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COUNCIL TO SEND WATER SYSTEM ISSUE TO THE VOTERS/PAGE 3

Friday, June 13, 2014 u One dollar


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Claremont
claremont-courier.com
LETTERS/ PAGE 2
CALENDAR/ PAGE 16
Celebrate, parents. Summer has arrived.
Visit claremont-courier.com
POLICE BLOTTER/ PAGE 4
OBITS/ PAGE 11, 12
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COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff
ABOVE: With head in hand, retiring teacher Ken Kirkwood is serenaded by
his colleagues during an end-of-the-semester assembly on Tuesday at El
Roble Intermediate School. Mr. Kirkwoods fellow teachers dressed in
beards, wire rim glasses and knee-high socks as they sang a special tribute
to the 37-year El Roble veteran. The costumes were inspired by Mr. Kirk-
woods standard work attire, which has added to his uniqueness as a fixture
at the school.
Tearful goodbyes to standout El Roble teachers/PAGE 10
R
etiring special education teacher
Stella Grace, right, receives flowers
from Julie Villanueva during an as-
sembly on Tuesday at El Roble Intermedi-
ate School. Ms. Grace, who spent 30 years
teaching special education at El Roble, said
she is excited about her retirement, which
she described as a great moment. Its okay.
Ive done a lot of hard work, she said.
But Ill definitely miss the hubub.
t
Lukkarila an inspiring teacher
Dear Editor:
We are dismayed by the story about
the potential dismissal of Claremont
High School teacher Dave Lukkarila in
the June 6 COURIER.
It reads as though his conflict with the
Claremont Unified School District, initi-
ated with his complaint of serious mold
in the school, has escalated into a variety
of confrontations that may lead to his
dismissal.
In the story, Mr. Lukkarila was de-
scribed as a favorite among students
by a 2009 CHS graduate.
Our daughter graduated from CHS in
2001, and Mr. Lukkarila was the teacher
who had the greatest impact on her, even
among many other outstanding CHS
teachers. His instruction in history and
economics led her to pursue a career in
economics (and a PhD at the London
School of Economics). She is now a uni-
versity faculty member in Oregon. We
continue to be grateful to him personally
for much of her success in life.
We hope that the Claremont Unified
School District will realize the impor-
tance of keeping this extraordinary
teacher on its faculty, and encourage a
mediation process that will result in that
end.
Shirley and Gary Johnston
Claremont
TAG not advising on
impending tree disaster
Dear Editor:
On June 2, the Tree Advisory Group
(TAG) spent over five hours explaining
to the Claremont City Council and a few
citizens their plan for trees in Claremont.
Every home will have a TAG-selected
tree(s) or, in the case of diseased/dam-
aged trees, a TAG-selected alternate. The
homeowner does not decide; TAG does.
The crucial fact that TAG did not re-
veal at this meeting came out on the
CBS website on Saturday. CBS revealed
that the Huntington Botanical Garden in
Pasadena has had an infection by a
polyphagous borer beetle in over 200 of
their 700 species of trees. This beetle
bores into the tree, carrying a fungus in
its mouth, eventually killing the tree. No
pesticide is known for this beetle. Even
if there were one, once in the tree the
beetle would be immune from the pesti-
cide. Contact is Jim Folson of the Hunt-
ington Botanical Garden. Additionally,
Akif Eskalen of the University of Cali-
fornia Riverside has determined that this
beetle is attacking our avocado trees.
I pose the following questions to TAG:
Are the 500 species of trees not yet at-
tacked at the Botanic Garden a question
of time or immunity? How can TAG, se-
lecting city trees for homeowners, pro-
ceed not knowing the answer to this
question? They have to know the resist-
ance of the trees they select.
These questions have a particular per-
tinence to me. I have a fallen, diseased
liquidambar in my front yard, as I noted
at the meeting. I have a 120-foot heritage
avocado tree in my backyard. Should I
be replacing the diseased liquidambar in
my front yard as a threat to my neighbors
liquidambar? Should I be concerned
about the replacement tree that would go
in? Is it immune to the beetle?
Critical advice on trees is TAGs very
reason for existence.
Lorne B. Smith
Claremont
READERS COMMENTS
Claremont COURIER/Friday, June 13, 2014 2
The Claremont Courier (United States Postal Service 115-180) is published once weekly by the Courier Graphics Corporation at 1420 N. Claremont
Blvd., Suite 205B, Claremont, California 91711-5003. The Courier is a newspaper of general circulation as defined by the political code of the state of
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is paid at Claremont, California 91711-5003. Single copy: One dollar. Annual subscription: $52.00. Send all remittances and correspondence about sub-
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phone: 909-621-4761. Copyright 2014 Claremont Courier
one hundred and sixth year, number 23
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Agendas for city meetings are avail-
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GOVERNING
OURSELVES
Monday June 16
Tree CommitteeCancelled
Tuesday, June 17
Planning Commission
Council Chamber, 7 p.m.
Youth Sports Committee
Hughes Center, 7 p.m.
Wednesday, June 18
Claremont Teen Committee
Youth Activity Center, 3:15 p.m.
ADVENTURES
I N HAI KU
Stitched out of data,
Networks knot, tangle, bunch, cinch
Solid ground? Weve weaves.
D.J. Kraemer
Haiku submissions should reflect upon life
or events in Claremont. Please email entries
to editor@claremont-courier.com.
READERS COMMENTS
Send readers comments via email to edi-
tor@claremont-courier.com or by mail or
hand-delivery to 1420 N. Claremont Blvd.
Ste. 205B, Claremont, CA 91711. The dead-
line for submission is Tuesday at 5 p.m. Let-
ters are the opinion of the writer, not a
reflection of the COURIER. We reserve the
right to edit letters. Letters should not exceed
250 words. We cannot guarantee publication
of every letter. Letters and viewpoints will be
published at the discretion of the editor.
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Claremont COURIER/Friday, June 13, 2014 3
CITY NEWS
A
water revenue bond slated for
the November ballot received a
green light from city council
Tuesday night, despite a request from
Golden State Water Company (GSWC) to
put a plug in it.
City staff has said it can support an $80 million
purchase price through current revenues collected
from water bills. The proposed bonds would give the
city an additional $55 million toward the potential ac-
quisition of the Claremont water system, should the
systems price tag exceed the $80 million.
The councils decision to move forward on issuing
those bonds was somewhat complicated by an
eleventh-hour correspondence from Golden State
Water stating that the water company had entered into
a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with Clare-
mont Affordable Water Advocates (CAWA), a group
of Claremont residents who would rather see the city
engage Golden State in solving the water supply is-
sues and abandon its plan to seize the system.
The MOU, which was signed by Denise Kruger,
senior vice president of regulated utilities at Golden
State, and Donna Lowe on behalf of CAWA, outlines
20 commitments Golden State requested the city
council review before drawing any conclusions about
moving ahead with the water bond ballot measure.
The commitments listed in the memorandum include,
but are not limited to, lower water bills
for residential customers, alternatives
to the WRAM rate, city participation
in the Pomona Valley Protective Association (PVPA)
meetings and dismissal of existing litigation.
They have had years to collaborate with the city
and find alternatives to costly rate increases, Clare-
mont Mayor Joe Lyons said in a statement. But
higher rates and charges is the only real agenda this
city has seen from Golden State Water.
Claremonters have been wading though the water
issue for years and, given Golden States recent liti-
gious activity with the city, the water companys re-
quest was met with both skepticism and reluctance.
At Tuesdays council meeting, residents and council
alike expressed determination to gain local control of
the utility.
Golden State is not making any attempt to help the
citizens of Claremont and they will not, Marilee
Scaff told the council members. What youre doing
is draining the community of something like $8 mil-
lion a year to stockholders and high salaries. Do you
want to keep doing that? I dont like paying high
salaries but I dont mind paying for something I
wantlike a house, or a water company. So what can
you do to keep them from putting you on the spot
which is what they intend to do?
The least you can do is move ahead, she contin-
ued They are well aware that Claremont is deter-
mined and theyre afraid theyll lose the vote but you
cant let them push you so far that you dont have a
chance to do it.
The potential acquisition of the Claremont water
system, which has been owned and operated by
Golden States parent company American Water
Corp. since 1929, continues to propel the city to seek
additional mechanisms of financing. Council and city
staff believe the water revenue bond is one viable op-
tion. Council also believes Claremont residents de-
serve the opportunity vote on it.
Revenue bonds are a special type of municipal
bond distinguished by its guarantee of repayment
solely from revenues generated by a specified entity
associated with the purpose of the bonds, rather than
from a tax. In this case, the bonds would be payable
from the water rates residents are already paying. In
other words, when a resident pays his/her water bill,
the money would go to the city instead of Golden
State, with no impact on property taxes.
The revenue bond measure will require approval by
more than 50 percent of Claremont voters during a
special election. The city would request the Los An-
geles County Board of Supervisors to consolidate the
municipal election with any other election to be held
within the county on Tuesday, November 4, 2014 at a
Water bond ballot measure approved by city council
CITY
COUNCIL
Concern for student safety raised after child is struck by police car
A
boy struck by a Claremont police
vehicle on June 9 while walking to
school returned to classes the fol-
lowing day with minor injuries. The Condit
Elementary School student was in the
crosswalk around 8:20 a.m. when the offi-
cer, attempting to stop a speeding motorist,
hit the boy at the intersection of Scripps
Drive and Mountain Avenue.
According to an eyewitness, the unnamed officer had
turned on his lights and chirped his siren before begin-
ning his pursuit of the driver.
Then I heard a thud.
According to Lt. Mike Ciszek of the Claremont Po-
lice Department, the boy sustained minor injuries. He
had a bruised right knee and a scuffed right cheek, but
appeared to be okay. He was treated at the scene by
Los Angeles County Fire Paramedics and released to
his parents.
Many residents with children attending Condit Ele-
mentary took to social media, voicing their concerns
about speeders near the campus. Some were outraged
that drivers are creating unsafe conditions for their chil-
dren while others dont believe police officers should
pursue a reckless driver when children are present.
Condit parent Lisa Chen has seen careless drivers
around the school before and was nearly a victim her-
self of a distracted driver a few years ago.
I was crossing Scripps Drive when a driver making
a left turn from Mountain Avenue didnt see me and
nearly ran me over, she said. At the time, Ms. Chen
wanted to write the city about her experience, but never
got around to it. Now, she wishes she had.
Sadly, this isnt the first time this year a Claremont
student has been hit by a car on the way to school. On
February 14, an El Roble Intermediate School student
was crossing the street at Harrison and Mountain Av-
enues just before 8 a.m. when a car failed to yield, hit-
ting her in the intersection. When police first received
the call, the girl was stuck underneath the vehicle. By
the time officers arrived, the girl had been safely re-
moved and was awake and breathing. She was trans-
ported to the hospital for neck and back pain.
Less than three weeks later, police responded to yet
another incident at the local intermediate school. A stu-
dent informed school officials that a woman driving a
white SUV hit her while she was walking across Harri-
son Avenue. Though the girl said she was not injured,
she was transported to the hospital and her parents were
notified.
La Verne Police Department, who responded to the
accident near Condit Elementary and is handling the in-
vestigation, remains tight-lipped about the incident and
would not provide additional details at this time.
Its an ongoing investigation, said Watch Com-
mander Lt. Elizabeth Garcia. The report needs to be
completed, then sent to a traffic investigator who re-
views it. It takes about 10 working days.
The speeder who attracted the attention of the officer
near the elementary school got away.
The COURIER will provide more details when they
become available. Visit www.claremont-courier.com
for the latest information.
Angela Bailey
news@claremont-courier.com
COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff
Parents and students wait to cross Mountain Avenue on Tuesday near where a Condit Elementary School stu-
dent was struck by a police car the day before. Traffic around schools has been a big concern for many years,
and some parents want to see safety improvements at busy intersections that students cross.
CITY COUNCIL
continues on page 14
T
he man accused of rap-
ing a 12-year-old Clare-
mont girl appeared in a
Los Angeles County court on
June 9 and entered a plea of
not guilty.
Joseph Chandler Davall was ar-
raigned on seven felony counts, includ-
ing two counts of aggravated sexual
assault of a child; one count each of
forcible rape; sexual penetration by for-
eign object; and assault to commit a
felony during the commission of first-
degree burglarys.
The bearded 34-year-old Coachella
Valley man entered the Pomona court-
room in an orange jumpsuit and hand-
cuffs, now bearing only a slight
resemblance to the clean-shaven sketch
of the suspect released by the Clare-
mont Police Department back in
March. Shielded from the audience by
his public defender, Mr. Davall ap-
peared calm as he addressed the judge
and kept his head down as he was es-
corted out of the courtroom by the
bailiff.
Judge Jack P. Hunt accepted the de-
fendants plea and set a preliminary
hearing and pretrial date for July 14.
The date farmer is accused of attack-
ing and raping the preteen girl on
March 21 while she slept in her Clare-
mont home. The victims father and her
younger sibling were both away from
the residencealthough they were not
togetherwhen the alleged crime oc-
curred.
As the COURIER previously re-
ported, in addition to the seven felonies
hes charged with in Los Angeles
County, Mr. Davalls past includes vari-
ous other crimes in San Bernardino,
Riverside and Ventura counties. Those
charges include but are not limited to:
assault with intent to rape, public intox-
ication, indecent exposure, grand theft
as well as reckless driving and other
traffic-related offenses.
The suspect was taken into custody at
his Yucca Valley home on April 18 after
a short pursuit involving Claremont po-
lice and the San Bernardino Sheriff. Po-
lice previously confirmed evidence
relating to the Claremont crime was
found at Mr. Davalls residence. The Los
Angeles District Attorneys office said
authorities linked the date farmer to the
Claremont attack through the Combined
DNA Index System.
Mr. Davall remains in custody in
Mens Central Jail in lieu of $5 million
bail. If convicted as charged, the accused
faces a maximum sentence of life in
prison without the possibility of parole.
Angela Bailey
news@claremont-courier.com
Wednesday, June 4
A Pomona resident with a chip on his
shoulder took it out on a sidewalk sign
and was arrested for vandalism. Larry
Thurman was walking outside of Aloe
Loans on the 400 block of Auto Center
Drive when he allegedly began kicking
the business signage, causing $200 in
damage. At the owners request, the 32-
year-old man was placed under a private
persons arrest. He was released on
$5,000 bail.
* * * *
Thursday, June 5
Crossing the street appears to be a
dangerous thing to do in Claremont, as
one woman in The Village found out
when a vehicle making an unsafe turn
struck her. The 27-year-old driver was
stopped at Indian Hill Boulevard and
began a right turn onto Second Street
when he collided with the 62-year-old
pedestrian in the crosswalk. The woman
complained of dizziness and leg pain and
was transported to San Antonio Hospital
for treatment.
* * * *
Home burglaries continue to be a
problem in Claremont and the items
taken by thieves continue to be as ran-
dom as the homes they hit. An unknown
suspect entered a residence on the 2200
block of Villa Maria sometime around 1
p.m. and took off with the homeowners
safe, an Xbox gaming system, jewelry
and a green glass ashtray with some
change. The loss is estimated to be
around $700.
* * * *
Saturday, June 7
You may be able to get away with
stealing music online but one Upland
teen found out that you cant get away
with it at Rhino Records. Around 8:46
p.m., Dean Perez attempted to run out of
the store with merchandise in hand, set-
ting off the alarm before being detained
by police. The 19-year-old was found to
be in possession of eight CDs totaling
$133.98 and was arrested for petty theft.
He was later released on $1,000 bail.
* * * *
A creeper struck below the belt around
midnight in a popular parking structure
in the Village. The man, who approached
two women walking to their car, was
seen shaking his penis after exiting a
white, 4-door vehicle on the second floor
of the structure located on the 400 block
of First Street. He is described as a white
male, approximately 64 and weighing
about 230 pounds.
* * * *
Sunday, June 8
A vehicle carrying two young children
and a female driver rolled over on Towne
Avenue after colliding with an unsafe
driver. The 26-year-old woman was trav-
eling northbound around 10 a.m. when a
car in the adjacent lane made an unsafe
lane change, sideswiped her and caused
her vehicle to flip. The driver suffered
minor injuries to both shins and was
transported to San Antonio Hospital after
complaining of stomach pain. The chil-
dren, aged 4 and 6, were not injured.
* * * *
Tuesday, June 10
Prescription medications, electronics
and cold hard cash are missing from an-
other Claremont home on the 400 block
of Sycamore Avenue. Sometime be-
tween 10:45 a.m. and 12:15 p.m., the
thief entered the residence through a rear
sliding door and took $6,000 in cash, a
laptop, a television and prescription
drugs belonging to the homeowner.
There are no suspects at this time.
* * * *
A woman who left her tote bag on top
of the lockers at The Claremont Club
was surprised to discover her bag on the
floor and her wallet missing when she re-
turned to the locker room over an hour
later. The petty thief made off with the
wallet containing a drivers license, a
health insurance card and about $40 in
cash. The Club staff recommends mem-
bers and visitors put their personal items
inside the lockers, not on top of them.
* * * *
Wednesday, June 11
A man with a terrible sense of direc-
tion made a series of bad decisions re-
sulting in his arrest for driving under the
influence. According to Lt. Mike Ciszek,
officers spotted David Dabney parked in
an eastbound direction on the westbound
side of Foothill Boulevard around 1:30
a.m. When the 37-year-old refused to
submit to sobriety tests, he was arrested
for DUI. In California, the penalties for
refusing to take a blood, breath or urine
test begin with a one-year suspension of
your drivers license. The Pasadena res-
ident was released seven hours later on
$5,000 bail.
Angela Bailey
news@claremont-courier.com
Claremont COURIER/Friday, June 13, 2014 4
POLICE BLOTTER
CITY NEWS
Assault suspect pleads not guilty to seven felonies
M
arcel Esparza Her-
rera, the man ac-
cused of assault with
a deadly weapon against a
Claremont police officer that
shot him, entered into a plea
agreement with the Los Ange-
les County District Attorney on
Tuesday, June 10 in Pomona
Superior Court.
Dressed in a blue jail-issued jump-
suit, Mr. Herrera was escorted into the
courtroom in handcuffs and took a seat
at the defendants table. Bouncing in
his seat from time to time, the accused
smiled briefly at his family sitting in
the otherwise empty courtroom. He
took a moment before the preliminary
hearing to apologize to his family.
Im sorry for all Ive done to you
guys, he said, adding, Dont cry, Ma,
Im good. God is good. Im getting an-
other chance to restore my life.
After speaking with his attorney, Mr.
Herrera entered a plea of no contest to
two of the three felony counts against
him, including assault upon a police of-
ficer and unlawful driving or taking of
a vehicle. The 24-year-old also agreed
to pay damages.
As part of the plea deal presented by
Deputy District Attorney Duke Chau, a
third count of possession of a con-
trolled substance was dismissed.
Judge Thomas C. Falls accepted the
plea and set a sentencing date of June
24.
Three additional cases remain pend-
ing against the accused in Pomona
court two probation violations and a
third misdemeanor charge of resisting,
delaying or obstructing officer from an
unrelated incident in April. Those cases
will be held over until the sentencing
date, giving Judge Falls an opportunity
to review Mr. Herreras probation re-
port that was not available in court
Tuesday morning.
Based on the remaining charges, Mr.
Herrera faces a maximum sentence of
five years and eight months in state
prison. With the plea agreement, the
Pomona resident is looking at three
years in a state facility, but will most
likely serve about 18 months of that
sentence.
The Claremont Police Department
declined to comment on this case.
As the COURIER previously re-
ported, Lt. Jason Walters shot Mr. Her-
rera at about 3 a.m. on May 5 while
patrolling in search of a reported stolen
vehicle. As the officer drove closer to
the vehicle, the car sped away. Mo-
ments later, police located the car,
which appeared to be empty and ap-
proached the car on foot. The driver,
Mr. Herrera, suddenly put the car in re-
verse toward the officer, at which time,
the officer shot at the vehicle, striking
the accused in the upper left torso.
According to Detective Adan Torres
with Los Angeles County Sheriffs De-
partment Homicide Bureau, the depart-
ment has concluded their investigation
into the officer-involved shooting. The
results of that investigation are in the
process of being sent to the Los Ange-
les County District Attorneys Officer
Involved Shooting team for review,
said Det. Torres. The COURIER will
report on the results of those findings
when they become available.
Angela Bailey
news@claremont-courier.com
Plea-deal struck in officer-involved shooting case
EDUCATION
Claremont COURIER/Friday, June 13, 2014 5
C
laremont community members
mingled with glasses in hand Sun-
day, June 1 at the seventh annual
Mi Casa es Su Casa charity event bene-
fiting the Claremont Community Founda-
tion and Claremont Educational
Foundation.
Hosted at Hotel Casa 425, over 170 guests attended
the soiree and savored a variety of foods, fine wines,
spirits and beers as they strolled through the courtyard
to the sounds of the Brandon Bernstein Trio.
The event offered a little something for everyone
with eats from Spaggis, Loving Hut, Viva Madrid and
Hotel Casa 425 as well as libations from Dale Bros.
Brewery, Claremont Craft Ales, Vom Fass, Plume
Ridge and Chacewater Winery just to name a few.
Vom Fass Claremont and their staff concocted sev-
eral unique cocktails featuring their signature spirits.
The Hemingway Absinthe cocktail made with Liber-
tine 72 Absinthe was a favorite among guests.
No doubt, the highlight of the evening was the raffle
emceed by Ken Corhan. With 14 prize packages in-
cluding such items as dinner theater for two at the Can-
dlelight Pavilion, a $350 gift certificate to The
Diamond Center, a J. Augur designer handbag and a
night for two at a Newport Beach boutique hotel,
guests opened their hearts and their wallets to con-
tribute to the cause.
The raffle sold out, we had a terrific, great group of
people, says Richard Chute, CEF president. A spe-
cial thanks to Andrew Behnke and the hotel for their
generous support.
At $40 a raffle ticket, Mr. Behnkes generosity did
indeed pay off and not just for the event organizers.
The general manager of the DoubleTree hotel left the
event winning three of the 14 raffle prizes: a Dale Bros.
Brewery basket, a Date Night package and a night at
the theater.
Other winners included Michelle Mitchell, recipient
of the J. Auger handbag, and Linda Scott, winner of
The Diamond Centers $350 gift certificate. Ive
never won anything before, she said.
The grand prize, a night for two at Newport Beach
Hotel including complimentary continental breakfast
and use of the hotels bicycles and beach toys, went
home with Tim Tipping.
I cant take it, but my wife will, Mr. Tipping said.
Shes had a busy weekend with Sycamore Celebrates
on Friday and the Folk Festival yesterday. Shell be
thrilled!
The Claremont Community Foundation and the
Claremont Education Foundation will share proceeds
from the event.
This years event should prove to equally success-
ful in terms of our goal, Mr. Chute said. Weve
grossed over $12,000 and should net about $10,000.
Weve very happy.
The Claremont Community Foundation (CCF) was
established in 1989 to enrich the lives of citizens in
Claremont and its surrounding communities. Through
donor-advised funds, endowments and legacy gifts,
CCF has awarded more than $500,000 to support over
300 art and community impact projects, programs, and
initiatives.
The Claremont Educational Foundation is a non-
profit organization founded in 1991 and through a vari-
ety of fundraising efforts and relationships in the
community, has been able to help provide art and
music instruction as well as fund technology in the
Claremont Unified School District.
With the Mi Casa es Su Casa event winding up a
weekend chocked full of activities in Claremont, Mr.
Chute was thankful for the generous spirit of the people
in the community.
When we have so many nonprofit organizations
collaborate in our community, we can do some pretty
wonderful things. Its just fantastic.
Angela Bailey
news@claremont-courier.coms
Claremonters show up en masse to support charity event
It was a full house at Casa 425 when hundreds of guests gathered to raise funds for the Claremont Commu-
nity Foundation and the Claremont Educational Foundation at the Mi Casa Su Casa annual wine tasting event.
COURIER photos/Kathryn Dunn
Nickie Cleaves, executive director of the Claremont
Community Foundation, greets guests and thanks
business partners at the Mi Casa Su Casa event
COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff
Claremont High School Principal Brett OConnor gives last minute instructions to the class of 2014 as they
have their picture taken during rehearsal for graduatiuon Thursday morning at CHS. This year is the biggest
graduating class ever according to school officials including 599 students from CHS and 33 from San An-
tonio High School. Graduates names are listed on Page 22 of this edition. For a photo gallery from Thurs-
days graduation, visit www.claremont-courier.com this afternoon.
Preparing for the future
T
he United States of
America, a nation con-
ceived in liberty and
dedicated to the idea that all
men are created equal, was an
oddity in the world when it
came into being. Active citi-
zens would maintain this lib-
erty through participatory
republicanism. The holiday for
celebrating this freedom is ar-
riving next month.
America is coming upon its 238th
birthday. With the Fourth of July fast
approaching, with all the barbecues
with loved ones, festive parades and
fireworks, it is important to reflect on
how interfaith fits into the founding of
the United States of America.
During the spring of 2004, a good
friend of mine was graduating from
Washington and Lee Law School in Vir-
ginia. After the graduation, some sight-
seeing was in order. The state of
Virginia produced something appropri-
ately named the Virginia Dynasty, be-
cause four out of the first five US.
Presidents, except for John Adams,
came from the Old Dominion. Most of
these presidents left amazing homes
scattered throughout Virginia.
Montpelier, the palatial home (the
second largest in Virginia) of James
Madison, was being restored at the
time, but the grounds were stunning.
Madison described Montpelier as Just
a squirrels jump from heaven.
The next home on the tour was James
Monroes cozy home near Char-
lottesville. The final destination of the
tour was the home of Thomas Jefferson.
Monticello, the never fully finished
home, was majestic. Located atop a
small hill promontory, Monticello was
inspired by Mr. Jeffersons frequent
trips to France. Mr. Jefferson, the inces-
sant Francophile-inspired architect, was
busy adding additions to Monticello
throughout most of his life. After seeing
many of his wondrous inventions, it was
time to end the tour, which concluded
with the viewing of the Jefferson family
cemetery.
In the center of the family plot stands
the obelisk-shaped gravestone of
Thomas Jefferson. There are three ac-
complishments listed on the headstone.
The first is author of the Declaration
of Independence; father of the Univer-
sity of Virginia. Curiously missing is
that he served as the third president of
the United States. What would be the
pinnacle for most lives lived was a
minor accomplishment for Mr. Jeffer-
son. Oddly enough, a feat receiving
scant attention is the second item on his
epitaph: Statute of Virginia for Reli-
gious Freedom.
In 1777, Thomas Jefferson intro-
duced a draft bill into the Virginia state
legislature. With the help of James
Madison, the bill finally became law
1779. Section 1 of a perambulatory
clause states that all attempts to influ-
ence it by temporal punishments, or
burthens, or by civil incapacitations,
tend only to beget habits of hypocrisy
and meanness, and are a departure from
the plan of the holy author of our reli-
gion, who being lord both of body and
mind, yet chose not to propagate it by
coercions on either, as was in his
Almighty power to do, but to extend it
by its influence on reason alone.
Section two of the law states that all
men shall be free to profess, and by ar-
gument to maintain, their opinions in
matters of religion, and that the same
shall in no wise diminish, enlarge, or af-
fect their civil capacities.
The statute for religious freedom did
not become a law without some opposi-
tion from Patrick Henry. Mr. Henry
tried to insert an amendment, so that the
preamble would read, A departure
from the plan of Jesus Christ, the holy
author of our religion. This is when
Mr. Jefferson commented that the
statute was meant to, By a great major-
ity in proof that they meant to compre-
hend, within the mantle of its protec-
tion, the Jew and the Gentile, the
Christian and the Mohammedan, the
Hindoo and the Infidel of every denom-
ination.
Mr. Jefferson clearly states that the
freedom of choosing a faith (or not to
follow one) was solely under the juris-
diction of the individual. Mr. Jefferson
imagined a nation that would one day
be inhabited by adherents from a
panoply of faiths. The interfaith move-
ment is alive and well in Claremont. We
come together in times of tragedy and
celebration. After the terrorist attacks on
September 11, 2001, a local Muslim
house of worship was receiving threats.
The Claremont interfaith community
gathered in the evening in a show of
support for the mosque. Senior Pastor
Butch Henderson stood up and said,
An attack on the Islamic Center of
Claremont is an attack on the United
Church of Christ. We also come to-
gether in celebration.
The Claremont Interfaith Council in-
vites individuals and other houses of
worship to participate and plan for the
baccalaureate program in the spring and
the Thanksgiving worship in the fall.
It would seem that residents of Clare-
mont are living up to the Jeffersonian
vision of living in a nation where people
of different faiths would be allowed to
express them freely and, yes, even co-
operate for a better future.
Claremont COURIER/Friday, June 13, 2014 6
Carinis OUTOFMYMIND/next page
Interfaith: American as apple pie
By Joe Salas
Inter-Faithfully SPEAKING
Master,
how many distinct emotions are there?
Let me offer an alphabetical, albeit partial, list of these nebulous experiences:
angst, anguish, attraction, bereavement, betrayal, compassion, disappointment,
ecstasy, elation, envy, exultation, failure, glee, gratefulness, guilt, happiness,
hatred, helplessness, inferiority, insecurity, ire, jealousy, keenness, kinkiness,
kinship, loss, love, meanness, misery, nostalgia, obligation, obsession, outrage,
panic, pride, qualm, queasiness, regret, remorse, repulsion, revulsion, sadness,
shame, trust, unhappiness, vulnerability, withdrawal, xenophobia, yearning and
zealousness.
Lets go get some tea.
Claremonter goes to
state finals of National
Geographic Bee
Q: The Aral Sea lies between Kaza-
khstan and what other country? (answer
below)
Charlie Warren, a 5th grade student at
Chaparral Elementary School, knew the
answer to that question and more when he
competed in the California state finals of
the National Geographic Bee in Fresno.
Charlie qualified for the state finals by
winning his elementary school bee, then
scoring in the top 100 of 4th-8th grade
school-level winners in the state on a
written exam.
The Geography Bee encompasses top-
ics of locations, culture, politics, religion,
history and current events. On the young
side of contestants, Charlie looks for-
ward to competing again over the next
few years. (A: Uzbekistan)
Bicycle safety class
A free bicycle safety class sponsored
by the city of Claremont and the Clare-
mont Senior Bike Group will be held at
the Hughes Community Center, 1700
Danbury Rd., on Tuesday, June 17 from
6:30 to 8:30 p.m. The class will be taught
by League of American Bicyclists-certi-
fied instructors and is open to kids from
4th grade up to adults. Kids under 16
must be accompanied by a parent. Par-
ticipants will learn how to safely ride on
city streets. Reserve a spot by contacting
Tom Shelley at tshelley47@gmail.com.
I
think I just gave my son the best-ever
ride to school. It involved fast food,
soda, candy, unlimited control of music
selection and free Continental breakfast!
And, at the end of the ride, he got to keep
the car.
Unlike the daily jaunts to his grammar school that used
to involve a three-block limousine-like experience
(Would you like me to help you carry your backpack,
sir? or Will you be finishing that Pop-Tart or should I
expect to find it under the seat later this week?), this was
a journey of epic proportionsa little over 1,000
milesinvolving approximately four rest stops, two trips
to Target, one excursion to Ikea, and several hours of
wondering who in the Netherlands translates Swedish
directions into English.
My son was returning to the Seattle area, where he
will be a junior at the University of Puget Sound in Sep-
tember, to work at a summer internship for a life insur-
ance and financial services corporation. He moved into
the house where hell be living for the year.
First, the drive.
We left in the family station wagon, an ark-like ve-
hicle in which my husband and I felt our son would
enjoy relative safety. As we pulled onto the major north-
south artery through the Pacific states, I recalled my
own years of family travel in a similar car, facing back-
wards, watching the Worlds Largest, Greatest, what-
ever go by from the third-row seat.
This time I was co-piloting with complete control
over pit stops and temperature regulation. My son was
DJ-ingjazz and Frank Sinatrasome I could sing-
along with, and some, much to my sons great relief, I
could not. Our first break was for cheeseburgers, fries
and shakes. The meals only deviated from that point on
by supposed country of origin, though I doubt those of
Hispanic heritage would claim the waffle taco or Ital-
ians, the ham, bacon and pineapple pan pizza.
Second, the house.
What can one say about a lovely old Craftsman-style
cottage thats been taken-over by college-aged young
men? Yuck comes first to mind.
We purchased a futon, the assembly of which pro-
vided bonding time I can only compare to the intense
work of finishing a science fair project at 2 a.m. on the
morning it is due (and running out of glue stick). My
son was incredulous that the small hex-wrench was all
we required to turn the flat-pack box into a piece of fur-
niture. I was in denial that, in order to finish the project,
I would have to spend considerable time kneeling on
the questionably-matted shag carpet in his new room.
Like Cinderella, my time was short, and before I
knew it, my son was delivering me to the airport. My
return trip would be two hours instead of two days and
I was on my own. My son was in his big boy pants,
ready for his first day of work.
As I buckled-up for take-off, I thought about the
small boy whose stick-like legs once dangled over the
piano bench as he first learned to plunk the scales and
the fine young man whod just kissed me on the cheek
and said, I wish you could have stayed longer.
How lucky Ive been to share this journey with him,
and how much I look forward to seeing where his
dreams and ambitions take him.
Claremont COURIER/Friday, June 13, 2014 7
The last car pool
by Debbie Carini
OUR TOWN
Charlie Warren of Claremont recently
competed in the state finals of the Na-
tional Geographic Bee inFresno.
Claremont COURIER/Friday, June 13, 2014 8
F
or El Roble history
teacher Ken Kirkwood,
a good story is the heart
of history.
For well over three decades, he has
taught US history to Claremonts junior
high kids, roping in their interest with
tales of courage, intrigue, sacrifice and
rebellion. Mr. Kirkwood doesnt just tell
stories to hook students, though. He tells
them to keep the stories alive.
I have always felt it is important to
make sure that the people in American
history who shouldnt be forgotten are
not forgotten, he said.
Take Elizabeth Blackwell. You may
not have heard of her, but she was a fear-
less pioneer. In 1849, in the face of enor-
mous opposition, she became the first
American woman to earn a medical de-
gree.
By contrast, there is little doubt that
you have heard of Samuel Clemens, bet-
ter known as Mark Twain. But did you
know that the legendary speaker, author
and humorist once helped out a dying
president?
President Ulysses S. Grant, out of of-
fice and facing bankruptcy, made an
agreement with a publisher to write his
memoirs. When his good friend Mark
Twain got wind of the deal and found
out the paltry sum he would be paid, he
offered to publish the book under his
own imprint, with Grant receiving the
majority of royalties.
Grant, who was dying of cancer, spent
his last months putting down the story of
his life. The result is considered the best
presidential autobiography ever written.
Of more immediate importance to
Grants bereaved family, the book
yielded his widow $400,000.
Mr. Kirkwood shared these stories
with the COURIER on Wednesday, the
day before the last day of school at El
Roble, the conclusion of which would
signify the start of his retirement.
The latter story was made more vivid
by the fact that the teacher was wearing
a T-shirt emblazoned with the face of
Mark Twain. Mr. Kirkwood, who
teaches US history from the Colonial pe-
riod to 1914, has a different historical T-
shirt for every day of the school year. He
coordinates his wardrobe with his cur-
riculum, selecting a shirt that coincides
with whatever time period his class is
currently studying.
I dont know what Im going to do
with all these T-shirts. Maybe Ill quilt a
hot air balloon, he joked.
With his salt-and-pepper beard and
earnest but casual demeanor, its easy to
see why students like him.
He makes history funhe makes it
come alive in multiple ways, 8th grader
Mikayla Platt said. On the first day of
school, he dressed up as a monk and did
some chanting. US history is already one
of my favorite subjects, but he makes it
even more enjoyable.
With their work for the year done, Mr.
Kirkwood was showing his students a
movie. During his COURIER interview,
he popped back into the room intermit-
tently to make sure that the kids werent
up to any mischief. Each time, he found
them quietly watching the film.
Theyre so good, he said.
Intermediate school kids have a repu-
tation for being difficult.
When I tell people I teach junior
high, they recoil in horror, he laughed.
But I love the age, because you can
joke and laugh and theyre excited about
things. You never know what youre
going to get, kind of like that box of
chocolates. One moment, they can be so
grown up. But theyre still kids.
There is more than a bit of the kid in
Mr. Kirkwood, who collects 1890s-era
HO gauge model trains and creates his-
torical scenes to complement them,
complete with tiny people, the women
Longtime history teacher, storyteller bids goodbye to El Roble
KEN KIRKWOOD/next page
COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff
Longtime El Roble teacher Ken Kirkwood embraces fellow teacher Debbie Foster following the performance of a tribute song
celebrating Mr. Kirkwooda retirement on Tuesday at the school. Dressed to look like Mr. Kirkwood, the teachers sang a mod-
ified version of Get on Board Little Children that lauded his accomplishments during his 37-year tenure.
El Roble teachers and staff members enter the gym dressed in beards and knee-
high socks as they sing a song for their colleague, Ken Kirkwood.
carrying parasols and the men in straw boaters. Hes
written a number of articles on his hobby, which have
been printed in publications such as Model Railroader.
Between the train tableaux and bookcases overflowing
with books on history, his home will likely be a won-
derland for his grandchildren, a 4-year-old grandson
and one-year-old granddaughter, as they grow up.
Mr. Kirkwood, who was named the Claremont Uni-
fied School Districts Teacher of the Year in 2009, has
known he wanted to be a history teacher since he was
in 5th grade, and counts as his greatest influences a
couple of history teachers whose classes he had the
good fortune to attend.
I had this one history teacher, she could have been
reading the phone book and I would have been inter-
ested, he said.
Mr. Kirkwood has likewise enjoyed making history
interesting and even amusing.
Theres no greater sound to me than a child laugh-
ing, and the sound of a child laughing when learning is
amazing, he said. Ive had more joy than anyone has
a right to expect.
His enthusiasm for his subject and his students has
been evident since he began teaching. After getting a
bachelors degree in history from the University of
Redlands as well as a masters degree in early child-
hood development, Mr. Kirkwood, who grew up in
Torrance, landed in the Claremont Unified School Dis-
trict.
He started in 1977 at the short-lived La Puerta Inter-
mediate School, which closed after his first year there,
followed by two years at Sumner Elementary School.
He then moved on to El Roble Intermediate School and
has been there since. In a serendipitous turn of affairs,
Mr. Kirkwood also served as the schools drama
teacher for 30 years.
Im not really a theater person, he confided. But
one day, the principal called me in and said, You like
kids. Youre the drama teacher.
Along with delving into the world of the stage, Mr.
Kirkwood served for a time as the yearbook editor and
as adviser for the journalism class. He has also taught a
number of interesting electives, including a murder
mystery class and another on simulation games. He has
additionally served as the department chairs of the fine
arts and social science departments at El Roble.
For the last several years, Mr. Kirkwood has team
taught, sharing the same batch of 8th graders with Eng-
lish teacher Jenny McGourty-Riggs. The two teachers
have integrated their respective lesson plans in a way
that perfectly dovetails with the nations new Common
Core curriculum and provided a powerful learning at-
mosphere for their students. While Mr. Kirkwood has
covered the Civil War, Ms. McGourty-Riggs has taught
the students vocabulary related to the era. The teaching
team also has collaborated on projects relating to the
Colonial period and the exploration of Lewis Clark,
immersive experiences complete with costumes.
Mr. Kirkwood is proud of the impact he has had on
the countless students he has taught. He was recently
touched when school board member Nancy Treser Os-
good shared that her son, who is at Oxford, is studying
history because of Mr. Kirkwoods class. He looks
back on his career as being the proverbial E-ticket ride.
Claremont, in some ways, is Disneyland, he said.
Kids want to read books as opposed to only using
electronic devices. I see what I have in my classroom. I
see kids going places, kids that are going to write their
own ticket. Claremont has been very good to methe
district, the community, Claremonts children.
The newly-retired Mr. Kirkwood plans to fill the
extra time afforded by retirement by digging into his
miles-deep book collection and writing more about
model trains. Most of all, he is looking forward to
spending time with his grandkids, who live just a cou-
ple of blocks away.
If the El Roble staff had any doubts as to where Mr.
Kirkwoods priorities lie, they were put to rest earlier
this week during a tearful moment.
The history department threw a party for me and
were singing a ballad about me and my teaching. In the
middle of it, my little granddaughter made her way to
grandpa. I picked her up, and the whole department
was demolished.
Sarah Torribio
storribio@claremont-courier.com
Claremont COURIER/Friday, June 13, 2014 9
KEN KIRKWOODfrom previous page
History teacher Ken Kirkwood collects a homework assignment during a fifth-period class on Wednesday at
El Roble Intermediate School in Claremont. After 37 years teaching at the school, Mr. Kirkwood retired this week.
Claremont COURIER/Friday, June 13, 2014 10
MIKE F. OBRIEN
Attorney at Law
212 Yale Avenue
Claremont, CA 91711
(909) 626-9999
www.mikefobrien.com
Specialist in personal injury and
wrongful death cases.
Se habla espaol
BUXBAUM & CHAKMAK
A Law Corporation
414 Yale Avenue, Suite K
Claremont, CA 91711
(909) 621-4707
41 years experience in: Business Law,
Probate, Family Law, Estate Planning,
Real Estate Law, Civil Litigation, Bankruptcy.
architect
WHEELER & WHEELER
A.I.A. Architects, Inc.
133 South Spring Street
Claremont, CA 91711
(909) 624-5095
www.wheelerarchitects.com
Building a better Claremont
since 1985
attorney
attorney
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Christiansen Accounting
Corina L. Christiansen, CPA
140 W. Foothill Blvd., Suite E
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www.facebook.com/christiansenaccountingcpa
Specialize in small business accounting
and tax planning since 1962.
accounting
Kendall &Gkikas LLP
Attorneys at Law
134 Harvard Avenue, 2nd Floor
Claremont, CA 91711
(909) 482-1422
Specializing in Family Law in Claremont
since 1994: Divorce, Custody, Visitation
with Children, Property Division, Alimony,
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SERVICE DIRECTORY
Don McDonald, Pharmacist
Health insurance
333 N. Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont
(909) 635-8933
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Longtime supporter of arts, loving mother and grandmother
Claremont COURIER/Friday, June 13, 2014 11
OBITUARIES
Dawn Burleigh Scherer of Claremont
died May 31, 2014 at Pomona Valley
Hospital following a very brief illness.
Mrs. Scherer was surrounded by her
family and a great amount of love.
Dawn Valerie Burleigh was born on
May 27, 1942 to Ed and Mattie
Burleigh in Greenfield, Massachusetts.
She was a graduate of Greenfield High
School in 1960, and then attended
Chamberlain College in Boston, where
she majored in marketing and public re-
lations. She studied watercolor painting
with Stephen Hamilton and oil painting
with Stephen Munity, well-known
artists in Massachusetts.
In June of 1963, the then Miss
Burleigh met Nelson Scherer of Clare-
mont. The couple married on August
15, 1964 in Greenfield after Mr.
Scherer was commissioned as a Second
Lieutenant in the US Army. The couple
began their life together in Fort Ben-
ning, Georgia. They later lived in
Lanesboro, Massachusetts and in San
Jose, California for a time before set-
tling in Pomona, California and then in
Claremont in 1992 at the longtime
Scherer family home.
An avid supporter of the arts for over
three decades, Mrs. Scherer was a fre-
quent president of the Pomona Valley
Art Association. She also worked for
advertising agencies, radio and televi-
sion stations and political candidates.
She was a past Cultural Arts Commis-
sioner for the city of Pomona and
served on the boards of the Claremont
and Pomona Heritage societies as well
as The Webb Schools of California,
Foothill Country Day School and
Pomona Valley Art Association.
Seven years ago, Mrs. Scherer estab-
lished the Artist Demonstrator Program
for the Millard Sheets Center for the
Arts and coordinated the Sheets Center
Gallery Store during the Los Angeles
County Fair during each of those years.
Family members noted that Mrs.
Scherer was known by friends as a
North Star to many lost travelers, al-
ways shining bright and giving guid-
ance, generosity, hope and love. She
became a mother to anyone who
needed one and a friend to everyone
who crossed her path.
Friends confirmed that. Ah, where
to start, commented Tony Sheets of
Claremont. She was an incredible per-
son who picked up strays, took in kids
whose parents werent doing right by
themshe was a very talented person,
a wonderful part of the [Millard Sheets[
galleryand provided opportunities
for many local artists.
Chris Stoner-Meyer, one of Mrs.
Scherers associates at the Sheets
Gallery, reflected of her friend, She
was a wonderful, dedicated mother to
alljust a great person.
Mrs. Scherer is survived by her hus-
band, Nelson Scherer; by her brother
and sister-in-law, Bill and Elizabeth
Burleigh of Lakewood, California; by
her daughters and sons-in-law, Jenny
and Chris Carlson of Kirkland, Wash-
ington and Laurel and Tripp Meister of
Laguna Beach and by her son, David
Scherer of Claremont. She also leaves
her grandchildren, Jeffrey, Kevin and
Lucas Carlson, Hailey and Ty Meister
and numerous nieces and nephews.
A memorial service in honor of Mrs.
Scherer will be held on Saturday, June
14, 2014 at 1:30 p.m. at Trinity
Methodist Church in Pomona.
Pat Yarborough
Claremont COURIER/Friday, June 13, 2014 12
OBITUARIES
Ruth Bobo, a longtime Claremont High School
teacher, died peacefully on Saturday, June 7, 2014
surrounded by family and friends. She was 76.
Mrs. Bobo was born on March 16, 1938 in Parker,
California to Arlie Moultrie and Evelyn Moultrie (ne
Moats). Soon, the family returned to Moulton, Ala-
bama. While her father, a carpenter, ran his successful
lumber mill and building business, her mother
worked with him, leaving 10-year-old Ruth Ann to
cook dinners and care for her siblings, Joan, Peggy,
and Dan. She became a mother figure, according to
her sister, Peggy Henson.
Whatever I needed, I could always go to her, she
said. Always enterprising, at age 12, Ruth Ann started
a local newspaper with a girlfriend and sold single-
sheet mimeographed copies for a penny-a-piece.
Growing up, she also picked cotton every season, and
the summer she was 15, she took the train alone to
Chicago and worked as a typist, a job she got the day
after she arrived.
Her beauty was complemented by her music and ac-
ademic talents. In 1953, Ruth Ann was crowned Miss
Aiken Co-Op; her photo graced an edition Reality,
the electric companys trade publication. Winning the
title boosted her confidence. When she returned to Al-
abama, she was voted Sadie Hawkins Day Queen and
May Queen at Lawrence County High School. After
playing the clarinet for a year in the marching band,
she attained the status of drum majorette, conducting
and leading the band. She earned the title of valedicto-
rian of her graduating class.
During her first year at Florence State Teachers
College (now the University of North Alabama), she
met fellow student John Bobo. We jitterbugged. She
was an outstanding dancer, he remembered. Later,
when I saw how she cared for her siblings, I knew she
would make a great mother.
With a year of college under her belt, she married
Mr. Bobo on July 8, 1956. After a honeymoon in
Estes Park, Colorado, the couple moved to Birming-
ham, Alabama. There, Mrs. Bobo completed her
bachelors degree in English at Howard College (now
Samford University).
Next, the couple moved to New Orleans, where
Mrs. Bobo earned a masters degree in English litera-
ture at Tulane University. The day she got her degree,
the couple moved to California, where Ruth taught at
Slauson Middle School in Azusa and at Glendora
High School.
After their daughter Elizabeth was born, the couple
moved to Claremont because of its excellent schools.
Mrs. Bobo began teaching at Claremont High in
1967, shortly before her second child, Brian, was
born. She quickly became active in the school, serv-
ing as faculty adviser of the Wolfpacket and the year-
book in the 1970s.
COURIER publisher Peter Weinberger remembers
being a photographer for the student newspaper at the
time. She had a specific game plan on what we were
going to accomplish and expected a lot. But she
would help you get there. She was very popular, he
said in a 2007 COURIER article.
In the classroom, Mrs. Bobo taught a range of lan-
guage arts classes, from creative writing to Advanced
Placement English. She hoped her influence as a
teacher would extend well beyond the classroom.
My goal, she often said, was to teach students not
only to write but also to have something to say.
Mrs. Bobo may have left the South, but she re-
tained her gentility throughout her life. She charmed
people with her engaging demeanor and delightful ac-
cent. She always showed southern hospitality, wel-
coming guests with iced tea and having homemade
biscuits on the stovetop when her childrens friends
came over after school. She enjoyed cooking southern
dinners and baking iced apple cookies, fresh coconut
cakes and her bourbon-laced Lane Cake.
She contributed to the homemade ice cream socials
at the Claremont Presbyterian Church. She also loved
to read and teach southern writers, including William
Faulkner, Flannery OConnor and Tennessee
Williams. She was the recipient of two National En-
dowment of the Humanities Summer Fellowships: one
on Catholic Mysticism at Fordham University, the
other on Islamic Mysticism at Columbia University.
With her Alabama drawl, her passion for literature
and her warm and humorous engagement with stu-
dents, Mrs. Bobo was a well-loved teacher at Clare-
mont High School. She was named Grand Marshall
of the Homecoming Parade in 1999, and the 2004-05
yearbook was dedicated to her for her many years of
devotion to several generations of Claremont stu-
dents.
The kids got a kick out of her. They were touched
by her humanitybeing open, caring and down-to-
earth, CHS English teacher Becca Feeney said in a
2007 COURIER article.
She was always straightforward and honest,
Teresa Garcia, a 1993 CHS graduate added. She
treated her students with total respect when it was
earned.
In an online tribute, Jack Myers said Mrs. Bobo
was the most inspirational teacher he encountered
while at CHS. He took a moment to share one of her
many out-of-the-box teaching methods: She did this
thing called guided imagery, Mr. Myers said. She
had the classroom shut its eyes, and she was able to
transport the class to a dream state to see the time and
place in a fiction or nonfiction book. It was not a
hokey-pokey thing but really cool. It was an in-depth
experience to be alive at that time and to show a great
appreciation for the historical context.
Mrs. Bobos son, Brian, recalls that when his
mother became his junior-year English teacher she
treated him just like other students. I learned pretty
quickly not to call her mom, he laughed.
Her niece Emily Moultrie served as a teaching as-
sistant for Mrs. Bobo during her freshman year and
got to see her spitfire aunt in action. She was always
so mannered and just lovely. But she knew what time
it was, Ms. Moultrie recalled. If you paid attention
and really listened, she would let you work at your
own pace and do what you needed to do. But if you
tried to pull one over on her, she would call you out in
a second.
Mrs. Bobo had a full life outside of school. She
was a natural athlete, who excelled at snow and water
skiing. She was a devoted mother, who served as
leader for her daughters Girl Scout troop and at-
tended all her sons football games. Each year, the
Bobos would take a car trip to Florence, Alabama
where relatives still resided. Those summer vacations
were idyllic times for her and her children.
She taught me to catch lightening bugs in a jar and
how to tie a thread on June bug, Brian said.
She traveled widely, including trips to Hawaii, New
York and Europe, as well as three trips to Egypt
where her daughter was teaching at the American
University in Cairo. During these trips, she visited
Bethlehem and Jerusalem and she celebrated the Mil-
lennium at the Pyramids. In 1993, she travelled to
Russia to participate in a conference organized by
Claremonts Committee of Women for Russian-
American Dialogue. Later in life, she and her sister
Peggy travelled to meet her daughters colleagues at
the University of Louisiana at Lafayette English De-
partment. She intended to continue her travels upon
Ruth Bobo
Unforgettable teacher, loving mother, southern belle
RUTH BOBO/continues on the next page
her retirement, planning to live for a
summer in Spain. Because of her love
of opera, she also planned to go back to
Italy. Her last trip was to Chicago to at-
tend her daughters wedding and her
son-in-laws graduation from a PhD
program.
Hosting parties was among her great
joys and most refined skills. One year
she threw a party every week for three
months, finding that attending to the so-
cial and emotional wellbeing of others
improved her spirits. In addition to the
annual holiday gatherings such as the
Tenth Street Luminary Night and
Fourth of July, she hosted Shakespeare
play-readings during which readers
would finish a five-act play. There were
also literary character costume parties
for her students. At one such party, Ruth
dressed up as the pregnant Lena Grove
from Light in August, saying, My,
my, a body does get around. More re-
cently she, Peggy and Liza attended a
literary costume party dressed as Daisy,
Jordan and Myrtle from The Great
Gatsby, one of Ruths favorite novels.
A longtime fan of poetry, Mrs.
Bobos retirement dreams included cre-
ating and hosting a local access televi-
sion show about poetry. She often gave
friends a hardbound edition of the
works of e. e. cummings, some of
whose poems she had committed to
memory: one winter afternoon/(at the
magical hour when is becomes if)/a be-
spangled clown/standing on eighth
street/handed me a flower.
Upon retirement at age 69, Mrs.
Bobo, who had long battled the debili-
tating effects of rheumatoid arthritis,
was hit with Parkinsons disease. By
the time she was 72, her mounting
health concerns now required 24-hour
in-home care. Relying on others was a
hard pill for the always-independent
Mrs. Bobo to swallow. The significant
expense also drained her income. By
October 2012, she was faced with the
very real possibility of having to give
up her home of 40 years for a long-
term care facility that would not pro-
vide the intimate and continuous care
she required.
As a result, the Save Mrs. Bobo
campaign was launched. When Arin
Allen, a CHS class of 92 alumnus,
learned of Mrs. Bobos troubles, he
joined with other concerned former stu-
dents to create a donation website and
numerous fundraisers, the goal of
which was to offset the cost of Mrs.
Bobos care and medication long
enough for her to be able to remain in
her home through her 80th birthday.
Explaining what prompted him to help
his favorite high school teacher, Mr.
Allen spoke with passion.
There are certain people in our lives
whom we cant refuse. When you have
a mentor, an elder whos invested in
you, you cant say no. Your heart
wouldnt let you.
Mrs. Bobo died four years shy of 80
but, according to the family, the com-
munitys response made a tremendous
difference: it helped her stay in her
home until the end of her life. She was
also deeply touched by the many let-
ters, cards and visits she received as a
result of the campaign. Her last request
regarding the campaign was to thank
everyone for all the love and support
they showed her. The donations and
well-wishes brought great joy and posi-
tive energy into Mrs. Bobos life in her
final years.
Mrs. Bobo remained sharp as a tack
until her final moments, inviting every-
one to read to her, whether it be from a
novel or the editorial section of the Los
Angeles Times. Peggy lived with her sis-
ter the last three years of her life and
they brought each other comfort and
emotional support. Particularly sustain-
ing was her lunch bunch especially
Jean Collinsworth, Emilia Trakovsky
and Ann Donnan for their love and
friendship, including most recently the
exquisite high-tea party they threw for
this years birthday. Mrs. Bobos family
wishes to express their gratitude for the
dedicated work and loving companion-
ship of her long-term caregivers,
Donna, Julia, Geraldine, Margie,
Kristina and Susanne.
She is predeceased by her sister Joan
Mack and her brother Dan Moultrie.
She is survived by her former husband
and longtime friend, John Bobo; her
daughter and son-in-law, Elizabeth
Bobo and Michael Petersen; her son,
Brian Bobo; her grandson, Henry Pe-
tersen; her sister, Peggy Henson; her
sister-in-law, Carly Moultrie; her
nieces, Susanne Hyvarinen, Melissa
Moultrie and Emily Moultrie; her
nephews, Scott McDoniel and Robert
Hyvarinen; and several grand-nephews
and grand-nieces.
The visitation will be Thursday, June
19 from 4 to 8 p.m. at Todd Memorial
Chapel, 325 N. Indian Hill Blvd. The
memorial service will be Friday, June 20
at 11 a.m. at Claremont Presbyterian
Church, 1111 N. Mountain Ave. Fri-
days service will be followed by a
graveside service at Oak Park Cemetery.
Claremont COURIER/Friday, June 13, 2014 13
RUTH BOBO/from previous page
OBITUARIES
Claremont COURIER/Friday, June 13, 2014 14
cost to the city of about $75,000.
T
he ballot measure, which was
drafted at Tuesdays meeting,
would require a yes or no vote
and would read as follows:
Shall the city of Claremont be authorized to issue
water revenue bonds in the maximum amount of
$55,000,000 for the purpose of acquiring the Clare-
mont Water System and other expenses related to the
bond issue, paid for solely by water system revenues,
but only if the purchase price of the system exceeds
$80,000,000?
In March, city consultants put the fair market ap-
praisal of the Claremont water system at $55,094,000
and advised that the city may have to pay as much as
$80 million. Golden State Water claims that the fair
market value of the water system is substantially
higher. The purpose of the water bond would be to
generate an additional $55 million in the event they
are right.
As Claremont resident Ludd Trozpek pointed out,
there didnt appear to be any legal or calendar impedi-
ment in postponing the councils vote on the water
bond issue. In fact, Mr. Trozpek implored council to
consider reviewing the MOU presented, as it would
be a no-cost show of good faith to explore all propos-
als for resolution.
I know there is a good bit of mistrust with Golden
State Water, I have it myself, he said. To be polite,
in almost all cases they are very difficult to defend,
and Ive been watching them since 1995. However, to
quote Yasser Arafat, You make treaties with your en-
emies, with your friends you make business. I think
all the smart attorneys on both sides could put an
iron-clad agreement together.
Councilmember Larry Shroeder asked the question
on everyones mind. If we put this on the ballot
tonight, could we pull it from the ballot later?
According to City Attorney Sonia Carvalho, the
Elections Code provides for a withdrawal deadline of
88 days prior to the November election, giving the
city until August 13 to rescind the ballot measure.
Perhaps seeing an out if they need to backtrack and
a good start if they dont, council unanimously ap-
proved the resolution for a special election.
City Manager Tony Ramos confirmed Wednesday
that the city attorney had notified Golden State about
the councils decision to move forward on the water
revenue bond election, but reiterated that the council
remains open to discussion with Golden State on their
20-point Memorandum of Understanding.
Mayor Lyons agrees.
If Golden State Water is serious about working
with the city on real solutions, our door is open, Mr.
Lyons said. The city has been engaged with our resi-
dents for over two years through this process. Where
is Golden State Water Companys transparency when
it comes to their rates, tariffs, surcharges, and now
signing agreements with advocacy groups?
Councilman Corey Calaycay was very spirited in
urging the water company to come before the public to
discuss the new proposal drafted with CAWA.
This is very inappropriate, Mr. Calaycay said to a
packed council chamber. If they have an MOU, then
put it here on the table so that the council and every-
body else can see it. Not your minions but, you your-
self, Ms. Krueger. Come here and present your proposal
in public, dont hide. The irony is they have a couple of
representatives outside who are watching from a dis-
tance but wont even come in the room and speak them-
selves, so lets be honest about it.
Its unclear if Golden State remains open to discus-
sions with the city given Tuesday nights decision.
There has never been a public takeover of a water
system where the acquisition and rate promises have
come true, and Claremont will be no different, says a
spokesperson for GSWC. Golden State Water be-
lieves residents should have the opportunity to vote
on the entire financing proposal of $135 million and
continues to recommend that the city operate trans-
parently, produce public information and allow for a
full review of their plan.
The outcome of the revenue bond measure will re-
inforce which side of the water table Claremont resi-
dents want to be on. What side are you on? Visit
www.claremont-courier.com to participate in our poll.
Angela Bailey
news@claremont-courier.com
CITY COUNCIL/continued from page 3
If Golden State Water is serious
about working with the city on real
solutions, our door is open
Joe Lyons
Mayor, City of Claremont

Girl Scouts lend a hand


in the garden at school
I
ts been a banner year for growing
things in the Claremont Unified
School District.
But even dedicated plant boosters like CUSDs
Community Garden Coordinator Dessa DAquila
cant be everywhere. When it was noticed that the
garden at Chaparral Elementary School was looking a
little lackluster, a number of groups stepped in, ea-
gerly offering their green thumbs.
The eight Junior Girl Scouts of Troop #2584 of-
fered up their elbow grease, as did students and staff
of the Chaparral Day Care. A local Boy Scout work-
ing towards his Eagle Scout award also joined in the
efforts.
With a little help, the kids got busy planting. Now,
the garden is teeming with leafy life. The corn is high
as the proverbial elephants eye. Towering sunflowers
are bending toward the sun and six of the gardens
cabbages are reportedly bigger than a human head.
Other garden denizens include patches of white
radish, tomatoes, zuchinni, squash, peppers and
onions. Tiny pumpkins are just beginning to show up,
but the broccoli is having a difficult time.
At the suggestion of Diana Kaljumagi, an avid gar-
dener who is the mother of a 5th grade Sycamore stu-
dent, Suvi, they have also included an edible wall,
where kids can sample herbs such as chocolate mint,
basil and rosemary.
The kids just love it, said Catherine Caporal, the
mother of one of the industrious girl scouts.
A number of adults help oversee the kids work, in-
cluding Principal Julie Olesniewicz, who will be
leaving Chaparral at the end of the year but fully sup-
ported the efforts to re-invigorate the schools garden;
second grade teacher Margaret Russell, who offered
financial support and nutrition and sustainability ex-
pertise along with Ms. Kaljumagi. Sheila Olson-
Pompa supervised the pint-sized gardeners from the
day care.
The Girl Scouts spent more than 20 hours working
this year, visiting the Chaparral garden every other
week to weed, plant, water and learn more about cul-
tivating the land. The troop even gained a new mem-
ber when a girl saw the scouts working in the garden
and asked if she could join up.
The biggest accomplishment was obtaining the
Girl Scout Bronze Award for volunteering for a large
project, Ms. Caporal shared. It is the highest award
that a Junior can achieve.
Sarah Torribio
storribio@claremont-courier.com
Claremont COURIER/Friday, June 13, 2014 15
CALENDAR
Nightlife
Eureka serves up a new specialty
drink: check out the recipe!
Page 21
Friday, June 13 through Saturday, June 21
Claremont COURIER/Friday, June 13, 2014 16
DEMOCRATIC CLUB OF CLARE-
MONT Pomona College professor of
politics Susan McWilliams will discuss
her grandfather at the monthly luncheon.
Carey McWilliams was an author, editor
and lawyer. Several of his books are con-
sidered definitive studies of Los Angeles,
immigration and farm workers. He ed-
ited The Nation magazine for 20 years.
Luncheon is $17 including tax and tip.
Noon. Casa de Salsa. (909) 626-8122.
FRIDAY NIGHTS LIVE Stroll
through the Village and listen to free,
live music from 6 to 9 p.m. This weeks
concerts include Melvin Eddy Blues
Band (blues) at the Public Plaza, Vinyl
Numbers (rock) at the chamber and
Delta 88s (classic rock) at city hall.
SUMMER GALA Claremont Her-
itage presents their summer gala, Les
Jardin des Arts, featuring cocktails,
dinner, an auction and live jazz. 5 p.m.
$100. Revelle House on the historic
Scripps College Campus.
LIVE JAZZ performance on the Blue
Fin patio at 2 p.m. 665 E. Foothill
Blvd., Claremont. (909) 946-1398.
BLUE STAR MUSEUM DAYS Free
admission for active military personnel,
their family members (military ID holder
and up to five immediate family mem-
bers) and veterans (admission fees apply
to accompanying family members). Me-
morial Day through Labor Day. Rancho
Santa Ana Botanic Garden, 1500 N. Col-
lege Ave., Claremont. (909) 625-8767.
FINANCE Investment professional
Michael Fay will talk about what the next
generation will do with inherited money.
Buffet lunch at 11:30 a.m. for $13 or dessert
and coffee for $6. The University Club
meets Tuesdays at the Hughes Community
Center, 1700 Danbury Rd., Claremont.
CLIMATE CHANGE The Science &
The Challenge presented by Joshua Fisher,
climate scientist at NASAs Jet Propulsion
Laboratory. His work focuses on terrestrial
ecosystems and their responses and feed-
back to a changing climate. The Pomona
Valley Chapter UNA-USAs meeting
will begin at 5:30 p.m. in Pilgrim Places
Porter Hall, 601 Mayflower Rd., Clare-
mont. This event is open to the public
and refreshments will be served.
COUNTRY HOEDOWN The Joslyn
YOUR WEEK IN 9 DAYS
9-DAY CALENDAR
continues on the next page
Image courtesy of John York
John York will perform a Gelencser House Concert on Saturday, June 21.
June
Friday 13
June
Saturday 14
June
Sunday 15
June
Monday 16
June
Tuesday 17
June
Wednesday 18
Movie listings
Local filmmakers debut their
film at Claremont Laemmle.
Page 23
Senior Center presents an evening com-
plete with dinner, dancing, live enter-
tainment and more. Guests are invited
to dress for the occasion. For ages 50
and over. Tickets are $5. Preregistration
is required. Call (909) 399-5488. 5 to 7
p.m. 660 N. Mountain Ave., Claremont.
SCOTCH WHISKY CLASS In this
class, guests will learn about the history
of scotch, gain a better understanding
of the regions of Scotland and taste six
single malt, single-barrel scotches. The
cost is $35 per person and guests must
be 21 years or older to participate.
Tickets will be on sale at Vom Fass,
101 N. Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont or
by calling the shop at (909) 399-0256.
FRIDAY NIGHTS LIVE Stroll through
the Village and listen to free, live music
from 6 to 9 p.m. This weeks concerts in-
clude The Dogs (rock) at the Public Plaza
and MP3s (soft rock) at the chamber.
ESSENTIAL OILS WORKSHOP
doTerra Oils presents a workshop on
how pure essential oils can give your
medicine cabinet a natural makeover.
Learn about the benefits of essential oils
plus the topical, internal and aromatic
uses including treating inflammation,
arthritis, allergies, headaches and more.
$10. 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. The Yoga Unit,
665 E. Foothill Blvd. Suite A, Claremont.
(909) 624-4800 or theyogaunit.com.
ICE CREAM SOCIAL The Friends of
the Claremont Library present an ice
cream social and annual meeting. There
will be a guest speaker from the Betsy-
Tacy Society, music and raffle. 2 to 4 p.m.
Shelton Park at Bonita and Harvard.
BALLET Claremonts own Village
Dance Arts presents 90 local ballet stu-
dents in a performance based on the
Russian folk tale, The Snow Maiden.
4 p.m. $10 presale or $15 at the door.
Citrus College. For more information,
call (909) 624-1415.
JOHN YORK CONCERT John York
will do a Gelencser House Concert at
7:30 p.m. $15. For more information
and reservations, call (909) 596-1266
or email singfolk@yahoo.com.
Claremont COURIER/Friday, June 13, 2014 17
Kaitlyn Wickler of Village Dance Arts
9-DAY CALENDAR
continued from the previous page
June
Thursday 19
June
Friday 20
June
Saturday 21
Claremont COURIER/Friday, June 13, 2014 18
CANDLELIGHT PAVILION: 455 W. Foothill Blvd.,
Claremont. Thursday, Friday and Saturday evening
shows: dinner at 6 p.m., performance at 8:15 p.m.; Sun-
day evening shows: dinner at 5 p.m., performance at
7:15 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday matinees: lunch at 11
a.m., performance at 12:45 p.m. (909) 626-1254, ext.1
or candlelightpavilion.com.
Though July 13: Bye Bye Birdie.
July 2 and 3: Company B, The Andrews Sisters
tribute. Tickets are $20 each. Doors open at 6:45 p.m.
with 7:30 p.m. curtain for this performance. Show-
only performance. No meal is included, but desserts
and beverages are available for purchase.
HAUGH PERFORMING ARTS CENTER: 1000
W. Foothill Blvd., Glendora at Citrus College. Dis-
counts available for students, seniors and youth. (626)
963-9411 or haughpac.com.
Saturday, June 21: Claremonts Village Dance
Arts present 90 local ballet students in a perform-
ance based on the Russian folk tale, The Snow
Maiden. 4 p.m. $10 presale or $15 at the door. For
more information, call (909) 624-1415.
LEWIS FAMILY PLAYHOUSE: 12505 Cultural
Center Drive, Rancho Cucamonga. Call (909) 477-
2752 or visit lewisfamilyplayhouse.com.
Though June 14: Karousel Kids present Youre a
Good Man Charlie Brown. Charles Shultzs Peanuts
characters speak to children and adults worldwide.
Sally and the gang come to life in this upbeat show giv-
ing an inside look at an average day in the life of that
self-musing character, Charlie Brown. Snoopy dances
into our hearts with wild charisma, while Linus endears
with the love of his blanket. Lucys witty quips and
brash ambitions bring humor to the stage as artistic
Schroeder entices us with the musical sounds of
Beethoven. From Valentines Day to the baseball game,
from wild optimism to utter despair, you will not want
to miss all the fun mixed in with great singing, dancing
and acting as Charlie Brown and his pals take the stage.
Friday, June 13: The Dred Scott Decision Com-
pany presents a sit reading of its award-winning
dramatic screenplay, Our Freedom Was Worth the
Fight. Our Freedom Was Worth The Fight is based
on the true accounts of the lives of Dred and Harriet
Scott, and the 1857 United States Supreme Court
landmark decision that changed history and ulti-
mately brought the country to its greatest conflict, the
Civil War. Celebration Hall at 7 p.m.
PERFORMING ARTS
Image courtesy of Kirklyn Robinson/Candlelight Pavilion
Candlelight Pavilion presents Bye Bye Birdie through July 13 in Claremont.
CASA DE SALSA: 415 W. Foothill Blvd. This is a
restaurant that offers weekly live entertainment.
(909) 445-1200.
Thursdays: Michael Ryan and Friends. 6 to 9 p.m.
Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays: Romantic gui-
tarist Vicente Victoria. 5 p.m.
Sundays: Mariachi San Pedro. Brunch. 10 a.m. to
2 p.m.
EUREKA CLAREMONT: 580 W. First St., Clare-
mont. Open from 11 a.m. to midnight Sunday
through Thursday; closes at 1 a.m. Friday and Sat-
urday. Hoppy Hour daily from 2 to 6 p.m. (909)
445-8875.
Mondays: Local Mondays featuring $3 Dale Bros.
Brewery pints.
Tuesdays: 50 percent off all wines by the glass.
Wednesdays: Steal-the-Glass craft beer of the
week. Meet the brewer first Wednesday of every
month.
Thursday, June 19: All Titos Vodka drinks $2 off
and Eureka Thursday Night Music with Hound Dog
(rock).
FLAPPERS COMEDY: 540 W. First St., Clare-
mont Packing House. 18+. Show times: Friday at
8 and 10 p.m., Saturday at 7 and 9:30 p.m. and Sun-
day at 7 p.m. Tickets can be purchased online or at
the door.
Friday, June 13: James P. Connolly from Comedy
Central. 7 and 9:30 p.m.
Saturday, June 14: James P. Connolly from Com-
edy Central. 7 and 9:30 p.m.
Sunday, June 15: Two Milk Minimum at 4:30 p.m.
and First Timer Funnies with Jamie Kaler at 7 p.m.
Thursday, June 19: First Timer Funnies with Jacob
Sirof at 8 p.m.
Friday, June 20: Jeff Garcia from Happy Feet. 7
and 9:30 p.m.
Saturday, June 21: Jeff Garcia from Happy Feet.
7 and 9:30 p.m.
GELENCSER HOUSE CONCERTS: gelencser-
houseconcerts.com. Directions given upon reserva-
tion, (909) 596-1266 or singfolk@yahoo.com.
Saturday, June 21: John York. $15. 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, June 26: Trippin the Sixties featuring
Barry McGuirre and John York. $20. 7:30 p.m.
HIP KITTY JAZZ & FONDUE: 502 W. First St.,
Claremont Packing House. Tuesday through Sunday,
5:30 p.m. to 2 a.m. Live jazz every night. Admission:
Two-drink minimum. Info: (909) 447-6700 or hip-
kittyjazz.com.
Friday, June 13: Switch Blade 3 (swing). 8 p.m.
$5 cover charge.
Saturday, June 14: Mark Tortorici and the Holly-
wood Combo. 8 p.m. $5 cover charge.
Sunday, June 15: Gypsies & Judges
(gypsy/swing). 7 p.m.
Tuesday, June 17: Jaxx Sessions presents Brigitte
Rose Purdy. 9 p.m.
Wednesday, June 18: Jam with Carl Bunch &
Friends. 8 p.m.
Thursday, June 19: The Mike Taylor Trio (jazz).
7 p.m.
Friday, June 20: Rumble King (rock and roll). 8
p.m. $5 cover charge.
Saturday, June 21: Ry Bradley and His Band
(country/rock and roll). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge.
THE PRESS RESTAURANT: 129 Harvard Ave.,
Claremont Village. Thursday through Saturday until
2 a.m. Live DJ every Thursday at 11 p.m. 21 and
over after 9 p.m. Standing room only after 9:30 p.m.
No cover. (909) 625-4808.
Friday, June 13: Jayar (contemporary rock).
10 p.m.
Saturday, June 14: The Woolly Bandits (garage
rock) and If All Else Fails (acoustic/punk). 10 p.m.
Sunday, June 15: Piano Sunday featuring Angela
Parrish. 6 p.m.
Tuesday, June 17: King Trivia Night. 9:30 p.m.
Wednesday, June 18: Wine Wednesday with music
by Joe Atman at 9:30 p.m.
Thursday, June 19: Baldy Mountain Jazz Band
(jazz) at 8:30 p.m. and DJ Sharp (hip
hop/reggae/R&B) at 11 p.m.
Friday, June 20: Miss Massive Snowflake
(indie/rock). 10 p.m.
Saturday, June 21: The Jerry O Band (blues).
10 p.m.
PIANO PIANO: 555 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont.
Live dueling piano show times: Wednesday and
Thursday, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; Friday and Saturday, 8
p.m. to 1 a.m. 21 and over. $5 cover charge on Fri-
days and Saturdays after 8 p.m. (no cover charge
with student ID). (909) 547-4266.
Tuesdays: Taco Tuesday with $1 tacos, $2 Coro-
nas and $3 margaritas. Rock the mic or jam with
the band.
Wednesdays: Rockstar Karaoke. Rock the mic
or jam with the band. $2 Bud Lights and $4 Vodka
Rockstars. 9 p.m.
WALTERS RESTAURANT: 310 Yale Ave.,
Claremont. VIP and fire pit lounge open from 7 to
10 p.m. Happy hour specials are only valid in the bar
and lounge areas. (909) 767-2255.
Margarita Mondays: $5 margaritas, $5 house
wine, $5 Jacaranda Rye, $5 Tandoori chicken
wings.
Tequila Tuesdays: $5 house tequila, $5 house
wine, $5 Double Dude IPA and $5 nachos.
Whiskey Wednesdays: $5 whiskey, $5 house
wine, $5 Dale Bros. Black Beer and $5 bruschetta.
Thirsty Thursdays: $5 beers, half-off wine bottles
and appetizers (not specials).
Finest Fridays: $5 house vodka, $5 house wine,
$5 Claremont Craft Double Dude IPA, $5 Walters
Honey Blonde, $5 Dale Bros. Pomona Queen, $5
nachos and $7 classic burger and fries.
Saturdays and Sundays: $4 bloody Marys, $4 mi-
mosas, $5 fireball shots, $5 Afghan fries and $5
Stone Pale Ale, all day and night.
NIGHTLIFE
Claremont COURIER/Friday, June 13, 2014 19
Eureka introduces
the Caipiroska
T
he 2014 FIFA World Cup
Brazil is almost here. Starting
this week, watch the games at
Eureka and sip on an All-American
version of the traditional Brazilian
cocktail: the Caipiroska.
A Caipiroska is a interpretation of Caipirinha,
prepared with vodka instead of the usual cachaa.
The Eureka Caipiroska is made with Ballast
Point Fugu Vodka and locally-sourced ingredi-
ents. Check out the 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil-
themed cocktail at Eureka and make it at home:
Eureka Caipiroska
1.5 oz Ballast Point Fugu Vodka
1 Demerara sugar cube
.75 oz Brown Simple Syrup
Instructions:
Muddle sugar cube and simple syrup together
with a splash of water.
Squeeze three lime wedges into rocks glass,
drop one of the limes.
Add one orange rind to glass.
Lightly muddle orange rind and lime wedge.
Add crushed ice to glass.
Eureka's Caipiroska is available until Sunday,
July 13 for $8. Eureka is located at 580 W. First
St., Claremont.
Image courtesy of Eureka
RESTAURANT ROW
CALL MARYTODAY: 621-4761
Claremont COURIER/Friday, June 13, 2014 20
COURIER CROSSWORD
Across
1. All stirred up
5. Delhi dress
9. Chick's sound
13. Yawn maker
14. Month before Nisan
15. Pack animal
16. Computer operator
17. Holy man
18. Consume wholly
19. Pomona College English professor
22. Take out
23. Touch off
26. 150 religious poems
30. Eagle/lion combo
32. Breathing woe
33. Thug's blade
35. Dolomite, e.g.
36. Cheerful and helpful quality
40. Miss the mark
41. Prearranged fight for two
42. Sci-fi servant, sometimes
43. Blue Man Group co-founder, Phil
46. Touch fondly
47. One who could use a lift
48. Consider
50. Indian Hill Boulevard sight
56. Civil rights organization
59. Showy bloom
60. Watch face
61. Circle
62. Remove from a manuscript
63. Air transport group (abbr)
64. Student overseer
65. Some beans
66. Do different jobs
Down
1. Finish at
2. "Gee whillikers!"
3. Creamy middled cookie
4. Undeveloped idea
5. Spicy dips
6. Change
7. China grass
8. Where to hear a lot of Farsi
9. Highlight
10. Finish a fast
11. Ostrich kin
12. Drivel
15. Guarded
20. Pitcher, of a sort
21. Courage
24. One of the friends on "Friends"
25. Work out specialists' pride
26. Youthful attendants
27. Wears
28. Coat
29. Put down the first card
30. "____ interrupted at her
music" Vermeer
31. Prepares for birth
33. Wow
34. Peach or plum
37. Honor
38. Pulled from the deck
39. Neither rain ___...
44. A vitamin B
45. Coax
46. Ends
48. Small New World songbird
49. With no warmth
51. Relieves
52. Cut some opinions, perhaps
53. Fly babies
54. Domestic's word
55. Pig food
56. Affirmative action?
57. Have being
58. Lawyers' org.
Crossword by Myles
Mellor. Puzzle #267
Answers to last weeks puzzle #266
BUDDHAMOUSE EMPORIUM:
134 Yale Ave., Claremont. Open daily
from 10:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. (909)
626-3322. buddhamouse.com.
Through June 30: Watercolor land-
scapes by Henry H. Hayden from the
Hayden family homesteads and trav-
els. Henry H. Hayden is a Pilgrim
Place resident and artist. For several
years, he headed the arts programming
at Pilgrim Place, training new artists
and coordinating the annual Festival.
He is currently 91 and continues to
paint each day.
BUNNY GUNNER GALLERY: 254
W. Bonita Ave., Claremont. Tuesday
through Friday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Satur-
day, noon to 6 p.m. (909) 624-7238.
Through June 30: Paintings by
Joyce Hesselgrave and Gary Geraths.
CLAREMONT COMMUNITY
FOUNDATION ART GALLERY:
205 Yale Ave., Claremont Chamber of
Commerce. Monday through Friday, 9
a.m. to 4 p.m. (909) 398-1060.
Through June 30: Paintings by
Georette Unis.
CLAREMONT FORUM GALLERY:
586 W. First St. in the Packing House.
Tuesday through Thursday, noon to 7
p.m.; Friday and Saturday, noon to 9
p.m.; and Sunday, noon to 7 p.m.
(909) 626-3066.
Through June 30: Intersection,
photography by Johnnie Chatman.
CLAREMONT MUSEUM OF ART:
claremontmuseum.org.
Through July 13: The Claremont Mu-
seum of Art presents Steve Comba Ar-
boretum in the gallery at Rancho Santa
Ana Botanic Garden, 1500 N. College
Ave., Claremont, daily 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Garden admission is $8 for general ad-
mission, $6 for seniors and students, $4
for children and free for CMA and
RSABG members. For more informa-
tion, go to claremontmuseum.org. The
Claremont Museum of Art exhibition
features Mr. Combas drawings,
sketches, photographs and paintings
that relate to and culminated in the
eight-foot painting Arboretum. In
2011, the artist devoted eight months
to creating the painting using photos,
sketches and studies from 1984 to the
present day. It is both an autobiograph-
ical journey through his own work in
landscape as well as a treatise on the
artificial nature of painting and the ob-
jective beauty of nature.
THE COLONY AT LOFT 204: 532
W. First St., #204, Claremont Packing
House. Open Wednesday through Sat-
urday, 1 to 7 p.m. Extended hours on the
first Friday of the month for Claremont
Art Walk until 9 p.m. Visit loft204.com.
Email info@loft204.com for informa-
tion about purchasing monthly wall
space for artwork display or to inquire
about event rental of gallery space.
Call Vicki at (626) 224-7915 or (626)
963-4238 for one-on-one art instruc-
tion for junior high and high school
age students.
Through June 28: Fernando Sanchez
utilizes a silk screening process in his
unique and humorous pop art paintings,
which are full of life and texture. Mr.
Sanchez begins his process in the digital
darkroom, then incorporates free-hand
painting and silk screening. Opening re-
ception: Friday, June 6 from 6 to 9 p.m.
FIRST STREET GALLERY ART
CENTER: 250 W. First St., Suite 120,
Claremont. Monday through Friday, 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. (909) 626-5455.
Through July 11: Thaumatrope, a
group show curated by Elonda Billera
Norris, Janice Gomez and Fatima
Hoangfounders of Summercamps
ProjectProject. For this third installment
of First Street Gallerys Other Eyes
Guest Curator Program, they have in-
vited artists to make work in response
to, or in collaboration with, First Street
Gallery artists for an exhibition which
offers a blend of style, process and in-
spiration that reflects the wide range of
this eclectic group of artists.
PETTERSON MUSEUM OF IN-
TERCULTURAL ART: 730 Ply-
mouth Rd., Pilgrim Place. Friday,
Saturday and Sunday, 2 to 4 p.m. Con-
tains collections of international fine art,
folk art and material culture from 10,000
BCE to the present, contributed by Pil-
grim Place residents and community
friends, covering every continent. (909)
399-5544.
Through August 24: Lifestyles of the
Rich and Famous: Chinese Luxury
Goods of the Ming and Qing Dynas-
ties. Drawing on the Petterson Mu-
seums extensive collection of Chinese
art and artifacts, they will highlight pres-
tige items used by the nobility and
wealthy civil servants during Chinas
last two dynasties, spanning the years
between 1368-1912. The exhibit will in-
clude silk robes, jewelry and costume
accessories, paintings, ivory, ceramic,
lacquer and metal artifacts once used by
the ruling elite of China.
SQUARE i GALLERY: 110 Harvard
Ave., Claremont. Tuesday through Sat-
urday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., or by appoint-
ment. Square i is an annex of the Artist
Trait Gallery. Exhibits rotate approxi-
mately every six weeks. Call (909) 621-
9091 or email info@squareigallery.com.
Through June 30: A show celebrating
the Chinese year of the horse featuring
limited-edition fine art giclee prints of
paintings by artist Susan Hertel. Known
internationally for her paintings and
deep love of horses, Ms. Hertels
gouache studies and large oil-on-canvas
paintings are in many major museums
and collections including the Museum
of Long Beach, the Pasadena Museum
of Art and the private collection of
Robert Redford. The limited-edition
prints are made through a giclee method
that takes a digital image of an original
painting and, using pigments on fine-art
paper, produces richly-colored, high-
quality prints. The pieces range from
16 x 12 (for $125) to 37 x 30 (for
$375). Ms. Hertel lived and worked in
southern California for close to 30 years,
moving from Evanston, Illinois to attend
Scripps College in 1950. She also stud-
ied at the Kann Institute in Los Angeles.
Ms. Hertel moved to New Mexico in
1980 where she painted full-time until
her death in 1993, leaving few works
unsold. These pieces offer a rare oppor-
tunity to acquire an acclaimed Susan
Hertel print.
GALLERIES
Image courtesy of Bunny Gunner Gallery
Paintings by Joyce Hesselgrave are on exhibition at Bunny Gunner Gallery in the
Claremont Village through June 30.
Claremont COURIER/Friday, June 13, 2014 21
LAEMMLES CLAREMONT 5:
450 W. Second St., Claremont. 621-
5500 or visit laemmle.com for movie
listings. $11; students with ID $8.50;
children under 12 $8; seniors 62+
$8; bargain price $8 on Monday
through Friday for all shows prior to
6 p.m. and Saturday, Sunday and
holidays prior to 2 p.m.
Now playing: How to Train Your
Dragon 2 [PG], Maleficent [PG],
Edge of Tomorrow [PG13], Words
and Pictures [PG13], Chef [R].
Saturday and Sunday, June 14: The
Grand Seduction [PG13] at 10:45
a.m. and Fed-Up [PG] at 11 a.m.
June 20 through 26: Turn-
around Jake.
MOVIE LISTINGS
A
n unlikely group of
Azusa Pacific Univer-
sity alumnia police
officer, a music pastor and a
teachercame together and
made a full length feature-film
to be released next weekend.
Turnaround Jake debuts dur-
ing a special engagement at the
Claremont Laemmle Theatres
from June 20 through June 26.
The projects goal
was to create a cul-
turally relevant
Christian film that
entertains and en-
gages the millennial
culture. These local film makers drew
from their education and the network
they developed at Azusa Pacific Uni-
versity. They worked with extremely
limited resources including a $70,000
budget and very little entertainment in-
dustry experience.
The filmmakers include Upland res-
ident Jarret Lemaster as the lead actor,
who wrote and performed all the music
in the film, Ontario resident Shawn
Svoboda filled the role of writer and
producer, Ontario resident Christa
(Burroughs) Svoboda served as loca-
tion manager/featured background,
Los Angeles resident Mackenzie
Marsh worked as casting director/sup-
porting cast and Pasadena resident
Jared Isham directed.
The story centers around a young
businessman, bent on success, who
loses everything, and discovers a faith
and a family he never knew he had.
Jake Zaker (Jarret Lemaster, Bounty)
is a rising business prodigy working
under the guidance of his corrupt boss,
Russell OMalley (Michael Madsen,
Reservoir Dogs, Kill Bill). Life is
sweet, until a government investiga-
tion of his firm targets Jake.
Overnight, he loses it all: his career,
his downtown penthouse, and his at-
tractive high-class fianc. Left without
options, Jake escapes from Los Ange-
les to his childhood home in rural
Texas where he is forced to deal with
the consequences of his broken rela-
tionships with his father, Leo Zaker
(Mark Withers, True Blood, The Ul-
timate Life) and the girl he left be-
hind, Jessica Henry (Jen Lilley, The
Artist, Days of Our Lives). While
struggling to reclaim his life in Los
Angeles, amidst the scheming of his
former boss, Jake learns a family se-
cret that shakes his faith and forces
him to make the biggest decision of
his life.
Several major film distributors have
made offers to take Turnaround
Jake nationwide. Check it out begin-
ing Friday, June 20 at Claremont
Laemmle 5, located at 450 W. Second
St., Claremont.
For showtimes and to see the trailer,
visit laemmle.com/films/38246.
OUR
TOWN
Local filmmakers debut movie in Claremont
Image courtesy of Laemmle
COURIER file photo
Laemmle Claremont 5 theater in Village West has screenings as late as 10 p.m. They
offer bargain prices for screenings Monday through Friday for shows prior to 6 p.m.
Claremont High School
Daniel Jefferson Aaron
Jessica Lee Abrolat
Justin David Abrolat
Grace Marie E Absalon
Mileena Cristina Acosta
Aaron Adame Huante
Addison Rodney Adsit-Metts
Marija Adzic
Patricia Aguilar
Elizabeth Marie Aguirre
Gabriel Alarcon
Dana Marie Alfirevic
Fatima Abdullah Alrazaa
Dana Ivy Altmann
Lilly D Altree
Andrew J Alva
Allysa Rene Alvarez
Natalie Marie Alvarez
Oubadah Adam Alwan
Victor Amato
Jasmin L. Amigon
Alyssa Anaya
Jordan Anckle
Madison Rose Anderson
David A Andrade
Isaiah John Aragon
Cruz Alejandro Araiza
Merin Anne Arft
Aaron N. Argomaniz
Isaac Daniel Armijo
Ryan Milo Armijo
Andrew Lee Atwood
Jordan Ray Austin
Anise Lissette Avalos
Martin De Jesus Avila
Ricardo Anthony Avila
Sibelle Azar
Kevin Badeau
Haley Marie Baker
Timothy Edward Barney
Mark Alexander Barr
Alexis Batista
Eran Bechor
Mikaella Elizabeth Belisle
Emily M Bergstresser
Andrew Michael Bernstein
Tatiana Bertirotti
Maria del Carmen Berumen
Brianna Irene Bias
Kennedy Bingham
Jordane L. Birkett
Emma Joan Bishop
Clara Bittencourt
Raylon Jerome Bivins
Alexander K Bixler
Anastasia Adelheid Bjornlie
Parker Blakeslee
Joseph A. Blash
Kevin Jacob Bleich
Jack S Blomberg
Marisa J Borreggine
Jeanae Lauren Bourdeau
Blake O Boyer
Fiona Katherine Bradford
Andrea Leticia Bran
Sarah Nicole Bratman
Jordon Adam Brown
Kyle Neil Brown
Denise Paola Brunetti
Kristina Nola Bumpus
Kaden Khan Alexander Bunker
Brandon Burnham
Brittney Monique Butler
David Andrew Calzada
Hernan Canas-Guerrero
Dominique Canchola
Deja Lynae Cannon
Kirsten C. Cannon-Rodriguez
Alexis Cardenas
Kimberly Starr Cardenas
Roxann Amber Cardoza
Megan Lynn Carney
Michael Alan Cassell
Estefania M Castillejos-Palma
Ashley Dianna Castillo
Joseph Richard Castillo
Leslie Tatyana Castillo
Salma Causor
Anthony Alan Ceccarelli
Emily Susan Ceschini
Nicholas Jon Chakerian
Caitlin In Sum Chan
Matthew HeeGene Chang
Noah Philip Chavarria
Nia Mattie-Marie Chavez
Karen Yi Chen
Amberish Manoj Chitre
Caleb Sule Chodosh
Hannah Feng Hui Chua
Christopher B Cisneros
Justin R. Claire
Martin Alexander Clark
Natalie Cleere
Dylan Zacary Cobos
Langston B Coleman-Brown
Troy Connor Collins
Shaira Comia
Blake John Contreras
Joshua A Contreras
Grant Cook
Pedro Matthew Cordero III
Joshua Corona
Arturo Corona Jr
Savannah Renee Corsaro
Dallas Jalon Cox
Sara Neftali Crespo
Carissa Marie Crum
David P Cumpston Jr
Shannen Lee Dahl
Sabrina Van-Khanh Dang
Savannah R Daniels
Emerson Timothy Dauwalder
Celeste Divine Davalos
Hailey Elizabeth Davis
Kathryn Melissa Davis
Stephanie De la Pena
Fernanda De La Rosa
Ivan A. De La Rosa
Kaylee Francine Deal
Jessica DeLaTorre
Kathryn Adams DesCombes
Annick Jade Dewald
Sarah Jessica Diaz
Bruce Austin Dickens
Michael Thomas Dillon
Christine Dinh
Katherine Lianne Dinh
Julia Marie Dirckx
Emily Marie Dominguez
Nicholas Daniel Dominguez
Sirenna M Dominguez
Brian Jeremy Minh Hoa Donahue
Tesa Denee Donnan
Lauren Elizabeth Dozier
Stacy Nicole Draper
Mercedes Aurora Duncan
Ellen Rachel Savitzky Durnal
Christopher Dallas Edward
Dustin L Eguiluz
Mahmoud Gamal Eissa
Taan Mohamad Ellahib
Trevor Hayes Ellis
Annika J Ellwanger-Chavez
Luke Kim Englebert
Bianca Enriquez
Kobina Essel-Proch
Alejandro Estrada
Siauvale T Eveni
Justin Farraj
Annalyese M. Fausel
Janie Mishel Feldsher
Joshua Ferrer
Braydon Thomas Fidak
Odette E Finn
Joseph Michael Fitzpatrick
Andrea Daniela Flores
Cristina Olivia Flores
Katelyn Julia Flores
Brian Roland Fox
Auden Karol Foxe
Madison M. Franco
Devin Lynn Franklin
Baron L Franklin Jr
Michael Patrick Free
Bailey Rose Fuimaono
Cinque Edward Gales
Gregory B Galindo
Jonathan Galinzoga
Katherine Mulroy Gallagher
Alexander Galuchie
Peter Di Gao
Sarah Louise Garbayo
Clarissa Monet Garcia
David M.P. Garcia
Mario Miguel Garcia-Ramos
Sarah Andromeda Garner
Westin Cesar Gause
Melanie Robin Gettler
Syed Mohammad Ghazi
Sequoia Gibson
Justin Malik Christian Giles
Jordan Lyn Gill
Austin Matthew Gillespie
Jonathan Taylor Glenn
Ramil Jay Goc-Ong
Garrett Thomas Gomez
Joseph Alexander Gomez
Kimberly Gomez
Sage Michelle Gomez
Matthew Seth Gonzales
Alexis Gonzalez
Alondra Gonzalez
David Gonzalez
Natalie Angela Gonzalez
Rance Michael Gonzalez
Alexandra Haley Gorder
Emily Angelina Grace
Angelica Noel Graham
Rebecca L. Graham
Matthew Grajales
Alana Monique Granados
Dayton Graue
Caroline Michelle Guerra
Yamilex Guerrero-Estrada
Nicolas Anthony Guido
Kirsi Gulati
Nicholas Andrew Guzman
Sophie Clare Haas
Drew Austin Hadfield
Christian A Hagelis
Matthew Avery Hagen
Robyn Arthur Haley
Jacqueline Hall
Hajar Islam Hammado
Grace Borah Han
Bryce Hanna
Mary Justina Hanna
Tara Akemi Harbison
Madison M Harlow
Steven Donte Harris
Jynelle Dawn Harrison Kelly
Brittney Ann Hastert
Amanda Lanae Hauptmann
Jack Ernest Hayward
Amanda Marie Heck
Madeline Hope Helland
Catherine Marie Hempen
Avery Braswell Hernandez
Bryan Thomas Hernandez
Edwin Isaiah Hernandez
Leana M. Herrera
Mickey R Herrera
Catherine Nicole Hester
Charles Dolan Hildebrand
Brooke Katelyn Hill
Karina T. Hines
Tashjohn T Hinkson
Elaine Cayetana Hodge
Drew Harley Hoisington
Brent Hollinger
Ashley N Holmes
Hannah C Hoyle
Alice Huang
Alison W Huang
Matthew Christopher Hughes
Grace Elizabeth Hunt
Shelley Elise Hunter
Joseph Gabriel Hurley
Nathan Anthony Hurt
Chau Bao Huynh
David D Huynh
Simon Chin-Lun Huynh
Nicholas Roy Ibarra
Julie Innabi
Ashlyn Lee Jackson
Katelyn Ann Jackson
Dominick Michael Jaffe
David Scott Jameson
Alejandro Jasso-Vazquez
Jesse Garrett Jimenez
Alexander Bryan Johnson
Infinity Selease Johnson
Samantha Marie Johnson
Sarah H Jonny
Kaylee Faith Jorgensen
Demi May Joyce
Jasmine Hope Juarez
Aleksander Eric Kaljumagi
Bryce Yuji Kasamoto
Brandon Luke Kemple
Tyler Joann Kenney
Ki Hyun Kim
Khalia Melashia Kincey
Alexa Summer King
Sierra S King
Cameron James Kirkley
Jennifer Danielle Kloster
Kristina Rose Grindulo Kneip
Daniel Edward Knudsen
Miriam Quinne Kome
Sho Koyama
Edward Solomon Kropf
Melissa Christine Lach
Bryan Samuel Landgreen
Nathan Landman
Cortney Marie Langdon
Kortney Irene Lange
Vincent Martin Lara
Shelley Lau
Melanie Marie Lauer
Perri Danielle Lawler
Carson Harrison Leathers
Marcus D Lee
Chen-Ju Lei
Sabrina Irene Lemus
Daniel Cortez Leon
Michael Isaiah Lewis
Natalyn Liao
Kegee Francis Limbe
Naomi Tzuhui Lin
Dannyelle Hailey Linares
Cindy Rae Liu
Elaine Liu
Samuel J Liu
Issac Henry Lopez
Juan Lopez
Katherine Lopez
Matthew Alexander Lopez
Elizabeth Marie Lopez-Heydt
Cameron Matthew Lorek
Michael J. Loria
Jennifer Renee Lowe
Alejandra Lozano
Sara Larenn Lozano
Hailee Brook Lozzi
Elizabeth Anne Luevano
Chynna Alexis Lum
Samuel Austin Macaluso
Jesse Macias
Nathan Joseph Macias
Megan Danielle Macioce
Omar Abdallah Mahmoud
Elizabeth Marie Maine
Edgar Delrico Mambou
Paul F Manus
Ruth Dianne Manzanares
Gladys Luisa Marcano
Andrew Watson Marchant
Ezra A Marlowe
Jayson Marquez
Kathy Marquez
Jovana Martinez
Oscar Daniel Martinez
Rocio Daniela Martinez
Berlin Alexandra Mason
Ricky Lee Mason
Mary Kathrine McCord
Alia McDaniel
Kayla Sky McFadden
Fergus Patrick McGillivray
Judy C. McGlover
Jason Scott McMillin
Melody Ann Melendez
Emelie F Mendelsohn
Lorena Marie Mendoza
Nancy M. Mercado
Niza Tatiana Metoyer
Andrew Derrin Meyers
Samantha Meza
Christopher Adam Michno
Caitlin Nicole Mikasa
Aria E Miller
Samantha Nicole Milwrick
Chazney Patrice Minor
Lina Gabrielle Mitchell
Lindsay Anne Mitchell
Tristan John Moffatt
Adrian R Mondragon
Matthew Austin Monroe
Rebecca Ann Monroy
Jasmin Monrreal
Anthony Mathew Monsivais
Antonio Joseph Montoya
Mia Alexis Moore
Jenna Rose Moreno
Kiana Lynn Moreno
Alexandra R Morgan
Tiffany G Mosley
Janette Munoz
David Irarimam Musa
Brandon Musharbash
Craig Louis Myers
Yoo Jung Nam
Fernando Navarrete
Cassandra L. Navarro
Dominique Navarro
Anh Tuan Nguyen
Brent Masami Nishimura
Kyle Donald Nishimura
Seamus Deulen Noll
Phuvanai Nosavan
Jonathan Peter Ochoa
Hyun Jin Oh
Tobias D Olausson
Sal Anthony Olmos
Andrea Lynn Olmsted
Amber Alexis Oostendorp
Damien Ortiz
Jacqueline Ortiz
Kiarra E Osakue
Connor Harris Osgood
Shannon Taylor OToole
Anissa Julianna Pacheco
Thomas Jay Padilla
Isabel Jane Page
Ruslan Pankiv
Elijah Pantoja
Jillian Joy Pascua
Tristan M Patrick
Marissa Jordan Patton
Faith Rachel Pavlisin
Joseph N Pedraza
Kourtney Alice Peoples
Alexis Gabrielle Perez
Jesus David Perez
Jorge Luis Perez
Silvanna Petrocelly
Caitlyn Lee Pfau
Kelly P Pham
Matthew Khang Pham
Emma Diane Pion-Berlin
Susan Portillo
Emily Rae Pound
Mark Peter Pruitt
Clarice Danielle Pumerantz
Sarah Maria Quevedo
Christian Foster Quick
Jordynn My kel Quinine
Kari Nereida Quinonez
Raina Rahman
Alejandra Ramirez
Alexa Lennyn Ramirez
Cristian A. Ramirez
Enrique Agustin Ramirez
Jose Antonio Ramirez
Joshua Rene Ramirez
Alyssa Michelle Ramos
Mark Edward Ramos
Rahul Vinay Rangnekar
Paige Brianna Rankin
Eden Raviv
Marissa Brianna Raygoza
Andrea Real
Marieann Real
Lamont Jamal Reeves
Amber Destiny Renish
Megan Alexandra Renken
Robert Dale Rennie
Annalise Michelle Reynosa
Jonathan Reza
Christin Cierra Rickman
Justine Nichole Rios
Danny Rivas
Kristopher Jett Rivas
Alyssa Marie Rivera
Sierra Sky Roberts
Danna Robles
Damian Rodgers
Reynard Roebini
Breshanna Rogers
Madelyn M. Rohde
Amanda C. Romero
Mayahuel Sol Rosado
Juan Jose Rosales
Anne Catherine Rosett
Daniel Ross
Julian Creed Ross
Hayley Eryn Rostenbach
Jade Lee Rowe
Andrew Alexander Rubio
Emeril Alicia Ruiz
Sarah Danielle Ruiz
Alisha June Ryczek
Matthew G. Salamatin
Angelica Marie Salas
Alejandro R Salas Hernandez
Luis Alberto Salcedo
Lana Saleh
John C Salinas
Cecilia Elena Sambrano
Aaron Ethan San Diego
Celeste Sanchez
Sirenia Sanchez
Sandra Nicole Sandoval
David Santana
Adam Christopher Sargent
Jefferey T Sarinana
Michelle Sarraf
Robert Savala
Anna Michelle Schiff
Claire Whitney Sears
Madelyn Louise Seder
Rachel Segura
Travis S. Sellers
Erica Naomi Serna
Andres Serrano
Tyler J Sharpnack
Keegan Bradly Shaw
Sarah Marion Shea
Jeffrey R. Shen
Mirza A Sheriff
Benjamin Olson Shultz
Gabriel Maximiliano Silva
Daryan Melissa Silvestre
Alan Gene Simpson
William G. Sirski
Chelsea Slocum
Bryannah Nicole Smith
Simon Curtis Smith
Tyler Adam Smith
Alexis Solis
Omar Solis
Janene Soto
Jacob Jordon Spencer
Drew Dorothy Spinosa
Arthur Grant Srmabekian
Madison Ann Stark
Gillian Lingyan Steinmetz-Blair
Samantha Raquel Stephens
Elise Emily Sterba
Jenelle Rose Stockton
Katherine Charlotte Stott
Devin James Strasen
Tanzila Suliman
Samuel Sunarjo
Khalil Suradi
Robyn Jillayne Swift
Thomas E Syrja
Naomi Takeda
Eli Robert Tanenbaum
Joshua Eric Taylor
NyKevva Zaire Taylor
Marissa Telarroja
Isaac Tanner Texeira
Christopher Adrian Thomas
Tyler Ryan Tinajero
Samantha To
James Joseph Tonan
Annabel Leigh Torres
Michael J Torres
Sergio J Torres-Callejas
Davis Watrous Tran
Abby Rebecca Treadwell
Mykiah Q. Trotter
Aaron Paul Tschetter
Javon Johnson Turner
Jordan Marcel Turner
Cameron Joseph Tyus
Shanon Bradley Uhl
Rachel Fran Umansky
Katie Ursua
Anthony Valencia
Fernando Vallejo Jr
Gina Briann Valvo
Mark Andrew van Zee
Jonathan James Vance
Eduardo Ezequiel Vargas
Eroni Makoto Vatuloka
Bianca Marie Vazquez
Jessica J. Vazquez
Abraham Villa
Joshua Robert Villa
Kirsten Alyssa Villa
Faustine C. Vuong
Amanda Jean Walker
Ashley Waller
Kevin A Wang
Jayne Madeline Ward
Aujenique K Washington
Brianna Camera Watson
Mercedes Loren Wechter
Alexander W Weith
Blayden James Wesleyson
Zakee West
Jacqueline R. Westcott
Ashley Elizabeth Whims
Benjamin Bourne Whitham
Sean Addison Whitham
Skyler Celeste Whiting
Jason Alexander Widjaja
Conner Mitchell Williams
Drew Sarai Williams
Renae Candice Williams
Jordan David Wilmore
Tiana J Wilson
Tyler Ryan Winslow
Carolina Telfair Woodcock
Justine Anne Wood-Mikhail
Dea Nor Woods
Erin Castle Work
Brian C. Xie
Brandon Yeoh
Allen You
Dominique Ann Young
Iris Yu
Diana Y. Zhao
Kevin Zhao
Christine Zheng
Dakota Thomas Zucconi
San Antonio High School
Justus Marquis Akins-Zolman
Esteban Arroyo
Ginelle Rose Calvero
Robert V. Campbell, IV
Francesca Mae Canda
Jorge Cardenas
Ramiro E. Cholewa
Nautika Clemons
Ruby Lisette Cuervo-Mitchell
Cecil Fleming
Nathan Anthony Gonzales
Angela Monique Gonzalez
Rejon Booker Green
Bryan Hernandez-Diaz
Stephanie Odelys Herrera
Tommy Huynh
Destiny Marie Krug
Vianna Clarissa Lara
Elizabeth Carmen Lopez
Luis Magana
Molly Marie Martin
Christian Martinez
Joseph Brandon Molina
Katrina Vivian Moore
Kristofer Mushrush
Pearl Rose Perez
Aaron Avery Peterson
Isabella Reyes
Gustavo Rodriguez
Derek Charles Russell
Gabriel Timothy Salgado
Brianne May Sudar
Joseph Robert Trujillo
Claremont COURIER/Friday, June 13, 2014 22
CONGRATULATIONS,
Class of 2014
from the Claremont COURIER
RENTALS
Apartment For Rent
CLAREMONT Village Eleventh
St. Two bedroom, two bathroom
upstairs unit. One-car garage.
$1800 monthly. 909-641-6165,
daviscoffman@gmail.com.
House For Rent
CLAREMONT newly built homes
for rent. Two-story, four bed-
rooms, three bathrooms, two-car
garage, fenced and gated pri-
vate yards, everything new.
Call 562-355-1715 for details.
Office Space For Rent
CLAREMONT Healing Arts
Center is looking for a mas-
sage therapist, acupuncturist,
healer or therapist seeking
part-time hours in our serene
holistic center. Joanne, 909-
946-9098.
Room for Rent
AMAZINGClaremont Packing
House loft space. Experience
loft living at less than half the
cost! This unique, artistic and
open floor plan features a sec-
ond level bedroom with closet
space and room for living
area. $1,000 per month in-
cludes wifi, water, gas, electric
and trash utilities plus shared
kitchen, bathroom and com-
mon area. Female applicants
preferred. Call 626-388-6248.
Studio For Rent
CLAREMONT studio with eat-
ing, sleeping area. Carpet, A/C,
window coverings, stove, re-
frigerator, washer, dryer. 462
Grinnell Drive. $775 monthly.
909-593-0752.
Townhome For Rent
GATED courtyard with pool.
Two bedrooms, 2.5 bath-
rooms. Washer, dryer. Central
heating and air. Gas fireplace.
No pets, smoking. $1595
monthly. Water and trash paid.
605 Colby Cr. 909-455-3612.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
DRIVERS: Prime, Inc. Com-
pany drivers and independent
contractors for refrigerated,
tanker and flatbed needed!
Plenty of freight and great
pay! Start with Prime today!
Call 877-736-3019 or apply
online at driveforprime.com.
(Cal-SCAN)
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
TRUCK drivers, obtain Class
A-CDL in two-and-a-half
weeks. Company sponsored
training. Also hiring recent
truck school graduates, expe-
rienced drivers. Must be 21 or
older. Call 866-275-2349.
(Cal-SCAN)
DRIVERS: Start with our training
or continue your solid career.
You have options! Company
drivers, lease purchase or owner
operators needed! 877-369-7091.
centraltruckdrivingjobs.com.
(Cal-SCAN)
MARKETPLACE
Announcements
DID you know that not only
does newspaper media reach
a huge audience, they also
reach an engaged audience?
Discover the power of news-
paper advertising. For a free
brochure call 916-288-6011
or email cecelia@cnpa.com.
(Cal-SCAN)
DID you know newspaper-
generated content is so valu-
able its taken and repeated,
condensed, broadcast,
tweeted, discussed, posted,
copied, edited and emailed
countless times throughout
the day by others? Discover
the power of newspaper ad-
vertising. For a free brochure
call 916-288-6011 or email
cecelia@cnpa.com. (Cal-SCAN)
DID you know 144 million US
adults read a newspaper print
copy each week? Discover
the power of newspaper ad-
vertising. For a free brochure
call 916-288-6011 or email
cecelia@cnpa.com. (Cal-
SCAN)
DID you know seven in 10
Americans or 158 million US
adults read content from news-
paper media each week? Dis-
cover the power of newspaper
advertising. For a free brochure
call 916-288-6011 or email
cecelia@cnpa.com. (Cal-SCAN)
AUTO accident attorney. In-
jured in an auto accident?
Call InjuryFone for a free
case evaluation. Never a cost
to you. Dont wait, call now. 1-
800-958-5341. (Cal-SCAN)
Antiques
AMERICAN and European
antiques, furnishings, home
and garden decor. New ship-
ment weekly! The Ivy House.
214 W. Foothill Blvd. 909-
621-6628.
MARKETPLACE
Announcements
A BARN and house full of an-
tiques, furniture and smalls. Re-
finishing too! 909-593-1846. La
Verne. Kensoldenoddities.com.
Donations
DONATE your car, truck or
boat to Heritage for the Blind.
Free three-day vacation, tax
deductible, free towing, all
paperwork taken care of.
888-902-6851. (Cal-SCAN)
Estate Sales
ESTATE/yard sale: Saturday
and Sunday, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Everything goes. Craigslist
has pictures. 541 Bowling
Green Drive, Claremont.
ITS a Zoe TeBeau estate
sale! 684 Windham Drive,
Claremont. Saturday, June
14, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Lovely
furnishings and decor.
FURNITURE, collectables,
etc. Saturday, Sunday, June
14 and 15, 9 a.m. 2447 N.
Mountain Ave., Claremont.
Financial
IS your identity protected? It is
our promise to provide the
most comprehensive identity
theft prevention and response
products available! Call today
for a 30-day free trial, 1-800-
908-5194. (Cal-SCAN)
DO you owe over $10,000 to
the IRS or State in back
taxes? Get tax relief now! Call
BlueTax, the nations full serv-
ice tax solution firm. 800-393-
6403. (Cal-SCAN)
REDUCE your past tax bill by
as much as 75 percent. Stop
levies, liens and wage gar-
nishments. Call The Tax Dr.
now to see if you qualify. 1-
800-498-1067.
ARE you in big trouble with the
IRS? Stop wage and bank
levies, liens and audits, unfiled
tax returns, payroll issues and
resolve tax debt fast. Seen on
CNN. A BBB. Call 1-800-761-
5395. (Cal-SCAN)
Garage Sales
YARD sale: Saturday, June
14, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. 920 Occi-
dental Drive, Claremont.
For Sale
THIRTY year old Sego palm
in pot with pups. $2000
value first $800 cash. 909-
624-1591.
MARKETPLACE
For Sale
SAWMILLS from only $4897.
Make and save money with
your own bandmill. Cut lumber
any dimension. In stock ready
to ship. Free information/DVD.
NorwoodSawmills.com. 1-800-
578-1363, ext.300N. (Cal-SCAN)
BULLETINS
Business
ONE call, does it all! Fast and
reliable handyman services.
Call ServiceLive and get re-
ferred to a pro today: Call
800-958-8267. (Cal-SCAN)
REDUCE your cable bill! Get a
whole-home satellite system in-
stalled at no cost and program-
ming starting at $19.99 monthly.
Free HD/DVR. Upgrade to new
callers, so call now, 1-866-982-
9562. (Cal-SCAN)
BE the first medical alert com-
pany in your area! Owning your
own local distributorship. We
do 70 percent of the work! Un-
limited money return. Invest-
ment required. Free call
1-844-225-1200. (Cal-SCAN)
DIRECTV two year savings
event! Over 140 channels only
$29.99 a month. Only DirectTV
gives you two years of savings
and a free Genie upgrade! Call
1-800-291-0350. (Cal-SCAN)
DISH TV retailer. Starting at
$19.99 a month for 12 months
and high speed internet starting
at $14.95 a month (where
available). Save! Ask about
same day installation! Call now!
1-888-806-7317. (Cal-SCAN)
BULLETINS
Business
CALLING all business-minded
bakers! Go into business for
yourself at a great location.
Claremont gallery looking to
expand with coffee shop run
by you! Call 626-388-6248.
BULLETINS
Education
MEDICAL billing trainees
needed! Become a medical of-
fice assistant! No experience
needed! Online training gets
you job ready! High school
diploma/GED and PC needed!
1-888-325-5168. (Cal-SCAN)
Health
SAFE Step Walk-In Tub alert
for seniors. Bathroom falls can
be fatal. Approved by Arthritis
Foundation. Therapeutic jets.
Less than four-inch step-in.
Wide door. Anti-slip floors.
American made. Installation in-
cluded. Call 800-799-4811 for
$750 off. (Cal-SCAN)
MENS lifestyle medicine. Vi-
agra, Cialis, Levitra. USA
pharmacies. Telemedicine
physicians. Overnight shipping
available. Trusted since 1998.
800-951-6337. VIAMEDIC.com.
Save five percent using code:
CAL14, coupon expires De-
cember 31, 2014. (Cal-SCAN)
Personals
MEET singles right now! No
paid operators, just real people
like you. Browse greetings, ex-
change messages and connect
live. Try it free. Call now, 1-800-
945-3392. (Cal-SCAN)
rentals..............23
services...........26
legals..............24
real estate.......29
CLASSIFIEDS
Friday 06-13-14
909.621.4761
CONTACT US
1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711
Ph: 909.621.4761 Fax: 909.621.4072
classified@claremont-courier.com
Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Claremont COURIER Classifieds 23
EMPLOYMENT
MEMBERSHIP AND GUEST SERVICES MANAGER
The American Museum of Ceramic Art (AMOCA) in Pomona
seeks a professional and detail-oriented individual to be our
Membership and Guest Services Manager. He/she is responsi-
ble for the growth and development of the museums member-
ship program and for leading the guest services team in providing
a positive first impression to visitors. He/she will strengthen the
museums membership program through the development of
new and innovative programs, policies and events intended to
increase visitor participation.
For complete position description and required qualifications, see
www.amoca.org/employment. To apply, email cover letter and re-
sume to search@amoca.org.
Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, June 13, 2014 24
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014133941
The following person(s) is (are) doing business
as COMMUNITY HOME ENERGY RETRO-
FIT PROJECT, 4225 Piedmont Mesa Rd.,
Claremont, CA 91711. Registrant(s): Smart En-
ergy Planet Corporation, 1433 N. Fine, Fresno,
CA 93727.
This business is conducted by a Corporation.
Registrant has not yet commenced to transact
business under the fictitious business name or
names listed herein.
I declare that all information in this statement is
true and correct.
/s/ Devon Wright Hartman Title: Secretary
This statement was filed with the Registrar-
Recorder/ County Clerk of Los Angeles County
on 05/16/14.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of
section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement gen-
erally expires at the end of five (5) years from the
date on which it was filed in the office of the
County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision
(b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days
after any change in the facts set forth in the state-
ment pursuant to section 17913 other than a
change in the residence address of a registered
owner. A new Fictitious Business Name State-
ment must be filed before the expiration. Effec-
tive January 1, 2014, the Fictitious Business
Name Statement must be accompanied by the Af-
fidavit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself au-
thorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Busi-
ness Name in violation of the rights of another
under federal, state, or common law (see Section
14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: May 23, 30, June 6 and 13, 2014
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014133890
The following person(s) is (are) doing business as B
AND B LEARN AND PLAY, 4141 North Harlan
Ave., Baldwin Park, CA91706. Registrant(s): Nur
Karina Bandek, 4141 North Harlan Ave., Baldwin
Park, CA91706.
This business is conducted by an Individual.
Registrant has not yet commenced to transact busi-
ness under the fictitious business name or names
listed herein.
I declare that all information in this statement is true
and correct.
/s/ Nur Karina Bandek Title: Owner
This statement was filed with the Registrar-
Recorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County
on 05/16/14.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of sec-
tion 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally
expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on
which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk,
except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section
17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in
the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to sec-
tion 17913 other than a change in the residence ad-
dress of a registered owner. A new Fictitious
Business Name Statement must be filed before the
expiration. Effective January 1, 2014, the Fictitious
Business Name Statement must be accompanied by
the Affidavit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself author-
ize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name
in violation of the rights of another under federal,
state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq.,
Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: May 23, 30, June 6 and 13, 2014
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY
[Probate Code 16226]
No. BP147361
Superior Court of the State of California
for the County of Los Angeles
In the Matter of the Trust created by HENRY
FRANICH and MARJORIE R. FRANICH on
January 9, 2002
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Erinn Unger,
as Successor Trustee of the trust created by
Henry Franich and Marjorie R. Franich on Jan-
uary 2002, will sell at public sale to the highest
and best bidder, upon the terms and conditions
hereinafter mentioned, and subject to confirma-
tion by the Superior Court, on June 21, 2014 at
10:00 a.m. all the right, title and interest and es-
tate of the said Trustee in and to the real prop-
erty located in the County of Los Angeles, State
of California, described as follows:
Lot 24 of Tract No. 17979, in the City of Clare-
mont, as per map recorded in Book 449, pages
11 and 12 of Maps, as recorded in the office oft
he County Recorder of said county;
and commonly known as 412 West Point Drive,
Claremont, California (Assessor's Parcel No.
8315-027-007).
The property will be sold on site.
The said sale of the real property herein de-
scribed will be made upon the following terms:
Cash or terms acceptable to the Trustee.
For further information, please contact Larry Weiner
of Flans & Weiner, Inc. 16200 Ventura Boulevard,
Suite 417, Encino, California 91436-2227; telephone
(818) 501-4888; www.flansweiner.com
Dated: May 15, 2014
/s/ Erinn Unger
Erinn Unger, Successor Trustee
/s/ Keith S. Walker
Keith S. Walker
Attorney for Successor Trustee
Keith S. Walker, Attorney at Law, 319 Harvard
Avenue, Claremont, California 91711-4721
Telephone: (909) 626-1041
Facsimile (909) 625-5781
(California State Bar #73047)
Attorney for Erinn Unger, Successor Trustee
5/30, 6/6, 6/13/14
CNS-2627215#
CLAREMONT COURIER
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014 120072
The following person(s) is (are) doing business as
WEST COAST TRAINING INSTITUTE,
EMERGENCY VEHICLE FLEET SERV-
ICES, 1059 E. Bedmar Street, Carson, CA90746.
Registrant(s): AMERICARE MEDSERVICES,
INC., 1059 E. Bedmar Street, Carson, CA90746.
This business is conducted by a Corporation.
Registrant has not yet commenced to transact
business under the fictitious business name or
names listed herein.
I declare that all information in this statement is
true and correct.
/s/ Micheal Summers Title: President/C.E.O.
This statement was filed with the Registrar-
Recorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County
on 05/02/14.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of
section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement gen-
erally expires at the end of five (5) years from
the date on which it was filed in the office of the
County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision
(b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days
after any change in the facts set forth in the state-
ment pursuant to section 17913 other than a
change in the residence address of a registered
owner. A new Fictitious Business Name State-
ment must be filed before the expiration. Effec-
tive January 1, 2014, the Fictitious Business
Name Statement must be accompanied by the
Affidavit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself au-
thorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Busi-
ness Name in violation of the rights of another
under federal, state, or common law (see Section
14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: May 30, June 6, 13 & 20, 2014
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014 140585
The following person(s) is (are) doing business as
ARTE PRIMA EDITIONS, 219 N. Indian Hill
Blvd., Suite 201, Claremont, CA 91711. Mailing
address: 221 Tennyson Street, Upland, CA91784.
Registrant(s): Joseph D. Piscioneri, 221 Tennyson
Street, Upland, CA91784.
This business is conducted by an Individual.
Registrant commenced to transact business under the
fictitious name or names listed above on 09/27/1994.
I declare that all information in this statement is true
and correct.
/s/ Joseph D. Piscioneri Title: Owner
This statement was filed with the Registrar-
Recorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County
on 05/23/14.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of
section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement gener-
ally expires at the end of five (5) years from the
date on which it was filed in the office of the
County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision
(b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after
any change in the facts set forth in the statement
pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in
the residence address of a registered owner. Anew
Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed
before the expiration. Effective January 1, 2014,
the Fictitious Business Name Statement must be
accompanied by the Affidavit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself au-
thorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Busi-
ness Name in violation of the rights of another
under federal, state, or common law (see Section
14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: May 30, June 6, 13 & 20, 2014
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014142322
The following person(s) is (are) doing business as ILO
COLLECTIVE, 101 N. Indian Hill Blvd., #106, Clare-
mont, CA 91711. Mailing address: 605 McKenna
Street, Claremont, CA91711. Registrant(s): Brian Lewis
Johnson, 605 McKenna Street, Claremont, CA91711.
This business is conducted by an Individual.
Registrant commenced to transact business under the
fictitious name or names listed above on 05/13/2014.
I declare that all information in this statement is
true and correct.
/s/ Brian Lewis Johnson Title: Owner
This statement was filed with the Registrar-
Recorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on
05/27/14.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of sec-
tion 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally ex-
pires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which
it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as
provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it
expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth
in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a
change in the residence address of a registered owner.
Anew Fictitious Business Name Statement must be
filed before the expiration. Effective January 1, 2014,
the Fictitious Business Name Statement must be ac-
companied by the Affidavit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize
the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in vi-
olation of the rights of another under federal, state, or
common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and
Professions Code).
PUBLISH: June 6, 13, 20 and 27, 2014
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY
COMMISSION
California Department of Water Resources
Project Nos. 2426-218, 14579-000, 14580-000
NOTICE OF APPLICATIONS ACCEPTED FOR
FILING, SOLICITING MOTIONS TO INTER-
VENE AND PROTESTS, READY FOR ENVI-
RONMENTAL ANALYSIS, AND SOLICITING
COMMENTS, RECOMMENDATIONS, AND
TERMS AND CONDITIONS
(June 6, 2014)
Take notice that the following hydroelectric applica-
tion has been filed with the Commission and is avail-
able for public inspection.
a. Type of Applications: Amendment of License
and Conduit Exemptions
b. Project Nos.: 2426-218, 14579-000, & 14580-000
c. Date Filed: January 15, 2014
d. Applicant: California Department of Water
e. Name of Projects: South SWPHydropower Proj-
ect, Alamo Powerplant Project, and Mojave Siphon
Powerplant Project
f. Location: The South SWP Hydropower Project
is located on the California Aqueduct in San
Bernardino, Los Angeles, San Luis Obispo, Ventura,
and Kern Counties, California. The project occupies
U.S. lands administered by the U.S. Forest Service.
g. Filed Pursuant to: Federal Power Act, 16 USC
791 (a)-825(r)
h. Applicant Contact: Ted Craddock, Chief, Hy-
dropower License Planning and Compliance Office,
California Department of Water Resources, P.O. Box
942836, Sacramento, California 94236-0001, tele-
phone: (316) 263-0261.
i. FERC Contact: Christopher Chaney, tele-
phone (202) 502-6778 or e-mail:
christopher.chaney@ferc.gov
j. Deadline for filing comments, motions to inter-
vene, and protests: 60 days from the issuance of this
notice by the Commission; reply comments are due
105 days from the issuance of this notice by the
Commission. The Commission strongly encourages
electronic filing. Please file any motion to intervene,
protest, comments, and/or recommendations using
the Commissions eFiling system at
http://www.ferc.gov/docs-filing/efiling.asp. Com-
menters can submit brief comments up to 6,000 char-
acters, without prior registration, using the
eComment system at http://www.ferc.gov/docs-fil-
ing/ecomment.asp. You must include your name and
contact information at the end of your comments.
For assistance, please contact FERC Online Support
at FERCOnlineSupport@ferc.gov, (866) 208-3676
(toll free), or (202) 502-8659 (TTY). In lieu of elec-
tronic filing, please send a paper copy to: Secretary,
Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, 888 First
Street, NE, Washington, DC 20426. The first page of
any filing should include docket numbers P-2426-
218, P-14579-000, and P-14580-000.
k. Description of Request: We consider the appli-
cations filed on January 15, 2014, as consisting of
three requests: an application for amendment of li-
cense under P-2426 and two applications for conduit
exemptions under P-14579 and P-14580. The ap-
plicant is not proposing any changes to the project
operations or facilities, and no ground disturbing ac-
tivity will occur.
i. Amendment of License: The appli-
cant proposes to amend the South SWPHydropower
Project license to remove the Alamo Powerplant and
Mojave Siphon Powerplant from the project. Con-
current with the amendment, the licensee proposes
to convert the two powerplants to conduit exemp-
tions as described below. This would result in a de-
crease of 49,400 kilowatts in the installed capacity
from 1,679,100 kilowatts to 1,629,700 kilowatts, and
a decrease of approximately 270 acres in the acreage
encompassed by the project boundary.
ii. Conduit Exemptions: The Alamo
Powerplant Project would consist of: (1) the existing
Alamo Powerplant containing one existing generat-
ing unit with an installed capacity of 17,000 kilo-
watts; and (2) appurtenant facilities. The applicant
estimates the project would have an average annual
generation of 83.751 gigawatt-hours. The Mojave
Siphon Powerplant Project would consist of: (1) the
existing Mojave Siphon Powerplant containing three
generating units with an installed capacity of 10,800
kilowatts each, for a total installed capacity of 32,400
kilowatts; and (2) appurtenant facilities. The appli-
cant estimates the project would have an average an-
nual generation of 65.678 gigawatt-hours.
l. Locations of the Application: This filing may
be viewed on the Commission's website at
http://www.ferc.gov/docs-filing/elibrary.asp.
Enter the docket number P-2426, P-14579, or P-
14580 in the docket number field to access the
documents. You may also register online at
http://www.ferc.gov/docs-filing/esubscription.asp to
be notified via email of new filings and issuances re-
lated to this or other pending projects. For assistance,
call 1-866-208-3676 or e-mail FERCOnlineSup-
port@ferc.gov, for TTY, call (202) 502-8659. A
copy is also available for inspection and reproduc-
tion at the address in item (h) above and at the Com-
mission's Public Reference Room, located at 888
First Street, NE, Room 2A, Washington, DC 20426,
or by calling (202) 502-8371.
m. Individuals desiring to be included on the Com-
mission's mailing list should so indicate by writing to
the Secretary of the Commission.
n. Comments, Protests, or Motions to Intervene:
Anyone may submit comments, a protest, or a mo-
tion to intervene in accordance with the requirements
of Rules of Practice and Procedure, 18 CFR 385.210,
.211, .214. In determining the appropriate action to
take, the Commission will consider all protests or
other comments filed, but only those who file a mo-
tion to intervene in accordance with the Commis-
sion's Rules may become a party to the proceeding.
Any comments, protests, or motions to intervene
must be received on or before the specified comment
date for the particular application.
o. Filing and Service of Responsive Documents:
Any filing must (1) bear in all capital letters the
title COMMENTS, PROTEST, or MOTION
TO INTERVENE as applicable; (2) set forth in
the heading the name of the applicant and the proj-
ect number of the application to which the filing
responds; (3) furnish the name, address, and tele-
phone number of the person protesting or inter-
vening; and (4) otherwise comply with the
requirements of 18 CFR 385.2001 through
385.2005. All comments, motions to intervene, or
protests must set forth their evidentiary basis and
otherwise comply with the requirements of 18 CFR
4.34(b). All comments, motions to intervene, or
protests should relate to project works which are
the subject of the license amendment. Agencies
may obtain copies of the application directly from
the applicant. Acopy of any protest or motion to
intervene must be served upon each representative
of the applicant specified in the particular applica-
tion. If an intervener files comments or documents
with the Commission relating to the merits of an
issue that may affect the responsibilities of a par-
ticular resource agency, they must also serve a
copy of the document on that resource agency. A
copy of all other filings in reference to this appli-
cation must be accompanied by proof of service on
all persons listed in the service list prepared by the
Commission in this proceeding, in accordance with
18 CFR 4.34(b) and 385.2010.
Kimberly D. Bose,
Secretary.
Publish: June 13, 2014
NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF BULK SALE
AND OF INTENTION TO TRANSFER ALCO-
HOLIC BEVERAGE LICENSE(S)
(UCC Sec. 6105 et seq. and B & PSec. 24073 et seq.)
Escrow No. 8728-JS
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a bulk sale of
assets and a transfer of alcoholic beverage li-
censes is about to be made. The name(s), and
business address of the Seller(s)/Licensee(s) are:
JINSUNG CORPORATION, 20627 GOLDEN
SPRINGS DR, UNIT A & B, BLDG 3, DIA-
MOND BAR, CA 91765
Doing business as: KA HWA RESTAURANT
All other business names(s) and address(es) used
by the Seller(s)/Licensee(s) within the past three
years, as stated by the Seller(s)/Licensee(s),
is/are: WIN B B Q
The name(s) and address of the Buyer(s)/Appli-
cant(s) is/are: STEVE LEE, 4874 PETERSON
ST, CHINO HILL, CA 91709
The assets being sold are generally described as:
EQUIPMENT, FIXTURES AND FURNITURE,
GOODWILL, TRADENAME, LEASE, LEASE-
HOLD IMPROVEMENT, AND COVENANT
NOT TO COMPETE and is/are located at: 20627
GOLDEN SPRINGS DR, UNIT A & B, BLDG
3, DIAMOND BAR, CA 91765
The type of license to be transferred is/are: Type:
47-ON SALE GENERAL EATING PLACE Li-
cense No. 534917 now issued for the premises lo-
cated at: SAME
The bulk sale and transfer of alcoholic beverage
license(s) is/are intended to be consummated at
the office of: TIME ESCROW INC, 3055
WILSHIRE BLVD, STE 1150, LOS ANGELES,
CA90010 and the anticipated sale date is JULY 9,
2014
The purchase price of consideration in connection
with the sale of the business and transfer of the li-
cense, is the sum of $380,000.00, including in-
ventory estimated at $, which consists of the
following: DESCRIPTION, AMOUNT: DE-
MAND NOTE $190,000.00; CASH $190,000.00;
ALLOCATION TOTAL $380,000.00
It has been agreed between the seller(s)/li-
censee(s) and the intended buyer(s)/transferee(s),
as required by Sec. 24073 of the Business and
Professions code, that the consideration for trans-
fer of the business and license is to be paid only
after the transfer has been approved by the De-
partment of Alcoholic Beverage Control.
Dated: 6/3/14
JINSUNG CORPORATION, Seller(s)/Li-
censee(s)
STEVE LEE, Buyer(s)/Applicant(s)
LA1425396 CLAREMONT COURIER 6/13/14
ORDINANCE NO. 2014-03
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL
OF THE CITY OF CLAREMONT, AMEND-
ING SUBSECTION C OF SECTION 9.82.010
AND SECTION 9.82.020 OF CHAPTER 9.82
OF TITLE 9 OF THE CLAREMONT MU-
NICIPAL CODE AND REPEALING SUB-
SECTIONS D, E, F, AND G OF SECTION
9.82.060 OF CHAPTER 9.82 OF TITLE 9 OF
THE CLAREMONT MUNICIPAL CODE
REGARDING UNLAWFULLOITERING BY
REGISTERED SEX OFFENDERS.
WHEREAS, the City Council of the City of
Claremont (City Council) has adopted Ordi-
nance 10-01 adding Chapter 9.82 to the City of
Claremont Municipal Code pertaining to sex of-
fender residency restrictions within the City of
Claremont (City); and
WHEREAS, Section 9.82.020 of the Claremont
Municipal Code prohibits a registered sex of-
fender from loitering in a child safety zone, which
is defined by Section 9.82.010(C) as any area
located within three hundred (300) feet from the
nearest property line of a child care center, pub-
lic or private school (grades K through 12), park,
public library, location that holds classes or group
activities for children, and/or any school bus
stop; and
WHEREAS, this January, a California Court of
Appeal held that the California Legislature had
established a comprehensive scheme for regulat-
ing the daily lives of sex offenders thereby pro-
hibiting local legislation on the subject unless it is
expressly permitted by a statute. The decision,
People v. Nguyen, undermines the ability of mu-
nicipalities to restrict where a sex offender may
go and what a sex offender may do; and
WHEREAS, this April, the California Supreme
Court declined to review the ruling in Nguyen,
leaving the decision intact; and
WHEREAS, as a result of the Nguyen decision,
provisions of the Citys Municipal Code purport-
ing to regulate where a registered sex offender
may go are in violation of current law; and
WHEREAS, the remaining provisions of the
Citys Municipal Code relating to the residency
restrictions on registered sex offenders remain
unaffected by the Nguyen decision; and
WHEREAS, in order to bring the Citys Munic-
ipal Code into conformity with current law and
to reduce the risk of civil suit, the City now
wishes to repeal portions of Chapter 9.82.
NOW THEREFORE, THE CITY COUNCIL
OF THE CITY OF CLAREMONT DOES
ORDAIN AS FOLLOWS:
Section 1. Subsection C of Section 9.82.010 of
Chapter 9.82 of Title 9 of the Claremont Munic-
ipal Code is hereby amended to read as follows:
9.82.010 Definitions.

C. Reserved.
Section 2. Section 9.82.020 of Chapter 9.82 of
Title 9 of the Claremont Municipal Code is
hereby amended to read as follows:
9.82.020 Reserved.
Section 3. Subsections D, E, F, and G of Sec-
tion 9.82.060 of Chapter 9.82 of Title 9 of the
Claremont Municipal Code are hereby repealed
in their entirety.
Section 4. The Mayor shall sign this Ordinance
and the City Clerk shall attest and certify to the
passage and adoption of it, and within fifteen (15)
days, publish a summary of the Ordinance in the
Claremont Courier, a semi-weekly newspaper of
general circulation, printed, published, and circu-
lated in the City of Claremont and thirty (30) days
thereafter it shall take effect and be in force.
PASSED, APPROVED, AND ADOPTED10th
day of June, 2014.
STATE OF CALIFORNIA )
COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES )ss.
CITY OF CLAREMONT )
I, Shelley Desautels, City Clerk of the City of
Claremont, County of Los Angeles, State of Cal-
ifornia, hereby certify that the foregoing Ordi-
nance No. 2014-03 was introduced at a regular
meeting of said council held on the 27th day of
May, 2014, that it was regularly passed and
adopted by said City Council, signed by the
Mayor and attested by the City Clerk of said City,
all at a regular meeting of said council held on the
10th day of June, 2014, and that the same was
passed and adopted by the following vote:
AYES: COUNCILMEMBERS: CALAYCAY,
LYONS, NASIALI, PEDROZA, SCHROEDER
NOES: COUNCILMEMBERS: NONE
ABSTENSIONS: COUNCILMEMBERS:NONE
ABSENT: COUNCILMEMBERS: NONE
Publish: June 13, 2014
NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER
ESTATE OF ARNO R. HOHN,
AKA ARNO HOHN
CASE NO. BP152742
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent
creditors, and persons who may otherwise be
interested in the will or estate, or both, of
ARNO R. HOHN, AKA ARNO HOHN:
A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed
by ARNO R. HOHN, JR. in the Superior Court
of California, County of Los Angeles.
THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests
that ARNO R. HOHN, JR. be appointed as
personal representative to administer the es-
tate of the decedent.
THE PETITION requests the decedents will
and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The
will and any codicils are available for exami-
nation in the file kept by the court.
The PETITION requests authority to administer
the estate under the Independent Administration
of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the
personal representative to take many actions
without obtaining court approval. Before tak-
ing certain very important actions, however, the
personal representative will be required to give
notice to interested persons unless they have
waived notice or consented to the proposed ac-
tion.) The independent administration authority
will be granted unless an interested person files
an objection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the au-
thority.
A HEARING ON THE PETITION WILL BE
HELD IN THIS COURT AS FOLLOWS:
Date: July 8, 2014 Time: 8:30 A.M. in Dept. 11
located at:
Superior Court Of California,
County Of Los Angeles,
111 North Hill Street
Los Angeles, CA 90012
Central District
IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the peti-
tion, you should appear at the hearing and state
your objections or file written objections with
the court before the hearing. Your appearance
may be in person or by your attorney.
IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a CONTIN-
GENT CREDITOR OF THE DECEDENT, you
must file your claim with the court and mail a
copy to the personal representative appointed
by the court within the later of either (1) four
months from the date of first issuance of letters
to a general personal representative, as defined
in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code,
or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or per-
sonal delivery to you of a notice under section
9052 of the California Probate Code.
Other California statutes and legal author-
ity may affect your rights as a creditor. You
may want to consult with an attorney knowl-
edgeable in California law.
YOU MAY EXAMINE THE FILE KEPT BY
THE COURT. If you are a person interested in
the estate, you may file with the court a Request
for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing
of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or
of any petition or account as provided in Pro-
bate Code section 1250. A Request for Special
Notice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for petitioner, Arno R. Hohn, Jr.:
Charles S. Althouse SBN#29104
Law Offices Of Charles S. Althouse
188 N. Euclid Ave., P.O. Box 698
Upland, CA 91785
909-985-9828
Publish: June 13, 20 and 27, 2014
legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
LEGAL TENDER
Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, June 13, 2014 25
ORDINANCE AMENDING TITLE 16,
TITLE 17 AND TITLE 18 OF THE CLARE-
MONT MUNICIPALCODE
SUMMARY OF ORDINANCE NO. 2014-04
INTRODUCED AT THE REGULAR CITY
COUNCILMEETING OF MAY 27, 2014
AND ADOPTED AT REGULAR CITY
COUNCILMEETING OF JUNE 10, 2014
(Full text of this ordinance is on file in the of-
fice of the City Clerk)
SUMMARY OF THE ORDINANCE OF THE
CITY COUNCILOF THE CITY OF CLARE-
MONT AMENDING TITLE 16 (ZONING
ORDINANCE), TITLE 17(SUBDIVISION
ORDINANCE), AND TITLE 18 OF THE
CLAREMONT MUNICIPALCODE, REVIS-
ING AND UPDATING VARIOUS CHAP-
TERS AND SECTIONS
THE FOLLOWING IS A SUMMARY OF
THE ABOVE TITLED ORDINANCE:
The ordinance makes amendments to several
changes and sections of Title 16 (Zoning), Title 17
(Subdivision Ordinance), and Title 18 (Signs).
The amendments to Title 16 (Zoning) are as
follows:
1. Acode chapter pertaining to Residential Unit De-
velopments is deleted from the Citys code, as Res-
idential Use Developments are no longer used for
projects that vary from typical development stan-
dards. Specific Plans have now become the pre-
ferred planning tool, replacing Residential Unit
Developments for these types of projects.
2. Because the state dissolved all Redevelopment
Agencies, all references to the Redevelopment
Agency are removed from Title 16.
3. Some minor changes are made to the permitted
uses in Commercial and Industrial Districts (Table
16.051.A):
a. Some uses which currently re-
quire a Conditional Use Permit, are to be per-
mitted with a Special Use and Development
Permit, and as such, will be reviewed by staff
rather than the Planning Commission simplify-
ing the process for business applicants. These
uses include non-controversial uses such as
dance studios, tutoring classes, etc., which typ-
ically have little impact to surrounding devel-
opment and require minimal review.
b. Some non-sales tax producing uses,
such as insurance and administrative offices, which
are currently permitted with a Conditional Use Per-
mit in the Commercial Freeway District, will no
longer be permitted in the Commercial Freeway
District as these uses are not consistent with the
stated intent of the Commercial Freeway. The in-
tent of the Freeway Commercial District is for uses
oriented toward the regional market and benefiting
from high visibility, including automobile sales, su-
permarkets, hotels, large retailers, and restaurants.
c. Afew changes are made to the uses
permitted in the Business/Industrial Park District
based on the consistency of the uses with intent of
the district and the compatibility of uses with the
other permitted uses in the district. Banks are added
as a permitted use, as the nature of banks has
changed dramatically over the past several years
and are no incompatible with the other types of uses
in the Business/Industrial Park District.
d. For uses such as Educational/In-
struction/Day Care, Electronic Cigarettes, Hookah
Lounge/Smoking Rooms, Fortune Telling, Cash for
Gold and Diamond, and Photocopying and Photo
Developing, requirements are clarified and permit-
ted locations revised, based on the nature and com-
patibility of the uses with other permitted uses.
e. To comply with State law, massage
uses will be permitted in all districts where general
office and personal service uses are permitted.
4. For Master Plans, the code is revised to reflect
the Citys current policy of referring applications to
the Architectural Commission prior to Planning
Commission review, rather that when the applica-
tions are deemed complete, in order to allow staff
time to adequately prepare for the Architectural
Commissions review.
5. The Citys regulations for antennas and wireless
telecommunication facilities are updated to keep
the regulations in compliance with State and fed-
eral law, and to provide greater flexibility for the
City in enforcing the regulations.
6. Changes are made to the requirements for flags
in order to correct inconsistencies in the code
identified by the City Attorney, and to simplify re-
quirements.
7. Related to the requirements for new develop-
ments, a provision is added to clarify that bus stop
facilities (bus turnouts, benches, shelters, etc.) are
off-site improvements that the City may require
of development projects that are adjacent to exist-
ing transit routes, in order to encourage alterna-
tive forms of transportation and reduce the
dependency on private automobiles.
8. For architectural review of projects, the review
criteria is revised to make the criteria more easily
understood by the both the commission and appli-
cants.
9. Needed revisions, as identified by the City At-
torney, are made to terms in the Glossary of Title
16. Terms not used elsewhere in Title 16 are
deleted, terms that require clarification to be con-
sistent with State law are revised, and new terms
that are included elsewhere in the proposed changes
are added to the Glossary (e.g. Antenna Array, Sup-
port Structure.) Adefinition for Director of Com-
munity Development is added at the direction of
the Planning Commission to clarify who is author-
ized to perform the duties of the Director.
The amendments to Title 17 (Subdivision Ordi-
nance) are as follows:
1. Bus stop facilities are added to the list of off-site
improvements that the City may require of new de-
velopment.
2. Requirements for the voluntary merger of con-
tiguous parcels are revised to simplify and make the
process more efficient.
The amendments to Title 18 (Signs) are as follows:
1. Clarifications are made regarding the time limit
for reviewing sign applications, the authority of
staff and the Architectural Commission to approve
signs; and the substitution of non-commercial mes-
sages for permitted signs in compliance with First
Amendment case law.
2. Acorrection is made to the definition of aban-
doned signs and the language for periodic invento-
ries and abatement of such signs is updated.
3. The language for non-commercial flags is revised
to provide necessary flexibility for permitting flag-
poles in setbacks.
4. References to commercial freeway-oriented
signs are simplified.
5. Authorization is given to the Director of Com-
munity Development to approve non-substantial
changes to approved sign programs.
STATE OF CALIFORNIA )
COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES ) ss.
CITY OF CLAREMONT )
I, Shelley Desautels, City Clerk of the City of
Claremont, County of Los Angeles, State of Cali-
fornia, hereby certify that the foregoing Ordinance
No. 2014-04 was introduced at a regular meeting
of said council held on the 27th day of May, 2014,
that it was regularly passed and adopted by said city
council, signed by the mayor, and attested by the
city clerk of said city, all at a regular meeting of said
council held on the 10th day of June, 2014, and that
the same was passed and adopted by the following
vote:
AYES: Councilmembers: Calaycay, Nasiali, Pe-
droza, Lyons, Schroeder
NOES: Councilmembers: None
ABSENT: Councilmembers: None
ABSTAINED: Councilmembers: None
Publish: June 13, 2014
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014150416
The following person(s) is (are) doing business as
LC VOCATIONAL TRAINING CENTER,
1420 Claremont Blvd., Suite 205C, Los Angeles,
CA 91711. Registrant(s): LIFETIME COMMU-
NITY CARE INC, 1420 Claremont Blvd., Suite
205C, Los Angeles, CA91711.
This business is conducted by a Corporation.
Registrant has not yet commenced to transact busi-
ness under the fictitious business name or names
listed herein.
I declare that all information in this statement is true
and correct.
/s/ Theresa Ann-Jones Zarour Title: CEO
This statement was filed with the Registrar-
Recorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on
06/03/14.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of
section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement gener-
ally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date
on which it was filed in the office of the County
Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of sec-
tion 17920, where it expires 40 days after any
change in the facts set forth in the statement pur-
suant to section 17913 other than a change in the
residence address of a registered owner. Anew Fic-
titious Business Name Statement must be filed be-
fore the expiration. Effective January 1, 2014, the
Fictitious Business Name Statement must be ac-
companied by the Affidavit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself au-
thorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business
Name in violation of the rights of another under
federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et
seq., Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: June 13, 20, 27 and July 4, 2014
NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER
ESTATE OF MARTIN F. STONER
CASE NO. BP151865
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent
creditors, and persons who may otherwise be in-
terested in the will or estate, or both, of MARTIN
F. STONER:
A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by
RENE ABRAHAM in the Superior Court of Cal-
ifornia, County of Los Angeles.
THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that
RENE ABRAHAM be appointed as personal rep-
resentative to administer the estate of the dece-
dent.
THE PETITION requests the decedents will and
codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will
and any codicils are available for examination in
the file kept by the court.
The PETITION requests authority to administer
the estate under the Independent Administration
of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the per-
sonal representative to take many actions with-
out obtaining court approval. Before taking
certain very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to give no-
tice to interested persons unless they have waived
notice or consented to the proposed action.) The
independent administration authority will be
granted unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good cause why
the court should not grant the authority.
A HEARING ON THE PETITION WILL BE
HELD IN THIS COURT AS FOLLOWS:
Date: July 3, 2014 Time: 8:30 A.M. in Dept. 9 lo-
cated at:
Superior Court Of California,
County Of Los Angeles,
111 North Hill Street
Los Angeles, CA 90012
Central District
IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition,
you should appear at the hearing and state your
objections or file written objections with the court
before the hearing. Your appearance may be in
person or by your attorney.
IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a CONTIN-
GENT CREDITOR OF THE DECEDENT, you
must file your claim with the court and mail a
copy to the personal representative appointed by
the court within the later of either (1) four
months from the date of first issuance of letters to
a general personal representative, as defined in
section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or
(2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal
delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of
the California Probate Code.
Other California statutes and legal authority
may affect your rights as a creditor. You may
want to consult with an attorney knowledge-
able in California law.
YOU MAY EXAMINE THE FILE KEPT BY
THE COURT. If you are a person interested in
the estate, you may file with the court a Request
for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of
an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of
any petition or account as provided in Probate
Code section 1250. ARequest for Special Notice
form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for petitioner Rene Abraham:
Charles S. Althouse SBN#29104
Law Office Of Charles S. Althouse
188 N. Euclid Ave., P.O. Box 698
Upland, CA 91785
909-985-9828
Publish: May 30, June 6 and 13, 2014
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014142914
The following person(s) is (are) doing business as
COX AND PATEL DDS, 2K CLAREMONT
DENTAL, 326 North Indian Hill Blvd., Clare-
mont, CA 91711. Registrant(s): Krutav H. Patel,
2879 Water Course Drive, Diamond Bar, CA
91765. Kush Patel, 2879 Water Course Drive, Di-
amond Bar, CA91765.
This business is conducted by a General Partnership.
Registrant commenced to transact business under
the fictitious name or names listed above on
05/01/2014.
I declare that all information in this statement is true
and correct.
/s/ Krutav H. Patel Title: Co-Owner
This statement was filed with the Registrar-
Recorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on
05/29/14.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of
section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement gener-
ally expires at the end of five (5) years from the
date on which it was filed in the office of the
County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision
(b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after
any change in the facts set forth in the statement
pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in
the residence address of a registered owner. Anew
Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed
before the expiration. Effective January 1, 2014, the
Fictitious Business Name Statement must be ac-
companied by the Affidavit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself au-
thorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business
Name in violation of the rights of another under
federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et
seq., Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: June 6, 13, 20 and 27, 2014
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014133048
The following person(s) is (are) doing business
as ANEE E. TEES, MOTHER WITT, 576 N.
Diamond Bar Blvd., Diamond Bar, CA 91765.
Registrant(s): Annie Toliver, 576 N. Diamond
Bar Blvd., Diamond Bar, CA 91765.
This business is conducted by an Individual.
Registrant has not yet commenced to transact
business under the fictitious business name or
names listed herein.
I declare that all information in this statement is
true and correct.
/s/ Annie Toliver Title: Owner
This statement was filed with the Registrar-
Recorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County
on 05/15/14.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of
section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement gen-
erally expires at the end of five (5) years from the
date on which it was filed in the office of the
County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision
(b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days
after any change in the facts set forth in the state-
ment pursuant to section 17913 other than a
change in the residence address of a registered
owner. A new Fictitious Business Name State-
ment must be filed before the expiration. Effec-
tive January 1, 2014, the Fictitious Business
Name Statement must be accompanied by the Af-
fidavit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself au-
thorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Busi-
ness Name in violation of the rights of another
under federal, state, or common law (see Section
14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: June 6, 13, 20 and 27, 2014
legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
LEGAL TENDER
NOTICE OF SPECIAL EVENT PERMIT
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to the Municipal Code of the City of
Claremont, that the Human Services Department of the City of Claremont has
petitioned for the approval of the annual 4th of July events (File #14-SEP03)
to be held on Friday, July 4, 2014. The details are as follows:
4th of July Parade: The parade will start at 4:00 p.m. and end at 5:30 p.m. The
proposed route is generally described as starting at Memorial Park, moving
south along Indian Hill Boulevard to Harrison Avenue and then proceeding
west to conclude at Larkin Park. The route is indicated on the associated map.
1K/5K Run: The 1K run will be held between 7:30 a.m. and 8:00 a.m., and
the 5K run will be held between 8:00 a.m. and 10:00 a.m. Both runs will begin
and end at Memorial Park. The route is indicated on the associated map.
The entire public right-of-way along the routes will be temporarily closed to
accommodate the events. In addition, the annual fireworks will take place at
the Pomona College Campus (Strehle Track), in which portions of First Street,
Sixth Street, and Mills Avenue around the site will also be temporarily closed.
The Director of Community Development has determined that this proposal is
exempt subject to California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) Section
15061(b)(3) and through Chapter 3 of the City of Claremonts Local Guide-
lines for Implementing the California Environmental Quality Act (2012), be-
cause it can be seen with certainty that there is no possibility that the Annual
4th of July Celebration could have a significant effect on the environment.
Therefore, no further environmental review is necessary.
The public review period will commence on June 13, 2014, and will run
through June 23, 2014. Any interested person is directed to contact Associ-
ate Planner Joanne Hwang at the Community Development Department,
Planning Division, 207 Harvard Avenue, P. O. Box 880, Claremont, CA 91711,
or by calling (909) 399-5353, for further information.
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT
CITY OF CLAREMONT
Claremont COURIER Classifieds 26
SERVICES
Friday 06-13-14
CONTACT US
1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711
Ph: 909.621.4761 Fax: 909.621.4072
classified@claremont-courier.com
Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Acoustical
QUALITY Interiors. Acousti-
cal contractor, specializing in
acoustic removal, texture,
painting, acoustic re-spray
and drywall repairs.
Lic.602916. 909-624-8177.
AC/Heating
SAME DAY SERVICE
Free service call with repair.
Only $49.50 diagnostic
fee without repair.
All repairsAll brands
Edison and Gas
Company rebates.
Great prices.
Friendly service.
We're local.
909-398-1208
www.novellcustom.com
Lic.958830
STEVES HEATING
& Air Conditioning
Serving your area for over
25 years. Repairs all
makes/models. Free
service call with repair.
Free estimate on new units.
MC/Visa. 100 percent
financing. Senior discounts.
Lic.744873
909-985-5254
Bathroom Remodeling
A Bath-Brite
authorized dealer.
Bathtubs and sinks.
Showers, tile, countertops.
Refinish - Reglaze - Restore
Porcelain, ceramic,
fiberglass.
Quick and affordable.
Please call 909-945-7775.
www.bath-brite.com
DIAMOND TILE
Kitchens Showers Baths
Competitive rates
Free estimates
Lic.588500
909-346-3707
Carpentry
SEMI-RETIRED rough to
finish remodeler. Kitchens,
porches, doors, decks, fences,
painting. Lots more! Paul,
909-919-3315.
Carpet Service
ED EY The Carpet Guy. Car-
pet repairs and re-stretching.
Claremont resident. Free es-
timates. 909-621-1867.
Carpet Service
ANDERSON Carpet Service.
Claremont resident serving
Claremont since 1985. Power-
ful truck mounted cleaning
units. Expert carpet repairs
and stretching. Senior dis-
counts. 24-hour emergency
water damage service. Please
call 909-621-1182.
Chimney Sweep
Gash Chimney Sweep
Dust free chimney
cleaning. Repairs, chimney
covers, spark arrestors,
masonry and dampers.
BBB. Please call
909-467-9212.
Quality Fireplace
& BBQ
Chimney sweeping.
Complete fireplace,
woodstove installation,
service and repair.
Spark arrestor supply
and installation.
Call 909-920-6600.
392 N. 2nd Ave., Upland.
Concrete
ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
Stamped, broom,
color finishes.
Slate, flagstone, planters,
walls and walkways.
Call 909-599-9530 now
Cell 626-428-1691
Claremont area
30 years!
Lic.323243
JDC CONCRETE
909-624-9000
Driveways/walkways, block
walls, pavers, bricks,
stone veneer,
concrete staining, drainage.
Lic.894245 C8, C29.
Contractor
PPS General Contractor.
Kitchen and bathroom remod-
eling. Flooring, windows, elec-
trical and plumbing. Serving
Claremont for 25 years.
Lic.846995. 951-237-1547.
WENGER Construction. 25
years experience. Cabinetry,
doors, electrical, drywall, crown
molding. Lic.707381. Compet-
itive pricing! 951-640-6616.
ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Veteran
New and repairs.
909-599-9530
Serving Claremont
for 30 years!
Lic.323243
Contractor
KOGEMAN
CONSTRUCTION
Room additions.
Kitchen/bath remodeling.
Custom cabinets.
Residential/commercial.
909-946-8664
Lic.B710309
Visit us on Facebook!
Cooking
Fresh Healthy Food
Personal Chef
Special Diets
Tasty Party Fare
Cooking Classes
Private Lessons
www.LotsaFlavor.com
Chef Linda Heilpern
909-625-9194
Drywall
THOR McAndrew Construc-
tion. Drywall repair and in-
stallation. Interior plaster re-
pair. Free estimates. CA
Lic.742776. Please call 909-
816-8467. ThorDrywall.com.
Electrician
CALL Lou. Flush lights, service
changes, repairs, service calls,
outdoor lighting and room addi-
tions. Lic.258436. Call 909-
241-7671, 909-949-8230.
SPARKS ELECTRIC
Local electrician for all your
electrician needs!
626-890-8887 or
909-251-2013. Lic.922000
MOR ELECTRIC &
HANDYMAN SERVICES
Free estimates
and senior discounts.
909-989-3454
Residential * Industrial *
Commercial. We do it all.
No job too big or small!
24/7 emergency services.
Reasonable and reliable.
Lic.400-990
30 years experience.
Haydens Services Inc.
Since 1978
Bonded * Insured
No job too big or small!
Old home rewiring specialist.
24-hour emergency service.
909-982-8910
* Senior Discount *
Lic.359145
Electrician
Serving Claremont
Since 1995. Residential,
Commercial.
Recessed lighting and
design, breaker replacement,
service panel upgrades,
ceiling fans, troubleshooting,
landscape lighting, rewires
and LED lighting. Free
estimates. 24-hours emer-
gency service. References.
909-900-8930
909-626-2242
Lic.806149
Fences & Gates
ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Veteran
New, repairs.
ONE CALL DOES IT ALL!
909-599-9530
Cell: 626-428-1691
Lic.323243
Fictitious Name
A FICTITIOUS Name State-
ment (D.B.A.) is required if
youre in business. You are re-
quired to file and publish a DBA
in the local newspaper. You
must renew every five (5)
years. You must republish if any
changes have been made to
your business. If your business
is in LA COUNTY, The Courier
will provide the legal form, file it
with the L.A. County Clerk, pub-
lish the Statement and provide
you with proof of publication.
Only $95.00 to publish plus a
$26 county fee. Claremont
Courier: 1420 N. Claremont
Blvd, Suite 205B Claremont.
Call Vickie, 909-621-4761.
Furniture Restoration
KEN'S Olden Oddities.com.
Taking the time to care for
Courier readers complete
restoration needs since 1965.
La Verne. Call 909-593-1846.
Garage Doors
SERVICE REPAIR INSTALL
Doors, Openers, Gates
Same Day
24/7 Emergency Service
909-596-3300
accessdoorsco.com
Gardening
EXPERIENCE our award
winning maintenance! We
create a customized main-
tenance program for your
property and lifestyle needs.
Sprinkler repairs and low
voltage lighting. Call Alan
Cantrall, 909-224-3327.
Lic.861685 and insured.
Eco-friendly landscaping.
We will get you a $3000
grant to remove your lawn!
Why mow when you can
grow? From the creators of
The Pomona College
Organic Farm.
Specializing in native
and edible landscapes.
909-398-1235
www.naturalearthla.com
Lic.919825
*$1.50 sq. ft. rebate*
MANUELS Garden Service.
General cleanup. Lawn main-
tenance, bush trimming,
general maintenance, tree
trimming and removal. Low
prices and free estimates.
Please call 909-391-3495 or
909-239-3979.
Garden Maintenance
Hand-pull weeding, mowing,
trimming, sprinkler work,
monthly service, cleanups
and junk removal.
Free estimates.
David, 909-374-1583
Girl Friday
I'M here to help! Housekeep-
ing, shopping, errands. Se-
nior, pet, house sitting.
Jenny Jones, 909-626-0027,
anytime!
DOT Will Do It! A full-service
errand business. Dorothy
"Dot" Sheehy. www.dotwill
doit.com. 909-621-9115 or
909-782-2885.
Handyman
SMALL repair jobs, fencing,
gates, brick block, concrete
cutting, breaking and repair.
25 years in Claremont. Paul,
909-753-5360.
Handyman
HOME Repair by Ken. Local
for 11 years. We can get it
done for you! 909-374-0373.
Claremont
Handyman Service
Carpentry, repairs,
gates, lighting,
small painting projects.
Odd jobs welcome!
Free consultations.
909-921-6334
ODD jobs, small repairs, low
prices. Jim, 951-264-2898.
A-HANDYMAN
New and Repairs
Inside, outside, small,
large, home, garage, yard,
ONE CALL DOES IT ALL!
909-599-9530
Cell: 626-428-1691
Lic.323243
30 years experience!
Claremont area.
Hauling
SAMEDAY-HAULAWAY
Free estimated.
Senior discount!
WE HAUL IT ALL CHARLIE!
909-382-1210
626-383-1442
sameday-haulaway.com
ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Same Day
One call does it all!
Garage, yard, home,
moving!
909-599-9530
Health Care
MALE ICU nurse available for
in-home position. Full nursing
care provided for patients of
all ages. 909-542-9690.
House Cleaning
20 YEARS experience. Free es-
timates. Excellent references.
Tailored to your individual
needs. Senior care, day or night.
Call Lupe, 909-452-1086.
Established, upbeat,
licensed house cleaning
service. Specializing in
larger homes. Organic
cleaning supplies used.
26 years of experience.
Jeanette 909-224-1180,
909-946-7475.
CAROUSEL Quality Cleaning.
Family owned for 25 years. Li-
censed. Bonded. Senior rates.
Trained professional services
including: baseboards, ovens,
windows. Hauling. Move in/out.
In home care. House/pet sit-
ting. 10 percent discount to
Claremont College faculty.
Robyn, 909-621-3929.
Shirley's Cleaning Service
28 years in business.
Office/residential
No job too small.
Free estimates.
We do spring cleaning!
909-730-8564
ROSIE'S Spic Span Cleaning
Service. Residential, commer-
cial, vacant homes, apart-
ments, offices. Free estimate.
Licensed. 909-986-8009.
Irrigation
SPRINKLER SYSTEMS
INSTALLATIONS
EXPERT REPAIRS
DRIP SYSTEM
SPECIALISTS
C.F.PRIVETT, LIC.557151
909-621-5388
ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
New, repairs. Professional.
All sprinkler repairs.
Call 909-599-9530 Now
Cell: 626-428-1691
Haydens Services Inc.
Since 1978
Bonded * Insured
No job too big or small!
24-hour emergency
service.
909-982-8910
* Senior discount *
Lic.359145
Landscape Lighting
ENJOY your yard after dark!
We offer expert design instal-
lation and repair of low volt-
age lighting. Alan Cantrall
Landscaping. 909-224-3327.
Contractor Lic.861685.
Landscaping
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
New, refurbish or repair.
Design, drainage, concrete,
slate, flagstone, lighting, irri-
gation, decomposed granite.
909-599-9530
Cell: 626-428-1691
Claremont area 30 years!
Lic.323243
DLS Landscaping and De-
sign. Claremont native spe-
cializing in drought tolerant
landscaping, drip systems
and lighting. Artistic solu-
tions for the future. Over 35
years experience. Call: 909-
225-8855, 909-982-5965.
Lic.585007.
GREENWOOD
LANDSCAPING CO.
Landscaping contractor for
complete landscaping,
irrigation, drainage,
designing and gardening.
Lic.520496
909-621-7770
Dale's Tree &
Landscape Services
Pruning, removal, planting,
irrigation and yard cleanup.
909-982-5794
Lic#753381
Landscaping
DANS GARDENING
SERVICE
Sprinklers installed, re-
paired. Clean-up, hauling.
Sod, seed, planting,
lighting, drainage.
Free written estimates.
Insured. References.
Since 1977. Lic.508671.
Please call 909-989-1515.
Eco-friendly landscaping.
We will get you a $3000
grant to remove your lawn!
Why mow when you can
grow? From the creators of
The Pomona College
Organic Farm.
Specializing in native
and edible landscapes.
909-398-1235
www.naturalearthla.com
Lic.919825
*$1.50 sq. ft. rebate*
Learn Chinese
Fun and Easy
All Levels
Small Groups
School age children
Afternoon and Summer
Classes
Claremont
909-254-7084
Learn Japanese
TAUGHT by Sumi Ohtani at
the Claremont Forum in the
Packing House. Monday,
Tuesday, Wednesday after-
noons/evenings. All levels
welcome. Excellent brain exer-
cise for seniors! 909-626-3066.
Painting
ACE SEVIER PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
BONDED and INSURED
Many references.
Claremont resident.
35 years experience.
Lic.315050
Please call: 909-624-5080,
909-596-4095.
D&D Custom Painting.
Bonded. Lic.423346. Resi-
dential, commercial. Interior
or exterior. Free estimates.
909-982-8024.
RESIDENTIAL/Commercial.
Quality work at reasonable
prices. Free estimates.
Lic.541469. 909-622-7994.
Painting
KPW PAINTING
Older couple painting,
40 years experience!
Competitive rates.
Small repairs.
No job too small.
References available.
We work our own jobs.
Carrie or Ron
909-615-4858
Lic.778506
COLLINS Painting & Con-
struction Company, LLC. In-
terior, exterior. Residential
and commercial. Contractors
Lic.384597. 909-985-8484.
STEVE LOPEZ
PAINTING
Extensive preparation.
Indoor, outdoor, cabinets.
Offering odorless green
solution. 33-year master.
Lic.542552
Please call
909-989-9786.
AFFORDABLE. Traditional or
green options. Custom work.
No job too big or too small. 20
years of Claremont resident
referrals. Free estimates.
Lic.721041. 909-228-4256.
www.vjpaint.com.
Patio & Decks
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
New, refurbish and repair.
Concrete, masonry, lighting,
planters and retaining walls.
909-599-9530
Cell: 626-428-1691
Claremont area 30 years!
Lic.323243
Pet Care
CANINE Wellness Therapeu-
tics. Therapeutic, immune-
enhancing canine massage.
Canine athletes, arthritic
seniors, postsurgical healing,
anxiety issues. Certified therapist.
massagefordogs@yahoo.com.
626-825-1662.
Plastering & Stucco
PLASTERING by Thomas.
Stucco and drywall repair
specialist. Licensed home
improvement. Contractor
Lic.614648. 909-984-6161.
www.wall-doctor.com.
PLASTER, stucco, drywall,
texture. Small job specialist.
909-629-7576. Unlicensed.
Local 30 years.
Pools
Carr Pools
Family owned/operated
Claremont natives
Over 10 years experience
Dependable Timely Efficient
Tablets/filter
cleans included
909-624-5648
Plumbing
EXCEL PLUMBING
Family owned and operated.
30 plus years experience.
Expert plumbing repairs and
drain cleaning. Water
heaters, faucets, sinks,
toilets, disposals,
under slab lead detection,
sewer video inspection.
Licensed, bonded and
insured. Lic.917874.
909-945-1995
STEVES PLUMBING
24-hour service* Low cost!
Free estimates.
All plumbing repairs.
Complete drain cleaning,
leak detection,
water heaters.
Your local plumber
for over 25 years.
Senior discounts.
Insured, Lic.744873.
* 909-985-5254 *
Haydens Services Inc.
Since 1978
Bonded * Insured
NO JOB TOO BIG
OR SMALL!
24-hour emergency service.
909-982-8910
* Senior discount *
Lic.359145
RENES Plumbing and AC. All
types residential repairs,
HVAC, new installation, re-
pairs. Prices to fit the working
familys budget. Lic.454443.
Insured professional service.
909-593-1175.
Roofing
GORDON Perry Roofing.
Reroofing, repairs of all types.
Free estimates. Quality work.
Lic.C39588976. 909-944-3884.
DOMINICS Roofing. Resi-
dential roofing and repairs.
Free estimates. Lic.732789.
Call Dominic, 951-212-9384.
Sprinklers & Repair
ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Veteran
Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
New, repairs. Professional.
All sprinkler repairs.
Call 909-599-9530 now
Cell: 626-428-1691
DURUSSEL Sprinklers. Install,
repair, automate. Since 1982.
Free estimates. Lic.540042.
Call 909-982-1604.
WASTING WATER?
Poor Coverage?
Sprinkler repair.
Installations
and modifications.
C.F. Privett
909-621-5388
Lic.557151
Tile
Regrout, clean, seal, color
grout. 909-880-9719, 1-888-
764-7688.
MASTER tile layer. Quick and
clean. Stone and granite work.
Residential, commercial.
Lic.830249. Ray, 909-731-3511.
DIAMOND TILE
20 years quality work.
Kitchens Showers Baths
Great prices Discounts
909-346-3707
Lic.588500
Tree Care
Dale's Tree Service
Certified arborist. Pruning
and removals. Landscaping,
corrective and restoration
trimming and yard clean up.
909-982-5794
Lic#753381
MGT Professional Tree Care.
Providing prompt, dependable
service for all your tree care
needs. Certified arborist.
Lic.#836027. Matt Gray-Trask.
Call 946-7444.
TOM Day Tree Service. Fine
pruning of all trees since
1974. Free estimate. 909-
629-6960.
Johnny's Tree Service
Tree trimming
and demolition.
Certified arborist.
Lic.270275, insured.
Please call:
909-946-1123
951-522-0992
BAUER TREE CARE
40 plus years
in Claremont.
Pruning of your small
and medium perennials.
909-624-8238
www.bauertreecare.com
Upholstery
PINK UPHOLSTERY
48 years of experience. Up to
30 percent discount on fabric.
Free pickup and delivery.
Please call 909-597-6613.
Weed Abatement
TIRED of dealing with weed
problems on your lot or field?
Help control the problem in
an environmentally safe
manner. To receive loads of
quality wood chips. Please
call 909-214-6773. Tom Day
Tree Service.
ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Veteran
Weed eating, mowing,
tractor fields,
manual slopes, hauling.
909-599-9530
Cell: 626-428-1691
JOHNNY'S Tree Service.
Weed abatement/land clear-
ing. Disking and mowing.
Please call 909-946-1123,
951-522-0992. Lic.270275.
Window Washing
NACHOS Window Cleaning.
For window washing, call Na-
cho, 909-816-2435. Free es-
timates, satisfaction guaran-
teed. Resident of Claremont.
27
Claremont COURIER Classifieds
SERVICES
Friday 06-13-14
tax help antiques house cleaning landscaping
pet care roofing elder care computer services
Although paid advertisements may appear in Claremont COURIER publications in print, online or in other electronic formats, the
Claremont COURIER does not endorse the advertised product, service, or company, nor any of the claims made by the advertisement.
Claremont COURIER Classifieds 28
909-621-5626
CONTACT US
1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711
Ph: 909.621.4761 Fax: 909.621.4072
classified@claremont-courier.com
Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
SERVICES
909.621.4761
Friday 06-13-14
HOME IMPROVEMENT HOME IMPROVEMENT HOME IMPROVEMENT
COMPUTERS
HOME IMPROVEMENT HEALTH&WELLNESS
Options In-Home Care is built on integrity and compassion. Our friend-
ly and professional staff provides affordable non-medical home care
service, tailored care for our elderly clients, including personal
hygiene, Alzheimer & dementia care, meal prep, bathing and light house
keeping. For your convenience our Operators and Case Managers are
available 24/7! Now offering VA benefit support assistance.
Office #: 909-621- CARE(2273) Fax #: 909-621-1114
Website: www.optionsinhomecare.com
SPECIALTY SERVICE SPECIALTY SERVICE HOME IMPROVEMENT
REAL ESTATE
AUTOMOTIVE AUTOMOTIVE
HOME IMPROVEMENT
Complete Flooring Custom Kitchens & Bathrooms
Showroom in Claremont next to Sprouts
(909) 981-0319
Come see our monthly specials!
Claremont COURIER Classifieds 29
REAL ESTATE
909.621.4761
Friday 06-13-14
REAL ESTATE
(909) 626-1261
www.curtisrealestate.com
Visit www.curtisrealestate.com for MLS, community info and more!
Carol Curtis, Broker
Sales Associates: Craig Beauvais, Maureen Mills,
Nancy & Bob Schreiber, Patricia Simmons, Corinna Soiles, Carol Wiese
Continuing the family tradition in the Claremont Village since 1947
107 N. Harvard, Claremont CA 91711
(909) 626-1261 www.curtisrealestate.com
VILLAGE WEST TOWNHOME
Charming tri-level in Claremont Vil-
lage Walk. 3 bedrooms and 2.5
bathrooms. Wood floors, master
bedroom opens to covered patio,
fireplace in living room. Community
pool, spa, BBQ and playground.
$510,000. (F757)
1221 HARVARD AVE., CLAREMONT
Rare, historic Village 2-on-a-lot! Main
house is a 1911, 2-story Craftsman with
4 bedrooms, 1.75 remodeled bath-
rooms in 2034 sq. ft. Covered front
porch, hardwood floors, beamed ceil-
ing, fireplace, built-ins, bay window plus
upgrades to plumbing and electric.
Back house, circa 1930, has separate
alley access, 3 bedrooms, 1.75 bath-
rooms, covered porch, fenced yard and
carport. $985,000. (H1221)
SOLD!
1728 UKIAH WAY, UPLAND
Listing Agent: Carol Wiese
2783 sq. ft., 4 bedroom, 2.5 bathroom
custom Nick Gula home. Remodeled and
professionally decorated in 2002. Formal
living and dining rooms plus breakfast
room. Spacious master suite, hardwood
floors, kitchen with pass-though granite
counters to patio. Resort-like yard on a
spacious 15,390 sq. ft. lot featuring large
pool, patio areas, fountain and stainless steel
BBQ. 3-car garage. $885,000. (U1728)
OPENHOUSESUN 1 - 4 PM
CLAREMONT three bedroom, two bathroom home featuring living
room with brick fireplace and formal dining room. Large landscaped
yard completely fenced. Seperate two-car garage with half bathroom
plus workshop. Five minute drive to Village, Colleges and Montclair
Plaza. Built in 1950 and owned by original owner. $510,000.
HILDA PATINO
888-264-2121
Bre#01181910
MALKA RINDE
Broker - Owner
Celebrating Over 25 Years
Selling Real Estate in the Area
Bus: 909-625-2407 Fax: 909-621-2842
www.malkarinde.com
EXPERIENCE MATTERS...
M MALKA RINDE REAL ESTATE ALKA RINDE REAL ESTATE
1876 Morgan Avenue, Claremont CA 91711
BRE# 00545647
OPEN HOUSE DIRECTORY
SUNDAY, JUNE 15
1-4 p.m. 4220 Piedmont Mesa Rd., Claremont. Coldwell Banker Residential.
1-4 p.m. 1728 Ukiah Way, Upland. Curtis Real Estate.
BRE# 01326104 & 01733616
CARLOS, 909-964-7631
PAT, 909-214-1002
www.SamuelsonRealEstate.com
We represent buyers and sellers with expertise, profession-
alism, technology and personal service. Neighborhood
knowledge is a top factor for successful sales. We know
and serve Claremont and the Foothill Communities.
Residential Investment Historical Green Short Sales
Check out
our reviews!
2014 2013 Change From Previous Year
Number of Homes Sold
Number Sold > $750,000
Number Sold < $750,000
Highest Sale Price
Lowest Sale Price
Average List Price of Homes Sold
Average Sold Price
Average Days On Market
May
Claremont Real Estate Market Snapshot
May was another fast paced month for Claremont home sales. Home inventory is slowly starting to pick up,
and there were a very large number of homes sold this month compared to 2013. Current home inventory
is at 84, which is up 30 homes from the beginning of the year. The summer season is usually busier and car-
ries around 100 homes on any given month. While the snapshot numbers for May makes it appear home
prices are down, they are in fact considerably higher. The large number of high dollar sales last year skewed
the data to appear as if prices were higher this time last year. The statistic most noticeable for last month
was the average list price versus average sold price, since there was a less than one percent differential.
Information provided by Ryan Zimmerman, Wheeler Steffen Sotheby's International Realty.
Contact Ryan at ryan.zimmerman@sothebysrealty.com.
37
8
29
$1,588,000
$263,000
$651,603
$650,724
48
28
9
19
$2,116,000
$359,900
$754,961
$737,496
43
+32 percent
-11 percent
+53 percent
-25 percent
-27 percent
-14 percent
-12 percent
+12 percent
Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, June 13, 2014 30

Mason Prophet, Voted Top Local Realtor


in the COURIERs Best of the Best Contest
Broker Associate, CRS, GRI, ABR, e-PRO, SRES
909.447.7708 Mason@MasonProphet.com
www.MasonProphet.com DRE# 01714034
Read what my clients are saying. Visit www.MasonProphet.com
and click on "Testimonials," or find me on www.Yelp.com.
Mason is an excellent realtor. We commend him
for his diligence throughout the entire process of
selecting and purchasing our new property. We're
sure with his thoughtfulness and kindness he will
do very well in his chosen field of endeavor.
Garry & Dorothy L.
TIMELESS APPEAL A rarely available seven bedroom, six bathroom home in one of
Claremont's most desirable neighborhoods. This beautiful cul-de-sac home of approxi-
mately 4000 sq. ft. has timeless appeal. The backyard has a spacious patio with a gor-
geous pool and a breathtaking top of the world view. Offered at $995,000. (P4220)
gail.sparks@camoves.com
909-524-9252
BREs: 0096348 and 0100833
Gail Sparks
OPEN HOUSE Sunday 1-4 PM 4220 Piedmont Mesa Rd., Claremont
New Listing!
CLASSIC NORTH CLAREMONT LIVING
Beautiful four bedroom and two-and-a-half bathroom
home in North Claremont. Stroll to Higginbotham Park,
Thompson Creek Trail and La Puerta Sports Field.
Coming Soon: Custom Built Mid-Century Modern Single-Story North
Claremont Home.
On the Market: Single-Story North Upland Pool Home, Peppertree School Area.
Four Bedroom and Two-and-a-half Bathrooms, 2160 Sq. Ft. - $529,000.
909-964-7631 or 909-214-1002
www.SamuelsonRealEstate.com
BRE# 01326104 & 01733616
454 Mount Carmel Drive, Claremont - $649,500
SPACIOUS CLAREMONT HOME NEW LISTING - $475,000
Approximately 2000 sq. ft., four bedrooms with two bedrooms
upstairs and two bedrooms plus den downstairs. One-and-three-quarters
bathroom in main home plus three-quarters bathroom for pool area.
New paint, plumbing and pool. (D582)
Geoff Hamill
geoff@geoffhamill.com - 909.621.0500
NORTHEAST CLAREMONT VACANT ESTATE
HOME LOT NEW LISTING - $695,000
Nearly one rural acre approximately 150 ft. front by 236 ft. depth.
Provides plenty of room to build a large home, pool, spa, guest house,
multi-car garage, sports court, etc. Block walls are already in place.
Utilities are brought to the street. (P3808)
Geoff Hamill
geoff@geoffhamill.com - 909.621.0500
LUXURY PENTHOUSE MOUNTAIN VIEW
CONDO NEW LISTING - $250,000
This spacious two bedroom, two bathroom condo is located on
the top floor and has been thoroughly renovated.Wood laminate
floors, smooth ceilings, ceiling fans, granite counters and newer
custom cabinetry in kitchen and bathrooms, plus clean steel
kitchen appliances including refrigerator. (S3636)
Geoff Hamill
geoff@geoffhamill.com - 909.621.0500
TIMELESS APPEAL NORTHEAST
CLAREMONT GEM NEW LISTING
This light, bright and airy home is an entertainers delight. Lovely
home on a very peaceful large lot with many trees and plants.
Newer dual-pane windows, roof and flooring. To preview this
home, please call agent. (G2142)
Madhu Sengupta
madhups@aol.com 909.260.5560
GANESHA HILLS SECLUDED RETREAT - NEW LISTING
Circa 1965, contemporary design elements, terraced gardens, timeless
terrazzo tile, hardwood floors and two fireplaces. Floor to ceiling glass walls,
balcony and patios offer views from every direction. Open floor plan ideal
for entertaining. 1.17 acres includes adjacent lot. Design your dream! (P990)
Bernadette Kendall
Bernadette.kendall@sothebysrealty.com 909.670.1717
PRICED TO SELL PRESTIGOUS PIEDMONT MESA
Light and bright 2678 sq. ft., single-story home. Refinished
hardwood floors and new carpeting, freshly painted interior,
three bedrooms, two-and-half bathrooms, office, den and dining
room, two fireplaces, pool and spa. (L4237)
Bernadette Kendall
Bernadette.kendall@sothebysrealty.com 909.670.1717
Susan Emerson
909.447.7710
Jeannette Ewing
909.670.0322
Diane Fox
909.447.7709
Geoff Hamill
909.621.0500
Rose Ishman
909.624.1617
Bernadette Kendall
909.670.1717
Cheryl Knight
909.447.7715
Rob & Amy Titus
909.450.7415
Maria Silva
909.624.1617
Madhu Sengupta
909.260.5560
Mason Prophet
909.447.7708
Heather Petty
909.447.7716
B.J. Nichka
909.625.6754
Coleen Smouse
909.539.7512
Betty Leier
909.262.8630
Sally Tornero
909.447.7718
Eurydice Turk
909.447.8258
Ryan Zimmerman
909.447.7707
Sue Gold
909.447.7714
Gloria Alvarez
909.670.0322
Paul Steffen
Broker/Owner
Chris Macaulay
909.227.0162