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6DS THEORY OF ARCHITECTURE.

Book 1 1.
22241/. Table II. of the Weight of a lineal Foot oi- Round and Square Copper,
IN I'oUKDS.
Inches -
Square '-
Round -
i
3
s i
5
a i I
1
n H n
n
n
24 54 96
1^50 2-16 2-94 3-84
4-8C
6
-co 7-27
8-G5
10-15
188 424 753 1-17 1-69 2-31 3-02 3-82 4-71 5-71 6-79 7-94
Inches -
Squa;e -
Round -
1|
11-77
^l
2
-1
2^
n
^5
2J
21
3
l:i-5J
15
-SS 17 36 19-47 21-69 24-03
26-5:)
29-08!3l-79 34-61
9-21 10-61
12 08 1:3-64 15-29 17-0:^ 18-87 20-81 22-84
24-9i 27-18
The table given in Hunt's HanMnok, page
82, is a slight increase on the above; from
that work, page 85, the following table has been derived.
2224c. Table III. or the Weight of Copper, per superficial Foot, in Pounds.
TliicknLSS - . -
15 s
3
i5 3 .% 1
7s i
Weight
... - 2-891 5-781 8-672
1 1^563 14-453 17-344 20^234 23-125
Thickness . - -
T*^
s
8 \k ^ \l I
1.3
Is
1
Weight - - - . 26-016 28-906 31-797 34-688 37-578 40-469
43 359 46-250
2224^. SoldiT for copper, iron, and brass, is composed of an alloy of zinc and copper;
for pewter an alloy of tin, lead, and bismuth. Copper is a metal too soft
to use very
much in decoration, but it goes well with brass, in inlay, incrustation,
or bands.
A
tinned copper bowl where the ground is cut away and the pattern left is a good example
of work.
2224e. JJ'eftersfedt's patent wetal should be laid by a good plumber. The flats are formed
with rolls and drips similar in every respect to lead, but the latter should l)e
formed witii
a gradual descent. The rolls need not i'e more than 1 to
\\
inch diameter,
tapered at the
ends, and brought close up to the edge of the drip. Circular and sio|)ing roofs may be
laid either with rolls or welts, the ends of the sheets being joined by a welt or overlap of
C inches. Tiie metal should be laid free, and nails avoided
as much as possible, but if
used they should be of wrought copper. Soldering is to be avoided, but to secure the
metal as against an uprigiit face, a solder dot over a screw is the best means to adopt.
2224/'.
3Iuntz's metal is used as a coating for iron vessels under w-ater
; to prevent
"-al-
vanic action a band of vitreous sheatliing is attached for some distance below a;id above
the water line. This sheathing consists of small plates of iron covered with
a preparation
of glass, and is intended to be an anti-fouling as well as a protective agent.
ZINC.
2224(7. The common sheets in general use are
12, 14, 16, 18, and 20 ounces to the foot
superficial; and as 18 thicknesses of 16 ounces to the foot are half an incii thick the
following show the thicknesses of the different weights:

Plates or sheets of 10 ounces to the foot are 001736 inch thiek.


12

0-02083

14

002430
16

0-02777
=3'gofaninch.
18

003125
20

0-0:;472

It is employed for water-cisterns and baths, rain-water pipesin short, for almost all
purposes where lead has been hitherto employed.
Latterly it has been formed into sash-
bars for skylights and ornamental sashes
; for which purposes, .strength
excepted, it is
superior to iron, as not being liable to rust, and loosen the putty and glass. It is, in every
respect, equal to copper, and not more than one-third the cost of it. Tlie discoverv of the
electro process was said to have introduced the application of zinc to cast and wrought
iron, so as to prevent its oxidation
or rust, but such lias not been the case (see galvanized
and zinked Iron),