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Strengthening English Language Through Teacher Professional Development

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ELTC-TED
Conference 2011
Strengthening English Language
Through Teacher Professional Development
5 - 7 July 2011
Royale Bintang Hotel, Seremban,
Negeri Sembilan,
MALAYSIA
Strengthening English Language Through Teacher Professional Development
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Strengthening English Language Through Teacher Professional Development
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DAY ONE - 5 JULY 2011
Welcoming Remarks
by The Deputy Director General
Ministry of Education Malaysia
9.30 - 9.45 am Seri Negeri Ballroom
Opening Ceremony
- Opening Address by
Honourable Deputy Prime Minister and
Minister of Education, Malaysia
- Press Conference
9.45 - 10.45 am Seri Negeri Ballroom
PLENARY SESSION 1
Tea Break Seri Negeri Ballroom 10.45 - 11.45 am
Upskilling EL Teachers Through In-Service Teacher
Education
by Dr. Choong Kam Foong
11.15 - 12.15 am Seri Negeri Ballroom
- Lunch
- Registration for Special Interest Group (SIG)
Grand Concorde
Foyer
12.15 - 2.00 pm
PARALLEL SESSION 1
Capturing the Perceived Needs of the Teacher
Participants in the MBMMBI Program
by Dr. Don Nixon & Hjh. Kamariah Hj Samsuddin
Ampangan 1 2.30 - 3.00 pm
A Study of the Perception of Non-Option English
Language Teachers of the English Profciency
Course Conducted under the Strengthening English
Language (MBI) Programme
by Sachithanantham Tachina Moorthi
3.00 - 3.30 pm
Fostering Teachers Professional Development.
by Prof. Dato Dr. Tunku Mohani Tunku Mohtar
Ampangan 3 2.30 - 3.30 pm
A Survey of ELT Pre-Service Teachers Motivation
and Attitudes Towards Learning English
by Phil Keegan & Nazura Mohamad
Rasah 1 2.30 - 3.30 pm
Teacher Learning and Professional Identity:
Making the Connection
by Prof. Dr. Richard Kiely
Rasah 2 2.30 - 3.30 pm
Teachers Markings of Grammar Errors:
Revealing Gaps in Teachers Knowledge of Content
by Dr. Napisah Kepol
Lenggeng 2.30 - 3.30 pm
PROGRAMME
Late Registration
Registration for Parallel / Workshop Sessions
Boardwalk
5 July 2011
8.00 - 9.20 am
Seri Negeri Ballroom
Grand Foyer
Registration
Registration for Parallel / Workshop Sessions
Boardwalk
4 July 2011
2.00 - 6.00 pm
Lobby
Grand Foyer
Strengthening English Language Through Teacher Professional Development
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Malaysian B.Ed TESL Trainees Perceptions in Early
Teaching Practice of Basic TESL Lesson Content
and Design
by William Taylor
Labu 2.30 - 3.30 pm
The Learner Factor in Assessment for Learning
by Dr. Sophie Ioannou-Georgiou
Rantau 2.30 - 3.30 pm
Is There a Gap to Bridge Between New Professional
Development Initiatives for Teachers and Their
Practices in the School Context?: A Case Study of ELT
Participant Perceptions of their MBI Course
by John Bateman & Jenny Kwong Shuk Wah
Mantin 2.30 - 3.30 pm
Tea Break Seri Negeri
Ballroom Foyer
3.30 - 3.50 pm
PLENARY SESSION 2
KSSR English Language Curriculum:
Concept and Implementation
by Dr. Mohamed Abu Bakar
Seri Negeri Ballroom 4.00 - 5.00 pm
DAY TWO - 6 JULY 2011
PLENARY SESSION 3
Rethinking Pedagogical Practice In ELT
by Prof. Dr. Moses Samuel
Seri Negeri Ballroom 8.00 - 9.00 am
PARALLEL SESSION 2
The Status of Teaching and Learning of English
in Malaysian Preschool
by Dr. Ng Soo Boon
Ampangan 1 9.15 - 10.15 am
DADs Way to Enhance Vocabulary
by Hyacinth Foo Mook Keow
Ampangan 3 9.15 - 9.45 am
SVA In SVO Writing It Right
by Shirley Monica George
Rasah 1 9.15 - 9.45 am
I Am An Independent Reader
by Rohaida Ngah
9.45 - 10.15 am
Writing Apprehension and the Availability of First
Steps 2nd. Edition Writing Resources in the Teaching
of Writing Among Primary School Teachers in Negeri
Sembilan
by Koh Bee Hoon
9.45 10.15 am Rasah 2
Vocabulary Strategies
by Dr. Rafah Abdul Rahman
9.45 - 10.15 am
Strengthening English Language Through Teacher Professional Development
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Rethinking Teaching Pedagogy to Enhance the
Quality of Learning and Teaching
by Assoc. Prof. Dr. Cynthia Yolanda Doss
Labu 9.15 10.15 am
Defcit Approach Is So Last Season! Embracing
Developmental Model of Learning as A Key to
Improve Performance
by Nurjanah Mahat
Rantau 9.15 9.45 am
A Case Study of Young Learner Literacy for Children
with Learning Difculties
by Rod Deering
9.45 10.15 am
Strengthening English Language Pedagogy &
Professional Development with Action Research
by Dr. Jef Hawkins
Mantin 9.15 10.15 am
PLENARY SESSION 4
Is Fun really Fun? And is it Achievable? An
Exploration of Fun Learning in Malaysian
Classrooms
by Dr. Simone Evans
10.40 - 11.40 am Seri Negeri Ballroom
PARALLEL SESSION 3
Ways of Improving the Language Skills of Student
Teachers of English
by Dr. Hyacinth Gaudart
11.50 -12.50 pm Ampangan 1
Importance of Multicultural Childrens Literature
by Vineet Kaul
Ampangan 3 11.50 -12.50 pm
The Efect of the MBI Profciency Course on
Teacher Self-Efcacy of Non-Option English
Language Teachers
by Dr. Goh Lay Huah & Jenny Kwong Shuk Wah
Rasah 1 11.50 -12.20 pm
An E.T. at Honeywell NASA Educators@SpaceCamp
- From the Classroom and Beyond
by Rodney Tan Chai Whatt
12.20 -12.50 pm
Using Role Play in the Classroom to Engage
Students Interest in Literature Within
the ELT Classroom
by Dr. Lloyd Precious & Nurul Izzati
Rasah 2 11.50 -12.50 pm
Diferentiated Classroom Instructions (DCI) and Its
Efect on the Reading and Writing Skills of the Middle
School Pupils of Dole Philippines School
by Zaldy Baguios
Lenggeng 11.50 -12.50 pm
Tea Break 10.15 10.35 am Seri Negeri
Ballroom Foyer
Human Capital Development in Smart School
Programmes for Strengthening the
English Language
by Dr. Dorothy Dewitt
Lenggeng 9.15 - 10.15 am
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Engaging Visuals for Poetry
and Critical Literacy
by Norina Melati, Sivaganga & Lee Sze Seau Jill
Labu 11.50 -12.50 pm
Exploiting Authentic Materials for Developing
Receptive Skills with Young Learners
by Stuart Gale, Wong Lind Say & Muhamad Hazrul
Rantau 11.50 -12.50 pm
The Art of Making Little Books
as a Minimal Resource Classroom Activity
by Ruth Wickham
Mantin 11.50 -12.50 pm
Lunch Grand Concorde 12.50 -2.00 pm
PLENARY SESSION 5
Dialoguing to Learn Through Assessment
in the English Classroom
by Asoc. Prof. Dr. Saratha Sitamparam
Seri Negeri Ballroom 2.30 - 3.30 pm
WORKSHOPS
SPECIAL INTEREST GROUP (SIG)
Tea Break Seri Negeri
Ballroom Foyer
5.00 - 5.30 pm
Conference Dinner Seri Negeri Ballroom 7.30 - 10.00 pm
Fun Learning through Language Arts
Language & Literacy
Ampangan 1 3.45 -5.00 pm
Current Pedagogical Approaches in ELT
Language & Pedagogy
Ampangan 3 3.45 -5.00 pm
Upskilling ELT through Teacher Development
ELT Management
Rasah 1 3.45 -5.00 pm
KSSR Language Curriculum Implementation
Quality & Assurance
Rasah 2 3.45 -5.00 pm
Assessment for Language in EL Classroom
Assessment & Evaluation
Lenggeng 3.45 -5.00 pm
MBI Implementation: Issues & Concerns
Research & Development
Labu 3.45 -5.00 pm
Childrens Literature
Documentation & Publication
Rantau 3.45 -5.00 pm
ICT in ELT
Language & Technology
Mantin 3.45 -5.00 pm
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DAY THREE - 7 JULY 2011
Cooperative Book Publishing
by Dianne F. Stephens
8.00 - 8.50 am Ampangan 1
WORKSHOPS
English Immersion through Appropriate
Mediated Movie Presentation
by Peter Wickham
8.00 - 8.25 am Ampangan 3
Cartoons and Hand phones
- Creating and Composing Texts
by Barry W. Jarrett
8.00 - 8.50 am Rasah 1
Understanding CLT from the Learners Perspective -
Producing and Presenting a Minority
Language Lesson
by William Taylor & Clara Anselmus
8.00 - 8.50 am Rasah 2
Music and Storytelling
by Phil Keegan & Nazura Mohamad
8.00 - 8.25 am Lenggeng
Exploring Possibilities for Creative Learning (Drama)
by Norhanim Abdul Samat
8.25 8.50 am
Using Reward Systems with Young Learners
by Stuart Gale & Syaliana Jamaludin
8.00 - 8.25 am Labu
Maximising the Usage of Textbooks under
KSSR to Strengthen ELT
by Normala Baharudin
8.25 - 8.50 am
New Literacies: New Resources for
Listing and Viewing
by Genevieve Chow
8.00 - 8.50 am Rantau
Exploring Learner Engagement
by Prof. Dr. Moses Samuel
8.00 - 8.50 am Mantin
Forum 9.00 - 10.30 am Seri Negeri Ballroom
Tea Break 10.30 - 11.00 am Seri Negeri
Ballroom Foyer
Closing
- Conference Report
- Closing Ceremony
11.00 - 12.30 pm Seri Negeri Ballroom
Lunch 12.30 - 2.00 pm Grand Concorde
END OF CONFERENCE 1.00 pm
Using Typhoon! - The Ultimate Whole-Class
Interactive Learning Activity For
English Language Lessons
by Ruth Wickham
8.25 - 8.50 am
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PLENARY PAPERS
Strengthening English Language Through Teacher Professional Development
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Dr. Choong Kam Foong A.M.N
Upskilling EL Teachers through In-Service
Teacher Education
PLENARY PAPER 1
Much emphasis has been given to initial teacher education, perhaps too much, that seems to
imply that it is the panacea to good teaching in schools. However, we all know that the success
or failure of any educational innovation is dependent on teachers especially those who are
in-service. It is only natural that heads of schools will send their most experienced and capable
teachers for induction courses to new curriculum and other innovations. These teachers are ex-
pected to transmit new skills and new ideas into the system. It is critical therefore that there is
buy-in from these teachers because they have the experience of teaching and the professional
status as seniors. By default they are the change-makers.
Given their critical potential, will up-skilling these teachers be an adequate strategy in the im-
plementation of educational change? This paper aims to explore the signifcance of in-service
teacher education in teacher development.
DR. CHOONG KAM FOONG A.M.N is the current director of the English Language Teaching Centre,
MOE, Malaysia. Over a 34-year career, she has served in various capacities as teacher, teacher
trainer, ELT project manager and teacher training curriculum designer. She is a member of the
RELC Governing Board, representing Malaysia.
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Dr. Mohamed Abu Bakar
KSSR English Language Curriculum:
Concept and Implementation
PLENARY PAPER 2
The Standard-Based English Language Curriculum for Malaysian Primary Schools is designed
to provide pupils with a strong foundation in the English language. The curriculum comprises
content standards and learning standards. Content standards are specifc standards which pupils
need to attain at the end of Year 6. Learning standards are building blocks which ensure that
pupils attain language skills in order to fulfll a particular content standard.
The focus in Years 1 and 2 is on basic literacy which is developed through early reading, writing
and listening and speaking activities. Learning is fun-flled and language skills are integrated in
meaningful contexts. From Year 3 onwards, pupils will further develop the ability to speak, listen,
read and write in English meaningfully, purposefully and with confdence. Grammar is only
introduced in Year 3 to enable pupils to develop a sound grasp of English Language structures
allowing time for pupils to have frst developed grammar awareness of their frst language. The
Language Arts component is introduced right from Year 1 to give pupils more opportunity to
engage in and enjoy stories, poems, songs, rhymes and plays written in English. Language input
is presented under themes and topics, which are appropriate for the pupils. Assessment is both
formal and informal including tests, exams and classroom exercises where progress is regularly
recorded and monitored.
This presentation will highlight the elements of the KSSR English language curriculum and
discuss its implementation in the English language classroom.
DR. MOHAMED BIN ABU BAKAR is currently the Deputy Director of the English Language
Teaching Centre (ELTC), Teacher Education Division, Ministry of Education, Malaysia. Prior to
this posting, he was the Head of Unit for English Language and Literature at the Curriculum
Development Division, where he worked for 13 years. Dr. Mohamed has presented papers at
conferences and written articles in language journals. He was an education consultant with the
Ministry of Education, Oman in 2009.
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Professor Dr. Moses Samuel
Rethinking Pedagogical Practice in ELT
PLENARY PAPER 3
This paper invites conference participants to refect on pedagogical practices in ELT as they are
articulated at the macro-level in academic and professional discourses, and enacted at the micro-
level in diverse classroom settings. The paper considers the continuities and contradictions
between macro-level articulations and micro-level enactment, i.e., between how classroom
practice is framed in idealized contexts and how it is in reality performed in actual classrooms. It
aims to challenge participants to consider how pedagogy should be re-calibrated to better serve
the changing out of school and beyond school needs of learners.
The paper begins by considering the post-method condition (Kumaravadivelu, 2006) and
explores the implications of the shift from methods to pedagogy. This sets the stage for a
consideration of various contemporary frameworks for pedagogical practice. It thus explores
and exemplifes several recent trends in pedagogical practice that address notions of
intellectual quality (e.g., higher order thinking and deep understanding); supportive learning
environments that promote learner engagement; learner diversity; and the relationship between
in-school and out-of-school experiences. The paper concludes by considering implications for
the link between what Basil Bernstein called the three message systems of schooling, namely
pedagogy, curriculum and assessment.
DR. MOSES SAMUEL is Professor and Deputy Dean ( Undergraduate Degrees and
Internationalisation ) at the Faculty of Education, University of Malaya. He has over 30 years
experience as a teacher educator and researcher in TESL. Among his areas of specialization are
TESL Methodology; Literacy Development; Sociolinguistics; Language Planning and Policies.
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Simone Evans, PhD
Is fun really fun? And is it achievable?
An Exploration of Fun Learning in
Malaysian Classrooms
PLENARY PAPER 4
Malaysian English language curriculum, like its counterparts across the world, requires teachers
to deliver programs which are learner-centered, meaningful, and creative. In a recent curriculum
transformation, the standard-based document for English language in primary schools went one
step further by introducing a Language Arts module in which pupils will apply what they have
learnt in the other modules in fun-flled activities based on meaningful experiences (BPK, 2009).
Fun, fun-flled activities and enjoyment are now a requirement of English lessons.
Whilst the curriculum draws on sound pedagogical principles, and the experiences of classroom
practitioners, school management, teacher trainers and other stakeholders, very little is known
of how Malaysian primary and secondary school teachers understand fun, how fun should be
achieved, and how fun relates to learning .
Clearly, Malaysian teachers understandings of and practices around fun learning will have a
major impact on the achievement of the new curricula learning outcomes. The nature of this
impact and the ability of teacher-training and professional development activities to modify
these attitudes and practices are, therefore, areas worthy of investigation.

This paper analyses the evidential basis for the current focus on fun learning, its meaning and
its potential impact within the Malaysian context. It presents initial fndings of a quantitative
survey administered to in-service, optionist and non-optionist English Language primary and
secondary teachers across the country on their attitudes towards beliefs about and experiences
of fun within the classroom. Finally, it explores the implications of these analyses for teacher
education in Malaysia.
SIMONE EVANS, PhD is a Training Fellow based at ELTC. She has worked in Curriculum Design,
TESOL Pedagogy, TESOL and Intercultural Communication in Morocco, Qatar, UAE, Japan and
Australia.
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Assoc. Prof. Dr. Saratha Sithamparam
Dialoguing to Learn Through Assessment
in the English Classroom
PLENARY PAPER 5
With the increasing currency of the term assessment for learning over the last two decades,
there has been a heightened focus on student learning through the use of assessment. This is
contrasted with assessment of learning which characterises more traditional forms of evaluating
students learning. In examining the process of seeking and interpreting evidence for use by
students and their teachers, two key questions emerge: How can assessment enhance and
extend learning? and Can assessment motivate students to learn? In discussing assessment
for learning, these questions will be considered within the context of English classrooms. It
highlights the process of dialoguing which must occur if students are to obtain direction and
support for their learning. Teacher-student dialogue and student-student dialogue through
classroom processes such as questioning, teacher feedback and peer feedback will be discussed.
These are tied to the goal of providing students guidance, and allowing negotiation so that they
begin to assume responsibility for their own learning.
DR. SARATHA SITHAMPARAM, is Deputy Dean and Associate Professor of Language and Literacy
Education at the Sultan Hassanal Bolkiah Institute of Education, Universiti Brunei Darussalam.
She has also been a teacher educator working at Universiti Malaya and in teacher training
colleges in Malaysia. Her research interests include childrens literacy practices, the teaching and
learning of literature, language use in content area classrooms and school-based assessment for
learning. She recently led the English facilitation team for teacher professional development in
assessment for learning in secondary schools in Brunei Darussalam.
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PARALLEL PAPERS
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Dr. Don Nixon, Hjh. Kamariah Hj Samsuddin
Capturing the Perceived Needs of the Teacher
Participants in the MBMMBI Program
The shortage of English Teachers in Malaysia is currently being addressed by the MBMMBI
program. All Non-Optionist teachers currently participate in a profciency program to upgrade
their profciency skills. What do the Teacher participants say about this program?
To answer this question structured, semi-structured questionnaires and interviews were carried
out in two phases of one program in Kuching to determine the perceived needs of the Teacher
Participants. The results suggest that in addition to the exercises in the module which promote
profciency the participants feel that Teaching ideas would be useful.
It is also argued that meeting the perceived needs of the Teacher Participants will, in itself, lead
to the enhancement of profciency through greater engagement of the teacher participants
with the MBMMBI program.
The paper suggests that other lecturers may wish to consider modifying the generic module to
include more teaching ideas in addition to profciency exercises.
Currently, the non-optionist teachers are tested for profciency in the latter stages of the
MBMMBI profciency program. It is suggested that the profciency test be carried out before the
profciency program begins-and that the results of the test should be used as a placement test.
DR. DON NIXON, has taught for 37 years in secondary schools and at Universities in ten countries.
he spent his early years teaching in Africa, South and Central America, and the Middle East.
Since 1990, he has taught English as a Second Language in schools and Universities in Australia
and Brunei. He has an Ed.D and two Masters degrees in TESOL and Education in developing
countries.His interests are in Teacher Education, Student and Teacher Motivation, Teacher
Collaboration and Educational Management.
HJH. KAMARIAH HJ SAMSUDDIN Currently, she is a lecturer at the English Language Unit, Teacher
Training Institute Batu Lintang Campus, Kuching, Sarawak. She obtained a BA (Hons) TESOL from
Strathclyde University, Glasgow, Scotland and a Master of Science in TESL from University Putra,
Malaysia. Her 27 years of teaching experience ranges from primary and secondary schools
to universities in Pahang, Perak and Selangor. She then joined Teacher Education Divison
Teacher Training Institute, International Language Campus, Lembah Pantai, Kuala Lumpur and
the English Language Teaching Centre Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur. Her areas of interest include
Malaysian Literature in English, New Englishes , Boys Literacy and Teacher Education.
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Strengthening English Language Through Teacher Professional Development
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Sachithanantham Tachina Moorthi
A Study of the Perception of Non-Option English
Language Teachers of the English Profciency Course
Conducted Under the Strengthening English Language
(MBI) Programme
The Malaysian Ministry of Education has been initiating numerous programmes to improve
the quality of teaching and learning of the English language in schools. Among them is the
Strengthening English Language (MBI) programme that focuses on the pedagogical and
profciency aspect of teaching and learning of the English language. Since then, hundreds of
practising teachers, especially those who are non-English language optionists but teaching
English in schools, have attended the English Language Profciency Course. This study attempts
to investigate the attitude of the participants towards the English Language Profciency Course
as well as their perception of its efectiveness. A questionnaire was administered among the
fourty-one participants of the English Language Profciency Course in IPG Sultan Abdul Halim,
Sungai Petani, Kedah. The questionnaire consists two sections. Section A seeks demographic
information while section B seeks responses to sixteen items that would help determine the
participants attitude and perception of the English Language Profciency Course. Both these
constructs, attiitude and perception were operationalised and the participants responses were
sought using the likert scale. The data is analysed using descriptive statistics mainly percentages
and frequencies. However, the two open-ended items in the questionnaire were qualitatively
analysed and described. This paper essentially discusses the English Language Profciency
Course participants responses to the eighteen items in detail and suggests strategies to further
improve this course.
SACHITHANANTHAM TACHINA MOORTHI is an English Language Lecturer at Sultan Abdul
Halim Teacher Education Institute in Kedah, Malaysia. He has been involved in the teaching
of English for over 30years both in schools and in Teacher Training Institute. He has about 15
research papers published both locally and overseas. His area of interest is in the teaching and
learning of English particularly in the Teacher Education Institutes.
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Strengthening English Language Through Teacher Professional Development
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Prof. Dato Dr. Tunku Mohani Tunku Mohtar
Fostering Teachers Professional Development
The main aim of teacher education is universal, that is, to equip teachers with pedagogical
knowledge and skills so that they will be able to produce students who are competent in the
area of study they have pursued. The professionalisation of teacher education lies not only in the
application of pedagogical knowledge and skills that teachers have mastered. It encompasses
attitudes and personal dispositions which enhance the concept of professionalism. These
attitudes and personal dispositions are refected through awareness of sensitivity to students
needs and spontaneity in addressing their needs to develop twenty-frst century skills. Trainees
are not able to fully develop professionalism in teaching through educational programmes
which they undergo. Professionalism in teaching develops through experience over a period of
time. The trainees need to learn as they teach. They need to learn from their practices. This paper
highlights the need for both potential as well as practising teachers to ensure that what is taught
is learned. They need to produce an impact on learning. The efectiveness of teaching lies in the
learning. Teaching is efective only if students have learned from what is taught. The content
of this paper is based on exploratory studies which look into strategies used by some teacher
trainees in teaching English as a second language (ESL). The paper evaluates and discusses some
practices in language teaching which can be enhanced to guide students learn the language
more efectively. Suggestions for improvement of teaching are made to ensure quality and
sustainable teaching and learning
TUNKU MOHANI TUNKU MOHTAR holds a doctoral degree from the University of Malaya and
a Master of Arts degree in Applied Linguistics from the National University of Singapore. Her
areas of interest include TESL methodology, language testing, discourse analysis in TESL, and
linguistics for TESL. She has presented papers at seminars and conferences at national as well
international level. She has also published a number of articles in English as well as in Malay.
Currently she is a professor lecturing at the Faculty of Languages and Communication, University
Pendidikan Sultan Idris, Tanjong Malim, Perak.
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Strengthening English Language Through Teacher Professional Development
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Phil Keegan
A Survey of ELT Pre-service Teachers Motivation
and Attitudes Towards Learning English
This talk will present the results of a survey carried out at IPBA Kuala Lumpur into students
motivation and attitudes in respect of studying English. The background to the survey will be
explained and the results will be examined. Finally, suggestions and conclusions will be ofered
PHIL KEEGAN, before coming to Malaysia in January of this year worked for over 25 years as a
teacher and teacher trainer in the UK, the USA, Germany, France, Austria and Turkey. His frst
book, In My Opinion, was published in the USA in 2009. He is currently employed as a training
fellow at IPBA, Kuala Lumpur.
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Professor Richard Kiely
Teacher Learning and Professional Identity:
Making the Connection
This paper explores the links between teacher learning and professional identity, and the
implications for teacher education. It takes Wengers situated learning in Communities of
Practice theory as a conceptual basis and draws on data from two recent research projects
which investigated the learning of experienced and novice teachers. It identifes observation,
interaction and performance as key opportunities for learning. These activities, when integrated,
facilitate negotiation of meanings which allow teachers to transform their own practice as part
of ongoing professional development. Learning occurs through the processes of participation,
alignment and reifcation. These processes in turn grow confdence and competence, and
suggest a course of development for teacher education programmes, and institutions as well as
the professionals involved.
RICHARD KIELY is Professor of Applied Linguistics and Language Education and Head of the
Centre for International Language Teacher Education at University College Plymouth St Mark
and St John. He has worked as a teacher and teacher educator in Malaysia, Hong Kong, France,
Poland, Mexico, Zambia and Hungary. He has published in Language teaching Research, ELT
Journal, Language Awareness, Journal of English for Academic Purposes, Studies in Educational
Evaluation, and Innovation in Language Learning and Teaching. He is the author (with Pauline
Rea-Dickins) of Programme Evaluation in Language Education. His current research focus is the
impact of initial language teacher education programmes.
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Strengthening English Language Through Teacher Professional Development
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Dr. Napisah Kepol
Teachers Markings of Grammar Errors:
Revealing Gaps in Teachers Knowledge of Content
A teachers knowledge of content plays an important role in their practice. In the feld of language
teaching, several studies have reported the negative efect of inadequate knowledge of content
on teachers practices. In this paper, the results of a study that examined a collection of essays
that had been marked by a selected group of in-service teachers enrolled in a post-graduate
TESL programme in a Malaysian public university are presented. The essays were written by
students taught by the in-service teachers and had been submitted with a course assignment
in which the teachers were required to mark the essays and analyse the grammar errors that
were made by their students. The teachers markings were analysed for the type and quantity
of grammar errors marked and unmarked. The fndings revealed that the teachers markings
contained inconsistencies, inaccuracies and omission of many grammar errors. This tendency to
mark inconsistently, inaccurately and incompletely suggests that there are gaps in the teachers
knowledge of grammar. The results raise issues about the quality of feedback and grammar
teaching provided by such teachers to their students. The discussion is centred around these
issues and suggestions that address the issues are proposed.
DR. NAPISAH KEPOL is a lecturer in the English Language and Literature Department at
Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris (UPSI). She has experience in teaching a variety of courses
including general English courses, English Grammar, The Teaching of Grammar, Syntax and
Morphology, TESL Methodology, and Materials Development and Adaptation. Her research
interests are language teacher knowledge, teacher training and development, grammar, and
grammar teaching.
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William Taylor
Malaysian B.Ed TESL Trainees Perceptions in Early
Teaching Practice of Basic TESL Lesson
Content and Design.
Data from observations of 34 Malaysian B.Ed TESL year-four students between July 2009 and
Sept 2010 was analysed for factors that might shed light on trainees understanding of what
constitutes a TESL lesson at the end stage of their formal training. The lessons observed were the
trainees frst independent in-school teaching practice lessons. The data was initially collected
in ethnographic detail and then transferred to a standard rubric. Collection was for assessment
purposes without prior research designs, so analysis was purely a quantitative assessment of
lesson occurrences. Focus was on the nature of EL input provided to the learners, the incidence
of TESL-related techniques such as pair-work, group-work, language games and use of media.
Participants had been led to expect assessment on these basic lesson essentials. Results show
that a proportion of the trainees omitted to give model samples of the target English of the lesson
before holding student practice activities. Also, participants employed a very limited range of
communicative-interactive techniques overall. The presentation of results leads to a discussion
of what is understood by the term TESL in modern English Language teaching and the practical
understanding among the sample Malaysian TESL trainees about the communicative-interactive
TESL techniques available to them. This work is the frst stage of a series of planned research
projects. Follow-up research projects will employ shared refections on these observations and in-
depth interviews with experienced Malaysian teacher trainers. This is to uncover reasons for the
gap between the knowledge gained from four years of teacher training and the understanding
of its practical class-room application among year-four trainees. It is hoped that this might
contribute to ideas that help overcome this gap in future teacher training programmes.
WILLIAM TAYLOR, born and educated in England, with a background in scientifc R&D has taught
English at various levels in a variety of institutions in fve countries since 1988. From 2003 he
trained in-service teachers with the DELC project in Sabah and TESL undergraduates at Universiti
Malaysia Sabah before joining the Fellows project.
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Dr. Sophie Ioannou-Georgiou
The Learner Factor in Assessment for Learning
The concept of Assessment for Learning has become widely accepted and educationalists around
the world are working to fully understand it and implement it in their context.
If Assessment for Learning is to be implemented correctly, teachers also need to understand
the new roles that need to be adopted by the learner. This presentation will briefy present the
concept of Assessment for Learning and then discuss the changes that we should bear in mind
as regards the role of the learner.
It will then proceed to discuss practical examples which illustrate how teachers can apply the
theory to their teaching
DR. SOPHIE IOANNOU-GEORGIOU is the co-author of Assessing Young Learners (Oxford
University Press) which was awarded the ELTON prize for innovation and excellence by the British
Council and shortlisted for the Ben Warren Prize. She has extensive experience as an EFL teacher
and teacher trainer. Her most recent publications are Guidelines for CLIL Implementation in
Primary and Pre-primary Education (co-edited with Pavlos Pavlou) and TESOL Technology
Standards: Description, Implementation, Integration (co-authored with Healey, Hanson-Smith,
Hubbard, Kessler and Ware). She is currently an Inspector for English at the Cyprus Ministry of
Education and Culture while also continuing to train teachers through the Cyprus Pedagogical
Institute (in-service training) and the European University Cyprus (initial training).
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Dr. John Bateman, Jenny Kwong
Is there a gap to bridge between new Professional
Development initiatives for teachers and their
practices in the school context? : A Case Study of ELT
Participant Perceptions of Their MBI Course.
This research examines the afect on participants of a specifc MBI profciency inservice course
introduced in six regions in Sabah. The intial pilot research into the previous years cohort helped to
defne the parameters/framework of this latest qualitaiitve research. So this investigation ofers a
further opportunity to revisit the intial fndings and provide more up-to-date data. The objectives
are to explore the extent to which a new materials/strategies of the course are perceived to have
changed the teaching perspectives of the participants. Also whether what has been learnt has
been/can be successfully implemented in the school context. Finally to investigate how they
perceive the importance of this strategy within the scope of their professional development. The
research raises important issues that concern the challenge of balancing the commitment to
change classroom practices with the school demands. In addition how far this type of professional
development can renew and extend participants learning. So insights will be ofered into teacher
attitudes both towards the course, and its longer-term efect. The fndings will partly be derived
from interviews with participants and trainers/facilitators that will be conducted at two distinct
phases of the course, and also from written refections obtained after the end of the course. The
analysis will focus on revealing insights on the extent to which the course materials have been
applied by participant teachers in their teaching, and also any problems that occurred whilst
carrying this forward in the school context.
DR. JOHN BATEMAN has previously been an examiner, teacher, lecturer and trainer in fve
diferent countries prior to taking up the Fellows post in Sabah. Over the last twenty years he has
held both teaching and researcher positions in a range of education programmes in diferent
Universities. He has also been course leader in his specialist areas of Literature and Action
Research. His academic qualifcations include a BA and PGCE in English, and Masters and PhD in
Education all from UK Universities.
JENNY KWONG SHUK WAH is an English Language lecturer at Teacher Training Institute, Gaya
campus, Kota Kinabalu, Sabah. She has been teaching there for 12 years. Prior to joining the
institute, she served as a secondary school English Language teacher in one of the schools in
Kota Kinabalu for six years, and worked as the Sabah State English Language Ofcer for the Sabah
State Education Department for three years. She holds a B.A (Hons.) degree in TESL from National
University of Malaysia and a Master in Education from University Technology of Malaysia. Her
forte is in Teaching Methodology and Action Research.
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Dr. Ng Soo Boon
The Status of Teaching and Learning of English in
Malaysian Preschool
Language acquisition is an important component of universal preschool education. One of the
major strands in the Malaysian National Preschool Curriculum is Language and Early Literacy.
In the context of Malaysia, preschool children need to be exposed to at least two languages
which are national language and english, and the other mother tongues. In the new National
Preschool Curriculum Standard (NPCS) implemented beginning 2010, a new language policy
was enforced. This new policy required preschools with national language as medium of
instruction to teach 50% of the time using english language while preschools with the other
mother tongue as medium of instruction will teach 1/3 of the time using english language. A
preliminary study was conducted mid 2010 to investigate the readiness to implement this new
policy and to investigate the quality of teaching and learning in english. Findings indicated that
generally preschool teachers perceived themselves as able to teach using the language, however
classroom observations conducted by the researchers discovered that they have problem with
pronunciation and grammar and speak a lot of broken english. At the same time it is found that
the teaching and learning methodology is more teacher-centered. This fnding is consistent with
previous observation by Curriculum Development Division where learning through play was
lacking. Learning through play is the recommended strategy of teaching and learning in the
Malaysian National Preschool Curriculum. It can be used to teach english language efectively
and make lesson more fun. Besides presenting fndings of the study conducted, this paper
will explore ways to make learning fun using english language through Learning through Play
strategy.
DR. NG SOO BOON is the Head of the Science Sector in Curriculum Development Division (CDD),
Ministry of Education Malaysia. She was a school teacher for nine years before joining CDD in
1992. She served as the Head of Early Childhood Care and Education Sector in CDD. She has
wide experience and knowledge in the feld of early childhood education. Her portfolio includes
conducting courses, research and evaluating educational materials including early childhood
materials. She has also written early childhood modules and guidebooks. Dr. Ng is actively
involved in early childhood education in Malaysia under Education for All (EFA) initiated by
UNESCO. She is also currently the steering committee member of the Asia Pacifc Network for
Early Childhood (ARNEC).
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Hyacinth Foo Mook Keow
DADs (Defne, Attempt, Design)
Way to Enhance Vocabulary
This research is conducted to examine if students involvement in producing non-linear materials
enhances their vocabulary. Six boys and four girls of Form 4A12 and their English teacher
participated in this research. The problem identifcation began with observations in the classroom
and through written work and exam answer scripts. A questionnaire was administered and a pre-
test was then conducted to collect the data. It was found that the students were more interested
in the preparation of non-linear materials in place of writing essays. Three activities were then
planned for the students. In each activity, a word tree was produced. Then, using details in the
tree, they were asked to create non-linear materials. The end-product from the fnal activity
showed that DAD was efective in enhancing the vocabulary of the students and made a positive
change in the students attitude towards learning English. When the students vocabulary was
extended, they found that writing assignments were actually not a daunting experience after all.
This also helps in the students fow of ideas; especially when they were allowed to prepare their
own version of non-linear materials other than a word tree. A writing experience for any students
should be fun, and at the same time enhance their writing ability. Hence, DAD (Defne, Attempt,
Design) is the way!
HYACINTH FOO MOOK KEOW is a B.Ed. TESL graduate and has MA in Education. She has been
in the teaching profession for 23 years and is currently teaching in SMK Sri Sentosa in Kuala
Lumpur. Due to her outstanding performance in the profession, she was appointed Guru
Cemerlang Bahasa Inggeris for Wilayah Persekutuan Kuala Lumpur in 2009
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Dr. Rafah Abdul Rahman
How should I teach the word?
The study investigates the efect of vocabulary instruction on the depth of vocabulary knowledge
of English as Second Language (ESL) learners. It seeks to fnd out if teaching vocabulary
contributes to the development of depth of vocabulary knowledge. The experiment was carried
out on 60 student teachers from one of the teachers training institutes in Malaysia. This study
was a true experimental, employing the Solomon Four-Group design. The Word Association
Test (WAT) was scored using percentages and was further analysed under the three semantic
relationships: paradigmatic, syntagmatic and analytic. The statistical tests employed were the
t-tests and the analysis ANOVA. Results indicate that vocabulary instruction has a signifcant
diference on the subjects depth of vocabulary knowledge. Further analysis indicates that only
the paradigmatic relationships are statistically signifcant. It can be concluded that vocabulary
need to be taught explicitly to ESL learners in Malaysia in order for them to reach the vocabulary
threshold level. The fndings are discussed in relation to its pedagogical implications.
DR. RAFIAH ABDUL RAHMAN is a lecturer at the Institut Pendidikan Guru Kampus Tun Hussein
Onn, Batu Pahat, Johor Darul Takzim. She completed her PhD at Universiti Putra Malaysia and her
research interests are reading in the second language, vocabulary and testing and evaluation.
Currently, she is Head of the Language Department
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Shirley Monica George
SVA IN SVO Writing It Right
To a great extent, English language used by teachers and students in the classroom detemines
what is learnt and how learning takes place. The classroom is a unique context for learning and
exerts a profound efect on students development of language and literacy skills. In other words,
the classroom provides opportunities for students to develop their mastery as they learn, acquire
and apply the knowledge imparted by their English teachers. Errors in language learning have
always been a cause of concern for every language teacher, especially English Language teachers.
Grammar has been given a lot of importance even though it is only supposed to be incorporated
into the English lesson. This action research proposes a teaching strategy that has been tried
and tested to help Form Three students who have difculty in formulating sentences. There
are about 10 students involved in this research. This action research is focused in the building
of sentences in the simple present tense based on the SVO sentence structure. It is hoped that
the approach used will allow English teachers to refect on their classroom practice and try
yet another method to encourage students to write grammatically correct sentences. For this
research, Howard Gardners Theory of Multiple Intelligences (M.I.) was taken into consideration
whereby diferent types of activities were carried out to further enhance the learning process.
This is mainly due to the fact that diferent students have diferent learning styles
SHIRLEY MONICA GEORGE is a First Class Hons. B.Ed. TESL graduate. She has MA in TESL and is
currently teaching in SMK Datok Lokman, Kuala Lumpur. As a Guru Cemerlang Bahasa Inggeris
for Wilayah Persekutuan Kuala Lumpur, she has extensive experience in ELT and has shared a lot
of her experience with English teachers in the state.
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Rohaida Ngah
I am an Independent Reader
This paper will suggest ways to choosing books that spark students interest and enthusiasm
about reading, books that catch their attention and captivate their attention. Picture books are
always inviting and always fun to look at, fun to read and even fun to hold. Picture books depict
characters who display real emotions, feelings and relationships that students recognise. So
picture books are best recommended in the classroom. Teachers are to play an active role in
choosing suitable books for students. Selected books must be those that lead to critical and
creative thinking experiences. Therefore reading materials should help students grow as readers.
Teachers also play a role in choosing classroom activities that ofer opportunity for students
to practice and use new words, practice the thinking and organisational skills, get to use and
practice the language, and practice speaking skills. Activities like reading out loud is encouraged
because most important students enjoy listening to books. To foster a love of books students
need opportunity to talk about them. Informal conversations around books such as book talks or
book chats enhance students motivation to read. And in the course of retelling, students need
to analyse the story and in doing so students develop new knowledge and understanding as
well as gain comprehension. Activities should open up to opportunities for teachers to work
with individual students to reinforce various reading strategies, and opportunity to discuss book
choices and students interests. This should set the stage for producing independent readers,
therefore independent learners.
ROHAIDA NGAH has been teaching English Language for 22 years and is currently teaching
English at SMK Ibrahim Fikri, Kuala Terengganu. She obtained her BA in Linguistics from
Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada and her Masters in Education from Bristol University, United
Kingdom. Her special interest area is students reading habit.
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Koh Bee Hoon
Writing Apprehension and the Availability of First
Steps 2nd Edition Writing Resources in the Teaching
of Writing among Primary School Teachers in Negeri
Sembilan
The purpose of this study was to examine whether the teaching of writing was infuenced by
(1) writing apprehension and (2) the availability of First Steps 2nd Edition writing resources.
This study proposed to answer the following questions: Are teachers more or less apprehensive
about teaching writing? To what extent has this afected their interest in teaching writing? And is
there a change in the teachers level of confdence towards the teaching of writing after using the
writing resources? In order to assess the infuence of writing apprehension and writing resources
available in the teaching of writing, three diferent measures were employed: (1) to determine
the level of writing apprehension amongst 30 primary school teachers teaching English in Negeri
Sembilan, the Daly-Miller Writing Apprehension Questionnaire was administered in 2009 (2) To
assess the teachers feelings towards the teaching of writing and the writing resources available,
a set of seven open-ended questions was distributed after the First Steps 2nd Edition Writing
course (3) to determine the efectiveness of the writing resources in the teaching of writing, a
set of nine open-ended questions was given in 2011 to fve of the 30 teachers. The results of
this study revealed a positive attitude of the teachers towards the teaching of writing after the
exposure to the writing course. There was no infuence of writing apprehension in the teachers
overall performance in their teaching of writing, however; there was an increase in the teachers
confdence in writing based on their refections and feedback.
KOH BEE HOON is currently a lecturer in the English Studies Unit, IPG Kampus Raja Melewar,
Seremban and has been an educator for more than 23 years. She holds a B.Ed (Hons) in TESOL
from Moray House Institute of Education, Heriot-Watt University and read her Master (Science) in
TESL from Universiti Putra Malaysia. Her current research interests are ELT, teacher development
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Dr. Dorothy Dewitt
Human Capital Development in Smart School
Programmes for Strengthening
the English Language
The Educational Technology Division, Ministry of Education (MOE) has always been in the
forefront in integration of technology in teaching and learning. The MBMMBI program for
Strengthening English Language has been given priority and there is a need to ensure there
are sufcient teaching and learning materials available to support this programme. In addition,
training in the integration of technology in education has to be provided for teachers. Several
programmes for teacher development have been implemented. Training for the Media- Library
Teachers and ICT Coordinators as change agents in schools is being conducted. These specialist
teachers would train other teachers in their schools on the integration of digital materials in
teaching and learning. Specifcally for English Language instruction, several programmes were
conducted with MOEs smart partners on the developing podcasts (audio materials) for listening,
as well as videos and other digital materials for teaching language skills. The move towards user-
generated content has ensured that programmes for students are also conducted. Students
have developed digital stories, and upload online projects for sharing in an online community.
These programmes have led to diferent models of instruction for the integration of technology
in instruction.
DR. DOROTHY DEWITT is currently working at the Educational Technology Division, Ministry
of Education. She is involved in programs for Making All Schools Smart and the Smart School
Qualifcation Standards (SSQS). She was in the Smart School Pilot Project team in 1999. Her
Doctorate is in Instructional Technology (University Malaya, 2010).
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Assoc. Prof. Dr. Cynthia Yolanda Doss
Rethinking Teaching Pedagogy to Enhance the
Quality of Learning and Teaching
The fndings from a growing body of research in the feld of education reveal that students
learn more efectively, develop critical reasoning and inquiry skills, when they are actively
engaged in the classroom. The 21st Century has placed great demands on individuals to become
independent learners and thinkers, as well as being profcient in English. In addressing these
challenges, this paper will discuss the following:
the role dialogic teaching and mind mapping played in enhancing the learning and teaching
of literature.
the step by step approach that was used with the intent of making learners mindful of
themselves as language learners and thinkers.
the implication of adopting dialogic teaching and mind mapping as an efective learning
and teaching pedagogy to strengthen not only the command of English but also promote an
appreciation for the language.
DR. CYNTHIA YOLANDA DOSS is currently an Associate Professor at the Academy of Language
Studies at MARA University of Technology, Shah Alam. She has taught Business English, ESP, and
English at profciency levels at the above University for 26 years. She has co-authored several ELT
books, one of which is TEXT MUET: A Strategic Approach. She is also a Certifed Buzan Licensed
Instructor and has conducted mind mapping courses at Buzan Malaysia and uses mind
mapping when she lectures at UiTM. Recently, she co-authored a revision book, Buzan Mind
Maps for Science Form 1. This book is the frst of its kind in Malaysia to be published using Buzan
Mind Mapping Laws. At the 14th International Conference on Thinking held in Kuala Lumpur in
June 2009, she co-presented a paper with Tony Buzan entitled Buzan Brain Focussed Taxonomy
on Reading Towards an Intelligent Future.
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Nurjanah Mahat
Defcit Approach is So Last Season! Embracing
Developmental Model of Learning as a Key to Improve
Performance
For centuries, teachers have targeted their teaching on learning areas that students are grappling
with or are weak at. This approach known as defcit approach to learning has the tendency to
focus on things that students cannot do (Grifn, Murray, Care, Thomas & Perri, 2010, p.152),
hence followed by teacher prescriptions of a fx-it remedy. There are a number of harmful
efects of such approach on student learning particularly in creating the learning environment
that appeals only to low-achieving students and one that unintentionally neglects the high-
achievers - the results of teachers perceiving this group of students as facing no learning issues,
thus requiring no fxing. In contrast, developmental model focuses on student readiness and
builds on the existing knowledge bases of every student. This paper revolves on the premise
that teachers adoption of developmental model is more likely to improve student learning and
performance as compared to the utilization of defcit approach. The use of this model is discussed
in relation to the model proposed by a professional development program for literacy teachers
known as the Assessment and Learning Partnerships (ALPs) program participated by more than
200 schools across the state of Victoria, Australia a collaboration between the University of
Melbourne and the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development Victoria. Hence
the discussion focuses on issues that surround defcit approach, the how to with regards to the
use of developmental model, as well as challenges and realistic expectations of its applicability
within the context of Malaysias classrooms.
NURJANAH MAHAT is an academic staf with the Department of General Studies, Kolej
Profesional Mara and currently is pursuing her masters degree in Teaching English as a Second
Language with University Kebangsaan Malaysia. Her current interest is in the enhancement of
English language teaching.
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Rod Deering
A Case Study of Young Learner Literacy for Children
with Learning Diffculties
The new KSSR curriculum in Malaysia has incorporated a phonics approach to young learner
literacy. It is apparent that much more needs to be done to support teachers in using a phonics
approach efectively. However, phonics is really only one component in developing young learner
literacy as teachers may use a variety of approaches depending on their students needs and
response. Not all students ft the developmental norms or averages. (See Gardiner on Multiple
Intelligences; Piaget on Cognitive Theory and Vygotsky on Developmental Psychology.) Some
students need more phonics, some less. Ideally students should be engaged in the whole language
as soon as possible. However, teachers of young learners will be well aware that a vast number of
students are still unable to read after several years at school. Many are branded as slow learners.
Young learners should develop encoding-decoding skills early, through identifying sound-letter
relationships and language patterns. Learners who possess these skills can accelerate their
learning and signifcantly improve their chances for literacy development, especially students
who are not natural, inductive learners. Training children with learning difculties to be more
analytical and phonemically aware should enable them and teachers to get more done. Until
students are freely decoding and encoding language they will be constantly asking for help in
things they should be able to largely work out for themselves. Teachers who have students with
learning difculties will fnd these approaches and materials particularly efective. This session
will present the what and how of using phonics to accelerate young learner literacy and provide
classroom material samples.
ROD DEERING is a Training Fellow at the Institute of Teacher Training ,International Language
Campus, Kuala Lumpur. He has taught and trained in Malaysia, Japan, Australia and China. His
work at the IPG in Kuala Lumpur focuses on improving the methodology and pedagogy of
teaching English through assisting, mentoring and coaching ELTs.
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Dr. Jef Hawkins
Strengthening English Language Pedagogy and
Professional Development with Action Research
Action research has been recognized in the educational literature as a method that gives English
teachers a systematic way to refect upon, understand and improve classroom action (Mertler
2009; Price 2005). Increasingly in Malaysia, action research has been used to cultivate refective
practice and document evidence of professional development for Lecturers of at Institute
Pendikan Guru (IPG) teacher training colleges. In order to improve my teaching practice this
study sought to investigate IPG English Lecturers perceptions of an action research course that I
taught from January to April 2011.
JEFF HAWKINS, In 2003, received his Master of Teaching elementary at Grifth University
Australia, and Lectured as an English professor at Kanda University Japan. At Kanda, Jef became
interested in action research and in 2010 completed his Doctorate in Education in action
research and embodied refection at Grifth University. He is a fully certifed elementary school
teacher with the Ontario College of Teachers #509341.During his educational career, Dr. Hawkins
has been an elementary school teacher and University Lecturer and is currently a Training Fellow
with a focus on teacher education and training at IPG Kuching Malaysia. Over the last 10 years
he has been involved in similar teacher education and training programs in Malaysia, Canada,
Japan and Australia.
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Dr. Hyacinth Gaudart
Ways of Improving the Language Skills
of Student Teachers of English
It is painful to see English language errors committed by many English language teachers -
from mispronunciation to poorly written comments and test items. Parents complain bitterly,
but there is very little they can do. In fact, once the teacher has been confrmed in his or her
position, there is very little anyone can do to change the situation.
We therefore need to start at the level of the student teacher.
This paper will look at some ways we can go about improving the level of English of student
teachers so that, by the time they do teach English in our schools and institutions, they would
have an acceptable level of English. The paper will consider various positive and negative
dimensions in the life of the student teacher and the infuences those dimensions have on him
or her, including the infuence of teacher trainers. The paper will also consider the various levels
of English Language acquisition, whether profciency at these levels is attainable, and how it can
be attained.
The paper is based on the presenters experience and research in teacher education over more
than 25 years.
DR. HYACINTH GAUDART was a professor at the Faculty of Education, University of Malaya. She
began her working life as a teacher in schools in Johor and later joined the University of Malaya
where she taught for about 25 years. Since 1979, she has written a number of academic books as
well as stories and plays for children and adolescents.
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Vineet Kaul
Importance of Multicultural Childrens Literature
In the global era, it is becoming well-nigh impossible for a community to live exclusively without
having interaction with other cultures. Multiculturalism is a given entity for many nations. The
global perspective of multicultural education recognizes cultural pluralism as an ideal and
healthy state in any productive society and promotes equity and respect among the existing
cultural groups. Yet, some nations have not seen the importance of multicultural education
and are ignorant on the need of multicultural literacy. As a young generation, children need to
be introduced to values and ideology which will be useful in their future life. Because living in
the middle of complicated diversity is an unavoidable fact for future generation, multicultural
literacy becomes indispensible.
Researchers and professionals seem to agree about the need for childrens literature to better
refect the reality of our pluralistic society. Thus, the books we select for our classrooms need
to not only refect the diversity of the students in the classroom and school, but the diverse
reality of the world in which we live. To begin with, every student should be represented, and
accurately, in the literature used. Negative images and inaccurate stereotyping of people and
cultures in childrens fction books is harmful to students whose ethnicity is being portrayed.
Students should be able to see themselves and their lives refected in the books they read.
This paper defnes authentic multicultural childrens literature, explores the role of childrens
literature, discusses the trends in multicultural childrens literature and how to apply and develop
them and fnally the methodology and guidelines for selecting multicultural literature in the
elementary classroom.
VINEET KAUL has MA and M.Phil in Shakespeare studies and an MBA, all with frst classes. He
is currently pursuing a full time Ph.D. He is a freelance teacher mostly visiting B-Schools and
a professional content writer and free lance journalist. He has written quite a number of prize
winning poems, management and language articles published in national and international
journals.
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Strengthening English Language Through Teacher Professional Development
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Dr. Goh Lay Huah, Jenny Kwong Shuk Wah
The Effect of the MBI Profciency Course on Teacher
Self-effcacy of Non-option English Language Teachers
- A Study of Teacher Self-effcacy of Non-option English Language Teachers in the
South West Division of Sabah
This survey research explores the teacher self-efcacy and perceived profciency of a group of
non-option English Language teachers participating in the profciency course implemented
under the MBI (Memperkukuhkan Bahasa Inggeris Strengthening the English Language)
Project. One of the objectives of the MBI for strengthening the English Language is through
English Language teachers of quality. In 2009, there were 92,899 English Language teachers
in the country, of which 29, 275 were non-optionists. These non-optionist teachers needed
to develop their language profciency skills. Under the MBI program, Profciency courses are
provided for these teachers to enhance their professionalism and allow them to learn about the
latest development in the areas of the language. The intention of this research is to assess the
efect of the Profciency course on profciency and self-efcacy level of the participants. The
respondents of the research will include all participants in the MBI Profciency course in Kota
Kinabalu, Papar, Beaufort, Kuala Penyu, Sipitang and Labuan from March to June 2011. The
research instruments being used are questionnaires with Likert-type scales. The questionnaires
were administered to the participants at the beginning of the MBI Profciency Course and at
the end of the course to facilitate before and after analysis of the phenomenon. Findings from
the research will provide an idea of efectiveness of the profciency course on teacher self-
efcacy of the participant teachers. This research will provide feedback to the policy makers and
implementers, and also ofer suggestions and recommendations for further strengthening the
English Language profciency of the non-option English Language teachers.
DR. GOH LAY HUAH is a senior lecturer in the Language Department in the Malaysian Teacher
Education Institute, Gaya Campus, Kota Kinabalu, Sabah. She has won awards as excellent
teacher. Her forte is education research, and her research focus is ICT in education, teaching
English Language, teacher professional development and change management. She can be
reached at gohlayhuah@yahoo.com
JENNY KWONG SHUK WAH is an English Language lecturer at Teacher Training Institute, Gaya
campus, Kota Kinabalu, Sabah. She has been teaching there for 12 years. Prior to joining the
institute, she served as a secondary school English Language teacher in one of the schools in
Kota Kinabalu for six years, and worked as the Sabah State English Language Ofcer for the Sabah
State Education Department for three years. She holds a B.A (Hons.) degree in TESL from National
University of Malaysia and a Master in Education from University Technology of Malaysia. Her
forte is in Teaching Methodology and Action Research.
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Tan Chai Whatt Rodney
An E.T. at Honeywell NASA Educators@SpaceCamp
From the Classroom and Beyond
It was a heaven-sent opportunity to be selected for the Honeywell NASA Educators@Space
Camp experience --a starried-eyed childs dream come true for an earth-bound educator.
This interactive session will begin with an introduction on the importance of aiming for the stars
in an English Teachers (E.T.) continuous professional development (CPD). Next, the presenter will
recount his own personal quest for CPD which began in Malaysia to conferences and training in
faraway galactic kingdoms such as the Red Moon planet of Japan, the exotic elephant land
of Thailand, the English-speaking island nation of England and the faraway stars and stripes
empire of the USA. Important lessons that he discovered will be shared to all humanoids
present.
In the next part of this oral and visual transmission, space-bound E.T. will share the invaluable
secret of how he discovered, applied and obtained a once in a lifetime fully-paid scholarship for
an out of this world trip to the Marshall Space & Rocket Centre in Huntsville, Alabama, USA.
In the fnal part of this exciting saga, E.T. will share some ideas and materials to implement space
and rocket technology theme lessons in the classroom and beyond, using techniques such as
simulations and educational visits; logos, rocketry and space technology. This will be followed by
a Q&A session for other E.T.s to fll in the gaps in their own quest for ELT knowledge.
Theres no stopping this extra-terrestrial educator as he plots and explores further into the vast
expanse of the ELT universe in search of CPD!
RODNEY TAN CHAI WHATT is the Head of English Panel in SMK Methodist ACS, Melaka State
Main Trainer, an alumni member of the Malaysian Teachers Development Programme and
the Honeywell Educators@Space Camp programme. He is passionate about teaching and is
committed to continuous professional development by learning and relearning his craft.
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Strengthening English Language Through Teacher Professional Development
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Dr. Lloyd Precious, Nurul Izzati
Using Role Play in the Classroom to Engage Students
Interest in Literature within the ELT Classroom
PPISMP SEM 2 TESL 4 are required to give PowerPoint presentations as part of their assessment
for the Literature component of their classes. These presentations are observed to be either
underprepared or simply take then from presentations that are already available on the internet.
This creates both misconceptions and misinterpretations of the literary text. To address these
issues Ms. Nurul will present in her paper the option of requiring students to replace PowerPoint
presentations with role play activities. The thesis being that:
1. There will be an active learning process among PPISMP SEM 2 TESL 4 students through using
in-class role play.
2. There will be an increased interest in learning ESL teaching methodologies through the use of
literary texts among PPISMP SEM 2 TESL 4 students as a direct outcome of actual interaction
with the text.
3. The research methodology will be analysed and fndings presented.
Dr. Precious will present an introduction of the paper and comment on both the validity of the
initial problematic and viability of the research fndings.
DR. LLOYD PRECIOUS worked at Universities in Greece, Lebanon, Turkey and Yemen. He has also
been a visiting full Professor at METU Cyprus and a Fulbright Scholar at Rockford University in
the USA. EDUCATION: 1977: B.A. Honors Degree, (1.1) Philosophy, University College of Wales
Aberstwyth. 1984: Dr. Phil. University of Heidelberg Germany, Doctorate by thesis: 1998: CELTA,
British Council Damascus. 2002 MA (ELT) The New School /Columbia University New York, New
York.
NURUL IZZATI BINTI MD FUAD is a graduate of the Victoria University of Wellington, New
Zealand. She is currently teaching at IPG Kampus Dato Razali Ismail.
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Zaldy P. Baguios
Differentiated Classroom Instructions (DCI) and Its
Effect on the Reading and Writing Skills of the Middle
School Pupils of Dole Philippines School
This study entitled, Diferentiated Classroom Instructions (DCI) and its Efect on the Reading
and Writing Skills of the Middle School Pupils of Dole Philippines School, is an experimental
research that uses quasi experimental design. It aimed to test the efect of DCI in the Philippine
setting. This was based on the assumptions of Carol Ann Tomlinson. In her book, she stressed
that a diferentiated classroom ofers a variety of learning options designed to tap into diferent
readiness levels, interests, and learning profles of the students.
This study utilized the following strategies: learning stations; interest centers; multiple reading
and writing assessments including portfolios and performance assessments; process and genre
approach in teaching writing; use of multiple text and supplementary materials; learning
contracts; compacting; and group investigation.
A group of 26 students from the grade 6 class were chosen as the participants of the experiment.
They were divided into two groups: the control and the experimental group. The researcher used
the tossing of coin technique to identify the group that each student should belong.
The result of study showed that DCI has helped the students improved their reading and writing
skills. This conclusion was based on the pre and the post test results of the standardized tests
given by the researcher after a 90-day experiment. It further showed that students who belong
to the experimental group performed better compared to the students in the control group (the
students who were taught reading and writing using the conventional methods of teaching).
ZALDY P. BAGUIOS, is a Reading Specialist with a Masters Degree in Education major in Reading
Education. He is working as Associate Professor II at The University of Mindanao-Davao City,
Philippines. Presently, he is a candidate for a Doctor of Philosophy in Language Education from
the Notre Dame of Dadiangas University.
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Strengthening English Language Through Teacher Professional Development
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WORKSHOPS
Strengthening English Language Through Teacher Professional Development
42
Lee Sze Seau Jill, Norina Melati Mohd Yusof,
S. Sivaganga Sathasivam
Engaging Visuals for Poetry and Critical Literacy
Multiliteracies is evident in our everyday lives and is necessary for the 21st century world citizen
(Street 1998; Kress 2004; Koo 2008). However, Malaysian students are not educated formally on
the literacies that would enable them to engage purposefully and successfully in the real world.
This research gives an insight as to how students can be guided to make meaning through the
combination of texts and visuals in a Literature lesson as well as be nurtured on critical literacy.
It is observed that the chance to use visuals to make meaning among students is dormant in
school and very minimal emphasis is placed on developing multiliteracies. The use of visuals in
the teaching of literature will therefore prepare students for a new world of meaning-making
in contrast to the traditional literacy which is dominated by the written word. The study is also
undertaken to fnd out whether the choice of visuals and the rationale given by these students
on their choices will promote their critical literacy. Lastly, it is hoped that the literature lesson
using both text and visuals will provide a chance for the students to have fun with poetry.
The lesson targets lower secondary students. The students would be divided into 4-5 students
per group by the teacher. As far as possible, the groups would be mixed in terms of linguistic
abilities. They would be told to use visual images to represent the words from the poem Mr
Nobody (Author Unknown) and to present their products on mahjong papers. The visual images
could be drawn or cut and pasted from available sources such as magazines and newspapers.
The students could engage their own creativity to decide on how exactly they would like to
visually represent the poem. After the session, students would be asked to present their products
to the class and justify their visual choices in spoken form.
LEE SZE SEAU JILL, After graduating from Singapores National Institution of Education (NIE) on
a scholarship, Jill Lee taught at a Singaporean secondary school before returning to Malaysia to
teach at a private university. Currently displaced from any institutional afliation, she hopes one
day to fnd an educational institute that will appreciate her critical mind and honesty.
NORINA MELATI MOHD YUSOFF, is a secondary English teacher with 12 years of teaching
experience. She has just completed her MA in English Language Studies in UKM. Her interests
includes Multiliteracies, World Englishes and Intercultural Communication. Currently she is
attached with the English Language Teaching Centre (ELTC) in Lembah Pantai as an English
language lecturer.
S. SIVAGANGA SATHASIVAM, is a teacher at SMK Methodist (ACS) Seremban, N. Sembilan. She
possesses a Bachelor of Education in TESL and is currently pursuing her MA in English Language
Studies at Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia. Her areas of interests span across the use of literature,
genre studies, multiliteracy pedagogy in ESL classrooms and discourse analysis.
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Strengthening English Language Through Teacher Professional Development
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Stuart Gale, Wong Lind Say, Muhamad Hazrul Haris Fadzilah
Exploiting Authentic Materials for Developing
Receptive Skills with Young Learners Language
Texts in course books are often criticized for their lack of authenticity. Proponents for using
authentic texts argue that we need to expose students to real English whereas others would say
that it makes the task too difcult and that we need to grade the language for diferent levels.
It is only recently that authors have introduced more authentic reading and listening material for
our students at an adult level and there are now fne examples of course books and supplementary
materials to work from.
Teachers are even more reluctant to use authentic materials with Young Learners but I would
argue that it is pedagogically advantageous considering the wide range materials available.
This demonstration and workshop will enable participants to see how culturally relevant and
child-friendly authentic materials can be exploited in a receptive skills lesson. The session will
initially focus on the key issues of authenticity, availability and challenges and move on to look
at procedures and techniques.
A selection of materials from the local area will be made available and participants will work on
a series of tasks for exploiting them. Participants in this hands-on session will have a chance to
present their suggested tasks in small groups.
This session will also look at the challenges of diferentiated learning and the link to Language
Arts. Participants will be able to take away sample materials and suggested lesson plans.
STUART GALE is a Training Fellow at ELTC. He has taught and trained in Europe, South America,
Russia and most recently in Thailand where he spent over 10 years managing and working on
pre-service and in-service Teacher Training programmes. He has a special interest in developing
innovative and alternative methods of motivating learners to learn.
WONG LIND SAY is a lecturer at ELTC. She has trained in-service teachers in the area of Phonics
and Assessment and Evaluation. Her interests include early literacy, the teaching of reading to
young learners as well as exploring assessment methods in English Language Teaching.
MUHAMAD HAZRUL is a lecturer at ELTC. He has worked on Enhancing English Language
Profciency through Online and Ofine Technologies (ELPTech-MUCP), Certifcate in the Practice
of ELT (C-PELT) and Fun Learning through Language Arts courses. His current area of interest is
the integration of ICT in the English Language Classroom.
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Ruth Wickham
The Art of Making Little Books as A Minimal Resource
Classroom Activity to Motivate and Engage English
Students of All Ages in the Practice of Both Creating
and Enjoying Literature.
There is something fascinating and almost magical about making ones very own Little Book.
Initially there is surprise as the empty book takes shape from a single sheet of paper. And then an
engaging tale must be devised to fll the pages along with tiny pictures or designs. Immediately
the scene is a quiet classroom with heads down and tails up as the students eagerly scratch away
at their task.
As the masterpieces take shape, the students can be given opportunities to share their work
(swap and read) with classmates, tell their tale to a group or the whole class while holding up
their book, display the books on a table or board, and fnally take it home to share with family and
little brothers or sisters. Also, if especially desirable, the book can be opened fat and scanned or
photo-copied, then re-folded to make sharing copies.
As an added treat, the book can include pop-up faces on every page, leading to character
descriptions and discussions, and more stories.
Other examples of simple folding and pop-up books will also be indicated and discussed.
Participants should bring a pencil-case with coloured pencils / pens, and a pair of scissors if
possible.
RUTH WICKHAM, English Training Fellow IPGKDRI. M Ed TESOL (UOW, Wollongong, NSW); B
Ed (ECU, Perth, WA); Field linguist/translator (Torres Strait, Queensland); Primary School Arts
Specialist Music and Performing Arts (Western Australia); Teaching English - EAP, Business,
General English to kindergarten - mature adults in China, Turkey, UK, Saudi Arabia, and Australia.
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Dianne F. Stephens
Cooperative Book Publishing
This cooperative book publishing unit (upper grades and elementary grades) allows both classes
of students to learn language arts skills and computer desktop publishing skills, as well as
providing a potential fundraising project for the class and/or school. Elementary students write
stories and draw an original illustration, using a language arts lesson based on the 6+1 traits:
organization. A teacher-composed description of the class and its students is submitted along
with the completed stories and drawings to the upper grades class. Each elementary student
gets one free fnished class book, one is presented to the school library, and orders are taken
for additional copies (fundraiser). Older students proofread and type the students stories, scan
the original drawings, setting them up for two-sided printing in book format using computer
software. The book pages are printed and sewn together. The older students manufacture,
using a modifed mass production scenario, the book covers. A proof copy is submitted to the
elementary class for approval, and then fnal assembly of fnished books is made. An authors
reception is planned for the elementary school, and hosted by the upper grades students, when
the fnished books are delivered. Authors read their stories to assembled administrators, students,
parents and teachers. This unit allows for the older students to perform a service, while earning
funds for their class, and while learning valuable real-life language, technological and hands-on
skills. Younger students learn organized story writing, and get a keepsake, bound book of their
and their classmates literary work.
DIANNE F. STEPHENS is Georgia (USA) certifed in English (AP Lit), Technology Education, Visual
Arts and TESOL, with twenty one years experience teaching pre-K to adults. She serves as English
department chair at Al Akhawayn School of Ifrane in Morocco. She is working on completing her
doctorate in Distance Education.
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Peter Wickham
Current Pedagogical Approaches in ELT:
English Immersion through Appropriate Mediated Movie
Presentation
This workshop is titled Current Pedagogical Approaches in ELT: English Immersion Through
Appropriately Mediated Movie Presentation. Participants explore the listening skills of Listening
for Detail, Recognition of Accents, and Understanding Idiomatic Speech during a hands-on
lesson utilising a popular animated movie.
After actively participating in this workshop, participants will be able to better judge the
suitability of audiovisual material to be used in the context of English language teaching. Aspects
of material suitable for this form of teaching investigated include rapidity of speech, accents,
difculty of vocabulary, moral and religious sensitivities, and interest level for students.
Participants will be encouraged to engage as students of English language in a short lesson
in which a section of an animated movie is screened while questions are answered at regular
intervals during the viewing time. This experience is used to extrapolate lesson idea for classes of
students of other interest, age and profciency levels.
The use of appropriate and mediated movies into the ESL/EFL classroom is a powerful weapon
that every teacher ought to have in their arsenal.
PETER WICKHAM, MEd (TESOL) (University of Wollongong, NSW), BEd (Edith Cowan University,
WA), Diploma of Teaching, Australian Certifcate IV TESOL: Field Linguist and Translator (Torres
Strait, Queensland), ESL/EFL teacher in Australia, China, Turkey, UK and Saudi Arabia, (Specialising
in IELTS, Foundation, and ESL Management) Primary School Teacher (WA) Currently English
Language Teaching Fellow at IPGKDRI.
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Ruth Wickham
Using Typhoon! - The Ultimate Whole-Class Interactive
Learning Activity for English Language Lessons Which
is Suitable for All Ages and Adaptable to an Endless
Range of Lesson Types.
Your lesson is about to die a natural death, but there is still an hour of class time left ...
Or you are about to face a class which last week proved unmotivated and difcult to control ...
Or your PowerPoint presentation just went south because the projector died, your computer
malfunctioned, the electric power went of ...
Or you simply need a fun way to revise and practise vocabulary or a newly-learned grammar
concept.
Think of all the horror stories that teachers can tell, times when a magic wand would be so very
useful, and then make sure that you have Typhoon! in your grab-bag to pull out at a moments
notice. Not that you have to wait until disaster all but overtakes you, its much better to plan it
into your day ahead of time.
There are a great many reasons to use this activity, and occasions where it can save your sanity
as a busy teacher. The only materials needed are a white (or black) board, a piece of paper, some
questions you could ask, and a class that is looking for something to motivate and engage them.
With those ingredients your students will leave the room at the end of the lesson with smiles on
their faces and learning reinforced in their heads.
RUTH WICKHAM, English Training Fellow IPGKDRI. M Ed TESOL (UOW, Wollongong, NSW); B
Ed (ECU, Perth, WA); Field linguist/translator (Torres Strait, Queensland); Primary School Arts
Specialist Music and Performing Arts (Western Australia); Tea Ruth Wickham ching English - EAP,
Business, General English to kindergarten - mature adults in China, Turkey, UK, Saudi Arabia, and
Australia.
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Strengthening English Language Through Teacher Professional Development
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Barry W. Jarrett
Cartoons and Handphones
-Creating and Composing Texts
With the ubiquitous popularity and almost expediential growth in the use of laptops and
handheld electronic devices in both social and professional environements, it is not difcult to
imagine that in the near future there will be strong demands for their use more often in the
classsrooom. These demands, one would logically expect, would be initially driven by students,
particularly with regard to handheld devices. However with the next few generations of teachers,
not knowing a world without them, the push for their greater inclusion in the day to day classroom
architecture, will gain a valuable ally.
Considering the above, and if current research is correct, and about 65% of us are visual-spatial
learners who learn best by looking, reading, and watching (With most of the remainder being
auditory-sequential learners* ). Then we have to ask ourselves two questions: How do we balance
our classroom activities to refect these statistics? And how are we going to incorporate the use
of new electronic devices, in an efective and pedagogically satisfying way, in our day to day
teaching?
The answer to both questions rotates around the issue of broadening our skills base. However, I
suspect on the issue of learning styles you are well on the way. Nonetheless, I would like to share
a good example of a visual text as a stimulant to creative writing. Secondly, in regards to using
new devices (with their matching authoring programmes), in the classroom, I would like to show
and talk about a few texts by students; texts done on hand phones and laptops and authored
using Windows Movie Maker and Adobe Flash.
* Dr. Linda Silverman, Gifted Development Centre, Denver, Colorado.
http://www.gifteddevelopment.com/
BARRY W. JARRET began his teaching career in the Royal Australian Airforce in1970 as a P.T.I.
Since then, apart from a 12 year hiatus in the magazine/publishing business, he has been
a Primary and Secondary school English/Maths/Science teacher, ESL/EFL teacher, Head of
Department, Teacher Trainer and Curriculum Designer. Barry has a Diploma in Teaching, Master
of Education(Technology) and a Master of Applied Linguistics.
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Strengthening English Language Through Teacher Professional Development
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William Taylor, Clara Anselmus
Understanding CLT from the Learners Perspective
- Producing and Presenting a Minority
Language Lesson.
Ideally, participants in this workshop will be language teachers who are able to speak a foreign or
minority Malaysian language in addition to English and Malay, but anyone interested is welcome.
1. In this workshop, participants are frst put in the position of absolute beginners in a basic
Spanish Language lesson. The lesson is taught using only Spanish throughout, in order to give
participants the experience of being learners in a language lesson taught communicatively.
The method of delivery at this level draws mostly from The direct method and The Silent Way
and provides a dramatic interactive experience.
2. At the second stage of the workshop, participants are asked to refect on the learning
experience, describe how they felt at the various stages and discuss: (i) the application of
these methods in Malaysian TESL classrooms and (ii) the use of this kind of foreign language
lesson as a language teacher training technique.
3. In the productive stage of the workshop, participants are asked to prepare a similar short
lesson in a foreign or minority language. It can be a simple translation of the lesson just
demonstrated.
4. Finally, participants work in groups practising the delivery of their lesson using the
communicative methods demonstrated earlier.
The presenting trainers will encourage feedback at every stage and assist participants with
lesson preparation and delivery practice.
WILLIAM TAYLOR, born and educated in England, with a background in scientifc R&D, William
has taught English at various levels in a variety of institutions in fve countries since 1988. From
2003 he trained in-service teachers with the DELC project in Sabah and TESL undergraduates at
Universiti Malaysia Sabah before joining the Fellows project.
CLARA ANSELMUS hails from Tambunan, Sabah, Malaysia. She has taught at three diferent
levels of education in Malaysia, namely in primary and secondary schools as well as in her
present role in the Teacher Training Institute training pre-service and in-service teachers.
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Phil Keegan, Nazura Mohamad
Music and Storytelling
Language, music and stories are universals - features of every society that has ever been known
to exist. This workshop will demonstrate how instrumental music can be used to inspire learners
to create imaginative and motivating stories. This will be hands on, learning by doing workshop.
PHIL KEEGAN worked for over 25 years as a teacher and teacher trainer in the UK, the USA,
Germany, France, Austria and Turkey before coming to Malaysia in January of this year. His frst
book, In My Opinion, was published in the USA in 2009. He is currently employed as training
fellow at IPBA, Kuala Lumpur.
NAZURA MOHAMAD has been an English Language teacher in secondary schools since 1997.
She has worked in Educational Technology Division and the Teachers Education Division. She is
currently lecturing English Studies at IPGKBA, Kuala Lumpur.
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Norhanim Abdul Samat
Exploring Possibilities for Creative Learning
In this practical workshop, primary school teachers will be exposed to techniques for encouraging
students to be actively engaged in the second language classroom. Working with a form of drama
education, Process Drama techniques allow more direct involvement in learning on the part of
all students. This involvement increases students sense of personal commitment to the learning
process. It also increases students sense of trust and allows for more avenues of learning that
result in the production of the target language in a natural manner. Kao and ONeill (1998) argue
that with process drama, students can use language in meaningful and authentic situations. By
participating in drama activities, students motivation level increases and this encourages them
to become risk- takers. Participants in this workshop will get a hands-on experience on a variety
of drama conventions that seek to foster student engagement in the classroom. A popular
Malaysian folktale will be used as an authentic context for language learning. The session will
show how problem-solving activities can challenge and engage students to be creative and
energetic.
NORHANIM ABDUL SAMAT is a lecturer at Language Academy, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia
Johor Bahru. She teaches language profciency courses and trains teacher trainees in drama
education. She is currently pursuing her PhD in drama education at the University of Waikato
in New Zealand.
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Stuart Gale, Syaliana Jamaludin
Using Reward Systems with Young Learners. Bringing
Language Arts into the Classroom and Managing Our
Learners Effectively at the Same Time.
Efective classroom management of large classes within a context of diferentiated learning has
always been a challenge. The increased pressure of learner-centred teaching with a focus on
Language Arts and where children are having fun brings new challenges. We need to consider
innovative alternatives to the traditional use of rewards, praise and punishment.
The session will focus on these three key techniques, look at benefts and problems as well as see
how they can be fne-tuned for the Malaysian context. Teachers assumptions that it is natural to
use these will also be examined.
The presenters will demonstrate a variety of alternative techniques and participants will see
how children are able to police themselves and take responsibility for their own behaviour in
everyday classroom situations.
In this hands-on session, participants will also be able to practise techniques and use the materials
in the session. All participants will get a set of materials to take away.
STUART GALE is a Training Fellow at ELTC. He has taught and trained in Europe, South America,
Russia and most recently in Thailand where he spent over 10 years managing and working on
pre-service and in-service Teacher Training programmes. He has a special interest in developing
innovative and alternative methods of motivating learners to learn.
SYALIANA JAMALUDIN is a lecturer at ELTC. She has conducted courses such as Fun Learning
with Language Arts and Certifcate for English Language Teaching (C-PELT) for in-service
teachers. She has a special interest in childrens literature and the use of creative works in the
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Normala Baharudin
Maximising the Usage of Textbooks under KSSR to
Strengthen English Language Teaching and Learning
Textbooks and instruction materials are often used by language teachers and instructors alike as
essential constituents in an English language classroom. Hutchinson and Torres (1994) cited in
Litz 2005 suggested that the textbook:
is an almost universal element of (English Language) teaching. Millions of copies are sold
every year, and numerous aid projects have been set up to produce them in (various) countries
No teaching-learning situation, it seems, is complete until it has its relevant textbook
Malaysia provides textbooks for free to the students under the Textbook Loan Scheme under
Textbook Division since 2008. (Surat Pekeliling Ikhtisas Bil. 11/2007) The textbooks for primary
schools come in packages which consist of the textbook and the activity book. Since 2005
the Textbook Division, Ministry of Education has initiated a series of workshops nationwide to
enhance awareness among teachers to increase and maximise the usage of textbook during
the teaching and learning process. The response has been very positive and eforts have been
made to reach all levels of teachers be it in the urban, rural or remote areas. To date almost 4500
jurulatih utama and subject teachers as well as 60 IPG lectures have attended the workshops.
Therefore, I would propose to have similar session during ELTC-TED conference in order to increase
knowledge about the concept, the characteristics of the textbook and to further maximise the
usage of textbooks in the classroom by adapting and adopting materials in the textbook. The
new Standard-Based Curriculum or Kurikulum Standard Sekolah Rendah (KSSR) brings about the
approach of teaching and learning based on standards. In other words, teachers need to extend
the usage of the textbooks and develop supporting learning modules to complement. A short
session on how to adapt and adopt materials in the textbook package followed by hands on
experience to develop additional modules to equip the teaching and learning process will end
the workshop.
NORMALA BAHARUDIN, Head of Language and Literature Unit in Primary schools Publication
Sector, Textbook Division. Served as an English teacher in Pahang for 8 years and joined Textbook
Division in 2002. Main responsibility is to co-ordinate English language textbook projects for
primary schools and ethnic language textbooks for both primary and secondary textbooks.
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Genevieve Chow
New Literacies: New Resources for
Listening and Viewing
With the Internet and new technologies for literacy entering the lives of learners who are
the digital natives, the experience of listening and viewing has increased substantially. This
experience of new literacies can be translated into the fact that traditional classroom materials
that relied almost solely on teaching listening skills is no longer as relevant as it once was before.
Hence, teachers would need to introduce these relatively new but ubiquitous resources into the
classroom. The exposure to this wide range of audio and visual texts also suggests that equipping
learners with higher levels of listening and viewing skills and strategies as well as developing in
the learner an appropriate attitude and behavior is essential.
This workshop considers how digital resources for listening and viewing can be used with
learners in a language classroom to help them develop higher-order skills such as inferential
comprehension, evaluation and appreciation which encompass skills such as the ability to listen
critically and comprehend non-verbal cues. It looks at how teachers can exploit these resources;
and by asking the right questions, equip learners with these relevant skills that are required in
the time of the 21st Century where digital media is prevalent.
GENEVIEVE CHOW is currently a lecturer in SEAMEO Regional Language Centre teaching English
to students from various Asian countries like China, Indonesia, Japan, Laos, and Vietnam. She has
also taught Business English in Cambodia. In addition, she has also participated in several action
research projects and presented these projects at local conferences.
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Professor Dr. Moses Samuel
Exploring Learner Engagement
This workshop is a follow up of ideas discussed in the plenary paper on Rethinking Pedagogical
Practice in ELT. Through hands-on, practical activities, it aims to ofer teachers a better
understanding of ways in which they can transform their learning environments to develop and
sustain learner engagement.
Part one of the workshop considers the notion of learner engagement and distinguishes
engagement from motivation. Through an analysis of vignettes, it invites teachers to see
engagement as a cognitive as well as socio-cultural phenomenon.
Part two of the workshop considers classroom guidelines for ensuring and facilitating learner
engagement.
Part three of the workshop involves teachers in the design of materials and activities that aim at
enhancing learner engagement. It also encourages teachers to adapt and re-calibrate learning
materials in existing textbooks to ensure better learner engagement.
DR. MOSES SAMUEL is Professor and Deputy Dean (Undergraduate Degrees and
Internationalisation) at the Faculty of Education, University of Malaya. He has over 30 years
experience as a teacher educator and researcher in TESL. Among his areas of specialization are
TESL Methodology; Literacy Development; Sociolinguistics; Language Planning and Policies.
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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The Teacher Education Division of the Ministry of Education, Malaysia and the English Language
Teaching Centre, Malaysia wish to express their sincere appreciation to:
Y.A.B. Tan Sri Dato Haji Muhyiddin Bin Haji Mohd. Yassin
Deputy Prime Minister
and Minister of Education, Malaysia
and
Y.Bhg. Dato Abd. Ghafar bin Mahmud
Director General
Ministry of Education Malaysia
We would also like to express our sincere gratitude to all individuals, agencies and
organizations that have directly of indirectly contributed towards making this conference a
success..
Thank you.