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Date: June 2, 2014 (Monday) IX 3, IX 5 & IX 8

Components: Grade 9 BIOLOGY



GENERAL ORIENTATION


Date: June 3, 2014 (Tuesday) IX
3, IX 5 & IX 8
Components: Grade 9 BIOLOGY

Classroom Orientation
Subject Overview


Date: June 4, 2014 (Wednesday) IX 3, IX 5 & IX 8
Components: Grade 9 BIOLOGY

Objective:
Identify the key parts of the breathing system.
Content:
Respiratory and Circulatory Systems Working with Other Organ Systems
How the different structures of the circulatory and respiratory systems work
together to transport oxygen-rich blood and nutrients to the different parts of the
body.(Content Standard)
Conduct an information dissemination activity on effective ways of taking care of
the respiratory and circulatory systems based on data gathered from the school or local
health workers (Performance Standard)
Materials:
- Bunch of grapes (or any other bunch of fruits or vegetables such as arosep or lato
(seaweed), lanzones, cauliflower, etc.)
Reference:
Teaching Guide, pp. 5-7
Strategies:
Inquiry-based approach
Science idea:
The air we breathe goes through the nose, nasal passages, and then through
trachea or windpipe, which separates into two branches, called bronchial tubes or bronchi,
one entering each lung. The bronchi subdivide many times inside the lungs, analogous to the
branching pattern of grapes, finally becoming hairlike tubes called bronchioles. In the last
part of the terminal bronchioles are tiny bubble like-bunch of structures like bunch of
structures called alveoli or airsacs.
Assessment:
- What does each part of the Bunch of Grapes model represent, in relation to
the breathing system?
- What will happen if one part of the system fails to carry out its function
properly?
Assignment:
Bring the following materials:
2-liter plastic bottle, two straws, two balloons, larger balloon



Prepared by:
JOWELL O. OAA
Science Teacher

Checked by: Noted by:

ARSENIA G. CORTEZ MYRNA U. LIGAS
HT III, Science Dept. SS Principal III


Date: June 5, 2014 (Thursday) IX 3, IX 5 & IX 8
Components: Grade 9 BIOLOGY

Objective:
Explain the mechanism and activities of the lungs and the diaphragm.
Content:
Respiratory and Circulatory Systems Working with Other Organ Systems
How the different structures of the circulatory and respiratory systems work
together to transport oxygen-rich blood and nutrients to the different parts of the
body.(Content Standard)
Conduct an information dissemination activity on effective ways of taking care of
the respiratory and circulatory systems based on data gathered from the school or local
health workers (Performance Standard)
Materials:
- Bunch of grapes (or any other bunch of fruits or vegetables such as arosep or
lato (seaweed), lanzones, cauliflower, etc.)
Reference:
Teaching Guide, pp. 5-7
Strategies:
Inquiry-based approach
Science idea:
The mechanism and activities of the lungs and the diaphragm. When you breathe
in, your diaphragm muscle contracts downward and rib muscles pull upward causing air
to fill up the lungs. When your diaphragm goes lower and ribs shift up, they provide more
breathing space in your chest. This also reduces the force on your lungs so the air
will move in from the outside. Breathing out is a reverse process. Your diaphragm
loosens up and the ribs and lungs thrust in, causing the gas to be exhaled.
Assessment:
How will you describe the pathway of oxygen in the breathing system?
Assignment:
Bring the following materials:
2-liter plastic bottle, two straws, two balloons, larger balloon



Prepared by:
JOWELL O. OAA
Science Teacher

Checked by: Noted by:

ARSENIA G. CORTEZ MYRNA U. LIGAS
HT III, Science Dept. SS Principal III


Date: June 6, 2014 (Friday) IX 3, IX 5 & IX 8
Components: Grade 9 BIOLOGY

ICL


Prepared by:
JOWELL O. OAA
Science Teacher

Checked by: Noted by:

ARSENIA G. CORTEZ MYRNA U. LIGAS
HT III, Science Dept. SS Principal III

Date: June 9, 2014 (Monday) IX 3, IX 5 & IX 8
Components: Grade 9 BIOLOGY

Objectives:
- Explain how the lungs work
- Describe how the movement of the diaphragm helps the air go in and out of the
lungs
Content:
- Respiratory and Circulatory Systems Working with Other Organ Systems
How the different structures of the circulatory and respiratory systems work
together to transport oxygen-rich blood and nutrients to the different parts of the body.
(Content Standard)
Conduct an information dissemination activity on effective ways of taking care of
the respiratory and circulatory systems based on data gathered from the school or local
health workers (Performance Standard)
Materials:
1 two-liter empty plastic bottle 1 sturdy straw 1 pair of scissors
3 balloons (1 big, 2 small) 5 rubber bands
Reference:
Teaching Guide, pp. 7-8
Strategies:
Students will perform Activity 2-Bottled Balloons
Science idea:
When you breathe in, or inhale, the diaphragm muscle contracts. Inhaling moves
the diaphragm down and expands the chest cavity. Simultaneously, the ribs move up and
increase the size of the chest cavity. There is now more space and less air pressure inside
the lungs. Air pushes in from the outside where there is a higher air pressure. It pushes into
the lungs where there is a lower air pressure. When you breathe out, or exhale, the
diaphragm muscle relaxes. The diaphragm and ribs return to their original place. The chest
cavity returns to its original size. There is now less space and greater air pressure inside the
lungs. It pushes the air outside where there is lower air pressure.
Assessment:
- How does the movement of the diaphragm cause the air to go in and out of the
lungs?
Assignment:
- Why do we believe that life is possible only on planets where oxygen is
present?
- How do the respiratory and circulatory systems work together to carry out
their common purpose?

Remarks:


Prepared by:
JOWELL O. OAA
Science Teacher

Checked by: Noted by:

ARSENIA G. CORTEZ MYRNA U. LIGAS
HT III, Science Dept. SS Principal III


Date: June 10, 2014 (Tuesday) IX 3, IX 5 & IX
8
Components: Grade 9 BIOLOGY

Objectives:
- Explain how the lungs work
- Describe how the movement of the diaphragm helps the air go in and out of the
lungs
Content:
Respiratory and Circulatory Systems Working with Other Organ Systems
How the different structures of the circulatory and respiratory systems work
together to transport oxygen-rich blood and nutrients to the different parts of the body.
(Content Standard)
Conduct an information dissemination activity on effective ways of taking care of
the respiratory and circulatory systems based on data gathered from the school or local
health workers (Performance Standard)
Materials:
1 two-liter empty plastic bottle 1 sturdy straw 1 pair of scissors
3 balloons (1 big, 2 small) 5 rubber bands
Reference:
Teaching Guide, pp. 7-8
Strategies:
Inquiry-based approach
Science idea:
When you breathe in, or inhale, the diaphragm muscle contracts. Inhaling moves the
diaphragm down and expands the chest cavity. Simultaneously, the ribs move up and
increase the size of the chest cavity. There is now more space and less air pressure inside
the lungs. Air pushes in from the outside where there is a higher air pressure. It pushes into
the lungs where there is a lower air pressure. When you breathe out, or exhale, the
diaphragm muscle relaxes. The diaphragm and ribs return to their original place. The chest
cavity returns to its original size. There is now less space and greater air pressure inside the
lungs. It pushes the air outside where there is lower air pressure.
Assessment:
- How does the movement of the diaphragm cause the air to go in and out of the
lungs?
Assignment:
- Why do we believe that life is possible only on planets where oxygen is
present?
- How do the respiratory and circulatory systems work together to carry out
their common purpose?
Remarks:


Prepared by:
JOWELL O. OAA
Science Teacher

Checked by: Noted by:

ARSENIA G. CORTEZ MYRNA U. LIGAS
HT III, Science Dept. SS Principal III


Date: June 11, 2014 (Wednesday) IX 3, IX 5 & IX 8
Components: Grade 9 BIOLOGY

Objectives:
- Describe blood flow and gas exchange within the heart, circulatory system, and
lungs
- Explain the mechanism of how the respiratory and circulatory systems work
together
Content:
Respiratory and Circulatory Systems Working with Other Organ Systems
How the different structures of the circulatory and respiratory systems work
together to transport oxygen-rich blood and nutrients to the different parts of the body.
(Content Standard)
Conduct an information dissemination activity on effective ways of taking care of
the respiratory and circulatory systems based on data gathered from the school or local
health workers (Performance Standard)
Materials:
paper strips rope/ribbon marking pen chalk
Reference:
Teaching Guide, pp. 9-10
Strategies:
Performance of Activity 3- Just Go With the Flow!
Science idea
Air first enters your lungs and then into the left part of your heart. It is then driven by
your heart into the bloodstream, all the way through your body. The heart pumps blood,
which transports essential nutrients, oxygen, and other chemicals to every cell in your body.
Once it reaches the cells, oxygen processes the nutrients to release energy. Carbon
dioxide is given off during this process. The blood delivers carbon dioxide into the right
portion of your heart, from which it is pumped to the lungs. Carbon dioxide leaves your
body through the lungs when you exhale.
Assessment:
- How do the heart and the lungs work together?
- What takes place when you inhale and exhale?
- What does blood deliver to every part of the body?
- Why is oxygen important to your body?
Assignment:
- How will you describe the sequence of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and blood flow
in your own words?
Remarks:



Prepared by:
JOWELL O. OAA
Science Teacher

Checked by: Noted by:

ARSENIA G. CORTEZ MYRNA U. LIGAS
HT III, Science Dept. SS Principal III


Date: June 12, 2014 (Thursday) IX 3, IX 5 & IX 8
Components: Grade 9 BIOLOGY

NO CLASSES: Independence Day
Date: June 13, 2014 (Friday) IX 3, IX 5 & IX 8
Components: Grade 9 BIOLOGY

ICL

Date: June 16, 2014 (Monday) IX 3, IX 5 & IX 8
Components: Grade 9 BIOLOGY

Objectives: Describe blood flow and gas exchange within the heart, circulatory system, and lungs
Explain the mechanism of how the respiratory and circulatory systems work
together
Content:
Respiratory and Circulatory Systems Working with Other Organ Systems
How the different structures of the circulatory and respiratory systems work
together to transport oxygen-rich blood and nutrients to the different parts of the body.
(Content Standard)
Conduct an information dissemination activity on effective ways of taking care of
the respiratory and circulatory systems based on data gathered from the school or local
health workers (Performance Standard)
Materials: coloring pen (blue and red)
Reference:
Teaching Guide, pp. 10
Strategies:
Enrichment activity
Science idea:
Air first enters your lungs and then into the left part of your heart. It is then driven by
your heart into the bloodstream, all the way through your body. The heart pumps blood,
which transports essential nutrients, oxygen, and other chemicals to every cell in your body.
Once it reaches the cells, oxygen processes the nutrients to release energy. Carbon
dioxide is given off during this process. The blood delivers carbon dioxide into the right
portion of your heart, from which it is pumped to the lungs. Carbon dioxide leaves your
body through the lungs when you exhale.
Assessment:
- How do the heart and the lungs work together?
- What takes place when you inhale and exhale?
- What does blood deliver to every part of the body?
- Why is oxygen important to your body?
Assignment:
Bring at least two sheets of short bond paper
Remarks:

Prepared by:
JOWELL O. OAA
Science Teacher

Checked by: Noted by:

ARSENIA G. CORTEZ MYRNA U. LIGAS
HT III, Science Dept. SS Principal III


Date: June 17, 2014 (Tuesday) IX 3, IX 5 & IX 8
Components: Grade 9 BIOLOGY

Objectives:
Identify the components of the circulatory system.
Explain the different types of circulation.
Content:
Respiratory and Circulatory Systems Working with Other Organ Systems
How the different structures of the circulatory and respiratory systems work
together to transport oxygen-rich blood and nutrients to the different parts of the body.
(Content Standard)
Conduct an information dissemination activity on effective ways of taking care of
the respiratory and circulatory systems based on data gathered from the school or local
health workers (Performance Standard)
Materials: bond paper
Reference:
Teaching Guide, pp. 10
Learners Manual, pp. 14-15
Strategies:
Performance of Activity 4, Lets Organize!
Science idea:
The heart is a hollow muscular organ, about the size of your fist, which is located in
the center of your chest between the lungs. It is a double pump that pumps on the left and
right sides. Every side is divided into two chambers, the atrium and the ventricle, each of
which has left and right portion, totalling to four chambers altogether. The top chamber is
the atrium (plural: atria). The bottom chamber is called the ventricle. The valve acts as a
one-way door, allowing blood to flow either forward into the next chamber, or out of the
heart.
Assessment:
Explain how the heart works.
Assignment:
Evaluate how the heart can be compared to a mechanical pump.

Remarks:



Prepared by:
JOWELL O. OAA
Science Teacher

Checked by: Noted by:

ARSENIA G. CORTEZ MYRNA U. LIGAS
HT III, Science Dept. SS Principal III


Date: June 18, 2014 (Wednesday) IX 3, IX 5 & IX 8
Components: Grade 9 BIOLOGY

Objectives:
Identify the components of the circulatory system.
Explain the different types of circulation.
Content:
Respiratory and Circulatory Systems Working with Other Organ Systems
How the different structures of the circulatory and respiratory systems work
together to transport oxygen-rich blood and nutrients to the different parts of the body.
(Content Standard)
Conduct an information dissemination activity on effective ways of taking care of
the respiratory and circulatory systems based on data gathered from the school or local
health workers (Performance Standard)
Materials: bond paper
Reference:
Teaching Guide, pp. 10
Learners Manual, pp. 14-15
Strategies:
Inquiry-based approach.
Science idea:
The heart is a hollow muscular organ, about the size of your fist, which is located in
the center of your chest between the lungs. It is a double pump that pumps on the left and
right sides. Every side is divided into two chambers, the atrium and the ventricle, each of
which has left and right portion, totaling to four chambers altogether. The top chamber is the
atrium (plural: atria). The bottom chamber is called the ventricle. The valve acts as a one-
way door, allowing blood to flow either forward into the next chamber, or out of the
heart.
Assessment:
Explain how the heart works.
Assignment:
Evaluate how the heart can be compared to a mechanical pump.

Remarks:


Prepared by:
JOWELL O. OAA
Science Teacher

Checked by: Noted by:

ARSENIA G. CORTEZ MYRNA U. LIGAS
HT III, Science Dept. SS Principal III


Date: June 19, 2014 (Thursday) IX 3, IX 5 & IX 8
Components: Grade 9 BIOLOGY

Objectives:
Measure and describe your pulse (heart rate) after several different activities.
Explain how to use different time intervals to measure your heart rate.

Content:
Respiratory and Circulatory Systems Working with Other Organ Systems
How the different structures of the circulatory and respiratory systems work
together to transport oxygen-rich blood and nutrients to the different parts of the body.
(Content Standard)
Conduct an information dissemination activity on effective ways of taking care of
the respiratory and circulatory systems based on data gathered from the school or local
health workers (Performance Standard)
Materials: stopwatch/timer data logbook
Reference:
Teaching Guide, pp. 13-14
Learners Manual, pp. 17-19
Strategies:
Inquiry-based approach.
Science idea:
Each time your heart beats, it delivers oxygen-rich blood to your body, which allows it
to function properly. Your heart rate or pulse is the number of times your heart beats in a
minute (BPM or beats per minute). Shorter time intervals may be used in taking the
pulse as long as it comes to 60 seconds upon multiplying with a factor. When you are
resting, your heart rate slows down, as your body does not need as much blood as it does
when you exercise.

Assessment:
What was your calculated resting pulse?
What was your pulse after exercising?
How would you differentiate your heart rates before and after exercising?

Assignment:
Bring the following:
Meta cards marking pen adhesive tape

Remarks:



Prepared by:
JOWELL O. OAA
Science Teacher

Checked by: Noted by:

ARSENIA G. CORTEZ MYRNA U. LIGAS
HT III, Science Dept. SS Principal III


Date: June 20, 2014 (Friday) IX 3, IX 5 & IX 8
Components: Grade 9 BIOLOGY

ICL