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MASARYK UNIVERSITY BRNO

FACULTY OF EDUCATION
English Language and Literature Department






Bachelor Thesis










Brno 2009

Gabriela Admkov



MASARYK UNIVERSITY BRNO
FACULTY OF EDUCATION
English Language and Literature Department








British Festivals and Their Songs
(Teaching British Festivals through Songs)
Bachelor Thesis






Brno 2009

Supervisor: Author:
Mgr. Jaroslav Such Gabriela Admkov











Prohlen:

Prohlauji, e jsem bakalskou prci zpracovala samostatn a pouila jen prameny
uveden v seznamu literatury.

Souhlasm, aby prce byla uloena na Masarykov univerzit v Brn
v knihovn Pedagogick fakulty a zpstupnna ke studijnm elm.



Declaration:

I declare that I worked on this bachelor work on my own and used only the resources
mentioned in the bibliography.
I agree with storing this work in the library of the Faculty of Education at the Masaryk
University Brno and making it accessible for study purposes.




Brno 19
th
April 2009 Gabriela Admkov


































Acknowledgments:


I would like to express my thanks especially to my supervisor, Mgr. Jaroslav Such, for
his interesting and inspiring ideas, valuable advice and worthy guidance during my
work on my thesis.
I am also very indebted to my family and friends who listened to my ideas and
encouraged me during the time I have been working on my thesis.
Finally, I would like to express special thanks to Klra Kovov for her help while
teaching the lesson plans.

Gabriela Admkov
- 5 -
TABLE OF CONTENTS


I. INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................... 6
I. 2. Teaching British Festivals ..................................................................................... 6
II. THEORETICAL PART ........................................................................... 8
II. 1. Introduction of a lesson = motivation ................................................................... 8
II. 1. 1. Motivating introduction in teaching festivals ............................................... 9
II. 2. The use of songs in teaching festivals ................................................................ 11
II. 3. The importance of teaching vocabulary in connection to festivals .................... 15
II. 3. 1. The use of pictures in teaching festivals..................................................... 16
II. 3. 2. Vocabulary definitions ............................................................................... 18
II. 4. Challenging activities in teaching British festivals ............................................ 19
II. 4. 1. Edutainment ................................................................................................ 20
II. 4. 2. The use of rewards in challenging activities .............................................. 21
II. 4. 3. Individual, pair and group work ................................................................. 21
II. 4. 4. Experiential Education ............................................................................... 23
III. CONCLUSION: .................................................................................... 24
IV. PRACTICAL PART ............................................................................. 25
LESSON PLAN 1 ....................................................................................................... 26
LESSON PLAN 2 ....................................................................................................... 30
LESSON PLAN 3 ....................................................................................................... 34
LESSON PLAN 4 ....................................................................................................... 38
LESSON PLAN 5 ....................................................................................................... 43
LESSON PLAN 6 ....................................................................................................... 47
V. RESUME ................................................................................................ 51
VI. BIBLIOGRAPHY ................................................................................. 52
VII. APPENDICES ..................................................................................... 57




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I. INTRODUCTION
I. 2. Teaching British Festivals

New Years Day, St. Valentines Day, Easter, All Fools Day, Mothers Day,
Halloween, Guy Fawkes Day, Bank Holidays those are only a few festivals celebrated
in Britain. It can be said that almost every moth has its own festival or at least Bank
Holiday. They teach us about traditions and customs of the country and they are a rich
source of cultural information.
The main topic of this thesis is teaching British festivals through songs in an
interesting and enjoyable way for the pupils. This gives them basic knowledge of how
the Brits celebrate some festivals and what vocabulary is connected to them because
without vocabulary the pupils will not be able to understand the lesson and basic
features. For my thesis I chose New Years Day, St. Valentines Day, Easter, Summer
Bank Holiday, Halloween and Christmas, which were confirmed by a British native
speaker as the main festivals that are celebrated in Britain and which I think the pupils
will enjoy as they can compare them with the Czech traditions and customs.
This bachelor thesis is divided into two major parts. The first part is theoretical
and focuses on the description of the activities used in the second, practical part and
why those activities and tasks are important and in what way they develop pupils skills.
They also suggest how those activities enrich pupils knowledge about the certain
festival. The theoretical part is divided into sections according to the practical part
Introduction of a lesson = motivation, The use of songs in teaching festivals, The
importance of teaching vocabulary in connection with festivals and Challenging
activities in teaching British festivals. All those activities are variously used in the
practical part to broaden pupils experience.
The second part is fully practical and divided into six lesson plans according to
six British festivals in the order in which they appear thorough the year New Years
Day, St. Valentines Day, Easter, Summer Bank Holiday, Halloween and Christmas. The
crucial activity used in every lesson plan is the use of songs. I have chosen those songs
according to their content and informational contribution for the pupils. Each lesson
plan also contains basic information for the teacher, such as time, materials needed, etc.
There is also a certain number of handouts for each lesson plan at the end of the thesis.
- 7 -
Moreover, I have tried some of the lesson plans in a language school to get some
feedback for myself and the results will be mentioned at the end of each lesson plan
tested.























- 8 -
II. THEORETICAL PART
II.1. Introduction of a lesson = motivation

There are several tips in almost every teachers book how to introduce an
English lesson but it depends only on the teacher how good his/her lessons introduction
will be and how much he or she will motivate the pupils. Introducing activity or the
warm-up activity is a short fun game which a teacher or trainer can use with students.
1
The purpose of these exercises is to get pupils attention, make them ignore disturbing
thoughts and get them focused and ready for the lesson.
Here are some of the warm-up activities to introduce the lesson suggested by
Enabling Educational Network
1
:

Find someone who...
Find the lie
Tongue twister
Associations
Memory games

But not only a well-prepared and engaging introduction is the key to a successful lesson
but also the teacher is one of the building stones. The teachers temper and mood is the
first thing the pupils see when he or she enters the class. If the teacher comes to the
class and looks tired, miserable, in a bad mood and the first thing he or she says is
open your books on page... is not only uninteresting and without any stimulus for the
pupils to look forward to their lesson but also very inactivating. The teacher has to be
not only enthusiastic about the subject but also stimulating for the pupils to enjoy their
lesson.
We cant change our personalities but we can alter the impression we give in
class: by smiling that doesnt mean that you have to walk around with a fixed grin,
but showing a friendly attitude warms the students to you...
2

1
Ideas for warm up activities. Enabling Educational Network. 8 April 2009.
<http://www.eenet.org.uk/key_issues/teached/cambodia_warmups.pdf>
2
Gower, Roger, Diane Phillips, and Steve Walters. Teaching Practice A handbook for teachers in
training. Oxford: Macmillan Education, 2005.

- 9 -
II. 1. 1. Motivating introduction in teaching festivals

The introduction in all festival lesson plans in this thesis pays special attention to
some kind of visual features typical for the mentioned festival and through which the
pupils learn at least basic characteristics, e.g. thanks to the Father Christmas costume
they see what he looks like, the use of scary Halloween introduction with a costume
hints that this festival is mysterious and nightmarish, etc. And there appears the
motivational stimulus in the pupils they realize that the lesson will be taught either by
Father Christmas or, for example, by a party person and they start to look forward to
what will follow.
The New Years Day lesson plan uses one of the typical introductions called
vocabulary spidergram
3
, which is writing pupils associations on a suggested topic on
the board. This introduction is a good vocabulary exercise that practices only words
connected to New Years Day and this drags the pupils into the lessons topic. Or as
NICK PEACHEY
3
on his website says: They are very useful tools to help you think
about and arrange words or ideas as well as to show the relationship between those
ideas or words. The teacher is also asked to wear a cone hat and I will highlight this hat
as the motivational point of the lesson the pupils can see that the teacher is a part of
the lesson and it is attracting for them to see their teacher in a different way than only in
the formal one. It is sure that the pupils will smile while seeing their teacher with a cone
party hat and smile is a pleasant or favourable disposition or aspect
4
which is needed
in every lesson to create a warm and motivational atmosphere. On the other, hand the
introduction of St. Valentines lesson plan is a bit thrilling, easeful and enthusiastic at
the same time. The teacher is asked to come to the class and create the typical before-
test situation when the pupils are told to put away all their textbooks and keep only a
pen and a piece of paper. The pupils get nervous and angry because it seems that they
are going to write a test and the teacher did not tell them beforehand. Then it comes to a
huge relief when the pupils realize that they are not going to write a test but that there is
going to be an activity lesson instead. The introduction does not involve the lessons
topic as it is the aim of the first exercise. For most students authentic

3
Peachey, Nick. Remember more vocabulary. Nicks Daily English Activities. 9 December 2008.
12 April 2009. < http://daily-english-activities.blogspot.com/2008/12/remember-more-
vocabulary.html>
4
Smile. The Free Dictionary. 2009. 12 April 2009 <http://www.thefreedictionary.com/smile>
- 10 -
materials, because they are real, are intrinsically more interesting and motivating and
they give students confidence when they understand them (GOWER, PHILLIPS,
WALTERS, 2005, p.83)
5
. Consequently the

crucial point of the introduction of the
Easter lesson plan is a little basket with ribbons and chocolate eggs that the teacher has
to bring to the lesson and that represent the authentic material. It is the first thing the
pupils see and they will be curious and above all interested what is inside and how all
the things will affect the lesson. The teacher uncovers the secret by asking what festival
is approaching and then the use of tongue twister cheers the class up. The tongue
twisters have been around for many years and still cause a lasting laughing effect on
everybody. Children really enjoy the silly way a twister sounds when saying them
fast.
6
The last three suggested lesson plans, that are Summer Bank Holiday, Halloween
and Christmas, have a similar introduction based on a costume and teachers dramatic
skills. When summer is a few weeks away, the minds of students and teachers alike
can sometimes venture off on a premature vacation
7
. And this is exactly the theme of
the Summer Bank Holiday lesson plan. The introduction here is very short but
engaging. The teacher is asked to wear a colourful flowery shirt and sunglasses this
introduction is likable itself because the pupils look forward to their holiday and they
can see that the lesson will be somehow special and will bring them closer to the desired
summer holiday. Nevertheless, Halloween lesson plan uses a bit scary but attractive
introduction based on a dramatic monologue including basic thematic information
before starting the first exercise and University of Malaya highlights this dramatic start:
Drama increases motivation and provides the incentive to work hard.
8
In the end,
Christmas is focused on the teachers ability to make fun of himself and to be creative
because: In order to create optimal conditions for learning, we need to include
activities which develop creativity fantasy and imagination that are so much part of the
world of primary-aged children and which can lead to positive new learning.
9
The aim

5
Gower, Roger, Diane Phillips, and Steve Walters. Teaching Practice A handbook for teachers in
training. Oxford: Macmillan Education, 2005. 83.
6
Funny Tongue Twisters. Fun Staff on the Web. 9 April 2009 <http://www.fun-stuff-on-the-
web.com/funnytonguetwisters.html>
7
Lewis, Beth. ABC Countdown to Summer. About.com: Elementary Education. 10 April 2009
<http://k6educators.about.com/cs/lessonplanslea/a/abcountdown.htm>
8
Sam, Wan Yee. Drama in Teaching English as a Second Language A Communicative Approach.
MELTA. University of Malaya. July 1999. 10 April 2009.
< http://www.melta.org.my/ET/1990/main8.html>
9
Read, Carol. 500 Activities for the Primary Classroom. Oxford: Macmillan Education, 2007.
- 11 -
of this lessons introduction is to take the pupils into the lesson and get them ready for
an interesting Christmas lesson taught by the Father Christmas.
To sum up: this thesis tries to make the lessons enjoyable and interesting from
the pupils very first sight and to make this first sight curious to what will follow.
CAROL READ (2007, p. 9)
10
mentions the role of curiosity in her book 500 Activities
for the Primary Classroom:

...it is also important to arouse and maintain childrens
curiosity, to generate a desire to learn and find out about things, and to make the act of
learning interesting, relevant and enjoyable in its own right.

II.2. The use of songs in teaching festivals

No one exactly knows why songs are powerful, but everyone knows from a
personal point of view that they are.
11


One of the main focuses of this bachelor work is the use of typical songs in a
language classroom, especially songs connected to a certain festival: Songs can be
used in discussions of culture. They are a rich mine of information about human
relations, ethics, customs, history, humor, and regional and cultural differences.
12
The
songs here represent this rich mine and they tell the story about a certain festival
themselves. They also contain characteristic vocabulary and theme.
There are many explanations of a song, e.g. according to the CAMBRIDGE
DICTIONARY
13
are songs a usually short piece of music with words which are sung

and according to the music teacher Mag. Bruno Seebacher from the Catholic University
College for Education Graz songs mean learning without knowing. Songs in general
help students to develop all the linguistic skills listening, speaking, writing and
reading and they are also a very good source for teaching English especially because:




10
Read, Carol. 500 Activities for the Primary Classroom. Oxford: Macmillan Education, 2007. 9.
11
Griffee, Dale T. Songs in action. Hemel Hempstead: Phoenix ELT, 1995. 4
12
Lems, Kirsten. Using Music in the Adult ESL Classroom. Eric digest. December 2001. 10 April
2009. < http://www.ericdigests.org/2002-3/music.htm>
13
Song. Cambridge Online Dictionary. Cambridge University. 10 April 2009
<http://dictionary.cambridge.org/define.asp?key=75749&dict=CALD>
- 12 -
they are funny and amusing
they are highly motivating and memorable
14

they are for all ages and levels of English
the pupils learn unwittingly the right pronunciation and vocabulary
they create a positive and warm atmosphere
15

they can be quickly prepared.


My experience is that songs are the most popular activity in a classroom mainly
because they are relaxing and even the CAMBRIDGE DICTIONARY
16
mentions this
aspect: music is a pattern of sounds made by musical instruments, singing or
computers, or a combination of these, intended to give pleasure to people listening to
it.
Songs in this thesis focus on a certain festival and cultural studies and each song
has some kind of connection to the whole lesson theme. There are also suggested
different kinds of activities to each song:

JUMBLED LYRICS
17
this activity practices the skill of listening itself. It
is advisable to use this game for longer songs with more words or for songs
that are quick or difficult to understand. MURPHEY (2002, p. 73)
17
in his
book Music and Song suggests: Choose a song, preferably one with a
narrative that tells a story this choice helps the pupils because if they do
not understand the song, they follow the story and it is possible for them to
match the strips, but the pupils improve their reading skills rather the
listening ones. However, the plus point of strips is that the pupils do not have
to focus on a particular word and then miss the rest of the song but they
focus on the song as a whole. This activity can be used either in groups, pairs
or individually. But it is advisable not to use this activity individually

14
Murphey, Tim. Music and Song. Oxford: Oxford University press, 2002. 3
15
Uchida, Helen Jarmol. "Music in the language classroom". Use it!. 12 April 2009
<http://useit.vn/content/view/665/92/lang,english/>
16
"Music. Cambridge Online Dictionary. Cambridge University. 12 April 2009
<http://dictionary.cambridge.org/define.asp?key=52595&dict=CALD>
17
Murphey, Tim. Music and Song. Oxford: Oxford University press, 2002. 73
- 13 -
because there can be a lot of strips (e.g. Peter Cottontail) and the pupils will
get puzzled and lost.
ERASED PART this activity gives an interesting way of enriching pupils
vocabulary. The pupils are forced to use their imagination and think of
vocabulary they have already learned to find the hidden word. Moreover, in
this activity pupils have to read the whole song, which contains basic St.
Valentines characteristics and which the pupils unwittingly learn. This task
was used in a lesson taught by Prof. Karl Wiedner from the Catholic
University College for Education Graz in Austria. He also mentioned that
this activity leads to intensifying the lesson and to better articulation.
KARAOKE
18
this activity is a great fun when the pupils break the shyness
of singing. It develops pupils awareness to use the language and helps to
improve pupils pronunciation and get the rhythm of the language or, as
VLADIMIR CHEN (ESL)
19
says: Once, when they sing English songs,
they are already being taught the use of the proper English speech, accent,
and intonation which is needed if you want them to speak the language
clearly and fluently.
In addition to that DALE T. GRIFFEE (1995, p. 83)
20
in his book Songs in
action suggests a way how to restrict the pupils shyness: To deal with
shyness and reluctance to sing, ask students to stand in a circle and face out
rather than in so as to avoid eye contact. In other words, sing to the wall.

In
almost every class there are pupils who are shy of singing. It is only up to the
teacher how he or she deals with it. The teacher can tell the pupils only to
whisper if they are too shy to sing.
SPOT THE MISTAKES
21
in this activity pupils have to decide whether the
underlined words in lyrics are sung in the song or whether there is a different
word. This activity is good to use for longer lyrics that are sung quickly
because if the pupils do not understand well they will focus on the particular
place or word and on its pronunciation. It is good to use very similar words

18
Dutton, Melanie. Karaoke. TESL Journal. 2001. University of Texas at El Paso. 13 April 2009.
<http://iteslj.org/games/9921.html>
19
Chen, Vladimir. The Importance of Karaoke Songs when Children Learn English. ESL Teachers
Board. 13 April 2009. < http://www.eslteachersboard.com/cgi-bin/english/index.pl?read=1900>
20
Griffee, Dale T. Songs in action. Hemel Hempstead: Phoenix ELT, 1995. 83
21
Budden, Joe. Using music and songs. Teaching English. 20 March 2008. 13 April 2009.
<http://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/language-assistant/teaching-tips/using-music-songs>
- 14 -
for advanced or upper-intermediate students, e.g. are vs. our. But for young
learners and less experienced pupils it is desirable to use a different word in
place of the correct one as in the Halloweens handout, e.g. something vs.
anything. Some additional ideas are suggested by JOE BUDDEN
22
You
could make all the adjectives opposites for example. Another example of this
for higher levels is to show the students the real lyrics and you correct the
English and make it proper! E.g. gonna change to going to we was
change to we were etc. This is a good way to focus on song language.

Or
DALE T. GRIFFEE (1992, p.34)
23
proposes: Think about common
mistakes your students make such as spelling, singular and plural agreement,
verb tenses, omitted and incorrect prepositions. Insert the mistakes in the
lyric sheet you prepare for hand-outs.

The so called mistakes in the
Halloween songs are only changes in words, for example, instead of black
there is the word red. The used words do not make the sentence wrong as a
whole or grammatically incorrect because it can happen that pupils will
remember the wrong version instead of the correct one. Moreover, the
underlined either correct or wrong words in the song are typical Halloween
vocabulary which helps the students remember the typical Halloween words.
DEFINITIONS
24
this is a vocabulary exercise which is useful for pre-
teaching vocabulary from the song. Here the pupils are asked to match the
expressions from the song with their meaning. It is only up to the teacher
whether he or she creates the definitions or takes them from a dictionary.
Definitions created by the teacher may be easier for lower advanced students
but it is often better to get students to use a good learners dictionary in
order to find a definition of an unknown word, rather than giving a definition
yourself. Training in using such dictionaries will help the students find out
about vocabulary independently on the teacher.
25





22
Budden, Joe. Using music and songs. Teaching English. 20 March 2008. 13 April 2009.
<http://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/language-assistant/teaching-tips/using-music-songs>
23
Griffee, Dale T.. Songs in action. Hemel Hempstead: Phoenix ELT, 1995. 34
24
Griffee, Dale T.. Songs in action. Hemel Hempstead: Phoenix ELT, 1995. 38
25
Gower, Roger, Diane Phillips, and Steve Walters. Teaching Practice A handbook for teachers in
training. Oxford: Macmillan Education, 2005. 150.
- 15 -
II. 3. The importance of teaching vocabulary in connection to festivals

Children often measure their own language learning progress in terms of how many
words they know. Learning vocabulary can be one of the most significant and
satisfying outcomes in the first years of English lessons. It boosts childrens confidence
and self-esteem.
26

In compliance with THE FREE DICTIONARY
27
vocabulary is defined as:

All the words of a language.
The sum of words used by, understood by, or at the command of a particular
person or group.
A list of words and often phrases, usually arranged alphabetically and
defined or translated; a lexicon or glossary.
A supply of expressive means; a repertoire of communication: a dancer's
vocabulary of movement.

JOSEF HLADK (2006, p.52)
28
in his Glossary of Linguistic Terms characterizes word
as the smallest unit of grammar that can stand alone as a complete utterance, separated
by spaces in written language and potentially by pauses in speech.
Learning vocabulary can be considered to be more important in language
learning than grammar especially for communication purposes because if a pupil knows
the grammar in detail but his vocabulary has five words then he is not able to express
his ideas. But the pupil is able to express his thoughts using vocabulary and at least
some mimics or gestures as also a linguist in language teaching D.A. WILKINS says:
Without grammar very little can be conveyed; without vocabulary nothing can be
conveyed.
29
However, both areas grammar and vocabulary are according to
CAROL READ (2007, p. 85)
30
closely connected: Vocabulary and grammar are
closely interrelated in childrens early language learning, both in L1 and in a second or

26
Read, Carol. 500 Activities for the Primary Classroom. Oxford: Macmillan Education, 2007. 85
27
Vocabulary. TheFreeDictionary. 2009. 14 April 2009.
<http://www.thefreedictionary.com/vocabulary>
28
Hladk, Josef. vod do studia anglickho jazyka. Brno: Masarykova Univerzita v Brn, 2006. 52
29
English Vocabulary. English Club.com. 2009. 14 April 2009.
<http://www.englishclub.com/vocabulary/>
30
Read, Carol. 500 Activities for the Primary Classroom. Oxford: Macmillan Education, 2007. 85
- 16 -
foreign language. Young children initially learn chunks of language, which combine
vocabulary and grammatical patterns, in a holistic, unanalysed way.

VIRGINIA
FRENCH ALLEN (1983, p.3)
31
shares this opinion about the close relationship between
grammar and vocabulary: Students who do not learn grammar along with vocabulary
will not be able to use the language for communication.

Sure is that vocabulary plays
one of the major roles in learning a language and in its usage and this bachelor thesis is
primarily focused on its development.
And why is vocabulary so important in teaching British festivals? The answer is
simple each festival has its own terminology and typical items and without certain
acquaintance of those terms the pupils will not be able to understand the topic, activities
and explanations. Each festival contains at least one activity that deals with teaching
vocabulary so as the pupils are able to understand the whole lesson.

There are many activities how to teach vocabulary and some of them are also
suggested by DORIN SASSON
32
:

flashcards, pictures

bingo games

drawing the word


miming

matching etc.


Teaching vocabulary in this bachelor work can be divided into following areas:
II. 3. 1. The use of pictures in teaching festivals

A picture speaks a thousands words.
33



31
French Allen, Virginia. Techniques in teaching vocabulary. Oxford: Oxford university press 1983. 3
32
Sasson, Dorit. How to teach ELLs Vocabulary. English as a second language. 6 February 2007.
14 April 2009 <http://esllanguageschools.suite101.com/article.cfm/how_to_teach_vocabulary>
33
Goodman, Jennifer. Picture stories in the communicative classroom. British Council: Teaching
English. 10 February 2006. 14 April 2009
< http://www2.teachingenglish.org.uk/think/articles/picture-stories-communicative-classroom>
- 17 -
All the lesson plans in this bachelor thesis, with the exception of Easter, contain an
exercise that uses pictures for different learning purposes. Pictures are one of the best
ways how to introduce or explain a new word because it captures pupils cognitive
skills in an attractive or non-attractive form. It is important to have as wide range of
resources as possible in the classroom so that the students can have a rich base and
stimulus for their development. And the resources must include pictures.
34
Pictures are
very easy to prepare and can be reused in various ways in different exercises. They are
also very motivating and interesting for the pupils because they bring the world into
the classroom (a street scene or a particular object, for example, a train).
35
To be
precise pictures used in this thesis lesson plans bring not only the world into the
classroom but the festival with its atmosphere and symbolism itself. They show
concrete things, which activate a whole line of associations especially associations
connected to the main theme. For example a class of pre-intermediate students was
asked to write as many words as they know when seeing the picture with pumpkin and
almost all the answers had a connection to Halloween.

JIM SCRIVENER (2005, p.333)
36
presents different ideas what can be done
with pictures in a lesson:

to quickly show the meaning of a lexical item, e.g. to iron
to illustrate presentations of language, for example by giving a visual image
to an imaginary character e.g. This is Marilyn. Every day she gets up at six
oclock... etc.
to tell a story
as prompts to remind them of a specific grammar point or typical error
as seeds for student-based storytelling activities
as prompts for guessing games, definition games, description games, etc.




34
Wright, Andrew. Pictures for language learning. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989. 2
35
Wright, Andrew. Pictures for language learning. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989. 17
36
Scrivener, Jim. Learning Teaching. Oxford: Macmillan Education, 2005. 33
- 18 -
Pictures within the lesson plans in this work are especially focused either on
teaching words meaning because the use of suitable pictures in the introduction of
language can speed the process by which students assimilate meaning
37
or on checking
pupils understanding where pupils are usually asked to match the picture with the word
or phrase. According to ROGER GOWER, DIANE PHILLIPS AND STEVE
WALTERS (2005, p.149)
38
visuals in themselves make the lesson more interesting and
lively and can be put on the wall, with labels as a constant reminder of the vocabulary.

II. 3.2. Vocabulary definitions

The use of definitions was already mentioned in this thesis in the part
concerning using songs in teaching British festivals because there was a direct
connection to the vocabulary from a song.
Although ROGER GOWER, DIANE PHILLIPS AND STEVE WALTERS (2005,
p.149)
38
put almost no emphasis on teaching vocabulary through definitions because
giving an explanation, definition or paraphrase is often the least successful way of
conveying the meaning of a vocabulary item, especially at low levels where the words
you need to explain or define may be also unknown

on the other hand using definitions
is also considered to develop pupils communication skills by, for example, explaining a
word or it develops the skill to be able to understand explanations in a monolingual
dictionary. Moreover, the use of definitions in this thesis is connected either with
pictures or, as was mentioned above, with a song or as an activity task where this usage
is related to visual or auditory perception. Consequently the pupils perceive the
vocabulary not only in the partial way as a definition but it shows them possible ways
how such a word is used: Vocabulary is best learned when the meaning of the word is
illustrated, for example by a picture, an action or real object. The children should then
meet and use the word in relevant contexts, in order to fix them in the childrens
mind.
39


37
Wright, Andrew. Pictures for language learning. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989. 138
38
Gower, Roger, Diane Phillips, and Steve Walters. Teaching Practice A handbook for teachers in
training. Oxford: Macmillan Education, 2005. 149.
39
Phillips, Sarah. Young Learners. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1993. 74
- 19 -

II. 4. Challenging activities in teaching British festivals

Games in the language classroom help children to see learning English as
enjoyable and rewarding. Playing games in the classroom develops the ability to co-
operate, to compete without being aggressive, and to be a good loser.
40


The use of challenging activities, or in other words, games is especially focused
on motivating the pupils and making the lesson enjoyable because, as W. R. LEE (1986,
p.1)
41
suggests: Games are enjoyable. Enjoyable also is the active co-operation with
ones fellows. In group or team activity, rivalry and co-operation go hand in hand. The
best way how to learn a language is to use it in situations and communication or just to
try something. They are the best communication exercises because the learners are
forced to speak and make themselves understood only in English and they help to
improve the interaction among pupils. Games are also some kind of new activity
beyond the usual lessons spent with working with the book.
Although in many teachers books the word game is used PENNY UR (1991,
p.290)
42
in her book A Course in Language Teaching does not agree with this term. She
says that game is some kind of free time activity with the purpose of enjoyment and it is
only for fun not to be taken seriously. Instead of the word game she suggests the term
childrens learning activities. But for example Cambridge dictionary
43
gives a
synonym for the word game as entertaining activity to solve the problem of using the
word game there is a neutral term for both the game and children learning activity:
Edutainment.





40
Phillips, Sarah. Young Learners. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1993. 85
41
Lee, W.R. Language Teaching Games. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1986. 1
42
Ur, Penny. A Course in Teaching English: practice and theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University
Press, 1991. 290
43
"Game. Cambridge Online Dictionary. Cambridge University. 14 April 2009
<http://dictionary.cambridge.org/define.asp?key=32076&dict=CALD>

- 20 -
II. 4. 1. Edutainment

The expression edutainment is derived from two words education and
entertainment and it describes a way of learning in which entertainment and
amusement play role. Further, this term is impartial, which means that it does not
incline only to either education or games but uses equally both those methods.
According to WIKIPEDIA
44
, the term edutainment was used as early as 1948 by the
Walt Disney Company to describe the True Life Adventures series.

Nevertheless, it
also strongly reminds of the quote by John Amos Comenius kola hrou
45
where
Comenius used games for teaching pupils Latin. It is generally acknowledged that
every term has its own critics and so be it in case of edutainment. MISCHEL
RESNICK
46
in his article Edutainment? No, thanks. I prefer Playful Learning suggests:

The problem is with the way the creators of todays edutainment products
tend to think about learning and education. Too often, they view education
as a bitter medicine that needs the sugar-coating of entertainment to become
palatable. They provide entertainment as a reward if you are willing to suffer
through a little education. I have also a problem with the word edutainment
itself. When people think about education and entertainment they tend to
think of them as services that someone else provides for you. There you are
viewed as a passive recipient. In fact, you are likely to learn the most, and
enjoy the most, if you are engaged as an active participant, not a passive
recipient. So I prefer to focus on play and learning (things that you do)
rather than entertainment and education (things that others provide to
you). My preference is for playful learning rather than edutainment.

However, in this article there is actually no bigger difference between the two terms and
all the four words can be found in thesaurus
47
as synonyms. Come what may it is still

44
Edutainment. Wikipedia. The Free Encyclopedia. 2009. 16 April, 2009
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edutainment>
45
Komensk Jan Amos. iReferty. 20 April 2006, 16 April 2009.
<http://ireferaty.lidovky.cz/?tit=Komensky-Jan-Amos&ss=1374&id_sekce=100&str=clanek>
46
Resnick, Mitchel. Edutainment? No, thanks. I prefer Playful Learning. Lifelong Kindergarten. 2004.
MIT Media Laboratory. 16 April, 2009. < http://llk.media.mit.edu/papers/edutainment.pdf>
47
Entertainment. Education. Oxford Paperback Dictionary Thesaurus. Oxford: Oxford University
Press. 2001.
- 21 -
true that the use of games or childrens learning activities practices far more language
than only the core structure.
II. 4. 2. The use of rewards in challenging activities

Some of the activities also use some kind of reward. It can be the use of special
point, a candy treat or a gift. Those rewards are created to increase pupils motivation
and the feel-good factor that shows the pupils how good they are in absorbing the
language not only through the core structures within a book. However, CAROL REED
(2007, p.14)
48
does not recommend the use of rewards: It is usually best not to use any
system of extrinsic rewards to raise motivation levels and/or ensure good behaviour, at
least at the outset. This gives a positive message that you expect everything to go well.

However, the reward system in this thesis is created especially for pupils who are for
various reasons not able to succeed in grammatical exercises, e.g. fill-in the gap etc., but
who are good at using the language in a creative way. Here the use of special points
encourages those pupils and gives them little of self-confidence. Special points mean
that the pupils are collecting points in various exercises thorough the lesson and in the
end the pupil with the most points gets a little A note. This A note is added to his
everyday notes and can help the pupil improve his final note at the end of a school year.
CATOL READ (2007, p. 14)
48
remarks that it is good idea to regularly vary the
system you use for accumulating rewards, e.g. marbles, raffle stickers, as, if you always
use the same, it is likely after a while to loose its associations of pleasant expectation,
surprise and fun.
II. 4. 3. Individual, pair and group work

As for grouping the children it is desirable to remember that not all the pupils
will participate and be eager to work. The activities suggested in this thesis are created
in a way that everyone has to take a part and be a piece of the whole group. It is also
advisable not to use the same children in one group through the whole year but move
them in order to be able to communicate and loose the shyness to other classmates. It is
also the teacher who has to put pupils into groups as WENDY A. SCOTT and
LISABETH H. YTREBERG (1990, p.17)
49
say: Children should not be allowed to

48
Read, Carol. 500 Activities for the Primary Classroom. Oxford: Macmillan Education, 2007. 14
49
Scott, Wendy A., and Lisabeth H. Ytreberg. Teaching English to Children. New York: Longman Inc.,
1990. 17
- 22 -
choose their groups, partly because it takes a lot of time, but mainly because it usually
means that someone is left out.

Activities in this thesis lesson plans are created for
both individual, pair and group work although group work takes the major part.
Individual wok is good for quick exercises like in St. Valentines lesson plan where the
pupils have to write as much vocabulary connected to this holiday as possible because
they should try to use and remember the words themselves. Or individual work is good
to use in getting special point exercises where the pupils work on their own and show
their skills to gain such a point. On the other hand pair work has many advantages,
especially in organising the classroom or developing the pupils skills: Pair work: this
is easy and fast to organise. It provides opportunities for intensive listening and
speaking practice. or, as WENDY A. SCOTT and LISABETH H. YTREBERG (1990,
p.16)
50
suggest: Pairwork means that everyone in the class in occupied...

Pairwork in
this thesis is used mainly for cooperating between the pupils and for developing their
speaking or vocabulary skills like in the EASTER EGG HUNT exercise where they
have to create new words out of the headline. At last number of exercises in this thesis
contains groupwork that encourages pupils endeavour to beat the opposite team and it
improves the communication among the pupils in a group. Most of the groupwork
activities are used as competitions with a special learning aim, e.g. the activity
RUNNING EGG in Easter lesson plan where the pupils compete in running with an egg
on a teaspoon but at the same time they unwittingly learn one of the most typical
activities done in Britain. CHARLYN WESSELS (1987, p. 30)
51
mentions this learning
aspect of games: There are games used as a part of the lesson, to revise or to reinforce
previously-taught material. They should help to clarify the taught material through
direct experience.

This direct experience is also called Experimental education, to
which relates the following paragraph.


50
Scott, Wendy A., and Lisabeth H. Ytreberg. Teaching English to Children. New York: Longman Inc.,
1990. 16
51
Wessels, Charlyn. Drama. Oxford: Oxford University press, 1987. 30
II. 4. 4. Experiential Education

Experiential Educations main role is naturally dealing with the term experience
that is, according to CAMBRIDGE DICTIONARY
52
,

described as: knowledge or skill
which is obtained from doing, seeing or feeling things and where experience serves as
a tool for getting knowledge through pupils own encounter.
Experiential Education appears in this thesis lesson plans and not only in the
before mentioned RUNNING EGG but also in plans focused on Christmas, like creating
Christmas cards or on Halloween where the pupils play the Trick or Treat game. The
Czech website concerned with Experiential Education ZA OBZOR
53
says that after
three months of gaining an experience the pupils will remember a piece of knowledge
by 10% when it was gained only through oral message and by 65% when gained
through oral message, an example and an experience. And these numbers should play a
major part when the teacher decides whether to simply present the topic and let pupils
read some article or whether to create an experience lesson that will bring more
knowledge to the pupils.

Tell me, and I will forget. Show me, and I may remember. Involve me, and I will
understand. Confusius
54


To sum up,

SCOTT THORNBURRY (2002, p.102)
55
states a very true aspect of using
challenging activities in a classroom: Nevertheless, the fun factor may help make the
words more memorable, and, like it or not, a competitive element often serves to
animate even the most lethargic students.





52
Experience. Cambridge Online Dictionary. Cambridge University. 14 April 2009
<http://dictionary.cambridge.org/define.asp?key=27061&dict=CALD>
53
Pedagogika. Za Obzor. 2007. 16 April 2009. < http://www.zaobzor.cz/pedagogika/>
54
Neill, James. Experiential Leaning Cycles. Outdoor Educational Research. 11 December 2004. 16
April 2009. < http://wilderdom.com/experiential/elc/ExperientialLearningCycle.htm>
55
Thornbury, Scott. How to teach vocabulary. Harlow: Pearson Education Limited, 2002. 102
- 24 -
III. CONCLUSION:


I decided for this topic when I was a teacher at one language school and I tried
very hard to find an activity teachers book with ideas how to teach and describe British
festivals but with almost no effort. All of the activity books contain topics as sport,
clothes, weather etc. but no festivals. And I do think that festivals belong to the basic
cultural knowledge when learning a language and for this purpose function lesson plans
in this thesis.
The lesson plans are created to serve pupils at primary school as my field of
study is focused on this level of education. However, some of the lesson plans were
used in a group of adults and they proved to be successful even there.
I tried to create activities that are not found in every activity book and that are
challenging and motivating. Each lesson plan teaches the pupils basic vocabulary
connected to the selected festival through different kinds of activities and groupwork. In
every lesson plan I, according to my thesis topic, used a typical song that is also
characteristic for a given festival because I do think that songs make the lesson
enjoyable and contributing. I put also a special emphasis on the lessons introduction
and tried to attract pupils attention from their very first sight. Few lesson plans also use
some kind of reward like special points, candy or a little gift to motivate the pupils and
wake up the feel-good feeling in them.




















- 25 -










IV. PRACTICAL PART























- 26 -
LESSON PLAN 1
NEW YEARS DAY


1. Aim of the lesson: To teach the pupils what the main characteristics of the British
New Years Day are and to introduce a typical song for British New Years Day.
2. Grade level
56
: Intermediate.
4. Required material
56
: Handouts 1-5, CD with the song, cone hat.
5. Time
56
: app. 80 minutes.
6. When to use this lesson plan: After the Christmas holiday to get the pupils used to
English again.
7. Lesson description
56
:

INTRODUCTION (10 minutes)

Come to the class with a colourful cone hat on your head. Tell the students
that the whole class is going to celebrate New Years Day.
Tell them to put the chairs into a circle in the middle of the class. Then ask
the pupils how people usually celebrate New Years Day in the Czech
Republic. Write their ideas on the board. This activity evokes New Years
Day atmosphere and it reminds vocabulary connected to New Years fest.
After the pupils told all their ideas, tell them that they are going to work both
in pairs and individually and that there are going to be 3 main activities
text, song and vocabulary. For each task they will receive points the person
who will have the most points at the end of the class earns an extra point to
his/her notes.

TEXT (20-30 minutes)

Prepare slips of self-adhesive paper with the main points of celebrating New
Year in Britain. (Handout 1). Be ready to have always the same paper for

56
Logan, Darcy. How to Write a Lesson Plan. Mahalo. 2008. 17 November 2008.
<http://www.mahalo.com/How_to_Write_a_Lesson_Plan>

- 27 -
two different students, so if there are 14 students in the class, be ready to
have 7 different papers twice. Otherwise each student will not be able to
answer one question because the answer will be on his/her back.
Then tell the pupils that you want them to stand up and turn about to their
chair. Attach always one slip on the back of one student. If there are any
spare slips, attach two different ones. Ask the pupils to sit down and give
them a question sheet (Handout 2) and a minute or two to read through the
questions.
Tell them that the answers are on their backs and that they have to stand up
and find them. Tell them to write down the answers and ask them to sit down
when they have written all the answers because the first three pupils win a
special point. Monitor and prevent any cheating. The time limit is up to 10
minutes.
Check the answers with the whole class and tell the pupils that they get one
point for every correct answer. Then write their scores on the board the
maximum is 9 points (8 for questions and 1 for the first three). The aim of
this activity is to show pupils how the Brits celebrate New Years Day and
what the typical features of this fest are.

SONG (15 minutes)

Tell the students that there is going to be the second part of their New Years
Day lesson. Put the pupils into pairs and tell them that they are going to
listen to a song and that they are going to put its words into the correct order.
Tell them to raise their hands if they think that they have the correct order to
win some points.
Give the students the traditional song Auld Lyne Syne cut into 6 verses
(Handout 3). Give them a minute or two to read through the texts. Then play
them the tape with the song.
Play the song again and watch if there is a couple that will put together all
the verses first. Then give them the clue showing the right order of the
verses. (Handout 4). The first couple with all the verses put together gets 6
points, second pair 5 points, etc. Write their scores on the board again.
- 28 -
Sing the song with the pupils and pay attention to their pronunciation.

VOCABULARY (20 minutes)

Tell the pupils to keep the six verses and tell them that they are going to
match 12 underlined words in the text with pictures (Handout 5). Say to
them to raise their hands if they think that they have the correct order. To
arouse their activity and competitiveness count the points and tell the
ranking before this activity.
Give each pair 12 pictures that represent 12 underlined words in the text and
give them time up to 10 minutes to match the pictures. Walk round the class
and monitor any problems with recognizing the pictures.
When the pupils matched the entire set of pictures let always one student in
the pair read the word, while the partner shows the picture to the class. Pay
attention to correct pronunciation and correct if necessary.
Then give students the points where maximum is 12 and count the final
scores. The winning person gets a special plus point to his/her notes.
To get some feedback ask some of the questions (Handout 1) at the
beginning of your next English lesson.

MY FEEDBACK:

The New Years Day lesson plan was used in a group of 12 intermediate
students.
I came to the class with a cone party hat and this start met with a great
success. However, the first question I got after introducing the lesson was
whether they (students) are going to have such a hat for the lesson, too.
Thats why it may be advisable to bring some more hats into the lesson and
give them to the pupils so as they feel that they are also a part of the lessons
New Years Day party.
The next task we did together was the text part. The first problem was that I
had to deal with little space in the classroom so it was a bit hard for the
students to move round the class and find the answers for their questions.
- 29 -
Another problem was the size of the fonts I used in the handout. The original
size was only 12 so, consequently, I changed the size to 16 in the handout
because it was sometimes hard for the students to read the strips.
Other tasks proved to be successful so they need not to be changed.





























- 30 -
LESSON PLAN 2
ST. VALENTINES DAY

1. Aim of the lesson: The aim is to teach pupils what the main characteristics of the St.
Valentines Day are with the focus on its vocabulary. To introduce one St. Valentines
song with typical features concerning St. Valentines Day.
2. Grade level
56
: Intermediate/pre-intermediate.
4. Required material
56
: Handouts 6-11, CD with the song.
5. Time
56
: app. 60 minutes.
6. When to use this lesson plan: In February, the best would be if the lesson were right
on 14
th
February.
7. Lesson description
56
:

INTRODUCTION (10 minutes)

Come to the class and tell the students to put away all their textbooks for
their English lesson and tell them to keep only a piece of paper and a pen on
the desk. This command evokes typical test preparations and the aim is to
thrill the pupils before the activity lesson. Tell them that there is going to be
some fun instead of a normal English lesson for which they need only a pen
and the before mentioned piece of paper. Certainly, there will be a huge
relief in the class and the pupils will look forward to any kind of activity
rather than to writing a test. Do not tell them what the lesson will be about as
this is the main task for their first activity.
Calm down their enthusiasm and tell the pupils that there are going to be 3
parts of the lesson. Tell them that they will receive some points for each
activity and that at the end of the lesson there will be a special gift for the
winner.





- 31 -
WARM-UP (20 Minutes)

So far, the pupils have no idea what kind of lesson it is, tell them that the
lesson has a special aim and that they are going to find this aim in the first
activity called Warm-up.
Ask pupils to work in pairs and give them an activity sheet (Handout 6).
Then tell them that there are 10 words whose letters are messed up and their
task is to find out the words and write them down in the blank space next to
the jumbled letters. Tell them that the first letter of the new correct word is
written in capital and tell them to write down what they think that the lesson
is going to be about. Walk round the class and help if necessary.
Then give the pupils a set of pictures (Handout 7) and tell them to match the
pictures with the words. Say to them to raise their hands if they think that
they have all the words correctly matched to gain some special points.
Let always one pupil read the hidden word and tell the letter A-J of the right
picture. But do not examine the pupils in their sitting order because after
they finished reading their word, their attention will fall down. This skipped
examination keeps their attention and if there are any problems, examine one
student twice to get his attention back. Then give them a clue sheet (Handout
8) to correct any spelling mistakes in their words.
At the end count the points - the first person who had all the words correctly
written and matched gets 5 points, the second 4 points, the third 3 points, etc.
to win the before mentioned gift. Write the points on the board.
The aim of this activity is to introduce the goal of the lesson and to present
some of the vocabulary connected to it.

SONG (20 minutes)

Now, the pupils know what the lesson is about so introduce shortly the
second part called Song.
Tell the pupils that there is going to be one activity before singing, which is
connected to the song. Give them the first worksheet (Handout 9) and tell
them that there are 15 red coloured words in the text the lower part of which
- 32 -
is erased. For better imagination show them an example on the blackboard.
Write e.g. the word word and erase the lower part to help the pupils
understand their task. Now tell them that they are going to try to guess the
words and give them the second worksheet (Handout 10). Say to them to
write the words into the blank squares in the order in which the words appear
in the text. Assure them that they will see from the clue of the crossword
whether they are right or wrong.
Sit down and monitor any cheating pupils and at the same time tell them to
go to show you their crossword if they think that they have all the words
correctly in the crossword. The first pupil with all words correct gets 5
points, the second 4, etc. Let the pupils draw the filled crossword (Handout
11) on the board and ask them whether they know where this statement is
usually written.
In the end encourage the pupils to sing the song together with you.

WRITE IT, EAT IT... (15-20 minutes)

The last activity is called Write it, eat it. This activity is taken as a feedback
and also a vocabulary exercise.
Before this activity, count down the points and tell the pupils standings. Ask
them to take a pen and a piece of paper that they prepared at the beginning of
the lesson. Say to them that they have 3 minutes to write down as much
vocabulary connected to St. Valentine as they can. Tell them that they
receive one point for each word.
After the 3 minutes ask them to put away the pen and count their words. Let
the pupil with the most words read them loudly, stand by the pupil and look
for any spelling mistakes if there is a mistake in some word, the pupil will
not receive the point for the word. As there may be many pupils in the class,
give points to first 3 pupils with the most words. Write down the points and
count the standings.
It may seem that the winner is clear, but tell them that there is still one last
word, which will bring them 100 points. This attracts the pupils who were
not successful as well as the first ones because anyone can still win. Tell
- 33 -
them that the first person who writes the word Marshmallow correctly and
comes to show you wins the gift. Pronounce the word slowly and clearly and
repeat if necessary.
The first person then wins the gift a sack full of Marshmallows. But to be
fair give a second sack to the pupil who was the leader before this activity
because he performed well during the whole lesson.
This activity can be freely used in the following lesson as a vocabulary
feedback, but do not forget to write down the points. The aim is to extend
pupils vocabulary that is connected to St. Valentines Day as well as to
encourage their spelling skills.

MY FEEDBACK:

The St. Valentines lesson plan was used in a group of 10 pre-intermediate
students.
For this lesson plan I created two different papers with the song lyrics. In my
original lesson plan I erased the upper part of some of the song words but I
created a new handout where the lower part was erased by the same words.
There were 10 students in the class so I gave 5 students the original handout
and 5 students the new one. It proved that it is much easier to recognize the
words when the lower part is erased. Therefore, I changed the lesson plans
handout and erased the lower part of the words because it is more
encouraging for the pupils when they recognize the words. One more
problem was with the song there are 14 words, the lower part of which is
erased but they were not differentiated from the other words and if a student
missed one word he or she became puzzled what belongs to the crossword.
That is why I decided to colour the words red to avoid misunderstanding in
the following lessons.
In the last activity the pupils have to write as many words as they know in
connection to St. Valentine and the time provided was 3 minutes. While I
was watching the students, everyone finished in two minutes and in the last
one minute they were looking at their neighbours to crib the words. That is
why I made the change from three minutes to only two.

- 34 -
LESSON PLAN 3
EASTER

1. Aim of the lesson: The aim of the lesson is the enlargement of pupils vocabulary
connected to Easter. The pupils try personally one of the typical British activities called
Running Egg. An Easter song helps them to work in a group and improves their
listening skills.
2. Grade level
56
: Pre-intermediate/Intermediate.
4. Required material
56
: Handouts 12-15, small basket, chocolate eggs, teaspoons,
skittles, CD with the song.
5. Time
56
: 60 minutes.
6. When to use this lesson plan: Right before Easter or at the beginning of spring.
7. Lesson description
56
:

INTRODUCTION

Come to the class with a small basket full of chocolate eggs. Decorate the
basket with ribbons and do not forget to bring some teaspoons, too. Tell the
pupils that this will be one of the activity lessons. To find out the theme of
the lesson ask them what festival is approaching now. Write the correct
answer EASTER on the board.

TONGUE TWISTER + VOCAB (10 minutes)

Write the sentence Run red rabbit run on the board and tell the pupils that
it is a tongue twister. Ask them whether they know what tongue twister
means. If they hesitate, try to help them by analysing both the words
tongue and twister.
Read the sentence loudly and slowly, and then let the whole class repeat the
sentence. Ask the pupils to repeat it three times in a row as quickly as they
can.
The aim of this tongue twister is to introduce the lesson and it is also a great
articulation exercise which brings a lot of fun.
- 35 -
Go back to the word Easter written on the board and ask the pupils what they
imagine when hearing this word. Write or paint their ideas on the board if
they hesitate, try to help them by describing some words (e.g. the word egg
an oval thing produced by birds especially hens and people usually eat it...).
The aim of this activity is to evoke the Easter atmosphere in pupils heads
and to remind vocabulary connected to Easter.

RUNNING EGG (20 minutes)

Then tell the pupils that children in Britain also celebrate Easter and ask the
pupils whether they know any kind of activity that is typical for British
Easter, e.g. Easter Egg Hunt, Egg Rolling or Running with an Egg on a
Teaspoon, etc. Tell them that they are going to try one of these activities,
which is called: Running with an egg on a teaspoon.
Divide the class into two halves and give each pupil a teaspoon and one
chocolate egg. The chocolate eggs should be a bit bigger than the teaspoon
so as it is not very easy for the pupils to run with it.
Put aside all the chairs and desks in the class and ask the pupils to form two
rows. Each pupil in a row has to have a teaspoon and one chocolate egg.
Mark the starting line and explain the pupils that they have to run to the other
side of the class and back, where they have to touch his or her classmate and
only then can he or she start running. For this activity it is good to bring
some skittles to make the track more difficult the pupils have to run among
the skittles that are in a row and turn back by running around the last skittle.
Tell them that if their egg falls down, they have to go back to the start and
start running again. Tell them that the first row whose all members are back
in the finish with all the eggs and spoons wins.
Let the pupils enjoy the game but at the same time monitor any cheating or
other problems. If they like the game, you can make it more difficult take
all the spoons and eggs away except one spoon and one egg in each row. Tell
them that the task is the same but the person who is running has to hand over
the spoon with the egg to his or her classmate at the end if the egg falls
down then the person has to run again.
- 36 -
To make all the instructions clear pick two pupils and show the rest of the
class how it should work.
At the end announce the winning team and tell the pupils that they are
allowed to keep and eat (after the lesson) the chocolate eggs.
The aim of this activity is to try one of the British traditions with the whole
class as the pupils will certainly keep it in their mind.

SONG (15 minutes)

Keep the pupils in the two teams. Ask them to bring one table for each team
and let the pupils stand around it.
Tell them that they are going to listen to a song and that their task will be to
put the songs words into a correct order. There are 17 slips of paper so
according to the number of students in both teams let each pupil choose a
certain number of slips (e.g. if there are 8 pupils in one team every student
will get 2 slips and one pupil will have 3) (Handout 12).
Give the pupils some time to read their slips. Tell them that the first team
that will have all the slips in correct order wins. Remind them to raise their
hands when finished.
Then play them the song called Peter Cottontail. Be ready that it may be
necessary to play the song two or three times. While playing the tape walk
round the class and monitor the correctness of the slips. (For the teacher
Handout 13). If you find any wrong slip wait till the pause before the next
listening and warn the team that there is a mistake in the order.
When one team announces that they have all the slips correctly let one pupil
read it. If they have all the slips in the right order announce the winning
team.
Then ask the pupils for some vocabulary from the song, they may not know,
e.g. hopping, jelly beans, bonnet...
At the end sing the song together with the pupils.



- 37 -
CALM DOWN (15 minutes)

Tell the pupils that there is going to be last part of the lesson called CALM
DOWN and ask them to sit down. Ask the pupils whether they remember
what typical Easter activity for Britain was mentioned in the song. The
correct answer should be Easter Egg Hunt. Use a Hangman
57
game if the
pupils hesitate Draw 13 underscore characters on the board that represent
the letters in the phrase Easter Egg Hunt. Then let the pupils guess the letters
till they find the hidden word. If their guessed letter is incorrect draw parts of
Hangman on the board. Make sure that all of the pupils participate.
Put students in pairs and give each pair an activity sheet (Handout 14) and
letters (Handout 15). Go through the clue words with the whole class and ask
for any problematic words. Be ready to have an explanation for words,
which may be problematic for the pupils (e.g. rodent, sense, squirrel, etc).
Tell the pupils that their task is to create new words from the letters of
EASTER EGG HUNT whereas each letter can be used only once with the
exception of E, T and G. The time for this activity is up to 10 minutes.
Check the words with the whole class let always one couple read 3 words
that they found and let them write those words on the board. Monitor any
spelling mistakes.
At the end wish the pupils Happy Easter.

MY FEEDBACK:

This lesson plan was used in a class of 12 pre-intermediate students. Only
the last two parts were used: song and calm down. Both parts proved to be
usable and I did not find any confusing item that should be changed.






57
Hangman. Wikipedia. 2009. 29 January 2009. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hangman_(game)>
- 38 -
LESSON PLAN 4
SUMMER BANK HOLIDAY

1. Aim of the lesson: To relax after the whole demanding year and to learn some
vocabulary connected to summer activities.
2. Grade level
56
: Pre-intermediate/Intermediate.
4. Required material
56
: Handouts 16-22, two A2 papers, dictionaries, CD with the song.
5. Time
56
: 75 minutes.
6. When to use this lesson plan: In the end of the school year when all the notes are
already decided and children look forward o their holiday.
7. Lesson description
56
:

This lesson plan is perfectly suitable for the last lessons of the school year
because the notes are decided and there is not much to do. It evokes typical
summer atmosphere and holiday is what the pupils think about the most at
this time.

INTRODUCTION

Come to the class with dark sunglasses on your eyes/head wearing a
colourful flowery shirt. Tell the pupils that this lesson has a special aim
which is connected to a holiday celebrated in Britain and which is called
Summer bank holiday.
Tell them that this festival is celebrated in the last week of August and the
British people celebrate the end of summer. Say to them that you will do it
the other way round and the class is going to celebrate the beginning of
summer in this lesson.

DREAM PLACE (30 minutes)

Put the pupils into two groups and ask them to sit around two connected
desks.
- 39 -
Tell them that they have now 2 minutes to decide what their dream place is
and where they would love to go for holiday. They all have to agree with the
place.
Tell the pupils that the rule of this lesson is ONLY ENGLISH and for every
Czech word they will receive a minus point in the end count the points and
let the pupils do the squats according to the number of the minus point
received.
Then ask them for their destinations and write the answers on the board.
Say to them that when they know their destination they have to decide what
things they will need. For this purpose give them a set of pictures (Handout
16) and tell them that they as a group have to decide which 5 things are
necessary to take. The pupils have to give reasons why to take this thing and
the group has to agree with it. Give them time up to 10 minutes.
Then ask the groups what things they chose and write their ideas on the
board to their destination. Let them support their items and explain the
reasons why they are so important.
Now tell the pupils that their holiday will last 5 days and that they have to
think out an activity for each day but every day has to be different. It is
good to bring a dictionary for this activity as the pupils may not know all the
vocabulary. Bring an A2 paper and let the pupils draw their holiday. Give
them time 10 to 15 minutes.
Walk round the class and monitor that the pupils are really using only
English and watch the least participating pupils because they will have to
introduce and present their holiday in the end.
After they finished ask the least working pupil in each group to explain their
plans and activities using their poster. Compare them with the second group
and as a feedback discuss which plan is more interesting.
This activity may take a long time but it is an activity lesson before their
holiday so the pupils will enjoy thinking about summer and they unwittingly
learn some new vocabulary, too.
Hang their posters on the classroom wall.


- 40 -

SONG (20 minutes)

Tell the pupils that they are going to listen to a song that is very well known.
Warn them that a few Spanish words will appear in the song.
Put them into one line and let always one student say apple, second banana
and the third kiwi then again the fourth is apple etc. Ask them to create 3
groups named Apples, Bananas and Kiwis. According to their fruit they
should find the right group.
Give each group a certain number of words taken from the song. There are
12 words so each team will get 4 words (Handout 17) Then give them slips
with meanings and some time to match the meaning with the words.
Then let always one pupil in the group show the word and explain the
meaning.
Tell them that you have the same words but a bit bigger and put them on one
desk (Handout 18). Ask the pupils to make three rows. Explain them that you
will play them the song and when they hear the word they have to be quick,
take it out of the desk and keep it. Then the other person in the row follows.
The groups will compete against each other and the team with the greatest
number of words wins.
Be ready that it may be necessary to play the song more than once and watch
the pupils so as there are no misunderstandings and quarrels.
In the end announce the gold winning team, then the silver and bronze. Then
give the pupils the songs words (Handout 19) and sing the song together
with them.

SPANISH LESSON (25 minutes)

The next part of the lesson is still connected to the song so tell the pupils that
there will be a little English-Spanish section focused on the Spanish
vocabulary from the song. Put the pupils into groups of 3 or 4 people.
Give the pupils the two Spanish sentences Como puede ser verdad and Te
dijo te amo and a set of English words (Handout 20) Tell them that they
- 41 -
should find the meaning of the Spanish sentences in the English words and
create grammatically correct English sentences. At the same time they
should try to guess which English sentence fits the Spanish one. Say to them
to raise their hands when finished.
Walk round the class and monitor the pupils. Check and announce the
finished pairs.
In the end, check the correct sentences with the whole class.
Tell the pupils that there is one more Spanish sentence in the song: La isla
Bonita write the sentence on the board and ask the pupils whether they
have any idea what it could mean. If they hesitate ask them which English
word is similar to the Spanish La isla (=island).
Give the pupils Handout 21 and tell them that there are 15 pieces of the
Bonita Island and their task is to put the puzzle together. Warn them that
some spare pieces that do not fit may appear. The aim of this puzzle
activity is that there may be a pupil who has visited the Canary Islands and
he or she may be able to recognize the island.
Walk round the class and help the pupils if necessary.
Then ask the pupils whether they know what island it is. As it is difficult to
recognize give them the clues (Handout 22) but place them on the desk
bottom up.
Tell the pupils that on your command they will always turn one clue and if
they have any idea what island it is, they should say it. Let always one pupil
read the clue and ask for any problems with understanding.
At the end the pupils have to be able to recognize the Canary Islands so tell
them that this puzzle island is named La Palma but its second name is also
the Pretty Island or in Spanish La isla bonita.
Now there is still one name remaining in the song, which is San Pedro let
one pupil read the sentence I fell in love with San Pedro and ask the class
what they think that San Pedro (city) means. If they hesitate help them
giving clues, e.g.: a place where people live and work, where there are many
houses, shops, places of work, places of entertainment, etc.


- 42 -
GOOD BYE
Do not forget the squats!
At the end of your lesson wish the pupils a wonderful holiday. If there is
some time ask them what their plans are.


MY FEEDBACK:

This lesson plan was used in a group of 12 intermediate students.
The first activity, Dream Place, came to be successful because the students
were able to create a detailed description of their holiday and I can say that
they enjoyed themselves. I would only advise to strongly encouradge the
students to speak only English. I would also recommend to mind the time
and warn the pupils how much time they still have in the task where they
have to plan 5 days of their holiday because the students were so enthusiastic
about planning that we spent the too much time with it.
Next problem was connected to the Spanish lesson, specifically to the part
where the students deal with Spanish sentences to which they have to create
two English sentences out of 11 words. In the original version the students
got all the 11 words together and created the two sentences out of them He
told me I love you; How could it be true but I found out that the sentences
are a bit confusing for them. Therefore, I decided to give the students two
groups of words where each group represents one sentence.















- 43 -
LESSON PLAN 5
HALLOWEEN


1. Aim of the lesson: The aim of this lesson is to introduce one of the British festivals
called Halloween. The lesson is also focused on Halloween vocabulary and symbols.
2. Grade level
56
: Pre-intermediate/Intermediate.
4. Required material
56
: Handouts 23 26, Halloween mask, paper, pen, witch hat, CD
with Halloween songs.
5. Time
56
: 90 minutes.
6. When to use this lesson plan: In a rainy autumn at the end of October or at the
beginning of November.
7. Lesson description
56
:


INTRODUCTION

To evoke the typical scary Halloween atmosphere it would be great to come
to the class in a Halloween mask. But do not wear the mask on your face
because it would be hard for the pupils to understand you properly. Or one
alternative could be black clothes and a t-shirt with a pumpkin on it.

SCARY VOCABULARY (15 minutes)

When you come to the class try to look scared and tell the pupils that you are
very frightened because you saw a ghost in the night and it told you that on
31
st
October it will come back again. Write 31
st
October on the board.
Ask the pupils whether they know what is going to happen on 31
st
October.
If they do not know try to be even more scared that they do not know what
scary event is going to happen.
Tell them that it is believed that on this day the dead people come back to the
Earth and so people are dressed in costumes to protect themselves against
bad force. While talking walk round the class and look really afraid and keep
looking back as if someone may hear you.
- 44 -
Tell the pupils that on this day you may see the typical symbols out on the
streets but you are too scared to say these symbols loudly.
Ask the pupils whether they know what the word SHUSH mean. Tell them
that when you say this word they have to be quiet because you can feel the
ghost around and it must not hear you or the pupils.
Take handout 23 and tell the pupils that you are going to show them pictures
of Halloween symbols and they should only whisper the words but they must
not say them loudly otherwise a ghost may come and scare them during the
night. Whisper the words and let the pupils repeat after you. If someone says
some word a bit more loudly make a terrified face and say shush.
Then put the pupils into two groups and ask them to sit down in two rows,
one row opposite the other.
Give the last person in the row a piece of paper and a pen. Tell them that
they are going to play the silent post and the last person has to write down
the word he or she hears from his or her neighbour. Say to them that you will
show the first pupils a word on a flashcard with a picture describing the word
(Handout 23). The other pupils have to hide their face and especially eyes
into their hands and turn to the other side of the class so as they do not see
the word and the picture. Only the first pupils in the row are allowed to see
it. Then they have to whisper quietly this word to his or her neighbour. The
last person writes down the word, which he or she hears from his or her
neighbour.
The writer stays all the time the same but the rest of the pupils change their
places the first goes to the penultimate seat and the other pupils move one
seat to the right/left, according to where you stand.
It is important to watch the pupils that they are not cheating and looking
secretly on the words and pictures.
In the end, ask the writing pupils to write the words on the board and ask
them to paint the picture that characterizes the word. Let them always paint
and write one word and then discuss it with the whole class whether it is
correct or not - what it means, etc.
This activity serves as a warm up exercise and introduces the most used
word in connection to Halloween.
- 45 -
TRICK OR TREAT GAME (25 minutes)

Keep the pupils sitting in the two rows and ask the pupils whether they
know what the words Trick or Treat mean and write them on the board.
When they do not know ask the pupils to make pairs and give them the
handout 24.
Tell them that there are 8 slips of paper and their task is to put the slips
together to make a story. Give them time up to 5 minutes.
Then check the story with the pupils and let one student retell it with his/her
own words.
When the pupils know what Trick or Treat means then tell them that there is
a task connected to it. For this task you will need a black witch hat and a set
of tasks (Handout 25). Put the tasks into the hat and mix it. Make sure that
you have enough tasks.
Tell the pupil that each of them will say the sentence Trick or Treat and then
he or she will choose a paper from the hat where there is a task he or she has
to do that is the trick. If they are successful then the pupil will get a little
candy, which is the treat.
This activity helps to keep the words Trick or Treat in pupils minds without
any learning it and it is also a good speaking and motion exercise, which
usually brings a lot of fun.
TIP: It is good to bring a tape or CD and while doing this exercise it is good
to play some Halloween songs (the Adams Family theme, etc.) but it has to
be played quietly otherwise it would disturb the pupils.

THIS IS HALLOWEEN (20 minutes)

Tell the pupils that the next part of the lesson is a song. Say to them that two
tasks are going to be connected to it and they will work individually.
Tell them that the first task is very simple and that they only have to listen to
the song carefully and count how many times the word Halloween appears in
the song (31 times). Say to them that whose guess is the closest one wins a
candy treat!
- 46 -
Then play them the tape once and award the winner in the end.
Say to the pupils that they are going to listen to a song called This is
Halloween and give them the next handout (26).
Tell them that while they are listening to the song they have to recognize
whether the underlined words are correct or wrong. If the word is correct
they have to draw a tick, if it is incorrect then a cross.
Play the song twice and then check the words from the song with the whole
class. While you are checking the words play the song and stop it after each
underlined word. If the word is incorrect ask the pupils whether they know
what the right answer is.

MY SCARY STORY

As a feedback give the pupils a writing task called: My scary story and tell
them that they should write a scary story and use the typical Halloween
vocabulary such as pumpkin, witch, ghost, etc.
This activity helps the pupils to remember the vocabulary and the Halloween
festival stays in their minds a bit longer than only during the lesson.
If there is no time for this feedback in the lesson it can be equally used as
homework.

MY FEEDBACK:

This lesson plan was used in a group of 10 pre-intermediate students.
I tried only the song This is Halloween from this lesson plan because I had
two versions and I wanted to find out which is more suitable for students.
One is sung by Marilyn Manson from the CD soundtrack The Nightmare
before Christmas and second is sung by group Panic! At the Disco from the
same movie. I used both versions in the lesson and then I asked the students
which version was better. According to their answers I chose the Marilyn
Mansons version although my original tip was the other version.


- 47 -
LESSON PLAN 6
CHRISTMAS


1. Aim of the lesson: The aim of this lesson is to introduce the typical Christmas
vocabulary and the basic British way of celebrating Christmas.
2. Grade level
56
: Pre-intermediate/Intermediate.
4. Required material
56
: Handouts 28-33, bell, jingle bells, Father Christmas costume,
CD with Christmas carols, box of gingerbread.
5. Time
56
: app. 70 minutes.
6. When to use this lesson plan: Right before Christmas in your last lesson or in the
time of St. Nicolas Day.
7. Lesson description
56
:

INTRODUCTION (5 minutes)

Before the start of the lesson, be ready to bring a bell and little jingle bells.
Dress yourself in a Father Christmas costume and stuff your belly with a
pillow. Dont forget your sack with gifts. When the bells announcing the
start of the lesson rings wait a minute or two after they finished till there is a
silence in the corridor. Then stand behind the door of your class, start ringing
the bells and shout HO HO HO.
It would be good to warn the teachers in the neighbouring classes that there
will be a little noise at the beginning of the lesson.
Then rush into the class and run around ringing the bells. Tell the pupils that
this English lesson will be taught by Father Christmas make self-important
and proud mimic that YOU are the Father Christmas.
Then show the pupils a picture of your reindeer Rudolph (Handout 28). Stick
the picture on the board so as everyone can see and tell them that it is
Rudolph and he will watch them the whole lesson and at the end he will
decide who gets a gift and who not. Tell them that Rudolph is a reindeer and
write the word on the board.
- 48 -
Be ready to bring a CD with English Christmas carols and play the CD in the
lesson while the pupils are doing the activities. It should be played quietly
only in a background. It evokes the Christmas atmosphere, which helps the
pupils enjoy the lesson.

WIN YOUR JINGLE! (10 minutes)

For all the follow-up activities it is important to pre-teach the Christmas
vocabulary so let the pupils play an easy activity called WIN YOUR
JINGLE!
For this activity use Handout 29 there are 8 pictures and 8 explanations to
those pictures. Pass out either an explanation or a picture to each student. If
there are more students in your class, be ready to have enough pictures and
explanations.
Tell the students that their task is to find his or her partner the one with
picture has to find the explanation to it and vice versa. Each person in the
first three pairs will get a little jingle bell and a candy from Rudolf as a gift.
Then let the pupils stand in the pairs and they have to show the picture and
tell the meaning with their own words without reading the explanation. Write
the vocabulary on the board.
Always say one expression and let the pupils repeat it. Ask the pupils to
close their eyes and turn around, now erase one of the words and ask the
pupils to look at the board again and guess the erased word. Or make it the
other way round and add one word that was not in the handout (chimney,
sleigh, etc.) and ask for explanation.

I AM THE CHRISTMAS STORY (15 minutes)

Tell the pupils that the next activity is called I AM THE CHRISTMAS
STORY and put them into two groups.
Ask the pupils to stand in a row and give each pupil an A4 paper with a part
of the whole Christmas story (Handout 30). Tell the pupils to read their slip
and then to attach the slips on their chests using a safety pin.
- 49 -
Tell them that it is a story about British Christmas and they should find the
right order to make it meaningful. They have to make a row out of
themselves to create the story. Give them also a little bell and tell them to
ring the bell when finished.
In the end, let the pupils stand in the row opposite the other group and let
them read the story in the way that the first pupil of one group will read the
paper of the first pupil in the opposite group, etc.
This activity helps the pupils discover the British Christmas, they will get
know what the main day is and what the typical features are.

JINGLE KARAOKE (20 minutes)

Next activity is connected to a typical Christmas song Jingle Bells Rock.
Ask the pupils to stay in the groups and say that in the next activity they all
are going to sing. The group that sings better wins a special gift take a
wrapped box out of your Father Christmas sack. This box is full of either
bought or homemade gingerbread. The students do not know what is inside
so this will force them to sing and win the gift.
Before the karaoke singing give the pupils Handout 31 with the text and let
the pupils read the text aloud. Ask for any problematic vocabulary e.g.
bushel, chime etc. Monitor whether all the pupils are reading the text. If not
ask them individually to join the class, too.
Then play the song from a CD so as the pupils get the rhythm and words into
their minds.
Ask the pupils to put away the text and tell them that the whole class is going
to try the first karaoke together. Play them the YOUTUBE
58
version of Jingle
Bells Rock
59
and sing with them. This pre-activity shows the pupils the
karaoke version and it is a little singing ice beaker.
However, there will be surely some pupils that are too shy to join the class
and sing. Watch those pupils while the class is singing together and then pick


58
Youtube. 2009. 30 March 2009. <www.youtube.com>
59
Jingle Bells Rock Karaoke Bobby Helms Style. youtube.com. 15 January 2009.
SwingingChoices. 30 March 2009. <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YCkqdgjhlJU>
- 50 -
no more than 2 pupils from each group to sit in front and to be a committee.
This committee decides which group was better in singing.
Then let two pupils from each group play rock, shears and paper to decide
which group is going to start.
Now let both the groups sing the song. Help the pupils with singing and
getting the rhyme. Pay attention to nonsinging pupils force them to sing by
touching their arm.
In the end, ask the committee which group was according to them better but
tell the whole class that it is very hard for you to decide which group was
better, so tell them that they can share the gift.

MERRY CHRISTMAS (15 minutes)

Tell the pupils that there is one more activity for this Christmas lesson and it
is a little vocabulary feedback for which they need some colour pens.
Tell the pupils that they are going to work on their own and give them
Handout 32. Tell them that there are 8 blank squares and one square with an
angel. Say to the pupils that they are going to hear instructions (Handout 33)
from you and according to them they should either paint or write something
into the blank squares.
Read each instruction twice and monitor any cheating pupils.
In the end, tell the pupils that as they can see the paper has a second half and
ask them to bend it so as the squares are on the front page. Ask the pupils to
write a Christmas wish into this card.
Some of the pupils may be confused what to do with the paper so
demonstrate how to bend it to them.
Collect all the Christmas cards and mix them in a box. Then let always one
pupil choose one card so as everyone has got a Christmas card with a wish
inside.
Then check the writing and painting whether they are correct and wish the
pupils MERRY CHRISTMAS.



- 51 -
V. RESUME

Festivals are special occasions found in every country. They teach us about the
mentality, culture and traditions of the given country. They belong to cultural studies
and should be taken as a part of language learning process. The centrepiece of the lesson
plans used in this thesis is also the use of songs as a tool for an enjoyable lesson.
This bachelor thesis contains two parts theoretical and practical. The
theoretical part describes activities used in the second, practical one. Why those
activities are contributing and what the pupils will learn about certain festivals. The
practical part is a set of six lesson plans thematically oriented on six festivals (New
Years Day, St. Valentines Day, Easter, Summer Bank Holiday, Halloween and
Christmas) celebrated in Britain. Each lesson plan also contains a song as the
centrepiece of the lesson.
The aim of the thesis is to create usable lesson plans specialised in British
festivals through various activities and tasks.

RESUM

Svtky jsou vjimen udlosti, kter existuj v kad zemi a kter nm
umouj nahldnout do mentality, kultury a tradic dan zem. Pat ke studiu reli a
mly by bt samozejmou soust procesu vuky. Sted pozornosti je tak upnm na
pouit psniek v jednotlivch plnech hodin, kter slou jako nstroj pro zajmavou
hodinu.
Tato bakalsk prce obsahuje dv sti teoretickou a praktickou. Teoretick
st se zabv popisem aktivit pouitch v sti druh, praktick. Pro jsou tyto aktivity
pnosn a co se ci skrze n nau. Praktick st je souborem esti pln hodin, kter
jsou tmaticky zamen na est svtk (Nov Rok, Valentn, Velikonoce, Lto,
Halloween a Vnoce), kter se slav ve Velk Britnii. Kad z tchto pln obsahuje
psniku, kter tvo zklad vuky v hodin .
Clem tto prce je vytvoen pouitelnch pln hodin, zamench na britsk
svtky prostednictvm rozmanitch aktivit a kol.
- 52 -
VI. BIBLIOGRAPHY

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Canterbury, 2004.

French Allen, Virginia. Techniques in teaching vocabulary. Oxford: Oxford university
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Gower, Roger, Diane Phillips, and Steve Walters. Teaching Practice A handbook for
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Griffee, Dale T. Songs in action. Hemel Hempstead: Phoenix ELT, 1995.

Hladk, Josef. vod do studia anglickho jazyka. Brno: Masarykova Univerzita v
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Lee, W.R. Language Teaching Games. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1986.

Murphey, Tim. Music and Song. Oxford: Oxford University press, 2002.

Oxford Paperback Dictionary Thesaurus. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 2001.

Phillips, Sarah. Young Learners. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1993.

Read, Carol. 500 Activities for the Primary Classroom. Oxford: Macmillan Education,
2007.

Scrivener, Jim. Learning Teaching. Oxford: Macmillan Education, 2005.

Scott, Wendy A., and Lisabeth H. Ytreberg. Teaching English to Children. New York:
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Thornbury, Scott. How to teach vocabulary. Harlow: Pearson Education Limited, 2002.

- 53 -
Ur, Penny. A Course in Teaching English: practice and theory. Cambridge:
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Wessels, Charlyn. Drama. Oxford: Oxford University press, 1987.


Wright, Andrew. Pictures for language learning. Cambridge: Cambridge University
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- 54 -

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Christmas Present. Edupics. 2009. 2 April 2009.
< http://www.edupics.com/en-coloring-pictures-pages-photo-christmas-present-i8651.html>


Ideas for warm up activities. Enabling Educational Network. 8 April 2009.
<http://www.eenet.org.uk/key_issues/teached/cambodia_warmups.pdf>

Peachey, Nick. Remember more vocabulary. Nicks Daily English Activities. 9
December 2008. 12 April 2009. < http://daily-english-
activities.blogspot.com/2008/12/remember-more-vocabulary.html>

Smile. The Free Dictionary. 2009. 12 April 2009
<http://www.thefreedictionary.com/smile>

Funny Tongue Twisters. Fun Staff on the Web. 9 April 2009 <http://www.fun-
stuff-on-the-web.com/funnytonguetwisters.html>

Sam, Wan Yee. Drama in Teaching English as a Second Language A
Communicative Approach. MELTA. University of Malaya. July 1999. 10 April
2009. < http://www.melta.org.my/ET/1990/main8.html>
- 55 -

Lewis, Beth. ABC Countdown to Summer. About.com: Elementary Education. 10
April 2009 <http://k6educators.about.com/cs/lessonplanslea/a/abcountdown.htm>

Lems, Kirsten. Using Music in the Adult ESL Classroom. Eric digest. December
2001. 10 April 2009. < http://www.ericdigests.org/2002-3/music.htm>

Song. Cambridge Online Dictionary. Cambridge University. 10 April 2009
<http://dictionary.cambridge.org/define.asp?key=75749&dict=CALD >

Uchida, Helen Jarmol. "Music in the language classroom". Use it!. 12 April 2009
<http://useit.vn/content/view/665/92/lang,english/>

"Music. Cambridge Online Dictionary. Cambridge University. 12 April 2009
<http://dictionary.cambridge.org/define.asp?key=52595&dict=CALD>

Chen, Vladimir. The Importance of Karaoke Songs when Children Learn English.
ESL Teachers Board. 13 April 2009. < http://www.eslteachersboard.com/cgi-
bin/english/index.pl?read=1900>

Dutton, Melanie. Karaoke. TESL Journal. 2001. University of Texas at El Paso. 13
April 2009. <http://iteslj.org/games/9921.html>

Budden, Joe. Using music and songs. Teaching English. 20 March 2008. 13
April 2009. <http://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/language-assistant/teaching-tips/using-
music-songs>

Vocabulary. TheFreeDictionary. 2009. 14 April 2009.
<http://www.thefreedictionary.com/vocabulary>

English Vocabulary. English Club.com. 2009. 14 April 2009.
<http://www.englishclub.com/vocabulary/>

Goodman, Jennifer. Picture stories in the communicative classroom. British Council:
Teaching English. 10 February 2006. 14 April 2009
< http://www2.teachingenglish.org.uk/think/articles/picture-stories-communicative-
classroom>

Sasson, Dorit. How to teach ELLs Vocabulary. English as a second language. 6
February 2007. 14 April 2009.
<http://esllanguageschools.suite101.com/article.cfm/how_to_teach_vocabulary>

"Game. Cambridge Online Dictionary. Cambridge University. 14 April 2009
<http://dictionary.cambridge.org/define.asp?key=32076&dict=CALD>

Edutainment. Wikipedia. The Free Encyclopedia. 2009. 16 April, 2009
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edutainment>

- 56 -
Komensk Jan Amos. iReferty. 20 April 2006, 16 April 2009.
<http://ireferaty.lidovky.cz/?tit=Komensky-Jan-
Amos&ss=1374&id_sekce=100&str=clanek>

Resnick, Mitchel. Edutainment? No, thanks. I prefer Playful Learning. Lifelong
Kindergarten. 2004. MIT Media Laboratory. 16 April, 2009. <
http://llk.media.mit.edu/papers/edutainment.pdf>

Experience. Cambridge Online Dictionary. Cambridge University. 14 April 2009 <
http://dictionary.cambridge.org/define.asp?key=27061&dict=CALD>

Pedagogika. Za Obzor. 2007. 16 April 2009. <
http://www.zaobzor.cz/pedagogika/>

Neill, James. Experiential Leaning Cycles. Outdoor Educational Research. 11
December 2004. 16 April 2009. <
http://wilderdom.com/experiential/elc/ExperientialLearningCycle.htm>

Jingle Bells Rock Karaoke Bobby Helms Style. youtube.com. 15 January 2009.
SwingingChoices. 30 March 2009.
<http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YCkqdgjhlJU>

Youtube. 2009. 30 March 2009. <www.youtube.com>

Logan, Darcy. How to Write a Lesson Plan. Mahalo. 2008. 17 November 2008.
<http://www.mahalo.com/How_to_Write_a_Lesson_Plan>

DISCOGRAPHY

Briner, David. Auld Lyne Syne. Masters of Harmony. Naked Voice Records,
2008.

Autry, Gene. Here comes Peter Cottontail. The Essential Gene Autry. Sony. 2005.

Maddona. La Isla Bonita. La Isla Bonita. Warner. 1998.

Manson, Marilyn. This is Halloween. The Nightmare Before Christmas
(soundtrack). Walt Disney. 1993.

Helms, Bobby. Jingle Bells Rock. Home Alone 2: Lost In New York soundtrack
lyrics. Twetieth Century Fox Film Scores. 1992.
- 57 -












VII. APPENDICES























- 58 -
HANDOUT 1

The New Years fest begins on 31
st
December when people are
together with their friends or families; this day is made especially
for celebrating, drinking and eating.


People usually go to pub, parties or stay at home to celebrate this
fest. In London, people go to Trafalgar Square to hear the Big
Bens bells right at midnight and some of them jump into the
fountains there.

People usually count down the ten last seconds before midnight
and just at that time they sing the traditional song Auld Lang
Syne while standing in a circle and holding their hands.


There are also many fireworks around and the traditional drink is
champagne.


There is a tradition connected to New Years Day, which is
known in the whole Great Britain. This tradition is called First
Footing it means, that the first men, who crosses the door-step
on the New Years Day brings luck and happiness.


This man should have dark hair and be tall; he should also bring
some coins, food and a piece of coal and in return the resident of
the house should offer some whiskey or food to the stranger.
Blond or red-haired people bring bad luck as well as women.


And the usual thing to say, when you meet someone on the 1
st

January is Happy New Year!


- 59 -
HANDOUT 2
QUESTION SHEET


1) Which day do the Brits celebrate New Years Day?

2) Where do the people usually go in London?

3) What can they hear right at midnight?

4) What is the name of the traditional New Years Day song?

5) What is the traditional drink?

6) How is the tradition on the 1
st
January called?

7) What should the man bring?

8) What do the people usually say on the 1
st
January?







- 60 -
HANDOUT 3
AULD LYNE SYNE
6

Should old acquaintance be forgot,
and never brought to mind ?
Should old acquaintance be forgot,
and old times since ?
----------------------------------------------------------------
CHORUS:
For auld lang syne, my dear,
For auld lang syne,
Well take a cup of kindness yet,
For auld lang syne.

----------------------------------------------------------------
And surely youll buy your pint cup!
And surely Ill buy mine!
And we'll take a cup o kindness yet,
for auld lang syne.
CHORUS
----------------------------------------------------------------
We two have run about the slopes,
and picked the daisies fine;
But weve wandered many a weary foot,
since auld lang syne.
CHORUS
----------------------------------------------------------------
We two have paddled in the stream,
from morning sun till dine;
But seas between us broad have roared
since auld lang syne.
CHORUS
----------------------------------------------------------------
And theres a hand my trusty friend!
And give us a hand o thine!
And well take a right good-will draught,
for auld lang syne.
CHORUS

----------------------------------------------------------------
- 61 -
HANDOUT 4

AULD LYNE SYNE
60
- CLUE

Should old acquaintance be forgot,
and never brought to mind ?
Should old acquaintance be forgot,
and old times since ?
CHORUS:
For auld lang syne, my dear,
For auld lang syne,
Well take a cup of kindness yet,
For auld lang syne.
And surely youll buy your pint cup!
And surely Ill buy mine!
And we'll take a cup o kindness yet,
for auld lang syne.
CHORUS
We two have run about the slopes,
and picked the daisies fine;
But weve wandered many a weary foot,
since auld lang syne.
CHORUS
We two have paddled in the stream,
from morning sun till dine;
But seas between us broad have roared
since auld lang syne.
CHORUS
And theres a hand my trusty friend!
And give us a hand o thine!
And well take a right good-will draught,
for auld lang syne.
CHORUS



60
Briner, David. Auld Lyne Syne. Masters of Harmony. Naked Voice Records, 2008.
62
HANDOUT 5
PICTURES

































63




























Picture 1:Auld Lyne Syne
61





61
Somerset Total Communication Symbols Library. 2008. 15 January 2009
<http://www.somerset.gov.uk/stcsymbols/search.asp>
64
HANDOUT 6
WARM-UP

1) nerniD _____________________
2) eaHrt _____________________

3) sisK _____________________

4) lateCHooc _____________________
5) loweFrs _____________________

6) lesCandn _____________________
7) eRd _____________________
8) eoLv _____________________
9) gelAn _____________________
10) arybruFe th41 _____________________




This lesson is focused on: ____________________


















65






HANDOUT 7
PICTURES

A B C







D E F






G H I






Picture 2: Auld Lyne Syne Pictures
62

J








62
Somerset Total Communication Symbols Library. 2008. 15 January 2009
<http://www.somerset.gov.uk/stcsymbols/search.asp>
66
Picture 3: Auld lyne Syne Pictures I love you
63




HANDOUT 8
WARM-UP CLUE



1) nerniD ____Dinner___________ E
2) eaHrt ____Heart____________ D

3) sisK ____Kiss_____________ A

4) lateCHooc ____Chocolate________ C
5) loweFrs ____Flowers__________ B

6) lesCandn ____Candles__________ I
7) eRd ____Red_____________ F
8) eoLv ____Love____________ J
9) gelAn ____Angel____________ G
10) arybruFe th41 ____14
th
February______ H




This lesson is focused on: __St. Valentines Day___






63
(J) I love you. Pohlednice Tiscali. 2009. 15 January. 2009
<http://pohlednice.tiscali.cz/foto/prani/20030124093956198163.jpg>
67










HANDOUT 9
St. VALENTINES DAY
64
SONG























64
Compton, Richard. St. Valentines Day. Kiddidles. 2001. 17 January. 2009.
<http://www.kididdles.com/lyrics/s119.html>
68















HANDOUT 10
CROSSWORD





















69
O V L E
D A Y
I L L W
E E S
R I E N D S
E O
F
N
R M O T E H
F E B R
E H W
M A
N
E K
A U R Y
N T
L
E N
T F
Y N A
N
I
E
E
A L E V
E A M S











HANDOUT 11
CROSSWORD - BOARD CLUE





















E
70













HANDOUT 12
SONG PETER COTTONTAIL
65


Peter Cottontail

Here comes Peter Cottontail,
Hoppin' down the bunny trail,

Hippity, hoppity,
Easter's on its way.

Bringin' every girl and boy
Baskets full of Easter joy,

Things to make your Easter bright and gay.
He's got jelly beans for Tommy,

Colored eggs for sister Sue,
There's an orchid for your Mommy
71

And an Easter bonnet, too.


Oh! Here comes Peter Cottontail,
Hoppin' down the bunny trail,

Hippity hoppity,
Happy Easter Day.

Here comes Peter Cottontail,
Hoppin' down the bunny trail,

Look at him stop,
and listen to him say:

"Try to do the things you should."
Maybe if you're extra good

He'll roll lots of Easter eggs your way.

You'll wake up on Easter morning
And you'll know that he was there

When you find those choc'late bunnies
That he's hiding ev'rywhere.

72
Oh! Here comes Peter Cottontail,
Hoppin' down the bunny trail,

Hippity hoppity,
Happy Easter Day.








HANDOUT 13
SONG PETER COTTONTAIL
65
(TEACHER)


Peter Cottontail

Here comes Peter Cottontail,
Hoppin' down the bunny trail,
Hippity, hoppity,
Easter's on its way.

Bringin' every girl and boy
Baskets full of Easter joy,
Things to make your Easter bright and gay.
He's got jelly beans for Tommy,
Colored eggs for sister Sue,
There's an orchid for your Mommy
And an Easter bonnet, too.

Oh! Here comes Peter Cottontail,
Hoppin' down the bunny trail,
Hippity hoppity,
Happy Easter Day.

Here comes Peter Cottontail,
Hoppin' down the bunny trail,
Look at him stop,

65
Autry, Gene. Here comes Peter Cottontail. The Essential Gene Autry. Sony. 2005.
73
and listen to him say:
"Try to do the things you should."
Maybe if you're extra good
He'll roll lots of Easter eggs your way.

You'll wake up on Easter morning
And you'll know that he was there
When you find those choc'late bunnies
That he's hiding ev'rywhere.

Oh! Here comes Peter Cottontail,
Hoppin' down the bunny trail,
Hippity hoppity,
Happy Easter Day.



HANDOUT 14

How many words can you make out of:
EASTER EGG HUNT
66

__________________________ __________________________
__________________________ __________________________
__________________________ __________________________
__________________________ __________________________
__________________________ __________________________
__________________________ __________________________
__________________________ __________________________
__________________________ __________________________
__________________________ __________________________
__________________________ __________________________
__________________________ __________________________
Can you find:

A colour. The opposite of this.
A number. The opposite of here.
A planet. The opposite of those.
A weapon. The opposite of messy.
A rodent. The opposite of love.

66
Easter Worksheets. Lanternfish. 2007. 29 January. 2009.
<http://bogglesworldesl.com/easter_worksheets.htm>
74
Something you drink. The opposite of west.
Something you wear. The opening in a fence.
A verb, both past and present. Very, very good!
What a squirrel eats. Another word for begin.
To look at for a long time. Three of your senses.
A place to act.











Picture 4: Egg Hunt
66


HANDOUT 15
LETTERS


E A S
T E R
E G G
75
H U N
T



HANDOUT 16
NECESSARY THINGS






















76






































77
Picture 5: Necessary Things
67













HANDOUT 17
WORDS

APPLES:

NIGHT time when people usually go to bed
KNEW past simple of the verb know
EYES organs which you use to see with

YESTERDAY the day before today
BANANAS:
BREEZE light wind
SAMBA dance from Brazil
SUN the star that gives us light during the day
LULLABY a song which is sung to children

67
Somerset Total Communication Symbols Library. 2008. 3 February 2009
<http://www.somerset.gov.uk/stcsymbols/search.asp>
78


KIWIS:


DAYS periods of 24 hours
SKY the space above the Earth with clouds, stars, etc.
WORLD the Earth
SIESTA a short sleep or nap




HANDOUT 18
WORDS 2.





NIGHT KNEW

EYES SAMBA

79
BREEZE SUN

LULLABY DAYS

SIESTA WORLD

YESTERDAY SKY


HANDOUT 19
SONG

La Isla Bonita
68

Madonna

Como puede ser verdad
Last night I dreamt of San Pedro
Just like I'd never gone, I knew the song
A young girl with eyes like the desert
It all seems like yesterday, not far away


Tropical the island breeze
All of nature wild and free
This is where I long to be

68
Maddona. La Isla Bonita. La Isla Bonita. Warner. 1998.
80
La isla bonita
And when the samba played
The sun would set so high
Ring through my ears and sting my eyes
Your Spanish lullaby


I fell in love with San Pedro
Warm wind carried on the sea, he called to me
Te dijo te amo
I prayed that the days would last
They went so fast


I want to be where the sun warms the sky
When it's time for siesta you can watch them go by
Beautiful faces, no cares in this world
Where a girl loves a boy, and a boy loves a girl
Last night I dreamt of San Pedro
It all seems like yesterday, not far away







HANDOUT 20
SPANISH






COMO PUEDE SER VERDAT

TE DIJO TE AMO

81


HOW COULD IT BE

TRUE HE TOLD ME

I LOVE YOU





HANDOUT 21
ISLAND PUZZLE













82
























SPARE PIECES









83















HANDOUT 22
CLUES


THIS ISLAND BELONGS TO SPAIN

THIS ISLAND BELONGS TO A VERY WELL
KNOWN GROUP OF 8 ISLANDS

IT IS SITUATED IN THE NORTHWEST
COAST OF AFRICA
84

THE CAPITAL CITY IS BOTH THE SANTA
CRUZ AND LA PALMA

ONE OF THE ILANDS IS CALLED
TENERIFE

THE OTHER ISLANDS ARE CALLED
LANZAROTE, LA PALMA, LA GOMERA, EL
HIERRO, ISLA GRATIOSA AND GRAN
CANARIA


THE ENGLISH NAME IS THE CANARY
ISLANDS

HANDOUT 23
HALLOWEEN FLASHCARDS














85



SPIDER



Picture 6: Spider
69















PUMPKIN





69
Somerset Total Communication Symbols Library. 2008. 18 February 2009
<http://www.somerset.gov.uk/stcsymbols/search.asp>
86
Picture 7: Pumpkin
70













WITCH




Picture 8: Witch
71










BLACK CAT


70
O4-Jack-o-lantern. Edupics. 2009. 18 March 2009. <http://www.edupics.com/en-coloring-
pictures-pages-photo-04-jack-o-lantern-i5189.html>
71
Lynn. UnrealityPrimetime. Halloween movies. 29 October 2008. 18 March 2009.
<http://primetime.unrealitytv.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2008/10/witch-1.jpg>
87
Picture 9: Black Cat
72









BAT

Picture 10: Bat
73















BROOMSTICK


72
BlackCatnoTail. Ed.reggi. 2009. 18 March 2009.
<http://www.eslkidstuff.com/BlackCatNoTail.gif>
73
Bat. Wikipedia Commons. 29 September 2006. 18 March 2009.
<http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Bat-shadow.svg>
88
Picture 11: Broomstick
74









GHOST

Picture 12: Ghost
75











74
HarryPotter Things. Help for English. 22 October 2005. 18 March 2009.
<http://www.helpforenglish.cz/slovni-zasoba/okruhy-slovni-zasoby/slovicka-z-knih/harry-
potter/c2006072360-Harry-Potter---Things.html>
75
Somerset Total Communication Symbols Library. 2008. 18 February 2009
<http://www.somerset.gov.uk/stcsymbols/search.asp>
89
SKELETON

Picture 13: Skeleton
76



















HANDOUT 24
TRICK OR TREAT MEANING


Trick or treat say children on Halloweens day when they go from
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
house to house asking for treats. The resident of the house gives
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
them either a treat or the children will do them some trick. The
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
children wear costumes and the usual treats are candies,
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
chocolate, money or other sweets. But if the kids do not get a treat

76
Skeleton. Family Portal. 2009. 18 March 2009.
<http://parenting.leehansen.com/downloads/coloring/halloween/pages/skeleton.htm>
90
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
they will play a trick to the house owner sometimes they write
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
on windows with soap or even throw an egg at the front door of
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
the house.
77












HANDOUT 25
TRICK OR TREAT HAT



HOP ON ONE FOOT 5 TIMES CLOSE YOUR EYES AND
TOUCH YOUR NOSE



NAME 10 RED THINGS TELL THE ENGLISH
ALPHABET





77
Clemen, Gina D.B. British and American Festivities. Black Cat Publishing: Canterbury, 2004. 19.
91
HOP ACROSS THE CLASS LIKE TELL THE CLASS WHAT YOU
A BUNNY ARE AFRAID OF AND
WHY



TELL THE TONGUE TWISTER
WHICH WITCH WISHED WHICH WICKED WISH
78

THREE TIMES IN A ROW AS QUICKLY AS YOU CAN



TIE YOUR SHOELACES WITH MAKE A SENTENCE FROM
ONLY ONE HAND THE WORDS AUTUM,
COLD AND RAIN



NAME 4 THINGS YOU COULD WHAT SPORTS EVENT WOULD
NOT LIVE WITHOUT YOU LIKE TO SEE?




DESCRIBE HOW TO PREPARE FIND SOMEONE WHO HAS
A CUP OF TEA A PET



DO YOU KNOW WHAT THIS WHAT COMES TO YOUR MIND
TRANSCRIPTION MEANS? WHEN YOU HEAR: PUMPKIN,

79
31
st
OCTOBER, SCELETON?




78
Spooky Tongue Twisters. American Folklore. 2008. 18 March 2009.
<http://www.americanfolklore.net/tonguetwisters/spooky-tonguetwisters.html>
79
Spider. Cambridge Dictionaries Online. 2009. Cambridge university. 18 March 2009
<http://dictionary.cambridge.org/define.asp?key=91216&dict=CALD>
92
NAME THREE THINGS THAT WHAT WOULD YOU DO IF
MAKE YOU HAPPY YOU WON 5 MILLION
CROWNS?




















HANDOUT 26
THIS IS HALLOWEEN
80

2
81


Boys and girls of every age _______
_______
Wouldn't you like to see something unusual? _______
_______
Come with us and you will see
This, our town of Halloween

This is Halloween, this is Halloween
Pumpkins scream in the dead of night _______ _______
This is Halloween, everybody make a sleep _______ _______
Trick or treat till the neighbors gonna die of fright
It's our town, everybody scream _______ _______
93
In this town of Halloween

I am the one hiding under your head _______ _______
Teeth ground sharp and eyes glowing black _______ _______
I am the one hiding under yours stairs
Fingers like snakes and spiders in my hair _______ _______

This is Halloween, this is Halloween
Halloween! Halloween! Halloween! Halloween!
In this town we call home _______ _______
Everyone hail to the pumpkin song
In this town, don't we love it now?
Everybody's waiting for the next enterprise _______ _______

Round that corner, man hiding in the trash can
Something's waiting no to pounce, and how you'll...
Dream! This is Halloween _______ _______
Red 'n' black, slimy green
Aren't you scared?

Well, that's just fine
Say it once, say it twice _______
_______
Take a chance and roll the dice
Ride with the moon in the dead of night _______
_______

82

Everybody scream, everybody scream
In our town of Halloween!

82

I am the man with the tear-away face _______
_______
Here in a flash and gone without a trace
I am the "who" when you call, "Who's there?"
I am the wind blowing through your hair _______
_______
I am the shadow on the moon at night
Filling your dreams to the brim with fright _______
94
_______
This is Halloween, this is Halloween
Halloween! Halloween! Halloween! Halloween!
Halloween! Halloween!

Tender lumplings everywhere
Life's no fun without a good game _______
_______
That's our job, but we're not mean
In our town of Halloween

In this town
Don't we love it now?
Everybody's waiting for the next surprise _______
_______
Skeleton Jack might catch you in the back
And scream like a banshee
Make you jump out of your skin _______ _______
This is Halloween, everybody scream
Wont' ya please make way for a very special bride _______ _______
Our man jack is King of the Pumpkin patch
Everyone hail to the Pumpkin King, now! _______
_______

This is Halloween, this is Halloween
Halloween! Halloween! Halloween! Halloween!
In this town we go home _______
_______
Everyone hail to the pumpkin song
La la-la la, Halloween! Halloween!


82


HANDOUT 27
SONG CLUE



95
There are 22 underlined words and the pupils have to decide whether they are right or
wrong. 12 words are correct but 10 words are changed:

strange - unusual
scene - sleep
bed - head
red - black
surprise - enterprise
scream - dream
clown - man
scare - game
guy - bride
call - go

The second word is the one that appears in the song but is incorrect. The first word is
the correct one that should be there.



80



81




82



HANDOUT 28
RUDOLPH




80
Manson, Marilyn. This is Halloween. The Nightmare Before Christmas (soundtrack). Walt Disney.
1993.
81
Clipartguide. 2009. 20 March 2009. < http://www.clipartguide.com/_pages/0511-0712-1817-
5660.html>
82
Vista Style Halloween Pumpkin Emoticons. Icons-land. 2009. 20 March 2009.
<http://www.icons-land.com/vista-style-halloween-pumpkin-emoticons.php>
96





















Picture 14: Rudolf
83











HANDOUT 29
SYMBOLS AND EXPLANATIONS




83
Rudolph the Reindeer. iStockphoto. 2009. 30 March 2009.
<http://www.istockphoto.com/file_thumbview_approve/4075162/2/istockphoto_4075162-rudolf-the-
reindeer.jpg>
97











Picture 15: Carol
84




















Picture 16: Baby Jesus
85
Picture 17: Angel
86








84
Carol. Kaboose. 2009. 30 March 2009.
<http://www.kidsdomain.com/holiday/xmas/color/carol9.gif>
85
Barry, Jim. Baby Jesus. Coloring pages. 2009. 30 March 2009.
<http://www.woodworkersworkshop.com/graphics9/coloringpages-baby-jesus.gif>
86
Christmas Angel. TimTim. 2009. 30 March 2009.
<http://www.timtim.com/public/images/drawings/large/Christmas_Angel.gif>
98












Picture 18: Bell
87
Picture 19: Tree
88
















Picture 20: Decoration
89









87
Santas Coloring Page. Santa. 2009. 2 April 2009.
<http://www.santa.sc/workspaces/www/templates/domains/santa.sc/images/tn_bell1.gif.jpg>
88
Christmas Tree. Printactivities. 2009. 2 April 2009.
<http://www.printactivities.com/TracingLetters/Shapes/Christmas_Tree.gif>
89
Christmas Decoration. Edupics. 2009. 2 April 2009. <http://www.edupics.com/christmas-
decoration-t8646.jpg>
99












Picture 21: Stockings
90




















Picture 22: Present
91






CAROL
Happy or religious song, which is sung at Christmas under a
Christmas tree.

90
Stockings. Coloring Book. 2008. 2 April 2009.
<http://coloringbookfun.com/christmas/originalimages/stocking9.jpg>
91
Christmas Present. Edupics. 2009. 2 April 2009.
< http://www.edupics.com/en-coloring-pictures-pages-photo-christmas-present-i8651.html>
100



BABY JESUS
Because of his birth we celebrate Christmas. It is believed that he is
a son of God.


ANGEL
An angel told the shepherds about the birth of Jesus. It is a human
figure with wings.



BELL
A cup shaped object that rings.



CHRISTMAS TREE
An evergreen tree that people decorate at Christmas










DECORATIONS
Something that adds beauty. It is usually colorful and symbolic.

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CHRISTMAS STOCKINGS
A large sock which children leave out when they go to bed on Christmas
Eve so that it can be filled with small presents



PRESENT
A thing given to somebody to make him or her happy.























HANDOUT 30
I AM THE CHRISTMAS STORY



Christmas is a Christian holiday and it celebrates the birth of Jesus. The

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evening on 24
th
December is called Christmas Eve and children usually


hang up Christmas stockings above the fire place believing that Father


Christmas will let there some sweets or presents. The British main


Christmas celebration takes place on 25
th
December when the children
are allowed to open the presents placed under a Christmas tree and
the whole


family is together at home. Most of the families sing Christmas carols
and go to church. There is a special meal for this day which is
a roasted turkey,


potatoes and Christmas pudding. The 26
th
December is called Boxing Day


because people give some little presents or money in little boxes
to the poor people.


HANDOUT 31
JINGLE BELLS ROCK
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KARAOKE

Jingle bell, jingle bell, jingle bell rock
Jingle bells swing and jingle bells ring
Snowin' and blowin' up bushels of fun

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Helms, Bobby. Jingle Bells Rock. Home Alone 2: Lost In New York soundtrack lyrics. Twetieth
Century Fox Film Scores. 1992.
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Now the jingle hop has begun

Jingle bell, jingle bell, jingle bell rock
Jingle bells chime in jingle bell time
Dancin' and prancin' in Jingle Bell Square
In the frosty air
What a bright time, it's the right time
To rock the night away
Jingle bell time is a swell time
To go glidin' in a one-horse sleigh
Giddy-up jingle horse, pick up your feet
Jingle around the clock
Mix and a-mingle in the jinglin' feet
That's the jingle bell rock

Jingle bell, jingle bell, jingle bell rock
Jingle bells chime in jingle bell time
Dancin' and prancin' in Jingle Bell Square
In the frosty air
What a bright time, it's the right time
To rock the night away
Jingle bell time is a swell time
To go glidin' in a one-horse sleigh

Giddy-up jingle horse, pick up your feet
Jingle around the clock
Mix and a-mingle in the jinglin' feet
That's the jingle bell
That's the jingle bell
That's the jingle bell rock

HANDOUT 32
MERRY CHRISTMAS STUDENT





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HANDOUT 33
INSTRUCTIONS TEACHER

1. Start in the square with the angel. Go down one square. Go one square to the right
and draw a TREE.
2. Go up 2 squares and down one square. Draw a present.
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3. Go left two squares and up one square. Then go right two squares and write the name
of our reindeer.
4. Go left two squares and down one square. Write a name of an English carol.
5. Go down one square and right one square. Draw two bells.
6. Go up two squares. Draw a candle.
7. Go left one square and down two squares. Write on which day people in Britain
celebrate Christmas Day.
8. In the last blank square write MERRY CHRISTMAS!

ANSWER SHEET:










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Christmas Angel. TimTim. 2009. 30 March 2009.
<http://www.timtim.com/public/images/drawings/large/Christmas_Angel.gif>
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