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IHS iSuppli Topical Report | Automotive Research

The Connected CarIn-Vehicle Apps


for the Future
Report Author
Egil Juliussen, PhD,
Principal Analyst & Fellow;
with
Stacey Oh
Analyst & Regional Manager,
and
Dmytro Koshevy
Researcher,
Automotive Research
2011 iSuppli Corporation, a Company which
was acquired by IHS Inc. All Worldwide Rights
Reserved. Confdential, Patents Pending.
1700 E. Walnut Avenue El Segundo, CA 90245
Telephone: + 1.310.524.4007
Email: info@isuppli.com
Copyright 2011 iSuppli Corporation, a Company which was acquired by IHS Inc. Topical Report
Automotive Research
The Connected CarIn-Vehicle Apps for the Future
Table of Contents
Executive Summary ..........................................................................................................................................1
Introduction .......................................................................................................................................................1
Findings .............................................................................................................................................................2
The Apps Landscape .......................................................................................................................................2
Categorization of Vehicle-Centric Mobile Apps .........................................................................................4
CRM Apps .................................................................................................................................................4
Vehicle Location & Telemetry Apps ......................................................................................................4
Traffc/Navigation/LBS Apps ...............................................................................................................6
Eco/Diagnostics Apps .............................................................................................................................7
Entertainment Apps .................................................................................................................................8
Internet Radio ............................................................................................................................................8
OEM Smartphone Apps .................................................................................................................................9
BMW ...........................................................................................................................................................9
Ford ............................................................................................................................................................9
GM ........................................................................................................................................................... 10
Mercedes-Benz ....................................................................................................................................... 10
Nissan ...................................................................................................................................................... 11
Toyota ...................................................................................................................................................... 12
Volvo ........................................................................................................................................................ 13
OEM Integration of Mobile Apps into the Head Unit ........................................................................... 13
SYNC AppLink ...................................................................................................................................... 13
Toyota Entune ........................................................................................................................................ 14
Auto Infotainment Content Overview ...................................................................................................... 16
Local Search ............................................................................................................................................ 17
Send to Car .............................................................................................................................................. 17
What Is Mobile App Integration ................................................................................................................. 18
Content Integration Examples ............................................................................................................. 18
OS and Middleware ....................................................................................................................................... 21
Middleware Categories .......................................................................................................................... 21
Head Unit Integration Process & HMI ...................................................................................................... 22
OEM HMI Take-Up Rates ................................................................................................................... 23
HMI Trends for Mobile Apps.............................................................................................................. 23
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The Connected CarIn-Vehicle Apps for the Future
Apple iPod Out ...................................................................................................................................... 24
RealVNC's VNC Mobile Solution for Automotive .......................................................................... 24
Terminal Mode ....................................................................................................................................... 24
DirectVoxx .............................................................................................................................................. 25
The Role of Media Tablets ........................................................................................................................... 26
Apps Integration Forecasts .......................................................................................................................... 28
Smartphone-Based Remote Control ................................................................................................... 28
Internet Radio Apps Integration ......................................................................................................... 28
Social Network Apps Integration ........................................................................................................ 29
Head Units with Apps Integration ...................................................................................................... 30
Conclusion ...................................................................................................................................................... 31
Figures
Figure 1: Transition from Fixed Function Head Units to Apps-Based Head Units ..............................1
Figure 2: Daimler Smart Drive App ...............................................................................................................3
Figure 3: Customer Relations Management (CRM) Apps ..........................................................................4
Figure 4: Vehicle Location and Telemetry Apps .........................................................................................5
Figure 5: Traffic/Navigation/LBS Apps ......................................................................................................6
Figure 6: AVIC FEEDS App ..........................................................................................................................7
Figure 7: Eco/Diagnostics Apps ...................................................................................................................7
Figure 8: Entertainment Apps ........................................................................................................................8
Figure 9: My BMW Remote App ...................................................................................................................9
Figure 10: OnStar RemoteLink App ........................................................................................................... 10
Figure 11: Mercedes-Benz mbrace Mobile App ........................................................................................ 11
Figure 12: Nissan Leaf App .......................................................................................................................... 11
Figure 13: Citroen eTouch App ................................................................................................................... 12
Figure 14: Lexus Enform Mobile App ....................................................................................................... 12
Figure 15: Volvo On Call App ..................................................................................................................... 13
Figure 16: Toyota Entune ............................................................................................................................. 14
Figure 17: BMW Connected ......................................................................................................................... 15
Figure 18: Mini Connected ........................................................................................................................... 15
Figure 19: Aha Mobile ................................................................................................................................... 19
Figure 20: Pioneer Zypr ................................................................................................................................ 20
Figure 21: OEM HMI Take-Up Rates ........................................................................................................ 23
Companies Mentioned
Acer Apple Asus
Dell Hewlett-Packard Intel
Lenovo Research In Motion Toshiba
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Figure 22: HMI Trends for Mobile Device Integration ........................................................................... 23
Figure 23: Terminal Mode ............................................................................................................................ 24
Figure 24: DroidBuzz .................................................................................................................................... 26
Figure 25: DroidBuzz UI Profiles ............................................................................................................... 27
Figure 26: Regional Internet Radio Users .................................................................................................. 29
Figure 27: Regional Social Network Users ................................................................................................. 30
Figure 28: Cumulative Smartphone Apps Integration Sales ................................................................... 31
Figure 29: Auto Apps Integration - Big Picture ........................................................................................ 31
Tables
Table 1: Auto Infotainment Content Overview ......................................................................................... 16
Table 2: Examples of Content Integrators .................................................................................................. 18
Table 3: HMI Trends ...................................................................................................................................... 22
Table 4: Table 5: Smartphone-Based Remote Control Auto Integration Sales ................................... 28
Table 5: Internet Radio Auto Integration Sales .......................................................................................... 29
Table 6: Social Network Auto Apps Integration Sales.............................................................................. 30
Table 7: Head Units With Apps Integration Sales ..................................................................................... 30
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The Connected CarIn-Vehicle Apps for the Future
Companies Mentioned
AccuWeather Alarm.com Alpine
Apple Audi BMW
Buick Cadillac Chevrolet
Chrysler Citroen Clear Channel
Daimler Denso Directed Electronics
DirectVoxx Elektrobit Facebook
Ford Motor Company Funkwerk Dabendorf General Motors
GMC Google Gracenote
Harman Honda Hummer
Hyundai iheartradio INRIX Traffc!
Jeep Johnson Controls Jungo
Kia Motors Last.fm Lexus
LG Electronics Lincoln Live365
Luxoft Mazda Mercedes-Benz
Mercury Microsoft Mini
Movietickets.com Nissan Nokia
Nomadic Solutions Octo Telematics OnStar
OpenTable.com Panasonic Pandora
Peugeot Pioneer Pontiac
RealVNC RIM Rovi
Saab Samsung Saturn
Slacker Sony Spotify
SVOX TomTom Toyota
TuneIn Tuner2 Tweddle Group
Twitter Viper Volkswagen
Wcities Yahoo Yelp
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Executive Summary
Handheld devices such as mobile phones and smartphones will play a key role as an integrated part
of in-vehicle infotainment systems. Smartphones hold a leading position among devices brought into
the car with their high integration of multi-function capabilities, such as GPS and media players.
Consumers are attracted to smartphones for easier and faster communication, as well as the real-time
information available through applications. Smartphone applications are a special type of a software
program used on a smartphone, mobile and a handheld device running on an iPhone, Android,
BlackBerry, Windows Mobile Phone 7 and other smartphone platforms.
Some vehicle apps are branded by automakers and some cover the full gamut of an infotainment
system.
As the complexity of apps increases with additional content, features, accessibility, and user interface,
in-vehicle human machine interface (HMI) tools will allow for more complex content to operate
without additional distraction.
Meanwhile, the functionalities, choices, and variety of apps will only increase with time. Apps will
continue to grow in importance as communication and content channels, as well as conduits for users
to access their vehicles and assimilate brand loyalty.
Introduction
With consumer electronics, especially smartphones, infuencing the in-vehicle electronics landscape,
OEMs are looking to revolutionize the in-vehicle experience through connected devices and so-called
cloud-based content.
The key to this emerging connectivity is applications that provide infotainment, entertainment,
remote diagnostics and navigation solutions complete with real-time traffc and weather information.
Some of these apps will be built into the head unit, but most will be smartphone-based apps that are
integrated with the head unit and/or telematics system.
The result is that in-vehicle infotainment systems are in the middle of a major transition from fxed
function head units to what IHS iSuppli calls apps-based head units. Figure 1 illustrates the transition
from fxed-function head units to apps-based head units.
Figure 1: Transition from Fixed Function Head Units to Apps-Based Head Units
Source: IHS iSuppli | August 2011
In the past, the typical head unit was primarily focused on providing entertainment from broadcast
radio, cassettes, and compact discs. Later, the addition of optional navigation systems increased the
importance of the head unit.
In the future, the head unit architecture will see a dramatic change and the design will be similar to the
way PCs are designed. The so-called apps-based head unit will be based on a software and hardware
platform that will provide functionality via custom applications (apps). These apps will run on the
head unit operating system (OS) through a human machine interface (HMI).
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OEMs will include several standard apps to provide key vehicle functionality such as navigation, au-
dio entertainment from a digital music broadcast and from MP3 players or memory cards such USB
or SD cards and climate controls. The driver will also have the option of selecting additional apps
that can be downloaded and stored on the head unit.
Another key feature of an apps-based head unit is smartphone integration; this will enable the driver
to tap into the vast amount of auto-related smartphones apps and download them onto the head
unit. The smartphone will also provide a crucial functiona data plan for covering the cost of
wireless communication to receive content and services. Most drivers will resist using a separate data
plan for their car and will insist on using their smartphone data plan for cost saving.
Some of todays head units already have some of these features, but many more will emerge in the
next few years. The main object of this report is to review what is happening in the growing and
important apps integration segment. Several key topics will be covered:
Overview of auto-related smartphone apps
Review of the leading OEM apps and their integration efforts
Apps integration alternatives and trends
HMI trends that impact apps integration
Market forecast of key apps
Potential impact of media tablets and their apps
Findings
Smartphones have a large number of auto-related apps that are very useful to the driver and
passengers. A variety of apps categories have emerged ranging from navigation and location
based services (LBS), to entertainment and vehicle centric apps.
These smartphone apps will be used in the car, but many have signifcant driver distraction
issues. Driver distraction problems need to be solved by integrating the apps through existing
and emerging car HMI technologies. In-vehicle infotainment systems need to add apps
integration features.
Head unit apps integration to smartphone apps is a key trend that leading auto OEMs are
starting to deploy.
Four specifc apps categories are emerging and are receiving strong attention from the auto
OEMs: general smartphone apps integration, remote control of specifc vehicle functions,
Internet radio apps, and social networking apps. This report includes market forecasts for these
four categories.
A general purpose approach for smartphone apps integration that can manage many apps and
services is emerging for example, Terminal Mode, Aha Radio and Pioneer Zypr.
The Apps Landscape
To the attraction of smartphones by users for easier and faster communication, as well as the
information available through apps, has led to an increased relevance of smartphones and apps in
the car, and IHS iSuppli has categorized vehicle-centric apps into fve categories:
Customer Relations Management (CRM)
Vehicle Location & Telemetry
Traffc/Navigation/LBS
Eco/Diagnostics
Entertainment
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Vehicle-centric apps can be focused on one function, or include many. Some appear to cover the
full gamut of an infotainment system; some are branded by an automaker. An example in this space
is the smart drive app from Daimler. This app literally gives the user all the necessary functions for
connected travel, and it has full device integration for phone and media playback.
Developed by the Mercedes-Benz R&D team in Palo Alto, California, the app is designed to give
smart drivers with an iPhone the capability of an infotainment system without the cost. Users pay
$9.99 for the initial app downloadwhich comes will all of the features except the full turn-by-turn
navigation (which is an additional $49.99 annual subscription for the upgrade).
Figure 2: Daimler Smart Drive App
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Figure 2: Daimler Smart Drive App
Source: Daimler| August 2011
According to IHS iSuppli estimates, the average MSRP for infotainment systems today is roughly
$1,500 this is equivalent to approximately 30 years of subscription fees for the Smart Drive app. As
well, in two years or so, users are likely to upgrade their device or get a free update to the app, which
is an option not available in most head units today.
Daimler offcials even mentioned that non-smart brand drivers could download and use the app.
For the OEM, it's a chance to improve brand recognition, as well as earn a little bit of revenue in
the process. At the end of the day, Daimler is not banking on revenue from the app, but is more
concerned with selling vehicles.
IHS iSuppli believes that in the near future, these all-in-one infotainment apps could see some growth
as smaller OEMs recognize the importance of the connected car, but do not have the capital to
implement a full telematics and infotainment system. Furthermore, IHS iSuppli has recognized that
automakers have begun to brand and market their own apps and distribute them via online app
stores.
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Categorization of Vehicle-Centric Mobile Apps
The following sections focus on the fve categories mentioned previously as well as Internet radio,
which will each be explained with accompanying smartphone screen shots.
CRM Apps
As seen in Figure 3, many of the early OEM apps have been focused on customer relationship
management (CRM). Acting as an owner's manual for the user, CRM apps are designed to create a new
communication channel between customers and OEMs, and create a foundation to enhance vehicle
connectivity. Examples of this include the Hyundai Equus iPad Owner's Manual and appointment
setting app, as well as some roadside assistance apps from BMW, Mini, and Mazda.
Figure 3: Customer Relations Management (CRM) Apps
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Figure 3: Customer Relations Management (CRM) Apps
Source: IHS iSuppli | August 2011
Chrysler, in collaboration with Tweddle Group, launched owner information apps for the Jeep
Compass, Patriot, Wrangler, and Liberty vehicles, among others. Available as free downloads from
iTunes, Android Market, and BlackBerry App World; these vehicle info apps combine owner manual
information with product features and benefts. Key feature categories include vehicle highlights,
operating instructions, dealer locator, inspection and maintenance schedules, warning lights and
controls, warranty information, and customer assistance. Other features and benefts include links
to Mopar parts and accessories, Jeep gear and merchandise, and Jeep social media sites. The apps
contain media content such as photos and videos, as well as a search utility that allows for vehicle
information search.
Vehicle Location & Telemetry Apps
Vehicle location & telemetry apps are generalized as those that can remotely communicate with the
vehicle from an extended range for the purpose of location or remote control. Developers have
created a range of apps in this category that span from complex to simple, and connected to non-
connected.
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Figure 4: Vehicle Location and Telemetry Apps
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Figure 4: Vehicle Location and Telemetry Apps
Source: IHS iSuppli | August 2011
One app, Find Your Car with AR: Augmented Car Finder features a car fnder with augmented reality
(AR) from Augmented Works. Compatible with both the iOS and Android OS, the app simply records
the GPS location of the car. Later, when the user needs to get back to their vehicle, the app uses a
magnetic compass to show the AR view. This is an example of an app that needs no communication
with the vehicle. It simply uses geo-tags to guide the user back to their vehicle.
Where most apps can function without any hardware interaction in the car, some require hardware
add-ons for operation. Often these apps will cost more than their software-only counterparts. Yet,
in many cases, they will also enable more services and features than those without a connection into
the car.
One vehicle fnder app, Viper SmartStart, launched in July 2010, also enables remote start, door
locking and even alerts the user in the event of an intrusion. Viper launched its SmartStart app as
a service that is added onto existing Viper hardware systems. With a minimum hardware cost of
$249.99 plus installation, the Viper SmartStart app enables access to features such as lock/arm,
unlock/disarm, remote car start, trunk release, panic or car fnder, multiple vehicle controls, parking
fnder, SmartAlert, SmartPark, confrmation prompts, Viper Motor Club, and account access on the
users iPhone, BlackBerry, or Android devices.
At CES 2011, Viper announced the Viper SmartStart GPS solution that adds in asset tracking, social
networking through Facebook, and geofencing to the Viper SmartStart solution. Specifc features
included with the SmartStart GPS Secure Service plan ($5/month) are vehicle locator, social check-
in, speed alert, and lockdown alert. Upgrade to the Premium Secure Service Plan (under $6/month)
and users get smart geofencing, hotspot zones for arrival or departure, and notifcation and curfew
scheduling. SmartPark vehicle fnder and Viper Motor Club roadside assistance are also included with
the Secure Service Plan. Furthermore, the updated app also incorporates control of Alarm.com-
enabled home security systems to arm and disarm the system.
Although Viper is just a singular example, IHS iSuppli believes that majority of apps will come from
third-party developersevery day, more and more apps get released on the iTunes store, Android
Market, BlackBerry World, Windows Marketplace, and others. The growing app trend is led by its
companion growth in smartphone devicesautomotive is just one of the markets fueling the growth
in this application space. Interestingly, Directed Electronics has announced a partnership with Octo
Telematics in the U.S. for a separate program, and will likely utilize them as a TSP backend. Additional
servers will likely be added in the future as Vipers services expand into vehicle tracking.
IHS iSuppli expects that revenues will increase for aftermarket telematics suppliers, although not
confrmed with practical fgures. This is due to the growth and proliferation of smartphone devices
as well as added consumer awareness of vehicle tracking, telematics, and location-based services.
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Automotive OEM players have a unique proposition in the app world, as both vehicles and
smartphones are (by nature) mobile and the combination of the connected mobile device and the
vehicle can be very powerful. Whether completely software based or hardware-required, vehicle-
centric apps are poised for major growth. OEMs, suppliers, and other automotive value-chain players
will likely get involved and reap the rewards of mobile connectivity, with the users experiencing an
automotive eco-system like never before.
Traffc/Navigation/LBS Apps
This category of apps generally includes location-based services, navigation, traffc monitoring, and
even weather reporting. As shown in Figure 5, other apps in this category could help the user with
local search, fuel prices, movie listings, parking availability, and more. With all of the mapping and
navigation apps, plus specifc traffc and LBS apps, this category represents a large majority of the
vehicle-centric app market.
Figure 5: Traffic/Navigation/LBS Apps
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Figure 5: Traffic/Navigation/LBS Apps
Source: IHS iSuppli | August 2011
INRIX Traffc! is one of the more comprehensive apps. Following an introduction on the iOS, the
now Android-compatible free app partners with Clear Channel's Total Traffc Network to deliver
up-to-the-minute traffc incident and road condition updates (including construction, accidents and
other on-road events).
The comprehensiveness factor is increased as INRIX includes other traffc-infuencing events, which
offers users predictive traffc as well. These events range from sporting events and concerts to items
like the legislative calendar in Washington, D.C. These events can signifcantly affect drive times,
and knowing when and where these events happen will help users better plan their routes. In terms
of user-interface (UI), the app is simple, but it is also one of the most complex traffc apps on the
market.
Another example, the AVIC FEEDS App from Pioneer, enables a user to fnd a destination and then
transfer it to a Pioneer navigation system for turn-by-turn directions. Compatible with Pioneer AVIC-
X920BT and AVIC-Z120BT modules, the user is also able to search through surrounding POIs and
even save geo-tagged photos as POIs for later use.
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Figure 6: AVIC FEEDS App
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Figure 6: AVIC FEEDS App
Source: Pioneer | August 2011
Eco/Diagnostics Apps
Figure 7 shows a list of Eco/Diagnostics apps, which are gaining momentum with the proliferation
of electric vehicles (EVs). This category of apps is a bit more limited than others for the aftermar-
ket, as it generally requires a hardware connection into the vehicle. This can range from a $500 data
communications module to a $20 OBD II plug-in dongle. Other apps in this category can display
performance ratings, critical system diagnostics, and more.
Figure 7: Eco/Diagnostics Apps
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Figure 7: Eco/Diagnostics Apps
Source: IHS iSuppli | August 2011
One example is the Ecogyzer app from Nomadic Solutions. This app is mainly software driven,
offering a solution for the monitoring of eco-driving behavior without a direct vehicle connection.
It relies on the device's 3G connectivity and GPS using Windows Mobile 6.X. With only this, the
Ecogyzer app can inform the user of driving behavior, mileage, estimate of fuel consumption, speed,
and amount of acceleration and braking.
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Entertainment Apps
While this section is easily the largest app category on most app stores (due to the popularity of
games), it is not as large when considering the in-vehicle environment. Free application games are
fun, but not nearly as relevant for the driver, not to mention being a major distraction.
Figure 8: Entertainment Apps
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Figure 8: Entertainment Apps
Source: IHS iSuppli | August 2011
Within entertainment apps, Internet Radio is the most relevant for in-vehicle use. In the U.S., Internet
radio like Pandora, iheartradio, Slacker, and Spotify are in direct competition to standard broadcast
radio and subscription-based satellite radio. Only now with the growing wireless bandwidth have
these Internet radio stations seen this type of attention in the vehicle. Plus, the audio can be rendered
in the vehicle with only a 3.5 mm auxiliary input or Bluetooth A2DP.
Internet Radio
Pandora may as well be the de facto cloud-based application with most OEMs and aftermarket head
unit suppliers trying to integrate it frst. Like many aftermarket and OEM suppliers, Pioneer made
available a free PandoraLink app which requires an appropriate aftermarket infotainment head unit to
enable a wireless link between the head unit and the phone for Pandora radio integration.
Pandora makes its service available through a variety of distribution channels. In addition to streaming
its service to PCs, Pandora has developed applications for smartphones and has partnered with the
makers of over 200 consumer electronics devices, including Alpine, Panasonic, Pioneer, Samsung,
and Sony.
Pandora has also developed relationships with major automobile manufacturers, including Ford
Motor Company, Mercedes-Benz, and Mini (BMW Group), and with suppliers to major automobile
manufacturers to integrate the Pandora service into current and future automotive sound systems.
In addition, General Motors, Hyundai, and Toyota have publicly announced their plans for future
Pandora integrations.
In terms of cloud-based entertainment services (via smartphone entertainment apps), automotive
OEM requests are heavily centered on Internet radio apps such as Pandora. IHS iSuppli believes that
the emerging mobile OS vendor-initiated cloud-based music services will not be a standard feature
in vehicles anytime soon. However, when demand increases in the mobile space for such major OS
vendor cloud-based music services, OEMs will start asking for integration of those cloud-based apps
in the head unit platform sooner rather than later.
Apples iCloud will most likely be the frst requested service from OEMs, due to its higher anticipation
of ecosystem growth from the mobile consumer side, while Amazon will be the easiest service to
integrate in terms of openness of the API and its historical success in deploying many cloud-based
APIs. On the other hand, Google's Music service faces diffculties in making automotive-grade HMI,
as Android APIs heavily rely on web-based UI instead of app-based UI. Also, it is highly likely for
BMW to be the frst OEM to integrate an iCloud music service into its head unit due to its historical
ties with iOS APIs (i.e., iPod Out).
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OEM Smartphone Apps
Automotive OEM-branded apps encompass a host of functions including remote telemetry, remote
vehicle control, owner profle information, and vehicle fnder solutions. Examples of OEM-
branded telematics apps include the Mercedes-Benz mbrace, OnStar RemoteLink (previously OnStar
MyLink), Lexus Enform Mobile, BMW My BMW Remote, and others. For those telematics solutions
like OnStar and mbrace, the ability for users to access and utilize their subscription via their phone
increases relevance and overall usage, which directly affects subscription renewals.
The emergence of Electric Vehicles (EVs) has also highlighted the role that automotive OEM
smartphone apps can play in managing ones vehicle. At the end of the day, these apps give their
respective brands a boost in consumer perception; users of a highly-connected car will enjoy the
experience and are more likely to spread the news and the wow-factor.
This section highlights the OEM branded apps in alphabetical order of the automotive OEM.
BMW
The My BMW Remote app is available via Apple iTunes for all European countries that offer BMW
ConnectedDrive services. The new My BMW Remote app offers remote door lock/unlock, remote
HVAC control, a vehicle fnder, and a Google Local Search function that enables users to transfer an
address or POI directly to the in-vehicle navigation system. In addition, users can activate the vehicle
horn and lighting systems to make it easier to locate the vehicle in a large parking lot.
Figure 9: My BMW Remote App
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Figure 9: My BMW Remote App
Source: BMW | August 2011
BMW also noted that the app can be linked to more than one vehicle with only model years 2008 and
2009 able to make use of the remote door unlock/lock function and Google Local Search. The BMW
5 and 7 Series, as well as the new X3, can access all functions as long as the vehicle is equipped with
the Business or Professional grade navigation system plus Bluetooth interface.
The ConnectedDrive services are free for six months to three years depending on the contract.
Ford
Ford announced its MyFord Mobile app at CES 2011, enabling Focus Electric drivers to maintain
vehicle connection even when away from the vehicle. This is the frst time Ford will utilize an
embedded communications design with its SYNC system.
MyFord Mobile works via a smartphone app or secure website. Owners can use any connected
mobile phone with a data plan or a computer (when not operating the vehicle) to obtain charge status,
program vehicle charging, locate charging stations send the location to the vehicle, receive alerts on
vehicle charge status, remotely lock/unlock doors, and download performance and system data.
In addition, owners will have a feature from Microsoft that lowers costs by enabling customers to
recharge their vehicles at off-peak rates from their utility company. Ford is working with charge
station manufacturers and MapQuest to provide Focus Electric owners with the most current,
comprehensive station information. At launch, MyFord Mobile content will be available from the
respective smartphone app store or via the web.
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GM
The OnStar RemoteLink app is available on the Motorola Droid, Apple iPhone, and BlackBerry Storm
for remote real-time connected OnStar services and vehicle control features. OnStar RemoteLink
was developed from the ground-up by engineers in the OnStar EV Lab, in addition to third-party
application developers.
The application displays state of charge (%), plug status (in or not), voltage at plug (120V or 240V),
EV miles and range, odometer, and time to charge. Vehicle control functions include remote door
unlock/lock, remote horn and lights, remote start, HVAC control, and charging.
The application will be fully serviced for MY 2011 vehicles, starting with the Volt.
Figure 10: OnStar RemoteLink App
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Figure 10: OnStar RemoteLink App
Source: OnStar | August 2011
GM has also developed brand-specifc mobile apps that leverage OnStar technology, enabling
subscribers to operate functions like remote start, horn and lights, and door lock/unlock, and a
vehicle fnder from their smartphones. The apps also provides diagnostic-like fuel level and range,
remaining oil life, current and recommended tire pressure, and lifetime average MPG; in addition to
vehicle information like current odometer readings, vehicle VIN, OnStar account numbers, and a
one-touch OnStar advisor access.
OnStar offcially announced the expansion of its OnStar RemoteLink app technology for use with
most 2011 Chevrolet, Cadillac, Buick, and GMC products with the Gen. 9 OnStar hardware.
Mercedes-Benz
Available features for the Mercedes-Benz mbrace app include remote door lock/unlock, vehicle
fnder, call roadside assistance, Call mbrace Response Center, Call MB Financial Services, search for
local dealers, view dealer information, and review mbrace account information.
The mbrace mobile app version 1 is free of charge and available for iPhone and BlackBerry devices.
It requires iPhone running iOS 2.2.1 or later, Blackberry Curve 8300 and 8800 series running OS 4.5
or later.
The mbrace mobile app version 2 is available free of charge on iPhone only and includes all available
features in version 1 plus Mobile Concierge (requires mbrace PLUS subscription), location with
roadside assistance call, and lets the user save multiple accounts.
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Figure 11: Mercedes-Benz mbrace Mobile App
Copyright 2011 iSuppli Corporation, a Company which was acquired by IHS Inc. All Rights Reserved. Confidential Patents Pending
Figure 11: Mercedes-Benz mbrace Mobile App
Source: Mercedes-Benz | August 2011
Nissan
Nissan offers the Nissan Leaf Remote Control app for the iPhone as a free download from the
iTunes App Store. The app enables drivers to call in to their vehicles and check things like lithium-ion
battery status by linking up to the Leaf's built-in IT system and relaying the status of the batteries
directory back to the screen. The app also enables Leaf owners to start up their air-conditioning unit
before they enter the car. Finally, the app enables drivers to directly call the Nissan EV Customer
Service Center.
The app was released in the U.S. in May 2010.
Figure 12: Nissan Leaf App
Copyright 2011 iSuppli Corporation, a Company which was acquired by IHS Inc. All Rights Reserved. Confidential Patents Pending
Figure 12: Nissan Leaf App
Source: Nissan | August 2011
PSA
Citroen eTouch now includes an iPhone app for multiple functions. The app, which can be downloaded
from the iTunes store, includes information for the eco-driving function and a telediagnostics function
found on the Citroen telematics services. The eco-driving function notes how much CO2 the drivers
are emitting, what their weekly emissions are, how they compare to previous weeks, as well as how
they compare to other Citroen eTouch users.
The telediagnostics feature alerts drivers to problems they should have checked out over several
different areas of the car. It includes driver assist functions, security functions, the motor, and the
braking system.
The app can be downloaded from iTunes in any country but only in English and French, while the
Citroen eTouch services are found in every country that Citroen offers telematics.
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Figure 13: Citroen eTouch App
Copyright 2011 iSuppli Corporation, a Company which was acquired by IHS Inc. All Rights Reserved. Confidential Patents Pending
Figure 13: Citroen eTouch App
Source: Citroen | August 2011
Peugeot used the 2010 Paris Motor Show to offcially debut the customer ready version of the
Peugeot iOn. The rebadged Mitsubishi i-MiEV includes include Peugeot Connect, USB, Bluetooth,
MP3, and CD. The Peugeot Connect services will include the usual automatic crash notifcation,
roadside assistance, and SOS calling.
On the iOn there will also be a feet telematics services for companies, and an app that enables drivers
to check their charge level. The app is called Electric Driving and can be used via the user's smart-
phone or PC. The app is scheduled to be released in spring of 2011.
Toyota
Launched in October 2010, the Lexus Enform Mobile app gives subscribers access to parts of their
telematics subscription via their mobile device. The Lexus Enform Mobile app enables users to send
destinations to their vehicle navigation system; plan, review, and share their entire road trip from their
phone to Facebook, call for roadside assistance, and fnd nearby dealers and learn about information
on their vehicle including videos, as well as access the online Owners Portal for Enform users.
Tweddle Group Technologies worked with Lexus to develop and deploy the free app. The app can
support multiple vehicle subscriptions (for those users with more than one Enform-enabled Lexus
vehicle). The app is available for the iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad (iOS 3.0 or later) and will also be
available for download from the Android Market and BlackBerry App World. The app is available to
anyone but requires a subscription from LexusDrivers.com for a customized feature access.
Figure 14: Lexus Enform Mobile App
Copyright 2011 iSuppli Corporation, a Company which was acquired by IHS Inc. All Rights Reserved. Confidential Patents Pending
Figure 14: Lexus Enform Mobile App
Source: Toyota | August 2011
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Volvo
Late in 2010, Volvo released its On Call app in cooperation with Cross Country Automotive Services
(CCAS). While On Call used to be a monitored telematics service in North America, it currently
provides only roadside assistance for Volvo owners including towing, routing, lockout assistance, and
more and is compatible with the iPhone.
Figure 15: Volvo On Call App
Copyright 2011 iSuppli Corporation, a Company which was acquired by IHS Inc. All Rights Reserved. Confidential Patents Pending
Figure 15: Volvo On Call App
Source: Volvo | August 2011
In June 2011, Volvo released its remote telematics app for On Call across Europe in countries where
On Call is already available. The app was originally released in Sweden in early 2011 and is currently
available as a free download from both the Android Market and iTunes Store.
The application enables users to locate their vehicle, check the status of the windows and doors,
lock/unlock the doors, remotely start the heater, display vehicle information (VIN and registration),
and theft alert.
Other features include a virtual dashboard that enables the user to view at the fuel level, odometer,
trip meter, average fuel consumption, and average speed. The driver's journal feature enables users to
download trip detail from the past 40 days and store it as an Excel fle. Also available is a car check
feature that performs a "health check" on the vehicle and notifes the user about lights, oil level,
coolant level, brake fuid level, and oil pressure.
OEM Integration of Mobile Apps into the Head Unit
Rather than just creating apps for smartphones, automotive OEMs are also bringing app integration
solutions into the vehicle. A handful of OEMs and aftermarket system providersFord, Toyota,
BMW (Mini), Nokia, Harman (Aha Radio) and Pioneerhave successfully implemented mobile de-
vice app integration in the car.
SYNC AppLink
Ford has realized mobile app integration in its SYNC platform at the production level earlier than any
other OEM. SYNC AppLink, an industry-frst software application, gives SYNC users hands-free
voice control of their smartphone apps. Ford announced that the iPhone, BlackBerry, and Android-
based smartphones will be compatible with AppLink.
SYNC AppLink is available for the 2011 Ford Fiesta and 2012 Ford Mustang, Fusion, Fiesta, F-150
Super Duty, Expedition, E-Series, and Shelby GT500.
Pandora Internet radio, Stitcher news radio, and OpenBeak are the frst SYNC-enabled mobile apps.
Ford provides its SYNC SDK to third-party smartphone app developers individually. End-users can
download SYNC-supporting smartphone apps from the user's respective smartphone app stores.
However, depending on mobile platforms, the end-user usability of SYNC-supporting mobile apps
can be different, and Ford must track cross-platform compatibility of individual apps.
Meanwhile, Ford continues to grow the app developer community through its SYNC AppLink plat-
form. Through its dedicated SYNC developer website, Ford has a direct connection to the app
developer community where Ford received 2,500-plus app developer requests for its SDK. With the
SDK, developers can modify an existing app or create an all-new app that can interface with Ford
SYNC through AppLink.
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Categories under Ford consideration include personalized entertainment, personalized information
and news, LBS including navigation, traffc and business searches, notifcations and alerts leveraging
the SYNC ability to mash up vehicle information, GPS locations, and more; to provide the driver
with customized information and guidance, scheduling and planning apps that may include fight
status.
In addition to this, Ford also announced a plan to quadruple its global connectivity team and grow its
app developer network. Ford expects to grow the global Connected Services Solutions Organization
fourfold over the next four years, with a threefold jump for U.S. operations alone.
Toyota Entune
In the summer of 2011, Toyota will launch Entune, developed by Tweddle Groupa mobile device-
driven solution that brings Pandora, iheartradio, OpenTable.com, Movietickets.com, and Bing Local
Search functions into the vehicle head unit on the Prius V and Camry.
At the 2011 CES, Harman International frst announced its new scalable automotive multimedia
head unit in cooperation with Toyota, featuring EntuneDenso is the other supplier for Toyota that
integrates Entune into its head unit. Toyota drivers will need to download the Entune mobile app on
their Bluetooth enabled phone and pair it with the Entune-enabled system.
As shown in Figure 16, end-users need only download the app once, as the one app acts as a cloud-
based app aggregator and end-users will not need to check the Entune app compatibility with their
phones or cars. Toyota can avoid mobile platform fragmentation issues as long as they manage/
control a certain set of developer partners. However, developers need to work closely with Toyota/
Tweddle to ensure cross-platform portability of cloud-based content.
Figure 16: Toyota Entune
Copyright 2011 iSuppli Corporation, a Company which was acquired by IHS Inc. All Rights Reserved. Confidential Patents Pending
Figure 16: Toyota Entune
Source: Toyota | August 2011
BMW/Mini Connected
BMW is very committed to the process of integrating apps into the vehicle. BMW Connected enables
users to read Facebook and Twitter feeds and features a Web Radio application, all made possible
via the user's iPhone. The Connected Drive Group has also announced that it is working on a BMW
Connected application for Android and BlackBerry devices, to reach more customers. The same ap-
plies for its My BMW Remote application, which is currently only available via iTunes.
BMW of North America announced in April 2011 that all MY2011 and 2012 BMW vehicles equipped
with the BMW Connected Apps option will be able to stream Pandora Internet radio through the
iPhone app. Once the iPhone is connected to the vehicle via a USB cable (or through the center arm-
rest with an available snap-in adapter), Pandora radio functions are operated by the vehicle's existing
controls, with an on-board monitor and functionality including the ability to access existing stations,
create new stations, thumb-up or thumb-down tracks, and bookmark songs. The BMW Apps feature
has an MSRP of $250.00.
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In addition, BMW noted that it is also working on a Pandora-like application for Europe, rather than
just offering its web radio application. BMW is also looking into third-party app development, and
plans to release an SDK in the foreseeable future.
Figure 17: BMW Connected
Source: BMW | August 2011
BMWs Mini also has Mini Connected, which provides the basis for smartphone integration and
features telecommunications, entertainment, and online functions of a smartphone when in the car
while minimizing driver distraction.
The Mini Connected system tethers Apple devices through a 30-pin-connector on one end, and a
USB and Aux-in on the other end. Also, Mini Connected Plugin supports Apple's iPod out that ena-
bles Mini to display an iPod navigation menu in the vehicle's display and control the music playback
features of the iPhone, the iPod touch, and the iPod nano by using the existing vehicle controls.
Figure 18: Mini Connected
Source: Mini | August 2011
Available from Apple's App Store, the Mini Connected app integrates functions and can be operated
using the vehicle's HMI, such as joystick, steering wheel buttons, and on-board monitor. The Mini
Connected App enables iPhone users to integrate the entertainment and online functions, like access
to Web radio, news, Twitter, Facebook, Google Send to Car and Local Search, as well as Mini-specifc
driving style and situation apps (MiniMALISM Analyzer, Mission Control, and Dynamic Music).
Updates to the app are done via the App Store.
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Following are brief descriptions for each app:
Web radio enables the iPhone to receive online radio stations from around the world. Drivers
can browse stations by genre, country, and favorites.
News updates are available via RSS and displayed on the head unit screen.
Twitter: The latest tweets are shown, and preprogrammed messages can also be posted from
the car.
Facebook status and Like button, as well as posting using preset updates.
Google Send to Car: Get destinations sent from Google Maps website directly to the Mini
navigation system.
Google Local Search: Search for POIs near current location, and transfer the address direct to
the Mini navigation system.
MiniMALISM Analyzer: Analyses driving style, and awards points for fuel-effciency, accel-
eration, braking, and gear changes. Drivers can view their own score and compare it to other
members of the Mini community.
Auto Infotainment Content Overview
The following table shows an overview of auto infotainment content. The frst section lists current
high-volume and popular apps. Several winners are in the navigation/LBS category and include on-
board and off-board navigation and traffc information. Access to digital music on MP3 players and
smartphones are also popular, as are remote diagnostics.
Future winners are likely to be mobile search, Internet radio, social network apps, and apps that offer
money savings via coupons and mobile ads. The third section lists a few interesting issues.
Table 1: Auto Infotainment Content Overview
Key Information Other Information
Current High Volume Winners In-vehicle on-board navigation
Off-board navigation
Traffc information (w/wo probe)
LBS content
Digital music
Remote diagnostics
ACN or eCall
Communication
Tailored system SW apps
Mostly via MP/SP; telematics app
Broadcast & 2-way
Weather, parking, red-light camera
Mostly via MP3 devices & SPs
Increased car resale value
Included in most telematics systems
Voice, Email, texting, IM, Tweets
Future Winners Mobile search apps
Internet radio
Mobile ad, coupons etc. apps
Social network LBS apps
ECU software upgrades?
Need to understand travel direction
Streaming and cached music
How to address distraction issues?
Facebook-type or Foursquare-type?
Not if-question, but when
Other Issues How many content segments?
How many apps per segment?
SP apps dominance-how long?
What auto platforms will lead?
Will there be a long-tail effect?
Probably many similar products
Auto vs. Smartphone apps
GENIVI, Android, MS Auto, QNX
Source: IHS iSuppli |
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Search Engines: Local Search & Send to Car
IHS iSuppli sees content as a driving force for future apps. Even before the launch of in-vehicle apps,
local search as a means of searching for relevant content such as for points of interests (POIs) in a
navigation system has become an effcient way for drivers to fnd up-to-date content.
Local Search
Google, Bing and Yahoo! offer a location-based search service that includes local business information
and POI lookup.
In August 2007, BMW was the frst to add Google Local Search in Germany into its telematics
services profle. As an addition to BMW ConnectedDrive, Google Local Search joined BMW Online,
Assist and TeleService and was offered for free for the frst three years.
Since then, BMW has made Google Local Search available in any BMW with navigation and Assist
telematics in North America for MY2010 and newer. In the second half of 2010, BMW launched
Mini Connected in North America featuring a Mini Connected app that includes access to Google
Local Search.
Audi also utilizes Google Local Search as well as Google Earth and rolling Wi-Fi hotspot functionality,
as part of its Audi Connect system which brings real-time user-relevant information into the
vehicle.
Meanwhile, Google Local Search services have been incorporated in Renault Carminat TomTom
Live Services, the Toyota Touch&Go system, as well as in Mercedes-Benz Comand Online system
in Europe. TomTom Live Services with Sanyo hardware is also offered by Mazda as an option on its
new Mazda5 in Europe only.
In addition to navigation and telematics services, Carminat TomTom Live system includes HD
Traffc from TomTom and live weather updates. The Toyota Touch&Go system in Europe features
navigation, eco routing, traffc, speed limits, and speed camera warnings. Drivers also have onboard
connectivity to Google Local Search and destination routing through their smartphone. Finally,
Command Online offers Internet access via the user's mobile device and integrated services include
weather information, Google Local Search, as well as a Google Send to Car feature.
Microsofts Bing location-based services feature can be found in the Toyota Entune app, Ford
SYNC TDI services, and Hyundais Blue Link off-board navigation services. With ATX's off-board
interactive voice response (IVR) system, Hyundai drivers can access Bing-supplied LBS content,
including access to Bing Maps, POIs, addresses, restaurant ratings, gas prices, weather, and more.
In 2007, Nissan and Yahoo! Japan announced the start of a new service that enables drivers to access
Yahoo! Gourmet online via the Carwings navigation system in Japan. Yahoo! Gourmet provides
navigation assistance to fnd restaurants and view information including images, reviews by other
diners, and barcode coupons. Since then, Yahoo! Japan has been actively expanding its Yahoo!
Everywhere coverage to cellular phones, television, and navigation systems. Yahoo! Local Search is
available with Toyota G-Book mX/mX Pro solution that features Web Search Content which also
includes Google Local Search. Honda Internavi solution also provides a feature called the Internet
Link which provides Google Local Search and Yahoo! Gourmet services.
Send to Car
In addition to Local Search solutions, Google Maps Send to Car feature enables users to send business
listings and POIs directly to the vehicles built-in navigation systems. Google Maps Send to Car can be
found in the following vehicles: OnStar Gen 8+ models (Buick, Chevrolet, Cadillac, GMC, Hummer,
Pontiac, Saab, Saturn), Ford SYNC versions with TDI off-board services (MY2010+ Ford, Lincoln,
Mercury), BMW Assist vehicles (MY2009+), Mini Connected vehicles (MY2011+), Mercedes-Benz
vehicles with mbrace telematics (MY2010+), Audi vehicles with Audi Connect (MY2011+, A8, A7,
A6, and more), Nissan CARWINGS systems in Japan, Honda Internavi systems in Japan, Citroen
Vehicles in Europe with NaviDrive 3D head unit, and in the Hyundai/Kia Mozen telematics solution
in Korea.
In Japan, Toyota G-Book users can send Yahoo! location POIs from PCs and mobile phones to
Toyota G-Book compatible navigation systems. In addition to Honda and Nissan offering Google
Maps Send to Car feature, Yahoo!Drive User Generated Content (UGC) and Honda Internavi UGC
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share POIs, and users can then send Yahoo! POI information to Internavi-compatible navigation
systems. Nissan Carwings users can send location POIs from Yahoo! Japans WaiWai Map UGC to
Nissan Carwings compatible car navigation systems.
What Is Mobile App Integration
Mobile app integration in the car consists of two parts: HMI Integration and Content Integration.
HMI Integration includes the physical, voice, displays, graphics, and menu structure & app design,
whereas content integration refers to the third-party cloud-based app integration architecture and
specifes single or multiple transport protocols between mobile devices and the in-vehicle head unit.
HMI Integration
Physical HMI includes command and control from center stack buttons, steering wheel but-
tons, touch screen and/or joysticks.
Voice HMI includes in-vehicle or cloud-based speech recognition system (onboard/off-board)
and TTS engine.
Display HMI includes on-board head unit display with or without touch screen, radio display,
and Instrument Cluster Display (ICD).
Graphics HMI includes graphical user interface (GUI) with a brand-familiar ft and fnish,
which takes advantage of the high-resolution display, unique skin displayed on the head unit,
unique graphics HMI integration method with VNC architecture.
Menu Structure & App Design HMI.
Content Integration
Cloud app and content integration architecture.
Specifes wired or wireless connections such as USB, Bluetooth, or other interfaces.
Specifes single or multiple transport protocols between mobile devices and the in-vehicle head
unit.
Content Integration Examples
Content integration is being done by some OEMs like Ford who handle each third-party developer
partner individually. But cloud-based content aggregation platform providers are emerging to ease
the pain in the multiple integration process of cloud-based content. The next table shows examples
of connected infotainment integrators.
Table 2: Examples of Content Integrators
Company Key Information
Aha Mobile
(Harman)
Harman owned, working around the industry
Turns everything into a radio station
Location sharing, Facebook information, other content integrated via mobile phone
Signifcant future growth potential, yet competitor list is long
Zypr (Pioneer) Complete platform for content aggregation for car & other devices
Revenue potential is very high, if partners are interested in complete package solution
Tweddle Prior auto industry relations have lead to app development growth
Will continue to develop more apps, be more relevant, and enable technologies and content
Source: IHS iSuppli |
In order to integrate mobile apps into each proprietary auto infotainment system, auto OEMs or
aftermarket head unit makers have to use multiple transport protocols (via BT/USB) between smart-
phones and vehicle head units (which will have multiple web app clients). A smartphone is then
directly interacting with each web source via individual clients embedded in the head unit. This is not
a good future-proof solution as it requires multiple integration efforts on each individual app, as well
as ongoing software updates for the smartphone client.
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Most importantly, such an approach does not provide transitions to embedded connectivity. This is
where Aha Radio (owned by Harman International) and web app integrators/platform providers
are coming in. They use the "cloud platform" where clients for each web source are maintained and
interact with each web source on the cloud. They will use a single transport protocol/single app inte-
gration protocol between the smartphone and the cloud-based platform, which will lead to the same
process between the vehicle head unit and smartphone.
Of course, OEMs still have to fgure out vehicle HMI elements such as physical command & control,
displays, voice, graphics, and menu structure & app design HMI around the head unit app.
Figure 19: Aha Mobile
Source: Harman | August 2011
Pioneer opened Zypr (formerly PAIS) a voice-controlled device portal that normalizes the interface
between Internet services and connected devices. As seen below, the initial release of Zypr features
services such as natural language voice recognition from VoiceBox, weather from AccuWeather,
restaurant recommendations and local search from Yelp, local travel and event search from Wcities,
social networking from Facebook and Twitter, Internet radio from Slacker and Tuner2, and produc-
tivity from Google Calendar.
The platform also enables revenue sharing opportunity for device vendors with the potential to
receive a percentage of revenue generated from consumer subscriptions, as well as advertising.
According to Pioneer, the Zypr API simplifes connectivity for device manufacturers, enabling them
to easily create mash-ups from multiple information sources, and giving them customization and
control of the user experience without requiring the use of an app store. By accessing aggregated
services in the cloud, device makers can easily handle the changing services.
With device-agnostic cloud-based app integration, the user experience would be maximized as content
would be able regardless of the device. The downside of device-agnostic cloud-based app integration
is an unproven business model where ad-supported revenues are divided up amongst players.
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Figure 20: Pioneer Zypr
Source: IHS iSuppli | August 2011
The Pioneer Zypr platform presents open-standard interfaces for voice UI, navigation and maps,
local search, social networking, music & radio, and video & TV among other services. The Zypr
platform is a device portal that normalizes the interface between the Internet services and connected
devices by creating a common, stable method for accessing a wide array of constantly changing
Internet service APIs. Zypr reduces the impact of service and API changes.
This interface enables device vendors to add new service offerings quickly, eliminating the need for
signifcant investment in proprietary solutions, and saving vendors from the pitfall of trying to guess
the next killer app. The platform also enables a revenue sharing opportunity for device vendors, with
the potential to receive a percentage of revenue generated from consumer subscriptions to basic and
premium packages, as well as advertising. Zypr is device agnostic, meaning it is not dedicated to a
single hardware platform, but instead is fexible enough to work with any device, and will enable
a completely connected and aggregated user experience.
As previously mentioned, Toyota Entune users must download the Entune software in order to
run the Toyota-approved apps for use on the vehicle head unit. Toyota's Entune enables integration
with mobile applications such as iheartradio, Pandora, Bing local search, MovieTickets.com, and
OpenTable.com restaurant reservations via Bluetooth connectivity (SPP). Plus, the system will allow
for in-dash app support enabling users to add new apps as they become available. Drivers can make
hands-free phone calls and control several music sources like HD Radio all via voice commands,
and a TTS function will read incoming SMS text messages as well. Voice control for those apps
is not enabled yet, except for Bing local search, which includes voice search as part of the app.
However, Toyota's Entune system will support voice HMI integration for such mobile app control
in the future. It is interesting to note that Toyota announced most smartphones and even feature
phones as compatible devices.
Single app cloud-based aggregators provide simple one-to-one interface with one app to one
head unit, enables vast amounts of cloud-based content into the car without incremental design
work, and OEMs and Tier 1 suppliers still own relationships between a content provider and a car
(interchangeable parts). Nevertheless, one of the disadvantages to using a single app cloud-based
aggregator is that complicated apps require more complicated software running on the head unit.
On the other hand, advantages to using cloud-based aggregation apps are minimal work on the part
of OEMs or Tier 1 suppliers to integrate slews of cloud-based content while IVR technology enables
users to access data easily, all while stored off-board. However, licensing fees could prove to be more
expensive than other methods.
IHS iSuppli believes that open and standardized integration platforms will ensure a broader
participation from OEMs, Tier 1 suppliers, and third-party app developers. Currently, it is hard to do
so as there are not many standardized platforms or integration systems.
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At the end of the day, the most important thing is to ensure fexibility of future-proof mobile
app/device integration platforms for automakers, which will be open and standardized software
architecture-based systems, not hardware-dependent infotainment system.
OS and Middleware
An important trend that is making apps integration feasible is the use of software platforms as the
foundation of head unit and infotainment systems. This software platform is usually divided into two
segmentsoperating system and middleware.
The term middleware has been around for over 30 years, but was primarily used in legacy systems and
is new in the embedded automotive software segment. The basic meaning of middleware is software
that sits between the operating system and the embedded applications.
The boundary between middleware and the OS is somewhat arbitrary and can vary by company and
application segment. In large computer systems with large memory and disks, the operating system
usually includes most middleware because most applications use a large portion the middleware
functionality. In the large systems, middleware tends to be software that connected these systems into
networks including the Internet.
In smaller systems and especially in embedded systems, middleware functionally varies greatly be-
tween applications and product segments. Hence it is advantageous to remove middleware function-
ality from the operating systems and then include selected middleware functionality based on what
applications are used in the embedded system. This also gave a big boost to application programming
interfaces (APIs) that are now so prevalent in embedded automotive software.
This trend has another major advantage as many companies can now compete in each middleware
category and over time the so-called best-in-class for any middleware segment will have success and
the lower quality version will disappear. Hence middleware is becoming a major trend and will see
increasing importance in embedded systems and especially in automotive infotainment systems.
The GENIVI Alliance is a good example of how the middleware strategy is being used to create a
large community of middleware suppliers that will compete for Tier 1 and auto OEM businesses in
infotainment systems.
Middleware Categories
There are a variety of middleware categories emerging for embedded automotive software. It is im-
portant to notice that there is considerable overlap between middleware for automotive infotainment
apps, consumer electronics and wireless devices. The functionality is similar and from the middleware
suppliers' viewpoint, the market size is much larger. In many cases the automotive infotainment mar-
ket is not large enough to interest middleware suppliers, at least not early in the market expansion
phase.
Here are some of the key middleware segments:
Communication middleware: This type of middleware connects applications to wireless devices
via Bluetooth or Wi-Fi which facilitates the download of cloud-based content. Or this could go via
an embedded communication link to download cloud content such as email and messages, music,
POIs, and navigation routes.
German software company Jungo has announced a middleware solution that focuses on communica-
tion via 3G, 4G, Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, or USB for in-car infotainment and Internet connectivity. It also
provides an open platform for easy integration with mapping and telematics applications, with sup-
port for a variety of operating systems including Linux, QNX, Windows CE, and ulTRON.
Content middleware: Once the content has been transferred to the car's infotainment systems an-
other middleware category has to render the content into an understandable form, such as a speaker
for music and speech, or through a display for visual information.
Content middleware has the largest number of developers such as Pioneer (Zypr), Aha Radio,
iheartradio, Rovi, Gracenote and Tuneln Radio.
Harman's Aha Radio platform also brings audio, web and social networking content into the vehicle
through a voice-controlled HMI.
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Web access middleware: This category includes web browsers and other programs that are used
to access cloud-based content. There is a large variety of add-on software that is used within this
category.
Device driver software: This category can have an overlap with the OS, as in the PC industry where
the device drivers are part of the OS. It is not clear whether the device driver software will be con-
sidered middleware or OS in auto infotainment, possibly a bit of both.
HMI middleware: This type of middleware overlaps with the HMI part of the application. HMI
middleware includes text-to-speech (TTS) and speech recognition software.
SVOX offers its one-shot speech-enabled address entry which is available on TomTom PNDs.
SVOXs solution shows the direction of how address entry should be implemented in all navigation
systems, especially in-vehicle navigation systems.
Other middleware: There are many other specialized middleware categories either in use or emerg-
ing. Software that emulates programs from other platforms is available and includes Java virtual
machine emulators. Java is a way of levering programs that are available for many platforms but it
usually has a performance penalty which for most programs does not matter. Virtualization software
is another method of making old or legacy software run in a new environment.
There will undoubtedly be other middleware categories emerging over the next few years. Meanwhile,
the majority of the middleware in existence today is focused on communication and content as sev-
eral players are showcasing their solutions.
Head Unit Integration Process & HMI
The basic head unit HMI trends are important for future apps integration and the key trends are
listed in Table 3. Speech is increasing in importance as it has less driver distraction than other current
technologies. Speech recognition is particularly important for control and command functions, and
text-to-speech solutions are growing in importance because it can give the driver information on a
variety of subjects with relatively low driver distraction.
Multifunction controls remain a technology for premium priced cars and it is not clear how pervasive
it will be in future systems. Steering wheel controls are growing rapidly for head unit and smartphone
related applications and seems to be very popular.
Digital displays are also growing strongly and will be important for many functions including apps
integration. The instrument cluster display has added multifunction digital display for information
content. However, the long-term trend is to replace the traditional ICD with a full LCD. The head
units are also increasingly connected to digital ICD displays and improve the HMI experience.
Table 3: HMI Trends
Trends Comments
Speech Speech recognition as control input
Text-to-speech for output info
TM HFI, Navi, others
Navi, messaging, others
Touch Input control non-critical functions
Strong growth in USA & Japan
Navi, comfort systems
EU use is lagging
Multi-Function
Control
Pioneered by BMW and Audi
Increasing use in Europe
MF controllers on mid-range cars
Steering wheel controls: rapid growth
iDrive, MMI
BMW, MB, Audi, others
Little use by US/AP OEM
All regions
Digital Displays Partial digital ICD is common
Digital ICD emerging in luxury cars
Digital ICD as multifunction output
Continued center display growth
HUD remains niche until better tech
Dual-view will remain niche market
Rearview mirror has potential
Analog and digital ICD
Rapid growth likely
Driver info, TM, ADAS, Navi
Navi, comfort systems
Only luxury autos
Cost premium too high
First aftermarket; now OEM
Source: IHS iSuppli |
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OEM HMI Take-Up Rates
Figure 21 shows the attach rates for key HMI technologies in the U.S. auto market. Speech recogni-
tion is the leader with attach rates growing from 45.5% in 2009 to more than 86% in 2017. Head units
with displays (also called center displays) will grow from 19% in 2009 to nearly 58% in 2017. Touch
input is primarily used in navigation systems and is projected to grow from 9.6% in 2009 to more
than 36% in 2017. Full LCD-based instrument cluster displays will start slow, with primary usage in
luxury autos and will only reach a 13% attach rate in 2017.
Figure 21: OEM HMI Take-Up Rate
Copyright 2011 iSuppli Corporation, a Company which was acquired by IHS Inc. All Rights Reserved. Confidential Patents Pending
Figure 21: OEM HMI Take-Up Rate
0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
60%
70%
80%
90%
2009 2011 2013 2015 2017
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ICD LCD
Touch Input
H-U Display
Speech Input
Source: IHS iSuppli |
HMI Trends for Mobile Apps
In terms of app integration, Figure 22 shows how cloud-based apps ( including Internet radio) are
brought into the vehicle. The example on the left side of the chart is physical connectivity while the
one on the ride side is where the app is running on the head unit.
Figure 22: HMI Trends for Mobile Device Integration
Source: IHS iSuppli | August 2011
It is the assessment of IHS iSuppli that the approaches where apps run natively on the head unit are
the most complex to implement, but provide an OEM with the greatest control over the HMI. The
examples on the left side are the easier approaches to implement and faster to market, but provide
less control over the HMI.
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In-vehicle smartphone tethering takes advantage of hardware resources, such as the head unit, already
available inside the car, resulting in more accurate control for an OEM when it comes to safety and
driver distraction issues. Other advantages of direct head unit integration include: maximized device
compatibilityas API is integrated once an app is downloaded, and the ability of OEMs and Tier
1 suppliers to collaborate with the app developer on design specifcs. However, direct head unit
integration leads to OEMs and Tier 1 suppliers taking on a lot of developer community nurturing, as
well as requiring more time and resources to develop each additional application.
Apple iPod Out
BMW announced its support for the new iPod Out feature released in iOS 4. It provides BMW and
Mini drivers with an intuitive way of using their iPhone and iPod Touch in vehicles. iPod Out ena-
bles BMW and Mini entertainment systems to display and control the music playback feature of the
iPhone and iPod Touch directly within the vehicle's main display. In other words, the menu structure
or user interface of the Apple device is rendered on the in-vehicle display.
The integrated iPod navigation menu can be safely operated through the vehicle's controls, and utilize
all playlists, including the "Genius" feature. Genius creates a playlist of songs based on selections
from the user's library. Vehicles equipped with this technology will be able to adapt more quickly to
the software lifecycles of the iPod touch and iPhone.
RealVNC's VNC Mobile Solution for Automotive
The VNC Mobile Solution for Automotive is an OEM package that supports a range of in-vehicle
embedded operating systems including Linux, Windows Automotive, CE, QNX, Qt, Android, and
other proprietary operating systems. The VNC solution permits mobile devices to be automatically
detected, accessed and controlled through the head unit touch-screen, hard keys, or steering wheel
controls as they enter the vehicle.
Clarion is integrating the VNC Viewer into its next-generation HMI design embedded within the ve-
hicle head unit. RealVNC continues to provide cross-platform solutions with leading mobile devices
supported, including Windows Mobile, Symbian, Blackberry, iPhone, Android, WebOS, and Linux.
Clarion has licensed RealVNC's VNC Mobile Solution for Automotive to implement terminal mode.
Jungo and RealVNC announced a partnership to provide connectivity between personal mobile de-
vices and in-car infotainment systems. Jungo will provide its Automotive Connectivity Middleware
and RealVNC will offer its terminal mode solution.
The combined Automotive Connectivity Middleware and VNC Mobile Solution for Automotive
enables the head unit to detect, access and control mobile devices in the vehicle and show their un-
modifed content on the dashboard display. This solution features VNC's remote access and control
together with device connectivity, media and network management, and USB and Bluetooth protocol
stacks from Jungo. The RealVNC Mobile Solution for Automotive supports a wide range of mobile
operating systems and legacy devices, also providing support for handsets that allow terminal mode.
One of the key benefts of the proposed solution is that it is able to flter unsafe applications so that
they cannot be run while driving.
Terminal Mode
Terminal Mode is specifed around a set of non-proprietary standards. It uses IP technologies in
order to be independent of the physical transport mechanism. Legacy wireless car connectivity solu-
tions like Bluetooth HFP or A2DP are supported, as well as wired connectivity. Besides Bluetooth,
audio can be streamed using the Real-Time Protocol (RTP) over User Datagram Protocol (UDP).
Figure 23: Terminal Mode
Copyright 2011 iSuppli Corporation, a Company which was acquired by IHS Inc. All Rights Reserved. Confidential Patents Pending
Figure 23: Terminal Mode
Source: Nokia | August 2011
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On top of unlimited access to the mobile devices user interface, Universal Plug and Play (UPnP) is
used to give access to only a limited set of applications and Virtual Networking Computing (VNC)
is used to replicate the phones display.
Nokia's Terminal Mode can either make all apps available for fast integration of new apps with re-
stricted access while driving, or add car specifc apps by extending existing apps for optimal usage in
cars... The greatest beneft of this system is its protocol-invariant and standardized integration (both
mobile platform and auto infotainment operating system agnostic).
Nokia announced the creation of the Car Connectivity Consortium to focus on new in-vehicle tech-
nologies that employ standards like Terminal Mode and near feld communication (NFC). The Car
Connectivity Consortium is an open alliance that focuses on cross industry contribution. Founding
members of the consortium include Daimler, General Motors, Honda, Hyundai Motor Company,
Toyota, Volkswagen, Alpine, Panasonic, LG Electronics, Nokia, and Samsung. The Car Connectivity
Consortium will focus on further developing the Terminal Mode standard, and address certifcation
and branding.
At the 2011 International CES, Continental showed that it is working with Nokia on Terminal Mode
technology to enable drivers to connect, display and control mobile phone applications via an in-
vehicle display to improve the usability of services, such as telephony, navigation, social networking,
and music.
Funkwerk Dabendorf demonstrated the integration of smartphones in the vehicle and brought its
version of Terminal Mode at the 2011 CeBIT show in Hanover, Germany. Using the fexible soft-
ware architecture, applications can be controlled using the controls in the vehicle, while the vehicle's
existing cockpit display and speakers are used for visual and audio output. The Funkwerk Mobile
Device Management Software Framework enables fast interfacing of new devices and apps with the
central infotainment system. The interface between the smartphone and infotainment system uses
three protocols in Terminal Mode. The screen content of the phone is projected onto the head unit
over VNC, then the head unit returns all control commands back to the smartphone.
The audio transmission runs over RTP & BT (Real-Time Protocol & Bluetooth: Hands Free Profle,
A2DP) while UPnP permits phone apps certifed by Terminal Mode. The data transfer takes place by
means of Internet protocol via a WLAN connection.
Johnson Controls (JCI) introduced its newest center stack design that involves a plethora of in-
vehicle infotainment and connectivity and will be available in MY2014 vehicles. The technology in
the center stack includes natural language voice recognition, music playback via A2DP or USB, ac-
cess to various apps like Pandora, access to JCI-developed phone apps, GPS and LBS services, and
upgradable architecture for software updates and new software applications. Also included will be
various Bluetooth profles such as HFP, PBAP, A2DP, and phone-book image transfers and text/e-
mail messaging via text-to-speech.
JCI will be including Nokia Terminal Mode HMI as well, which means that the HMI on the center
stack will mimic the user's smartphone. One interesting note is that JCI will be developing their own
apps to use on the center stack, rather than allowing access to apps already on the market like those
from Apples App Store or the Android Market.
DirectVoxx
DirectVoxxs SmartDock takes a Terminal Mode like approach as it uses virtualization technology
that enables smartphone applications to run alongside native apps on embedded devices, supporting
a variety of connected and remote control scenarios. For example, an Internet radio application run-
ning on an iPhone or Android handset can appear as another media source on an in-car infotainment
system, providing tuning and playback control through the in-car HMI just like AM/FM or satellite
radio.
Even graphically-intensive applications like turn-by-turn navigation can run over the SmartDock link,
eliminating the need for multiple special purpose device docks in the car or expensive in-car GPS
solutions. In its initial release, SmartDock will support the iPhone and Android platforms, with ad-
ditional smart phone device support to follow in the future.
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The Role of Media Tablets
One of the main disadvantages mobile and smartphones have when brought into the car is the screen
size. Both driver and passengers are usually passive with regards to incoming data in a way that they
absorb and consume information and media, but do not create content. For these reasons, media
tablets could be the next future consumer devices to be massively adopted (and adapted) by OEMs.
Unlike PCs, laptops, and Netbooks that target creation of content, the purpose of media tablets is
to communicate, browse, search, read information, and enjoy media and social networks. In addition,
media tablets are distinguished from other devices in that tablets are essentially only a touch screen.
This peculiarity, along with a missing keyboard, confrms that tablets are focused on content con-
sumption rather than creation.
Furthermore, additional advantages of tablets are that they can amplify functionalities already present
in handsets, while removing usability disadvantages of those same handsets. For example, their screen
size allows a more comfortable browsing of various applications and an easier access to menus and
services via a more intuitive and user-friendly interface.
Having already experienced the second generation Apple iPad 2, consumers have contributed to a
thinning-out of unnecessary features and functionality after much market feedback. Even aggressive
competition, which many companies managed to set up, fostered improvements and helped mature
adoption of tablets in the automotive segment.
Meanwhile, a number of specialized companies are providing tablets, as well as smartphones with
vehicle-centric applications. Location-based, maps, POI, augmented reality and social networking
appls already found in said consumer devices are poised to spread quickly as they take advantage of
Internet access and communication capabilities ranging from Wi-Fi to 2G, 3G or LTE technologies.
For example, Luxoft has created an Android-based software platform called LUXnet. The software
platform was introduced at the 2010 Telematics Update Munich event. Features on the platform
include social networking, navigation, multimedia and connectivity services, dynamic POIs, and voice
over IP (VoIP). LUXnet supports BeagleBoard-compatible hardware platforms, and works with a
variety of interfaces, including CAN, HDMI, USB, SD cards, 3G, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth.
LUXnet is designed for in-car social networking and dynamic navigation use, and comes with integrated
Facebook and Twitter capabilities. Additional LUXnet features include: Internet connectivity, support
for application downloads, intelligent data caching and geocaching. LUXnet is a software platform
that can be used on either in-car infotainment systems or portable navigation devices.
Luxoft has also announced the availability of the new Android-based software platform developed
specifcally for rear-seat entertainment (RSE) systems. The new DroidBuzz, a prototype which can
be seen in Figure 23, is based on Android 2.2 Froyo. Due to its low-cost high-performance ARM
hardware platform, DroidBuzz can work on a variety of MCU modules from different vendors.
The Luxoft software platform also enables multimedia and online connectivity features, along
with the support of regular Android applications to the RSE systems, head units, PNDs and other
infotainment systems. The software is compatible with tablets, smartphones and other wireless
devices using Android.
Figure 24: DroidBuzz
Copyright 2011 iSuppli Corporation, a Company which was acquired by IHS Inc. All Rights Reserved. Confidential Patents Pending
Figure 24: DroidBuzz
Source: Luxoft | August 2011
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As seen in the Figure 25, DroidBuzz supports 3G and Bluetooth connectivity, providing a tablet
computer-like experience for car users by enabling them to surf the Internet, use social media net-
works, download content, and more.
Figure 25: DroidBuzz UI Profiles
Copyright 2011 iSuppli Corporation, a Company which was acquired by IHS Inc. All Rights Reserved. Confidential Patents Pending
Figure 25: DroidBuzz UI Profiles
Source: Luxoft | August 2011
Lately, Luxoft and Elektrobit Corporation (EB) have jointly developed a platform for a wallet-sized
in-car media server. The device, designed by EB, features 2G/3G connectivity and GPS, and oper-
ates as a DLNA server, Wi-Fi hotspot, and both Ethernet and USB host. In addition, it can be used
as a mobile TV receiver, supporting DVB-T, DVB-H or other mobile TV standards through the use
of an external antenna. Luxoft's client software ensures interactivity with the vehicle's head unit, rear
seat entertainment systems, and Android, Apple, or Linux-based devices such as iPads, tablet PCs
and more.
IHS iSuppli believes that integration of tablets into cars is a clear trend in near future, particularly
when thinking about tablets as an additional screen to main head unit or to RSE systems. In the case
of RSE systems, IHS iSuppli already sees Tier 1 suppliers and OEMs showing and designing such
solutions. The clear advantage of tablets versus factory-installed RSE systems lies in the fact that
factory-installed RSE systems so far are a luxury feature, and therefore not broadly deployed mainly
due to cost considerations. Instead, integration of tablets into RSE systems would provide a solution
to offer services and media content to passengers without increasing OEM costs and compromising
safety.
What tablets missand might be missingis a standard solution in terms of connectivity which
would let passengers consume content not just generated by the tablet itself, but content streamed
from a head unit as well. Such a limitation would not offer consumers an easy plug-&-play option for
their tablets without having specifc hardware adapters and proprietary software.
The cost position of tablets might still not have reached the sweet spot for a wide distribution and
introduction into vehicles. Nevertheless, competition will defnitely push prices down and car manu-
facturers might beneft in terms of image and branding, offering its customers a comfortable and a
low-cost solution to be entertained.
Given its portability, the introduction of tablets into vehicles will also be facilitated via aftermarket
(AM) channels and consumer quality levels. Specifcally, such devices will be easily and comfortably
removed from the car and will not experience environmental stress which could compromise device
functionality and reliability.
The current IHS iSuppli tablet research shows that over 17 million units were sold in 2010, which is
forecasted to surpass 58 million in 2011 and to top 120 million in 2012 on a worldwide basis.
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The Connected CarIn-Vehicle Apps for the Future
Apps Integration Forecasts
The popularity of vehicle-centric apps will depend on several factors: One is the number of times an
app gets downloaded; another is HMI integration potential to lower driver distractions while using
the apps.
As part of this report, IHS iSuppli has forecasted four apps segments that will be described in the
next sections. These four segments have enough activity so that it is feasible to provide a regional and
worldwide forecast.
Smartphone-based remote control functions
Internet radio apps integration
Social network apps integration
Head units with apps integration
There will be many more apps that will be integrated to the apps head unit, but currently there is not
enough information to provide a reasonable market forecast
Smartphone-Based Remote Control
Smartphone apps for remote control (RC) functions are currently only available on cars with embed-
ded telematics systems. The remote control apps that run on the smartphone communicate with the
telematics service provider (TSP) to get the commands to be completed. Battery-electric vehicles
(BEV) will also have such apps as they need to get information from the charging status and remotely
start the air conditioner or heater while the BEV is still plugged in.
The OEMs with smartphone RC apps in the U.S. include all GM brands, Mercedes-Benz, and
Hyundai. In Europe, only BMW and Volvo have smartphone RC apps. In China, GMs OnStar has
introduced smartphone remote control apps. The next table summarizes the estimate of IHS iSuppli
and forecast of smartphone remote control apps.
Table 4: Table 5: Smartphone-Based Remote Control Auto Integration Sales
Unit Sales (000) 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018
USA 437 2,036 2,587 3,594 4,969 6,504 7,505 8,501 9,564
N. America 484 2,235 2,811 3,909 5,407 7,087 8,167 9,258 10,412
W. Europe 51 288 523 909 1,556 2,635 4,302 5,995 7,216
Asia Pacifc 288 546 908 1,407 2,094 2,962 3,975 5,076
Other Regions 2 10 35 90 194 350 545
Worldwide 535 2,811 3,883 5,737 8,405 11,906 15,625 19,578 23,250
Source: IHS iSuppli |
The smartphone RC apps in the U.S. will grow from 430 thousand in 2010 to nearly 9.6 million in
2018 for a CAGR of over 44%. Worldwide smartphone RC app availability is forecasted to jump
from 530 thousand in 2010 to over 23 milliona CAGR of 60%.
Internet Radio Apps Integration
Music has been the leading entertainment category in the car for over 80 years and it will continue
to maintain this status. However, the music sources in the car will continue to change with Internet
radio emerging as a promising new in-car music source.
Internet radio has two segments: genre and streaming radio stations. The genre type is currently the
most popular segment with Pandora being the most prominent example. Other important genre-
based music providers are Slacker, Spotify, and Last.fm. There are over 12 million songs available on
the Internet and hence the genre type has a large supply to select from. The streaming radio channels
are mostly actual broadcast stations that provide their radio streams to aggregators that provide thou-
sands of stations to their customers. TuneIn, Live365, and iheartradio are some of the examples.
The forecast shown in Table 6 shows the number of cars sold with Internet radio integration. Only
systems that integrate or interface an Internet radio service to the head unit are included (smart-
phones with Internet radio that do not have a hands-free interface to the head unit are excluded).
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The Connected CarIn-Vehicle Apps for the Future
There are already about 50 models in the U.S. that have Internet radio integration or will have for MY
2012. BMW, Ford, Lincoln, Mercedes-Benz, Scion, Buick, Chevrolet and Hyundai are the OEMs in
the U.S. with Internet radio app integration. In Europe, only BMW and Mini offer Internet radio so
far. In China, there are four Chinese luxury models that are in the process of adding Internet radio
integration.
Table 5: Internet Radio Auto Integration Sales
Unit Sales (000) 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018
USA 149 651 2,297 3,729 5,249 6,735 8,238 9,639 10,929
N. America 149 651 2,299 3,736 5,269 6,783 8,325 9,781 11,129
W. Europe 19 95 272 656 1,302 2,258 3,624 5,493 7,520
Asia Pacifc 21 97 297 683 1,393 2,520 3,933
Other Regions 6 29 85 207 457 877 1,432
Worldwide 168 746 2,599 4,518 6,953 9,931 13,799 18,671 24,014
Source: IHS iSuppli |
Internet radio is clearly most important in the U.S. where the number of cars sold with Internet radio
will grow from 149 thousand in 2010 to over 10.9 million in 2018a CAGR of 71%. Worldwide
Internet radio auto integration sales are projected to grow from 168 thousand units in 2010 to over
20 million in 2018, a CAGR of 85%.
Figure 26 shows the forecasted amount of in-car Internet radio users. This assumes a four-year life
time of head unit Internet radio integrated systems. The Internet radio users in the U.S. are forecasted
to grow from 800 thousand in 2011 to over 35.5 million in 2018. Worldwide Internet radio users are
projected to grow from 900 thousand in 2011 to over 66 million in 2018.
Figure 26: Regional Internet Radio Users
Copyright 2011 iSuppli Corporation, a Company which was acquired by IHS Inc. All Rights Reserved. Confidential Patents Pending
Figure 26: Regional Internet Radio Users
0
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2011 2012 2014 2016 2018
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Asia-Pacific
O. Regions
Source: IHS iSuppli |
Social Network Apps Integration
Social network services have conquered the PC and smartphone markets and there is little doubt that
the automobile is the next growth segment. Social network apps on smartphones are used every-
where, but for lower driver distraction these apps need to be integrated into the head unit or telemat-
ics system.
The social network integration trend has started, and so far BMW, Ford, Mini, Hyundai, and Lincoln
have done so in some of their MY2012 cars, with GM announcing they will offer social network
apps integration in the near future. In Europe, BMW, Mini, and Mercedes-Benz are deploying social
network apps. In Japan, Twitter is available on most Nissan models. In China, there are four Chinese
luxury models that are in the process of adding social network apps integration.
Table 6 summarizes the growth of social network apps integration sales by region. U.S. will grow from
330 thousand in 2011 to over 8.5 million units in 2018. Worldwide social network apps integration
sales is forecasted to grow from 450 thousand in 2011 to 21 million in 2018a CAGR of 73%.
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Table 6: Social Network Auto Apps Integration Sales
Unit Sales (000) 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018
USA 66 334 867 1,766 3,093 4,501 5,913 7,288 8,588
N. America 74 372 955 1,937 3,384 4,921 6,451 7,952 9,363
W. Europe 19 48 130 331 731 1,438 2,553 4,073 5,804
Asia Pacifc 9 27 71 196 449 898 1,690 2,960 4,451
Other Regions 6 31 95 227 494 904 1,426
Worldwide 102 447 1,163 2,495 4,658 7,485 11,187 15,889 21,045
Source: IHS iSuppli |
Figure 27 shows the forecasted social network users in car. This assumes a four-year life time of inte-
grated social network apps. The social network apps users in the U.S. are forecasted to grow from 400
thousand in 2011 to over 26 million in 2018. Worldwide Internet radio users are projected to grow
from 900 thousand in 2011 to over 66 million in 2018.
Figure 27: Regional Social Network Users
Copyright 2011 iSuppli Corporation, a Company which was acquired by IHS Inc. All Rights Reserved. Confidential Patents Pending
Figure 27: Regional Social Network Users
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2011 2012 2014 2016 2018
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O. Regions
Source: IHS iSuppli |
Head Units with Apps Integration
The integration of smartphone apps is just emerging and is expected to be an important trend in the
next fve years. As explained earlier, a variety of apps integration methods will be used ranging from
Terminal Mode, Aha Radio, and Pioneer Zypr, to OEM-specifc APIs. These systems are general
purpose integration apps that can accommodate a large variety of smartphone apps.
Table 7 shows forecasted yearly sales of head units with` smartphone app integration, which includes
all categories of solutions. The U.S. will grow from a few thousand units in 2011 to nearly 5 million
units in 2018.
Table 7: Head Units With Apps Integration Sales
Unit Sales (000) 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018
USA 5 44 133 446 1,153 2,168 3,442 4,967
N. America 5 48 146 487 1,260 2,365 3,758 5,419
W. Europe 5 31 112 351 786 1,452 2,323 3,362
Asia Pacifc 24 97 266 630 1,354 2,692 4,676
Other Regions 8 33 92 205 451 990 1,823
Worldwide 11 111 388 1,196 2,880 5,622 9,763 15,280
Source: IHS iSuppli |
Figure 28 shows the forecasted cumulative sales for head unit apps integration systems. The cumula-
tive sales for head unit apps integration systems in the U.S. are forecasted to grow from 50 thousand
in 2012 to over 12 million in 2018. Worldwide Internet radio users are projected to grow from 120
thousand in 2012 to over 35 million in 2018.
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The Connected CarIn-Vehicle Apps for the Future
Figure 28: Cumulative Smartphone Apps Integration Sales
Copyright 2011 iSuppli Corporation, a Company which was acquired by IHS Inc. All Rights Reserved. Confidential Patents Pending
Figure 28: Cumulative Smartphone Apps Integration Sales
0
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2011 2012 2014 2016 2018
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Source: IHS iSuppli |
Conclusions
This report shows the big-picture on how content fows from providers to the various systems in
the connected car (see Figure 29) and is infotainment centric. Six layers are included with the major
options listed for each layer.
Figure 29: Auto Apps Integration - Big Picture
Source: IHS iSuppli |
The content and apps layer is divided in auto-related and more general content segments. The com-
munication link layer lists the options that are available now or will appear in a few years. The apps
integration layer lists the key approaches for doing apps integration for infotainment systems, several
examples of auto apps integration solutions are shown as well. The platform layer is based on the
operating system platforms that are available for deployment today and in the next few years. The
ffth layer is the auto systems that the driver and passengers can use for connected content. A sixth
layer lists key auto OEMs by major regions to remind us that deployment will vary signifcantly by
OEM and by country/region..
There is an emerging wealth of vehicle-centric and vehicle-related smartphone apps. As more
apps become available in the near future, these smartphone apps will be used in the vehicle with
potential for severe driver distraction issues.
To lower the distraction factor of apps, there is a need for apps integration methods that can
be added to infotainment systems. Such apps integration systems are becoming available and
leading auto OEMs are starting to deploy their solutions.
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The Connected CarIn-Vehicle Apps for the Future
The emerging apps-based head units will have built-in apps that are supplied by the auto OEMs.
Some of these built-in apps will be included in every car because they will be used by nearly all
drivers. Examples are navigation, apps to play music, and Internet radio. The drivers will have
varied needs for other apps and this will be satisfed by letting each driver select additional apps
that will be downloaded and then become built-in apps as part of the head unit.
The apps-based head unit will also have a general purpose apps integration system that can inte-
grate apps from all major smartphones and all the emerging cloud-based content and services.
Open and standardized integration platforms will ensure a broader participation from OEMs,
Tier 1 suppliers, and third-party developers. But, currently, it is hard to do so due to the lack
of available standardized platforms or integration systems. These integration platforms will be
used for general purpose apps integration.
Content and apps integration is being done by some OEMs who handle each third-party devel-
oper partners individually. However, cloud-based content aggregation platform providers are
emerging to ease the pain in the multiple integration process of cloud-based content.
The built-in apps that will be part of the head units will need to be tailored to each OEMs
head unit architecture. The proven way to do this is via the APIs and several auto OEMs have
already started down this path.
Ford, Toyota, BMW, and other OEMs will continue to provide a proprietary platform to third-
party app developers. While Nokia's Terminal Mode, Aha Radio, and Pioneer Zypr will open
up more universal cloud-based platform participation from broader parties.
Open and standardized software -based systems, instead of hardware-dependent infotainment
systems, are among the most important factors is to ensure fexibility of future-proof mobile
app and device integration platforms for auto OEMs.
Four specifc apps categories are emerging and are receiving strong attention from the auto
OEMs: General smartphone apps integration, remote control of specifc vehicle functions,
Internet radio apps, and social networking apps.
Copyright 2011 iSuppli Corporation, a Company which was acquired by IHS Inc. Topical Report
Automotive Research
33
The Connected CarIn-Vehicle Apps for the Future
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The Connected CarIn-Vehicle Apps for the Future
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The Connected CarIn-Vehicle Apps for the Future