Você está na página 1de 61

John Deere

Design Specification Report for


Design & Fabrication of Prototype Rain Simulator


April 4, 2014


Ryan Bimes
Justin Frazier
Bill Loffredo
Sean Munck
Xin Wen


Yes Intellectual Property Rights Agreement
Yes Non-Disclosure
1

Executive Summary
John Deere faced the problem of testing compact tractor components under various rain
conditions at their Augusta, Georgia location. Previous solutions involved testing individual
components under shower heads, sprinklers, or dripping mesh screens with fans to simulate
wind. A large scale solution was required for John Deere to test full sized compact tractors. The
rain simulator is required to be accurate and versatile with varying wind speeds, wind angles, and
rates of rainfall. Also, due to increasing environmental concern, the device is required to filter
and recycle runoff water from the test.

In order to accurately meet John Deeres requirements, customer needs were established, existing
patents and products were researched, and the rain simulator device was broken down into
several subsystems. An external search provided insight on techniques for droplet formation and
structure support. John Deere specified that the rain simulator requires adjustable rain fall from
0 to 6 inches per hour, wind speeds from 0 to 30 mph at 0 to 45 degree angles, and accommodate
1000 to 4000 series tractors. Several concept designs were generated which included fans,
sprinklers, perforated tubes, locking pins, aluminum extrusions, etc. We identified three main
subsystems which were the base, structure and water sprinkling device. Interchangeability of
subsystem components allowed us to select wind simulation, droplet formation, water delivery,
and structure for concept selection. The result of concept selection indicated that the final design
would include fans for wind simulation, aluminum tubes with locking pins for structure,
perforated tubes for water delivery, and some form of water droplet formation.

Detailed design of the rain simulator started with a simple and inexpensive base design utilizing
a waterproof sheet with cinder blocks and boards to support the tractor. Analyzing prices on
aluminum structural components and discovering heavy duty canopies showed it was more cost
effective and convenient to use a pre-fabricated structure. Testing showed that a soaker hose
effectively formed water droplets. Calculations were conducted to prove the design would meet
specifications. Materials and components were finalized and ordered, and a manufacturing
process was generated. A testing procedure was generated to ensure satisfaction of
specifications. A complete CAD model was constructed showing all major components of
assembly.

The alpha prototype was transported to August, Georgia for initial testing. It was discovered that
the fans did not significantly change the speed or angle of rainfall, that the single-line soaker
hose configuration restricted water flow, creating uneven distribution. Additionally, the
cinderblock base was not needed as rubber tracks were provided. Based on these findings, our
requirements were changed to simulate rate-adjustable standing rainfall only. We eliminated the
fan system, and reworked the soaker hose configuration to a parallel hose design, utilizing PVC
pipes as central lines, upon which soaker hose lines would branch. This allowed for even water
distribution. We successfully tested this design, measuring adjustable rainfall rate as a function
of pump flow rate. We created a poster summarizing the design for the engineering showcase.
Our project was within our budget of $1000, and is ready to present to John Deere.

2

Table of Contents

1.0 Introduction .......................................................................................................................... 5
1.1 Initial Problem Statement ...................................................................................................... 5
1.2 Objective ............................................................................................................................... 5
2.0 Customer Needs Assessment .................................................................................................... 6
2.1 Gathering Customer Input ..................................................................................................... 6
2.2 Weighting of Customer Needs .............................................................................................. 6
3.0 External Search ......................................................................................................................... 7
3.1 Patents ................................................................................................................................... 7
3.2 Existing Products................................................................................................................... 8
4.0 Engineering Specifications ....................................................................................................... 9
4.1 Establishing Target Specifications ........................................................................................ 9
4.2 Relating specifications to Customer Needs ......................................................................... 10
5.0 Concept Generation and Selection .......................................................................................... 11
5.1 Problem Clarification .......................................................................................................... 11
Figure 1: Water flow model of rain simulator........................................................................... 11
5.2 Concept Generation ............................................................................................................. 12
5.3 Concept Selection ................................................................................................................ 15
6.0 System Level Design .............................................................................................................. 17
7.0 Special Topics ......................................................................................................................... 18
7.1 Preliminary Economic Analysis .......................................................................................... 18
7.2 Project Management ............................................................................................................ 18
7.3 Risk Plan and Safety ........................................................................................................... 18
7.4 Ethics Statement .................................................................................................................. 19
7.5 Environmental Statement .................................................................................................... 19
7.6 Communication and Coordination with Sponsor ................................................................ 19
8.0 Detailed Design ....................................................................................................................... 20
8.0.1 Modifications to Statement of Work Sections ................................................................. 20
8.0.1.1. Introduction - no change .......................................................................................... 20
8.0.1.2. Customer Needs no change ................................................................................... 20
3

8.0.1.3. External Search no change .................................................................................... 20
8.0.1.4. Engineering Specifications no change .................................................................. 20
8.0.1.5. Concept Generation and Selection no change ...................................................... 20
8.0.1.6. System Level Design ............................................................................................... 20
8.0.1.7. Special Topics .......................................................................................................... 20
8.1 Manufacturing Process Plan ................................................................................................ 20
8.2 Analysis ............................................................................................................................... 22
8.3 Material and Material Selection Process ............................................................................. 24
8.4 Component and Component Selection Process ................................................................... 25
8.5 CAD Drawings .................................................................................................................... 26
8.6 Testing Procedure ................................................................................................................ 29
8.6.1 Procedure for Testing the Maximum Wind Speed ...................................................... 29
8.6.2 Procedure for Testing Rainfall Volume ....................................................................... 29
8.6.3 Base Testing Procedure................................................................................................ 29
8.6.4 Procedure of test on the accuracy of voltage adjuster to vary the wind speed ............ 29
8.6.5 Procedure of test on the accuracy of valve to vary the rainfall rate ............................. 30
8.7 Economic Analyses - Budget and Vendor Purchase Information ....................................... 30
9.0 Final Discussion ...................................................................................................................... 32
9.0.1 Introduction .................................................................................................................. 32
9.0.2 Customer Needs ........................................................................................................... 32
9.0.3 External Search ............................................................................................................ 32
9.0.4 Engineering Specifications .......................................................................................... 32
9.0.5 Concept Generation and Selection ............................................................................... 32
9.0.6 System Level Design ................................................................................................... 32
9.0.7 Special Topics .............................................................................................................. 33
9.0.8 Detailed Design ............................................................................................................ 33
9.1 Construction Process ........................................................................................................... 33
9.2 Test Results and Discussion ................................................................................................ 33
10.0 Conclusions and Recommendations ..................................................................................... 33
11.0 Self-Assessment (Design Criteria Satisfaction) .................................................................... 33
11.1 Customer Needs Assessment ............................................................................................ 34
4

11.2 Global and Societal Needs Assessment ............................................................................ 34
Appendix A Patents ................................................................................................................... 34
Appendix B Concepts ................................................................................................................ 36
Appendix C Gantt Chart ............................................................................................................ 41
Appendix D Initial Budget ......................................................................................................... 43
Appendix E Bill of Materials ..................................................................................................... 43
Appendix F Detailed CAD Drawings ........................................................................................ 44
Appendix G Team Resumes ...................................................................................................... 56

















5

1.0 Introduction
For John Deere, reliability is key. The companys core values are integrity, quality,
commitment, and innovation. (Deere) These values extend to every product sold, and without
proper weather testing, they could not be guaranteed. John Deere implements exhaustive tests on
their equipment to make sure that degradation can be avoided, but as the products evolve, so too
must the tests for reliability. John Deere performs system level testing on tractor components,
but currently has no apparatus for entire tractor level rain testing. Our team is tasked with
creating a rain simulator which is durable, easy to use and assemble, accurate, compact and
portable, and within budget.
1.1 Initial Problem Statement
Deere & Co., commonly known as John Deere, is a major manufacturer of agricultural
machinery, based in Moline, Illinois. Because the companys equipment is regularly exposed to
the elements, John Deere is in need of a rain simulator system for its testing facility in Augusta,
Georgia. The system must be designed to test rain effects on commercial series tractors. The
simulator must have the ability to control rate, direction and speed of rain, and should recycle
water. The design needs to filter contaminates, such as oil, grease and dirt from the rainwater,
and must be easy to set-up and tear down for shipment to the testing facility.
1.2 Objective
The primary objective is to design a rain simulator for John Deere which, in descending order of
importance to the customer is reliable, easy to use, easily assembled and disassembled, accurate,
reasonably light and compact, and within the cost requirements of the project.
The most important design objectives are durability and reliability. The simulator needs to be
run repeatedly without fail. Because it may be used on many different vehicles per day, the
system should not have an operating limit which causes it to fail under expected use. The
materials used will be constructed of aluminum, PVC, and rubber, so rust will not be a concern.
The sponsor would like a system which can be employed very quickly after the delivery date,
with little to no learning curve for operation. The operating parameters and controls of our
simulator will be very straightforward. The system will be easy to assemble and
disassemble. Because John Deere may need to move the simulator between facilities, or even
factory locations, easy setup and tear-down is crucial to the design. The structure will screw
together and use locking pins so that setup is fast and easy.
The design will accommodate accurate control of water flow rate, wind intensity and rain
direction. The direction will change up to 45 degrees in any direction from vertical. By
electrically attenuating the speed of the pumps, rainfall will be adjustable between one and six
inches per hour, to an accuracy of +/- one inch per hour. The wind speed will be continually
6

variable up to 30 miles per hour. Additionally, the simulator must successfully filter and recycle
used water. The system will employ a density separator for removing automotive oil, diesel fuel
and grease, as well as a sediment filter and particulate trap for soil, grass, and other organic
material which may be on the tested vehicle.
The design must be light and compact. John Deere has set a limit of 1000 lbs and a disassembled
size of 66wide x 44 deep x 50 tall. When assembled, the system will use a collapsible
aluminum pole structure to expand to over 150 long x 80 wide x 100 tall, so that it may
accommodate all of the commercial tractors to be tested. Although the weight and disassembled
size is important, the working size is much more crucial in our design. John Deere has stated
that our team has more flexibility on the disassembled size and weight.
The project budget of $1000 is the final major requirement of our project. We have been given
tentative permission by John Deere to add to the budget if necessary, but only after justification
to the company.
2.0 Customer Needs Assessment
2.1 Gathering Customer Input
John Deere currently has a need for a rain-bay that can create rain to a pre-determined and
selectable rate. The rain simulator needs to possess the ability to select the rate, direction and
force of the water that has to hit the tractor. In order to develop a relationship with the sponsor
and get customer input, a teleconference was scheduled and a list of preliminary questions that
were going to be discussed in the teleconference was sent to Tom Aho. He answered the
questions, providing a list of importance to John Deere. In order to further clarify the details of
the customer needs, we held a teleconference with Tom Aho and Mark Beltowski from John
Deere. The final order of decreasing importance of the given customer needs is as follows:
reliability, ease of use, ease of set-up/disassembly, precision/accuracy, storage size, ability to
recycle water, cost.
2.2 Weighting of Customer Needs
To produce a rain simulator that best suites the needs provided by John Deere, the customer
needs were weighed against each other. In this manner, we will determine which needs carry
more weight than others, and to what degree. Using the weighted customer needs, we will then
be able to accurately assess different concepts and select the concept that will best accommodate
John Deeres needs. Provided John Deeres ranking of their needs, the team knew the ranking of
each need and only had to determine how important they were to each other. In order to do so,
an AHP matrix was used. Below, each need is weighted against another, if the need on the left
holds more weight over the need on the right, a number will the assigned between 1 and 5. If the
7

need on the left does not hold as much weight as the need on the right, a number between 0 and 1
will be assigned. Each corresponding cell across the diagonal hold the reciprocal of its
counterpart.


Table 1: AHP Matrix to Determine Weighting of Customer Needs

From the AHP matrix seen in table 1, durability/reliability account for about 25% of the total
design. Ease of use, ease of assembly, and accuracy account for between 20-16%. Lastly,
weight/size and cost only account for 10-8% of the total design. These weighted values will
carry into the assessment of generated concepts.

3.0 External Search

An external search was conducted to find existing patents and products that relate to rain
simulators. A few patents were found that involve rain simulation devices for various purposes,
and these will be discussed below in section 3.1. There are no traditional rain simulation devices
for sale right now that can be bought as a single unit, but there a few papers published online that
document various other rain simulation devices. These will be discussed in section 3.2.
3.1 Patents
A thorough patent search was performed to find existing technologies that would help in the
design of the final concept, as well as prevent any possible patent infringement. The patent
search is summarized below with the use of an Art-Function Matrix. The functions of a rain
simulator were broken into three main subsystems - a water sprinkling device, a main structure,
and a base. The base envisioned would be a combination of devices to support the tractor,
collect water, filter water, and pump water. Because the individual components of the base will
be purchased and not designed, the main focus of the patent search was on the water sprinkling
device and structural support. Most patents discovered related to different methods of creating
rainfall. The water sprinkling devices fell into three categories a standard sprinkler, a pipe with
holes throughout, and either of the two in combination with a collection sheet or plate. The
Durability/Reliability Ease of Use Accuracy Ease of Assembly Weight/Size Cost Total Weight
Durability/Reliability 1.00 1.11 1.25 1.43 2.50 3.33 10.62 0.25
Ease of Use 0.90 1.00 1.11 1.11 2.00 2.50 8.62 0.20
Accuracy 0.80 0.90 1.00 1.25 1.43 1.67 7.05 0.17
Ease of Assembly 0.70 0.90 0.80 1.00 2.00 2.50 7.90 0.19
Weight/Size 0.40 0.50 0.70 0.50 1.00 1.43 4.53 0.11
Cost 0.30 0.40 0.60 0.40 0.70 1.00 3.40 0.08
8

discovery of the collection sheet was significant in revealing another method of creating realistic
raindrops, as opposed to John Deeres solution of using a mesh screen. The patents found for
rain simulators were designed for various purposes such as irrigation, testing on buildings, as
well as for visual purposes. None of the patents found dealt specifically with vehicle testing.
The exact configuration of components in the final design will differ from all patents discovered,
and patent infringement will not be an issue. A summary of each patent in the table is provided
in Appendix A.



Table 2: Art-Function Matrix


3.2 Existing Products
The device being designed for John Deere is very specific in its function as a rain simulator with
adjustable rainfall rate, wind speed, and wind angle that recycles water and can accommodate
compact tractors. Not surprisingly, there are no existing products on the market that satisfy these
needs. There are also no products that could be found that were marketed as any type of rain
simulator.

Although no existing products were found, some academic research articles were found online
documenting rain simulators built for research purposes. These rain simulators used similar
technology as discovered in the patent search, mainly relying on the use of sprinkler to deliver
rain water. One such article revealed a structural technique found to be very convenient for ease
of assembly. The structural support was built using aluminum pipes connected to fitting with
holes for locking pins. This concept would be perfect for John Deeres needs of easy assembly.
A benchmarking table of the rain simulators found from research papers is shown below.




9


Table 3: Benchmarking of Rain Simulators for Research
4.0 Engineering Specifications
4.1 Establishing Target Specifications
John Deere provided us with target specifications. The dimensions were chosen to accommodate
a compact tractor. The collapsible dimensions were chosen so the rain simulators container
could be placed in a pickup truck with relative ease. The rate of rainfall was chosen to simulate
foreseeable conditions.


Initial target specifications:
Length: 150
Width: 80
Height: 100
Weight: <1000lbs
Rate of rainfall: 1 to 6 per hour, with accuracy of 1 per hour
Collapsible into a 66wide x 44 deep x 50 tall container
Filters oil and particulate
Provides rain from 0 to 45 degrees
Simulates wind speed up to 30 mph
Cost: <$1000

Title
Author(s)
Important Aspects to
Project
"The Use of a Rainfall Simulator for
Brush Control Research on the
Edwards Plateau Region of Texas"
Shane Courtney Porter
Sprinkler heads,
Flow meter,
Inline filter
"The Walnut Gulch Rainfall
Simulator: A Computer-Controlled
Variable Intesity Rainfall Simulator"
G. B. Paige, J. J. Stone,
J. R. Smith, J. R. Kennedy
Aluminum pipe structure,
Telescoping legs,
Recycles water
"A Portable Rainfall Simulator for
Plot-Scale Runoff Studies"
J. B. Humphry, T. C. Daniel,
D. R. Edwards, A. N. Sharpley
Aluminum pipe structure,
Locking pins,
Sprinkler nozzle
10

4.2 Relating specifications to Customer Needs


Table 4: Needs-Metrics Matrix






M
e
t
r
i
c
#

o
f

c
o
n
n
e
c
t
i
o
n

p
o
i
n
t
s
C
o
l
l
a
p
s
e
d

S
i
z
e
D
i
a
m
e
t
e
r

o
f

s
m
a
l
l
e
s
t

f
i
l
t
e
r
e
d

p
a
r
t
i
c
l
e
s
P
u
m
p

H
e
a
d
s
p
a
c
i
n
g

b
e
t
w
e
e
n

h
o
l
e
s
W
e
i
g
h
t
D
i
a
m
e
t
e
r

o
f

h
o
s
e

a
t
t
a
c
h
m
e
n
t
T
h
i
c
k
n
e
s
s

o
f

s
u
p
p
o
r
t
s
D
e
g
r
e
e

o
f

s
w
i
v
e
l
F
a
n
/
D
u
c
t

S
C
F
M
G
a
l
l
o
n
s

p
e
r

m
i
n
u
t
e
S
u
p
p
o
r
t

A
l
l
o
y
#

o
f

c
o
n
t
r
o
l

s
u
r
f
a
c
e
s
T
e
n
s
i
l
e

S
t
r
e
n
g
t
h

o
f

r
o
o
f

m
a
t
e
r
i
a
l
T
e
n
s
i
l
e

s
t
r
e
n
g
t
h

o
f

b
a
s
i
n

m
a
t
e
r
i
a
l
D
i
a
m
e
t
e
r

o
f

r
a
i
n
f
a
l
l

a
t
t
a
c
h
m
e
n
t

p
o
i
n
t
Need
easily collapsible and buildable X X X
easily transportable X X
Filters out oil and particulate X
Recycles Water X X
Produces an even distribution of rain X
relatively lightweight X X X X
Attaches to standard water inlet X
Supports any John Deere Compact tractor X X
Can change the direction of rain X
Variable Wind Speed X X
Variable rainfall X X X
Doesnt rust X
easy to use X
durable X X X
reliable X
evolvable X X
11

List of Metrics
# of connection Points 8
Collapsed Size 66 x 44 x 50
Diameter of smallest filtered particles 1 m
Pump Head 12ft
Spacing between holes 3in
Weight 1000lbs
Diameter of hose attachment 1 in
Support thickness .25in
Degree of swivel 45
Fan SCFM 1500
Gallons per minute 5.2
Support alloy A-36 Steel
# of control surfaces 1
Tensile Strength of roof material 29007psi
Tensile Strength of basing material 4351psi
Diameter of rainfall attachment point 1.5in

5.0 Concept Generation and Selection
5.1 Problem Clarification
5.1 Problem Clarification
A water flow box model shows the parts involved in our Rain Simulator System, the output will
be simulated rainwater. We want the raindrop in a specific angle and wind speed that is set by an
operator. The wind speed and angle should be accurate. Also, the whole system can be
disassembled so that John Deere could move it easily.

Figure 1: Water flow model of rain simulator
12


Figure 2: Black box model of rain simulator

5.2 Concept Generation
5.2 Concept Generation
Concept generation began with brainstorming. Numerous designs were discussed by all team
members. All of the concepts were broken down into separate categories to simplify design
considerations. Figures 3, 4 and 5 shown below are our three main subsystems.



Figure 3: Design Tree for Water Sprinkling Device.



Figure 4: Design Tree for Structure
13





Figure 5: Design Tree for Base

Figure 6 to 11 are subsystem concept generations in response to the subsystem chart.
Larger versions of the sketches are available in Appendix B.

























Figure 6: Overhead Sprinkler bars Figure 7: Single Overhead Fan, Fixed

14
























Figure 8: Single Overhead Fan, Fixed Screen Figure 9: Multiple Overhead Fans,
Individual Screens



Figure 10: Fans with multiple rotating axis
15



Figure 11: Fan attachment to sides of structure



5.3 Concept Selection
Concept selection was done for most important elements of the rain simulator where there are
clear alternative concepts to choose from. The base subsection is not included in the selection
because of its complicity. The overall function of the base will remain the same regardless of
choices made from the base concept tree shown in section 5.2. Although different base designs
will affect weight and ease of assembly, these designs rely highly on available materials and
products which has not been determined at this point.

Table 5: Pugh Chart for Wind Simulation
Selection Criteria Weight Rating Weighted Score Rating Weighted Score
Durability/Reliability 0.25 3 0.75 2 0.5
Ease of Use 0.2 3 0.6 3 0.6
Accuracy 0.17 3 0.51 2 0.34
Ease of Assembly 0.19 3 0.57 3 0.57
Weight/Size 0.11 3 0.33 4 0.44
Cost 0.08 3 0.24 4 0.32
Total Score 3 2.77
Rank 1 2
Fan (ref) Angle/Pressure
Wind simulation
16


Table 6: Pugh Chart for Droplet Formation

Table 7: Pugh Chart for Water Delivery

Table 8: Pugh Chart for Structure

The results of the concept selection show that the final concept will use some configuration of
fans, a perforated tube, and pipes with locking pins. Some sort of droplet formation will be used,
but further testing will have to be done to determine which method is most suitable.

Selection Criteria Weight Rating Weighted Score Rating Weighted Score Rating Weighted Score Rating Weighted Score
Durability/Reliability 0.25 3 0.75 3 0.75 3 0.75 3 0.75
Ease of Use 0.2 3 0.6 3 0.6 3 0.6 3 0.6
Accuracy 0.17 3 0.51 5 0.85 5 0.85 5 0.85
Ease of Assembly 0.19 3 0.57 2 0.38 2 0.38 2 0.38
Weight/Size 0.11 3 0.33 3 0.33 3 0.33 3 0.33
Cost 0.08 3 0.24 3 0.24 3 0.24 3 0.24
Total Score 3 3.15 3.15 3.15
Rank 2 1 1 1
Droplet formation
None (ref) Screen/mesh Collection Sheet Rope
Selection Criteria Weight Rating Weighted Score Rating Weighted Score
Durability/Reliability 0.25 3 0.75 4 1
Ease of Use 0.2 3 0.6 3 0.6
Accuracy 0.17 3 0.51 3 0.51
Ease of Assembly 0.19 3 0.57 3 0.57
Weight/Size 0.11 3 0.33 3 0.33
Cost 0.08 3 0.24 4 0.32
Total Score 3 3.33
Rank 2 1
Water Delivery
Sprinkler (ref) Perforated Tube
Selection Criteria Weight Rating Weighted Score Rating Weighted Score Rating Weighted Score
Durability/Reliability 0.25 3 0.75 1 0.25 3 0.75
Ease of Use 0.2 3 0.6 3 0.6 3 0.6
Accuracy 0.17 3 0.51 3 0.51 3 0.51
Ease of Assembly 0.19 3 0.57 4 0.76 2 0.38
Weight/Size 0.11 3 0.33 4 0.44 3 0.33
Cost 0.08 3 0.24 4 0.32 2 0.16
Total Score 3 2.88 2.73
Rank 1 2 3
Structure
Pipes/Locking pins Collapsible tent Aluminum extrusions
17

6.0 System Level Design
The rain simulator consists of several elements but has one main process flow. First, water is
dispensed into the basin via standard, 60 psi connection. When the pump is turned on, the water
is adverted through the in-line filter. It then passes through the pump and is carried to the water
delivery system. The water delivery system will be a perforated tube and the water will flow
through the perforations and into some type of droplet creation device. The rain dispenser will
consist of either a screen/mesh, a droplet sheet, or ropes. The water flows into the rain dispenser
and turns into droplets. The droplets then hit the test subject and fall into the basin, where they
are recycled again. The structure holding the enclosure consists of pipes with locking pins.


Figure 12: CAD drawing of rain simulator concept
18

Figure 12 shows one possible configuration of the rain simulator. The structure is composed of
aluminum pipe that will be connected using locking pins. The base uses a grating that is
mounted on supports to suspend the tractor above the water. The base will be made of
waterproof lining to collect water. Water will be pumped through a filter to the top of the
structure though a hose to perforated pipe (not shown). Fans will be mounted in some
configuration to simulate wind.
7.0 Special Topics
7.1 Preliminary Economic Analysis
The preliminary economic analysis consists of the initial budget and the Bill of Materials
(BOM). These can both be seen in Appendices D and E respectively. The budget of $1000 set by
Penn State University is not firm due to the magnitude of this project and does not include travel
expenses. Team Rain Simulator will aim to meet the $1000 budget by using available resources
to buy materials at reduced cost. Additionally, the team will optimize the design to use the lease
amount of material safely possible.
7.2 Project Management
Team rain simulator consists of five mechanical engineers. Together, we possess a powerful
variety of technical skill, leadership, and ability to work as a team. This project involves different
engineering principles. Fluid mechanics is needed to produce rain the right way. Structural
mechanics is needed to make sure the frame supports the weight of the assembly and the water.
Some team members specialize in fluid mechanics while others specialize in structural
mechanics. Additionally, we have all taken design courses and have used the Product
Development Process. With our combined skills used in school and on the job, we possess all the
skills necessary to deliver all the customer needs and to meet all due dates. Due dates can be
found in Appendix C.
7.3 Risk Plan and Safety
This project involves different types of risks. Most of them are associated with technical
problems, but other risks include safety issues and scheduling issues. To minimize these risks we
are designing the rain simulator early to allow for one major failure. We are also designing the
system with flexibility and redundancy. During the build, we will keep safety in mind to prevent
injury. Keeping these risks in mind will ensure success, even if failure does occur at some point.



19



Table 9: Risk Plan
7.4 Ethics Statement
During the entirety of this project, we will abide by the ASME Code of Ethics. It States:
Engineers uphold and advance the integrity, honor, and dignity of the engineering profession
by: I. Using their knowledge and skill for the enhancement of human welfare
II. Being honest and impartial, and serving with fidelity their clients (including their
employers) and the public
III. Striving to increase the competence and prestige of the engineering profession

7.5 Environmental Statement
Team Rain Simulator strives to exceed all environmental standards set within this projects field
of expertise. We aim to abide by these standards by minimizing waste and choosing products
from companies that abide by environmental standards. More specifically, we will guarantee no
harmful runoff from the rain simulator and 100% containment of environmentally harmful
substances.
7.6 Communication and Coordination with Sponsor
Meetings with John Deere will happen via progress report and teleconference unless specified
otherwise. Team Rain Simulators point of contact (POC) is Mr. Thomas Aho of Augusta,
Risk Level Actions to Minimize Fall-back strategy
Rain Simulation
Inaccurate
Medium Build Alpha prototype early
enough to re-do if needed
Re-work initial design
Frame doesnt support
weight
Low Incorporate factor of safety Slowly load supporting
members until max weight
Personal injury during
manufacture
Low Dont stand under overhead
loads
Wear personal protection
equipment
Basin springs a leak High Test before installation Use repair materials
Pump is too small Low Check fluid equations for
correctness
Return pump and buy a
bigger one
Something doesnt fit Medium Design for flexibility Re-work
Filter doesnt separate
oil from water
Low Make system redundant Employ natural separation
20

Georgia. Progress reports include action items that need to be discussed, things that have been
done in the past week, and things that will be done in the upcoming week. They will be emailed
to our POC weekly. Typical teleconferences will happen on an as-needed basis, whenever is
most convenient for the POC. We will use the teleconferences for guidance and answers to
specific questions.

8.0 Detailed Design
8.0.1 Modifications to Statement of Work Sections

8.0.1.1. Introduction - no change
8.0.1.2. Customer Needs no change
8.0.1.3. External Search no change
8.0.1.4. Engineering Specifications no change
8.0.1.5. Concept Generation and Selection no change

8.0.1.6. System Level Design
Rather than fabricating our own aluminum structure, we have chosen to buy a pre-
fabricated canopy to tie into the base. During testing we found that adding cinder blocks to our
design was pointless. We were able to wrap the tarp around the tractor and tie it to the base
without any leaks. This rendered the cinder-block base unnecessary.
8.0.1.7. Special Topics
Updated the Gantt Chart, Budget, and BOM to include new materials and updated
designs.
8.1 Manufacturing Process Plan
Our manufacturing process plan placed emphasis on Design For Assembly. Design For
Manufacturing was not as important as the rain simulator will not be mass-produced.
Nevertheless, the rain simulator must accommodate for evolution in design and be easily
adaptable to make way for bigger tractors.


21

Table 10: Manufacturing Process Plan
Assembly Name Material Type Raw Stock Size Operations
Structure Pre-fabricated canopy 10'x15'x8' Set up canopy
Drill 16x.12 holes
into horizontal
members below roof
Eye Hooks Install into horizontal
members
Fans Fans, PVC pipe 1.25 inch pipe Install 2 fans per 5
PVC section, make 3
of these
PVC 1.5 inch Ts Connect 2 1.5 inch ts
per the design. Make
6 of these
Mount fan sections
onto T-sections.
PVC Pipe 5 1.25 inch sections Mount horizontal
PVC sections on the
roof with Ts and 4-
ways
Mount fan assemblies
onto horizontal PVC
roof sections per the
design
Base Pressure Treated
Wood
4"x6"x10' Cut to 8x2.5' sections
Drill 2x .5 holes on
top and 1x .5 hole
on bottom of 4 on
each side, staggered
Drill 2x .5 holes on
top and 1x .5 hole
on bottom of 4, 1 side
only
1.5"x6"x5' Drill respective holes
into these boards
Threaded Rod 3/8 Cut with band saw
into 54x6 sections,
8x8 sections.
Bevel each section on
both sides
Assemble wooden
base per drawing.
Use threaded rod
with nuts and
22

washers to hold wood
together
3 wood screws Lift assembled
canopy onto wooden
base, drill wood
screws into canopy
holes and base wood
Collecting Basin Waterproof tarp 12'x20' Install rivets 3' apart
on every corner
Place rivets into
respective bolts on
the base.
Water delivery
system
Pump, hose, filter Hose 15" long Connect sediment
filter to pump and
hose to filter. Tie to
structure
Soaker hose 125x3/8 Hang soaker hose
with eye hooks and
tie into water line
Electrical Fan plugs Attach 2 fan plugs to
1 surge protector,
attach surge protector
to voltage adjuster.
Carry out 3 times
Surge protector Attach 3 voltage
adjusters to main
surge protector
Electronics box Contain electronics in
electronics box,
attach to canopy
8.2 Analysis
During the design development process, our team knew that we had several important parameters
within which we had to work, namely the required variability and accuracy of water flow volume
and speed, and known weight and size specifications.
Our design calls for six fans which accelerate the water droplets from above. When deciding on
a fan to purchase, we needed one which would achieve 30 mph wind speeds while being of
reasonable weight, cost and size. Because fans are measured on their volumetric flow rate, we
needed to convert to wind speed ourselves. The calculations used for our chosen fan are below.


23


] [

] [

]

Our next calculation was an estimate of the total water-mass running through the soaker hoses
during operation. We were able to use this data, in combination with the weight of the fans and
frame, to make sure our chosen canopy could safely support the system.
( )( )
(

) ( )

) ()

Another calculation we had to make involved the horizontal loading of the wind from the fans.
Assuming a wind speed of 30mph, we calculated the thrust and in turn, the loading on the
structure.


(

) ( ) [

] (

) [

) [


]
[


]
Although experimentation is necessary to verify the stability of our structure, we could still form
an educated estimate for factor of safety. Because our canopy is not an engineered rigid
structure, it has no official snow or wind load ratings, but based on an engineered structure of
similar size (built by the same company), we found that that the roof supported 43 pounds per
square ft. Because our structure is not as heavy duty, we estimated a load rating of about 10
24

lbs/sq. ft. As long as the weight of our system is distributed evenly over the upper frame of the
canopy, this should be a reasonable estimate.
(

) ()()

( ( ))

( () )




We were given a range of rainfall rates for the simulator (0 to 6 in/hr). As a result, we needed to
convert rate of rainfall to required volumetric flow rate, based on the dimensions of our
simulator.
( )( )
(

) ()() [

] [


Each of these calculations was very beneficial in deciding upon which products to use, but
experimentation was necessary to verify the max wind speed and flow rates. These procedures
are detailed in the Test Procedure section.

8.3 Material and Material Selection Process
In order to assemble a rain simulator, we utilized many prefabricated and existing
components in order to reduce construction time and cost. Weight, cost, and strength were the
three most important aspects of material selection for the few remaining components that could
not utilize pre-existing products. Depending on the function of the structural component,
different factors carried more weight. For example, when deciding upon a material to support
the weight of the tractor, compressive strength was most important. With several strong
25

materials available, our second factor was cost. With a very low cost to strength ratio, the final
material selected to support the tractors weight was cinderblocks. Materials for other aspects of
the rain simulator were accessed as seen in Table 11 below.
Table 11: Material Selection Process

8.4 Component and Component Selection Process
The goal of our component selection was to find the components that, for the price, were most
cost-effective, easiest to work with, and either most durable or easiest to replace.
The frame for the rain simulator is a pre-fabricated, 10x15 ShelterLogic canopy. Our original
frame would have been fabricated out of aluminum piping and locking pins. After market
research, we determined that a pre-fabricated canopy would not only be easier to assemble and
cheaper, but it would also hold the piping and fans just as well.
The base is comprised of a wooden shell, waterproof tarp, and cinderblock track. A wooden shell
was chosen to accommodate for discrepancies between the advertised frame height and the
actual frame height during testing and to provide a sturdy support for the frame. A waterproof
tarp was chosen for ease of assembly and to ensure cheap water-holding capacity. Cinderblocks
were chosen to support the track because they are both economical and strong.
The water delivery system is comprised of a sump pump, in-line sediment filter, hoses, box fans,
and soaker hose. The sump pump and in-line filter were chosen for ease of assembly. Hoses were
chosen as a cheap alternative to pipes. Box fans were chosen for their low cost and ease of
replacement. Soaker hoses were chosen for their cheap droplet formation.
The main tradeoffs involved cost vs performance. Many of the ideal components for the rain
simulator cost much more than our entire budget. For example, the best pumps that can be found
online eclipsed $300. Through our research we were able to find a pump that performed almost
as well for 1/6 the price of the ideal pump. Another example was the oil collection system.
Rather than spend $500+ on expensive oil-water separator technology, we opted for cheap oil-
Part Selected Material Positives Negatives
Fan Support Structure Aluminum Piping Lightweight, Strong High Cost
Tractor Support Cinderblocks Strong, Low Cost Heavy
Water Containment
Sheet
Tarp
Strong, Low Cost,
Replacable
Potential
Low
Availability
Canopy
Support/Raisers
Wood Strong, Low Cost
Potential
Low
Durability
Grating Steel Grating Strong, Availability Heavy
26

collection sheets. Using research, outside-the-box thinking, and common sense, we are able to
slash our costs significantly.

Table 12: Component Selection Process
Part Selected Component Positives Negatives
Frame Pre-fabricated Canopy Easy to modify Lack of stiffness
Base Wooden Structure Easy to modify Bulky
Water Delivery Utility Pump Low cost, versatile None
Sediment Filter Low cost Doesnt filter oil
Hoses Flexible Minor Losses
Soaker Hose Even Distribution Lacks power
Oil Sheets Cost effective Not 100% effective

8.5 CAD Drawings
Figure 13 shows the detailed CAD drawing of the John Deere Rain Simulator. Included in this
drawing are the ShelterLogic canopy, base constructed of wood, tractor supports constructed of
cinder blocks and wood, two service ramps, wind simulators constructed of PVC and box fans,
and soaker hose winding across the canopy frame. Not included in this view is the pump, filters,
connecting hose, wiring, voltage regulator, tarp, and canopy cover. These were excluded as they
did not affect the major dimensions of the system. The canopy cover can fully enclose the
canopy, and open in the front to allow tractor entrance. Holes may be needed in the top for wind
circulation. The tarp will lie within the base using towels or other soft material as a cushion to
prevent tears. The pump will be submersed in the water below the tractor.
27



Figure 13: Detailed CAD Drawing
28


Figure 14: Close up of wind simulators
Each individual wind simulator is constructed of two box fans mounted to the shelter frame
using 1.5 PVC pipe. The grey connecting components are two 2 PVC tees cemented
orthogonally. The oversized tees allow for lateral movement and rotation of each pair of fans.
The fans will be rotated by winding rope around one end of the axle pipe, pulling from either
direction, and securing the rope to a lower support.
The base will be constructed of 20 long
4x4 pressure treated wood blocks and
various lengths of 2x4 wood. Figure 15
shows holes where dowels can be used to
secure the base, allowing easy assembly and
disassembly. After the canopy is secured on
top of the base, it will be raised 20 to allow
for maximum sized tractors to fit below.

Detailed drawings of each component can be
found in Appendix F.
Figure 15: Close up of Base Construction
29

8.6 Testing Procedure

In order to verify that the rain simulator is capable of meeting requirements, several tests will be
conducted to verify the appropriate parameters.

8.6.1 Procedure for Testing the Maximum Wind Speed
1. Assemble and wire the fan array on the top of the frame.
2. Point all fans in the same direction.
3. Using an anemometer, record average wind speed at various locations within the
rain simulator. Make sure all fans are set to their max wind speed setting.
4. Record wind speed for at least four locations at three different distances from the
fans. (4 locations at 1 ft, 4 locations at 5 ft, 4 locations at frame base).
5. Create a table of average wind speeds for each distance, and a final average
maximum wind speed. Compare to theoretical fan wind speed.
8.6.2 Procedure for Testing Rainfall Volume
1. Use a single soaker hose and measure its length. Attach the hose to a utility
pump, and suspend the hose 10ft above the pump.
2. Place the pump in a basin of water of which original volume of water is known,
and turn on the pump. At the same time, begin a stopwatch.
3. Turn off the pump after five minutes has passed. Record the new volume of water
in the lower basin. Use this information to find the change in volume of water
with time, and calculate the resulting inches per hour of rainfall in the full-scale
simulator. Perform several tests and average the results.
4. Repeat Steps 1-3 with a segment of rope-lined PVC pipe.
8.6.3 Base Testing Procedure
It is imperative that the rain simulator's base be tested to make sure that it can support the full
range of tractors to be tested. Here is the procedure for testing the base:
1. Transport Rain Simulator base and several tractors of various size to a flat field
2. Set up the ramps and base of the Rain Simulator in desired location
3. Slowly drive the smallest tractor onto the base and see if base is stable.
4. Drive tractor off the base and make sure the base's structural integrity is upheld
5. Drive tractors onto the base one at a time in order from lightest to heaviest.
6. Drive each tractor off and make sure the base is not compromised. Stop if the
bases integrity was compromised by the loading from the previous tractor.

8.6.4 Procedure of test on the accuracy of voltage adjuster to vary the wind speed
One of our customer needs is being accurate. We are using fans to simulate wind from 0 to 30
mph. As a result, the accuracy of our wind speed is important in our project.

1. Attach the voltage adjuster to the fan
2. Measure the distance from fan to raindrop simulator device in the real model. For
30

instance, X meter
3. Set the wind speed meter X meter away from the fan
4. Twist the voltage adjuster several times in small increments, read the wind speed
meter, mark the actual speed if necessary
5. Turn off the fan and wind speed meter
6. Redo step 4 with speeds that marked to see if they are still the same

8.6.5 Procedure of test on the accuracy of valve to vary the rainfall rate
Also important to test the tractors is the rainfall rate. This is adjusted using valves for the soaker
hoses.

1. Attach flow meter to water line.
2. Completely open valve to guarantee correct full flow
3. Close the valve 1/3 of the way and make note of the flow rate and the valve position
4. Close the valve another 1/3 and again make note of the flow rate and valve position
5. Tweak the valve positions to ensure 1/3 reductions of flow rate for each position
8.7 Economic Analyses - Budget and Vendor Purchase Information
Included in this section is our current bill of materials. It takes into account the initial budget in
appendix 4 and the changes we have made from our initial budget.













31

Table 13: Bill of Materials









Component Dimension Unit Purchased Materials Total cost
Frame 0
Canopy (Shelterlogic Autoshelter 1015) 1 290.95 290.95
Wind simulator 0
Fan 6 128 128
Voltage adjust 0 0 0
PVC pipe mounted fans 1-1/2inx80in 3 16.47 16.47
PVC pipe mount to frame 1 1/2inx59.5in 6 22.08 22.08
2 in PVC Tee 2in 12 35.52 35.52
The thing that fix the angle 0
Raindrop simulator 0
Soaker hose 1 6.02 6.02
Rope Cotton Cord 1 1.84 1.84
Base 0
Cinder Block 8inx8inx16 12 17.52 17.52
Pressure Treated Lumber 72.16 72.16
Outer raiser 4inx4inx20in 8 0
Inner raiser 4inx4inx20in 4 0
Corner wall 2inx4inx57.5in 8 0
End wall 2inx4inx51in 8 0
Side wall 2inx4inx59.5in 4 0
Other 0
Ramp 2 0 0
Filter (Culligan House Water Filter HD-950A) 1 64.99 64.99
Pump (Ace 1/6 HP Utility Pump) 1 66.99 66.99
Other cost 100 100
0
Total Cost 822.54 822.54
Refrence
http://www.acehardware.com/home/index.jsp
http://www.ecanopy.com/
http://www.mscdirect.com/
http://www.lowes.com/
32

Table 14: Budget 4/8/2014


9.0 Final Discussion
9.0.1 Introduction no change
9.0.2 Customer Needs no change
9.0.3 External Search no change
9.0.4 Engineering Specifications
After testing in Augusta, Georgia demonstrated that the fan assembly was ineffective,
John Deere indicated that the 0-45 angle and 0-30mph wind speed requirements were no longer
required. Simulation of vertical rainfall from 0-6 in/hr is the only rainfall specification.
9.0.5 Concept Generation and Selection no change
9.0.6 System Level Design
Based on our observations at the John Deere testing facility in Augusta, Georgia, we
determined that fans were inadequate for directing rainfall. The fans used in the overhead
configuration did not have an effect on the angle or speed of the rain. Further testing was done
using a large industrial fan supplied by John Deere which failed to produce noticeable changes in
Amount($) Location Date
Beginning Budget 1000
1 17.49 ACE 2/25/2014
2 128 MSC Online
3 290.95 ECanopy Online
4 49.88 Home Depot 3/24/2014
5 12.69 Home Depot 3/24/2014
6 45.28 Home Depot 3/25/2014
7 49.07 Home Depot 3/25/2014
8 43.96 Home Depot 3/25/2014
9 40 Home Depot 3/25/2014
10 13.81 Home Depot 3/25/2014
11 45.2 ACE 3/26/2014
12 42.47 ACE 3/26/2014
13 37.48 Home Depot 3/27/2014
14
15
Ending Budget 183.72
33

angle or speed of the rainfall. Considering the inability of the fans to produce the rainfall
requirements, it was decided that the wind simulation was no longer required and the current fan
configuration would be excluded from the final design.
9.0.7 Special Topics
Updated the Gantt Chart, Budget, and BOM to include new materials and updated
designs.
9.0.8 Detailed Design
Testing in Augusta, Georgia revealed that our current single continuous hose
configurations created kinks and a large pressure drop. This was evident because of a dramatic
uneven distribution of rain fall. In order to create an even pressure through the length of the
simulator, two parallel PVC pipes were used to create a uniform pressure down the length of the
simulator. The soaker hose was cut into sections and was secured to the pipes in a parallel
configuration. The hose sections were secured using barbs and hose ties, which were sealed with
silicone to prevent leaks.
The cinderblock and wood plank track system was more complex and unwieldy than the
rubber tracks supplied by John Deere. As a result, the rubber tracks will rest on top of the tarp
for the final design.
9.1 Construction Process
9.2 Test Results and Discussion
10.0 Conclusions and Recommendations
11.0 Self-Assessment (Design Criteria Satisfaction)
Based upon the requirements initially set by our sponsor, our team met many important
goals in our design. We created a working simulator which was easily transportable, simple to
assemble, filtered and recycled water, was accurate, and was within budget. Although we could
not complete a system for changing water speed and direction in our allotted time and budget, we
build a successful piece of equipment upon which future designs can be added.
Our project is unique because it is not intended to be a mass produced product. Instead,
John Deere will use the simulator to test new prototypes. Because of this, function over form has
been key. Although John Deere may wish to alter our design in the future, we have made sure
that the core functions of accuracy, portability, usability and self-containment are upheld.
34


11.1 Customer Needs Assessment
Our final design meets the all of the revised customer needs. Initially, John Deere
wanted a rain simulator that could create wind speeds from 0-30 mph causing rain to fall from
0-45 from vertical. After alpha prototype testing in Augusta, it was concluded by John Deere
engineers and the members of the Capstone team that the current fan set up would not be
adequate for wind simulation. As a result, the customer needs were modified to focus on
simulating natural vertical rainfall. The 0-6 in/hr requirement still applied, as well as the size
requirements. With a flow meter attached downstream of the filter, our pump was pushing 5.3
gal/min. With our area of rainfall, a gallon per minutes equals roughly an inch per hour of
simulated rainfall. This falls within 1 in/hr of the maximum of 6 in/hr required.
It was recommended to John Deere to add an additional pump to increase flow rate and
even the pressure in the soaker hoses. Also, possible future plans at John Deere are to add high
pressure cone nozzles that could be secured at different spots of the structure to simulate desired
wind speed and angle.
11.2 Global and Societal Needs Assessment
Global and Societal needs are based on the environmental impact of building and running
a rain simulator along and the lessons learned during the project that can be used by other people
in the world with the same needs.
Any design improvements or changes would strictly benefit John Deere. With that being
said, there are many changes that can be done. The design could be scaled for their larger tractors
and could also be made a permanent fixture if needed.
The global needs of the rain simulator involve environmental impact. The fabrication of
the rain simulator proved environmentally friendly. Running the rain simulator has little
environmental impact as long as any oil from the tractor is absorbed and the used water is
disposed of down a proper drain.


Appendix A Patents

35

WO2005063001 A1 - Rain simulator for environmental studies
This invention relates to a rain simulator which is used to carry out environmental
studies. The inventive simulator is based on a combined structure comprising a fixed
part and a mobile part. The mobile structure moves from side to side so as to be
positioned sequentially over plots of land or surfaces of a determined width in order to
wet. The tubes bearing sprinklers or nozzles are fixed to the cables forming the mobile
structure, and nozzles are supplied by means of a general supply system.
CN101912832 A - Self-controllable wind-induced rain load simulation experimental device for
buildings
A wind-induced rain load simulation experimental device for buildings comprising a
water tank, water pump and separator, an array of spray heads attached to cross
beams, and a frame. Each spray head is connected with a horizontal rotary motor for
spray simulation.

CN202587987 U - Artificial rain-making simulating device
An artificial rain making device comprising a rain-making system, a circulating water
supply system and a supporting frame. The rain-making system comprises a rain-
making plate, reflection plate, and nozzle pipes.

US6945468 B1 Rainfall simulation apparatus
A rainfall simulation apparatus and structure comprising an electric pump, riser pipe, V-
shaped aperture-containing trough connected to roof, and elongated collection bin
below the trough and connected to the pump. The rainfall simulation apparatus has
particular utility in connection with providing the relaxing acoustic effect of rainfall on a
structure while additionally providing the visual effect of rainfall through the windows
of the structure.
US5137214 A - Method and apparatus for creating artificial rain
An artificial rain creating apparatus using spray nozzles and a vertical planar collection
sheet. A water tank supplies water under pressure to an overhead manifold which
feeds water to a plurality of spray nozzles. The spray nozzles spray a horizontal fan of
water onto a vertical collection sheet. The water then runs to the bottom of the
collection sheet which contains pointed teeth, and water droplets are formed from each
tooth.
36

Appendix B Concepts
Concept 1 Fans blowing through mesh screen






37

Concept 2: Fans mounted on rotating axis







38

Concept 3: Multiple tractor entry points for different angled tests



39

Concept 4: Rotatable perforated tube




40

Concept 5: Fans with multiple rotating axis

Concept 6: Fan attachment to sides of structure

41

Appendix C Gantt Chart

42


43

Appendix D Initial Budget
Our initial budget is meant to reflect our first attempt at calculating the total cost of our rain
simulator. It does not include travel expenses. A 30% contingency has been added in case
modifications are needed.
Item Cost
Frame Material $400
Basin Material $30
Ramp $40
Oil Collection $40
Grating $150
Piping $25
Pump $100
Hose attachment $10
Fans $150
Side Skirting $75
Mesh $10
Other Hardware $50
30% Contingency $324
Total $1404

Appendix E Bill of Materials





Part # Part Name Part Source Price Quantity Total Cost
M-CPVC57-30MIL 5' x 7' Clear Vinyl Tarp - 30 MIL tarpsplus.com 64.75 4 259
2534T12 8' Steel Clamp-on framing fittings McMaster-Carr 11.65 16 186.4
44155K88 Oil Absorbing Pillows McMaster-Carr 35.67 1 35.67
4892K95 1.5" PVC pipe McMaster-Carr 10.79 2 21.58
4880K25 90 Elbows, Female Unthreaded Socket Ends McMaster-Carr 1.16 10 11.6
T9FB430490 8' X 10'' Heavy Duty Black/Silver Tarp globalindustrial.com 16.75 2 33.5
Irrigation Pump ACE Hardware $50 1 50
T9F258323 Floor Fan 12 Inch - Global Industrial globalindustrial.com $44 4 176
85385T11 Corrosion-Resistant Type 304 Stainless Steel Wire Cloth McMaster-Carr $39.91 4 159.64
Other Hardware McMaster-Carr $50 1 50
603635 2 in. x 4 in. x 16 ft. Douglas Fir Lumber Home Depot 7.86 20 157.2
44

Appendix F Detailed CAD Drawings

45

46

47

48

49

50

51

52

53

54

55


56

Appendix G Team Resumes
Justin R. Frazier jrf5222@psu.edu
3017 Steven Martin Drive, Fairfax, VA 22031 703-474-5939

EDUCATION: Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering May, 2014
The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 3.11 GPA
TECHNICAL SKILLS:
Engineering Design: Component design, Process Flows, AutoCAD, Solidworks, Open-Source 3D printing
Computer Expertise: Excel, Statistics, basic Java, ACSPL+ Motion Control, Image Pro Plus, Matlab
Testing Proficiency: wind and water tunnel testing, laser profilometry and velociometry, material testing
Proven ability in technical writing, team leadership, and conflict resolution
Professional knowledge in statics, dynamic systems, heat transfer, fluid mechanics, and material science

RELEVANT WORK EXPERIENCE
Project Engineer, MeadWestvaco Paperboard Division, Covington, VA Jan-May 2013
Supported engineers with the construction of a $300 million biomass power plant
Engineered all Lock-out Tag-out procedures for a power boiler and turbine generator
Created lubrication routes for boiler equipment
Audited boiler equipment, worked with contractors to ensure safe working conditions
Paper Science Researcher, MeadWestvaco Paperboard Division, Richmond, VA May-Aug 2013
Automated a new piece of laboratory equipment capable of imitating high-speed automation
Developed a method of calibration for paperboard creasing equipment
Created experiments to study the effects of creasing on paperboard properties
Quantified a measurement for the amount of cracking in a paper crease
Camp Counselor, Fairfax County Park Authority, Fairfax, VA Summers of 2010-2012
Supervised early teens and younger as part of the Fairfax County Summer Recreation program
Planned daily camp activities and details involving safety, allergies, and costs.
Maximized facility usage and regularly adapted to changes in plans
Math Tutor, Penn State, taught elementary math through Calculus I Oct 2010-Apr 2011

OTHER EXPERIENCE AND AWARDS:
Eagle Scout Project. Led 3 dozen Boy Scouts in a project to collect bicycles for charity. Planned the project
and presented details to Troop and District authorities. Secured funding, moving van, and use of school
facilities. Organized and led Scouts in implementing the project which collected 75 bicycles and monetary
donations totaling $750.
Mechanical Engineering and Systems Engineering. Designed and built a working tabletop wind
turbine. Solved problems regarding system efficiency, material selection, and industrial fabrication. Performed
research by analyzing data to draw conclusions about real problems and events such as infrastructure corrosion
and the September 11th attacks.
Mechanical Systems Maintenance and repair. Fixed an air compressor with no prior knowledge of the
subject. Repaired bicycles, specifically drivetrains, brake systems, and chains. Performed preventative
maintenance and tested for proper operation prior to returning each bicycle to owner.
AWARDS/LEADERSHIP
Eagle Scout, Boy Scouts of America, 2009
Deans List, Fall Semester, 2013
Order of the Arrow, Boy Scouts of America, 2007
John Philip Souza Band Award, Paul VI High School, 2009
57


58




59

Sean W. Munck

616 E. College Avenue, Apt. 506, State College, PA 16801
Phone: 717 713 0815 Email: swm5376@psu.edu
____________________________________________________________________________

Education: The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA
Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering
Expected Graduation: August 2014
Current GPA: 3.40 / 4.00

Semester Exchange Program Fall 2013
Monash University, Melbourne, Australia

Awards: Bricker James Memorial Engineering Scholarship 2010-2014
Deans List 2011

Relevant Courses: Internal Combustion Engines, Heat Transfer (including Lab), ME Design
Methodology, Senior Capstone Design Project

Work ACE Hardware May 2013-Current
Experience: - Sales Associate
- Organized, constructed and sold ACE products
- Assisted customers with household projects and repairs

TAG Trailers / Lion Launch Pad June 2012-Dec 2012
- Intern
- Used SolidWorks to design new components for an electric bicycle
trailer
- Assisted with prototype trailer fabrication
- Designed new business logo
- Camp Counselor

Camp Pemigewassett (Sleep-away Camp) June 2011-Aug 2011
- Managed a cabin of eight campers full-time
- Worked and lived at camp for eight week session
- Coached boys basketball and baseball teams
- Taught woodshop classes, served camper meals

Computer Skills: MS Office, MATLAB, HTML, SolidWorks

Activities: OPPerations THON Committee, Four Diamonds Fund
- Volunteer for student-run pediatric cancer charity
- Blue Love Chairperson

Aeromodelers Association of Pennsylvania
- Builder/Flyer of model airplanes

Penn State University Cycling Club
- Member, competitor in cycling competitions
60