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UFRN Exame de Proficincia 2013.

3 Ingls

















1
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Se, em qualquer outro local deste Caderno, voc assinar, rubricar, escrever mensagem, etc., ser
excludo do Exame.
2
Este Caderno contm 5 questes discursivas referentes Prova da Lngua Estrangeira escolhida
pelo candidato. No destaque nenhuma folha.
3
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imediatamente ao Fiscal que o substitua.
4
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que os rascunhos no sero considerados.
5
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6 S ser permitido o uso de dicionrio INGLS/INGLS.
7
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8 Utilize para rascunhos, o verso de cada pgina deste Caderno.
9 Voc dispe de, no mximo, trs horas, para responder as 5 questes que constituem a Prova.
10 Antes de retirar-se definitivamente da sala, devolva ao Fiscal este Caderno.















Assinatura do Candidato: ________________________________________________


UFRN Exame de Proficincia 2013.3 Ingls Cincias Humanas e Sociais 1
As questes de 01 a 05, cujas respostas devero ser redigidas EM PORTUGUS, referem-se
ao texto abaixo.

The Human Sciences in a Biological Age
Nikolas Rose
Department of Social Science, Health and Medicine, Kings College London
My work over many years has centred on one question what kinds of creatures do we
think we are, us contemporary human beings? It is also concerned with two further
questions which flow from this: how have we come to understand ourselves in these ways,
and with what consequences? The social and human sciences have had their own views,
often implicit, about the nature of the human beings whose social lives they study. But
today, once again, they have to negotiate their relationship with biology, in two senses:
biology as the field of positive knowledge of living beings that we give that name, and
biology as the reality of those beings themselves humans who are, after all, animals,
living creatures, primates; who are born, live, sicken and die. To think of the human as
animal: this has long been associated with essentialism, determinism, reductionism,
fatalism; with the naturalisation of human delinquencies from sexism to warfare; and with a
bloody legacy of horrors from racial science to eugenics. But in what some have termed the
century of biology (Venter and Cohen, 2004), this relationship is being reposed. It is being
reposed in politics, in the life sciences and in the human sciences. Contemporary biopol itics
centres not on death but on life; that is to say, it is organised around dilemmas concerning
human vitality: human rights to life (a dignified life, a quality of life), the equality of all
humans as particular kinds of living creatures (human right s), the value of life, the future of
life, and what can be done to the lives of some to facilitate the lives of others (pre-
implantation genetic diagnosis, stem cells, organ transplants, donations of body parts)
(Rose, 2007).
This focus on the vitality of the living body is also becoming central to the human sciences.
Nowhere was the discursive turn more problematic than when debates over the body
seemed to deny any powers to the bloody thing itself. But over the last decade, a number of
social theorists and feminist philosophers have come to realise that it is not reactionary to
recognise the reality of our fleshly nature, and to examine the possibilities and constraints
that flow from it (Grosz, 1994; Braidotti, 2002; Massumi, 2002; Wilson, 2004; Thri ft, 2007;
Blackman, 2008; Blackman, 2010). Along similar lines, a radical movement in philosophy is
rethinking the place of the animal in contemporary thought; rethinking the founding
distinction of the human sciences between us tool makers, sign makers, l anguage speakers
and other animals (for example Haraway, 1991; Wolfe, 2003; Daston and Mitman, 2005;
Haraway, 2007; Calarco, 2008). No longer are social theories thought progressive by virtue
of their distance from the biological. Indeed it often seems that the reverse assumption is
more common constructivism is pass; the linguistic turn has reached a dead end; and a
rhetoric of materiality is almost obligatory.
Many things have led to this reframing of the human. Some have to do with the cycles of
theoretical fashion in the human sciences. Some undoubtedly stem from the sense of our
precariousness as a species in the face of ecological threats and climate change. Others
arise from a belief that the embodied nature of human beings generates creative for ces that
can lead to political resistance and change. []

Disponvel em: <http://logincms.uws.edu.au/data/assets/pdffile/0010/282484/ICSOccasionalPaperSeries31Rose
Final.pdf.> Acesso em: 27 de setembro de 2013

UFRN Exame de Proficincia 2013.3 Ingls Cincias Humanas e Sociais 2
Questo 1
Segundo o autor, as cincias humanas e sociais devem negociar sua relao com a biologia. Por
qu?



























Questo 2
Explique por que o autor afirma que a biopoltica moderna deve centrar-se na vida e no na
morte.



























Espao para Resposta

Espao para Resposta


UFRN Exame de Proficincia 2013.3 Ingls Cincias Humanas e Sociais 3
Questo 3
O autor afirma ter ocorrido uma mudana na ltima dcada. A que mudana ele se refere?

























Questo 4
Quais fatores levaram, segundo o autor, a um reenquadramento do humano?





























Espao para Resposta

Espao para Resposta


UFRN Exame de Proficincia 2013.3 Ingls Cincias Humanas e Sociais 4
Questo 5
Traduza o fragmento textual abaixo no espao reservado para isso.
Seu texto dever apresentar clareza e estar bem articulado tanto em termos estruturais
quanto de sentido.

No longer are social theories thought progressive by virtue of their distance from the
biological. Indeed it often seems that the reverse assumption is more common
constructivism is pass; the linguistic turn has reached a dead end; and a rhetoric of
materiality is almost obligatory.


ESPAO DESTINADO AO TEXTO DEFINITIVO