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TECHNICAL REVISION

September 2007

Process Industry Practices Work Processes

PIP ADG009 Guideline for Increasing the Global Application of Process Industry Practices

PURPOSE AND USE OF PROCESS INDUSTRY PRACTICES In an effort to minimize the cost of process industry facilities, this Practice has been prepared from the technical requirements in the existing standards of major industrial users, contractors, or standards organizations. By harmonizing these technical requirements into a single set of Practices, administrative, application, and engineering costs to both the purchaser and the manufacturer should be reduced. While this Practice is expected to incorporate the majority of requirements of most users, individual applications may involve requirements that will be appended to and take precedence over this Practice. Determinations concerning fitness for purpose and particular matters or application of the Practice to particular project or engineering situations should not be made solely on information contained in these materials. The use of trade names from time to time should not be viewed as an expression of preference but rather recognized as normal usage in the trade. Other brands having the same specifications are equally correct and may be substituted for those named. All Practices or guidelines are intended to be consistent with applicable laws and regulations including OSHA requirements. To the extent these Practices or guidelines should conflict with OSHA or other applicable laws or regulations, such laws or regulations must be followed. Consult an appropriate professional before applying or acting on any material contained in or suggested by the Practice.

This Practice is subject to revision at any time.

Process Industry Practices (PIP), Construction Industry Institute, The University of Texas at Austin, 3925 West Braker Lane (R4500), Austin, Texas 78759. PIP member companies and subscribers may copy this Practice for their internal use. Changes, overlays, addenda, or modifications of any kind are not permitted within any PIP Practice without the express written authorization of PIP.

PRINTING HISTORY May 2006 Issued September 2007 Technical Revision

Not printed with State funds

TECHNICAL REVISION
September 2007

Process Industry Practices Work Processes

PIP ADG009 Guideline for Increasing the Global Application of Process Industry Practices
Table of Contents 1. Introduction................................. 2
1.1 Purpose............................................ 2 1.2 Scope ............................................... 2

2. References .................................. 2
2.1 Industry Codes and Standards ........ 2 2.2 Other References............................. 2

3. Definitions ................................... 3 4. Guidelines ................................... 3


4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 4.7 4.8 General ............................................ 3 Dual Units of Measurement ............. 3 Specific Discipline Guidelines.......... 4 Material Specifications ..................... 4 Standard Conditions ........................ 4 Symbols ........................................... 5 Safety Regulations........................... 5 Environmental .................................. 5

APPENDIXES
Appendix A Position Statement Appendix B Specific Discipline Guidelines

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1.

Introduction
1.1 Purpose This Practice provides guidance for Function Teams and authors to increase global applicability of the content of Process Industry Practices (PIPs). 1.2 Scope This Practice identifies benefits and drivers for globalization, describes the current state, presents a globalization strategy for Function Teams, and includes content guidelines for increasing the global applicability of Practices. Comment: This Practice requires guidelines and recommendations from the discipline function teams that should be added in the future.

2.

References
Applicable parts of the following industry codes, standards, and references shall be considered an integral part of this Practice. The edition in effect on the date of contract award shall be used, except as otherwise noted. Short titles are used herein where appropriate. 2.1 Industry Codes and Standards American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) ANSI/ASME American Petroleum Institute (API) Manual of Petroleum Measurement Standards (MPMS) Chapter 15 Guidelines for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) in the Petroleum and Allied Industries (formerly known as API Publication 2564) ASTM International (ASTM) (originally known as the American Society for Testing and Materials) ASTM SI 10 International Organization for Standardization (ISO) ISO 31 Quantities, units, and symbols ISO 1000 SI units and recommendations for the use of their multiples and of certain other units 2.2 Other References Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. (IEEE) Insulated Cable Engineers Association, Inc. (ICEA) Insulated Power Cable Engineers Association (IPCEA) International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC)

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PIP ADG009 Guideline for Increasing the Global Application of Process Industry Practices

National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)

3.

Definitions
metric units: A system of physical units based on the International System of Units that uses Celsius for temperature instead of Kelvin SI units: A system of physical units of the International System of Units (abbreviated SI in all languages) in which the fundamental quantities are length, time, mass, electric current, temperature, luminous intensity, and amount of substance. The corresponding units are meter, second, kilogram, ampere, Kelvin, candela, and mole. SI has been given official status and is recommended for universal use by the General Conference on Weights and Measures. U.S. customary units: A system of physical units in which the fundamental quantities are length, time, mass, electric current, temperature, luminous intensity, and amount of substance. The corresponding units are foot, second, pound, ampere, Fahrenheit, lumen, and mole. U.S. customary units are used in various U.S.-based standards development organization (SDO) documents.

4.

Guidelines
4.1 General 4.1.1 4.1.2 4.1.3 4.1.4 New Practices being generated and Practices being revised should incorporate the globalization content recommendations defined herein. See Appendix A for globalization of the Practices. Some Practices may be published as separate documents (U.S.-based and international-based) to align with the worldwide industry standards. Certain country, regional, or local requirements could be required for specific projects and could require overlay or addenda additions to Practices by the end user. Language used in a Practice should be chosen with the intent that if the language is translated to a different language, there can be little possibility of misinterpretation. The content that is universal in a Practice should be identified and modified to remove U.S. specific language and references, thereby becoming the core content of the Practice.

4.1.5

4.1.6

4.2

Dual Units of Measurement 4.2.1 4.2.2 The systems for units of measurement should be both metric and U.S. customary units. Unless otherwise arranged in an industry document on which a Practice is substantially based, the metric quantity and unit should precede the U.S.

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customary quantity and unit, and the U.S. customary quantity and unit should be shown parenthetically. 4.2.3 4.2.4 4.2.5 4.2.6 Metric units should be in accordance with ISO 31 and ISO 1000. The system of units should be in accordance with IEEE/ASTM SI 10 unless otherwise specified. Flow measurement units should be in accordance with API MPMS, Chapter 15 unless otherwise specified. When converting quantities from U.S. customary to SI quantities, the number of significant digits should be similar or increased by no more than one digit, [e.g., 107 mm (4.2 inches) rather than the exact conversion 106.68 mm (4.2 inches).] In no case should the conversion vary by more than 10% from the original quantity. If the original quantity is a minimum or maximum, the conversion should maintain at least that minimum or maximum value (e.g., if 4.2 inches is the maximum quantity in the example above then the conversion should be 106 mm rather than 107 mm; whereas if 4.2 inches is the minimum quantity then the conversion should be 107 mm rather than 106 mm). When metric units are also acceptable in the U.S. customary convention, the units should be shown only in the metric convention (e.g., temperature rise for electric motor winding insulation rating purposes is shown only in C).

4.2.7

4.3

Specific Discipline Guidelines 4.3.1 Detailed guidelines for each discipline are provided in Appendix B and should be updated by the Function Teams as globalization initiatives are developed and implemented. Comment: Discipline guidelines will be added to Appendix B in future revisions. 4.3.2 The systems for designating items such as tubing size and wall thickness, fastener sizes and grades, sheets and wires and shapes, as well as wires and cable should be in accordance with appropriate ASME, ISO, ASTM, IEC, and IPCEA/ICEA/IEEE/NEMA requirements as referenced and detailed in Appendix B.

4.4

Material Specifications If materials are specified e.g., ASTM, non-US material specifications may be included.

4.5

Standard Conditions Standard conditions for temperature, pressure, elevation, etc., and the respective differences should be listed in data sheets or appropriate documents as required in Appendix B.

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PIP ADG009 Guideline for Increasing the Global Application of Process Industry Practices

4.6

Symbols Separate, multiple symbol definitions (e.g., welding symbols, P&ID symbols, electrical one-line drawing symbols) should be determined as needed.

4.7

Safety Regulations Practices should include a general statement that the user shall determine if specific regulations and other country, regional, or local safety requirements apply, and therefore should be considered for specific applications of the Practice. Comment: PIP does not harmonize or publish Practices specific to the safety subject. However, the Function Teams are asked to consider safety requirements in development of harmonized Practices. Comment: Many countries have "U.S. OSHA-equivalent organizations. Specific regulations may vary widely although in some cases, the regulations could be very similar to U.S. OSHA.

4.8

Environmental Practices that can be impacted specifically by environmental requirements should include a general statement that the user shall determine if specific country, regional, or local environmental requirements apply, and therefore should be considered for specific applications of the Practice. Comment: PIP does not harmonize or publish Practices specific to the environmental subject. However, the Function Teams are asked to consider environmental requirements in development of harmonized Practices.

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APPENDIXES
Appendix A Position Statement Appendix B Specific Discipline Guidelines

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PIP ADG009 Guideline for Enhancing the Global Application of Process Industry Practices

Appendix A Position Statement Benefits and Drivers for Globalization


Owners need a consistent set of Practices for facilities regardless of location. Consistent international Practices allow for more cost effective use of low cost engineering centers. Contractors need standards and specifications that can be applied to international projects. Operating companies cannot afford to develop and maintain multiple sets of standards and specifications for different regions. Standardization can be enabled/promoted. Many major projects are being constructed outside the U.S. More companies are moving towards using international standards.

Current State - Global Applicability of the Current Practices


As global standards requirements tend to be regional in nature, any Practice based on U.S. standards alone may be difficult to utilize in other regions. In Europe, where ISO standards are dominant, Practices may not be applicable. China and Russia are both moving to adopt ISO/IEC standards as their national standards. The Middle East, on the other hand, may still be receptive to U.S. standards.

The following list provides guidelines on when current Practices can be applied globally:
In a region not dominated by ISO standards or the CE European Directives When the Practice applies to design and/or selection of equipment issues that are not code based (e.g., heat exchanger thermal design, as opposed to fabrication When minor overlays or addenda can adequately convey modified requirement Packaged equipment Practices Wherever U.S. standards are accepted Owner mandated (as permitted by local authority jurisdiction)

Globalization Strategy
Progress towards globalization may be inconsistent between Function Teams because some technologies are more easily applied to different regions than others (e.g, electrical is a greater effort than CSA). Also, some teams will have a higher priority need than others based on project activities and/or development/acceptance of international standards.

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As globalization needs arise and resources permit, Function Teams should determine the opportunities for developing global practices for their technology. This may include adding regional restrictions or referencing international standards in an existing Practice, or developing an overlay to an international standard. The following factors should be considered when selecting Practices to globalize: ease of conversion for use outside the U.S., existence of relevant international standards and perceived need by member companies, and availability of resources with international experience. Each Function Team should develop and/or revise a priority schedule for their Practices. Function Team should use talent already in-place for domestic effort, and supplement it with international expertise as required.

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Appendix B-1 Piping


B-1.1 Prioritization Piping Practices should be reviewed for developing a priority list and schedule for globalization based on the following factors: a. Ease of globalization b. Anticipated need and usefulness c. Targeted global area d. Availability of resources (subject matter experts) e. Availability of other (non-USA) industry standards f. Directions from the Globalization Committee

B-1.2 Globalization Factors Each Practice to be globalized should be reviewed considering the following factors, as applicable to the targeted area or audience: a. Base industry standard (e.g., API, ASME, ISO, BS, etc.) b. Material standards (e.g., ASTM, JIS, DIN, etc.) c. Local area standards (e.g., OSHA, PED, etc.) d. Units of measurement (e.g., US customary, SI, metric, etc.) B-1.3 Technical Bases for Globalization Regardless of the requirements dictated by the standards of the targeted global area, the minimum technical bases for a new globalized Practice should be the requirements of the original Practice. B-1.4 Format B-1.4.1 Piping Material Specification and Valve Descriptions B-1.4.1.1 If globalizing a Piping Material Specification or Valve Description, because of space and formatting limitations, a new Practice should be generated. B-1.4.1.2 Several globalized versions of one Piping Material Specification (e.g., one each for USA, European Union, Japan, Russia, etc.) may be developed. B-1.4.2 Narrative Practices B-1.4.2.1 If a published Practice is based on USA standards and corresponding associated ISO standard does not exist, a new Practice using a widely accepted local area standard should be developed. An example is PIP PNE00001 Design of ASME B31.3 Metallic Piping Systems.

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B-1.4.2.2 If a published Practice is based on USA standards and a corresponding ISO standard does exist, the Practice should be revised to match the corresponding joint USA/ISO standard. B-1.4.2.3 If a published Practice is general in nature (i.e., it does not utilize a base industry standard), the Practice should be globalized. An example is PIP PNE0003 Process Unit and Offsites Layout Guide. B-1.4.2.4 If a published Practice is primarily a listing or index, special changes should not be required for globalization. An example is PIP PNSM0001 Piping Line Class Designator System. B-1.4.3 Fabrication/Installation Details Practices Each Practice should be reviewed independently to determine the best approach for globalization. Examples are PIP PNFS0001 Pipe Support Details, PIP PNF0200 Vents, Drains, and Instrumentation Connection Details. B-1.5 Metrication The method used to metricate a Practice should be in accordance with the industry document the Practice is based on. For example, all piping Practices based on ASME B31.3 should be metricated in accordance with the metrication rules of ASME.

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PIP ADG009 Guideline for Enhancing the Global Application of Process Industry Practices

Appendix B-2 - Vessels

B-2.1 Prioritization Vessel Practices should be reviewed for developing a priority list and schedule for globalization based on the following factors: a. Ease of globalization b. Anticipated need and usefulness c. Targeted global area d. Availability of resources (subject matter experts) e. Availability of other (non-USA) industry standards f. Directions from the Globalization Committee

B-2.2 Globalization Factors Each Practice to be globalized should be reviewed considering the following factors, as applicable to the targeted area or audience: a. Base industry standard (e.g., API, ASME, etc.) b. Material standards (e.g., ASTM, ASME, JIS, DIN, etc.) c. Local area standards (e.g., OSHA, GB, ISI, PED, etc.) d. Units of measurement (e.g., US customary, SI, metric, etc.) B-2.3 Technical Bases for Globalization Regardless of the requirements dictated by the standards of the targeted global area, the minimum technical bases for a new globalized Practice should be the requirements of the original Practice. B-2.4 Format B-2.4.1 Narrative Practices B-2.4.1.1 If a published Practice based on USA standards does not exist but is determined by vote of the PIP Steering Team to be required for international use, a new Practice based on a widely accepted international standard should be developed. B-2.4.1.2 If a published Practice is based on ASME/API standards and a corresponding international standard does exist, the Practice should be revised to permit use of the corresponding international standard. B-2.4.1.3 If a published Practice is general in nature (i.e., it does not utilize a base industry standard), the Practice should be globalized.

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B-2.4.2 Fabrication/Installation Details Practices B-2.4.2.1 If a published Practice is primarily details, two sets of details should be developed (i.e., one set in U.S. Customary units and the other in metric units). Examples of the development of two sets of details are PIP VEFV1100 and PIP VEFV1100M Vessel/S&T Heat Exchanger Standard Details. B-2.4.2.2 For a Practice that contains details and narrative content, the Practice should be reviewed to determine the best approach for globalization. B-2.5 Metrication The method used to metricate a Practice should be in accordance with the industry document the Practice is based on. All Vessels Practices should be metricated in accordance with the metrication rules of ASME Code Section VIII, Div 1, Appendix GG.

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PIP ADG009 Guideline for Enhancing the Global Application of Process Industry Practices

Appendix B-3 - Electrical

B-3.1 Globalization Factors B-3.1.1 Electrical standards are not harmonized around the world. American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standards are applied in the U.S. International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standards or other relevant country standards are applied in Europe. IEC standards can vary from country to country. B-3.1.2 ANSI and IEC standards are not compatible for equipment specification. U.S. codes, standards and inspection are closely linked. Mixing IEC or other than U.S. codes and standards into a design could compromise the safety and design of an electrical system. B-3.1.3 A significant global effort would be required to harmonize electrical standards. Until the worlds codes and standards are globally harmonized, the electrical Practices should be based on ANSI standards and relevant U.S. codes.

B-3.2 Metrication Because the electrical Practices are based on U.S. codes and standards and the U.S. customary units are typically shown before the metric units, the U.S. customary quantity and unit should precede the metric quantity, and the metric quantity should be shown parenthetically.

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Appendix B-4 Coatings, Insulation & Refractory


B-4.1 Prioritization Refractory Practices should be reviewed for developing a priority list and schedule for globalization based on the following factors: a. Ease of globalization b. Anticipated need and usefulness c. Targeted global area d. Availability of resources (subject matter experts) e. Availability of other (non-USA) industry standards f. Directions from the Globalization Committee

B-4.2 Globalization Factors Each Practice to be globalized should be reviewed considering the following factors, as applicable to the targeted area or audience: a. Base industry standard (e.g., API, ASME, etc.) b. Material standards (e.g., ASTM, ASME, JIS, DIN, ISO, etc.) c. Local area standards (e.g., OSHA, NIOSH, PED, etc.) d. Units of measurement (e.g., US customary, metric, etc.) B-4.3 Technical Bases for Globalization Regardless of the requirements dictated by the standards of the targeted global area, the minimum technical bases for a new globalized Practice should be the requirements of the original Practice. B-4.4 Format B-4.4.1 If a published Practice based on USA standards does not exist but is determined by vote of the PIP Steering Team to be required for international use, a new Practice based on a widely accepted international standard should be developed. B-4.4.2 If a published Practice is based on USA standards and a corresponding international standard does exist, the Practice should be revised to permit use of the corresponding international standard. B-4.4.3 If a published Practice is general in nature (i.e., it does not utilize a base industry standard), the Practice should be globalized. B-4.4.4 If a published Practice is primarily details, one set of details should be developed and dual dimensioned. B-4.5 Metrication B-4.5.1 The method used to metricate a Practice should be in accordance with the industry document the Practice is based on.

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B-4.5.2 All Practices should be metricated in accordance with the metrication rules of ASME Code Section VIII, Div 1, Appendix GG. B-4.5.3 Both metric and U.S. Customary values should be rounded unless an exact conversion is required.

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Appendix B-5 Machinery


B-5.1 Prioritization Machinery Practices should be revised for globalization based on the following factors: a. Order of creation or revision b. Ability to harmonize metric and U.S. customary units c. Availability of resources (subject matter experts) e. Availability of other (non-USA) industry standards f. Directions from the Globalization Committee

B-5.2 Globalization Factors Each Practice to be globalized should be reviewed considering the following factors, as applicable to the targeted area or audience: a. Base industry standard (e.g., API, ASME, ISO, etc.) b. Standards for harmonizing SI (metric) and U.S. customary units (e.g., ANSI /ASTM SI 10) c. Local area standards (e.g., OSHA, GB, ISI, PED, etc.) d. Units of measurement (e.g., US customary, SI, metric, etc.) B-5.3 Technical Bases for Globalization Regardless of the requirements dictated by the standards of the targeted global area, the minimum technical bases for a new globalized Practice should be the requirements of the original Practice. B-5.4 Format B-5.4.1 If a published Practice based on USA standards does not exist but is determined by vote of the PIP Steering Team to be required for international use, a new Practice using a widely accepted international standard should be developed. B-5.4.2 If a published Practice is based on ASME/API standards and a corresponding international standard exists, the Practice should be revised to permit use of the corresponding international standard. B-5.4.3 If a published Practice is unique (i.e. it is not based on an industry standard), the Practice should be globalized. B-5.4.4 For a Practice that contains details and narrative content, the Practice should be reviewed to determine the best approach for globalization. B-5.5 Metrication The method used to metricate a Practice should be in accordance with the industry document the Practice is based on. All Machinery Practices should be metricated in accordance with the metrication rules of ANSI /ASTM SI 10.

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