Cc|||c|
|u|| HO 1920 / 1080/O0| V|dec 8.0" |CO
SO/SOHC/SO/C Ca|d S|c| S|ru||a|ecu HO
|c.|e a|d S|||| Cap|u|e A.a||ao|e || B|a:|, Be|e,
Red or White \||c| ||:. ||r||ed Wa||a||] ||:|uded
Kit with 10-30mm VR #NI1J31030* ................... 399.95
||| W||| 10-80 & 80-110rr VR #NI1J32LK* ...... 649.95
||| W||| 10-100rr VR =\|1J810100* ............... 849.95 14
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Pixels
D610 DSLR
|/-|c|ra| (|u||-||are, C|0S Se|c| 8.2" |CO
Ue \||c| A| |e|e SO/SOHC/SO/C Ca|d S|c|
E/PEEO 8 |rae P|c:ec|
E/pa|dao|e Se||||.||] |c |S0 2bO00
|u|| HO 1080p V|dec Re:c|d|| a| 80 |p
|u|||-CA| 4800 A| Se|c| W||| 89 Pc|||
\||c| ||:. ||r||ed Wa||a||] ||:|uded
Bcd] 0||] #NID610 ....................................................1996.95
Kit with 24-85mm VR Lens #NID6102485 .................2596.95 24
Mega
Pixels
Alpha A7 DSLR
|u|| ||are E/rc| C|0S Se|c|
O||e:| Ccrpa||o||||] W||| E-rcu|| |e|e
8.0" T|||ao|e T|T |CO |u|||-|||e||a:e S|ce
SO/SOHC/SO/C, |S P|c Ouc/
P|c H-OucCa|d S|c|
|u|| 1080/O0p W||| U|:crp|eed 0u|pu|
Bu|||-|| w|-|| a|d \|C O||e:| A::e |||e||a:e
Bcd] 0||] #SOA7B
Kit with 28-70mm Lens #SOA7KB 24
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Pixels
Panel Frame Refector Kits
Zeo|a c|d / Zeo|a S||.e|
Re.e||o|e TWc S|ded |ao||:
Cc||ap|o|e
A|ur||ur
A||c] ||are
Tcc|-||ee Aero|]
Padded S|cu|de|
Ba ||:|uded
Instant Final
Price Rebate Cost
43 x 67" #IMFPK436ZGZS ....... 299.95 ......$60.... 239.95
59 x 82" #IMFPK598ZGZS ....... 464.95 ....$100.... 364.95
b9/82" S||.e|
48/O/"
Gold
ts a bone chilling minus 12 degrees in
Ely, Minn., and photographer Layne
Kennedy is lying on his chest, almost
face down in the snow, and aiming
his Nikon D3 up at a fast-approaching dog
sled. A team of powerful, pure-bred Cana-
dian Eskimo dogs, the so-called Sherman
tanks of the mushing world, pulls the sled.
As the dogs plow through and kick up 2
feet of powdery February snow, Kennedy
turns to a group of photographers with him
and, like a general addressing his troops,
commands, Get ready, theyre on their way.
Kennedy has completed countless edito-
rial photography assignments for clients
such as National Geographic Traveler,
Smithsonian, Sports Illustrated, and
Islands. Today, however, hes teaching a
photography workshop to eight amateurs
who are spending five days with him in the
wilds of northern Minnesota honing their
photography skills.
This mornings lesson covers perspective.
To shoot dog sledding effectively, you have
to become a dog, Kennedy told his workshop
students earlier in the day. To get a shot of a
dog that looks like a dog you have to get down
E D I T O R I A L
Cool customer
Layne Kennedy treks the world with amateur photographers in tow
BY ROBERT KIENER
I
All images Layne Kennedy
lower than the dog. From that perspective we
can get a shot that were not used to seeing.
Taking their cue from Kennedy, the eager
photographers have hunkered down in the
snow. As the pack of hearty dogs approach
and then pass in a blur of fur, legs, teeth (and
saliva), the students excitedly click away.
Perfect! says Kennedy as he gets up on
one knee. Now lets try that again.
SIDEBAR WORK
Kennedy, 55, has been a widely sought-after
editorial photographer for more than 30
years, and his list of credits and portfolio are
world class. He has produced several of his
own coffee table photography books and
contributed to books published by Time-
Life, The Nature Conservancy, and the
National Geographic Society, among others.
While he admits that his first love is edi-
torial photography, he also notes that the
business is not as lucrative as it used to be.
Although he still gets editorial assignments,
Magazines have cut back, and book pub-
lishing is not what it once was, he explains.
The collapse of editorial assignments has
forced photographers to find new ways to
create works and still pay our mortgages.
One of those ways is leading or taking
part in photo workshops. Like other accom-
plished professional photographers, Kennedy
considers participating in multi-day work-
shops a new sidebar to our business model.
According to the Minneapolis-based pho-
tographer, there is a growing demand from
eager amateurs for workshops, especially in
more exotic locales.
As Kennedy explains, There are a lot of
people who want to photograph places around
the world but they dont want to get bogged
down in making all the arrangements such
as securing permits and lining up hotels and
shooting locations. We can do this for them.
And we can get them to the magical places
around the planet and be available for pho-
March 2014 Professional Photographer 85
tographic discussions, techniques, while in
the field. Most of the photo workshops
and tours are designed with comfort in
mind, featuring nice places to stay with
great food and access.
Kennedy led his first photo workshop in
1985 and until recently had done about four a
year. However, since the magazine industry
began to cut back Ive upped my workshop
participation to eight or so a year, he explains.
Fees for the workshops vary. For example, a
recent four-day Mentor Series workshop to
the Virgin Islands costs participants $1,399,
excluding travel, room, and board, while his
five-day Dog Sled Photo Workshop in
northern Minnesota is $1,575 all-inclusive.
As a rule, Kennedy hopes to make a
profit of at least $300 per participant on
average; so revenues can range from as little
as $1,000 per workshop to $5,000 or more,
depending on the number of attendees and
the length of the workshop. You may not
get rich, but its a great way to make up for
cutbacks in assignments and other work, he
explains. Workshop shots also help him beef
up his portfolio and his stock library, which
is represented by Corbis.
Some of the workshops Kennedy partici-
pates in have come from personal connec-
tions or have grown out of an editorial
photography assignment. For example,
while shooting a story on dog sledding, he
and the company that ran the tours decided
to offer a photo workshop. It proved popu-
lar, and weve done one every year since,
says Kennedy. Hes also been invited to
participate in existing workshops, such as
the Mentor Series Workshops, which he
has done since 2001. Im like the hired
gun at these, he explains.
STUDENT BODY
Recently, Kennedy decided to organize his
own photo workshop in Costa Rica. Its a
place Ive always wanted to go to but had
never gotten an assignment that took me
there, he says. He went to the country and
scouted locations. Kennedy enlisted a friend
with local knowledge to act as a producer
who will take care of all the details such as
transportation, lodging, and scheduling.
Im not interested in handling details
and want to stay on the creative side, says
Kennedy. For example, I dont want to
have to find the bus driver at the airport
when we arrive. Id rather find the cool shot
to photograph at the airport.
Participants will pay their own travel
expenses to Costa Rica. After deciding on a
price for the workshop, Kennedy and his pro-
ducer/partner will send out an email and social
media marketing blitz to former workshop
attendees and others on their mailing lists.
Based on his experience, workshops are most
successful if they are limited to three to five
days, and Kennedys workshop students have
ranged in age from teenagers to octogenarians.
Because of the time and travel involved, he
hopes to earn up to $10,000 for this workshop.
We only have to get eight to 10 participants
to make this economically worthwhile, so its
not that difficult, says Kennedy.
Any more than 10, and you tend to get
subgroups that pair off, making it harder to
talk to everyone at the same time, he says.
More than 10 also means more vehicles
and more time spent managing people.
That means less time shooting pics.
Accessibility is also important. On his recent
scouting trip to Costa Rica he hiked to a drop-
dead beautiful waterfall but realized not all
of his students could complete such a rugged
trek. Kennedy now asks himself, Could my
mom and dad get to this spot? when he
chooses places to bring students. He also
advises that students not have to travel more
than three hours a day to locations. You need
at least half a day of shooting per day, he adds.
SOMETHING NEW TO LEARN
All of Kennedys workshops include a cri-
tique session where he advises students on
what they could have done to improve their
shots. Lessons typically include techniques
such as panning, shooting tight, perspective,
and using available and low light. I tell
workshop attendees that they will learn
maybe 10 things but most of them will only
remember two, he explains. But if you
learn those two new techniques and put
them in your visual tool bag, you had a good
workshop. One workshop wont make you a
great photographer, but it will make you a
better, more informed photographer.
Minnesota-based Joseph Kandiko, M.D.,
who has attended more than 20 of Kennedys
workshops since 1988 says, Laynes combi-
nation of skill and enthusiasm never fails to
get my creative juices flowing. I keep going to
his workshops, getting my Layne fix, because
hes continually reinventing himself. Theres
always something new to learn from him.
Workshops are a great way for skilled
photographers to increase their revenues,
but for Kennedy and others, theyre not just
about earning more money. Shooting pic-
tures is in my DNA, he says. Like assign-
ments, workshops are another vehicle to get
me out into the world shooting. They have
enabled me to continue photographing and
getting paid for it. And I get to pass on what
Ive learned to others. Thats a combination
that is hard to beat! I
See Layne Kennedys portfolio at
laynekennedy.com.
Robert Kiener is a writer based in Vermont.
88 www.ppmag.com
ts funny sometimes the way things fall
into place. Like how Tracey Buyce
started out using her speech-language
pathology education to help adults recover-
ing from brain injuries, and she wound up
rescuing stray dogs in Mexico and photograph -
ing couples in the company of their pets. For
Buyce, the switch from a clinical career to a
creative one resulted from the emotional pain
of losing her mother in 2007 to a heart attack.
At the time, Buyce was dabbling in photog-
raphy and had enrolled in graduate school
to work on a masters degree in counseling.
It was very traumatic, says Buyce from
her Saratoga Springs, N.Y., studio. I with-
drew from grad school, resigned from my
job, and started my business full-time. I
never looked back. Losing her so unexpect-
edly really put life into perspective.
Just three years later, that message hit
home again when Buyces father passed away.
I continued to evolve out of loss to find
myself, she says about those difficult years,
crediting the support of her husband, Pete,
with getting her through it. You really dont
know how much your parents mean to you
until theyre gone. I miss them every day. I
carry their memory with me and am defi-
nitely much more of an emotional shooter
now. I love photographing families and
weddings and animals. That was big for me.
After losing both parents, I decided I was
going to do what made me happy.
RELATING TO ANIMALS
After that turning point, Buyces goal was to
photograph and show in her portfolio only
what brought her joy. It wasnt surprising that
All images Tracey Buyce
Wild and wonderful
Tracey Buyce captures some of her best engagement work in the company of animals
BY STEPHANIE BOOZER
E N G A G E M E N T S
I
what she loved also made her clients happy.
Buyces two dogs made their way into her
online portfolio and grabbed the attention of
prospective clients. Ironically, one of the
images that garnered the most attention
from wedding clientele featured her dog
Roxy in mid-leap from a dock with a
fluttering American flag safety
pinned to her collar.
I have booked more weddings
from that one photo than my actual
wedding work, and it doesnt have
anything to do with a wedding, she
says. Once I put more of my animal
work out there, things just opened
up. Well over 80 percent of my cou-
ples getting married have dogs, and
they hire me because Im a dog lover.
People relate to that.
Buyce says its natural for people to want
their pets in engagement shots. Its essen-
tially their first family portrait.
Animals in engagement portraits create
natural moments, says Buyce. They add
humor and help the couple feel more com-
fortable. The unpredictability is the best.
Saratoga Springs boasts ample farmland
and lush green space for pastoral settings,
and its just a few hours journey from New
York City and Boston. This makes it a popular
destination for engaged couples. Buyces rep-
utation for being comfortable in the
company of animals led to a project
photographing five family-run dairy
farms for the nonprofit New York
Animal Agriculture Coalition. That
work resulted in more, including a
recent engagement session at which
the couple wanted their horse and two
dogs in some of the images. The dogs
were a little afraid of the horse, but
the momentary craziness produced
what Buyce looks forreal moments.
I got this great photo of one of
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the dogs climbing up on the groom and the
horse is in a fenced area just behind, almost
like hes photobombing the scene, she says.
THE CLIENTS SHE WANTS
Buyce is open to including just about any
animal in her sessions. At one wedding a
dozen chickens roaming through the cere-
mony resulted in one of Buyces favorite
images: a chicken literally escaping from a
brides arms. Hair is flying and feathers are
splayed. Though she was able to capture sev-
eral shots with the chicken calmly in the
brides gentle hold, this brief moment of
unpredictability is the one that draws the
attention of Buyces kind of client.
I put that image dead center on my web-
site for a reason, says Buyce. Its going to
distinguish brides with a sense of humor
from brides just looking for a fashion shoot.
Real moments happen. My business model
and branding are true to who I am, so I get
the clients that I want.
Buyce feels so blessed by her thriving
business that she takes the opportunity to
donate time and photog raphy to CANDi
International, whose purpose is sterilizing
animals throughout Mexico and the Caribbean
and finding homes for the animals in direst
need. Three or four times a year, Buyce travels
to Mexico to help round up stray animals,
photograph them, and assist as veterinari-
ans spay and neuter. Almost 900 cats and
dogs were sterilized during her last five-day
visit. She almost always brings home at least
one dog to adopt out.
Im a firm believer that if you have a tal-
ent, whatever it is, you have to pay it for-
ward, says Buyce, who serves on CANDis
board. We use my photography for aware-
ness, including pamphlets in hotels [in
Mexico and the Caribbean] so tourists can
see that something is being done.
Buyce says this volunteer week is diffi-
cult and draining. She cries nearly every
day that she sees the animals in such dis-
tress, but the fulfillment she feels is worth
the anguish. Its also a point of connection
between Buyce and her clients.
If my brides are letting me into their lives,
Im letting them into mine, she says. My
social media isnt just about what wedding
Im shooting; its about my personal life, my
dogs, and volunteer projects. When youre
being yourself and not trying to just be a rock
star of the photography world, you can be
more comfortable in your own skin. Its OK to
be vulnerable because it makes you more relat-
able. People dont relate to you being a pho-
tographer; they relate to you being you. I
See Tracey Buyces work at traceybuyce.com.
Stephanie Boozer is a writer in Charleston, S.C.
94 www.ppmag.com
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New beginnings
BY SUSAN MICHAL, M.PHOTOG.CR., CPP, ABI
PPA Member Newsletter
I am so proud to be the president of an
association that exists only to support pho-
tographers. When I was asked to serve on
the PPA Board of Directors, I couldnt say
no. How could you not be willing to serve
an association that has given so much to
photographers? PPA is my family, and its
yours, too.
I became a photographer after a 25-year
career in music. I understood what it took
to be an artist and did not intend to be a
starving one!
Photography has allowed me to become
a part of my clients lives and has given me
access to events that I would not otherwise
have been able to experience. I have pho-
tographed celebrities, Olympians, and U.S.
presidents. I have been on the 50-yard line
at the Super Bowl and have photographed
children in their first days of life and, sadly,
sometimes in their last.
What I love most is what I get to do
every day in my studio. I get to see how
much parents love their children and I get
to be a part of important life events. Many
clients have become like family to me.
Photography has afforded my family many
luxuries in life, and I never take for granted
how lucky I am to make a living doing
something I love so much.
Over the next year, I will share some of
the things that have meant the most to my
business and career. I will also introduce
you to the photographers who have made a
difference in my life. For those of you just
getting started, Ill tell you how great the
photography business can be. And for those
who, like me, have been at it a while, I will
share the passion I have for both the craft
and the business of photography.
Recently, the PPA Speaker Selection
Com mittee began choosing speakers for
Imaging USA 2015. The lineup for Nashville
is going to be amazing. I just need to figure
out how to be two places at once because I
dont want to miss any of it. And if you see
me there, please come say hello. I love to
make new friends. Imaging USA is a great
place to mingle with peers, learn new tech-
niques, and really get inspired.
Besides Imaging, there is no better way
to become the best you can be than the
International Photographic Competition. I
started entering prints before I really
understood how everything worked, and
IPC is a great way to learn. There is no bet-
ter way to raise your photographic skill
than putting images out there for your
peers to see.
I look forward to meeting many of you
this year. In a profession that has changed
so much in the past few years, being a part
of a great organization like PPA has never
been more important.
PPATODAY
March 2014 Professional Photographer 97
PRESIDENTS MESSAGE
FRIENDS IVE MADE ALONG THE WAY
Fifteen years ago, the first week-long class I took was with Jeff Lubin,
M.Photog.Cr., at Florida School of Photography. I had just signed a calendar
deal, and Ill never forget what Jeff said when I shared my ideas with him dur-
ing a mentor session. He told me never to undervalue my workthat if I
charged appropriately I could thrive in photography. I went back to the studio
the next week and raised my prices substantially.
Jeff is a wonderful teacher, and let me tell youhe knows how to make
money. He operates a very high-end studio in Virginia. Dont ever pass up an
opportunity to hear him speak.
98 www.ppmag.com
Ever wonder about the guiding force behind
PPA? The people behind the direction, strat-
egy, and long-term planning that drive your
professional association? Theyre a group of
photographers who have been there and done
that and want to see fellow professionals be
more creative, profitable, and satisfied with
life. Traveling from their home studios all
over the nation, they gather for meetings to
make decisions that benefit their peers. Theyre
here because they care, and they have the
experience to put their passion into practice.
The Board of Directors is elected each
year by the PPA Council and serve a term
that begins March 1. They are listed below in
order of seniority.
As a photographer who has made 100 per-
cent of my living in photography for more
than 15 years, I believe I understand what
photographers need from an association,
says Susan Michal, owner of Susan Michal
Portrait Studio. Our industry has changed
so much over the past 10 years. I want to
help PPA and its members look to the future
and make choices that will benefit all mem-
bers for many years to come.
Its an honor to serve on the PPA Board of
Directors, says Timmons, the owner of two
photography studios: Gallery 143 (for cor-
porate work) and The Portrait Gallery.
Having been a member for over 30 years
now, I have seen the association flourish to
record numbers and excel at its ability to
educate all levels of photographic artists.
The PPA family has helped me prosper as a
photographer and businessperson for many
years. PPA allows us all to be more.
Be more in 2014 isnt just a sloganits how
I want to approach my commitment to the PPA
Board and the membership, says Lori Craft,
who operates Craft Photography with her hus-
band, Dennis. I want to be more intentional
with the PPA staff, be more in touch with the
membership, and be more aware of how I can
help PPA to be the best that it can be. PPA
mem bers deserve the best that we, as an asso-
ciation, can provide. Thats why all of us at PPA
work so hard to continue to improve and offer
more member benefits. Be more in 2014!
I serve to give back to all the folks who have
given so much to me, says Ralph Romaguera.
I serve to help those who want to be involved
in volunteering and speaking. PPA has been
family; I never miss Imaging USA because
its like missing a family reunion. Working
on the national level has been a pleasure; to
help members and working with terrific
staff for the success of professional photog-
raphy has made it a great eight years.
The opportunity to serve on the Board of
Directors at PPA is simply the most rewarding
leadership position I have ever held. Why?
Because PPA is the greatest photography asso-
ciation on the planet, with the best members
and the most talented staff, says Valley Studio
owner Rob Behm. It truly is like a second
family to many of us on the Board. My hope
is that we can continue to grow our association
and its benefits. There are so many new pho-
tographers out there who have not experi-
enced how to be more as a member of PPA.
According to Stephen Thetford of Stephen
Thetford Photography, I give a great deal of
credit for my success as a photographer to
the educational and networking opportuni-
ties provided by this organization. As our
industry continues to evolve at a rapid pace,
we as leadership must respond appropriately
to provide our membership with the knowl-
edge, tools, and skills necessary to remain on
the cutting edge. What a fun ride!
Meet the PPA Board of Directors
PPATODAY
PRESIDENT
SUSAN MICHAL
M.Photog.Cr., CPP, ABI
Jacksonville, Fla.
TREASURER
LORI CRAFT
Cr.Photog.
Marshall, Mich.
ROB BEHM
M.Photog.Cr., CPP
Spokane Valley, Wash.
STEPHEN
THETFORD
M.Photog.Cr., CPP
Fayetteville, Ark.
CHAIRMAN
OF THE BOARD
RALPH
ROMAGUERA, SR.
M.Photog.
Hon.M.Photog.Cr., CPP,
API, F-ASP
New Orleans, La.
VICE PRESIDENT
MICHAEL TIMMONS
M.Photog.M.Artist.Cr.,
CPP, F-ASP
Vassar, Mich.
March 2014 Professional Photographer 99
As a PPA member for over 25 years, I have
personally benefited from all the PPA path
has offered, says Audrey Wancket, owner
of Wancket Studios. My work and busi-
ness has been successful because of the
education PPA provides on photographic
technique as well as business and market-
ing. The chance for me to serve on the
Board of Directors at PPA and give back
to this association and our members
has brought me full circle. I am honored
to work side by side with the rest of the
Board and our amazing PPA staff to fur-
ther the impact on professional photogra-
phers worldwide.
Our members are the some of the best
and most experienced photographers in
the world as well as some of the youngest,
notes Mike Fulton of TriCoast Photog-
raphy LLC. The mixture makes PPA a
special place unlike any other photography
organization. Between the leadership
of the experienced members and the beau-
tiful and rare open-minded vision of the
younger members, finding a balance to lead
us all into the next generation is truly an
honor and pleasure to be a part of. I look
forward to continuing to serve and reach
out to our members and together find ways
to grow and succeed. Oh, and have a ton of
fun in the process!
I truly love this profession and all that it
has provided my family, clients, and me
from a creative and financial perspective,
says Gregory Daniel, who came to profes-
sional photography after a long career
in the U.S. space program. The skills I
have obtained through entrepreneurship,
photographic association leadership posi-
tions, and upper management for the
space program provide me with some
unique resources to contribute. I hope
to leverage my experience and connec-
tions within the photographic industry
to serve and further PPAs mission, deliv-
ering trusted resources and supporting
its members in growing more profitable
businesses.
Lou George has the distinction of being the
only non-photographer member of PPAs
Board of Directors. She has led photo lab
BWC Printmakers since 1975.
With her business partner, Jamie Hayes,
Mary Fisk-Taylor operates portrait and
wed ding studio Hayes & Fisk Photography.
She also owns Real Life Studios, providing
photography to high school seniors. A pop-
ular leading presence in the industry, Fisk-
Taylor has earned numerous awards for her
work and has been an active PPA Studio
Management Services mentor, instructor
on PPAedu, and participant in PPA
Charities programs.
I am so excited to have been elected to
serve on the PPA Board of Directors, a
group of dedicated individuals for whom I
hold a great deal of respect, says Barbara
Bovat, a digital artist who, with her hus-
band, Ken, has operated Photo-Art studio
since 1976. I look forward to working with
them toward improving the lives and skills
of our PPA family.
Steve Kozak is a longtime instructor at
Imaging USA and the Texas School of
Professional Photography. He now brings
his talents and experience to PPAs Board.
In addition, he is an instructor for PPAedu
and PPA business workshops as well as an
avid proponent of PPAs certified profes-
sional photographer program.
AUDREY WANCKET
M.Photog.Cr., CPP
Spring Grove, Ill.
GREGORY DANIEL
M.Photog.Cr., CPP, F-ASP
Titusville, Fla.
LOU GEORGE
Industry Advisor
Dallas
BARBARA A. BOVAT
Cr.Photog.
Claverack, N.Y.
MARY FISK-TAYLOR
M.Photog.Cr.,
CPP, ABI, API
Richmond, Va.
MIKE FULTON
Cr.Photog.
Lake Jackson, Texas
STEVE KOZAK
M.Photog.Cr., CPP
Grand Prairie, Texas
*PhotoCare Equipment Insurance is available to U.S.-based PPA Professional Active and Life members
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WHERE THE PROS GO FOR THE BEST IN REPRODUCTION SERVICES LabTab
March 2014 Professional Photographer 101
WHERE THE PROS GO FOR THE BEST IN REPRODUCTION SERVICES LabTab
102 www.ppmag.com
2014 Affiliate Schools Schedule
PPA members receive both merits
and the best published prices.
March 9-11
East Coast School Photographic Workshops,
Raleigh, N.C., eastcoastschool.com, clatruell@aol.com
March 30-April 3
New England Insititute of Professional
Photography, Hyannis, Mass., neipp.com,
exsec@ppane.com
April 2-9
Illinois Workshops, Riviera Maya, Mexico,
bcinc1@yahoo.com
April 27-May 2
Texas School, Dallas, texasschool.org,
don@dondickson.com
May 4-9
Mid-Atlantic Regional School, Cape May, N.J.,
marsschool.com, director@marsschool.com
June 1-5
Florida School of Professional Photography,
Daytona State College, Daytona Beach, Fla.,
fpponline.org., marybeth@marybethphoto.com
June 1-5
Kansas Professional Photographers School,
Bethel College, Newton, Kan., kpps.com
June 8-11
iClick Expo, Des Moines, Iowa, iclickexpo.com,
iclickexpo@gmail.com
June 15-20
West Coast School, San Diego,
westcoastschool.com, wclorwnzo@gmail.com
June 22-25
Winona School, Brown County State Park,
Nashville, Tenn., winonaschool.org,
shortlens2000@yahoo.com
July 13-17
The Lamarr Williamson School, University of
South Carolina Campus, Solumbia, S.C.,
ppofsc.com, jeejeecowherd@gmail.com
July 20-25
Professional Photographers Society of New
York State Workshop, Geneva, N.Y.,
ppsnyworkshop.com, mrshutchsr@aol.com
July 27-31
Image Exploration, Shawnigan Lake, British
Columbia, Canada, imageexplorations.com,
don@imageexplorations.com
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March 2014 Professional Photographer 103
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ClassifiedAdvertising
March 2014 Professional Photographer 105
here is nothing that compares to see-
ing a child on an operating table, sur-
rounded by the bright lights and com-
plex apparatuses of heart surgery. Its gut
wrenching, terrifying, graceful. And thats
what the fundraising committee from
Childrens Mercy Hospital wanted to con-
vey when they contacted photographer
Muffet Petrehn, M.Photog. With a fundrais-
ing gala coming up in the midst of the 2009
recession, the committee sought dramatic
imagery that would touch patrons hearts
and get inside their minds, reminding them
that donations save lives. The tactic worked.
Despite the economic slump, the gala raised
more than $650,000 for the Kansas City, Mo.,
area hospital. Organizers were quick to credit
Petrehns intimate images of pediatric heart
surgery with helping to reach that goal.
It really was amazing to watch, Petrehn
says of the surgery. Im so thankful I could
show the world how great these surgeons are.
I think the entire medical team are like angels.
Petrehn, who operates Muffet Petrehn
Image Design on a 9-acre horse farm on
the outskirts of Kansas City, had worked as
a dental hygienist in the past. She felt that
was good preparation for staying professional
and calm in the operating room. Prior to
the assignment, Petrehn underwent a thor-
ough health screening. For the surgery, ris-
ers were installed in the operating room to
give Petrehn a vantage point directly over
the patients heart. A nurse was assigned to
help Petrehn move about as needed.
I essentially had free reign and could go
where I wanted, she says. Though, you
always have to be aware of whats going on
and ultimately make sure youre not inter-
fering with the surgeons work because
somebodys life is at stake.
After the gala, Petrehn compiled the
images into a commemorative coffee table
book for the hospital and the family,
earning a spot in the Loan Collection and
a Fujifilm Masterpiece award as well. About
a year later, Petrehn was back to document
another heart surgery, this time for a child
with Down syndrome. Later, Petrehn
found out the girl was involved with a rid-
ing club for children with special needs,
and she soon got involved by donating
photography, which led her to another
riding club for special needs children that
stirred her heart.
Petrehn says shed like to continue
working with the hospital, perhaps photo-
graphing a heart transplant or capturing
stories in the pediatric cancer center. For
her, the most rewarding part of her philan-
thropic work is meeting her subjects and
their families and giving them the ability to
share their stories.
Once you do one thing, it branches
out, she says. I think I feel more blessed
than the people Im photographing, just
from the opportunity to do this. Im so
thankful that in my small way I can share
these stories. I
See more of Muffet Petrehns work online at
muffetpetrehn.com.
106 www.ppmag.com
good works |
Images wield the power to afect change. In this monthly feature,
Professional Photographer spotlights professional photographers
using their talents to make a diference through charitable work.
From the heart
MUFFET PETREHN AIDS HOSPITAL WITH DRAMATIC IMAGES
Share your good works experience
with us by emailing Joan Sherwood at
jsherwood@ppa.com.
Mufet Petrehn
T
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Photo by Ian McManus Model: Vera Bartsch @ Nemesis Model Management Hair: Lisa Booth MUA: LucieMUA Styling: Bernard Connolly