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M!ng PLC
(PLC Network)
TS. Tr!"ng #nh Nh"n
B$ mn T% &$ng #i'u khi(n
Email: nhontd@hcmute.edu.vn


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Content
! Basic industrial network
! Profibus
! DeviceNet
! ControlNet
! ASi
! Ethernet
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References
[1] Hong Minh S!n - M"ng truy#n thng cng nghi$p Nh xu%t b&n khoa
h'c v k( thu)t, 2007

[2] Cc ti li$u k( thu)t thi*t b+ !i#u khi,n cng nghi$p c-a SIEMENS,
ROCKWELL
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Criteria
Midterm 1 (paper test) : 30%
Midterm 2 (representation) : 30%
Final (project) in group : 40%
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Basic Industrial Network
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Historical Overview
In the early 20
th
century, the process control systems and
the manufacturing systems were designed based primarily
on the mechanical technology and with analogue devices.

After the period, the pneumatic control technology and the
hydraulic power were introduced.

The pneumatic control technology made it possible to control
remote systems by a centralized control system.

These technologies are still very common.
7
Historical Overview
At the beginning of 1960, a digital computer was for the first
time really applied as a digital controller.

The term direct digital control (DDC) was used to emphasize
that the computer directly controls the process.

In the 1960s, the application of a minicomputer was still a
fairly expensive solution for many control problems. In the
meantime, programmable logic controller (PLC) was
developed and it replaced the conventional, relay-based
controller, having relatively limited control functions.
8
Historical Overview
The numerically controlled (NC) machine tool became to be
controlled by computers and the robot was developed in this
period.

In mid 70s, the first distributed computer control system
(DCCS) was announced by Honeywell as a hierarchical
control system with a large number of microprocessors.

The concept of the DCCS spread widely in many industrial
automation systems such as power plant control systems,
manufacturing systems, etc.
9
Historical Overview
The installation of distributed control systems (DCS) in the
newly planned plants or replacement of existing analogue or
centralized control systems is presently a common decision
of enterprise management.

The use of local area networks to interconnect computers
and automation devices within an industrial automation
system has become popular since 1980.

The industrial automation systems are often implemented as
an open distributed architecture with communication over
digital communication networks.

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Historical Overview
Considerable international standardization efforts have been
made in the area of local area networks.

The Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) standards permit
any pair of automation devices to communicate reliably
regardless of the manufacturer.
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Historical Overview
What is an Industrial Network?

By definition, an industrial network requires geographical
distribution of the physical measurement I/O and sensors or
functional distribution of applications.

Most industrial networks transfer bits of information serially.
With fewer wires, we can send information over greater
distances. Because industrial networks work with several
devices on the same line, it is easier to add a new device to
existing systems.
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Historical Overview
To make all this work, our network must define a set of rules
(a communication protocol) to determine how information
flows on the network of devices, controllers, PCs, and so on.

With improved communication protocols, it is now possible
to reduce the time needed for the transfer, ensure better
data protection, and guarantee time synchronization, and
real-time deterministic response in some applications.

Industrial networks also ensure that the system sends
information reliably without errors and securely between
nodes on the network.
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Historical Overview
For the lower level communication network for industrial
automation, the industrial local area network solutions such
as MAP are too expensive and/or do not reach the required
short response times, depending on the application.

The fieldbuses have been developed to meet these
requirements, and many efforts are now being made to
make fieldbus standards for industrial automation
applications.
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Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
The industrial automation systems can be very complex, and
it is usually structured into several hierarchical levels.

Each of the hierarchical level has an appropriate
communication level, which places different requirements on
the communication network Figure 1.1 shows an example of
the hierarchy of an industrial automation system.
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Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Industrial networks may be classified in several different
categories based on functionality:
field-level networks (sensor, actuator or device buses)
control-level networks (control buses)
information-level networks
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Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks

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Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Field level
The lowest level of the automation hierarchy is the field
level, which includes the field devices such as actuators and
sensors.

The elementary field devices
are sometimes classified as the
element sublevel. The task of
the devices in the field level is
to transfer data between the
manufactured product and the
technical process.
18
Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Field level

The data may be both binary and analogue. Measured
values may be available for a short period of time or over a
long period of time.
For the field level
communication, parallel,
multiwire cables, and serial
interfaces such as the 20mA
current loop has been widely
used from the past.
19
Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Field level

The serial communication standards such as RS-232C,
RS-422, and RS-485 are most commonly used protocols
together with the parallel communication standard IEEE488.

Those point-to-point communication methods have evolved
to the bus communication network to cope with the cabling
cost and to achieve a high quality communication.
20
Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Field level

Field-level industrial networks are a large category,
distinguished by characteristics such as message size and
response time.

In general, these networks connect smart devices that work
cooperatively in a distributed, time-critical network.

They offer higher-level diagnostic and configuration
capabilities generally at the cost of more intelligence,
processing power, and price.

21
Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Field level

At their most sophisticated, fieldbus networks work with truly
di stri buted control among i ntel l i gent devi ces l i ke
FOUNDATION Fieldbus.

Common networks included in the devicebus and fieldbus
classes include CANOpen, DeviceNet, FOUNDATION
Fieldbus, Interbus-S, LonWorks, Profibus-DP, and SDS.
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Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Control Level
At the control level, the information flow mainly consists of
the loading of programs, parameters and data.

In processes wi th short machi ne i dl e ti mes and
readjustments, this is done during the production process.

In small controllers it may be necessary to load subroutines
during one manufacturing cycle.

This determines the timing requirements. It can be divided
into two: cell and area sublevels.
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Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Control Level
Cell sublevel

For the cell level operations, machine synchronizations and
event handlings may require short response times on the
bus.

These real-time requirements are not compatible with time-
excessive transfers of application programs, thus making an
adaptable message segmentation necessary.
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Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Control Level
Cell sublevel

In order to achieve the communication requirements in this
level, local area networks have been used as the
communication network.

After the introduction of the CIM concept and the DCCS
concept, many companies developed their proprietary
networks for the cell level of an automation system.

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Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Control Level
Cell sublevel

The Ethernet together with TCP/IP (transmission control
protocol/internet protocol) was accepted as a de facto
standard for this level, though it cannot provide a true real-
time communication.

A de facto standard is a custom, convention, product, or system that has
achieved a dominant position by public acceptance or market forces (such as
early entrance to the market). De facto is a Latin phrase that means "concerning
fact." De facto means "existing in fact,

or "in practice but not necessarily
ordained by law" or "in practice or actuality, but not officially established.
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Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Control Level
Cell sublevel

Many efforts have been made for the standardization of the
communication network for the cell level.

The IEEE standard networks based on the OSI layered
architecture were developed and the Mini-MAP network was
developed in 1980s to realize a standard communication
between various devices from different vendors.

Some fieldbuses can also be used for this level.
27
Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Control Level
Area sublevel

The area level consists of cells combined into groups. Cells
are designed with an application-oriented functionality.

By the area level controllers or process operators, the
controlling and intervening functions are made such as the
setting of production targets, machine startup and shutdown,
and emergency activities.
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Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Control Level
Area sublevel

We typically use control-level networks for peer-to-peer
networks between controllers such as PLCs, distributed
control system (DCS), and computer systems used for
human-machine interface (HMI), historical archiving, and
supervisory control.
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Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Control Level
Area sublevel

We use control buses to coordinate and synchronize control
between production units and manufacturing cells.

Typically, ControlNet and PROFIBUS-FMS are used as the
industrial networks for controller buses.

In addition, we can frequently use Ethernet with TCP/IP as a
controller bus to connect upper-level control devices and
computers.
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Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Information level
The information level is the top level of a plant or an
industrial automation system.

The plant level controller gathers the management
information from the area levels, and manages the whole
automation system.

At the information level there exist large scale networks, thus
we can use Ethernet networks as a gateway to connect
other industrial networks.
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Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Transmission Methods
The data communication can be analogue or digital.

Analogue data takes continuously changing values. In digital
communication, the data can take only binary 1 or 0 values.

The transmi ssi on i tsel f can be asynchronous or
synchronous, depending on the way data is sent.

The synchronous mode transmission is more efficient
method.
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Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Transmission Methods

The data is transmitted in blocks of characters, and the
exact departure and arrival time of each bit is predictable
because the sender/receiver clocks are synchronized.

The transmission methods in industrial communication
networks include baseband, broadband, and carrierband.
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Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Transmission Methods

In a baseband transmission, a transmission consists of a set
of signals that is applied to the transmission medium without
being translated in frequency.

Broadband transmission uses a range of frequencies that
can be divided into a number of channels.

Carrier transmission uses only one frequency to transmit
and receive information.

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Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Transmission Methods

The most common transmission media for industrial
communication network is copper wire, either in the form of
coaxial or twisted-pair cable.

Fiber optics and wireless technologies are also being used.
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Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Transmission Methods

Coaxial cable is used for high-speed data transmission over
distances of several kilometers.


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Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Transmission Methods

The coaxial cable is widely available, relatively inexpensive,
and can be installed and maintained easily.

For these reasons it is widely used in many industrial
communication networks.

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Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Transmission Methods

Twisted-pair cable may be used to transmit baseband data
at several Mbit/s over distances of 1 km or more but as the
speed is increased the maximum length of the cable is
reduced.
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Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Transmission Methods

Twisted-pair cable has been used for many years and is also
widely used in industrial communication networks.

It is less expensive than coaxial cable, but it does not
provide high transmission capacity or good protection from
electromagnetic interference.
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Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Transmission Methods

Fiber optic cable provides increased transmission capacity
over giga bits, and it is free from electromagnetic
interference.
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Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Transmission Methods

However, the associated equipment required is more
expensive, and it is more difficult to tap for multidrop
connections.

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Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Transmission Methods

In many mobile or temporary measurement situations,
wireless is a good solution and is being used widely.
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Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Today's environment

Conventional point-to-point wiring using discrete devices and
analog instrumentation dominate today's computer-based
measurement and automation systems.

Twisted-pair wiring and 4-20 mA analog instrumentation
standards work with devices from most suppliers and
provide interoperability between other 4-20 mA devices.

However, this is extremely limited because it provides only
one piece of information from the manufacturing process.
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Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Today's environment

Integrating devices from several vendors is made difficult by
the need for custom software and hardware interfaces.

Pr opr i et ar y net wor ks of f er l i mi t ed mul t i - vendor
interoperability and openness between devices.

With standard industrial networks we decide which devices
we want to use.
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Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Industrial Network Components

In larger industrial and factory networks, a single cable is not
enough to connect all the network nodes together.

We must define network topologies and design networks to
provide isolation and meet performance requirements.

In many cases, because applications must communicate
across dissimilar networks, we need additional network
equipment.
45
Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Industrial Network Components

The following are various types of network components and
topologies:

Repeaters
Router
Bridge
Gateway


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Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Industrial Network Components
Repeaters: a repeater, or amplifier, is a device that
enhances electrical signals so they can travel greater
distances between nodes. With this device, we can connect
a larger number of nodes to the network. In addition, we can
adapt different physical media to each other, such as coaxial
cable to an optical fiber.

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Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Industrial Network Components

Router: a router switches the communication packets
between different network segments, defining the path.

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Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Industrial Network Components
Bridge: with a bridge, the connection between two different
network sections can have different electrical characteristics
and protocols. A bridge can join two dissimilar networks and
applications can distribute information across them.


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Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Industrial Network Components

Gateway: a gateway, similar to a bridge, provides
interoperability between buses of different types and
protocols, and applications can communicate through the
gateway.

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The OSI model
51
1. OSI - layered framework for the
design of network systems that
allows communication across all
types of computer systems.

2. The OSI 7 Layers. (Brief
functional overview)

3. Verti cal and hori zontal
communication between the
layers using interfaces. (defines
what information and services
should the layer provide to the
layer above it)




The OSI model
52
was developed to structure telecommunication protocols in
the 70 (Pouzin & Zimmermann)
standardized by CCITT and ISO as ISO / IEC 7498
all communication protocols (TCP/IP, Appletalk or
DNA) can be mapped to the OSI model.
The Open System Interconnection (OSI) model is a standard
way to structure communication software that is applicable to
any network.
The OSI model
53
is a model, not a standard protocol, but a suite of protocols
with the same name has been standardized by UIT / ISO /
IEC for open systems data interconnection (but with little
success)
mapping of OSI to industrial communication requires
some additions
The OSI model
54
Physical
Link
Network
Transport
Session
Presentation
6
5
4
3
2
1
Application
7
"Transport"
protocols
"Application"
protocols
Definition and conversion of the data
formats (e.g. ASN 1)
All services directly called by the end user
(Mail, File Transfer,...) e.g. Telnet, SMTP
Management of connections
(e.g. ISO 8326)
End-to-end flow control and error recovery
(e.g. TP4, TCP)
Routing, possibly segmenting
(e.g. IP, X25)

Error detection, Flow control and error recovery,
medium access (e.g. HDLC)
Coding, Modulation, Electrical and
mechanical coupling (e.g. RS485)
The OSI model
55
7. Application Layer

" Provides user interfaces and
support for services
" Resource sharing and device
redirection
" Remote file access
" Remote printer access
" Inter-process communication
" Network management
" Directory services
" Electronic messaging (such
as mail)
" Network virtual terminals

The OSI model
56
6. Presentation Layer

" Translation (connects
different computer systems)
" Compression (transmission
efficiency)
" Encryption (SSL security)
The OSI model
57
5. Session Layer

" Session establishment,
maintenance and
termination (Deciding who
sends, and when.)
" Session support (security,
name recognition,
logging )
The OSI model
58
4. Transport Layer

" Connectionless and
connection-oriented services
" Process-Level Addressing
" Multiplexing and
Demultiplexing
" Segmentation, Packaging and
Reassembly
" Connection Establishment,
Management and
Termination
" Acknowledgments and
Retransmissions
" Flow Control

The OSI model
59
3. Network Layer

" Logical Addressing
" Routing (where the packet is
destinated to)
" Datagram Encapsulation
" Fragmentation and
Reassembly (handling too big
packets )
" Error Handling and
Diagnostics ( using status
messages for example )


The OSI model
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2. Data Link Layer
2.1. Logical Link Control (LLC )
" Establishment and control of
logical links between local
devices on a network.
2.2. Media Access Control (MAC)
" The procedures used by
devices to control access to
the network medium.
Frame sequencing
Frame acknowledgment
Addressing
Frame delimiting
Frame error checking
PDU: frame



The OSI model
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1. Physical Layer

Definition of Hardware
Specifications (of cables,
connectors, wireless radio
transceivers, network
interface cards )
Encoding and Signaling (bit
representation)
Data Transmission and
Reception (half duplex, full
duplex )
Topology and Physical
Network Design (mesh, ring,
bus)
PDU: bit



The OSI model
62
Basic requirements:

work in the real-time (time to transmit data from one node to
another is determined);

immunity to disturbances typical in industrial environment.
Industrial Networks
63

Two types of data transmission:

Query-Response;

Broadcast.

Uniform data frame format and standard set of functions.
Master-Slave protocols
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This protocol is dedicated for communication between many nodes (peer-
to-peer) and guarantees reliability at high speed.

The main features:
distributed architecture (there is no central node);

it can be easy extended;

frame dimension is limited;

time is guaranteed,

network can work even if one of the nodes is broken down.
Token-passing protocols
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Two types of frames:

service frames (token);

data frames.

Token is transferred between nodes and only the owner of the token can
send the frame, that is available for all others nodes.

Data are transmitted with a constant sweep depending on transfer speed,
the number of nodes and the number of transferred bytes.
Token-passing protocols
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To transfer the token correctly, one should set in each station:

number in the network (unique),

number of the last station.

It can be declared in a software or hardware way.

Examples of Token-passing networks: Genius of GE Fanuc, Sycoway N10 of
CEGELEC.
Token-passing protocols
67
Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Network Topology

Industrial systems usually consist of two or more devices. As
industrial systems get larger, we must consider the topology
of the network.

The most common network topologies are the bus, star, or a
hybrid network that combines both.

Three principal topologies are employed for industrial
communication networks: star, bus, and ring.
68
Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Network Topology
69
Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Network Topology

A star configuration contains a
central controller, to which all nodes
are directly connected.

This allows easy connection for
small networks, but additional
controllers must be added once a
maximum number of nodes are
reached.
70
Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Network Topology

The failure of a node in a star
configuration does not affect other
nodes.

The star topology has a central hub
and one or more network segment
connections that radiate from the
central hub.
71
Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Network Topology

With the star topology, we can easily add further nodes
without interrupting the network.

Another benefit is that failure of one device does not impair
communications between any other devices in the network;
however, failure of the central hub causes the entire network
to fail.
72
Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Network Topology

In the bus topology, each node is directly attached to a
common communication channel.

Messages transmitted on the bus are received by every
node. If a node fails, the rest of the network continues in
operation as long as the failed node does not affect the
media.
73
Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Network Topology

In the ring topology, the cable forms
a loop and the nodes are attached
at intervals around the loop.

Messages are transmitted around
the ring passing the nodes attached
to it. If a single node fails, the entire
net work coul d st op unl ess a
r ecover y mechani sm i s not
implemented.
74
Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Network Topology

For most networks used for industrial applications, we can
use hybrid combinations of both the bus and star topologies
to create larger networks consisting of hundreds, even
thousands of devices.

We can configure many popular industrial networks such as
Ethernet, FOUNDATION Fieldbus, DeviceNet, Profibus, and
CAN using hybrid bus and star topologies depending on
application requirements.

75
Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Network Topology

Hybrid networks offer advantages and disadvantages of both
the bus and star topologies.

We can configure them so failure of one device does not put
the other devices out of service.

We can also add to the network without impacting other
nodes in the network.
76
Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Benefits of industry-standard networks

Modern control and business systems require open, digital
communications.

Industrial networks replace conventional point-to-point
RS-232, RS-485, and 4-20 mA wiring between existing
measurement devices and automation systems with an all-
digital, 2-way communication network.

Industrial networking technology offers several major
improvements over existing systems.

77
Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Benefits of industry-standard networks

With industry-standard networks, we can select the right
instrument and system for the job regardless of the control
system manufacturer.
78
Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Benefits of industry-standard networks
Other benefits include:

Reduced wiring: resulting in lower overall installation and
maintenance costs

Intelligent devices: leading to higher performance and
increased functionality such as advanced diagnostics

Distributed control: with intelligent devices providing the
flexibility to apply control either centrally or distributed for
improved performance and reliability
79
Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Benefits of industry-standard networks
Other benefits include:

Simplified wiring of a new installation, resulting in fewer,
simpler drawings and overall reduced control system
engineering costs

Lower installation costs for wiring, marshalling, and
junction boxes
80
Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Benefits of industry-standard networks
Other benefits include:

Standard industrial networks offer the capability to meet the
expanding needs of manufacturing operations of all sizes.

As our measurement and automation system needs grow,
industrial networks provide an industry-standard, open
infrastructure to add new capabilities to meet increasing
manufacturing and production needs.

81
Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
Benefits of industry-standard networks
Other benefits include:

For relatively low initial investments, we can install small
computer-based measurement and automation systems that
are compatible with large-scale and long-term plant control
and business systems.
82
Hierarchical Levels in Industrial Networks
83
Common Industrial Networks
84
Common Industrial Networks
85
Common Industrial Networks
86
Common Industrial Networks
87
Common Industrial Networks
88
Common Industrial Networks
89
Common Industrial Networks
90
Common Industrial Networks
91
Common Industrial Networks
92
Common Industrial Networks
93
Profibus
94
Profibus
The worlds most installed open field-level network

Origin: German Government in cooperation with automation
manufacturers, 1989.

Implemented on ASIC chips produced by multiple vendors.
Based on RS485 and the European EN50170 Electrical
specification.

Formats: Profibus DP (Master/Slave), Profibus FMS
(Multimaster/Peer to Peer), and Profibus PA (intrinsically
safe).
95
Profibus
Connectors: 9-Pin D-Shell connector (impedance
terminated) or 12mm IP67 quick-disconnect.

Maximum Number of Nodes: 127

Distance: 100M to 24 KM (with repeaters and fiber optic
transmission).
Baudrate: 9600 to 12M Bit/sec
Message size: up to 244 bytes of data per node per
message
Messaging formats: Polling (DP/PA) and Peer-to-Peer
(FMS)
96
Profibus
Supporti ng Trade Organi zati on: Profi bus Trade
Organization

Profibus is commonly found in Process Control and large
assembly, and material handling machines.

Single-cable wiring of multi-input sensor blocks, pneumatic
valves, complex intelligent devices, smaller sub-networks
(such as AS-I), and operator interfaces.
97
Profibus
Advantages:

Profibus is the most widely accepted international networking
standard. Nearly universal in Europe and also very popular in
North America, South America, and parts of Africa and Asia.

Profibus can handle large amounts of data at high speed and
serve the needs of large installations. The DP, FMS and PA
versions collectively address the majority of automation
applications.
98
Profibus
Disadvantages:

High overhead to message ratio for small amounts of data;
no power on the bus; slightly higher cost than some other
buses; European- and Siemens- centricity is occasionally an
obstacle for some North American users.

Profibus substantial speed, distance and data handling
capabilities make it ideal for many process control and data
intensive applications.
99
Profibus
Disadvantages:

Profibus DP, which is the most commonly messaging format
for I/O, is a polling network, meaning that its assigned master
periodically requests the status of each node.

This ensures that each device on the network (which can
send up to 244 bytes of data per scan) is updated
consistently and reliably.

Each message contains 12 bytes of overhead for a maximum
message length of 256 bytes.
10
0
Profibus
Multi-Master:

Multiple masters are possible with Profibus DP, in which case
each slave device is assigned to one master.

This means that multiple masters can read inputs from the
device but only one master can write outputs to that device.
10
1
Profibus
Peer to Peer:

Profibus FMS is a peer to peer messaging format, which
allows masters to communicate with one another. All can be
masters if desired.

FMS messages consume more overhead than DP
messages.."COMBI mode" is when FMS and DP are used
simultaneously in the same network.

10
2
Profibus
Peer to Peer:

This is most commonly used in situations where a PLC is
being used in conjunction with a PC, and the primary master
communicates with the secondary master via FMS. DP
messages are sent via the same network to I/O devices.


10
3
Profibus
Profibus DP V1 extension:

The older FMS specification is giving way to a new approach,
DP with V1 extensions. This serves the needs of new
devices with greater complexity.

The Profibus Trade Organization has released a new
specification which integrates many of the functions of
Profibus FMS (multimaster, peer to peer communication)
together with Profibus DP (master/slave I/O communication)
so that the two types of messaging work together to combine
synchronous scanning with on-the-fly configuration of
devices.

10
4
Profibus
Profibus DP V1 extension:

In the past, FMS and DP have been used together, but often
for entirely different purposes. This integration enables
Profibus to more effectively compete with some of the more
advanced capabilities of its rivals, DeviceNet and Foundation
Fieldbus.

10
5
Profibus
Profibus DP V2 for motion control:

A recent addition to the Profibus specification is V2, which
adds
1) a synchronization feature which allows multiple devices
and axes of motion to work on the same time clock
2) publisher / subscriber messaging which allows devices to
communicate to each other on a one-to-one or one to
many basis.

This allows the coordination of synchronized axes of motion.
10
6
Profibus
Intrinsically safe:

The Profibus PA protocol is the same as the latest Profibus
DP with V1 diagnostic extensions, except that voltage and
current levels are reduced to meet the requirements of
intrinsic safety (Class I div. II) for the process industry.

10
7
Profibus
Intrinsically safe:

Most master cards support Profibus PA, but barriers which
convert between DP and PA are necessary (available from a
number
of companies).

PA devices are powered by the network at intrinsically safe
voltage and current levels.
10
8
Setup Guide - Profibus communication
AC141x with Step 7 V5.5

English
10
9 Stand: 12.03.2012

Seite 109 ifm electronic
gmbh
Contents:
1. Connect the Profibus Unit
2. Create a Project and set the PG/PC Interface
3. Configure the Hardware
4. Configure the Profibus Gateway
5. Transfer the Project
6. Monitor the Inputs and Outputs
11
0 Stand: 12.03.2012

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1. Connect the Profibus Unit
Siemens PLC with
Profibus Interface
ifm AS-i / PB Gateway
AC141x
Laptop / PC
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2. Create a Project and set the PG/PC Interface
# Create project
" Start Simatic Manager
with icon from desktop
" Use an appropriate
name for the project
" Confirm with OK
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2. Create a Project and set the PG/PC Interface
# Set the PG/PC interface
" Set the PG/PC-Interface using
Options -> Set PG/PC
Interface.
" Choose the PC from the list of
Ethernet interfaces.

" Confirm with OK

" Confirm with OK
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3. Configure the Hardware
# Add the Simatic Station
" Add the PLC to the project : Insert -> Station -> Simatic 300
Station or Simatic 400 Station
" Open the Hardware configuration
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3. Configure the Hardware
# Add Rail
" Add the Rack Rail by using drag and drop on the respective
icon from the catalogue.

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3. Configure the Hardware
# Add CPU
" Add the CPU by using drag and drop to the respective slot
from the catalogue.
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3. Configure the Hardware
# Set the Ethernet interface
" Enter the IP address for the
Ethernet interface of the PLC
" Click New) to add the
ethernet connection
" Enter an appropriate name
for the Ethernet connection
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3. Configure the Hardware
# Set Ethernet interface
" The Ethernet interface
Ethernet1 is now added.
Close the configuration
session with OK.
" This interface will be used to
upload and download the
PLC configuration and
program

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4. Configure the Profibus Gateway
# Install GSD File
" The Generic Station
Description File
(GSD File) is required
in order to integrate
the Profibus gateway
into the hardware
configuration. When
using the Profibus
gateway with the Step
7 system for the first
time, the GSD File is
to be installed via
Options -> Install
GSD File).
" Choose the GSD File
with Browse)
" Start the installation

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4. Configure the Profibus Gateway
# Add the Profibus path right click on the MPI/DP interface to create the Profibus
connection
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4. Configure the Profibus Gateway
# Add the Profibus path right click on the MPI/DP interface to create the Profibus
connection
1
2
3
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4. Configure the Profibus Gateway
# Add the Profibus gateway
" Choose the Profibus gateway from the catalogue using the
following steps: Profibus DP -> Additional Field Devices ->
Gateway -> ifm electronic gmbh -> AS-Interface -> AC1411/12-PB
V2.0 and add it to Profibus network.
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4. Configure the Profibus Gateway
# Description of the Slots
" Slots 1 - 4: digital IO signals M1/M2 (address 0-63)
" Slots 5 - 6: analogue inputs M1/M2 (address 256 263)
" Slots 7 - 8: analogue outputs M1/M2 (address 256 263)
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4. Configure the Profibus Gateway
# Description of Slots
" Slots 1 - 4: digital IO signals
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4. Configure the Profibus Gateway
# Description of Slots
" Slots 5 - 6: analogue inputs/outputs,
" Data mapping and corresponding parameter setting:
analogue channels per input / output slave" = 1
analogue channels per input / output slave" = 2
analogue channels per input / output slave" = 4 is not suitable for this
representations since it can be defined by the user.
.$ Complete table for data mapping is given in the Device Manual
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Seite 125 ifm electronic
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5. Transfer the Project
" Save the configuration using Ctrl + S or Station -> Save and
Compile
" Load the configuration to PLC using Ctrl + L or PLC ->
Download
" If the configuration is correct, the bus error LEDs (BF 1 and BF 2)
are out and the system error LED (SF) of the CPU is green.

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6. Monitor the Inputs and Outputs
" Create a Variable Table (VAT) in Step7
" Insert -> Range of Variables)
" IW for Input Words or PIW for Periphery Input Words
" IB fr Input Bytes or PIB for Periphery Input Bytes
" Ix.y for Input-Bits, for example . I64.1 for bit 1 in input byte 64
" -> Read inputs via monitor variable (glasses)
" QW for Output Word or PQW for Periphery Output Word
" QB for Output Byte or PQB for Periphery Output Byte
" Qx.y for Output Bit, for example Q64.1 for bit 1 in output byte 64
" -> Outputs can be set via Variable Control
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6. Monitor the Inputs and Outputs
" Add variable table by right clicking left window, Insert New Object
> Variable table
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6. Monitor the Inputs and Outputs
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6. Monitor the Inputs and Outputs
" Open VAT table by clicking on VAT1
" To add variables, Go to Insert % Range of Variable
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6. Monitor the Inputs and Outputs
" To Monitor values, Variable % Monitor
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6. Monitor the Inputs and Outputs
13
2
DeviceNet
13
3
DeviceNet
DeviceNet - fieldbus for low and mid-level factory networking

Origin: Allen-Bradley, USA, 1994

Based on CAN (Controller Area Network) technology,
borrowed from the automotive industry

Maximum Number of Nodes: 64

Connectors: Popular Mini 18mm and Micro 12mm
waterproof quick disconnect plugs and receptacles, and 5 pin
phoenix terminal block.
13
4
DeviceNet
Distance: 100M to 500M

Baudrate: 125, 250 and 500 Kbits/sec

Maximum Message size: 8 bytes of data per node per
message

Messaging formats: Polling, Strobing, Change-of-State,
Cyclic; Explicit messaging for configuration and parameter
data; UCMM for peer to peer messaging. Producer/
Consumer based model.
13
5
DeviceNet
DeviceNet Network Example
Cable to open-style
connector on
network PLC scanner
KwikLink cable
Termination
resistor
RightSight
photo sensor
Insulation
displacement
connector
CompactBlock
I/O module
ArmorBlock
maximum
4 I/O points
Power
supply
Termination
resistor
Open-style connection
for power supply
Prox switch
and cable Stack light
13
6
DeviceNet
Sample of Some DeviceNet Media Components
Thick round
drop line cable
KwikLink drop
line cable
KwikLink flat trunk
line cable insulation
displacement connector
Device port
T-port
KwikLink flat trunk
line cable
DeviceLink
13
7
DeviceNet Purpose
# Open network
# Link low-level devices to PLCs
" Sensors
" Pushbutton stations
" Distributed I/O blocks
" Intelligent motor started overloads
" Variable frequency drives
13
8
DeviceNet Open Network
# Open network
# Network devices (nodes) can be purchased from many different
vendors
# Network managed by Open DeviceNet Vendors Association
(ODVA)
" ODVA.ORG
13
9
DeviceNet Advantage
# Save wiring costs
" Rather than run power wires separately to
each device
" Rather than run signal wires from each field
device separately back to PLC, I/O module
connect devices directly to a network
" One cable with four wires
Two power wires
Two signal wires
14
0
Field Devices More Intelligent
# Traditional systems
" A photo switch counting pieces as they pass on a conveyer
was wired directly into an input module.
# Counter programmed on ladder to track parts count
# Counter done bit triggered output point to control field action
14
1
DeviceNet Advantage
# Many DeviceNet devices are intelligent.
# Photo switch has counters and timers
incorporated into sensor.
# PLC does not need to have timer or counter
on ladder.
# When timer or counter is done, the action is
carried out through RSNetWorx for
DeviceNet software to trigger field device
across the network.
14
2
DeviceNet Components
# PLC with DeviceNet scanner
# RSNetWorx software for DeviceNet
# Trunk line
# Drop lines
# Nodes
# Minimum one power supply
# Two 121-ohm *-watt termination resistors
# Up to 64 nodes
14
3
DeviceNet Network Example
Cable to open-style
connector on
network PLC scanner
KwikLink cable
Termination
resistor
RightSight
photo sensor
Insulation
displacement
connector
CompactBlock
I/O module
ArmorBlock
maximum
4 I/O points
Power
supply
Termination
resistor
Open-style connection
for power supply
Prox switch
and cable Stack light
14
4
Sample of Some DeviceNet Media
Components
Thick round
drop line cable
KwikLink drop
line cable
KwikLink flat trunk
line cable insulation
displacement connector
Device port
T-port
KwikLink flat trunk
line cable
DeviceLink
14
5
DeviceNet Cabling
# Thick round
# Thin round
# KwikLink cable
# Special-use cable
# Open-style connectors
14
6
Thick Round Cable
# Used for trunk line
# T-ports used to connect from trunk line to drop lines
14
7
Thin Round Cable
# Typically used for drop lines
# Can be used for trunk in short networks with low current
requirements
14
8
KwikLink DeviceNet Connection
KwikLink flat cable
Insulation displacement
connector
14
9
Insulation Displacement
Connection
# For non-wash down
# Typical usage conveyor lines
# Mount on inside rail of
conveyor
# No conduit needed
# Easy installation of new nodes
# No minimum spacing
15
0
DevicePort
# Passive 4- or 8-point taps
# Connected to trunk line by drop line
# Previous slide showed an 8-point DevicePort
# Nodes connected to DevicePort by drop lines
15
1
T-port
# Used to connect drop line to trunk line
# Drop line connected to DevicePort and then on to multiple nodes
# Drop line connected directly to node
# Maximum drop line length 20 feet
15
2
DeviceLink
# Adapter to interface non-DeviceNet devices to network
# 2- or 3-wire 24-V sensors
# Mechanical limit switches
# Any non-DeviceNet device with relay contacts
# One required for each non-DeviceNet node
15
3
Additional Media
# Refer to the DeviceNet Media catalog for a complete listing of
available products.
15
4
Maximum Trunk Line Length (1 of 2)
# Maximum cable distance between any two nodes
# Not necessarily actual length of backbone
# Maximum length determined by cable type and baud rate
15
5
Maximum Trunk Line Length (2 of 2)
15
6
Trunk Line Calculation One
Node number
15
7
Example One
# Left terminating resistor to node 1 is 12 feet.
# Drop line node 1 is 2 feet.
# Right terminating resistor to node 12 is also 12 feet.
# Node 12 drop line is 2 feet.
# From node 1 drop line to node 12 drop line is 800 feet.
15
8
Trunk Line Calculation (1 of 2)
# For this example, trunk line length is maximum length of cable
between terminating resistors.
15
9
Trunk Line Calculation (2 of 2)
# 12 + 800 + 12 = 824 feet
# Refer to table for maximum baud rate of network.
16
0
Maximum Trunk Line Length
Trunk line length is over 820 feet so maximum baud rate for this network is 125 K.
16
1


Trunk Line Calculation Two
Power Supply
1
2
3
4
5
6
7 8
9
10
11
12
13
14
6 ft
2 ft
8 ft
300 ft
20 ft
12 ft
3 ft
Node numbers
16
2
Example Two
# Left terminating resistor to node 1 drop line
is 20 feet.
# Node 1 drop line is 6 feet.
# Right terminating resistor to node 12 drop
line is 2 feet.
# Node 12 drop line is 8 feet.
# Trunk line from node 12 drop to node 14
drop line is 3 feet.
# Node 14 drop line is 12 feet.
# Node 1 trunk line to node 14 is 300 feet.
16
3
Trunk Line Calculation
# For this example, trunk line length is maximum length of cable
between any two nodes or terminating resistors.
# Assume round thick trunk line.
# Look at network again.
16
4
Trunk Line Calculation Two (1 of 2)
Power Supply
1
2
3
4
5
6
7 8
9
10
11
12
13
14
6 ft
2 ft
8 ft
300 ft
20 ft
12 ft
3 ft
For this example, trunk line length is maximum length of cable between any
two nodes or terminating resistors.
16
5
Trunk Line Calculation Two (2 of 2)
# The longest cable distance is between the left terminating
resistor and node 14.
# For this example, the distance between terminating resistors
would not be the correct calculation.
# 20 + 300 + 12 = 332 feet
# Refer to table for maximum baud rate of network.
16
6
Maximum Trunk Line Length (1 of 3)
Trunk line length is over 328 feet so maximum baud rate
for this network is either125 K or 250 k.
16
7
Maximum Trunk Line Length (2 of 3)
# The rule is to go back 20 feet from the termination resistors and
see if there is a drop line that is longer.
" If a drop is longer, then it must be included in the trunk line
calculation.
" Remember maximum drop line length is 20 feet.
16
8
15
8
4
3
7
20 feet
Maximum Trunk Line Length (3 of 3)
# Terminating resistor and
node 00 is 3 feet.
# Node 00 and node 1 is 4
feet.
# Trunk line to node 7 is 15
feet.
# 15 foot drop is longer
than 3 +4 for trunk.
16
9
Cumulative Drop Line Length (1 of 2)
# Sum of all drop lines
# Maximum drop line length to any one node
" 20 feet
# Cumulative drop line length also determines network baud rate
17
0
Cumulative Drop Line Length (2 of 2)
Text figure 11-30
17
1
Total All Drop Line Lengths (1 of 2)
17
2
Total All Drop Line Lengths (2 of 2)
# Cumulative length is 131 feet.
# Nodes 10, 13, and 14 exceed the 20-foot maximum drop to any
1 node.
# Shorten up cable.
# Cumulative drop line length is now 127 feet.
# Refer to the table for maximum baud rate for network.
17
3
Cumulative Drop Line Length
Cumulative drop line length is 127 feet.
17
4
Power Calculations
# Add up total device current
# Determine trunk line length
# Cable type
# How many power supplies and where
mounted
# Look up tables for power allowed on network
# Full calculation method available for
additional accuracy
17
5
Common Problems
With DeviceNet Networks (1 of 2)
# Improper installation
" Trunk line length correct?
" Cumulative drop line length correct?
" Power supply proper size?
" Overdriving network with too much
information flow?
# Refer to DeviceNet Cable System Planning
and Installation Manual from Rockwell
Automation Web site.
17
6
Common Problems
With DeviceNet Networks (2 of 2)
# Network modification after installation
" Trunk line length recalculated?
" Cumulative drop line length recalculated?
" Power supply recalculated?
" Overdriving network with too much information flow?
17
7
DeviceNet Interface

17
8
DeviceNet open-style
cable connection point
Set baud rate
Set interface
cards node
Status LEDs
FlexLogix PLC DeviceNet
Daughter Card
17
9
CompactLogix DeviceNet Scanner
DeviceNet scanner
Open-style cable connection
CompactLogix processor
CompactLogix is a member of the ControlLogix family.
18
0
ControlLogix Modular Interface
# ControlLogix modular
chassis interface module
# 1756-DNB
# DeviceNet bridge module
Information
window
Status LEDs
Open-style
network connection
1756-DNB
18
1
Example of Rockwell Automation PLC
DeviceNet Interface Modules
# SLC 500 DeviceNet scanner
" 1747-SDN
# PLC 5 DeviceNet scanner
" 1771-SDN
18
2
Example of General Electric PLC DeviceNet
Interface Modules
# Series 90-30 PLCs
" DeviceNet master module
" IC693DNM200
# VersaMax PLC
" Remote I/O DeviceNet network interface
" IC200DB1001
18
3
Personal Computer
DeviceNet Interface
# Computer type determines interface needed.
" Notebook uses PCMCIA such as a Rockwell Automation
1784-PCD.
" Desktop or industrial computer would require a DeviceNet
1784-expansion card.
" Computer with serial port could use Rockwell Automation
1770-KFD interface box.
18
4
1770-KFD Interface
Desktop or notebook
computer with serial port
1770-KFD
Interface cable
Open-style connector to
DeviceNet network
Interface
cable plug
KFD to serial port
interface cable
SLC 500 1747-SDN
18
5
Open-style connector
to DeviceNet network
PCMCIA interface
card 1784-PCD
SLC 500 1747-SDN
Notebook
personal computer
Interface cables
1784-PCD Card
18
6
Use ControlLogix
PLC as a Bridge (1 of 2)
# Most popular interface to PLC for upload, download, on-line
editing is Ethernet
# Ethernet interface card in ControlLogix chassis(1756- ENBT)
# A 1756-DNB or DeviceNet bridge module in ControlLogix
chassis to communicate with DeviceNet
18
7
Use ControlLogix
PLC as a Bridge (1 of 2)
# Use RSLinx Ethernet driver to get to Ethernet interface module
# Bridge across ControlLogix backplane to DeviceNet Bridge
module (1756-DNB)
# Out DNB to DeviceNet network
# No separate DeviceNet interface required
18
8
RSNetWorx Software
# RSNetworx for DeviceNet software
" Set up network
" Map data flowing on network
" Program, monitor, or modify device parameters
18
9
RSNetWorx for DeviceNet
19
0
RSNetWorx View of DeviceNet
Termination
resistor
Termination
resistor
Power supply not shown in RSNetWorx
Trunk line
Drop line
Network scanner
Node address
Device or node
on network
19
1
DeviceNet Scan List
# RSNetWorx software
# Scan List is part of scanner properties.
# Any device that is on the network that is to
be scanned by the PLC scanner must be in
the Scan List.
# Network devices are not mapped until
placed in the Scan List by programmer.
" Auto mapping
" Manual mapping
19
2
Add or remove
single device to
or from Scan List
Auto map
devices when
add to scan list
Scan List tab
Scan List
Electronic
keying
ControlLogix
DNB scanner
properties screen
DeviceNet PLC Scanner Properties
Add or remove
all devices to
or from Scan
List
19
3
Available Devices on Network
# When going on-line with a network scanner, like a 1756-DNB,
scanner will recognize devices currently present on network.
" These devices or nodes will be listed in the Available
Devices view.
" These devices are not in the scan list at this time.
19
4
Auto Map Devices
When Add to Scan List
# Do you want the device(s) to be auto-mapped when added to the
scan list?
# If Automap is selected, you have no control of how devices are
mapped.
# If you uncheck Automap, then devices can be manually mapped
by the programmer.
19
5
Electronic Keying
# How close does a replacement device have to be to the original
when replaced?
" Device type
" Vendor
" Product code
" Major revision
" Minor revision
Minor revision or higher
19
6
DeviceNet Data Mapping
ControlLogix
19
7
ControlLogix 1756-DNB Mapping
Scanner
properties
Input devices
in Scan List
Input tab
ControlLogix processor
tags or addresses
where data is mapped.
Data mapping
for each node
Unused processor
memory. Can be
manually mapped later.
Click here to
unmap a device.
19
8
DeviceNet Data Mapping
# ControlLogix is a 32-bit PLC.
" All tags will be either 32 bits wide or a:
Word, called an integer (INT) which is16 bits
Byte, called a short integer (SINT) which is 8 bits
# Minimum memory allocation for any DeviceNet device
is a SINT.
# Node 6 is a bulletin 160 Allen-Bradley Drive.
" Drive has two words of data.
Drive status information as single bits
Drive speed feedback represented as 0 to 32767
19
9
32 Bits
16 Bits
0 7 8 15
16
31
ControlLogix Input Mapping
Node 6 Drive Input Status word
Node 6 Drives Speed Feedback word Node 4 Series 9000
Photo Electric Sensor
mapping
Node 3 Series 9000
Photo Electric
Sensor
mapping
ControlLogix Tags
20
0
ControlLogix Processor
Data Mapping or Tags (1 of 2)
# Node 6 is Bulletin 160, the variable frequency drive
" Status bits mapped as upper word of Local:1:I.Data[2].
" Drive Speed Feedback word is mapped as the lower word of
Local:1:I.Data[3].
20
1
ControlLogix Processor
Data Mapping or Tags (2 of 2)
# Node 4 is a Series 9000 Photo Switch mapped as the upper byte
of the lower word at Local:1.I.Data[2].
# Node 3 is a Series 9000 Photo Switch mapped as the lower byte
of the lower word at Local:1.I.Data[2].
20
2
DeviceNet Data Mapping
SLC 500
20
3
DeviceNet Data Mapping
# SLC 500 and PLC 5 are 16-bit computers.
" All data will either be a 16-bit word or one
byte.
# Minimum memory allocation for any
DeviceNet device is a byte.
# Node 6 is a Bulletin 160 Allen-Bradley Drive.
" Drive has two words of data.
Drive Command information as single bits
Drive Speed Command represented as 0 to
32767
20
4
SLC 500 Output Data Mapping
1747-SDN
properties view
Output devices
in Scan List
SLC 500 Output Status
Table where data is
coming from
Output mapping tab
Click here to unmap
selected device
Two words or 8
bytes currently
mapped for drive
at node 6
20
5
SLC 500 Processor Data Mapping
# Node 6 is Bulletin 160, the variable frequency drive
" Drive Command bits word is mapped as O:1.2.
" Drive Speed Command word is mapped as O:1.3.
20
6
Node 2 Output Mapping
# Node 8 is a Rockwell Automation 1792D compact block output
module.
" This compact block has four outputs.
# Output data from SLC 500 mapped to lower byte of O:1.6.
# Currently upper byte of O:1.6 is available for another device.
20
7
DeviceNet Nodes
General Properties
20
8
# Right click on device on RSNetWorx screen.
# General Properties screen is displayed.
" Display I/O data
" Display, monitor, or modify devices parameters
" View electronic data sheet (EDS file)
20
9
Identifies this device
Current node address.
Node address can be
changed here.
Parameters
tab
Devices
identity
EDS tab
Numbers used
to identify EDS file
General Properties
21
0
Device Parameters
Parameters
tab
Parameter
number
Lock identifies
read-only
parameters
Click here to
monitor parameter
Icons for uploading
or downloading
to device
Monitor a single
parameter or all
Current value
of parameter
Device
21
1
Parameter Editing
Select parameter
to edit
Options drop-down box
Select
21
2
Electronic Data Sheets
EDS Files
21
3
Electronic Data Sheets
# Typically referred to as EDS files
" EDS files contain information regarding the personality of the
device.
" Correct EDS file must reside in the device before it can be a
working part of the network.
" EDS file must be the same firmware level as the device.
21
4
If EDS File Is Not Current
# Go to manufacturers Web site and download correct file.
# Go to ODVA.ORG site and download correct file.
# EDS file numbers represented in Hex.
# Use EDS Wizard to update or register the network device.
21
5
EDS Wizard
Updating a network
Devices EDS file is to
register the file.
Click next to continue.
21
6
Register EDS File
How many
files to register
After download,
browse for file
on you computer.
Click next to
continue
registration.
EDS file name
represented
in Hex
21
7
Determine EDS File Name
# After downloading EDS file, the file name is represented in Hex.
" To determine EDS file to use when registering file:
Must know Hex
Construct file number from RSNetWorx general properties
page
21
8
[1] = 0001
Convert General Properties
Page Device Identity to Hex
[6] = 0006
[43] = 002B
[1.004] = 0100
21
9
Select Correct EDS File
22
0
Select Correct EDS File
22
1
DeviceNet
Typical Applications:

Most commonly found in assembly, welding and material
handling machines.

Single-cable wiring of multi-input sensor
blocks, smart sensors, pneumatic valves, barcode readers,
drives and operator interfaces.

DeviceNet is especially popular in automotive and
semiconductor.
22
2
DeviceNet
Advantages:

Low cost, widespread acceptance, high reliability, and
efficient use of network bandwidth, power available on the
network.


Disadvantages:

Limited bandwidth, limited message size and maximum
length
22
3
DeviceNet
Versatile, Available, and Competitive

DeviceNet is a versatile, general purpose Fieldbus designed
to satisfy 80% of the most common machine- and cell-level
wiring requirements.

Devices can be powered from the network so wiring is
minimized.

The protocol is implemented on many hundreds of different
products from hundreds of manufacturers, from smart
sensors to valve manifolds and operator interfaces.
22
4
DeviceNet
Versatile, Available, and Competitive

One of DeviceNet's major benefits is its multiple messaging
formats, which allow the bus to 'work smart' instead of work
hard.

They can be mixed and matched within a network to achieve
the most information-rich and time-efficient information from
the network at all times:
22
5
DeviceNet
Messaging Types in DeviceNet
Polling:

The scanner individually asks each device to send or receive
an update of its status.

This requires an outgoing message and incoming message
for each node on the network.

This is the most precise, but least time efficient way to
request information from devices.
22
6
DeviceNet
Messaging Types in DeviceNet
Strobing (broadcast):

The scanner broadcasts a request to all devices for a status
update. Each device responds in turn, with node 1 answering
first, then 2, 3, 4 etc.

Node numbers can be assigned to prioritize messages.
Polling and strobing are the most common messaging
formats used.

22
7
DeviceNet
Messaging Types in DeviceNet
Cyclic:

Devices are configured to automatically send messages on
scheduled intervals.

This is sometimes called a 'heartbeat' and is often used in
conjunction with Change of State messaging to indicate that
the device is still functional.
22
8
DeviceNet
Messaging Types in DeviceNet
Change of State:

Devices only send messages to the scanner when their
status changes. This occupies an absolute minimum of time
on the network, and a large network using Change of State
can often outperform a polling network operating at several
times the speed.

This is the most time efficient but (sometimes) least precise
way to obtain information from devices because throughput
and response time becomes statistical instead of
deterministic.
22
9
AS-I (Actuator Sensor Interface)
23
0
AS-I (Actuator Sensor Interface)
AS-I (Actuator Sensor Interface) - simple and inexpensive
fieldlevel network.
Origin: AS-I Consortium, 1993

Maximum Number of Nodes: 31 slaves, 1 master

Connectors: Insulation displacement connectors on flat
yellow cable, 2 position terminal block or 12mm micro quick-
disconnect connectors.

Distance: 100M, 300M with repeaters
23
1
AS-I (Actuator Sensor Interface)
Baudrate: 167 Kbits/sec

Message size: 8 bits (4 inputs, 4 outputs) per node per
message

Messaging formats: Strobing
23
2
AS-I (Actuator Sensor Interface)
Typical Applications: Commonly found in assembly,
packaging and material handling machines. Single-cable
wiring of multi-input sensor blocks, smart sensors, pneumatic
valves, switches and indicators.

Advantages: simplicity, low cost, widespread acceptance,
high speed, power available on the network. AS-I is
extremely suitable for wiring discrete I/O devices.

Disadvantages: problems when connecting analog I/O;
limited network size;
23
3
AS-I (Actuator Sensor Interface)
ASI is developed by a consortium of European automation &
sensor companies, which saw a need for networking the
simplest devices at the lowest level. ASI is easy to configure
and low in cost. It is most often used for proximity sensors,
photo-eyes, limit switches, valves and indicators in
applications like packaging machines and material handling
systems. ASI is designed for small systems employing
discrete I/O. It allows for up to 31 slaves, which can provide
up to 4 inputs and 4 outputs each for a total of 248 I/O. ASI is
arguably the simplest Fieldbus to use. ASI uses number of
sophisticated and clever mechanisms to ensure fast and
reliable data transmission and user friendliness. The only
configuration issues are choosing the address of each node
and assigning individual inputs and outputs within those
nodes.
23
4
AS-I (Actuator Sensor Interface)
The flat yellow cable
ASI is best known for its flat yellow cable, which is pierced by
insulation displacement connectors so that the expense of
tees and complex connectors is avoided. Devices are simply
clamped onto the cable and a.connection is made. In
addition to the popular flat cable, ordinary lamp cord can be
used and normally no adverse effects will be experienced.
Power on the bus
The signal cable also carries 30VDC at low current to power
input devices; supplemental power for outputs can be
provided via an additional flat (black) cable. Most output
devices have provisions for this extra cable.
23
5
AS-I (Actuator Sensor Interface)
Analog I/O
Analog signals can be transmitted on ASI, but a node can
represent only one analog device, and fragmented
messaging must be used to transmit signals requiring more
than 4 bits.
Determinism and Scan Time
ASI is deterministic; meaning that one can know with
certainty how long it will take for status changes to be
reported to the master. To calculate scan time, multiply the
number of nodes (i ncl udi ng the master) by 150
microseconds. The maximum network delay is 4.7mS, which
is certainly speedy enough for most applications (most PLC's
have a scan time of 20mS or more!).
23
6
AS-I (Actuator Sensor Interface)
Analog I/O
Analog signals can be transmitted on ASI, but a node can
represent only one analog device, and fragmented
messaging must be used to transmit signals requiring more
than 4 bits.
Determinism and Scan Time
ASI is deterministic; meaning that one can know with
certainty how long it will take for status changes to be
reported to the master. To calculate scan time, multiply the
number of nodes (i ncl udi ng the master) by 150
microseconds. The maximum network delay is 4.7mS, which
is certainly speedy enough for most applications (most PLC's
have a scan time of 20mS or more!).
23
7
CONTROLNET
23
8
CONTROLNET
CONTROLNET - mission critical control-level network
Origin: Allen-Bradley, 1995
Based on RG6/U cabling (popular in cable TV applications)
and
Rockwell ASIC chip
Maximum Number of Nodes: 99
Connectors: Twin redundant BNC
Maximum Distance: 250 to 5000M (with repeaters)
Baud rate: 5M bit/Sec
Message Size: 0-510 bytes
Messaging Formats: Based on Producer/Consumer model;
multi-master, peer to peer, fragmented, prioritized and
deterministically scheduled repeatable messages; dual
transmission paths for built-in redundancy.
23
9
CONTROLNET
Typical Applications: Mission critical, plant-wide networking
between multiple PCs, PLCs and sub-networks (i.e.
DeviceNet, Foundation FieldBus H1, etc.) and process
control, and situations requiring high-speed transport of both
time-critical I/O and messaging data, including upload/
download of programming and configuration data and peer-
to-peer messaging.
Advantages: Deterministic, repeatable, efficient use of
network bandwidth, provides redundancy at lower cost than
most other available networks including Ethernet. Can be
transmitted on any IP transport protocol via Ethernet,
Firewire or USB.
24
0
CONTROLNET
Disadvantages: Limited multi-vendor support and expensive
Rockwell ASICs (Application-Specific Integrated Circuits).
ControlNet was conceived as the ultimate high-level Fieldbus
network, and was designed to meet several high-
performance automation and process control criteria. Of
primary importance is the ability of devices to communicate
to each other with 100% determinism while achieving faster
response than traditional master/slave poll/strobe networks.
(Determinism means knowing absolute worst-case response
times with 100% certainty.) This is made possible by the
Producer/Consumer communication model and the
scheduler, which rigorously prioritizes messages.
24
1
CONTROLNET
Multi-Master and repeatability
ControlNet allows multiple masters to control the same I/O
points.
Repeatability ensures that transmit times are constant and
unaffected by devices connecting to, or leaving, the network.
These features are further enhanced with user selectable I/O
and controller interlocking update times to match application
requirements.
24
2
CONTROLNET
Large quantities of data and complex devices.
ControlNet is specifically designed to accommodate the high-
level information and control needs of literally dozens of sub-
networks and controllers. In process control situations where
hazardous materials are involved and absolute certainty with
respect to control processes is required, the deterministic
capabilities of ControlNet are extremely important.
Redundancy
The ControlNet architecture has redundant connectivity as
an integral feature. Redundancy is rather difficult to achieve
with other networks, but each ControlNet node has dual
connections for this very purpose.
24
3
Networks Popularity
# Stand-alone PLCs fading fast
# Older networks being upgraded
" Faster more efficient networks
" New networks offer deterministic and repeatable data
transfer
24
4
Network Advantages for Maintenance
Individuals
# PLCs connected on network
" Access any PLC from a single computer anywhere on the
network
" Upload, download, on-line editing across network to any
device on network from a central location
24
5
ControlNet
# Open network managed by ControlNet
International
# Use for real-time data transfer of time-critical
and non-time-critical data between
processors or I/O on same link
# Data transferred at a fixed rate of 5 million
bits per second
# ControlNet basically a combination of Allen-
Bradleys Data Highway Plus and Remote I/
O
24
6
ControlNet Nodes
# Up to 99 nodes
# No node 0
# Actual number of nodes determined by how efficiently the
network bandwidth is set up
# Network set up using RSNetWorx for ControlNet software
24
7
Nodes on ControlNet
# SLC 500, ControlLogix, PLC 5 processors
# Third-party field devices
# Operator interface
# Variable frequency drives
24
8
ControlNet Applications
# ControlLogix processor, SLC 500, or PLC 5 processor scheduled
data exchange
# Local PLC connection to remote chassis for high-speed remote I/
O connectivity
24
9
Interlocking or Synchronization
of Multiple Nodes
# Synchronized starting of variable frequency drives on ControlNet
# Interlocking multiple processors
25
0
Network Bridging
# Connect two Data Highway Plus networks
# Connect multiple DeviceNet networks
25
1
Trunk Line Drop Line
Node
number
Termination
resistor
Control Net Tap
Trunk line
Drop line
Termination
resistor
PLC 5 as
node 7
SLC 500
as node 8
Variable
frequency drive
as node 4
Computer
Interface cards
Operator
interface
ControlLogix PLCs
25
2
ControlNet Taps
Straight T
Straight Y Right Angle Right Angle Y
Drop line length is fixed at 1 meter (39.5 inches).
25
3
SLC 500 ControlNet Interface
# 1747-SCNR
# SLC 500 modular PLCs
# Scheduled and unscheduled
messaging
25
4
ControlLogix ControlNet Interface
# 1756-CNB
" Channel A only
# 1756-CNBR
" Channel A and B for
redundant media
# Module node address set
with side switches
# Duplicate node addresses
not allowed
# NAP for computer
connectivity
25
5
FlexLogix ControlNet Interface
FlexLogix processor
Two communication card slots
Two ControlNet interface cards
with redundancy
NAP
Set node address here
25
6
Redundant Media
Tap
Trunk
line
PLC 5
node
Personal computer
with ControlNet
interface
Redundant
cables
Drop
line
ControlLogix
25
7
25
8
Personal Computer Interface
Personal computer with ControlNet
interface card like 1784-KTCX15
Redundant
trunk line
25
9
KTCX15 ControlNet Interface
Status indicators
Network access port
Channel A
Channel B
Floppy with card driver
26
0
KTCX15 Interface to PLC 5
PLC 5 ControlNet
processor
NAP
Channel A
Channel B
Redunda
nt
trunk line
26
1
Redundant
trunk line
Personal computer with
ControlNet interface
NAP connection
Personal Computer to NAP
26
2
ControlNet Cabling
ControlNet Segment
26
3
Cabling Terms
# Segment
# Trunk line cable section
# Termination resistor
# Link
26
4
Segment
# Comprised of a number of sections of trunk cable separated by
taps
# Maximum segment length 1,000 meters or 3,280 feet
# Maximum 48 nodes per segment
# Segment length determined by number of nodes
26
5
Taps
# Taps are required.
# There is no minimum cable length between taps.
# Taps can be directly connected together.
26
6
Trunk Line Cable Section
# Trunk line cable section connects one tap to another.
# Taps are required.
# Standard light industrial quad shielded RG-6.
# Special use cables are available.
# Fiber optic cables are available.
26
7
Termination Resistor
# One termination resistor is required on the end of every
segment.
26
8
ControlNet Segment
Termination
resistor
Termination
resistor
39.5
inches
Segment
Trunk
line
Drop
line
Tap
26
9
Segment Calculation
# Formula to calculate segment length
1,000 meters [16.3 meters ( number of taps 2)]
27
0
Calculation Example:
# Calculate maximum segment length using standard light
industrial RG-6 coax requiring 22 taps.
1,000 meters [16.3 meters ( 22 - 2)]
1,000 meters [16.3 meters ( 20 )]
1,000 meters 326 meters
Maximum segment length = 674 meters
27
1
ControlNet Link
# If more than 48 nodes are required, an additional segment is
required.
# Repeater connects segments.
# Two segments connected by a repeater is a link.
27
2
Three Segments Connected by a Repeater to
Create a Star
27
3
Four Segments Connected by Repeaters to
Create a Ring
27
4
ControlNet Repeaters
# Required if additional nodes are required after either maximum
number of nodes or cable length reached
# Two modules required to build a repeater
# Many copper and fiber repeaters to select from depending on
application
27
5
Building a Repeater Example
# The two repeater modules can be DIN rail-mounted as a pair to
build a repeater.
" 1 - 1786-RPA (repeater adaptor module)
" 1 - 1786-RPCD (dual copper repeater)
27
6
Repeater Adapter Module
27
7
Dual Copper Repeater Module
27
8
Repeaters
ControlNet
PLC 5
Add Flex- I/O blocks
to this communication
for remote I/O points
27
9
Example of Fiber Repeater
# Fiber repeaters available
as short, medium, long,
and very long haul
# Up to 18.5 miles
ControlNet network using
proper fiber repeaters
# Right-hand module in
previous slide
28
0
RSNetWorx Software
28
1
RSNetWorx
# From Rockwell Software
# Required to configure and schedule a ControlNet network
28
2
RSNetWorx For ControlNet
Graphic view
of network
Go on-line
with network
RSNetWorx
for ControlNet
Enable
editing
Manual
network
configuration
Network
bandwidth
utilization
Trunk
line
Node
number
28
3
How Critical is this Data?
# Separate data into two categories.
" Is this information time critical?
" Can this information be transferred on a non-time critical
basis?
28
4
What is Real-Time
for This Application?
# How soon do you really need the information?
# Networks do not have unlimited bandwidth.
" Cannot have everything instantly
28
5
Realistic Data Flow (1 of 2)
# Assume you had a tank that takes four hours to fill.
" Why would you need a tank level every 10 milliseconds?
" What is realistic?
" Would every few seconds be acceptable?
28
6
Realistic Data Flow (2 of 2)
# Assume you had a tank of water that takes two hours to heat.
" Why would you need a tank temperature every 10
milliseconds?
" What is realistic?
" Would every few seconds be acceptable?
28
7
Scheduled / Unscheduled
# Time critical data is scheduled data.
" Requested packet interval (RPI) set up in RSNetWorx
# Non-time critical data is unscheduled data.
" Message instruction programmed on PLC ladder rung
Trigger to transfer only when needed
28
8
RPI
# Requested packet interval
# Scheduled network service
" The requested interval time-critical data will flow
" ControlNet will meet or beat the RPI if network installed and
configured properly
28
9
Inefficient Network
# Improper installation
" Follow installation manual
# Improper network modification
" Follow installation manual
# Poor design
" Follow installation manual
# Overdriving network
" Unrealistic data flow expectations
29
0
ControlNet Bandwidth
# Three pieces to bandwidth
" Scheduled traffic
" Unscheduled traffic
" Maintenance or guard band
29
1
Scheduled Traffic
Unscheduled
Traffic
Network
Maintenance
Network Update Time
29
2
Network Update
# One cycle of the network
# Called NUT time
" Set up on RSNetWorx
# Data cannot transfer faster than the NUT
29
3
Scheduled Maximum Node
# SMAX
# This is the highest node number that will be allowed to send
scheduled data.
# Any node address above SMAX that has scheduled data to
transfer will not be allowed to transmit.
29
4
Unscheduled Maximum Node
# UMAX
# This is the highest node number that will be allowed to send
unscheduled data.
# Any node address above UMAX that has scheduled data to
transfer will not be allowed to transmit.
29
5
Node Can Send Both
# A node can send scheduled as well as unscheduled data/
# The node number must be within SMAX.
29
6
Slot Time
# Slot time is time the network spends waiting for a node to
respond when the node address is either not used or the node is
not responding.
# Unused node addresses should be kept to a minimum for
network efficiency.
29
7
NUT
SMAX
UMAX
Media and
channel information
RSNetWorx Parameters
29
8
Set-up Example
# 10 nodes scheduled traffic
# 2 spare nodes future scheduled traffic
# 14 unscheduled nodes
# 3 nodes for NAP connectivity
" What will SMAX be?
" What will UMAX be?
" What about slot time?
" Maximum cable length?
29
9
Maximum Segment Length
# Assume RG-6 coax
" How many taps?
30
0
Number of Taps
# Number of taps does not include NAP connections.
# No node 0 in ControlNet.
# To keep it simple, lets use taps as nodes 1 to 26.
" NAP nodes 27, 28, 29
" Total taps = 26
30
1
Segment Calculation
# 1,000 meters [16.3 meters( Number of taps 2)]
# 1,000 meters [16.3 meters( 26 2)]
# 1,000 meters [16.3 meters( 24 )]
# 1,000 meters 391.2 meters
# Maximum segment length 608.8 meters
30
2
SMAX
# Scheduled traffic nodes 1- 12
# Nodes 1-10 currently used
# Nodes 11 and 12 future scheduled
" Unused nodes = slot time
# SMAX set at 12
30
3
Determine UMAX
# Nodes 13 - 26 unscheduled traffic
# Nodes 27, 28, 29 for NAP
" RSLinx drivers for personal computer node addresses
MUST be set at 27, 28, or 29.
" RSLinx default for 1784-PCC personal computer interface
default = node 99.
# UMAX must be set at a minimum of 29.
30
4
Efficient Network Configuration
1
99
UMAX =29 SMAX= 12
Node
10
Node 11 & 12
future scheduled
Node 27, 28, 29
for NAP
30
5
Future Network Expansion
# Recalculate segment length?
# Reconfigure SMAX?
# Reconfigure UMAX?
# Reschedule network using RSNetWorx if any scheduled node is
added or modified.
30
6
Reschedule Network
# It must be done whenever a scheduled node is modified or
added to the network.
# Network configuration is scheduled in RSNetWorx for
ControlNet.
" Part of saving new network configuration
" ALL processors on network in program mode
" Referred to as optimizing and rewriting network configuration
30
7
Rescheduling and the Keeper
# The ControlNet communication module at the lowest node
number is called the keeper.
" Should be node 1
" For ControlLogix 1756-CNB(R)
" Keeper like a traffic cop
Directs traffic on network and synchronizes nodes
" Newer CNBs have multi-keeper capability
30
8
Multi-keeper
# Older CNBs are single-keeper networks.
" Newer CNBs support multi-keeper.
" If there was a newer CNB at node 1 and also at node 2,
node 1 would be the keeper and node 2 would be a back-
up keeper.
" If node 1 fails, node 2 would take over network traffic control.
" In single-keeper systems, if the keeper fails, all network
communications are lost.
30
9
ETHERNET
31
0
ETHERNET
Ethernet: the worldwide de facto standard for business and
PC Networking
Origin: Digital Equipment Corporation, Intel and Xerox,
1976
Implemented on Multitudes of chips produced by many
vendors. Based on IEEE 802.3
Formats: 10 Base 2, 10 Base T and 100 Base T, 100 Base
FX, 1 Gigabit; Copper (Twisted Pair / Thin Coax) and Fiber
Connectors: RJ45 or Coaxial
Maximum Number of Nodes: 1024, Expandable with
Routers
Distance: 100M (10 Base T) to 50 KM (Mono mode, Fiber
with Switches)
Baudrate: 10M to 100M Bit/sec
Message size: 46 to 1500 bytes
Messaging format: Peer-to-Peer
31
1
ETHERNET
Typical Applications: Nearly universal in office / business
Local Area Networks. Widely used also in PC to PC, PLC to
PLC and supervisory control applications. After 2000
Ethernet is gradually working its way toward the sensor
level in plant floor applications.
31
2
ETHERNET
Advantages: Ethernet is the most widely accepted
international networking standard. Nearly universal
worldwide. Ethernet can handle large amounts of data at
high speed and serve the needs of large installations.

Disadvantages: High overhead to message ratio for small
amounts of data; No power on the bus; Physically vulnerable
connectors and greater susceptibility to EMI/RFI than most
fieldbuses; Confusion based on multiple open and
proprietary standards for process data.
31
3
ETHERNET
The networking of millions of PCs in offices and the
proliferation of the Internet across the world has made
Ethernet a universal networking standard. Ethernet hardware
and related software has evolved to the point where even
inexperienced users can build simple networks and connect
computers together. Ethernet hardware is cheap and can be
purchased in office supply stores, computer stores and e-
commerce sites. A study by an automotive manufacturer
showed that Ethernet could potentially serve up to 70% of
plant floor networking applications. But there are at least four
major issues, which must be addressed satisfactorily for
Ethernet to become a viable, popular, plant-floor network:
31
4
ETHERNET
1. A common Application Layer must be established. When
our device receives a packet of data, what format is that data
in? Is it a string of I/O values, a text document or a
spreadsheet? Is it a series of parameters for a Variable
Frequency Drive? How is that data arranged? There are
several competing standards resolving this issue.
2. Industrial grade connectors will be necessary for many
applications. Cheap plastic telephone connectors and the
RJ45 connectors are not suitable for the plant floor; industrial
strength connectors are needed.
3. Many users desire 24 Volt power on the Bus (like
DeviceNet is). This is advantageous from a practical
standpoint it reduces wiring and power supply problems --
but it adds cost and introduces noise and other technical
problems.
31
5
ETHERNET
4. Some applications require determinism. Ethernet - as it is
typically used - is not deterministic or repeatable; in other
words, throughput rates are not guaranteed. However,
methods exist for architecting.deterministic Ethernet
systems. In reality, most applications don't need determinism
- they just need speed.
31
6
ETHERNET
There are many transmission protocols that can be used on
Ethernet. The most popular, and the one used on the World
Wide Web, is TCP/IP, which stands for Transmission Control
Protocol/Internet Protocol. When we download a file from the
web, we can see the speed of the transmission speed up and
slow down as network traffic levels change. TCP/IP is the
mechanism that breaks the downloaded file into any number
of bits and pieces and re-assembles them at the other side.
TCP/IP was developed at Stanford University in the 1970s
as a handshaking mechanism that would assure that the
message would always eventually get through.
31
7
ETHERNET
To carry the Web example a bit further, weve all had the
experience of downloading a large file, only to discover that
our PC cannot find an associated application for this file
type. So we end up downloading a plug-in like Shockwave
or RealAudio or Winamp or Adobe Acrobat Reader so we
can open the file. The exact same problem applies to
industrial controls. We can send any file or piece of process
data we want to over Ethernet or the Internet, but the
receiving end has to know what to do with the data. TCP/IP
doesnt assure we of opening the file; it just guarantees that it
will arrive.
31
8
ETHERNET
Existing fieldbuses on Ethernet.
The next frontier for the established fieldbus organizations is
to produce Ethernet TCP/IP application layers of their
protocols. Presently, there are four major contenders:
Modbus/TCP (Modbus protocol on TCP/IP), EtherNet/IP (the
ControlNet/DeviceNet objects on TCP/IP), Foundation
Fieldbus High Speed Ethernet, and Profinet (Profibus on
Ethernet). One could propose an infinite number of potential
application layer protocols, and in fact right now there are, in
addition to the above protocols, a myriad of other, proprietary
standards from various vendors.
31
9
ETHERNET
Existing fieldbuses on Ethernet.
But there are several significant advantages to employing the
existing bus architectures:
Profiles for many devices have already been defined, and
can be transferred to Ethernet with relatively little effort.
In systems which use, for example, Profibus as an I/O level
network, and Profibus on Ethernet at the supervisory level,
the relationship between the two networks is relatively
transparent. Data can be transferred between the upper and
lower network fairly easily.
Many developers and users are familiar with these existing
protocols, and this speeds the process of product
development and adoption.
32
0
ETHERNET
Existing fieldbuses on Ethernet.
But there are several significant advantages to employing the
existing bus architectures:
Profiles for many devices have already been defined, and
can be transferred to Ethernet with relatively little effort.
In systems which use, for example, Profibus as an I/O level
network, and Profibus on Ethernet at the supervisory level,
the relationship between the two networks is relatively
transparent. Data can be transferred between the upper and
lower network fairly easily.
Many developers and users are familiar with these existing
protocols, and this speeds the process of product
development and adoption.
32
1
EtherNet/IP Profile Switch
Step by Step
32
2
Agenda
# Commercial Information
# Integrating the EtherNet/IP Profile Switch
" Assign IP address
" Enable EtherNet/IP and register EDS files
" Using RSLogix5000 sample files (v16 required)
" Using RSView Studio sample files

32
3
Commercial Information
# The EtherNet/IP Profile is available in the 3.0
firmware release for all Open Rail switches
(RS20/30/40 and MS20/30)
# This functionality allows the switch to be
integrated directly into the RSLogix5000 I/O tree
# There is no additional cost
# Switches already in the field can be flashed to
this firmware level (firmware can be found at
ftp.hirschmann-usa.com/firmware or send e-mail
to firmware@hirschmann-usa.com)
# 3.1 release (June) will add support for MACH,
PowerMICE and Octopus families
32
4
Integrating the EtherNet/IP Profile Switch
Step 1 Assigning IP Address to a new switch
# Use HiDiscovery to set the switchs IP address & subnet mask
# HiDiscovery is on the product CD or can be downloaded at
ftp.hirschmann-usa.com/software
32
5
Step 2 Enable EtherNet/IP and register EDS
files
# Connect to the switch with your web browser answer Yes
when prompted

32
6
Step 2 - continued
# Login as Admin, default password is private
32
7
Step 2 - continued
# Expand the Advanced menu item, and select Industrial
Protocols
32
8
Step 2 - continued
# Click the box to enable EtherNet/IP
# Click the Set button at the bottom of the page
*** Be sure to go to the Load/Save screen, and Save your
configuration to make this change permanent.***
32
9
Step 2 - continued
# Click on the Download EDS File button (the EDS file is
generated dynamically based on the switchs product code, then
transferred to your PC)
# Register the EDS file using the EDS Hardware Installation Tool
(Start > All Programs > Rockwell Software > RSLinx Tools >
EDS Hardware Installation Tool)
# Alternately, all EDS files are
included on the product CD. You
can register them all at once from
there.
33
0
Step 3 using RSLogix5000 sample files
# Sample files are available at http://
samplecode.rockwellautomation.com (search Title
Hirschmann) or at ftp.hirschmann-usa.com/EthernetIP
# Version 16 is required for this file it takes advantage of the new
Add-On Instruction functionality
# Version 16 is NOT required for the EtherNet/IP functionality of
the switch to work only to use these sample files

33
1
Step 3 - continued
# You can use the base sample file or
import the Add-On Instruction from the
XML file into an existing project (right click
on Add-On Instructions, and import)
33
2
Step 3 - continued
# Add a Generic Ethernet module to the I/O tree
# Enter the IP address
# Set the Connection Parameters as shown below
# Set the RPI to 100
33
3
Step 3 - continued
# Click the Add-On tab on the Instruction Bar
# Add the Hirschmann Instruction to your ladder program
33
4
Step 3 - continued
# Enter a name for this switch in the Hirschmann_Switch field (datatype =
Hirschmann_Switch)
# Map the Switch_Inputs and Switch_Output as shown below:
" Switch_Inputs Name of the switch created:I.Data
" Switch_Output Name of the switch created:O.Data[0]
# Enter & create tags as shown below:
" Switch_Parameters (Datatype = Switch_All)
" GetMessage (Datatype = Message)
" Set Message (Datatype = Message)
" Storage fields (Datatype = SINT[200]
33
5
Step 3 - continued
# Your instruction should now look something similar to this
33
6
Step 3 - continued
# Configure the GetMessage as shown below
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Step 3 - continued
# Configure the SetMessage as shown below
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Step 3 - continued
# For both Message instructions, click on the Communication tab,
then click browse
# Select the appropriate switch from the I/O tree
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Step 4 Using RSView Studio sample files
# Open your RSView Studio application
# Make sure the communication path is set up to your PLC
# Right click on Global Objects then select Import and Export
# Click No do not backup displays, then click next
# Select Multiple Displays Import File, then click next
# Click on the ) to open the file browser and point to the file
called BatchImport_Hirschmann Switch.xml
# Make sure that create new objects is selected
# Click Finish
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Step 4 - continued
# Your project tree should now
show a number of new global
objects
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Step 4 - continued
# Right click on Parameters and select New
# Enter an expression similar to the one shown below
# [Switch_Text] is the RSLinx Enterprise shortcut to the PLC
# My RailSwitchParams is the name of the tag in the Switch
Parameters field of the RSLogix5000 Add-On Instruction
RSLinx Enterprise shortcut to the PLC
Tag name from RSLogix5000
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# Save and close the parameter file
# Creating the graphics
" You will have 1 overview screen for each switch in your
application
" You only need to create the Pop Up screens once, they
will represent the appropriate information using the
Parameter files
" Create the 5 pop up displays
Diagnostics
Configure IGMP
Configure Ports
Switch Information
Port Stats
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# To create a Switch Overview Display:
" Select the appropriate Global Object
for your particular switch
" Edit the 5 buttons so that the
appropriate Parameter file is used for
the Pop Up screens
" Save the file (but leave it open)
" Create a new display
" On the Global Object file, click Edit >
Select All, then drag the objects to
your new display
" Save your new display
" Make sure to include the Parameter
file in the button that calls the Switch
Overview screen
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# Before running your project, you will need to create 2 HMI
memory tags
" Name: PLC_Port_Number and PC_Port_Number
" Type: Analog
" Initial Value: 0
# These tags are used on the Ports screen
# You will get error messages if they are not created
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# The result should look similar to the following screenshots
# HINT: The Parameter files dont initialize in Test Run mode
you have to actually run the project to test your screens
Overview Screen for an RS20-16
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Step 4 - continued
Diagnostics Screen
Read Only
Provides information found on the Diagnostics screen in the
web interface. Some of these alarms are disabled by
default.
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Step 4 - continued
Switch Information Screen
Read Only
Provides information found on the Main screen in the web
interface.
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Step 4 - continued
IGMP Settings Screen
Read/Write
Provides information found on the Multicast screen in the
web interface. Users can Enable/Disable IGMP snooping
and querier mode and set the IGMP protocol version
(default is 2).
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Port Settings Screen
Read/Write
Users can Enable/Disable each port of the switch
individually. If you click the PLC Port button, you can
enter a port number that cannot be disabled.
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Step 4 - continued
Port Statistics Screen
Read Only
Provides information on an individual port. Click on the Port
button to select the port that you want information on.
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Step 4 - continued
Disclaimer

Please keep in mind that these are sample files provided to make
it easier for users to integrate the Hirschmann EtherNet/IP
Profile Switches into their applications.

Careful thought should be given as to how to integrate these files.
It is recommended that you password protect or disable some
screens to prevent unauthorized access.

The applications should be thoroughly tested and verified before
being deployed in a production environment.