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Bibliography

Allied troops dug in. Photograph. LBJoramo. Accessed June 8, 2014.


http://blog.lbjoramo.com/?p=169.
This is a photo of Allied troops dug into a trench. We used this on the "Outcome" page.

Allied troops moving out. Photograph. Britannica. Accessed June 8, 2014.
https://www.britannica.com/dday/art-40277.
This image shows Allied troops moving out in trucks and other vehicles. We used this
image on the "Purpose" page.

Americans storming Utah beach. Photograph. DDay Overlord. Accessed June 8, 2014.
http://www.dday-overlord.com/img/dday/ub/utah_beach_debarquements_renforts.jpg.
This is a photo of Americans storming Utah beach. We used it on the "American
Offensive" page.

Amphibious tanks sailing to shore. Photograph. WW2Gyrene. Accessed June 8, 2014.
http://www.ww2gyrene.org/assets/peleliu_dday_amtanks_1.jpg.
This is a picture of amphibious DDTs swimming to shore to land on the beaches of
Normandy. We used it on the "Technology" page.

An amphibious troop transporter (DUKW) landing on the beach of Normandy. Photograph.
Curbside Classic. Accessed June 8, 2014. http://www.curbsideclassic.com/wp-
content/uploads/2013/08/DUKW1.jpg.
This is an image of an amphibious troop transporter (DUKW) landing on the beach of
Normandy. We used it on the "Technology" page.

"Amphibious Valentine Tank D-Day Studland Beach Dorset." Video file, 10:42. YouTube.
Posted by Golgothadiver, April 6, 2014. Accessed June 8, 2014.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KzHiw6fCXcY.
This video, while not an actual account of an amphibious tank during D-Day, is still
important. The man in the video is driving an actual amphibious tank which helps to give
the viewer an idea of what these tanks actually looked like and how they could possibly
be used. We felt it important to be able to clearly depict the technological innovations
that made D-Day happen.

Arnn, Roy. Roy Arnn to Lynn Arnn and Su An Arnn, November 10, 1990.
This letter from a soldier who landed on Omaha beach to his two daughters demonstrates
the extreme danger that soldiers experienced during D-Day. It gives an authentic recap of
someone who watched his fellow soldiers die as well as come very close to death
himself. We directly cited this letter on our "American Offensive" page in order to really
drive home the fact that the taking of Omaha beach was far more difficult and deadly
than the others. This is another one of our primary sources.

British troops landing on Sword beach. Photograph. Wikimedia. Accessed June 8, 2014.
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d9/Landing_on_Queen_Red_Beach,_
Sword_Area.jpg.
This image contains British troops landing on Sword beach. We used this in our "British
and Canadian Offensive" page.

British troops landing on Sword beach. Photograph. DDay Overlord. Accessed June 8, 2014.
http://www.dday-
overlord.com/img/dday/gb/gold_beach_debarquement_landing_craft_assault.jpg.
This is another photo of British troops landing on and storming Sword beach. This was
used on the "British and Canadian Offensive" page.

Color photograph of Erwin Rommel. Wikia. Accessed June 8, 2014.
http://img2.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20120407171749/deadliestfiction/images/d/dd/14_10
_Erwin-Rommel.jpg.
This is a color photograph of Erwin Rommel. We used it on our "Those Involved" page.

Davenport, John. D-Day and the Liberation of France. New York: Chelsea House, 2010.
This is a book on the Landings at Normandy that provided a more first hand account of
the invasion. It gave us a general overview of what life was like as a soldier on D-Day
and it also went over many details of the invasion. We used the information from this
book on many of our pages in order to supplement facts from other sources. Overall, this
is a great source.

"D-Day." Violence in America. Ed. Ronald Gottesman and Richard Maxwell Brown. New York:
Charles Scribner's Sons, 1999. U.S. History in Context. Web. 28 May 2014.Document
URL
http://ic.galegroup.com/ic/uhic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOver
Type=&query=&prodId=UHIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view
&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=false&disp
layGroups=&sortBy=&search_within_results=&p=UHIC%3AWHIC&action=e&catId=
&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CBT2350011087&source=Bookmark
&u=mlin_s_dux&jsid=5e95d8c536597a9e535bcabe14c5aeea
This database entry from U.S. History in Context provided us with a great deal of
information which we used generously. It's information was used to explain the purpose
of D-Day, it's initial opposition, and the enormous deception campaign launched by the
Allies. This page was also directly cited to further our intention of demonstrating the
initial disagreement over whether or not to launch the D-Day assaults. This source was
also instrumental in constructing most of the "Effects of D-Day" as well as the "Events of
D-Day" pages as it provides a very detailed account the time before, during, and after D-
Day.

"The D-Day $20 Bill - from ' A Paratrooper's Story - Benning to Bastogne .'" Video file, 7:55.
YouTube. Accessed June 8, 2014. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bcnc30cqags.
This video provides first hand recollections of American paratroopers who jumped during
D-Day. We used this video on the "American Offensive" page.

Dwight Eisenhower. Photograph. Wikimedia. Accessed June 8, 2014.
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/88/General_of_the_Army_Dwight_D.
_Eisenhower_1947.jpg.
This is an image of Dwight Eisenhower. We used it on our "Those Involved" page.

Dwight Eisenhower speaking to soldiers. Photograph. History. Accessed June 8, 2014.
http://www.history.army.mil/brochures/Ike/Ike-8a.jpg.
This is an image of Supreme Commander Dwight Eisenhower speaking to Allied
soldiers. We used this on the "Those Involved" page.

Eisenhower, Dwight. Memorandum, "Shaef Staff Message Control Incoming Message," June 6,
1944.
One of our primary sources, this provided the information we needed to correctly display
certain numbers and estimations such as the number of airplanes that were used in the
initial Normandy landings.
http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/d-day-memo/images/d-day-memo.jpg

French Generals Henri Giraud and Charles de Gaulle, FDR, and Winston Churchill. Photograph.
Britannica. Accessed June 8, 2014. https://www.britannica.com/dday/art-60988.
French Generals Henri Giraud and Charles de Gaulle, FDR, and Winston Churchill. We
used this on the "Opposition" page.

History.com Staff. "D-Day." History.com. Last modified 2009. Accessed May 28, 2014.
http://www.history.com/topics/world-war-ii/d-day.
This web page was instrumental in providing a quick, yet still detailed overview of the
Landings at Normandy. It covered everything from the initial planning of D-Day and the
deception campaign Operation Fortitude, all the way to the weeks after. We used this
source extensively on most of our pages and directly quoted it on our "Purpose" page to
further the notion of why D-Day happened. This source was also quoted on our
"Technology" page to remind the viewer that the D-Day assault was an amphibious one,
made possible by technological innovations. Finally, we quoted this web page on our
"Deception" page because the web page provided a useful list of the "ingredients" of the
Allied deception campaign. Overall, this was an excellently worthwhile source.

Hughart, Clarence. "Unlucky Number 13." Interview by Patrick O'Donnell. About.com.
Accessed June 8, 2014.
http://history1900s.about.com/gi/dynamic/offsite.htm?site=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.thedr
opzone.org%2Feurope%2FNormandy%2FNormandydefault.html.
This interview provided us with a primary, real-world account of what a US paratrooper
experienced during his drop on D-Day. We directly quoted him on our "American
Offensive" page to drive home to peril that the many of the paratroopers encountered. We
also were able to use the interviewee's account to further explain how paratroopers were
used on D-Day. This is another one of our primary sources.

"Liverpool Albert Docks - Amphibious Vehicle - theyellowduckmarine." Video file, 0:9.
YouTube. Posted by Gregory King, June 7, 2011. Accessed June 8, 2014.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h0ArisiKyms.
This short video clip shows how the DUKW transport vehicles could be used as well as
how they have since been made into tourist attractions. We felt it necessary to be able to
demonstrate, in detail, the innovations that made D-Day possible. We also directly quoted
the video's description on the "Technology" because it contained accurate and detailed
information about who designed and built these vehicles.

Lucas, Alanna. "D-Day: 70th Anniversary by Alanna Lucas." Blog for the Immortal American
Series. Last modified February 5, 2014. Accessed May 28, 2014.
http://blog.lbjoramo.com/?p=169.
Website where we found five of our pictures. Don't know which ones.

Map of Allied landing locations. Photograph. RB-29. Accessed June 3, 2014. http://www.rb-
29.net/html/75ArivdsonMem/Arvidsonscans/12.01invmap%231.jpg.
Another map showing where and when the Allies landed on the beach. we used this on
the "Maps" page.

Map of a possible Allied landing location. Photograph. My Camping France. Accessed June 8,
2014.
http://www.mycampingfrance.co.uk/shopping/images/Capture%20Pas%20de%20Calais.J
PG.
This is a map of possible landing location that the Allies tried to deceive the Germans
with. We used it on the "Deception" page.

Map showing D-Day landing locations. Photograph. Globe at War. Accessed June 8, 2014.
http://www.globeatwar.com/sites/g/files/g413946/f/styles/media_gallery_large/public/Ov
erlord_Plan_Combined_Bomber_Offensive_and_German_dispositions_6_June_1944.jpg
?itok=Uh_DjfZw.
This is a map that shows where each nation landed at D-Day. We used this on the maps
page.

Medic aiding a wounded soldier. Photograph. Wikimedia. Accessed June 2, 2014.
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f1/WWII,_Europe,_Francee,_Invasion
,_%22American_Wounded%22_-_NARA_-_195920.jpg.
This image depicts a medic helping a wounded soldier on the battlefield. We used this on
the "Possible Alternate Outcomes" page.

National D-Day Memorial Foundation. "National D-Day Memorial." The National D-Day
Memorial. Accessed May 28, 2014. http://www.dday.org.
This source was packed full of information regarding everything from detailed
descriptions of the most prominent leadership in the war, to detailed descriptions of
everything D-Day related. We used this source for many of our pages including the
"Effects" and "Execution" pages, as well as in the "Purpose" page. Overall, despite some
sections being under construction, we were able to gleam a great amount of the
information that was present in order to help prove our thesis. Finally, this site contained
an audio clip of a newscast reporting on the events of D-Day which provided another first
hand account.

"Nazi Occupation of France." Video file, 2:42. YouTube. Posted by No Peace without war !!,
January 5, 2011. Accessed June 5, 2014.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3uZ4HgGG53I.
We decided to embed this YouTube video into the "Purpose" page of our website to show
the Nazi occupation of France during World War II in greater detail. It is a slideshow
featuring Germans holding France with occasional captions to explain the significance of
certain images shown. This greatly helped to push the notion that the Allies should strike
back.

Nazi soldiers marching through France. Photograph. Conservapedia. Accessed June 8, 2014.
http://www.conservapedia.com/images/0/0b/German_invasion.-.jpg.
This is an image of Nazi soldiers marching through France before France was liberated.
We used it on our "Purpose" page.

A nurse drawing blood from a donor. Photograph. History 1900. Accessed June 2, 2014.
http://media-cache-
ec0.pinimg.com/236x/c0/95/8a/c0958a5558d1d8c94c88189f1370033c.jpg.
This photo shows a nurse drawing blood from a volunteer on D-Day.

Paratroopers getting ready to jump. Photograph. The Board Game Website. Accessed June 8,
2014. http://www.theboardgamefamily.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/D-Day-
paratroopers.jpg.
This is a photo of paratroopers getting ready to jump from the plane. We used it on our
"American Offensive" page.

Photograph of Erwin Rommel. Wikimedia. Accessed June 8, 2014.
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/75/Bundesarchiv_Bild_146-1973-
012-43,_Erwin_Rommel.jpg.
This is a black and white photo of Erwin Rommel. We used it on our "Those Involved"
page.

Photo of a modified tank. Photograph. Britannica. Accessed June 8, 2014.
https://www.britannica.com/dday/art-40256.
This is a photo of a modified tank used to help storm the beached os Normandy and solve
problems unmodified tanks failed at. We used this on the "Technology" page.

Photo of Canadians storming Juno beach. Photograph. World War 2 Headquarters. Accessed
June 8, 2014.
http://worldwar2headquarters.com/images/normandy/beacheads/juno/landing.jpg.
This is an image of Canadian soldiers storming Juno beach. We used this on the "British
and Canadian Offensive" page.

Photo of inflatable tank. Photograph. The World Wars. Accessed June 8, 2014.
http://theworldwars.wikispaces.com/file/view/oslo2010dday007.jpg/296710272/433x345
/oslo2010dday007.jpg.
This is a photograph of an inflatable tank used by the Allies to sell the image of an
imaginary army. We used it on the "Deception" page.

Photo of wounded soldiers. Photograph. War History Online. Accessed June 8, 2014.
http://www.warhistoryonline.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/Omaha-Beach-Wounded-
Soldiers-DDay.jpg.
This image shows wounded soldiers on D-Day. We used this image on our "Possible
Alternate Outcomes" page.

Rosenberg, Jennifer. "Looking Back: D-Day in Pictures." About. Accessed June 4, 2014.
http://history1900s.about.com/od/worldwarii/tp/D-Day-Pictures.htm.
This website was not used for information. It was strictly used to find the images used in
the slide show on the "D-Day" page. We used this instead of citing each individual image
on this site.

Shirer, Frank R. "D Day." Dictionary of American History. Ed. Stanley I. Kutler. 3rd ed. Vol. 2.
New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 2003. 507-508. U.S. History in Context. Web. 28
May 2014.Document URL
http://ic.galegroup.com/ic/uhic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOver
Type=&query=&prodId=UHIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view
&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=false&disp
layGroups=&sortBy=&search_within_results=&p=UHIC%3AWHIC&action=e&catId=
&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCX3401801149&source=Bookmark
&u=mlin_s_dux&jsid=e8a99fac9ea49e74d42e2e991098424d
This database entry played a relatively small part in our project, but it was important
nevertheless. It provided a detailed explanation on why D-Day is called what it is. The
source explains what the D stands for and how it has been used throughout history. We
used this information on the Purpose page to hopefully give viewers a deeper
understanding of the operation.

Soldiers exiting a DUKW. Photograph. War in Photos. Accessed June 3, 2014.
http://www.warinphotos.com/photos/galleries/world_war_two/d_day_june_6th_1944/inla
nd_we_go.jpg.
This image shows soldiers exiting an amphibious transport vehicle. We used this on the
"Effects on World War Two" page.

Soldiers exiting a DUKW to storm a beach in Normandy. Photograph. The Blog of Teresa.
Accessed June 8, 2014. http://theblogofteresa.com/wp-
content/uploads/2013/06/IMG_4215-300x225.jpg.
This image shows soldiers on D-Day exiting one of the DUKW amphibious transport
vehicles to storm one of the beaches of Normandy. It was used on our "Purpose" page.

Soldiers marching. Photograph. Britannica. Accessed June 2, 2014.
https://www.britannica.com/dday/art-40384.
This photo shows soldiers marching through the beaches of Normandy. This was used on
the "Effects of D-Day" page.

Stalin, FDR, and Churchill. Photograph. Britannica. Accessed June 8, 2014.
http://media.web.britannica.com/eb-media/67/48167-050-21151FA6.jpg.
The three Allied leaders at the Tehran Conference. This was used on the "Planning" page.

The three major Allied flag. Photograph. Travel Pictures Gallery. Accessed June 8, 2014.
http://www.travel-pictures-gallery.com/images/france/normandy/normandy-0085.jpg.
This is an image of the three major Allied flags, America, Britain, and Canada. We used
it on the "Those Involved" page.

US propaganda poster with cannons. Photograph. Army. Accessed May 29, 2014.
http://www.army.mil/d-day/posters.html.
This is a US propaganda poster that states the US will win the war if Americans stay
united on the war effort. We used this on our thesis page.

US propaganda poster with men holding large bullets. Photograph. Army. Accessed June 3,
2014. http://www.army.mil/d-day/posters.html.
This is a poster encouraging Americans to do their parts in helping with the war effort.
We used this on the thesis page.

US troops loaded into a DUKW. Photograph. USHMM. Accessed June 8, 2014.
http://www.ushmm.org/lcmedia/photo/lc/image/alpha/sc078.jpg.
This photo contains US troops loaded into a DUKW ready for landing on the beaches of
Normandy. We used this on the "American Offensive" page.

Vehicles being unloaded from a large US ship. Photograph. Vimeo. Accessed June 8, 2014.
http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/102841741_960.jpg.
This is a photo of vehicles being unloaded from a large US vessel. We used this on the
execution page.