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THE UNIVERSITY DAILY
KANSAN
Volume 127 Issue 124 Monday, June 16, 2014
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Today’s
Weather
HI: 92
LO: 74
Partly cloudy skies with gusty winds.
Hot. Winds S at 20 to 30 mph.
JAYHAWKS AT THE WORLD CUP
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Looking for leases
Stouffer Place Apartments closing in 2015
mean more than 200 non-traditional and
graduate students will have to find other
arrangements in Lawrence next year. Read
more on PAGE 2.
Staying afloat
The high rate of turnover for Lawrence
restaurants mean managers have to get cre-
ative marketing their establishments. Read
more on PAGE 5.
Kickin’ it in France
Freshman defender Aurélie Gagnet is working
toward a spot on the French national team
to play in the U20 Women’s World Cup in
August. Read more on PAGE 13.
Hoops to help
Former University athletes, including Ben
McLemore and Todd Reesing, helped raise
about $30,000 to benefit families with
children diagnosed with cancer by playing
in a charity basketball game. Read more on
PAGE 14.
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THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2014 PAGE 2
N
news
STAFF
Editor-in-chief
Emma LeGault
Managing editor
Tom DeHart
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Sales & Marketing
Adviser
Jon Schlitt
Content Director
Brett Akagi
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Stoufer Place Apartments will be-
come a new construction zone in fall
2015, leaving non-traditional and
graduate students without a favorable
on-campus housing option.
Te data behind the 2014-2024
Campus Master Plan determined the
apartments cannot be ofered at the
current afordable rates if the Uni-
versity were to maintain, improve or
entirely replace the units. It’s consid-
ered a “deferred maintenance” area in
need of between $10 to 20 million in
renovations.
Without the low rent rates that
attract non-traditional students,
Stoufer Place would become less de-
sirable.
“We learned that for the majority of
students with families, their reason
for being in Stoufer Place was the
low rent rates,” said Diana Robertson,
director of Student Housing. “Tey
were pretty clear with me in saying
that if the rates were to go up they
wouldn’t continue living there.”
Seyool Oh, a resident for eight years
originally from South Korea, was one
of those voices who did not want to
see rental rates increase.
Now that Stoufer Place is set to
close in June 2015, he is unsure about
where he will move with his family.
“It will directly afect non-tradition-
al students, international students
and diversity, which KU highly has
been emphasizing,” Oh said. “I am es-
pecially concerned that they are not
going to rebuild family housing.”
To replace Stoufer Place, the Master
Plan includes a new apartment com-
plex at 19th and Iowa Streets set for
completion in the late spring of 2017.
Robertson said the development will
be targeted at single upper-classmen
and graduate students.
Te University will lack housing
specifcally for graduates and non-
traditional students between 2015
and 2017, and doesn’t currently have
a plan for replacing family housing.
Currently, 55 percent of residents are
families.
Robertson said housing has directed
Stoufer Place residents with ques-
tions about moving out to websites
like Apartments.com for alternative
options.
Family housing is an amenity at
most Big 12 schools—only Texas
Tech University and Texas Christian
University do not ofer family hous-
ing.
Gavin Young, assistant director of
strategic communications, said the
decision to remove Stoufer Place was
made afer the University considered
the long-term use of the land.
Te Master Plan indicates that
Stoufer Place has underused impor-
tant real estate and, therefore, the re-
maining area between 19th Street and
Irving Hill Road will be used for new
integrated science buildings.
“I think the housing alternatives
that KU will provide in the long-term
will be a better alternative overall for
both the University and for the stu-
dents,” Young said.
Student Housing is still accept-
ing applications for the 2014-2015
school year, and Robertson said she
has received 224 contracts for the 283
apartments available.
Young said the University will dis-
cuss plans for the new housing fa-
cilities during the summer and fall
semesters.
Current resident assistants declined
to comment.
— Edited by Kaitlyn Klein
Stouffer Place closing limits options
STUDENT HOUSING
AMELIA ARVESEN
news@kansan.com
Stouffer Place Apartments
Rates beginning July 1, 2014
One-bedroom: $491
Two-bedroom (walk-through): $521
Two-bedroom: $550
Two-bedroom (renovated): $721
Three-bedroom (renovated): $913
MONTHLY RATE COMPARISON
housing.ku.edu/rates, housing.k-state.edu
The
Weekly
Weather
Forecast
TUESDAY
HI: 93
LO: 74
Windy with a few clouds from time to
time. Hot and humid.
Jardine Apartments (K-State)
2013-14 rates
One-bedroom: $420 (single), $485
(renovated)
Two-bedroom: $495 (single), $555
(renovated), $625 (family)
Three-bedroom (renovated): $725
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2014 PAGE 3
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Te Student Senate Safety Advisory
Board met with members of Universi-
ty administration and the Public Safe-
ty Ofce Tursday to discuss on- and
of-campus safety projects and priori-
ties for the 2014-2015 academic year.
Te main concerns brought up
included the state of campus and
of-campus lighting and the need to
spread the word about SafeRide and
SafeBus to students who need rides
home.
Te Board has an approximately
$100,000 surplus to spend on proj-
ects, which has built up from years
when the Board did not meet fre-
quently. Because of this surplus, there
is no student safety fee allocated in
the current semesterly student fees.
Garrett Farlow, a junior from Tope-
ka and chair of the Board, said there
was a 50 percent decline in SafeBus
and SafeRide users in the last two
years.
Te Board plans to display SafeBus
routes in popular bars near campus so
students can easily fgure out which
route to use to get home. SafeRide’s
marketing campaign will also include
providing keychains on all residence
halls’ room keys.
Student Senate Chief of Staf Mitch-
ell Cota said his main goal is working
to prevent sexual assault in Lawrence
bars. He said that since the bars are
of-campus, they would have to work
through partnerships with the busi-
nesses.
“Something that I’m really con-
cerned with are safe bars and how the
sexual assault culture can be bettered
within the main three bars near cam-
pus, like the Hawk, the Bull and the
Wheel, and just what we can do about
that,” Cota said.
Public Safety Captain James An-
guiano acknowledged the safety con-
cerns at the bars.
“We had a sexual battery toward the
end of the [spring semester] because
people were just getting into cars,"
Anguiano said. "Tat was something
we learned in the investigation—
there were more people doing that,
who weren't harmed, but were getting
into cars because that person ofered
them a ride."
Te concerns aren't limited to of-
campus sites. In 2013, there were 33
assault cases reported to the Public
Safety Ofce, up from 24 in 2012. Six
sex ofenses and three rape cases—the
most since 2009—were also reported.
Student Body Vice President Mi-
randa Wagner said she wanted the
marketing campaign to make it clear
to students that SafeBus isn’t just for
students who are going out or drink-
ing.
“If you’re staying in the library until
1 a.m. and you don’t feel safe walking
back to the dorms then you can call,”
Wagner said.
Donna Hultine, director of Park-
ing and Transit, also said that due to
the campus construction on Daisy
Hill, many residents may end up with
yellow lot or Park and Ride passes,
which are farther away, and that mar-
keting Safe Bus and Safe Ride to those
students should be a priority.
Hultine also said a real-time app
should be available in the fall semes-
ter that will allow students to track
the routes from their phones.
Wagner brought up lighting con-
cerns she had discussed with Student
Body President Morgan Said in park-
ing lots near Louisiana Street.
“In our conversations with a lot of
the sororities and female scholarship
halls, [there] is kind of, down Louisi-
ana Street, this very poorly lit parking
lot a couple of blocks down from the
scholarship halls where none of the
girls like to park,” Wagner said.
Te Board wants to work with the
city to provide lighting in student-
dense neighborhoods of-campus,
such as the Oread neighborhood and
Emery Road.
Te Board also plans to look into
the success of the emergency poles on
campus. Another proposed idea in-
cluded creating a campus safety week
and ofering self-defense classes for
students.
Farlow plans to set-up an open fo-
rum within the frst couple weeks of
the fall semester for students to con-
tribute to the conversation.
— Edited by Emma LeGault
STUDENT SENATE
Advisory board meets to discuss safety projects
MIRANDA DAVIS
news@kansan.com
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2014 PAGE 4
O
opinion
What are your
predictions for this
year’s World Cup?
Follow us on Twitter @KansanOpinion.
Tweet us your opinions, and we just might
publish them.
HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER TO THE EDITOR CONTACT US
LETTER GUIDELINES
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LETTER TO THE EDITOR in the email subject
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Length: 300 words
The submission should include the author’s
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letter to the editor policy online at kansan.
com/letters.
Emma LeGault, editor-in-chief
elegault@kansan.com
Tom DeHart, managing editor
tdehart@kansan.com
Scott Weidner, business manager
sweidener@kansan.com
Alek Joyce, sales manager
ajoyce@kansan.com
Brett Akagi, media director and content
strategist
bakagi@kansan.com
Jon Schlitt, sales and marketing adviser
jschlitt@kansan.com
THE EDITORIAL BOARD
Members of the Kansan Editorial
Board are Emma LeGault, Tom De-
Hart, Scott Weidner and Alek Joyce
Effects of past conflicts too easily forgotten
INTERNATIONAL
I
heard on the radio about the ISIS
forces inhabiting Iraq, shoot-
ing civilians lef and right and
preparing for a totalitarian move to
Sharia law. And then a commenta-
tor suggested America get involved
and “stop those criminals.” I nearly
crashed my car.
Te problem really comes down to
the frst joke at everyone’s lips when
the ISIS issue gets brought up. “Hey,
is Archer out there?” they say with
a wink. Drop the light-heartedness:
this is a serious matter that afects
every American.
Te strangest part of this whole
situation has to be the collective am-
nesia that seems to have struck most
of our politicians and news commen-
tators. It boggles my mind that there’s
even discussion of sending troops
back to Iraq. I fnd it incredibly trou-
bling that even though both tours—
Iraq and Afghanistan alike—ended
up as failures, America apparently
hasn’t learned a thing.
We moved to action too hastily
during the Bush administration. We
stayed far too long so the Obama
administration could safely survive
to a second term. We watched as
the Iraqi government turned from
corrupt to incompetent and back
again as American troops and Iraqi
civilians died.
Te general safety of American so-
ciety is a blessing and a curse. We’re
disconnected from the systemic
violence that dominates the Middle
Eastern landscape. Te closest most
of us will come to it is a feld report
on the news or Call of Duty. Atroci-
ties get reported to us in body counts
and dollar amounts—not in real,
tangible violence.
But all of this sudden forgetfulness
isn’t even the biggest problem.
As fun as it is to make fun of
America for pretending to be “the
world police,” a few neoliberals are
already advocating for a return to
Iraq. With the past decade of failure
and waste fresh in our minds, we
need to resolve not to cave into that
guilt. Te money isn’t there and the
lives aren’t worth it.
Te favored refrain for the liberal
camp during the Bush administra-
tion was “oil, oil, oil.” It’s no longer a
suspicion that these conficts in the
region were motivated by a desire to
secure and stabilize fossil fuels.
Te oil companies don’t care about
borders or creeds or moral obliga-
tions. Tey care about proft margins.
We need to recognize that, be open
about that recognition and challenge
that motivation when we discuss
these issues. Te politicians and the
lobbyists aren’t going to do it.
Te havoc that ISIS is causing in
Iraq right now is partly our own
fault. Te United States armed ISIS
and related groups when they battled
against the Syrian government just
next door. It’s the mirror of when
America armed the Taliban and then
condemned them a few years later.
Tat’s the biggest issue with these
regional conficts. Tere are no good
guys and bad guys. Tere are only
peoplewith guns and the civilians. As
much as we like to think otherwise,
America is no exception.
Te only positive net gain from this
entire fasco has been the lessons
learned and the mistakes corrected.
Let’s not sacrifce the only goal we
met.
Wil Kenney is a junior from Leawood
studying English. Find him on Twitter
@wilkenney.
By Wil Kenney
opinion@kansan.com
KANSAN COMICS
INTERESTED IN
SUBMITTING
YOUR OWN
CARTOON?
EMAIL:
EDITOR@KANSAN.COM
“The Fate of Lawrence Restaurants”
by Jacob Hood
@anniebeth623
@KansanOpinion Spain all the
way! Their style of play is basi-
cally flawless and they are proven
champions. Viva Espana!
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2014 PAGE 5
S
ummer
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utoring
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vailable
See www.tutoring.ku.edu for more information
Tutoring Services
Academic Achievement and Access Center
4017 Wescoe Hall, (785) 864-7733
340 Fraser | 864-4121
COUNSELING SERVICES
FOR LAWRENCE & KU
Confidential
Students and
Non-Students
Welcome
In the past four years, 38 restaurants
have closed in Lawrence and 39 res-
taurants have opened, according to
the Kansas Department of Agricul-
ture Food Inspections.
Te restaurant business in Lawrence
is so volatile partly due to oversatu-
ration and a low average income in
the community—in 2012, the median
was $50,184, slightly lower than the
national average of $51,371.
According to Lawrence restaurant
owners, the high degree of turnover
can be both positive and negative.
“Anytime a restaurant
closes I would say that
is a negative because
people are losing their
jobs,” Tim Barnes,
manager of Jeferson’s,
located at 743 Mas-
sachusetts St., said.
“Whoever made that
investment and put
their money in to open
up that place, they
failed in that.”
He said there is a positive side to the
turnover as well.
“It is always nice to get a diferent
type of restaurant, some new favor-
ing around here,” Barnes said. “It also
shows people want [to] be a part of
the restaurant market in Lawrence.”
Some of the better-known restau-
rants to close in Lawrence during the
past four years include Tree Spoons
Frozen Yogurt, Freebirds World Bur-
rito, Spangles and Tapas Mexican
Restaurant. According to articles in
the Lawrence Journal-World, Tree
Spoons most likely lost business due
to the opening of TCBY right down
the street, Freebirds simply wasn’t
making enough money and Tapas
lost their lease afer being open only a
year. Te reason behind the closing of
Spangles is still a mystery, consider-
ing they were a thriving business for
more than seven years in Lawrence.
Bob Schumm, previous owner of
Bufalo Bob’s Smokehouse and city
commissioner, said the volatility
stems from a low adjusted gross in-
come (AGI) per capita.
His restaurant will be replaced by
another Biggs BBQ location in the
fall.
“We have about a $36,000 AGI in
Lawrence, where Manhattan is about
$10,000 higher,” Schumm said. “On
top of that our cost of living is much
higher. People only have so much
money to spend on food, so you have
to keep the price within the reach of
as many people as possible, and in
Lawrence that means a lot of college
students.”
Schumm and Barnes both stressed
how important college students are
to the success of a restaurant in Law-
rence.
“You need to al-
ways stay in tune
with what your
market wants,”
Schumm said.
“Te market is so
well-served that
special oferings
and promotions
are a constant ne-
cessity.”
Schumm also said the restaurants
that tend to stay in business have a
minimum price point and are able
to follow food trends—the recent
increase in the desire for healthy eat-
ing or locally grown food are two ex-
amples.
Barnes knows frst hand how hard
it is to have a successful restaurant in
Lawrence.
“Even Jeferson’s, which is pretty
much an institution as far as Law-
rence restaurants go, has closed and
reopened within this four year time
frame,” Barnes said.
According to Barnes, Jeferson’s has
become very active on social media
to connect with the student body. In
May—their “Retweet for a chance to
win free wings for a year” contest re-
ceived more than 2,000 retweets and
almost 150 favorites.
“Social media is typically a younger
kids’ game,” Barnes said. “With the
majority of our sales coming from
college students we give out promo-
tions on Twitter such as free fried
pickles if you come in today or dis-
counted food during stop week.”
New restaurants that have opened
recently in Lawrence include Pueblo’s
Mexican Restaurant, Limestone Pizza
and Mass Street Sweet Shoppe.
Students have multiple new restau-
rants to look forward to in the fall of
2014. Te new restaurants include a
chain burger restaurant, BurgerFi, to
replace Chutney’s Indian Diner and
Ladybird Diner to replace the Dyna-
mite Saloon.
— Edited by Kaitlyn Klein
FOOD
Restaurants experience high rate of turnover
MEREDITH MITSCH
news@kansan.com

It is always nice to get a
different type of restaurant,
some new flavoring around
here.
TIM BARNES
Jefferson’s manager
JAMES HOYT/KANSAN
Pedestrians walk by the future site of BurgerFi in Lawrence. The burger chain is setting
up in the former site of Chutney’s Indian Diner on the 900 block of Massachusetts Street.
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN MONDAY, MONTH XX, 2014 PAGE XX
Take a picture with your
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THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2014 PAGE 7
While other 2014 graduates are pre-
paring to start their careers or flling
out job applications, Will Dale, a re-
cent University graduate from Topeka
holds a one-way ticket to O Barco de
Valdeorras, Spain, where he will teach
English in the country’s Auxiliares de
Conversación program.
For the frst time, Dale won’t be
spending the holidays with his family,
and he’s not alone. According to the
most recent estimate by the U.S. State
Department, approximately 6.8 mil-
lion Americans are now living over-
seas—more than ever before.
Wendy Shoemaker, senior associate
at the University Career Center, helps
prepare students for international ca-
reers and said that this trend is partly
explained by increasing globalization.
“We all live in a global economy,
we’re recipients of a global economy,
whatever that means….whether it
involves travel, work or volunteering,
or having international friends,” she
said.
According to the Open Doors Re-
port on International Educational
Exchange, more U.S. students are
studying abroad than before.
Dale’s own study abroad experience
in Costa Rica led him to seek out his
position in Spain.
Dale said his eight months abroad
led to diferent opportunities he
wasn’t aware of before—overseas jobs,
skills and knowing another language.
“You have to be that global citizen
that KU promotes to be competitive
and to really succeed wherever you
want to be,” Dale said. “Whether that’s
in my hometown in Topeka, Kansas,
or whether that's in Spain or Costa
Rica.”
Julie Hamel, assistant director at
the University Career Center, said
students must understand that many
of the jobs they’ll have will have an
international component — selling
products abroad, importing products,
expanding business into a new coun-
try or outsourcing parts of a business.
“It’s kind of an awareness thing,
that [globalization is] already here,”
Hamel said. “How can you, as a young
professional, become more aware and
knowledgeable?”
Both Shoemaker and Hamel teach
students to be more proactive global
participants and try to involve them
in a group of globally engaged people.
You don’t have to work abroad to
have an international career, Shoe-
maker said. Ofen U.S.-based workers
travel abroad or work with interna-
tional companies and representatives
on a regular basis.
Tese kind of jobs ofer internation-
al experience and require many of
the same skills necessary for a career
abroad. Hamel believes these skills
manifest in the qualities of openness
and adaptability—qualities that make
Students seek employment opportunites abroad
JOBS
KRISTA MONTGOMERY
news@kansan.com
an efective international worker.
Blane Harding, Ofce of Multicul-
tural Afairs director, said businesses
that bring together people with difer-
ent experiences, outlooks and world-
views are important to establish new
ideas and relate to diferent custom-
ers.
“If you can relate to others who are
diferent to yourself internally, then
you can relate to people who are dif-
ferent to yourself externally,” Harding
said. “It brings a lot.”
— Edited by Kaitlyn Klein

You have to be that global
citizen that KU promotes to
be competitive and to really
succeed wherever you want
to be.
WILL DALE
University graduate
INFOGR.AM BY KRISTA MONTGOMERY/KANSAN
Data from The Association of Americans Resident Overseas
An informatichart displaying the number of American residents living and working abroad in various
areas of the world. According to the U.S. State Department, approximately 6.8 million Americans are
now living overseas.
PAGE 8 MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
Natural History Museum bee
colony splits, moves
At around 9:30 a.m. on Wed., June 11,
about 15,000 bees swarmed around the
University’s Natural History Museum on
Jayhawk Boulevard.
The bees split from the museum’s obser-
vation hive, after reaching its maximum
capacity of 35,000 bees.
Greg Ornay, exhibit specialist at the
Natural History Museum, said the recent
rain has been so good for the bees that the
queen has been laying around 1,000 eggs
a day for about two months.
When the hive became too compact, the
queen bee produced a new queen egg.
“The old queen and half the hive will
split and go find a new home, and the new
queen will stay there,” Ornay said. “She’ll
go out and do a mate flight and then come
back and start the colony over.”
The bees found their new home this
morning: a pine tree branch right outside
the museum. Ornay then shook the hive
into a box, capturing the queen and worker
bees.
Even though thousands of bees sur-
rounded the area, passers-by had no rea-
son to be concerned, according to Ornay.
“I didn’t even put on gloves today,” Or-
nay said. “It’s not like you’re opening up a
working hive and actually disturbing them.
They’re already on one mission, and that is
to find a new hive and protect the queen
while they’re finding it.”
After gathering the bees, Ornay brought
them to a coworker’s farm, which already
has a bee colony. It will also be available
to the museum if the current hive ever col-
lapses.
— Allison Hammond
WILDLIFE
Alternative Breaks, a student-run
program that sends volunteers to sites
across the country, is like a road trip,
service opportunity, cultural experi-
ence and vacation all at once.
Tis summer, 63 students traveled to
nine sites in eight states. Te groups
drove from Lawrence to sites in In-
diana, Louisiana, Florida, New York,
Rhode Island, California, Washing-
ton D.C. and Texas.
Te students who took alternative
summer breaks had quite the jour-
ney—most of the destinations were
more than 10-hour drives. Students
felt like strangers to one another dur-
ing the frst hour in the car. By the
time they returned home, they had
become close friends.
“In the car, it’s honestly a really good
time to bond with the people in your
group because that’s the frst time you
spend an hour or more with them [in]
a week,” said Kristina Maude, a junior
from Clive, Iowa. “We got to know
each other really well during the car
ride.”
Maude traveled to Indianapolis in
May to serve at the Indiana Youth
Group, a safe and supportive center
for LGBTQ youth. Te drive was the
shortest out of the nine destinations
at only eight hours.
Bryce Volk, a senior from New-
ton, sat in a car for 16 hours to get
to Pensacola, Fla. to serve United
Cerebral Palsy for a week. His group
stopped halfway—in Memphis—and
journeyed down Beale Street, one of
America’s most iconic streets lined
with blues bands.
“It was a cultural experience too,
which was more than I paid for, so I
was happy,” Volk said.
Te trip cost summer participants
$325 and covered transportation,
housing and meals.
Afer the drive, Alternative Breaks
itineraries were planned so students
could experience their new sur-
roundings afer volunteering during
the day.
Maude said even though it was ex-
citing to travel to a new city, it was
the people who made the trip mem-
orable. She said one girl from the
youth group made a lasting impres-
sion when she performed slam poetry
about how body image doesn’t defne
her.
“I think Alt Breaks is a really good
Breaks merge vacation, service
TRAVEL
mixture of doing social justice, doing
good and impacting a group of peo-
ple,” Maude said. “At the same time,
we had plenty of time to explore the
city like you would on a typical road
trip.”
Te deadline for the fall break appli-
cation is Sept. 26.
— Edited by Emma LeGault
AMELIA ARVESEN
news@kansan.com
Indiana Youth Group—Indianapolis: 8 hours
Austin Zoo & Animal Sanctuary—Austin, Texas: 10 hours
The Nature Conservancy —Grand Isle, La.: 15 hours
United Cerebral Palsy—Pensacola, Fla.: 16 hours
A Wider Circle—Washington, D.C.: 17 hours
Kenilworth Park & Aquatic Gardens—Washington, D.C.: 17 hours
All Hands Volunteers—Staten Island, N.Y.: 19 hours
The Steel Yard—Providence, R.I.: 22 hours
Homeboy Industries—Los Angeles: 23 hours
ALTERNATIVE BREAK DESTINATIONS AND TRAVEL TIMES
LOCAL NUMBER: 785-841-2345
NATIONAL SUICIDE PREVENTION
LIFELINE: 800-273-8255
- Free, confidential, 24/7 Crisis Counseling
- Great Volunteer Opportunities
WE’RE HERE TO LISTEN
“CARING SUPPORT NOW. WE KNOW HOW TO HELP.”
LOCAL NUMBER: 785-841-2345
NATIONAL SUICIDE PREVENTION AA
LIFELINE: 800-273-8255
- Free, confidential, 24/7 Crisis Counseling
- Great Volunteer Opportunities
“CARING SUPPORT NOW. WE KNOW HOW TO HELP.”
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2014 PAGE 9
A
arts & features
HOROSCOPES
PUZZLES
Aries (March 21-April 19)
Today is a 7
Intuition leads to amazing discoveries. Dis-
cover a structural problem, and use trusted
methods and experts to handle it.
Taurus (April 20-May 20)
Today is a 7
Brief your team on a brilliant idea, and lis-
ten to what they come up with. Don't make
assumptions. Stay patient with a resister.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)
Today is a 7
Allow someone an insider advantage or
backstage pass. Follow advice from an
experienced elder. Make a good impression
without spending a lot.
Cancer (June 21-July 22)
Today is a 7
Friends help you discover a pleasant
surprise. Don't over-extend... weigh the
pros and cons before paying. Measure well
before committing.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)
Today is a 7
Money seems unstable, but put a little
aside for something special anyway.
Financial organization benefits more than
brute labor.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Today is a 7
Listen to intuition and share the load. Send
someone ahead. Take things slow, and
clean up as you go. Explain your view to a
skeptic.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Today is a 7
You can make your promises and dead-
lines. Upgrade workplace technology if
needed. Support from your family helps.
Set realistic goals.
Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
Today is a 7
Keep your objective in mind as you
navigate surprises. Keep building a strong
foundation. Hide out, if necessary. Hold
yourself to high standards.
Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
Today is an 8
Use your intuition to discover a weakness.
Make repairs at home. Postpone a trip. Take
on a new responsibility. Teach by example.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Today is a 6
Make a date for something you don't get to
do often. Take it easy on yourself. Tempers
could get short. Don't make expensive
promises.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
Today is a 7
Redecorate without great expense. An
awkward misunderstanding about priorities
could carry a high price tag. Proceed with
caution and communication.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)
Today is a 7
Sate your curiosity by reading the back-
ground material. This provides insight for
an amazing discovery.
CHECK OUT
THE ANSWERS
http://bit.ly/1kDTmpX
PAGE 10 MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
Don’s Auto Center
Lawrence’s l ocal repai r shop | 11th & Haskel l | 841-4833
Stop by before l eavi ng for summer tri ps and
make sure your car i s ready for the road!
NO WORRI ES!
Don’ s i s here to
save the day!
HELPING KANSAS STUDENTS
SINCE 1974
MAKE IT THROUGH
I ’ m havi ng a mental
breakdown because
my car i s brokedown!
SUMMER
Lawrence doesn’t exactly scream
“World Cup hot spot,” but that
doesn’t mean the Jayhawk name isn’t
being dutifully represented in the
Cup’s host nation, Brazil.
In fact, quite a few current and for-
mer University of Kansas students are
soaking up the South American sun
(and rain) during the World Cup’s
month-long stay.
While soccer is not the most popu-
lar sport in the United States (that
honor goes to American football),
it’s the most popular sport in the
world, which makes the World Cup
quite the spectacle every four years.
Tis year is no diferent, but circum-
stances leading up to Brazil’s hosting
of this prestigious tournament were
all but smooth sailing.
Brad Brooks, the Associated Press
bureau chief and a 1997 University
graduate, has been working and liv-
ing in Brazil for the past fve years
and has seen frst-hand the efect,
responsibility and criticism that a
country endures when hosting an
enormous global event.
“Tere has been this undercurrent
of discontent among Brazilians,”
Brooks said. “Many believe that the
money that went into building sta-
diums and fnancing the World Cup
should have been used for improv-
ing more important resources, like
schools. Te buildup has created so-
cial unrest and upheaval.”
Tanner Buzick, a junior from
Olathe, is spending the summer in
Natal, Brazil as a FIFA intern. Buz-
ick works in the media department
of Arenas Das Dunas, coordinating
a team of sideline photographers. He
Student, alumnus experience Cup culture in Brazil
WORLD CUP
ERIN ORRICK
news@kansan.com
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Switzerland’s Haris Seferovic, right, celebrates after scoring his side’s second goal dur-
ing the group E World Cup soccer match between Switzerland and Ecuador at the Estadio
Nacional in Brasilia, Brazil, Sunday, June 15, 2014.
Follow
@KansanNews
on Twitter
WANT NEWS
UPDATES
ALL DAY
LONG?
has also noticed the unsteady scene in
many of the tournament’s host cities.
“I went into this World Cup think-
ing the atmosphere could be the best
ever,” Buzick said. “I mean, it is Brazil
and the World Cup, that’s an amazing
mix. With that being said, there are
millions of Brazilians here that do not
want the World Cup in their country.”
Te months and weeks leading up
to the World Cup have been riddled
with local residents protesting, result-
ing in one gigantic transportation
nightmare. Te construction initiated
to help the fow of World Cup trafc
in Natal has yet to be completed, leav-
ing most of the city’s essential infra-
structure crippled, Buzick said.
Te local buses have also gone on
strike, leaving taxis or walking as the
only means of transportation. Buzick
said this transportation distress af-
fected a few thousand people at the
FIFA Fan Fest, live viewing parties for
fans from around the world.
“Afer the [frst] match was over we
ended up having to walk nearly two
miles just to fnd rides, and I’m sure
some people walked even farther,”
Buzick said. “People are being ad-
vised to go to the stadiums at least
three hours before the games to make
sure they get in on time.”
Despite the setbacks, Brooks said
he’s convinced that Brazil’s ability to
showcase itself and its love of soccer
will overcome any negativity.
“Brazilians are good about being
able to separate government from
their love of soccer,” Brooks said.
“Tis is Brazil’s chance to present it-
self to the world. Soccer will win out
this month.”
Brooks said turmoil had somewhat
dampened Brazilians’ World Cup ex-
citement, but it’s quickly on the rise
now that the tournament is under-
way.
“Honestly, in 2002 there was more
excitement,” he said. “It’s building up
now, though. People are getting ex-
cited.”
Buzick agreed and said he’s seen
some extravagant cultural displays of
Brazil’s and other nations’ afection
for soccer.
“From my hotel room I heard fre-
works all night celebrating Brazil’s
win [against Croatia] combined with
Mexican fans in the streets chanting,
‘Olé’ until early in the morning,” Buz-
ick said.
Every day Brazil has a match has
been deemed a national holiday. Buz-
ick said the fags of the eight nations
that will play matches in Natal, in-
cluding the United States, cover much
of the city. Huge soccer ball lights and
World Cup signs can be seen every-
where.
Although Brooks doesn’t have the
opportunity to enjoy the World Cup
as a spectator, he is happy to be in the
atmosphere while covering the event.
“It’s a huge amount of work,” Brooks
said. “I manage a large group of jour-
nalists. For a month, it’s 14- to 15-
hour days of extremely intense jour-
nalism. I love it, though.”
Buzick will attend two of the United
States’ group play matches, beginning
with their frst against Ghana, airing
Monday at 5 p.m. on ESPN.
“Now, more than ever, I realize how
much the rest of the world loves soc-
cer,” Buzick said. “It’s like taking the
passion we have for all of our main
sports and combining it into one.”
— Edited by Kaitlyn Klein
and Emma LeGault
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2014 PAGE 11
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Boulevardia, the food, music and
beer festival in Kansas City, Mo., has
come and gone as of 6 p.m. Sunday.
Te event was characterized by loud
sonic reverberations, ample amounts
of fowing beer, festivalgoers young
and old, hot and humid weather and
food trucks galore.
“We’ve been really blessed tonight,
it’s been unbelievable weather, the
crowd’s insane,” Chris Haighirian,
a Boulevardia board member, said
Friday. “When you take the time and
work toward something, you don’t
know what you’re going to get, and it’s
all worked really well.”
Te local 14-piece afrobeat band,
Hearts of Darkness, played a 40-min-
ute performance Friday night. By the
end of their frst song, a previously
vacant dance foor was packed with
people dancing.
“What else could you ask for? When
you imagine [Boulevard] throwing
their own party, it’s really cool,” Ra-
chel Christia, a vocalist from Hearts
of Darkness, said. “It’s KC represent-
ing pretty hard.”
Hearts of Darkness will play next
in Lawrence on June 27 at an outdoor
stage at Eighth and Vermont Streets.
Despite the number of breweries at
the event, KU Beer Club president
Kendall Goodden was a bit disap-
pointed by the beer selection.
Goodden said he tried several times
to purchase beer from other brewer-
ies during special tapping sessions.
Even when he showed up ffeen min-
utes early, he said he was told that
they ran out of the keg.
Goodden paid $24 for four beers
on Saturday, only one of which he
hadn’t tried before. He also didn’t get
into the Taps and Tastes Experience,
which sold out before the festival’s
opening day.
“We got in line 20 minutes early
and by the time we got to the front
they were out again,” Goodden said.
“In my opinion, if you're going there
to try diferent beers, defnitely do
the Taps and Tastes. Otherwise, it's
not worth it at all. Other than that I
thought it was awesome.”
Te profts from tips on Boulevard
beer purchases benefted charities
and non-proft organizations such
as the Victory Project, which sup-
ports children who are terminally ill,
and the Midwest Music Foundation,
which provides healthcare for unin-
sured musicians.
Amelia Arvesen
contributed to this report
— Edited by Emma LeGault
Locals gather at KC festival
BOULEVARDIA
DYLAN GUTHRIE
news@kansan.com
KELSEY WEAVER/KANSAN
A street performer juggles flaming torches atop a unicycle at the Boulevardia festival in
Kansas City, Mo., Saturday. The festival featured a multitude of local and national beer
brews, music, food and performances.
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2014 PAGE 12
S
sports
TRACK AND FIELD
Three athletes bring home NCAA trophies
Te University track and feld team’s
performance was up and down with
the weather last week at the NCAA
Outdoor Championships in Eugene,
Ore. Ten Jayhawks arrived at the Uni-
versity of Oregon ready to compete,
and three of the athletes would return
to Lawrence with trophies and First
Team All-America honors.
Te women’s 4x100 meter relay
team started of day one for the
Jayhawks, but their day was quickly
over as they failed to make the third
handof within the exchange zone
and were disqualifed. Only the
sophomore Sydney Conley—who
was also competing in the long jump
that day—would continue to compete
Wednesday evening with champion-
ship hopes still alive.
Conley, who fnished 17th in the
long jump during the 2013 NCAA
Outdoor Track and Field Champion-
ships, advanced into the long jump
fnals with a best jump of 20 feet 8
inches. Conley fouled on her frst
jump in the fnals and saw no im-
provement during the remaining two
jumps. She fnished seventh in the f-
nal standings and received First Team
All-America honors.
Te team’s frst day in Eugene con-
cluded on the track where junior hur-
dler Michael Stigler was running in
the semi-fnal round of the 400-meter
hurdles. Stigler fnished frst in his
heat with a season best time of 49.34
seconds.
In addition to having the fastest
qualifying time of the day, his time
is the second fastest in school his-
tory and is the 18th fastest time in the
world in 2014.
Two days later, Stigler lined up in
lane four of the 400-meter hurdles f-
nal. Although he was the favorite and
projected winner going into the week,
Stigler was the runner-up for the sec-
ond year in a row with a time of 49.90
seconds, just behind Nebraska’s Miles
Ukaoma’s 49.23 seconds.
Junior Lindsay Vollmer started day
two for the track and feld team with
the 100-meter hurdles—the frst of
four events that took place on Turs-
day as a part of the heptathlon. She
fnished the race in 13.61 seconds,
coming close to her personal record
of 13.57 seconds. Te swif fnish
earned her 1,034 points and placed
her ffh in the standings.
Te high jump was the next event
for Vollmer where she chalked up an-
other 870 points with a best jump of 5
feet 7.75 inches.
In the third heptathlon event, the
shot put, Vollmer threw 12.24 meters
and added 677 more points to her
score.
Te fourth and fnal heptathlon
event on Tursday was the 200-meter
dash. She clocked in at 24.82 seconds,
just shy of her personal best. Her fnal
efort of the day earned her 903 points
and allowed her to fnish the day sec-
ond overall in the standings.
Friday began with Vollmer over at
the long jump—the frst of the fnal
three events in the heptathlon. Her
frst jump of the day was measured at
18 feet 3.75 inches and was her best
and only attempt in the event—she
was unable to get a fair mark foul-
ing on her last two attempts. Her frst
jump earned her 723 points, put-
ting her at ffh place overall and 359
points of the lead.
Shortly afer Vollmer’s last try at the
long jump, she sat on the ground re-
ceiving medical attention. She later
elected to withdraw from the hep-
tathlon with an apparent right knee
injury. Vollmer was not able to de-
fend her national title, but remains
the only female individual outdoor
champion in Kansas history.
Senior thrower Jessica Maroszek
also competed for the women’s track
and feld team Tursday in the discus.
Afer only two throws, Maroszek was
number two in the standings with a
throw of 179 feet 9 inches and moved
on to the discus fnals in third place
overall. Maroszek failed to improve
on her best attempt of the day and
fnished in sixth place, earning herself
First Team All-America honors for
the third time in her college career.
Te 4x400 meter relay was the team’s
only other event. Stigler and the rest
of the 4×400 meter relay team, which
also includes junior DeMario Johnson
and sophomores Drew Matthews and
Jaime Wilson, fnished the race with a
time of 3 minutes 12.22 seconds, but
failed to advance to the fnals.
— Edited by Kaitlyn Klein
SAM DAVIS
sports@kansan.com
Quarterback Jake Heaps will trans-
fer to the University of Miami for his
fnal year of NCAA eligibility, Miami
announced Sunday. Te news comes
two days afer Kansas Football an-
nounced Heaps and wide receiver
Andrew Turzilli graduated from the
University and that running back
Darrian Miller had lef the program
for personal reasons.
“I'm proud that [Heaps and Turzil-
li] leave Kansas as graduates,” head
coach Charlie Weis said in a Friday
news release. “I would like to thank
them for their contributions to KU
football and wish them the best.”
All three departures saw signifcant
minutes last fall—Heaps started nine
games, Turzilli seven and Miller was
Kansas’ second-leading rusher be-
hind 2014 graduate James Sims.
Heaps, who transferred to Kansas
from Brigham Young University in
2012, will fnish his degree this month
before leaving for Miami.
"I am very grateful for the oppor-
tunity given to me by Coach Weis
to play football and earn my college
degree at the University of Kansas,"
Heaps said in the release. "My wife
and I have truly enjoyed being part
of the Jayhawk community. We have
made lifelong friends through this ex-
perience and we will always consider
ourselves Jayhawks."
Heaps had a high billing before
coming to the University—he was
rated the top quarterback in the 2010
class by Rivals.com. In his only year
as a Jayhawk, Heaps completed 128-
of-161 passes for 1,414 yards, and
scored eight touchdowns but logged
10 interceptions.
Turzilli saw action in 24 games,
caught 27 passes for 491 yards and
scored two touchdowns during his
three years at Kansas.
"I am extremely proud to have
earned my degree from KU," Turzilli
said in the release. "I am thankful for
all of the relationships I have made
during my time at Kansas and I wish
the entire program nothing but the
best in the future."
Darrian Miller also had high ex-
pectations before coming to Kansas,
ranked as the top player in Missouri
by Rivals.com. As a freshman in
2011, Miller played in 11 games and
fnished the year second on the team
in total rushing yards, including his
career best of 148 yards in the 31-30
overtime loss to Baylor in 2011.
Miller did not play in the fnal game
of the season, and lef the program in
2012. He returned in 2013 and played
in eight games averaging 4.8 yards per
carry.
— Edited by Emma LeGault
DANIEL HARMSEN
sports@kansan.com
Three players leave program, Heaps transfers to Miami
FOOTBALL
Event Athlete/s Result
400m
Hurdles
4x400m
Relay
Long
Jump
Discus
Hep-
tathlon
4x100m
Relay
2nd in
finals
23rd in
semi-
finals
7th in
finals
6th in
finals
Did not
finish
Did not
finish
Michael Stigler
Drew Matthews,
DeMario Johnson,
Jaime Wilson,
Michael Stigler
Sydney Conley
Jessica
Maroszek
Lindsay Vollmer
Diamond Dixon,
Alisha Keys,
Tianna Valentine,
Sydney Conley
Follow
@KansanSports
on Twitter
PAGE 13 MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
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Aurélie Gagnet, a freshman defend-
er, has returned to her native France
to train at the U20 French national
team camp and will attempt to land a
spot on the fnal French national ros-
ter for the U20 Women’s World Cup.
Te training camp ended Saturday
with results to follow determining
who will move onto the next stage of
the prep camp. Te fnal roster will be
released afer training camp, which
runs from June 30 to July 5.
Gagnet has worked hard for 14 years
and making the fnal roster is her ul-
timate goal.
“It would mean a lot and the highest
accomplishment of my career,” Gag-
net said. “I have worked hard and still
work for it. Tis is a big honor to play
for your national team.”
Gagnet is well aware that she needs
to continue to work hard in order to
move past the two training camps and
make the team, but said she is going
to try her hardest and to leave it all
on the feld.
“It’s going to be very hard to make
the team,” she said. “I am going to
give everything and I hope that things
are going to turn out well for me.”
Gagnet, who is originally from
Montpellier, France, has clocked min-
utes on several of France’s youth na-
tional teams in the past, including last
year when her U19 French national
team won the Union of European
Football Associations Cup in Wales.
She said they had a great team that
got along very well on and of the
feld, and she played a lot, which
made the experience even better, she
said.
“It was an honor,” Gagnet said. “Tis
is my best soccer experience so far.”
According to the women’s soccer
coach, Mark Francis, Gagnet will be
more than ready for the U20 World
Cup if she makes the fnal roster.
“I think she’ll do fne,” Francis said.
“She’s obviously competed at the na-
tional team level before. She played in
the European fnal and the top-col-
lege level, so she’ll be well-prepared
and hopefully she’ll do well at the
camp this week and make the squad.”
Francis said he would be very sur-
prised if she doesn’t make the fnal
cut.
Gagnet missed the frst part of the
collegiate season last year because of
the U19 world cup, but still played
in 15 out of 21 games for Kansas and
recorded more than 1,088 minutes,
averaging just over 72 minutes per
game.
Te coaches and her teammates
were thrilled when she fnally re-
turned to the team, Francis said.
“She jumped in and ft in right
away,” he said. “She’s quick, which
you need to be in that position. She’s
comfortable with the ball, she gets out
of pressure well and attacks well out
of the back.”
Gagnet agreed with Francis’ assess-
ment of her skills.
“I would say that my best soccer skill
is that I am very quick,” Gagnet said.
“I think that I also have good skills
with the ball, and usually pass it well.”
Te U20 World Cup will be held all
across Canada from August 5 to 24.
— Edited by Kaitlyn Klein
SOCCER
Freshman shoots for international opportunity
BEN CARROLL
sports@kansan.com
Follow
for sports updates
BEN LIPOWITZ/KANSAN FILE PHOTO
Freshman defender Aurélie Gagnet returned to her native France this summer to train
and attempt to land a spot on the national roster for the U20 Women’s World Cup.
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2014 PAGE 14
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L I V E W H E R E E V E R Y T H I N G M A T T E R S
w w w . t o w e r p r o p e r t i e s . c o m
GIVING BACK
Former athletes compete to help area families
BLAIR SHEADE
sports@kansan.com
Te sixth annual Rock Chalk
Roundball Classic was Tursday
inside the Lawrence High School
gymnasium. Former University ath-
letes and local celebrities played two
20-minute halves and held a silent
auction that helped raise the money
for families of Lawrence children di-
agnosed with cancer.
Te charity basketball game wel-
comed back former basketball players
such as Ben McLemore, Tyrel Reed,
Brady Morningstar, Sherron Collins,
Wayne Simien, Cole Aldrich, Aaron
Miles, Russell Robinson, Jef Graves,
Mario Little and Conner Teahan. For-
mer University football players Todd
Reesing and Brandon McAnderson
also participated. Te athletes were
split into two teams—red and blue—
to put on a show for the full gymna-
sium of fans.
Te spotlight was on the players, but
the cause was for the children.
“We wanted to make this event
something the kids would never for-
get,” Brian Hanni, director of Rock
Chalk Roundball Classic, said.
Te proceeds from the basketball
game and silent auction will go to the
families of Maddox Parsons, 3, Ad-
dison Whitenight, 7, and Bo Macan,
4, all of Lawrence. In past years, the
Roundball Classic was only able to
sponsor two families.
“We get over 100 applicants and
it’s so hard to pick between the last
three,” Hanni said. “We were happy
this year that we had enough private
donations to split the money between
three benefciary families.”
Last year, the Rock Chalk Roundball
Classic raised more than $22,000 to
help the families, but this year the di-
rectors are predicting a larger amount
in donations than previous years. Te
fnal fgure will be released within the
next week afer all donations are col-
lected, but as of Saturday, they were
nearing $30,000 according to event’s
Facebook page.
“Tis has been our biggest event
that we have ever held,” Hanni said.
“We were at standing room only for
the frst time in the six years that
we’ve held this event.”
Ben McLemore, who was drafed
seventh last year by the Sacramento
Kings and the leading scorer in the
charity game with 27 points, said he
came to the event because when he
was growing up he didn’t have anyone
come back to help him out.
“Having this opportunity is a bless-
ing and that’s the reason why I come
back and do what I do,” McLemore
said. “Tis is something I’ve always
dreamed of doing.”
Te basketball portion of the char-
ity event lived up to the hype as the
red team won 91-89 on a last second
shot from former national champion
shooting guard Tyrel Reed, who is
now in his third year of the doctoral
physical therapy program at the Uni-
versity of Kansas Medical Center.
“Te main thing is that it’s for a
good cause, and that’s why it’s so
much fun—coming out here, rais-
ing money for these kids,” Reed said.
“When I was here at KU, all the fans,
coaches and teammates were the best
to me, so it’s so important to give back
to the community because they were
so great to us.”
Te event connects the Lawrence
community to the athletes that want
to give back. Brady Morningstar, who
was part of the national title team in
2008 and a current player for the Tap-
iolan Honka basketball team in Fin-
land, said that growing up he noticed
the closeness in Lawrence.
“Tis community always gives back
and this event keeps getting bigger
and bigger, and more players keep
coming, so it makes for a fun expe-
rience every year,” Morningstar said.
“Te fans want to see a show and we
wanted to put one on for them.”
Even though the game is over, the
fundraising isn’t. Hanni said that a
PayPal account for the Rock Chalk
Roundball Classic on its Facebook
page will stay open for a few more
days.
“Every dollar [people] spend goes
back into the community to help
the local children,” Hanni said. “Te
community considers this event one
of the highlights of the summer,
which helps bridge the gap between
March Madness and the Late Night
[in the Phog].
Hanni said he was thankful for the
athletes’ dedication to the event and
the families.
“We couldn’t have done this event
without the great ambassadors of KU
because their hearts are as big as their
basketball skills.”
— Edited by Emma LeGault
JAMES HOYT/KANSAN
The red team, which included former Kansas athletes like Todd Reesing (left) and Ben
McLemore (right) won the Rock Chalk Roundball Classic 91-89 with a game-saving shot
by Tyrel Reed in the final seconds. The Classic raised money for area families’ children
with cancer.
PAGE 15 MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
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KANSAS CITY
Royals show high level of postseason promise
H
alfway through the season,
the Kansas City Royals sit
right where they were in
early April.
Going into the year it may not have
been what the fans had hoped, but
let’s be real—expectations are higher
than they’ve been since 2003 when
Kansas City fnished a disappointing
83-79 and missed the playofs.
Te consensus goal for the Royals’
front ofce and fans was to make
the playofs, and in the span of two
weeks, their spot in the playof race
has gone from hopeful to legitimate.
Te talent is there. Te roster is more
than capable to make a playof run,
but will they?
At the moment, all signs point to
the promised land. Te defense has
been dominant. Te bullpen hasn’t
looked any diferent in these past
two weeks than it has in the frst two
months. It has been terrifc. If any-
thing, it’s improved since April.
James Shields and Yordano Ventura
have shown why the media call them
“aces.” Ventura is leading the club
with a 3.20 ERA, and Shields is at the
top in wins and strikeouts with seven
and 78, respectively.
In addition, Greg Holland has been
nothing short of a shoo-in all star
and perhaps the best closer in the
league. He leads the MLB in saves
with 19.
Don’t forget about Jason Vargas,
who has unexpectedly risen to a
record of 6-2 and a 3.30 ERA. For
those who aren’t familiar with base-
ball statistics, that’s very good.
Dale Sveum was moved from third
base coach to hitting coach on May
29, right around when the Royals
began their run. Tird baseman
Mike Moustakas has been the one to
beneft the most from that change.
Since his return on June 1, Mousta-
kas’ batting average is up to .238 for
the month, which is a huge improve-
ment from earlier in the season when
he was sent down to Triple-A Omaha
afer batting .158 in the month of
May. Moustakas’ progression may be
due to Sveum’s coaching, or it may
just be a coincidence. But I don’t
think it even matters. Te bats are
fnally busy, the lineup fnally hitting
consistently. Tat’s all that matters.
And if it couldn’t look any more
favorable for the Royals, they now sit
a game behind division-leading De-
troit. Te Tigers began the season
quite impressively, with a record of
27-13 through their frst 40 games.
Since then, they’ve gone 8-17 in
the last 25 games and cling to the
AL Central lead at 36-29.
Kansas City has been waiting for
a team like this for 29 years. It’s
been a drought—it is a drought—
until the team can return to the
breathing the sweet relief of Octo-
ber air. Te playofs are no longer
just within reach, they are there for
the taking; and this is the squad
that can make a return to baseball’s
biggest stage.
— Edited by Kaitlyn Klein
By GJ Melia
sports@kansan.com
It is ofen discussed amongst Kansas
students that the best seats in the stu-
dent section for basketball games are
in the pit, “non-band-side.” But some
students know about a hidden gem—
section U.
Section U is located directly behind
the Jayhawks’ bench, so close to the
action that you can hear Bill Self ’s
huddles during timeouts and see his
face turn that shade of red we’re all ac-
customed to seeing. However, section
U seating will now be used for Uni-
versity boosters.
Tese seats are arguably some of the
best in all of Allen Fieldhouse, and
they’re being taken away from the
students who get up at dawn to attend
lottery and then spend an entire week
camping to race in and get the best
seats possible.
Te allocation of the seats to boost-
ers is a direct response to decreasing
the women’s and non-revenue stu-
dent fee from $25 to $7, which will
cost Athletics only $350,000 in yearly
revenue. Te athletic department is
searching to raise revenue and Asso-
ciate Athletic Director Jim Marchiony
says that’s exactly what the allocation
of section U to boosters will do.
What Marchiony doesn’t realize
is that he and the rest of the athletic
department are taking away some
students’ best opportunity at getting
close to student athletes. While the
pit is close, there’s nothing like sitting
right behind Self and the rest of the
Jayhawk bench.
My camping group sat in the front
row of section U during the Towson
game last season. At the end of the
game, Joel Embiid turned around and
tossed me a piece of gum. Te next
week, I thanked Embiid for the piece
of gum in the Underground, and he
smiled and laughed.
Tese are moments that I’ll never
forget as a Kansas basketball fan. And
now, students will never be able to
have experiences like the one Embiid
and I shared.
Te way the section U seats will be
handed out to donors is a controversy
in its own. A donor who has never
given to Kansas Athletics before can
put themselves in a good position to
get favorable seats in section U.
Other donor seating is based on
how long a person has been donating
to the University’s athletics. Donors
accumulate points, and whoever has
the most points gets the frst choice of
seating the summer before the season
begins. Now, a new donor can swoop
in, donate a large sum of money and
get some of the best seats in the Field-
house.
Marchiony claims that the removal
of section U will not afect students’
ability to get into games, but has not
yet revealed how the student seating
is going to make up for the loss of sec-
tion U. Te student body is eagerly
awaiting an answer.
— Edited by Emma LeGault
Loss of section U removes opportunities
CHECK OUT SAM DAVIS’ FOOTBALL COLUMN ONLINE AT KANSAN.COM
BEN FELDERSTEIN
sports@kansan.com
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN MONDAY, MONTH XX, 2014 PAGE XX

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