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Ain Shams University Faculty of Education Centre for Developing English Language Teaching ( CDELT) 32nd CDELT NATIONAL

SYMPOSIUM on English Language Teaching in Egypt

Teaching English in the 21st Century: New Horizons


Saturday 3th May Sunday 4th May, 2014

CDELT Directors (1981-present)


Abdel Messih Dawoud (1981-1990) Mona Abousenna (1990-2000) Zeinab El-Naggar (2000-2004) Asmaa Gheith (2004-2009) Nihad Shawky (2009-2012) Nagwa Younis (2012- present)

CDELT Board of Directors (2012-2015)


in alphabetical order Adel Salama, Vice Dean, FoE Ali Algamal, Dean of FoE Asmaa Gheith, Professor in FoE Mohamed El-Said Alkon, Head of English Departmen, FoE Nagwa Younis, CDELT Director Nihad Shawky, Professor in FoE Zeinab El-Naggar, Professor in FoE

CDELT 32nd Symposium Organizing Committee


in alphabetical order Ahmed Awaad, AUC Ahmed Keshk, Ain Shams University Ahmed Mahdy, M.I.E.L.S Asmaa Gheith, Ain Shams University Mahamed Saey. Ain Shams University Nagwa Younis, CDELT Director Ramy Shabara, AUC Samira Bakr, Ministry of Education Sameya Masud, Ain Shams University Shokry Megahed, Ain Shams University Zeinab El-Naggar, Ain Shams University

Secretariat
Rasha Abd El Ghany

Public Relations
Eman Ezzat

Logistics
Mohamed Saleh

Media Coverage
Hoda Saad

Registration& Help Desk


Ibtisam Ibrahim Ali Fathi Ateia Emam

Accounting Affairs
Adel Ismail Mohammad Abbas Mostafa Abdel-Razik

Hospitality Corner
Alaa Saleh Dina Mostafa Hussien

Book Exhibition
Manal Ahmad

Participating Countries
in alphabetical order

Egypt Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Pakistan Palestine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States of America Yemen

CDELT Annual Symposia : 1981-2014


English Teaching in Egypt Discourse Analysis Theory and Applications English for Specific Purposes English for Specific Purposes in Egypt Language and Literature Appropriate Methodologies Testing and Evaluation in English Teaching Professional Development: Education and Training Literature, Linguistics and Culture in Language Teaching Teaching English: the Decade Ahead Creativity in English Teaching New Policies and Strategies for English Teaching Global Age: Issues in English Language Education Dialogue of Languages and English Language Education English Language in 2000 The English Language Teacher as Interpreter The Role of the Reader in English Language Education Language in the Age of Knowledge New Guidelines for Child Education in the 21st Century The Role of CDELT in the Third Millennium Meeting Challenges of ELT in the Arab World The Specific Role of EFL for the Arab World: the Decade ahead The Language Educator in the Arab World: Guaranteeing an Active Learning Environment

Teaching English in the Primary Stage: Theory and Practice Current Developments in English Language Teaching Literacy and English as a Foreign Language (EFL) English as a Foreign Language: A Futuristic Vision Technology and Language Learning: from Theory to Practice E-Learning and Language: The Spirit of Age Globalization and English Language Teaching and Learning: Challenges and Strategies Active Learning in EFL: Introspect and Prospect

Table of Contents
Keynote and Guest Speakers...8 Schedule10 Abstracts16 For the presenters37 A word of thanks..38 CDELT courses...39 Presenters Contact Information..40

Keynote and Guest Speakers for the 32nd CDELT Symposium


Teaching English in the 21st Century: New Horizons

Victoria Clark is the Deputy Country Exams Manager for the British Council in Egypt . She has a PhD in Applied Linguistics from the University of Reading in England, and her main research interests are language assessment and task complexity. She is the author of over 10 books on the General English Proficiency Test (GEPT) and has worked in Egypt for over 10 years).

Zeinab El-Naggar, Professor of TEFL, received her Ph.D. from the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA), majoring in English as a foreign language and education in 1981. Since then, shes been working at Ain Shams Faculty of Education. She has extensive experience in pre-service and in-service teacher education. She has designed pre-service teacher education courses and in-service training programs. Dr. El-Naggar has taught undergraduate and graduate courses in curriculum development, micro-teaching, EFL teaching methodology, and quantitative and qualitative research methods .

Asmaa Gheith is a Professor of TEFL. She has got a PhD in Ain Shams University, Egypt. Her academic interests are based on learners' centered learning, and relating language learning and teaching to thinking. She is a member of the standards development committee for Teachers and students in Egypt. She participated in most of language development committees in the Ministry of Education. She is the author of three books in TEFL.
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Sameh Alansary is a Professor of Computational Linguistics, the head of Phonetics and Linguistics Department, Faculty of Arts, Alexandria University; and the Director of the Arabic Computational Linguistics Center in Bibliotheca Alexandrina. He has prepared his PhD in Nijmegen University, the Netherlands in building a formal grammar for parsing Arabic structures in 2002. His main areas of interest are concerned with corpus processing, formal grammars, Natural language analysis and generation, and Interlingua. Prof. Alansary has obtained Alexandria University Award for promoting scientific research (2008) and for recent and advanced scientific practices (2012).

Atta Gebril is an Associate Professor in the Department of Applied Linguistics at the American University in Cairo, Egypt. He teaches courses in language assessment and research methods in applied linguistics. His research interests include writing assessment, reading-writing connections, and test validation. He serves on the editorial board of Journal of Language Testing and Language Assessment Quarterly. His work has appeared in top-tier journals including, Language Testing, Language Assessment Quarterly, Journal of Second Language Writing, Assessing Writing, and Assessment in Education. He has taught in the USA, United Arab Emirates, and Egypt. He has also worked on a number of test development projects in different parts of the world.

Sohair Seleim is a Professor of Curriculim and instruction (EFL ) at the Faculty of Education , Helwan University . She worked for 26 years as a teacher, inspecturess of English in the Egyptian Ministry of Education. During this period she realized that she was learning teaching. Learning teaching has sustained her for many years and still does; even though her area of concern now is less language teaching than language teacher education.

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32nd CDELT Symposium Teaching English in the 21st Century: New Horizons 3-4 May 2014

Schedule
Day One
Saturday, May 3, 2014 09:00-10:00 a.m. Registration 10:00-10:30 a.m. Opening Ceremony 10:3011:30 a.m. Keynote Presentations Moderator: Ali Ezzat

10:30-11:00 Quality Professional Development Initiatives in the 21st Century Zeinab El- Naggar, Ain Shams University, Egypt 11:00-11:30 Assessing Language in the 21st Century: Moving Beyond Theory to Classroom Reality Victoria Clark, British Council, Egypt -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------11:30-11:45 a.m. Break ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------11:451:30 p.m. Guest Speakers Moderator: Ali Ezzat 11:45-12:30 The International Corpus of Arabic (ICA: Compilation, Annotation and Applications Sameh Alansary, Bibliotheca Alexandrina, Egypt 12:30-1:30 Corpus Linguistics: a modern tool for innovating teaching and learning: A Workshop Ahmed Awaad & Ramy Shabara, School of Continuing Education, AUC, Egypt ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------1:30-2:00 p.m. Break ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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2:003:45 p.m. Concurrent Sessions


Room A Moderator: Aisha Hanafy

- Representations of Muslim Brotherhood in Egyptian and British newspapers 20122013: A synergy of Corpus Linguistics and Critical Discourse Analysis Wesam M A Ibrahim, Tanta University, Egypt - Using Technology in TEFL: A Student-Teacher Motivating Process Samir Muhammad Rammal, Birzeit University, Palestine - The Potential of Web-Based Projects in FL Classrooms: Lessons from the Egyptian Context Ahmed Mahmoud Aliweh & Amany A. Sabagh, Tanta University, Egypt Enhancing Listening Comprehension Through a and Identifying Listening Strategies Used by EFL Students Shimaa Mahmoud El-Rashidy, Tanta University, Egypt ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Room B Moderator: Faisal Abdallah Web-based Program

Workshop on Assessment Rania Rafik Khalil, BUE, Egypt New Trends in Teaching Young Learners Ibtisam Ibraheem Khalilo, Al Quds Bard Honors College, Palestine Enhancing Reading and Writing Skills through Reading Journals Naglaa Mohamad Nada, Menoufiya University, Egypt If-Clauses in Finance Academic Papers Tharwat Mohamed El-Sakran, American University of Sharjah, UAE

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Room C Moderator: Shokry Megahed - Teaching Literature to Improve Multiple Intelligence

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Mohamed Eid EL Ghamry, CRDELS, Egypt - Teaching Translation in Public and Private Yemeni Universities Essam Hassan Naji Al-Mizjaji, University of Science and Technology, Yemen - Creativity within Constraints: A Model for Teaching News Translation to Undergraduate Students Aliaa Tawfiq el Guindy, Cairo University, Egypt - The Relationship between Scripts and Translation Linguistics Nevine Mahmoud Abolawafi, MIU, Egypt ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Room D Moderator: Badr Abdelkafy - Towards Learner-friendly Thesauri , Ain Shams University, Egypt - Edmodo : connect , collaborate and share.: Workshop Ayat Ahmed Al-Tawel, Baby Home School, Egypt - Constructing Better Test Items: Top Tips for EFL Teachers: Workshop Hoda Mahmoud Abu Hashem, Wor r U iv r it , Eg pt --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Room E Moderator: Asmaa Gheith - Assessment and Evaluation, a Magic Wand for Education Reform & E-learning Shawky A. Allam, Future Language School, Egypt - TMBR (Total Mind-Body Response) for Accelerated Learning in English Language as a Foreign language: Workshop AbdelFadeel Faid, Ministry of Education & Corinna May, Beni Soueif University, Egypt High Tech Low Tech AbdelFadeel Faid , Hala AbdelMoneim, Maged Rushdi, Ministry of Education, Egypt

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Day TWO
Sunday, May 4, 2014 09:30-11:15 a.m. Keynote Presentations Moderator: Ali Ezzat

09:30-9:50 Problem Based Learning: a framework for a constructivist problem solving context of EFL learning Asmaa Gheith, Ain Shams university, Egypt 9:50-10:10 CHAT Approach for Childrens Long-life Learning of English Language in the 21stCentury Soheir Seleim, Helwan University, Egypt 10:10- 10:45 Writing Assessment: New Developments and Emerging Challenges Atta Gebril, AUC, Egypt 10:45-11:15 Dynamic Assessment: When Assessment Becomes a Learning Strategy Ramy Shabara & Ahmed Awaad, AUC, Egypt --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------11:15-11:30 a.m. Break ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------11:30-12:45 p.m. Guest Speakers Moderator: Zeinab El-Naggar 11:30-11:55 Teaching Shakespeare: The Controversy over his Authorship Ghanim Jasim Samarrai, University of Sharjah , UAE 11:55-12:20 Using Students Funds of Knowledge as a Strength in Classrooms Saad Khamis Bushaala, University of South Carolina, USA 12:20-12:45 Dickens as a Feminist Writer Bahaa Abdelmegid, Ain Shams University, Egypt ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------12:451:15 p.m. Break -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1:153:00 p.m. Concurrent Sessions


Room A Moderator: h W f i

- Teaching Civic Engagement through Literature: Workshop Ghada Mamdouh Abdel Hafeez, Minia University, Egypt

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- After Criticism: A Call to Rethink Queer Theory Said A. Aboudaif, Salman University, KSA -The Treasure Box: Discovering Delight in a Comparative Literature Classroom: Workshop Magda Mansour Hasabelnaby & Sara Ali Shahwan, Ain Shams University, Egypt --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Room B Moderator: Shokry Megahed

- Designing Rubrics to Improve Students' Writing Samira Bakr, Ministry of Education, Egypt - Easing the Nightmare: Moving from Book to Exam Aelfwine Mischler and Eman El Nouhy, Longman, Egypt - Developing EFL Teachers' Performance at Sana'a Secondary Schools Khaled Mohsen Zuheer, Yemen - Life Skills: In & Beyond the Classroom Sarah Hamdy El-Sayed, Berlitz, Egypt ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Room C Moderator:

-The ELP and Learner Autonomy: An Integrative Literature Review Samia Kara, MSA University, Egypt -Corrective Feedback El Sayed Shanab Salem Rezk, Ministry of Education, Egypt -Vocabulary learning strategies employed by EFL students in Egypt and Oman Mohamed Ismail Abu-Rahmah, Suez Canal University, Egypt

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- E-Learning and English Language Teaching for People with Special Needs Muhammad Nasir Khan, International Islamic University, Pakistan -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Room D Moderator: Bahaa Abdelmeguid

- The Effectiveness of Designing a Program based on Mobile learning to Develop Students' Awareness of Polysemy on the Interpretation of English Sentences Said Fathy, Qassim Private Colleges, KSA Social Media that Changed the Face of Egypt: the Case of EFL learning and teaching Khaled Elebyary, Damanhour University & Dalia El Hawary, Alexandria University - Teachers Dual Vision from a Culturally Bound Angle: Student- teachers Voices Khaled Elebyary, Damanhour University, Egypt ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Room E Moderator: Amal Tayea - Employing the Multiple Intelligences Theory to Enhance EFL Students Reading Skills Rafik Ahmed AbdelMoati Moahmed, National Center for Educational Research & Development, Egypt - The Magic of graphic Organizers in Developing the Four ESL Skills Hamdi Eltantawi Shadi, Egypt -The effect of using conversational implicatures on developing EFL students' pragmatic competence and language proficiency Ahmed Mohammed Mahmoud Abdelhafez, Minia University, Egypt -Teaching The Railway Children in Egypt and the KSA: a Personal Experience Abdulgawad Ali Elnady, Tanta University, Egypt ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------16

3:003:30 p.m. Room A Closing Session Recommendations and Announcement of the 33rd CDELT Symposium -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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32nd CDELT Symposium


Teaching English in the 21st Century: New Horizons

3-4 May 2014


ABSTRACTS
Day One
Saturday, May 3, 2014
10:3011:30 a.m. Keynote Presentations Moderator: Ali Ezzat

10:30 11:00 Quality Professional Development Initiatives in the 21st Century Zeinab El- Naggar, Ain Shams University, Egypt
Abstract:

This presentation aims at describing the process undertaken in Egypt as well as elsewhere to build a quality teacher professional development (PD) system. The presenter will use the descriptive analytic approach to identify and share the key elements of PD since its beginning till the most recent initiatives in the first decade of the twenty-first century. The analysis will be undertaken to review and identify the characteristics and features of quality teacher professional development systems at the international level, including techniques that have proven to work. Analysis will also highlight the establishment of the Professional Teacher Academy (PAT) in Egypt and the Nile Schools system together with their efforts to build a quality PD system in light of the best practices. Finally the presenter will provide a set of recommendations for stakeholders to effectively institutionalize PD on solid basis.

11:00-11:30

Assessing Language in the 21st Century: Moving Beyond Theory to Classroom Reality Victoria Clark, British Council, Egypt

Abstract:

With claims being made that teachers spend from around one third to one half of their time in the classroom on assessment-related activities (Stiggins and Conklin, 1992), coupled with claims that many teachers know little about educational assessment (Popham, 2009), is it clear that though clearly of importance, the theory and practice of assessment has been somewhat neglected in teacher training programmes (Siedlecki, 2012). This clearly has implications for teachers conducting classroom-based assessments. Though the main aim of classroom-based assessments is to support the teaching and learning process, they are also used for monitoring, comparing, placing and defining students, and thus there is a need for confidence in the
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teacher-designed assessment forms, and ultimately in the decisions the teachers make based upon them. Traditionally, in high-stakes testing contexts, the concepts of validity and reliability have been used to assess the quality of the assessment used, but there are fundamental differences in the characteristics, forms and purposes between classroom assessments and traditional high-stakes testing. This has led to calls for better understanding of how we can produce quality classroom-based assessments that are valid and reliable. In this presentation, I will focus on the purposes and range of classroom-based assessments and the issues of the concepts of validity and reliability when applied to such assessments. In addition, I will propose some solutions to assist teachers in designing, administering, and grading valid and reliable tests, with the aim of ensuring decisions based upon the results to be sound and fair.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------11:451:30 p.m. Guest Speakers Moderator: Ali Ezzat

11:4512:30 The International Corpus of Arabic (ICA: Compilation, Annotation and Applications) Sameh Alansary, Bibliotheca Alexandrina, Egypt
Abstract:

Corpora are important resources for language studies, however, Arabic lacks sufficient resources in this field. Therefore, many trials have been conducted to build Arabic corpora but unfortunately some of them were unsuccessful; others were for commercial purposes. The International Corpus of Arabic (ICA) is a real trial to build a representative Arabic corpus as being used all over the Arab world to support research on Arabic. It is planned to contain 100 million words from written Modern Standard Arabic selected from a wide range of sources designed to represent a wide cross-section of Arabic. ICA is composed of four sources covering 11 genres and 24 sub-genres. The stem-based approach (concatenative/linear approach) has been adopted to analyze ICA. Buckwalter Arabic Morphological Analyzer Enhancer (BAMAE) is a software application built to reach the best solution for the input word. BAMAE starts to do linguistic enhancements through three disambiguation stages starting from word level, context level, and Memory based level. About 80 million words have been collected from different sources and sub-sources so far. About 2 million words have been disambiguated manually as testing data. ICA is available via http://www.bibalex.org/ica

12:30-1:30

Corpus Linguistics: a modern tool for innovating teaching and learning A Workshop Ahmed Awaad & Ramy Shabara, AUC, Egypt

Abstract:

The aim of this workshop is to familiarize attendants with corpus linguistics by collaboratively working with them through a variety of activities in which they use free corpora to enrich their classroom practices, and to help their learners explore different linguistic structures using these corpora.
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2:003:45 p.m. Concurrent Sessions


Room A Moderator: Aisha Hanafy

Representations of Muslim Brotherhood in Egyptian and British newspapers 20122013: A synergy of corpus linguistics and critical discourse analysis

Wesam M A Ibrahim, Tanta University, Egypt

Abstract:

This paper uses corpus linguistic methods in exploring the way the group of ( )or Muslim Brotherhood has been represented in the British and Egyptian press since 2012. Two corpora have been compiled from Egyptian and British news (January 2012-October 2013): an Arabic corpus (5,937,356 words extracted from AlAhram AlAraby, AlAhram AlMessai, AlAhram and AlAhram Weekly, AlAkhbar, AlGomhoriya, Almasry Alyoum, AlMessa, and Watani) and an English corpus (3,883,165 words extracted from The Sun and Sunday Sun, The Mirror and The Sunday Mirror, Daily Mail and Mail on Sunday, The Daily Telegraph and The Sunday Telegraph, The Times and The Sunday times, The Guardian and The Observer, The Independent and The Independent on Sunday, The Express and The Sunday Express, and The Star). The analysis focuses on two theoretical notions: keywords and collocation. Scott (1999) defines keywords as those whose frequency is unusually high in comparison with some norm. The main function of keywords is to point towards the aboutness of a text or homogeneous corpus (Scott 1999), that is, its topic and the central elements of its content (Baker et al. 2008). Collocation, on the other hand, can be defined as the above-chance frequent co-occurrence of two words within a pre-determined span, usually five words on either side of the word under investigation, i.e. the node (Sinclair 1991; Baker et al. 2008). Collocates of a node are extracted because they contribute to its meaning (Nattinger and DeCarrico 1992). Keywords are extracted using the BNC samplerwritten and the Leeds Contemporary Arabic Corpus as reference corpora. Collocates of ( )or Muslim Brotherhood used as node words are calculated with a cut-off point MI3 5. Concordances are also analysed, using a CDA perspective, in order to investigate the data in a more qualitative way. Keywords: Corpus-based study, collocation, keywords, ( )or Muslim Brotherhood, Egyptian and British press

Using Technology in TEFL: A Student-Teacher Motivating Process

Samir Muhammad Rammal, Birzeit University, Palestine


Abstract:

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This research examines a variety of techniques, strategies, and macro technological strategies which teachers can employ in order to motivate their students and thus become motivated to teach English as a foreign language. The main goal is to familiarize any putative practitioners with a set of techniques and strategies (henceforward, motivational strategies) for motivating foreign language students with special emphasis on the Palestinian teaching-learning environment in both Hebron and Al-Quds Universities. Research findings and recommendations are provided.

The Potential of Web-Based Projects in FL Classrooms: Lessons from the Egyptian Context

Ahmed Mahmoud Aliweh & Amany A. Sabagh, Tanta University, Egypt


Abstract:

In order for the current efforts of FL educational reform to be effective, Egyptian instructors and practitioners should abandon the traditional approaches that focus on rote learning and memorization. Rather, more innovative approaches should be introduced. Such approaches should be constructivist in nature and encourage learners full engagement in authentic language tasks. Among other alternatives, Web-based projects place the student at the center of the learning process and require him to make knowledge. Thanks to modern IC technologies, Web-based projects may yield various advantages; they could enhance students motivation, autonomous learning, collaboration, and ICT literacy skills. As such, the current presentation reports on a study that adopted this paradigm which is relatively new to the Egyptian context. Current results indicated the significant impact of Web-based project learning activities on enhancing the writing and cultural competencies of EFL experimental language school students.

Enhancing listening comprehension through a web-based and identifying listening strategies used by EFL students

program

Shimaa Mahmoud El-Rashidy, Tanta University, Egypt


Abstract:

The present study aimed at enhancing listening comprehension of EFL students through a Webbased listening program and identifying listening strategies used by them. For this purpose, one experimental group (N=37) was purposefully selected. They received a Web-based program on a Web site prepared by the researcher. The program included fifty lessons and two revisions. To test the program's effectiveness, two instruments were prepared: pre and post tests of listening comprehension and on-line listening strategies survey. The results were statistically analyzed by using the t-test to compare the mean scores of the pre-post tests. Also, the Pearson correlation was used to find out if there is a correlation between the listening proficiency and the strategy use. To identify listening strategies, a survey, self-reports, and a structured interview were used.

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Results revealed the effectiveness of the Web-based program in developing the third year students' listening comprehension skills. Accordingly, discussion and interpretation of these results were provided as well as relevant recommendations and suggestions for further research.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Moderator: Faisal Abdallah

Room B -

Workshop on Assessment

Rania Rafik Khalil, BUE, Egypt

Abstract:

Assessment is a central element in the overall quality of teaching and learning in higher education. The clarity of assessment criteria and standards, significantly influence the effectiveness of student learning. Carefully designed assessment set clear expectations, provide opportunities for students to practice and receive feedback.

New Trends in Teaching Young Learners

Ibtisam Ibraheem Khalilo, Al Quds Bard Honors College, Palestine


Abstract:

Teaching English in an elementary school in Palestine is intended to develop students communicative competence. Students can increase their language store as they write or speak authentic linguistic material. Today, teaching English is focused on the ability to communicate with it. It means that the communicative competence of the students is the main stress. Students with certain situation, where they must express what they think, what they feel, and what they must do. So story telling is one of the classroom managements and development. It provides extensive practice of listening and speaking skills. It has been estimated that adults spend almost half their communication time listening, and students may receive as much as 90 percent of their in school information through listening. So is an active process, as the mind is actively engaged in making meaning. Teaching teenagers can be stressful experience. They tend to be less motivated than other group, so as English teachers we help students surmount their difficulties by giving motivation. So I think that using the technique of storytelling to teach writing, listening and speaking increase their ability to interact in spoken communication. I also think that the appearance of technology has changed the way of storytelling. Students can use digital storytelling to tell stories of themselves and others. Storytelling is one of the most important ways of knowledge, of making a sense of experience and of seeing oneself in relation to others.

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In classroom, storytelling is an important activity as it can encourage students to communicate thoughts and feelings. Story telling also tells the students the importance of listening and that the spoken language is very important. So story telling offers the students an experience that not only develop their listening and verbal skills, but also increase understanding of experiences. Story telling involves imagination and the use of language and gestures to create scenes in the mind of the listener. See the pictures in your mind. Let your imagination create images.

Enhancing Reading and Writing Skills through Reading Journals

Naglaa Mohamad Nada, Menoufiya University, Egypt


Abstract:

This paper explains the results of using reading journals to enhance students' reading and writing skills. Third year, English majors were instructed to use reading journals while studying literary texts. Students were encouraged to apply some pre, during and post reading activities. Writing regularly in their journals and reviewing their peers' journals improved students' reading and writing skills.

If-Clauses in Finance Academic Papers

Tharwat Mohamed EL-Sakran, American University of Sharjah, UAE


Abstract:

Conditional if-clauses are used by authors to maintain and protect their reputation and credibility. In a shaky world and a fragile economy, one cannot publish a research paper and claim 100% certainty of the anticipated results. This research investigates and discusses the use of conditional if-clauses in finance research papers.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Room C Moderator: Shokry Megahed

Teaching Literature to improve Multiple intelligence

Mohamed Eid EL Ghamry, CRDELS, Egypt


Abstract:

This paper explores the gap between the status of teaching advanced level literature and the great variety of aims of teaching literature. No learner can be motivated for long to learn literary texts if the teacher is following the same approach or the same aims. The presenter will tackle

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different activities in the literature classroom that may lead to creating the maximum chances of creating a unique experience of a literary text.

Teaching Translation in Public and private Yemeni Universities

Essam Hassan Naji Al-Mizjaji, University of Science and Technology, Yemen


Abstract:

This paper attempts to investigate challenges and difficulties that might have caused several recognizable setbacks when running the translation program at the university level. The investigation process was carried out through a questionnaire and interviews with translation instructors who also tried to give objective reflections to their students problems and needs. Thus, the rules, standards, literature and infrastructure of the entire process of translation program, which starts from admission up to graduation, are likely to be, thoroughly, reconsidered so that they might cater for the needs of the students and the market. Having taken the mission of being a translation instructor and, later, a program coordinator at (UST), I experienced a handsome number of challenges that both instructors and undergraduate students of translation might had faced. Two benchmarking universities; Sanaa University (SU) and University of Science and Technology (UST) were chosen to represent Yemeni public and private universities respectively. Other universities live either similar or even worse conditions. This means that the outcome of this paper can meet the minimum requirements for setting up a successful translation program. Moreover, most of the problems discussed and the solutions suggested are applicable to the universities in the region which are living similar conditions bearing in mind the differences between these academic institutions. The problems of the program are so common that instructors and students might have arrived to a consensus about. The solutions presented by the translation instructors, who have seen more than they have believed in, were seriously demonstrated and discussed. The ultimate goal of all of these measures taken is to bring translation program to a success.

Creativity within Constraints: A Model for Teaching News Translation to Undergraduate Students

Aliaa Tawfiq el Guindy, Cairo University, Egypt


Abstract:

The purpose of this paper is to propose a model for teaching news translation from English into Arabic and vice versa to first year students in the English Department, Faculty of Arts. Despite the recent paradigm shift in pedagogical approaches from the teacher-centered transmissionist to the student-centered collaborationist, the model seeks to integrate both approaches.

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The relationship between scripts and translation linguistics

Nevine Mahmoud Abolawafi, MIU, Egypt


Abstract:

Texts are always defined as sets of linguistic signs that serve certain communicative function, which means that they are texts in-function embedded within the framework of communicative actions. Therefore it is not always possible for a text as a whole to be assigned to one single function. This is applied to the so called Complex text types. In these cases, situation and function have to analyzed separately for each of the embedded texts or texts sections.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Room D Moderator: Badr Abdelkafy

Towards Learner-friendly Thesauri

S meya Mas d Abu-Sekk na, Ain Shams University, Egypt

Abstract:

Very few people know or use thesauri, compared to dictionaries. The reason why is obvious, as observed in English, as well as Arabic, thesauri: most thesauri compilers claim that their works are intended just for helping a writer or an intellectual recall a particular word, which s/he knows very well, but it escapes his/her mind at the moment. However, when a language learner thinks of using a thesaurus, the story is completely different: his/her use is production-wise. This means that s/he hopes to be guided through selecting the right word which s/he seeks to fit in the present context. Learners are expected to consult the thesaurus for homonyms, synonyms, antonyms, hyponyms, and hypernyms; seeking mainly (besides spelling and pronunciation) usage instructions, i.e. morphological, syntactic, semantic, pragmatic and sociolinguistic information. In addition, the learner is in need of a kind of help that clarifies the collocations, gradations and different shadows of meanings that facilitate the decision of choice. In other words, learners seek new lexical items which they have never used and need guidance on how, when, and where such words can be used accurately. Thus, special thesauri are required for language learners. Here, the suggested construction of learners' thesauri can make use of a special type of lexicographical narration.

Edmodo : connect , collaborate and share: Workshop

Ayat Ahmed Al-Tawel, Baby Home School, Egypt


Abstract:

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This workshop introduces Edmodo, a very engaging tool that allows teachers, students and parents to get engaged in the learning process . Participants will create online classes for their students, share resources, create quizzes and assignmnets, and explore many other features. Participants will also join online communities for professional development.

- Constructing Better Test Items: Top Tips for EFL Teachers: Workshop

Hoda Mahmoud Abu Hashem, Worker's University, Egypt


Abstract:

This workshop acquaints participants with the topic of constructing test items. First, an overview will be made on a range of test items. Afterwards, participants will practice designing better test items by investing varied examples and performing group activities.

Room E Moderator: Asmaa Gheith Assessment and evaluation, a magic wand for education reform & E-learning, highly suitable for our youth within

Shawky A. Allam, Future Language School, Egypt

Abstract:

An exam centered-society would surely react positively to any assessment-based change. Such modification in the means of assessment and evaluation is the most effective in our education reform. Kindly, attend our session, waiting for your appreciated feedback. E-learning, nowadays is considered one of the most effective for our teens. Tons of sheets, binders, books could be easily replaced with a little click. Global education is heeding so fast within such trend. Kindly, attend our session, waiting for your appreciated feedback.

- TMBR (Total Mind-Body Response) for Accelerated Learning in English Language as a Foreign language: Workshop
AbdelFadeel Faid, Ministry of Education & Corinna May,Beni Soueif University , Egypt
Abstract:

The European Language Portfolio (ELP) is a document initiated by the Council of Europe with two functions: pedagogic (learners reflect on their learning) and reporting (learners record their
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language skills). This contribution aims to present the ELP in terms of pinpointing its components, developments as well as the practical aspects of its implementation.

High Tech Low Tech


AbdelFadeel Faid, Hala AbdelMoneim, and Maged Rushdi, Ministry of Education Egypt

Abstract:

The purpose of this presentation is to explore various ways of manipulating the different levels of technology to serve the needs of education regardless of the facilities at hand. The term technology is used here to denote all possible forms and techniques used in teaching whether simple or sophisticated. The rationale behind this demonstration is to prove that the level of technology, be it high or low, must not stand against the fulfillment of our goals and objectives as teachers. Technology is by no means a replacement of teachers or even of the material taught. The discrepancy between rich and poor, high and low levels of schools in terms of circumstances and facilities should not be allowed to provide an excuse for effective teaching. This presentation offers a wide range of techniques, ideas and solutions to solve this problem. Participants in this demonstration will come out with a vision that a resourceful teacher is the one who can adapt his own teaching and adopt whatever is in his reach of almost no, low or high technology. This presentation is based on the notion that a successful teacher is the maker of his own tech.

Day TWO
Sunday, May 4, 2014
09:30-11:15 a.m. Keynote Presentations 09:30-9:50 Moderator: Ali Ezzat

Problem Based Learning: a framework for a constructivist problem solving context of EFL learning Asmaa Gheith, Ain Shams University, Egypt

Abstract:

Problem Based Learning (PBL) is a constructivist, academic and environmental trend that helps students build up knowledge through self directed learning. Problem solving is the strategy through which learners awareness of the learning concept; and accordingly, other pedagogical and cognitive skills, such as critical thinking, reflecting vision, decision making, collaboration and, self assessment can be enhanced. This can be reflected on the students language learning process, and their effective use of English as a Foreign Language.

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9:50-10:10

CHAT Approach for Childrens Long-life Learning of English Language in the 21st Century

Soheir Seleim, Helwan University, Egypt

Abstract:

Since the start of the 21st century, with the new uncertainties and demands of globalization, important questions have arisen about the goals of childrens English language learning and the best means of achieving them. \In these unstable times we can look for ideas about these questions in only two places of inspiration i.e. the future and theory. What kind of world are todays children going to inhabit; and what skills and languages will they need to thrive therein? What are the best ideas about the childrens mind growth and about the childrens long-life learning of English language? What fresh perspectives are thereby made available? The author looked at the future as a reliable guide to tomorrow and to the best current theory Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) to help reappraise the means and ends of the childrens longlife learning of English language. This is because she believes that education is not about the transmission of specific bodies of knowledge. It is about the development of understanding and the formation of minds and identities: minds that are robust enough and smart enough to engage with the uncertain demands of the future and identities that are attuned to the changing communities of which they are members who contribute to and benefit from their transformation. So, the idea that education is a process of simultaneous enculturation and transformation is at the heart of CHAT which not only helps to clarify core questions that confront the childrens long-life learning of English language in the 21st century but also provides fresh answers for them as clearly shown in the paper. Its fundamental insights are of profound relevance to English language practitioners both as proposals for action and as suggestions for further investigation and discussion. Key words: CHAT, identity, perspectives, enculturation, transformation

10:10-10:45 Writing assessment: New developments and emerging challenges

Atta Gebril, AUC, Egypt

Abstract:

Writing assessment has traditionally focused on independent tasks that isolate writing from other language skills. Recently, a growing number of language programs have adopted an integrated approach that promotes the use of multiple skills in assessing writing. The popularity of integrated assessment hinges on the perceived authenticity and fairness of tasks designed based on this model. Integrated tasks usually simulate language used in real life and also provide similar opportunities to different writers. In spite of the apparent advantages of integrated writing tasks, they are not without challenges. These challenges are mainly associated with task design, score reliability, and interpretation and use of results. The current presentation will provide guidelines for language professionals interested in using these new tasks by addressing issues of task development and procedures for improving score reliability. In addition, the presenter will offer suggestions related to the interpretation and use of results obtained from such tasks. The final part of the presentation will suggest strategies for achieving
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positive washback in writing classes as a result of following an integrated approach to writing assessment.

10:45- 11:15

Dynamic Assessment: When Assessment Becomes a Learning Strategy

Ramy Shabara & Ahmed Awaad, AUC, Egypt

Abstract:

Recently, with the increasing appeal of constructivist approaches in education, a radical shift has occurred in the realm of language assessment where supporting meaningful learning is the central concern. Accordingly, the focus of testing has changed to be more for learning than to be of learning (Lee & Coniam, 2013; Schuwirth & van der Vleuten, 2011). Consequently, new promising approaches of language assessment have emerged in the educational context. One of these approaches is the so called dynamic assessment (DA). Although DA is mainly a pro learning form of assessment (Leung, 2007, p. 257), little is known about it in the field of teaching and learning English as a foreign language. This presentation is consequently an attempt to bridge this gap and link theory and practice. Put differently, the presentation aims to highlight the concept of DA and the practices used to promote authentic learning in EFL classrooms.

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11:30-12:45 p.m. Guest Speakers 11:30-11:55


Abstract:

Moderator: Zeinab El-Naggar

Teaching Shakespeare: The Controversy over His Authorship

Ghanim Jasim Samarrai, University of Sharjah , UAE

There is an ongoing argument about whether someone other than William Shakespeare wrote the works attributed to him. Some critics say that Shakespeare of Stratford was a front to shield the identity of the real author or authors, who for some reason did not want or could not accept public credit. Although the idea has attracted much public interest, all but a few Shakespeare scholars and literary historians consider it a fringe belief and for the most part disregard it except to rebut or disparage the claims. Supporters of alternative candidates argue that theirs is the more plausible author, and that Shakespeare lacked the education, aristocratic sensibility, or familiarity with the royal court that they say is apparent in the works. Those Shakespeare scholars who have responded to such claims hold that biographical interpretations of literature are unreliable in attributing authorship and Shakespeare's authorship was not questioned during his lifetime or for centuries after his death.

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Despite the scholarly consensus, a relatively small but highly visible and diverse assortment of supporters, including prominent public figures, have questioned the conventional attribution. They work for acknowledgment of the authorship question as a legitimate field of scholarly inquiry and for acceptance of one or another of the various authorship candidates.

11:55-12:20

Using Students Funds of Knowledge as a Strength in Classrooms

Saad Khamis Bushaala, University of South Carolina, USA

Abstract:

This paper aims to introduce the concept Funds of Knowledge and to highlight the importance of using the students funds of Knowledge to enhance leaning for culturally relevant teaching. It will provide authentic examples from real classrooms show how the use of funds of knowledge supports and helps students in their classrooms

12:20-12:45
Abstract:

Bahaa Abdelmegid, Ain Shams University, Egypt


This paper investigates the motives of Charles Dickens in writing about females characters. Four women characters are studied to reveal Dickens' support for women. These characters are: Nancy in Oliver Twist, Lady Havisham and Stella in Great Expectations and Mademe Defarge and Lucie Manette in A Tale of Two Cities. The paper also will investigate the image of women and the efforts of Dickens as a social reformer. The approaches of this study are psychological and feminist as well. The paper will also make a textual analysis for these characters as Dickens represents them in his novels. The didactic and pedagogic aspects of these novels are taken into consideration because they were mainly written to educate people about the psychology of women.

Dickens as a Feminist Writer

1:153:00 p.m. Concurrent Sessions


Room A Moderator: Maha Wafai

Teaching Civic Engagement through Literature: Workshop

Ghada Mamdouh Abdel Hafeez, Minia University, Egypt


Abstract:

With all the political and social turmoil we go through in Egypt, and with the explosion of social media, how should we as educators respond? We need to imbue our students with skills and values that underscore the duties and privileges associated with living in a free and democratic society. Teaching should be geared towards transforming students from self-interested persons into active citizens who care about community problem solving and the public good. That will
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happen when we teach them issues of justice, freedom, equality, and human rights through literature. The session will explore challenges and opportunities to advance a culture of civic engagement through literature. It will start by briefly defining civic engagement and then will focus on how to: - connect students civic development with their educational and career goals, - develop the students cultural sensitivity, - deepen their understanding of literary texts and develop leadership competencies, - explore teaching tools to enlighten students on issues related to civic engagement. The facilitator will then guide the participants in an interactive discussion of strategies that can be used in their literature classes. Participants will leave the session with a collection of ideas for advancing civic engagement through literature.

After Criticism, A Call to Rethink Queer Theory

Said A. Aboudaif, Salman University, KSA


Abstract:

The need to rethink the theory of criticism is urgent. Since the new decade is full of critical terms and international theories that is hard to account and to take into consideration in case of theorizing for literary criticism or even in the case of analyzing literary texts. The effort to escape the hypothesis and to find new ways of thinking and fresh points of view concerning the issue of theorizing for criticism becomes a necessity and obligation to cause some sort of development and round taking process. Most of the theoretical and the practical criticism have been organized around acknowledged movements like classicism, romanticism, symbolism, modernism, avant-garde, or historical periods like, Renaissance, Victorian, Edwardian, and Modern. This article will discuss the need to rethink critical theories and will present a new vision of the queer theory. It will then give a sense of the new form; the theory would take in practice. Key words: queer theory, Judith Butler, feminism

The Treasure Box: Discovering Delight in a Comparative Literature Classroom: Workshop

Magda Mansour Hasabelnaby & Sara Ali Shahwan, Ain Shams University, Egypt
Abstract:

In this workshop the co-presenters will share an unconventional comparative literature class. Instead of teaching comparative literature as a dry consortium of theories and set texts,

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this session presents the use of impressionistic lessons as a way of fostering the students enthusiasm and internal motivation for learning. Participants shall experience how such lessons strike the students imagination and inspire them to follow their own path of discovery while further pursuing research interests. During this interactive workshop, the presenters will share an impressionistic lesson which includes a dramatic presentation in addition to the old-new technique of story-telling. Participants will be invited to work in groups and come up with ideas that give students lasting impressions and offer them springboards to further study.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Room B Moderator: Shokry Megahed

Designing Rubrics to Improve Students' Writing

Samira Bakr, Ministry of Education, Egypt


Abstract:

Rubrics have become popular with teachers as a means of communicating expectations for an assignment, providing focused feedback on works in progress, and grading final products. Rubrics have the potential to help students develop understanding and skills, as well as make dependable judgments about the quality of their own work. Students should be able to use rubrics in many of the same ways that teachers use them, to clarify the standards for a quality performance, and to guide ongoing feedback. Rating students' writing is one of challenges EFL teachers face. Using rubrics in assessing students' production help teachers not only to be accurate but objective as well. Using rubrics, helps teachers and students to highlight weaknesses and suggest remedial work based on specific sub-skills. Rubrics Maker Tools are very helpful for designing rubrics for specific tasks. Teachers can make good use of Rubrics Maker Tools to make completely customizable rubrics, and print or edit them at a later date. This presentation will explore rubrics role in developing students' academic performance and present examples of rubrics for assessing writing activities. Participants will be given a chance to evaluate some students' writing using rubrics and develop rubrics using Rubrics Maker Tools.

Easing the Nightmare: Moving from Book to Exam

Aelfwine Mischler and Eman El Nouhy, Longman, Egypt


Abstract:

The thanawiya amma exam is regarded as a nightmare by most Egyptian students. Justifiably, for it is the single exam that determines how their entire academic and professional future will be shaped. Is the thanawiya amma English exam a fair reflection of a students linguistic potentials and capabilities? Does it assess a students academic standard in English fairly and accurately?

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Does the book provided (Hello English for Secondary Schools) supply the optimum means for studying English? Why do students always resort to private lessons and supplementary books? Is the exam a fair reflection of what is offered in the book? These are all questions that this workshop attempts to answer in an effort to bridge any gap that may exist between the book and the exam.

Developing EFL Teachers' Performance at Sana'a Secondary Schools

Khaled Mohsen Zuheer, Yemen


Abstract:

The main aim of the research is to determine the most necessary needs to develop EFL teachers' performance at Sana'a secondary schools in the light of their professional and specialist needs. A list of four needs was proposed and used as the most necessary needs for English teachers at Sana'a secondary schools: (effective communication skills, reflection, integrating language skills and intercultural competence). Beside these needs there is a review of literature for the related topics. At the end of this research there will be some recommendations and suggestions.

Life Skills: In & Beyond the Classroom

Sarah Hamdy El-Sayed, Berlitz, Egypt


Abstract:

Education is a process that enables students to take their place in society as effective citizens. My presentation revolves around the idea of adopting the concept that says: if English teachers can help students develop a range of life skills in English, then students will come to see such a language a life skill.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Room C Moderator: Sameya Masud

The ELP and Learner Autonomy: An Integrative Literature Review

Samia Kara, MSA University, Egypt


Abstract:

The European Language Portfolio (ELP) is a document initiated by the Council of Europe with two functions: pedagogic (learners reflect on their learning) and reporting (learners record their language skills). This contribution aims to present the ELP in terms of pinpointing its components, developments as well as the practical aspects of its implementation.
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Corrective Feedback

El Sayed Shanab Salem Rezk, Ministry of Education, Egypt


Abstract:

This workshop deals with corrective feedback. Through mutual discussion 1. What is corrective feedback (CF)? 2. Who should give CF? 3. Which errors should you correct? 4. When should you give CF? 5. Why? 6. How?

Vocabulary learning strategies employed by EFL students in Egypt and Oman

Mohamed Ismail Abu-Rahmah, Suez Canal University, Egypt


Abstract:

The purpose of this study was to investigate the vocabulary learning strategies (VLS) employed by EFL students in Egypt and Oman. A questionnaire including 42 VLS was developed and applied to 63 ELF students at Suez Canal University (Egypt) and 47 students at Sultan Qaboos University (Oman). The analysis of data showed that the students in both countries employed some discovery strategies and a few number of storage and consolidation strategies. It also showed that these VLS were different due to gender (males/females) and country (Egypt/Oman), but no difference was traced due to major (English/None English specialists).

E-Learning and English Language Teaching for People With Special Needs

Muhammad Nasir Khan, International Islamic University, Pakistan


ABSTRACT:

E-learning and quality of English language teaching has a momentous effect on concept learning of people with special needs. Teaching of English language electronically improves the language skills of people with special needs. The study has been conducted to explore the impact of e-learning in the English language teaching on people with special needs. . The study will be important for developing English language curricula. The study will be useful for research scholars of English language. The study will be beneficial for the English language teachers. The study will be fruitful in the teaching of English language to people with special needs. The study will be of enormous important in managing English language centers.

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Key Words: E-Learning, Special needs, Language, Teaching

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Room D Moderator: Bahaa Abdelmeguid

The Effectiveness of Designing a Program based on Mobile learning to Develop Students' Awareness of Polysemy on the Interpretation of English Sentences

Said Fathy, Qassim Private Colleges, KSA


Abstract:

The present study was an attempt to discover the effectiveness of designing a program based on mobile learning to develop students' awareness of Polysemy on the interpretation of English sentences. A pretest was given to 30 students of English language department at Qassim Private Colleges. This sample was divided into 2 groups. They were presented with 30 English sentences, each of which included an exchanged English polysemous noun or verb. The students were asked to translate sentences into Arabic as a part of their translation course they studied. Most of these sentences didn't include difficult words for them. Most of students did not perform well. The participants were randomly assigned to an experimental group, which consisted of 15 students and a control group with 15 students. Whereas members of the control group depended on specific book, members of the experimental group used mobile technology to develop their translation skills related to Polysemy. A pre/post test was administered to assess the effectiveness of the program. The study was conducted with thirty second year college students. Results of the T. Test analysis revealed that mobile technology yielded significant effects on students' translation related to Polysemy.

Social Media that Changed the Face of Egypt: the Case of EFL learning and teaching
Khaled El ebyary, Damanhour University & Dalia El Hawary, Alexandria University

Abstract:

The rapid advance in technology has created endless opportunities for language students and instructors to use social media. This social media includes social networks like Facebook and MySpace and social applications like Flickr, YouTube, Twitter, and other countless blogging websites. For example, one recent study undertaken in the university of Massachusetts indicated that 100 percent of colleges and universities surveyed used social media, but instructors used it far less for teaching than they do for personal or professional reasons (Barnes and Lescault, 2011). In Egypt, the huge impact of social media and its extensive use came into focus with the eruption of the 25th January revolution. As the attractiveness of diverse social media tools and
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applications continues to grow, the extent to which such technology is used/unused for language teaching purposes in Egypt is still under-researched. Focusing on a sample of language instructors at different Egyptian universities and a sample of student teachers, the purpose of this study is to examine whether or not social media is being used by the sample involved and the reality of using such technologies for English language teaching and learning purposes. The study also examines opportunities of and possibilities for the use of such social media for language learning/teaching purposes.

Teachers Dual Vision from a Culturally Bound Angle: Student- teachers Voices

Khaled Elebyary, Damanhour University, Egypt


Abstract:

As a result of developments within the communicative language teaching approach, Task-based Language Teaching (TBLT) has become a well-known practice within many state schools, private language schools and universities in various parts of the world. However, research has generally acknowledged challenges in adopting TBLT in many foreign language teaching/learning contexts. The literature seems to suggest that certain contextual and cultural issues influence the use of TBLT and therefore, it is not uncommon to find reference to a Western version of this approach (see Li, 1998 and Carless, 2007; Sato, 2009; Spada, 1987; Foster, 1999; Bygate 2000; Carless, 2004; Swan, 2005; Zhang, 2005) as opposed to Non Western versions. The Egyptian Ministry of Education has embraced the communicative language teaching approach and consequently EFL teacher training programmes follow the same line of thought. The EFL student teacher training programme at Damahour Faculty of Education train students at the English Section in different pedagogical innovations. As part of their training, the fourth year teaching methodology course focuses on communicative language teaching approach(es), with particular attention given to TBLT. Although student teachers are required to use TBLT to peer teach in microteaching sessions and to teach actual pupils in a practice teaching scheme, a sort of dual vision was noticed in adopting/rejecting this approach. Such dual vision reflects offline decisions taken by student teachers with regard to when to use/not use the approach. In fact, few researchers have concerned themselves with the extent to which top down decisions taken to influence the process of language teaching and learning affect the views and practices of student teachers. Furthermore, less effort is made to find out whether or not the use of certain approaches is compatible with whatever views student teachers might have about teaching and learning. As this researcher claims that the acceptance, and/or use, of TBLT by EFL student teachers is generally under-researched, this study is interested in exploring student teachers dual vision. To do so, the study examines the impact of intensive TBLT training on student teachers views (acceptability) and teaching practice (usability). The study involved use of surveys, face-to-face interviews, classroom observations of 88 participants.

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Room E

Moderator: Amal Tayea

Employing the Multiple Intelligences Theory to Enhance EFL Students Reading Skills

Rafik Ahmed AbdelMoati Moahmed, National Center for Educational Research & Development, Egypt

Abstract:

This study employs the Multiple Intelligences (MI) theory to enhance Saudi EFL students reading skills. The experimental group students were exposed to reading tasks in conformity with already identified dominant intelligences. The results crystallized the tangible effects of MIbased reading tasks on the experimental group students reading skills.

The Magic of graphic Organizers in Developing the Four ESL Skills

Hamdi Eltantawi Shadi, Zein Elabedein Secondary school, Egypt


Abstract:

Graphic organizers can be extremely helpful in teaching ESL students. These learning tools are available in a variety of designs. The presenter will share preparation of some successful lessons. The presenter will discuss the ideas and provide tools adaptable to participants' courses. He will let them know all kinds of graphic organizers.

The effect of using conversational implicatures on developing EFL students' pragmatic competence and language proficiency

Ahmed Mohammed Mahmoud Abdelhafez, Minia University, Egypt


Abstract:

The study aimed at investigating the effect of training 31 fourth year EFL students of education in conversational implicatures on developing their pragmatic competence and language proficiency. Statistical analysis showed significant differences at the level of (0.05) favouring the post measurement of the test of pragmatic competence and the TOEIC.

Teaching The Railway Children in Egypt and the KSA: a Personal Experience

Abdulgawad Ali Elnady, Tanta University, Egypt


ABSTRACT: 37

In his Ethnography, Linguistics, Narrative Inequality, Dell Hymes regards narrative form as a "grammar of experience". He also states that "narratives are undoubtedly part of a childs experience of language" (121). Informed by this pragmatic, contrapuntal insight into the relationship between narrative and language, I shall attempt in this paper to record my experience of teaching the novel to undergraduate students in Egypt and in the KSA. Of all literary forms, the novel remains the hardest to teach due, apparently, to its ostensible length and to the comparatively short time given to teaching/studying it in Egypt and in the gulf; due also, we have to admit, to the nature of second language acquisition whereby students get enmeshed in the cobweb of translation and assimilation of new genres and techniques. Though The Railway Children is a further impediment to teaching in view of the fact that it belongs to children's literature and must inevitably be taught as such, I claim that a great deal of benefit and pleasure could go into teaching it if some techniques are observed and if some tools are appropriated.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------3:003:30 p.m. Room A Closing Session Recommendations and Announcement of Symposium 33rd -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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For your paper to be published in the Occasional Papers, kindly submit a computer print-out of your paper and the CD containing the text of your presentation no later than June 2nd 2014 to Ms. Rasha Abd Elghany. You are kindly asked to pay L.E 300 for Egyptians and $250 for non-Egyptians, as publication fees, to the CDELT administrative Officer Mr. Mohammed Saleh at CDELT office, Faculty of Education, Roxy, Heliopolis. The publication is due in December 2014 , with the editorship of CDELT Director Dr. Nagwa Younis , at the inauguration of the 33st symposium . Thank you for your interest in CDELT symposium and CDELT publications.

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The 32nd CDELT Symposium Organizing Committee would like to thank: Ain Shams University Faculty of Education for supporting the symposium. We would also like to thank The British Council, The American Embassy in Cairo, Keynote Speakers & Guest Speakers. The Organizing Committee also wishes to extend gratitude to the publishers for their sincere contribution to the symposium: Longman ILB Macmillan.

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CDELT OFFERS THE FOLLOWING COURSES TEFL

TOEFL

- English Conversation

- General English

- ESP (English for Specific Purposes)

For details contact CDELT at:


Phone: (+202) 24505576 / 22595842 Fax: (+202) 24501039 E-mail: ainshams.cdelt@yahoo.com Website: http://cdelt.shams.edu.eg/ http://sites.google.com/site/cdeltainshams/ Mailing Address: CDELT, Heliopolis West, Cairo 11771, Egypt Location: CDELT, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Roxy

Saturdays through Thursdays 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

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Presenters Contact Information


in alphabetical order

Presenter AbdelFadeel Faid Abdulgawad Ali Elnady

Presenter's Email Address fadeel_faid@yahoo.co.uk Abdulgawad2@gmail.com

Room & time

2:00-3:45 Room E Day One 1:15-3:00 Room E Day Two 2:00-3:45 Room B Day One 12:30-1:30 Room A Day One 2:00-3:45 Room A Day One 1:15-3:00 Room E Day Two 2:00-3:45 Room C Day One 2:00-3:45 Room A Day One 9:30-9:50 Room A Day Two 2:00-3:45 Room D Day One 12:20-12:45 Room A Day Two

Aelfwine Mischler and eman.el-nouhy@longmanegypt.com Eman El Nouhy Ahmed Awaad Ahmed Mahmoud Aliweh Ahmed Mohammed Mahmoud Abdelhafez Aliaa Tawfiq el Guindy Amany A. Sabagh Asmaa Gheith a.awaad@aucegypt.edu ahmedaliweh@yahoo.com

abdelhafez.edu@mu.edu.eg

aliaa.elguindy@edcu.edu.eg

Uq2012@hotmail.com drasmaagheith@yahoo.com

Ayat Ahmed Al-Tawel ayatawel@gmail.com

Bahaa abdelmegid

bahameged@hotmail.com

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Corinna May

corinna.white@evolve4life.com.au

2:00-3:45 Room E Day One

El Sayed Salem Rezk

Shanab Sayedsalemr@yahoo.com

1:15-3:00 Room C Day Two 2:00-3:45 Room C Day One 1:15-3:00 Room A Day Two 11:30-11:55 Room A Day Two 2:00-3:45 Room E Day One 1:15-3:00 Room E Day Two 2:00-3:45 Room D Day One 2:00-3:45 Room B Day One 1:15-3:00 Room B Day Two 1:15-3:00 Room B Day Two 1:15-3:00 Room A Day Two 2:00-3:45 Room E Day One

Essam Hassan Naji Al-Mizjaji Ghada Mamdouh Abdel Hafeez Ghanim Jasim Samarrai Hala AbdelMoneim Hamdi Eltantawi Shadi Hoda Mahmoud Abu Hashem Ibtisam Ibraheem Khalilo Khaled El Ebyary Khaled Mohsen Mohamed Zuheer Magda Mansour Hasabelnaby Maged Rushdi

esamhasan10@yahoo.com

gabdelhafiz@yahoo.com ghanim@sharjah.ac.ae hala.eissa.73@facebook.com hashadi6@yahoo.co.uk

hoda_kady2000@yahoo.com

ramizshadi@yahoo.com k.ebyary@yahoo.co.uk Zuheer_2004@yahoo.com

hasabelnaby@gmail.com

magedru@gmail.com

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Mohamed Eid El-Ghamry

melghamrys@yahoo.com

2:00-3:45 Room C Day One

Mohamed Ismail Abu- mabu_rahmah@hotmail.com Rahmah

1:15-3:00 Room C Day Two

Muhammad Nasir Khan Naglaa Nada

muhammad.nasirkhan@iiu.edu.pk

1:15-3:00 Room C Day Two 2:00-3:45 Room B Day One 2:00-3:45 Room C Day One 1:15-3:00 Room E Day Two 10:45-11:15 Room A Day Two 2:00-3:45 Room B Day One 11:55-12:20 Room A Day Two 1:15-3:00 Room A Day Two 1:15-3:00 Room D Day Two 11:45-12:30 Room B Day One 2:00-3:45 Room D Day One

Mohamad nmnada@yahoo.com

Nevine Mahmoud Abolawafi

nevineabolawafi2000@yahoo.com

Rafik Ahmed rafikahm@gmail.com AbdelMoati Moahmed Ramy Shabara Rania Rafik Khalil ramy.shabara@aucegypt.edu Rania.khalil@bue.edu.eg

Saad Khamis Bushaala bushaala@email.sc.edu Said A. Aboudaif Said Fathy Sameh Alansary S meya Mas d Se a usaidaboudaif@yahoo.com saidalsaid1971@gmail.com Sameh.alansary@bibalex.org dr.sameya@gmail.com

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Samia Kara Samir Muhammad Rammal Samira Bakr

samia_kara2003@yahoo.fr srammal@birzeit.edu

1:15-3:00 Room C Day Two 2:00-3:45 Room A Day One 1:15-3:00 Room B Day Two 1:15-3:00 Room A Day Two 1:15-3:00 Room B Day Two 2:00-3:45 Room E Day One 2:00-3:45 RoomA Day One 2:00-3:45 Room B Day One 11:00-11:30 Room A Day One 2:00-3:45 Room A Day One 10:30-11:00 Room A Day One

Samira.bakr@moe.edu.eg

Sara Ali Shahwan

sarashahwan@hotmail.com

Sarah..Hamdy ElSayed Shawky Y A. Allam

shamdy@berlitzegypt.com shawkyallam@yahoo.com

Shimaa Mahmoud El- shimaamahmoud@hotmail.com Rashidy

Tharwat Mohamed EL-Sakran Victoria Clark

telsakran@aus.edu

Victoria.clark@britishcouncil.org.eg

Wesam M A Ibrahim Zeinab El-Naggar

wesam.ibrahim@edu.tanta.edu.eg zenaggar@gmail.com

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Notes

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