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Home medicines of chhattisgarh

Khushi Dewangan
1
, V. Acharya
2
, M.L. Naik
3
, Sanju Sinha
4
and A.K. Girolkar
5

1
Asst. Prof. (Samvida) Botany, Govt. G.N.A.P.G. College,
Bhatapara, C.G. (India)
2
Asst. Prof. Botany Govt. D.B. Girls P.G. College Raipur (C.G.),
3
Prof. and Consultant C.G. C.O.S.T. Raipur (C.G.),
Project Scientist C.G.C.O.S.T. Raipur (C.G.),
4
Principal Govt. D.B. Girls P.G. College Raipur (C.G.)
Indian J. Applied & Pure Bio. Vol. 26(1), 47-52 (2011).
ABSTRACT
Chhattisgarh state is famous for its natural resources, tribes
and rich biodiversity since ancient time. Ancient name of Chhattisgarh
Dakshin Kosal has originated from a grass known as Kush
Desmostachya bipinnata (L.) Stapf. which is used in religious ceremonies.
Physiography, soil and climate of the state favour luxurious growth of
vegetation. A large size of the population resides in forests and villages
and a good proportion of their livelihood is fulfilled through the forests.
Plants and their names, play important role in their life particularly in
dilects, socio-religious ceremonies, traditional and domestic system of
medicine, folklore and folktales. Many of the plants are used in the form
of home medicine. Knowledge of such medicines are orally transferred
by the old family members, particularly the ladies, from one generation
to another.
Some home medicines of Chhattisgarh state are:
1. For Blood purification, to kill worms, in fever, malaria and
intermittent fever.
Kalmegh (Andrographis paniculata Wall.ex Nees): Dried plant pieces
are dipped in water overnight and decantion is taken in empty stomach
in the early morning.
Decoction is used in fever, malaria and intermittent fever.
2. Skin diseases :
Neem (Azadirachta indica A.Juss): All parts are used in skin diseases,
chicken pox and measles.
(48)
3. For Cough and cold :
Tulsi (Ocimum sanctum L) :
a) Extract of leaf with honey.
b) Decoction of leaves with pounded rhizome of ginger (Zingiber
officinale Roxb.), seeds of Kalimirch (Piper nigrum L.) are taken
with jaggery ( Saccharum officinarum L.)
Farpipra (Piper longum L.) : Powder of roasted dried fruits with honey.
Harra (Terminalia chebula L.) : Roasted dried fruit.
Haldi (Curcuma longa L.) : Powder of dried rhizome.
Bhaskatiya (Solanum xanthocarpum L.) : Flowers roasted in pure
ghee and is eaten 2 to 3 times in a day.
4. To prevent dehydration and sunstroke in summer :
Ghritkumari (Aloe vera L.) : Small quantity of pulp of leaves is taken
in empty stomach in the early morning.
Tikhur (Curcuma angustifolia L.) : 2-3 teaspoon powder of dried
rhizome with sugar dissolved in 1 glass of water is taken in the early
morning.
Basi bhaat (Oryza sativa L.) : the cooked rice fermented overnight
by dipping in water.
Paiz (Oryza rufipogon Griff) : a cooked semi paste,
Kachche Aam ka panha (Mangifera indica L.) The green mango
roasted in water by adding sugar (Saccharum officinarum L.), roasted
zeera (Cuminum cyminum L.) powder, small quantity of chilli (Capsicum
annuum L.) powder and salt are taken orally to prevent dehydration in
summer days.
5. Migraine :
Padari (Stereospermum suaveolens DC.) : Pieces of long round dried
fruit wrapped around head.
Many plants and their parts are used in domestic cosmetics, after
delivery & in other ailments.
Some folklores are also associated with medicinal plants as : Ek
than Harra aau gaon bhar ke khokhi (One fruit of harra can cure
cough of entire village).
Documentation of local home medicines and sustainable
utilization of medicinal plant can uplift the living standard of local people
(Ethnic groups) economy of Chhattisgarh due the huge possibilities of
conservation, cultivation and traditional exploitation because of richness
of forest and favourable climate.
(49)
Chhattisgarh state is famous for its
natural resources, tribes and rich biodiversity
since ancient time. Ancient name of Chhattisgarh
Dakshin Kosal has originated froma grass
known as Kush, the Desmostachya bipinnata
(L.) Stapf., which is used in religious ceremonies.
Physiography, soil and climate of the state
favour luxurious growth of vegetation. The
State lies between 17
o
46to 24
o
6 North latitude
and 80
o
15 to 84
o
51 East longitude at an
average altitude of 300 m. The state is bounded
by Orissa in East, Madhya Pradesh and
Maharashtra in West, Uttar Pradesh &
J harkhand in North and Andhra Pradesh in
South. Biogeographically the State is placed
in Deccan plateau zone. A large size of the
population resides in forests and villages and
a good proportion of their livelihood is fulfilled
through the forests. Plants and their names,
play important role in their life particularly in
dilects, socio-religious ceremonies, traditional
and domestic system of medicine, folklore and
folktales. Many of the plants are used in the
form of home medicine. Knowledge of such
medicines are orally transferred by the old
family members, particularly the ladies, from
one generation to another.
No systematic study on the home
medicine of Chhattisgarh has so far been made.
Some work done on the medicinal plants of
Chhattisgarh are Harmukh et al.
1
, initial work
done by J ain
2
on Medicinal Plant lore of Tribes
of Bastar, Dictionary of Indian Folkmedicine
and Ethnobotany
3
and on the herbal Remedies
used by the Bhils of Madhya Pradesh, India
by Shrivastava
4
.
Information about home medicines
were collected fromthe old family members
particularly ladies of both the rural and urban
areas.
During interview information about 49
plants, used in home medicine were obtained
from different persons with respect to 15
ailments, mode of their use and method of their
preparations as follows :
1. For Blood purification, to kill worms, in
fever, malaria and intermittent fever:
Kalmegh (Andrographis paniculata Wall.ex
Nees): Dried plant pieces dipped in water
overnight and decantion is taken in empty
stomach in the early morning.
Decoction is used in fever, malaria and
intermittent fever.
2. Skin diseases:
Neem (Azadirachta indica): All parts
are used in skin diseases, chicken pox and
measles.
Poultice of Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)
flour, Haldi (Curcuma longa) is used to
cure Pus pockets.
Paste of Neem (Azadirachta indica) and
rhizomeof Kachchi Haldi (Curcuma longa),
Aamihaldi (Curcuma aromatica) is applied
for achne and pimples.
Paste of Tulsi (Ocimum sanctum) leaves /
Jaiphal (Myristica fragrans Houtt.) is applied
for achne and pimples.
Ubtan of Til (Linum usitatissimum L.)/ oil
of til (L. usitatissimum) and flour of Chana
(Cicer arietinum L.)/ Haldi (Curcuma longa)
and flour of Chana (Cicer arietinum) is
used.
Prickle of Semal (Bombax malabrica
Merrill) rubbed on the stone (sil) and applied
on pimples.
3. For Cough and cold :
Tulsi (Ocimum sanctum) :
a) Extract of leaf with honey.
b) Decoction of leaves with pounded rhizome
of Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roxb.), seeds
of Kalimirch (Piper nigrum) is taken with
jaggery (Saccharum officinarum)
c) Pieces of leaves boiled with water and
used in gargle and inhalation.
Farpipra (Piper longum) : Powder of
roasted dried fruits with honey.
Harra (Terminalia chebula) : Roasted
dried fruit.
Haldi (Curcuma longa) : Powder of dried
rhizome given with milk at night.
Ginger (Zingiber officinale) Small piece
of rhizome and jaggery (Saccharum
officinarum) eaten early in the morning.
Bhaskatiya (Solanum xanthocarpum):
a) Flowers roasted in pure ghee and is eaten
2 to 3 times in a day.
b) Ripe fruits roasted and powdered and
given in small quantity (approx. 2.5gm) with
honey two three times in a day.
Lahsun (Allium sativum L.) 2 or 3 buds/
Methi (Trigonella foenum-graecum L.)
seeds in hot oil of Sarson (Brassica campestris)
is eaten and the remaining oil used in massage
at sleeping time.
Powder of roasted dried fruits of Farpipra
(Piper longum L.), roots of Atis (Aconitum
heterophyllum Wall. Ex Royale), Galls on
the branches of Kekrasinghi (Rhus succe-
danea L.) given in small quantity (app. 2.5gm)
with honey two three times in a day.
4. To prevent dehydration and Sunstroke
in Summer :
Ghritkumari (Aloe vera L.) : Small quantity
of pulp of leaves is taken in empty stomach
in the early morning.
Tikhur (Curcuma angustifolia Roxb.) : 2-
3 teaspoonful powder of dried rhizome with
sugar dissolved in a glass of water is taken
in the early morning
Basi bhaat (Oryza sativa L.) : the cooked
rice fermented overnight by dipping in water.
Paiz (Oryza rufipogon Griff) : The cooked
rice fermented overnight by dipping in water.
Kachche Aamka panha (Mangifera indica
L.) The green mango boiled in water by
adding sugar (Saccharum officinarum
L.), roasted Zeera (Cuminum cyminum L.)
powder, small quantity of Chilly (Capsicum
annuum L.) powder and salt are taken
orally to prevent dehydration in summer
days.
5. Migraine :
Padari (Stereospermum suaveolens DC.):
Pieces of long round dried fruit wrapped
around head.
6. Vermicide :
Small pieceof tuber of Jhagrine jadi or Kalihari
(Gloriosa superba L.) are taken in empty
stomach in the early morning on the day of
Hareli Amavasya.
Small piece of Heeng (Ferula asfoeitida
L.) is rubbed on sil, mixed with mothers
milk and given to child (3-9 months) two
days before and upto Poornima (full moon
night), i.e. 3 days every month.
4,5 young leaves of Neem (Azadirachta
indica) are chewed for 7 days, once in 2
(50)
or 3 months.
Seeds of ripe fruit of Papaya (Carica papaya
L.) are used 2 or 3 days.
7. For Teething and Toothache :
At the time of teething in children small
piece of Majistha (Rubia cordifolia L.)
or rhizome of Bach (Acorus calamus L.)
is given to chew.
Small twig of Babool (Acacia arabica L.)/
Neem (Azadirachta indica) / Sarfonk
(Tephrosia purpurea L.) are used as datoon
generally.
Decoction of leaves of Amrood (Psidium
guajava L.) is used to gargle in toothache.
Flower bud and oil of Laung (Syzygium
aromaticum L.) is used in toothache.
Rhizome of Nagarmotha (Cyperus rotundus
L.) is kept on aching teeth for 3,4 times in
a day.
8. Fungal infection on scalp and neck :
Extract of leaf of bemchi (Psoralia corylifolia
L.)/ extract of fruit of Amla (Phyllanthus
emblica L.) is applied on infected part.
Paste of Neem(Azadirachta indica) leaf,
and pounded bark is rubbed on infected parts.
9. Bone fracture:
Leafy vegetable of Munaga (Moringa
oleifera Lam.) is eaten.
10. Gastric upset :
Powder of Heeng (Ferula asafoetida L.)
is mixed with water and applied around
navel (nabhi).
11. Bleeding of nose :
Powdered fruit of Dhania (Coriandrum
sativum L.) with J aggery (Saccharum
officinarum L.) is taken in summer.
Murabbah of Amla (Phyllanthus emblica
L.) is eaten in the morning.
12. Waist ache:
Equal ratio of powdered rhizome of Sonth
(Zingiber officinale) and Pipra mool (Piper
longum L.).
13. Janamaghutti :
Powder of Harra (Terminalia chebula L.),
Jaiphal (Myristica fragrans), Haldi (Curcuma
longa), Chhuhara (Phoenix sylvestris
Roxb.), Badam(Prunus amygdalus Batsch)
is rubbed with mothers milk and given to
children upto 8 months to develop resistance
against diseases.
14. Jaundice :
Extract of leaves and storage root of Mooli
(Raphanus sativus L.) two teaspoonful given
with mishri (Saccharum officinarum L.)
2 or 3 times in a day upto cure. Leafy vege-
table and raw Mooli (Raphanus sativus L.)
is taken as salad.
Pieces of sugarcane (Saccharum offici-
narum L.) are chewed.
15. Post natal care :
Pounded root of Kamarkas (Achyranthus
aspera L.)
Ajwain (Carum copticum Hiern) powder
of Satavar (Asparagus racemosus Wild.)
given with milk.
(51)
Information on a total number of 49
plant species, used in different ailment as home
medicines were recorded. For cough and cold
12 plants and for skin diseases 10 plant were
recorded. Some plants such as Neem
(Azadirachta indica), Haldi (Curcuma longa),
Harra (Terminalia chebula), Farpipra (Piper
longum) are used in more than one ailment
with different mode of use. Underground parts
(root/rhizome) and leaves are more commonly
used as medicine. Several plants and their
parts are used as cosmetics, after delivery
care. Some folklores are also associated with
medicinal plants as : Ek than Harra aau
gaon bhar ke khokhi (One fruit of harra
(Terminalia chebula) can cure cough and cold
of entire village).
Documentation of local home medicines
and sustainable utilization of medicinal plant
can not only save our depleting herbal resource
but can also help to uplift the economic
standard of local people (ethnic groups) of
Chhattisgarh.
References :
1. Harmukh, N., S. Das, M. L. Naik and S.
Sinha (2003). Medicinal plants of Chhattisgarh,
Proceedings, National Seminar on Science
Technology & Water: with special refer
Sence to Chhattisgarh, Pt. RSU, Raipur.
pp: 65-82.
2. Jain, S.K. (1965). Eco. Bot. 19(3): 236-256.
3. J ain, S. K. (1991). Dictionary of Indian
Folkmedicine and Ethnobotany, Deep
Publication, New Delhi, India.
4. Shrivatava, Ram Krishan (1985). Herbal
Remedies used by the Bhils of Madhya
Pradesh India, Oriental Medicine, Kyoto,
J apan 389-392.
(52)