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The Catholic Light

DIOCESE OF SCRANTON

WWW.DIOCESEOFSCRANTON.ORG

VOLUME 109 NUMBER 5 ISSN-0164-9418

THURSDAY, APRIL 9, 2009

Triduum

The three most sacred days


of the liturgical year commence.
(See page 3)

Parishes Will Implement


Second Collections
To Make Appeal Goals
(Pages 15-17)
APRIL 9, 2009 CATHOLIC LIGHT PAGE 01 CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

BISHOP MARTINOS MESSAGE FOR EASTER

APRIL 9, 2009 THE CATHOLIC LIGHT

Fulfilled Promises
My dear people:
Resurrexit sicut dixit (He has risen as he said) proclaims the ancient Marian
hymn Regina Caeli. This beautiful Easter hymn is just one of many reminders
that God is always faithful to his promises. As one reads through the Bible, the
one constant occurrence is the fulfillment of Gods promises.
We see it first with the nation of Israel. Despite their lack of faith and constant
complaining, Israel continually witnessed Gods faithfulness. In the New Testament, we see how our Lord made many promises, including one that he would
rise from the dead. These promises were often met with skepticism and lack of
understanding. It was not until his Resurrection that the apostles and disciples
truly believed in him and in all he promised.
Why is it that despite Gods constant faithfulness we still doubt? Is it because God does not answer according to our timetable or the way we had hoped?
Whatever the reasons may be, Easter is a clear reminder of Gods faithfulness
to his promises.
Given the current economic problems in our country and indeed throughout
the world, we all need this particular Easter reminder to penetrate our hearts.
Many leaders in our country and across the world have been making promises
that they will strive to solve these economic problems. I pray they will succeed.
However, in these hard economic times we should realize that only God is perfectly faithful to promises made. Then, as a people of faith, we will be careful
when listening to mans promises.
History has taught us that many terrible things can occur when people unreservedly put their hopes in the promises of human beings. One need only think
of the many promises of prosperity made by Adolf Hitler to an economically
weakened Germany in the 1930s. We are all aware of the unspeakable crimes
against humanity that were committed. Putting their total trust in the dictators
assurances only happened because people compromised their faith in God by
forgetting that he alone can be trusted completely. Their desire for the treasures
of earth led them to give a trust to human beings that belong only to God. Human promises that we can have heaven on earth, whether made by the state or
religious preachers, will always fail.
We must listen to all human promises with only one complete trust in our
minds and hearts. That is the trust we have in Christ our Lord in whose Resurrection we share by carrying the Cross with him.
The celebration of Easter reminds us that despite the difficult times in our
lives, the crosses we have to bear, Jesus Christ has conquered sin and death as
he promised. Because he has fulfilled all his promises, we can face these times
with faith and courage knowing that heaven is promised to those who are faithful
to the Lord. That is how the martyrs could face death. They did not place their
hopes in the promises of this world but in the one who said, Amen, amen, I say
to you, whoever keeps my word will never see death.
Let us pray that we will move forward with renewed faith in the promises
of God and strive to attain the treasure that truly matters which is eternal life.
May Mary our Mother, who always trusted in the promises of God, intercede for
us so that we may experience the joy of Easter.
Sincerely yours in Christ,

Most Reverend Joseph F. Martino, D.D., Hist. E.D.


Bishop of Scranton

The celebration of Easter reminds us


that despite the difficult times in our
lives, the crosses we have to bear, Jesus
Christ has conquered sin and death as
he promised. Because he has fulfilled
all his promises, we can face these times
with faith and courage knowing that
heaven is promised to those who are
faithful to the Lord. That is how the
martyrs could face death. They did not
place their hopes in the promises of this
world but in the one who said, Amen,
amen, I say to you, whoever keeps my
word will never see death.

APRIL 9, 2009 CATHOLIC LIGHT PAGE 02 CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

Sacred
Triduum

Culmination of Holy Week services


recalling the passion and death of Jesus Christ

The three most sacred days


of the Churchs liturgical year,
known as the Sacred Triduum, begin on Holy Thursday. These days
are the culmination of Holy Week
services, which recall the passion
and death of Jesus Christ.
Bishop Joseph F. Martino is
presiding at Holy Week services at
St. Peters Cathedral, Scranton.
Holy Thursday begins with
Sung Morning Prayer at 8 a.m.
The Pontifical Concelebrated
Evening Mass of the Lords Supper will begin at 5:30 p.m. Bishop
Martino will be principal celebrant for this commemoration of
the Last Supper that Christ shared
with his 12 Apostles. Sung Night
Prayer will occur at 9 p.m.
This is a solemn time of
prayer, reflection and preparation
for the Churchs central feast of
the Resurrection of Christ from
the dead, and serves as a reminder

to the faithful of Christs gifts to


the apostles on the night before He
died: the sacraments of Holy Eucharist, the gift of His own body,
blood, soul and divinity; and Holy
Orders, the ordained priesthood. It
is also the setting at which Bishop
Martino, assisted by deacons, will
perform the solemn and ancient
re-enactment of Christs washing
of the feet of the apostles.
Good Friday, April 10, is the
only day of the Churchs liturgical year on which the Church
suspends the daily celebration of
the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass,
as Catholics commemorate the
Lords Passion, crucifixion and
death for the redemption of humanity. It is a day of fast and
abstinence.
Good Friday services at the
Cathedral will begin at 8 a.m. with
Sung Morning Prayer. Following
confessions from 10:30 a.m. to

CTV COVERING HOLY WEEK SERVICES


Catholic Television of the Diocese of Scranton (CTV)
will provide live coverage of the Mass of the Lords Supper on Holy Thursday at 5:30 p.m., the Good Friday services commemorating the Lords Passion at 5:30 p.m.,
and the Easter Vigil liturgy on Saturday at 8 p.m.
CTV will also carry EWTNs coverage of the following Holy Week services from Rome:
Mass of the Lords Supper with Pope Benedict
on Holy Thursday, live at 11 a.m., with an encore at
midnight.
Celebration of the Lords Passion with Pope
Benedict on Good Friday at 11 a.m., with an encore at
midnight.
Way of the Cross with Pope Benedict on Good
Friday at 8 p.m.
Easter Vigil Mass with Pope Benedict on Holy Saturday, live at 3 p.m., with an encore at midnight.
Easter Sunday Mass with Pope Benedict, live at
4:30 a.m., with an encore at noon.
Pope Benedicts Easter Message and Blessing,
live at 6 a.m., with encores at 1:30 p.m. and Monday
at 10 a.m.

The Catholic Light Photo/Terry Connors

noon, the Stations of the Cross


will be observed at 12:10 p.m.
The Pontifical Liturgy of
Good Friday will begin at 5:30
p.m. Bishop Martino will lead
the service, which is comprised
of a unique three-part ceremony
of Scripture reading of the Passion of Christ, Veneration of the
Cross and distribution of the Holy
Eucharist.
The observance of Holy Saturday, April 11, will begin at 8 a.m.
with Sung Morning Prayer. Confessions will be heard from 10:30 a.m.
to noon, and 2:30 to 4 p.m. The
Solemn Pontifical Easter Vigil and
Mass of the Resurrection will begin
at 8 p.m., with Bishop Martino as
the principal celebrant.
The Easter Vigil ceremony
begins in darkness, with a sense
of watchful anticipation of the
Resurrection of Christ. As this
most solemn celebration begins,
the priest will bless the New Fire
and light the Paschal Candle either
outside or in the rear of the church.
The focus of the liturgy is on the
new life of the Risen Christ.
On Holy Saturday, the 193
people who have participated in
the Rite of Christian Initiation of
Adults and Children (RCIA) this
year will be officially welcomed
at Easter Vigil services at many

parishes throughout the Diocese.


They join tens of thousands of
other individuals throughout the
country who will become fullyinitiated Catholics at Easter this
year. Parishes will welcome these
individuals into full communion
with the Church during the observance of the Easter Vigil.
The most joyous day in the
Church year is Easter Sunday,
April 12. Bishop Martino will be
principal celebrant and homilist at
the 12:15 p.m. Pontifical Mass of
the Resurrection at the Cathedral.
Additional Easter Sunday Masses
at the Cathedral will take place at

6:30 and 10 a.m., and at 5 p.m.


Belief in the central mystery
of the Risen Savior unites Christianity in His promise of life after
death that can be achieved despite
the suffering and despair of human
life. Christians celebrate the Risen
Lords sacrifice for the redemption
of the sins of man after recalling
the events in His life which led to
His passion and death during Lent
and Holy Week. During the Easter
season, they renew their hope
for eternal life after their own
struggles, sufferings and deaths,
and look forward to new lives of
glory with the Lord.

Via Crucis in the Poconos


Latino faithful in the Poconos will conduct their seventh annual Via Crucis (Way of the Cross) on Good Friday, April 10. This
observance, which is a long-standing Hispanic tradition, involves
an outdoor procession simulating Jesus Christs journey with the
cross. Faithful, dressed in costumes from the period, assume the
roles of those involved in that first Good Friday.
The participants and the faithful who accompany them will
gather at 2 p.m. at the K-Mart parking lot on Rt. 940 in Mount
Pocono. The procession will proceed through the 14 Stations of
the Cross, ending at St. Mary Church on Fairview Avenue. The reenactment is coordinated by clergy and parishioners from St. Ann
Church in Tobyhanna and St. Mary Church in Mount Pocono.
Anyone is welcome to join in the observance. The committee
is chaired by Jose L. Mendoza. For more information, contact Mr.
Mendoza at 357-6338 or St. Ann Church at 894-8018.

APRIL 9, 2009 CATHOLIC LIGHT PAGE03 BLACK

THE CATHOLIC LIGHT APRIL 9, 2009

Bishop Martino blesses palms


at the Palm Sunday liturgy at St.
Peters Cathedral at the beginning
of Holy Week.
Dioceses world-wide celebrated
World Youth Day on Palm Sunday,
in conjunction with a special Mass
celebrated by His Holiness Benedict
XVI in Rome in observance of World
Youth Day.
This year approximately 400
students in grades 8 and 12 from
the Diocese of Scranton are the recipients of the Bishops Youth Award
in recognition for their service in
their respective parishes, schools
and communities. These awards
are presented to the students during ceremonies in their individual
parishes or schools. The honorees
as well as all students, and those in
parish youth groups were invited to
the Palm Sunday Mass celebrated
by Bishop Martino at the Cathedral.
The Bishop acknowledged the efforts
of the assembled youth for their commitment of service to their parishes,
schools and local communities.

APRIL 9, 2009 THE CATHOLIC LIGHT

Father Robert M. Everling Is Laid to Rest


Father Robert M. Everling,
pastor emeritus of St. Lawrence
Church, Great Bend, and a resident of Mountain View Care Center, Scranton, died April 1.
Born in Hawley on May 9,
1921, son of the late Nicholas and
Mary Kittner Everling, he was a
graduate of Honesdale Catholic
High School and St. Bonaventure
College, N.Y., having received his
Bachelor of Arts degree on April
18, 1943, and his Master of Arts
degree in theology in April 1947.
His studies for the priesthood
were completed at Christ the King
Seminary, St. Bonaventure, N.Y.
Father Everling was ordained to
the priesthood on May 31, 1947,
in Scranton, by late Scranton
Bishop William J. Hafey.
Following ordination, Father
Everling served as assistant pastor
at St. Boniface Church, WilkesBarre; and as director of Camp
St. George, Mountaintop. He
was appointed to the chaplaincy
of Divine Providence Hospital,
Williamsport, in September 1952,
where he served for 12 years. He
then became assistant pastor of St.
Boniface Church, Williamsport.
Father Everling was appoint-

ed to his first pastorate on Sept.


10, 1968, at St. Josephs Church,
White Mills. Later, on Sept. 9,
1971, he became pastor at St.
Boniface Church, Wilkes-Barre,
as well as administrator of St.
Boniface School. After serving
there for 13 years, he was appointed pastor at St. Lawrence
Church, Great Bend, on Sept.
6, 1984, and remained in that
ministry until October 15, 1993,
at which time he retired and was
named pastor emeritus.
In addition to his parochial
assignments, Father Everling also
served on the Diocesan Committee on Vocations; as dean of
the Susquehanna Deanery in the

early 1990s; and as faithful friar of


the Williamsport and Honesdale
Knights of Columbus.
He was also the moderator of
the Susquehanna-Wyoming District of the Diocesan Council of
Catholic Women and the Knights
of St. George; and secretary of
the finance committee of Bishop
Hoban High School, WilkesBarre, when the school opened.
Surviving are three nephews,
Joseph B. and Charles Everling,
both of Binghamton, N.Y.; and
Gerald Everling, Fort Myers, Fla.;
three nieces, Mary Ann Babcock,
Jo Ann Everling and Sharon Stephens, all of Binghamton; and
several grandnieces and grandnephews.
He was also preceded in
death by two brothers, Joseph and
Nicholas; and a sister, Ida Fey.
A Vigil Mass was celebrated
by Bishop Emeritus James C.
Timlin on April 5 in Villa St.
Joseph, Dunmore. The following
day, Bishop Joseph F. Martino
celebrated a Pontifical Mass of
Christian Burial in St. Lawrence
Church, Great Bend. Interment
was in St. Mary Magdalen Cemetery, Honesdale.

CLERGY APPOINTMENTS
His Excellency, Bishop Martino, announces the
following appointments, effective as noted:
ADMINISTRATORS
Reverend Brian J.T. Clarke, to Administrator,
Churches of the Blessed Sacrament, Saint Francis and
Saint John the Baptist, (Miners Mills) Wilkes-Barre, effective March 31, 2009. Father remains in Residence at Saint
Ignatius Parish, Kingston, and Chaplain at Holy Redeemer
High School, Wilkes-Barre.
Reverend Andrew R. Sinnott, V.E., to Administrator, Churches of Saint Joseph and Saint Stanislaus,
Hazleton, effective March 2, 2009.
ASSISTANT PASTOR
Reverend James P. Dougher, from Leave of
Absence to Assistant Pastor, Church of Saint John the
Evangelist, Pittston, effective March 20, 2009.
SPECIAL ASSIGNMENT
Reverend Christopher T. Washington, to ViceChancellor pro tem, effective March 12, 2009. Father
remains Secretary to the Bishop of Scranton, Assistant
Director for Worship and in Residence at Saint Peters
Cathedral, Scranton.

Good Friday Collection Helps Christians In The Holy Land


VATICAN CITY, (VIS)
Cardinal Leonardo Sandri,
prefect of the Congregation
for the Oriental Churches, has
sent a letter to the bishops of
the world encouraging them to
participate in the collection for
the Holy Land. Parishes in the
Diocese of Scranton will take
up the collection at services on
Good Friday.
In the letter, which also
bears the signature of Archbishop Antonio Maria Veglio,
then secretary of the same
congregation, now president
of the Pontifical Council for
the Pastoral Care of Migrants
and Itinerant Peoples, the two
prelates express the Churchs
profound concern for the
position of Christians, particularly following the conflict
in Gaza.
The wounds opened by
violence make the problem of
emigration more acute, inexo-

rably depriving the Christian


minority of its best resources
for the future. The Land that
was the cradle of Christianity risks ending up without
Christians.
Cardinal Sandri and Archbishop Veglio make an appeal
to help our Christian brothers
and sisters of the Holy Land
who, along with other inhabitants of vast areas of the Middle
East, have long aspired after that
peace and tranquillity which are
still so much under threat.
Apart from providing
study grants for priests and
seminarians from the Holy
Land to study in pontifi cal
universities, the 2008 collection supported various
restoration projects in, among
other places: Jerusalem, Bethany, Bethlehem, Haifa, Magdala, Nazareth and Nablus
(the Shechem of antiquity).
Funds were also distributed

to support parishes, families,


schools and universities, and
through the Custody of the

Holy Land to various cultural projects, such as the faculty of biblical sciences and

archaeology of the Studium


Biblicum Franciscanum in
Jerusalem.

A Christian pilgrim prays against a row of wooden crosses at the wall of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem. Thousands of pilgrims take part in Holy Week and Easter services in the Holy
Land each year. (CNS photo from Reuters)

APRIL 9, 2009 CATHOLIC LIGHT PAGE 04 BLACK

As the implementation of Called to Holiness and Mission proceeds, several assumptions are inherent in the process. These assumptions were recommended by the Diocesan
Implementation Commission and approved by Bishop Martino.
The assumptions and a reflection on each one follow:
1. The Paschal Mystery is both central to our faith and to this implementation
process because changes in parish structures are potential examples of the life-deathresurrection mystery.
When we approach the implementation of Called to Holiness and Mission: Pastoral
Planning in the Diocese of Scranton, we use the gifts of reason and our Catholic faith.
When we look at implementation and evaluation through faith we look at endings and
new beginnings, new life. There are several important questions to be answered.
What are the number and location of parishes that are needed to be effective for the evangelizing mission of the Diocese in the 21st century? Another is How can parishes partner,
cooperate and collaborate to increase and improve the quality of their mission? A renewed
understanding of a parish as communion, communication and mission raises further questions
that need to be answered. Such as, How does a parish express its catholicity?
The implementation phase of Called to Holiness and Mission is a time of faith, hope
and charity because it is a time of transition and perhaps even awkwardness as we move
to new life. We must be patient with both our questions and answers as we learn how to
move forward for the spiritual and pastoral renewal of our parishes based on the initiatives of the Second Vatican Council. We must work together to re-found our parishes for
more effective mission in the 21st century.
2. Implementation of Bishop Martinos Directives is an on-going process which
will unfold over the next five to ten years.
We must keep in mind the goals of Called to Holiness and Mission:
To foster the personal and communal holiness of Catholics and support them to
deepen their commitment in living out the mission of the Church.
To enhance quality parish life throughout the Diocese of Scranton.
To strengthen the presence and ministry of the Church in the urban, suburban and
rural areas of the four regions and eleven counties.
To increase collaboration between and among leaders, parishes and the whole
Diocese of Scranton.
To act as good stewards of all human, financial and facility resources.
To support increased understanding of and action for the assumptions and criteria
related to vibrant parish life.
To build a greater sense of unity within the rich ethnic, cultural and generational
diversity present within the local Church.
To work on the deanery, vicariate and diocesan wide revitalization.
The prayer for the Diocese of Scranton also reminds us that these goals will require
prayer and effort for years to come:
Heavenly Father, hear our prayer. Moved by your Holy Spirit dwelling within our
hearts, we humbly ask you, Father, to bless the Diocese of Scranton at this time of profound
parish renewal. Send your Holy Spirit upon our clergy, religious and lay faithful, so that
we may imitate the fidelity, love and zeal of the early Church. Grant us the humility to
preserve and teach the Catholic faith which has been handed on to us, so that we may
worship you in Spirit and in Truth. Increase our charity, so that we may generously attend to those who pass before us in need. Bless us with missionary zeal, so that through
the proclamation of the Good News, we may be salt, light and leaven to those who are
distant from your love.
3. As implementation proceeds there may be times when the Directives will need
to be reviewed and adjusted based on changing realities. The Implementation Commission will oversee that process, working with clusters and using a format similar
to the planning process used in Called to Holiness and Mission.
Because parishes are living communities, a cycle of pastoral planning, implementation and evaluation has to become an ongoing part of parish culture. The Parish Pastoral
Council and Parish Finance Council are important structures mandated for every parish
by Bishop Martino. These councils will assist the pastor and parishioners for ongoing
pastoral planning, implementation and evaluation.
Because parishes are like cells and connective tissue of the Diocese, parish
planning, implementation and evaluation has to take into consideration partnership with
neighboring parishes, cooperating in the deanery and the vicariate or pastoral region,
and collaborating in the diocesan mission. Parishes need to see themselves as being in
communion with each other in diocesan mission and the universal Church.

4. Strong leadership, ordained as well as lay, now and in the future, is needed
for implementation to succeed.
Prayer during the planning phase and implementation phase has made a big difference in our pastoral planning. The late Pope John Paul II noted on several occasions that
pastoral plans fail when they are not supported in prayer. When difficulties occur it is a
time for more prayer, study and reflection.
Ongoing formation for the Parish Pastoral and Parish Finance Councils is a necessity.
Opportunities for prayer during meetings and on other occasions will help to keep the
Councils focused on faith and mission of the universal Church, the diocese and parish.
Likewise, parish leaders need to learn from faith and reason techniques and strategies to
accomplish the goals and objectives of the parish mission. Ongoing adult faith formation
is important for all members of a parish but especially necessary for people in parish leadership. Faith-based resources can help parish leaders to improve their understanding and
practice of stewardship of the various resources that are necessary for parish mission. The
Diocesan Office for Parish Life and Evangelization is one resource that is available.
5. All parishes will be more effective if they work together to implement plans
to conserve human resources and avoid needless duplication of ministerial and
financial resources.
The parishes of the Diocese of Scranton will practice good stewardship of resources
and express both communion and catholicity by an effective mutual sharing of gifts and
resources. We must allow our faith to become alive and life-giving in the way that parishes
function and practice their mission.
Partnership is a practical living out of the spirituality of communion and catholicity that
has practical consequences and will improve the effectiveness of pastoral efforts. Partnership
helps to overcome a congregational understanding that sees a parish only in terms of itself.
Partnership helps parishes to grow into an awareness of communion in mission as a cell of
the Diocese. When a parish is in partnership it is challenged to substantial sharing and cooperation. While remaining independent and having their own pastor, parishes in partnership
will develop new attitudes and practices through their cooperation and sharing. They will not
be the same as they were before they entered into partnership.
If parishes have a difficulty in seeing how they can enter into partnership, prayer,
further reflection and learning from other parishes will help them overcome any difficulty
or obstacle about entering into partnership. Cooperative scheduling of Mass and other
services are but one example of partnership.
6. There will be more ownership of and less resistance to implementation of the
Bishops Directives because people were involved in the planning process and their
suggestions were taken seriously.
When people take time to pray and to study the teaching of the Church and work to
put it into practice everyone is enriched. There is a saying that every man has a right to
his own opinion; but no one has a right to be wrong concerning the facts.
When parishioners consider the parish and its mission they need to have an accurate
understanding of Church teaching. When people gather for prayer and study, as they
grow in understanding of Church and the importance of knowing what communion and
mission mean, it will influence their expectations of a parish and their responsibility to
participate in the mission of the parish, the diocese and universal Church.
Continued on Page 7

APRIL 9, 2009 CATHOLIC LIGHT PAGE 05 BLACK

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THE CATHOLIC LIGHT APRIL 9, 2009

Key Assumptions Are Inherent in Implementation Process

APRIL 9, 2009 THE CATHOLIC LIGHT

The Paschal Mystery Guides Us Through Endings and New Beginnings


By Monsignor Vincent J. Grimalia, V.G.
During the 40 days of lent, the Sacred Triduum
and the 50 days of Easter, the Church directs our
attention to the paschal mystery that we celebrate
on Sunday and, in fact, in every celebration of the
Mass. These 93 days give us an opportunity to
deepen our understanding, to be more attentive to
the grace of the paschal mystery, and to look on our
lives in its light.
Our theology and spirituality helps us to discover meaning in our lives and to make choices and
decisions that are in harmony with what we believe.
There is an early Christian maxim that says the law of
praying is the law of believing and the law of living.
What we celebrate in the liturgy what we believe
influences, guides and directs how we live. There is
a connection between the various facets and aspects
of our faith and our lives. It has been said that if we
want to know what we truly believe all we need to do
is to examine our thoughts, our words and our actions,
how we live our lives. Our attitudes and beliefs, our
values are expressed in our lives.
How does the creed that we recite when we pray
the rosary or recite at Mass on Sundays and Holy Days
influence the way we live? How do the choices and
decisions we make, our attitudes and outlook on life,
our perspective, differ from those who do not share
our faith? Do the values of our culture or society have
more influence on us than the creed? How does the
teaching of the Church, our theology and spirituality
make a difference in our lives?
By the very manner of our life, we can be witThey devoted themselves to the teaching of the
apostles and to the communal life, to the breaking
of the bread and to the prayers. Awe came upon
everyone, and many wonders and signs were done
through the apostles. All who believed were together
and had all things in common; they would sell their
property and possessions and divide them among all
according to each ones need. Every day they devoted
themselves to meeting together in the temple area and
to breaking bread in their homes. They ate their meals
with exultation and sincerity of heart, praising God
and enjoying favor with all the people. And every
day the Lord added to their number those who were
being saved. (Acts 2:42-47)
DIOCESE OF SCRANTON MISSION STATEMENT

We the Catholic faithful of the Diocese of Scranton, in union with our Holy Father, the Pope, are called
through baptism to share in the mission which Jesus
Christ has entrusted to the One, Holy, Catholic and
Apostolic Church. Priests, deacons, religious and laity, under the leadership of our Bishop, cooperate to
proclaim the Gospel in accordance with the teaching
of the Church, to celebrate the sacraments, especially
the Eucharist, for the salvation of all, and to witness
by grace to the Kingdom of God so as to promote a
culture of life, justice and peace.

In times of change and growth,


we leave behind whatever we are
used to, what we hold on to, and
open ourselves to new hopes
and possibilities. Faith and hope
support us in times of change
and transition, loss and grieving,
endings and beginnings.
nesses to the gospel and evangelizers everywhere
we are. Faith is personal but not private; it is not
something we decide, but a gift that comes to us from
God through the Church. Our Catholic faith involves
every aspect, facet and dimension of our lives and our
relationships. Faith touches everything that we are,
how we think, choose and decide.
The Paschal Mystery
When we look at our lives through the lens of
the paschal mystery we can see change and transition
times in our lives from the perspective of faith and
hope. The story of Abraham who was called by God to
uproot himself in his old age, to make a geographical
journey, to leave behind what he knew and reestablish
himself in a new location because he believed that
God would be faithful to his promise, is the model of
letting go and moving on. We call Abraham the father
of faith, because he trusted God and he put that faith
into action. When Moses responded to the call from
God to lead the Hebrew slaves out of Egypt and lead
them through the desert for 40 years, he was living in
faith and hope. We know the story of the exodus, and
how uncomfortable and upsetting the journey was at
times. There was the temptation to return to what was
known rather than live with the challenges of a time
of transition during the wandering in the desert.
Called to Holiness and Mission: Pastoral Planning in the Diocese of Scranton is a time of letting
go and reaching out, a time of transition, a time of
endings and new beginnings in faith and hope.
When our relatives came to the United States,
they left behind the people they knew, family and
friends, their church buildings and all that they knew.
They were motivated to sacrifice what was known for
the unknown because of the potential of a better life.
It was for them a time of endings and new beginnings.
Transportation and communication in the 19th and
early 20th century was so unlike what we have today.
Some people went back but most never returned to
their countries of origin. All families and friends did
not make the journey to America, and some were

never seen again. The immigrants brought their faith


with them and they were willing to sacrifice what
was known for new possibilities. When we think
about it, they were very courageous and hopeful,
were they not?
In times of change and growth, we leave behind
whatever we are used to, what we hold on to, and open
ourselves to new hopes and possibilities. Eagerly or
reluctantly we take risks and face the unknown in a
variety of situations and circumstances. When we
go to school for the first time and when we finish our
education and leave school behind for a new job, we
might need to go to a new city, state or move across
the country as we begin a new time in our lives. When
we respond to a call to priesthood, to the diaconate or
the consecrated life of a religious; when we decide to
enter in marriage or to live a single life, other changes
and new possibilities and new challenges are open to
us. When friends and relatives move away, when relationships change and when loved ones die, there are
endings and beginnings in our lives, times of grieving
and transition, before experiencing new life.
Faith and Hope Support Us
At different points in our lives we experience
changes in work, in health and in other aspects of life.
Faith and hope support us in times of change and transition, loss and grieving, endings and beginnings.
The Diocese of Scranton is entering into a time
of Hope, looking forward to pastoral and spiritual
renewal.
Our spiritual heritage can help us deal with loss
and change, when we not only view it from the perspective of faith and hope but from the perspective
of attachment and detachment. To be attached is to
be nailed and held in place, as a door is nailed to
its hinges. To be detached is to be free. In general,
addiction and attachment may be used interchangeably but addiction is the more common term from a
medical point of view and attachment from a spiritual
perspective.
Donald Nicholl, writing in his book Holiness,
commented: Any attachment, however slight, is
still a potential source of addiction or enslavement. A
person may, for instance, be in the habit of occupying
the same seat each day on a bus or in a church or at a
table. A matter of slight importance, one may think;
and yet if the person finds himself disturbed and upset
on the odd occasion when another person is occupying the chair, then that is a warning sign We can
become addicted or attached not only to substances
but to ideas, work, stress, a feeling, anything.
The paschal mystery provides us with help to
become free from all that holds us bound. When
dealing with change in our lives, we can receive help
from various sources, but we should not neglect our
spiritual tradition and its insights on detachment.

APRIL 9, 2009 CATHOLIC LIGHT PAGE 06 BLACK

Scranton Bishop Joseph F.


Martino and Auxiliary Bishop John M. Dougherty have
joined with more than a dozen
other bishops and thousands
of people throughout the nation who are publicly protesting Notre Dame Universitys
decision to honor President
Barack Obama at the schools
commencement.
In a letter to Notre Dames
president, Holy Cross Father
John I. Jenkins, Bishop Martino
and Bishop Dougherty cite the
extensive anti-life positions
taken by President Obama and
describe the Catholic schools
decision to host him as the
commencement speaker and
bestow an honorary degree
on him as a scandal to the
Church.
They also cite the 2004
statement by the United States
Bishops, which says: The
Catholic community and
Catholic institutions should
not honor those who act in
defiance of our fundamental
moral principles. They should
not be given awards, honors or
platforms which would suggest
support for their actions.

CNS photo/Jon L. Hendricks

People hold rosaries during a rally at the University of Notre Dame


on April 5. Hundreds of anti-abortion advocates protested on the
campus against the schools invitation to U.S. President Barack
Obama to speak at the May 17 graduation ceremony. Several
hundred thousand Catholics and others across the nation have
protested through emails and letters.

CONTACT NOTRE DAME


Faithful in the Diocese of Scranton can express their opposition to Notre Dames decision through on online petition
sponsored by the Cardinal Newman Society. As of April 6, the
petition had received more than 245,000 signatures.
The petition can be found on a website dedicated to the
scandal: http://www.notredamescandal.com
Letters can be sent to:
Reverend John I. Jenkins, C.S.C.
President
University of Notre Dame
400 Main Building
Notre Dame, Indiana 46556

Dear Father Jenkins,


The numerous, repeated and extensive anti-life positions taken by President Obama merit his recognition as an unequalled, prominent proponent of
the culture of death in our nation. Given her Catholic identity, the University
of Notre Dames receiving the President as the 2009 commencement speaker
and her bestowing on him an honorary doctorate are truly shameful, a scandal
to the Church and a major blow to hundreds of thousands who have sacrificed
to bring forth a culture of life in our midst.
As a Diocesan Bishop and his Auxiliary we cannot overstress our
disapproval of these actions by the University.
Through its President, His Eminence Cardinal George, the United
States Conference of Catholic Bishops acted swiftly and consistently to
engage President Obama on human life issues. Your reported comment
that I think if he is going to reconsider his views, I think Notre Dame is
the best possible place to begin that process demeans, we believe, the
intelligent urgency exercised by the nations bishops in this matter.
Moreover, your argument that honoring President Obama by granting a degree to him is not intended to condone or endorse his position on
specific issues regarding life is no more than a blatant rejection of United
States Bishops assessment of what Catholic institutions do when they so
act. Their 2004 statement is absolutely clear. The Catholic community
and Catholic institutions should not honor those who act in defiance of our
fundamental moral principles. They should not be given awards, honors or
platforms which would suggest support for their actions.
Bishops have a particular responsibility to promote Catholic universities, and especially to promote and assist in the preservation and
strengthening of their Catholic identity, including the protection of their
Catholic identity in relation to civil authorities. (Ex Corde Ecclesiae,
no. 28) We are convinced that Notre Dame will one day very much
regret rebuffing not only her own Bishop DArcy but also the USCCBs
efforts to fulfill their responsibilities in her regard.
Praying this conviction will prove untrue and that Notre Dame will
immediately and resoundingly proclaim her Catholic identity in word and
act, we are,
Sincerely yours in Our Lord,
Most Reverend Joseph F. Martino, D.D., Hist. E.D.
Bishop of Scranton
Most Reverend John M. Dougherty, D.D., V.G.
Auxiliary Bishop of Scranton

Key Assumptions Are Inherent in Implementation Process


Continued from Page 5
Improved communication and sharing of information in the parish through announcements, bulletins, meetings, web sites, etc, will help parishes become spiritually renewed
and more involved in the mission of the parish. Meetings founded on prayer and open to
the shared wisdom of the parishioners will help a parish to grow spiritually.
7. Parishes will be stronger and more effective because they are implementing the Bishops Directives together.
8. Parishes do not exist for themselves but as a presence of Christ and the Church
to the local area.
9. The vision of Church must be larger than ones own local community. People
must be helped to think locally, regionally and diocesan-wide when implementing
the Bishops Directives.
These three assumptions reinforce the understanding of the parish as communion of
persons in communion in mission with the Diocese and in partnership with other parishes.
These three assumptions teach a way of being parish that sees the parish not in isolation but
as a cell or connective tissue of the Diocese. Through the parishes in communion with
the Diocesan Bishop, they are in communion with the Pope and Catholic Bishops and communities throughout the world. The interests of the Church are larger than ones own parish.
Partnership with other parishes and participation in diocesan mission and events help a parish
to grow beyond its own limited self interest. As Catholics, we understand that the vision, mission and interests of the parish must include the Diocese and universal Church.

When we look at the Church, Diocese and parish as communion, communication,


catholicity and mission, we see that our theology and spirituality must influence our
structures, activities and functions. In times of pastoral planning, implementation and
evaluation there are no winners or losers. There should be no competition, but there must
be a mutual sharing of gifts and resources, and genuine welcome and hospitality. A parish
that does not practice hospitality fails in the expression of its catholicity.
Through Called to Holiness and Mission, parishes and all Catholics are being
challenged to spiritual and pastoral renewal that will lead to partnership, cooperation,
collaboration and the mutual sharing of gifts and resources. Prayerfully reflecting on
the diocesan Mission Statement and on Acts 2:42 47 which inspired it will help people
to see pastoral planning, implementation, spiritual and pastoral renewal and evaluation
to be various aspects of a faith-based activity to improve the quality of parish mission
effectiveness for our time.
As we move forward with the implementation phase of Called to Holiness and Mission and the spiritual and pastoral renewal that is the goal of this process, we must also
remember that the assumptions of the planning process continue to support the implementation and renewal process.
If parishes will recall the assumptions of the planning process, they will notice that
they are incorporated in a more condensed form here in the implementation process. This
will show that there is continuity between the planning and implementation process, and
these assumptions will guide the ongoing spiritual and pastoral renewal and pastoral
evaluation process.

APRIL 9, 2009 CATHOLIC LIGHT PAGE 07 BLACK

7
THE CATHOLIC LIGHT APRIL 9, 2009

Scranton Bishops Join Protest of Notre Dame Decision To Honor President Obama

APRIL 9, 2009 THE CATHOLIC LIGHT

Easter Triduum

A statue of Michelangelos
famous Pieta is seen at
Mother of Sorrows Church
in Murrysville. The powerful depiction from that first
Good Friday commemorates the Passion and Death
of Jesus Christ, which the
Church will observe tomorrow. The Easter triduum
begins today with the Mass
of the Lords Supper on Holy
Thursday evening and ends
Sunday with the celebration
of the Easter Solemnity.

Catholic Light Editorial

Tough Times Require


Faith in Action
Imagine Catholic Television going
dark in 235,000 households in our region.
People who are not physically capable
of attending church would no longer be
able to participate via the televised Daily
Mass, or watch the special programs locally, from Rome and around the globe
aired by CTV.
Imagine cutbacks to the religious education program, resulting in reduced or
no instruction in the faith for our young
people. Consider the medical and other
expenses of caring for our retired priests,
and the cost of forming new priests to
take their places in our parishes.
These programs and services, and
many more provided throughout the 11
counties of our Diocese, are only possible
through funding from the Diocesan Annual Appeal. Without sufficient funding,
their existence is in jeopardy.
To date, the 2008 Our Grateful
Faith Diocesan Annual Appeal is approximately $830,000 short of its goal.
Many parishes are finding it difficult
to meet their respective goals. The details are contained in this issue of The
Catholic Light.
The economic recession could certainly be affecting the campaign. Yet, we
know that people of good will dont lose
their desire to help when times are tough.
A recent survey by Cygnus Applied

Research, as reported in the March 26


edition of The Chronicle of Philanthropy,
concluded that a majority of Americans
who give to charity still plan to donate as
much this year as they have in the past.
More than 52 percent of donors said
their gifts would be at least as large as
in 2008, while only 17.5 percent planned
to give less.
Donors are still vibrantly connected
to their philanthropy and to the nonprofit
sector, and they want to do everything
they can to keep giving in tough times,
said Penelope Burk, president of the
research company. She could have been
describing Catholics, and specifically
Catholics in this Diocese.
In the midst of despair, we are a
people of hope. When the situation looks
bleak, we roll up our sleeves and lend a
hand to make sure that others receive the
help they need. We emerge from darkness into the light. When the cross seems
too heavy, someone is there to share the
burden. We draw our inspiration and our
strength from the great mystery we are
about to celebrate: the Passion, Death and
Resurrection of Our Lord.
Another opportunity to put our faith
into action will occur in the coming
weeks. Parishes that have not yet met

Continued on Page 10

Father Robert M. Everling


Today, we have gathered to do, perhaps, the most difficult. We are reminded
that one of the great ironies of life is the
fact that whether young or old, healthy or
ill, rich or poor, one day all of our lives
will end.
Even more so, however, than that it
is the most certain part of life, there is a
sense in which death is a constant part of
life. Not simply because as we go through
life many of the people we know and care
about pass away, but in many ways all of
our lives are made up of experiences that
are deaths.
We go from child to adult; when people
marry; when people leave home to get a job.
Even if we come back to the same town,
the same house, it is still never exactly
the same.
First and foremost, Father Everling
was a man of prayer. One of the first things
he told me I would like about St. Boniface
(in Wilkes-Barre) was that the church and
the rectory were connected. It made it very
easy to pray. His daily Mass at Boniface
was scheduled to allow as many of the
school children to attend as possible.
Even in his last years in the nursing
home, we are told he always said grace
before meals, and he would always be looking for his rosary to pray.
Father Everling was a very humble

man with simple needs. His greatest joy was


playing cards, especially the twice monthly
card club with the dozen priests who were
his friends and contemporaries from their
ordination years.
He always welcomed people as Jesus
did. His house on Penn Lake was used for
parish affairs. Rarely did he go to the lake
simply to relax for himself.
Father Everling was forever the loyal
friend, who always had the sympathetic ear.
He always spoke fondly of his family.
Almost seventy years ago, Father
Everling heard the call of Jesus to follow
Him, and he faithfully followed the call
through the seminary and almost 62 years
of priesthood.
May his goodness help us to follow
our baptismal call to follow Christ. As
well as so that one day we, too, may enter
the place Jesus has prepared for us. Where
there will be no more sorrow or weeping,
crying out or pain.
But only the unending happiness of being reunited with Father Everling and all of
our loved ones in the heavenly Jerusalem.
Excerpted from the homily by Father
Peter D. Menghini at the Mass of Christian
Burial for Father Robert M. Everling on
April 6 at St. Lawrence Church in Great
Bend.

The Catholic Light


(ISSN 0164-9418)
Official newspaper of the Diocese of Scranton. Published every
third Thursday by the Catholic Light Publishing Co., 300 Wyoming Ave., Scranton, PA 18503. Offices: 300 Wyoming Ave.,
P.O. Box 708, Scranton, PA 18501-0708. Phone: (570) 207-2229.
Periodicals postage paid at Scranton, Pa., and additional mailing
offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Catholic
Light, P.O. Box 708, Scranton, PA 18501-0708. Subscription
rates: $10.00 per year; $12.00 foreign. Member of the Catholic Press Association,
Subscriber to the Catholic News Service. William R. Genello, Editor-in-Chief. The
Catholic Light is our official diocesan journal. The publication of notices, regulations
and extra-synodical decrees in said paper constitute legal promulgation for all the
faithful of the Diocese of Scranton, Clergy and Laity.

Volume 109 Number 5 Thursday, April 9, 2009

APRIL 9, 2009 CATHOLIC LIGHT PAGE 08 BLACK

Book Reviews

Saint Edith Stein:


A Spiritual Portrait
By Dianne Marie Traflet. Pauline Books (Boston, 2008). 179 pp., $16.95.

Joan of Arc: A Life


By Mary Gordon. Penguin Lives (New York, 2008). 180 pp., $14.
Reviewed by Peggy Weber
Catholic News Service
converted, became a Carmelite
nun, and died in a concentration
camp.
What makes this book different is Ms. Traflets focus on
the spiritual life of a woman who,
during several years of her life,
rejected all religion.
The book focuses on St.
Ediths relation to the Eucharist,
Mary and the cross.
Ms. Traflet writes with a clear
style that is not bogged down in

academic jargon. She also brings


this saint to life and shows the
anxious moments, the fears and
the worries that were part of St.
Ediths spiritual process.
The author shows great compassion and almost a tenderness
when describing how difficult it
must have been for St. Edith to
choose Catholicism and religious
life in light of the strong opposition of her mother.
The book itself is an interest-

The Catholic Difference

Freed to Be
Images of God
By George Weigel
Senior Fellow of the Ethics and Public Policy Center
in Washington, D.C.
Four distinguished American theologians have died since
the beginning of Advent: Avery
Cardinal Dulles, S.J., Father
Richard John Neuhaus, Monsignor William B. Smith, and
Jesuit Father Francis Canavan.
Each of these men enriched
both Church and country with
a noble idea of freedom. That
idea has much to do with the
events of salvation history we
recall at this sacred season.
After receiving his vocation from God, Moses tried to
tell the Israelites the good news
of their impending liberation:
they would be freed from the
power of the Egyptians and
brought into the land that God
had given to Abraham, Isaac,

Jacob, and their offspring. It


sounds like a very good deal:
Israel comes into the possession
of its ancestral land; Israel is
brought into communion with
God, who is truly the Lord.
But Israel isnt buying: Moses spoke thus to the people of
Israel; but they did not listen to
Moses, because of their broken
spirit and their cruel bondage
(Exodus 6:9). After centuries of
slavery, Israel could not imagine
itself free. Israel had lost the image of God within itself.
As Dominican Father Dominique Barthelemy puts it in a wonderful book, God and His Image
(Ignatius Press), mankind after the
Fall had become wild; (man) flies
in terror toward death, in terror

because he can no longer bear the


gaze of the Father, whose love he
has in fact disowned and flouted.
Israel, trapped in the bondage of
Egypt, had forgotten the loving
gaze of the Father who had called
Abraham and spared Isaac. So Israel would have to be tamed anew;
Israel could only recover the truth
about its freedom by casting off
the bad habits of slavery.
Jacobs descendants in
Egypt are a people in winter,
Father Barthelemy writes, a
people ready to die, who see
death staring them in the face.
God will be able to tame a people
in conditions like these. It is not
immediately that he will be able
to take them by the hand on Sinai.
He must begin by saving them

ing biography. However, it also


holds lessons for anyone intent on
a better spiritual life. For example,
Ms. Traflet writes: An interior
life cultivated by quiet stillness
prepares souls to surrender their
lives to God and later to venture
into the chaotic noise of society,
remaining calm and focused.
Those words show St. Ediths
journey but they also invite the
reader to make a journey of his
or her own.

from death in a wholly


unexpected manner
hence the exodus from
Egypt... . He will not
expect this people to
start calling him God,
a name that evokes
terrifying almighty
power, immediately.
He asks them to call
him ...Yahweh, which for Israel
means Savior ... .
And Israel will grasp the
hand of this Savior as their guide,
since it is he who has saved them
from death. Afterward, they will
allow this saving hand to fashion
them anew. It is very necessary
that God should fashion man
once more in his own divine
image. For man was made in
the image of God. But this same
man has fled ... and has fashioned
in himself a caricature of Gods
image. God cannot therefore
make himself recognized by
man unless he first fashions in
him (once again) the true image
of God ... .
This is Gods fatherhood,
reaching out to refashion us in
true freedom: which, as St. Paul
writes, is the freedom of the children of God the freedom to

APRIL 9, 2009 CATHOLIC LIGHT PAGE 09 BLACK

In Joan of Arc: A Life, one is


immediately drawn into the book
through Ms. Gordons beautiful
writing.
A professor of English at
Barnard College in New York and
an accomplished novelist who is
best known for the books Final
Payments and The Company of
Women, Ms. Gordon takes on a
difficult subject here.
She notes immediately in the
acknowledgments page that there
are 20,000 books about St. Joan of
Arc in the Bibliotheque Nationale
in Paris. One might ask, what
more can be said?
Ms. Gordon finds a new angle
to approach the life of this warrior
saint.
She states that the book is
a biographical meditation. In it
she focuses on the sheer audacity
of the saint and the wonderful
example she offers to those who
follow a unique and special life.
Ms. Gordon writes that St.
Joan was a girl who came from
nowhere, supported an equivocal cause, triumphed for a few

Continued on Page 12
be the images of God
that we were created
to be, and thus the
freedom to bring into
the world the healing power of Gods
fatherly love. God
begins the definitive
work of refashioning
his image in us in
the Exodus. He completes that
work in raising Jesus, Son of
God and Son of Mary, from the
dead, so that Jesus the Christ
might be the first of many brothers brothers who live true
freedom in the communion of
the Church, which is the Sons
mystical body, extended in time
and space.
This is the truth about
freedom that Cardinal Dulles,
Father Neuhaus, Monsignor
Smith, and Father Canavan
tried to teach us: that true freedom consists in looking up,
not looking down in casting
off our broken spirit and living
according to the image of God
within us. That is the truth of
both Exodus and Easter. We
learn it crossing the Red Seas
of our own life-journeys, where
we meet the Risen Lord.

9
THE CATHOLIC LIGHT APRIL 9, 2009

Centuries separate St. Joan of


Arc and St. Edith Stein. And the
women who wrote about them are
different Mary Gordon, a novelist, and Dianne Marie Traflet, a
professor.
However, the authors both
provide incredibly compelling
works about the warrior saint and
philosopher nun that strike similar
chords with the reader. And as one
reads about the horrific yet courageous deaths suffered by both St.
Edith and St. Joan, one can see just
what these two had in common
courage and grace.
In Saint Edith Stein: A Spiritual Portrait, Ms. Traflet, associate dean and professor of pastoral
theology at Immaculate Conception Seminary School of Theology
at Seton Hall University in South
Orange, N.J., offers a wonderful
insight into the mind and life of
St. Edith.
Her scholarship glistens in
this work as she quotes directly
from many of St. Ediths writings
and from those who knew this
20th-century saint.
Much has been written about
St. Edith, a Jewish woman who

APRIL 9, 2009 THE CATHOLIC LIGHT

10

Our Catholic Heritage

Cardinal Emmanuel
Suhard of Paris
By Father Charles P. Connor, Ph.D.
One of the more prominent clerics to
influence the Church for the better during the era of the Second World War and
beyond was Emmanuel Cardinal Suhard,
Archbishop of Paris from 1940 until his
death in 1949.
Generations of priests read his monumental pastoral letter on the priesthood,
Priests Among Men, issued on Holy
Thursday, 1949 less than two months
before his death. Suhard considered the
priesthood under its ontological heading,
that is, the nature of the indelible character
the Sacrament of Holy Orders imparted; the
Priest in the Social Order, and the personal
spirituality of each and every priest. This
letter was standard fare in seminaries for
decades, and one of the regrettable consequences of modernity was the little emphasis placed on its timeless material.
Emmanuel Suhard was born in Brains
surlesMarches, Mayenne, in 1874, and
baptized on the very day of his birth. As a
young man, his local pastor did not think
he would make a particularly good priest;
nonetheless, he entered the minor seminary,
was sent to Rome for theology, and greatly

distinguished himself in the Gregorian University for his academic excellence.


Following ordination in 1897, he remained at the Gregorian for graduate work
in Philosophy, Theology and Canon Law.
Shortly after his arrival back in his native
France, he was made a professor, first of
Philosophy and later of Theology, at the
Grand Seminary at Laval.
In the summer of 1928, he was appointed Bishop of BayeuxLisieux the diocese
of Saint Therese and after a brief two year
stay, he became Archbishop of Rheims for
the next decade. In 1930, he received the
red hat of a Cardinal, and five years later
participated in the conclave that elected
Eugenio Pacelli as Pope Pius XII. That same
Pope would appoint him to Paris.
Like most of the French clergy of his
time, Suhard initially supported Marshal
Petains Vichy Government, but in the
summer of 1942 he wrote a public protest
against the deportation of the Jews of Paris,
and he condemned the collaboration of the
Vichy Government in this racial policy. He
was subsequently detained in his residence
for some time by the Nazi German troops.

In 1943, along with a priest-chaplain of


the Young Christian Workers, Abbe Henri
Godin, he began the priest worker movement. This was comprised of nearly 100
priests (diocesan and religious), who were
freed from regular parochial duties in order
to devote themselves to the evangelization
of the working classes by, literally, joining
the work force.
As the experiment developed in the
turmoil of post-war France, and especially
in the years after 1947 with no strong guidance and a variety of solutions put forward
by some of its members which did not especially please Suhards successor, Maurice
Cardinal Feltin, the movement was ended in
1954. Although all the priests obeyed, some
of the dissidents wrote a book putting forth
their position, titled Les Pretes Ouvriers.
The books publication stirred much
controversy in France, though happily the
movements founder did not live to experience it. Suhard was an extremely innovative
man in the soundest sense, did much to enhance the love of the priesthood among his
clergy, and stirred much French patriotism
with his strong positions.

Catholic Light
Editorial

Tough Times
Require Faith
in Action
Continued from Page 8
their Appeal goal will be taking up second collections on the weekends of May
2-3 and May 9-10. Those who have not
yet made a gift to the Appeal can do so
through these collections, and those who
have already made a pledge can enhance
it with another offering. Pledges are also
being accepted from anyone who wants
to help, regardless of whether they are in
a parish taking the special collection.
In all cases, those who participate
will be exercising faithful stewardship
the responsible and grateful use of
God given gifts and resources to promote
the evangelizing and reconciling mission
of Jesus Christ which continues in the
Church.
All the people who rely on the programs and services funded by the 2008
Our Grateful Faith Diocesan Annual
Appeal will be most grateful. So will
Our Lord.

Spirituality for Today

The Cross and Joy


By Father John Catoir
God wants you to be happy, even
though life is filled with misery. There will
always be crosses, and yet we are called to
live joyfully.
St. Paul helps us to master the Christian faith by understanding the relationship
between Gods love for us and the trials we
have to endure in this world. He suffered
mightily in his day, yet he commanded us
to rejoice always!
We all suffer physical and emotional
pain of some sort: Our bodies ache, people
disappoint and abuse us, financial woes
engender fear in us, and yet we are still
called to live joyfully.
I write about joy all the time, and I suppose I get on the nerves of some people, but
I feel driven by the Holy Spirit!
Occasionally St. Paul felt driven to
boast about his many trials for the glory of
God, and I feel that need right now.
In my Army days, I fired an M-1 rifle

for endless hours on a practice range. I


was an MP, and the company commander
wanted us to fire expertly. This bombardment of noise left me with a fierce buzzing
in my ears to this day. I cope by uniting my
inner buzzing with the song the angels sing
before the Lord. My tinnitus is no longer my
enemy, but has become my friend, enabling
me to pray without ceasing.
I have ulcerative colitis, and my 77year-old arthritic knees give me fits. Im a
cancer survivor, so far that is, and I suffer
from cardiac asthma. And yet, I get through
it all by following St. Pauls advice to thank
God in all circumstances.
St. Pauls advice has kept me sane. All
of my little miseries are under control with
medication. I love my life and my vocation. I love to write, which is a vocation
within a vocation, and I especially enjoy
maintaining my Web site (www.messengerofjoy.com), which offers help on being

more joyful.
How do we know that God loves us?
Its simple really. Jesus Christ told us to
call God our Father. Doesnt every father
want his children to be happy?
Thats why St. Paul said, Rejoice
always. ... In all circumstances give thanks,
for this is the will of God for you in Christ
Jesus (1 Thes 5:16, 18).
St. Paul took this magnificent idea
from Jesus, who at the Last Supper said,
I have told you this so that my joy may
be in you and your joy may be complete
(Jn 15:11).
Pope John Paul II confirmed it: Christ
came to bring joy: joy to children, joy to
parents, joy to families and to friends, joy
to workers and to scholars, joy to the sick
and to elderly, joy to all humanity. In a true
sense joy is the keynote of the Christian
message and the recurring motif of the
Gospels. ... Be messengers of joy.

APRIL 9, 2009 CATHOLIC LIGHT PAGE10 BLACK

Our response ought to be, I will delight and rejoice in you (Ps 9:3).
What about the cross?
When Jesus told us to love one another as I have loved you, he led us to
the cross. Wherever there is love, there is
service; wherever there is service, there is
sacrifice; and wherever there is sacrifice
there is suffering.
Joy and the cross are not contradictory
but complementary.
Jesus knew that the only way to find
true joy was to empty oneself in loving
others.
The greatest honor you can give to
almighty God is to live joyfully because
of the knowledge of his love (Julian of
Norwich).

Copyright (c) 2009


Catholic News Service

11
THE CATHOLIC LIGHT APRIL 9, 2009

A GAME PLAN FOR LIFE


Former football star diagrams one for young people
Chris Godfrey was a key
factor in many successful plays
on the football field. Now hes
helping young people to develop
a winning game plan for life.
The former Super Bowl
champion and All-Pro offensive
lineman talked to teens throughout
the Diocese March 10-13 on living
a life of virtue.
Prior to graduating from the
University of Notre Dame Law
School, Mr. Godfrey played nine
years of professional football. As
the starting right guard for the
Super Bowl XXI champion New
York Giants, he earned honors
as All-Pro NFL Films, and AllNFC (AP, UPI). He also played
on three University of Michigan
Rose Bowl teams.
Mr. Godfrey is the founder
and president of Life Athletes,
Inc., an organization comprised
of more than 300 professional
and Olympic athletes. The organization promotes virtue,
abstinence (chastity) and respect
for life.

Mr. Godfrey brought that


message to the four diocesan
Catholic high schools, as well as
gatherings of local teens at Annunciation Parish, Williamsport, and
St. Josephs Church, Minooka.
He opened his presentation by
talking about how his own faith life
grew while a student at the University of Michigan and a player in
the National Football League. The
greatest boost to him reconnecting
with God was when a teammate on
the Green Bay Packers invited him
to join a Bible study.
It was there that things began
to make sense for Mr. Godfrey
and, as a result, he started to put
God first in his life. He particularly
drew encouragement from Jesus
words in Mt. 6:33, But seek first
the kingdom of God and his righteousness, and all these things will
be given you besides.
Mr. Godfrey invited the students to consider four aspects of the
sexual relationship: how sex affects
us spiritually, emotionally, and
physically, as well as an explanation

Former pro football player Chris Godfrey recently gave talks at the four Diocesan high schools and
two parish groups about virtue, abstinence (chastity) and respect for life. He is shown here talking to
students at Holy Cross High School in Dunmore. (The Catholic Light Photo/Angelo Rose)
of how sex is a great mystery.
Making use of a number of
clever demonstrations, Mr. Godfrey
was successful in connecting with
his audience and offering them encouragement to live a chaste life.

Mr. Godfrey concluded his


presentation by inviting students to
become members of Life Athletes
by taking the official pledge, I will
try to do what is right, even when it
is difficult. I will give myself only

to the special person whom I marry


as my partner for life. I will respect
the lives of others, especially the
unborn and aged. I will not quit or
make excuses when I fail. I will try
again.

Bishops Seek Information on Student Health Services at Catholic Colleges


Initial response from schools
is deemed insufficient
Bishop Joseph F. Martino and Auxiliary Bishop
John M. Dougherty have asked the four Catholic institutions of higher learning in the Diocese of Scranton
to provide information on their student health services
to have assurance that no practice is occurring which
would be in violation of Catholic teaching.
The bishops made the request in an April 1 letter
to Holy Cross Father Thomas J. OHara, president of
Kings College in Wilkes-Barre; Immaculate Heart of
Mary Sister Anne Munley, president of Marywood
University in Scranton; Michael A. MacDowell,
president of Misericordia University in Dallas; and
Jesuit Father Scott R. Pilarz, president of The University of Scranton.
The letter stated: Will you please send to us any
documents available which will indicate policies,
procedures or practices authorized by (the institution)
for the provision of student health services. In addition, it is especially important that the Diocese have
assurance from you that no practice is occurring which
would be in violation of Catholic teaching.
We ask this accounting in accord with the norm
of canon 810 2, C.I.C. The canon notes the duty and
right of concerned diocesan bishops to be vigilant that
the principles of Catholic doctrines are faithfully observed in Catholic institutions of higher learning.

In their letter, the bishops explain that their


inquiry was prompted by a March 25 article in the
student newspaper at St. Joseph University in Philadelphia. The article describes how the university, in
its words, finds the middle ground between Church
doctrine and student healthcare.
In that article, St. Josephs director of student
health services says that the schools location offers
enough convenience and opportunity to encourage
students to purchase condoms. She describes this
as a fortunate situation for the students. She also
discusses the use of oral contraceptives.
The Catholic Church teaches that artificial contraception is immoral.
The St. Josephs director states, Its always a
fine line between staying within the values of the
University, which we completely respect, and offering
services to the students. We are fortunate that there
are other medical centers in the area, and that there
are health care providers other than us.
Bishop Martino and Bishop Dougherty said this
position indicates little respect for Catholic moral
teaching.
The four local presidents responded on April 6
with a joint letter that said: Condoms are not available on our campuses and our student health services
and centers do not provide oral and other forms of
contraceptives. We are, therefore, confident in assuring you that our health centers practice in ways that

We ask this accounting in accord with


the norm of canon 810 2, C.I.C. The canon
notes the duty and right of concerned diocesan bishops to be vigilant that the principles
of Catholic doctrines are faithfully observed
in Catholic institutions of higher learning.
respect and do not violate Catholic teaching.
Bishop Martino and Bishop Dougherty, in a
subsequent letter faxed to the presidents on April
8, noted that this declaration does not answer their
request for documents available which will indicate
policies, procedures or practices authorized by the
institution.
The bishops cited two practical examples for
their concern:
A section on Marywood Universitys website
advises international students to bring contraceptives
and condoms to campus.
In an April 5 story in the Wilkes-Barre Times
Leader, a student says the Student Center at Kings
College has Be Safe pamphlets that tell students
about birth-control options.
We believe (these examples) justify the urgency of our request for documentation, the bishops
wrote.

APRIL 9, 2009 CATHOLIC LIGHT PAGE 11 BLACK

APRIL 9, 2009 THE CATHOLIC LIGHT

12

Making Sense Out of Bioethics

TABLE
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The Obama Stem Cell Darkness

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President Obama, on March


9, 2009, signed an important
executive order that vastly expanded federal funding for human
embryonic stem cell research and
crossed a significant and troubling
ethical line. This decision, and the
rhetoric during the signing, encouraged scientists and researchers to enter the moral quagmire of
taking some human lives in order
to benefit others. During his signing speech, in order to support his
decision, the president invoked the
name of Christopher Reeve and
other patients desperate to find
cures for their ailments.
Desperation, however, rarely
makes for good ethics.
I once heard a true story that
brought this point home for me in
a dramatic way. The story involved
a father and his two young sons.
They had a favorite swimming
hole out in the countryside which

By Father Tad Pacholczyk, Ph.D.


they would visit on hot summer
days. The father, however, had
never learned to swim, while the
boys had learned when they were
younger and could swim moderately well.
Their father would sit on the
shore while the boys would swim
inside a line of bright red buoys
that marked where the shelf on
the floor of the swimming hole
would drop off steeply. Each year,
the father would tell his sons not
to cross that line, because if they
did, he would not be able to swim
out and rescue them. Each year
they would faithfully obey. This
particular year, however, they
decided to challenge their dads
authority and venture beyond the
buoys.
As they swam beyond the
line, their father saw them and
called out to them to return, but
they feigned they couldnt hear
him and continued to swim out
even further. Their dad got nervous, and began to walk out into
the water, as it got deeper and
deeper, and suddenly he moved
into the drop-off section and began sinking.
From a distance, the boys
spotted him flailing around in the
water, gasping for breath, trying
to keep his head above water, and
slapping the water with his hands.

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They suddenly realized he was


drowning, and swam towards him.
As they got near him, he yelled at
them not to come any closer. He
cried out, Get away! Dont touch
me! In fear, they kept their distance until he stopped struggling
in the water, and began to sink
beneath the surface, with gurgling
and bubbling.
As he slipped into unconsciousness, the boys approached
him and grabbed him as best they
could and dragged him back to
shore, where he sputtered and revived and finally coughed out the
water he had taken in. Later, the
boys asked him why he shouted
at them to stay away. He said he
was afraid if he put his hand on
them, he would drag them under
the water with him. He knew that
a desperate person would reach for
almost anything nearby in order
to save himself, maybe even his
own children, and he didnt want
to do that.
We must be similarly concerned in our society when scientists and desperate patients are
tempted to put their hand onto
our embryonic children in a bid to
alleviate suffering or even to save
themselves. Sadly, the presidents
stem cell decision encourages this
kind of unethical behavior by an
emotional appeal to patient desperation. The presidents ethical
mistake is further compounded
by the fact that remarkable and
powerful scientific alternatives
exist, such as cellular reprogramming on the one hand, or the use
of adult/umbilical cord stem cells
on the other, neither of which
requires ever laying a hand on a
human embryo.
His stem cell decision also
manifests a troubling shift towards
a more widespread and systemic
form of oppression within our
society. The president is offering
Americans the prospect of using
the powers of science to oppress,
or more accurately, to suppress the
youngest members of the human
family to serve the interests of
older and more wealthy members.
He is offering Americans the prospect of reducing fellow human
beings to cogs and commodities in

APRIL 9, 2009 CATHOLIC LIGHT PAGE12 BLACK

the assembly line of the medicobusiness industrial complex.


Many Americans, however,
seem only vaguely aware of what
has transpired in the presidents
decision. Supreme Court Justice
William O. Douglas once commented on the way that oppression
can subtly arise in our midst: As
nightfall does not come at once,
neither does oppression. In both
instances, theres a twilight where
everything remains seemingly unchanged, and it is in such twilight
that we must be aware of change
in the air, however slight, lest we
become unwitting victims of the
darkness.
Some would suggest that
perhaps the darkness is already
upon us. But a few moments
of twilight may still remain, in
which Americans can turn back
the moral darkness that threatens
our society and our future.
Father Tadeusz Pacholczyk,
Ph.D., earned his doctorate in
neuroscience from Yale and did
post-doctoral work at Harvard.
He is a priest of the Diocese of
Fall River, Mass., and serves
as the Director of Education at
The National Catholic Bioethics
Center in Philadelphia. See www.
ncbcenter.org

Book Reviews

Two Women
Saints Exhibit
Courage, Grace
Continued from Page 9
months only, failed as a soldier,
saw visions ... died in agony, a
saint whom the church refused
canonization for 500 years, yet
who stands in our imagination for
the single-minded triumph of the
she and it must be a she who
feared nothing (and who) knew
herself right and fully able and the
chosen of the Lord.
Ms. Gordon gives the readers beautiful words, a fascinating
topic and the desire to live a courageous and grace-filled life where
one attempts to listen to the voice
of God.

Every so often Joan


Vienna will hear someone bemoan the fact that
children today have to
be warned about child
abuse.
And my point back
to them, says the coordinator of the Safeguard
the Children program for
the Archdiocese of Los
Angeles, is always, No.
Isnt it too bad we havent
done this years ago!
For as she notes, the
more people are educated
about the topic, the more
they talk about it, the more
they look for it, the more
they spread awareness to
the wider community, and
the greater the chances are
that perpetrators will be
stopped before the damage
is done.
Recently, for example, parents trained in the
Safeguard the Children
program alerted their pastor about a school dad seen
regularly taking photos
of children on the school
grounds.
The picture taking
was stopped. And six
months later, the man was
in federal prison after being caught operating a
child pornography Web
site, Vienna says.
Vienna and her counterparts in dioceses around
the nation, including the Diocese of Scranton, are carrying out the U.S. Catholic
bishops mandate to protect
children from sexual abuse
and other abuse through
training programs for adults
and children that teach the

warning signs of abuse and


how to respond. Children
are taught to trust their
instincts and to report the
matter to adults if someone
is making them feel uncomfortable. They learn that no
one has the right to touch
you, Vienna says, and that
its not your fault if an
adult acts inappropriately.
Adults are trained to
look for warning signs
of inappropriate behavior, or relationships that
dont seem right, says Beth
Heidt-Kozisek, director of
the Child Protection Office
for the Diocese of Grand
Island, Neb. and a licensed
child psychologist.
Among the red flags
are adults who: isolate the
child from others; encourage the child to be secretive;
and withhold attention or
affection unless the child
engages in what the perpetrator wants. Its important
for adults to respond by
monitoring the situation,
Heidt-Kozisek says. If
there is clearly abuse going
on, its important to report
it to authorities.
Education is first
and foremost in safe environment efforts, Vienna
said. In addition, policies
and procedures, including codes of conduct,
must be established, and
special resources such
as brochures and other
informational materials
need to be developed.
Ive had the honor
these past five years of seeing the fruits of the labor,
where things are reported

to us before something
happens to a child or a
young person, Vienna
said. Thats how I can tell
its working.
Advocates find that
some adults still harbor
misconceptions about programs designed to protect children from abuse.
Theres a tendency for
people to equate safe environment training with sex
education or teaching in
human sexuality, and its
really not, Heidt-Kozisek
says.
Instead, its about
rules and what children
should do when they feel
pressured to break them.
Safe environment training empowers children to
know that there are things
they can do when dangers
invade their environment.
And by repeating the
rules each year, it becomes
rote in the childs mind,
she says. What we try to
teach children is that they
are Gods creation and
theyre worthy of dignity
and respect.
Some people regard
child abuse as a church
problem, Vienna says,
and that if it werent for
the clergy abuse crisis it
wouldnt be such an issue
today. They dont understand this is a worldwide
problem (that) has been
with us since the beginning of time, she says,
and that no other organization has stood up and
bravely faced it on a large
scale like the Catholic
Church has.

NOTICE REGARDING SEXUAL ABUSE OF A PERSON UNDER


EIGHTEEN YEARS OF AGE BY ORDAINED OR LAY PERSONNEL
OF THE DIOCESE OF SCRANTON
Such an act should be reported to the Diocese by calling the
Victim Assistance Coordinator (570-344-5216) or the Chancellor
(570-207-2216) or the Vicar for Priests (570-207-2269).
Upon receiving a report of this kind, the Diocese of Scranton
is committed to assisting victims or survivors of sexual abuse in
their pursuit of emotional and spiritual well-being.

CHILD ABUSE PREVENTION BLESSING


Dear Lord, We ask You to bless these Your holy people who have
participated in the Churchs efforts to help stop child sexual
abuse. Open their hearts to Your call to be the ears, eyes and
voice of children and young people everywhere. Give them the
vision and grace needed to fulfill the special commitments that
each of them has made to making their homes, churches, schools,
communities and world a safer place for all Gods Children. Amen

Diocese of Scranton Has Extensive


Abuse Prevention Training Programs
The Diocese of Scranton has committed significant resources to foster safe
environments for children.
The Diocese continues
to train all employees and
volunteers on how to create safe environments for
children and young people,
as mandated by the national
charter.
The Diocese has been
using the VIRTUS sexual
abuse awareness and prevention program, Protecting Gods Children, to
fulfill this requirement.
The program was introduced in the spring of 2003
and is ongoing. To date,
17,955 people have been
trained.
The Diocese has also
implemented a safe environment program for students
in grades K-10 to teach
them how to recognize and
avoid situations that could
lead to sexual abuse. It also
encourages communication
between children and their
parents so that dangerous
situations and incidents are
reported promptly.
Last fall the Diocese
began introducing safe environment lessons in its
parish religious education
programs. Henceforth the
VIRTUS Teaching Touching Safety Program will be
offered in religious education
classes to complement the

safe environment programs


used by public schools.
The program to be
taught in all Religious
Education (CCD) classes
teaches the children about
safe and unsafe touches, and
safe and unsafe adults in an
age-appropriate manner and
based on the Catechism of
the Catholic Church.
We wish to thank our
parish directors of religious
education and their volunteer staffs of catechists who
are, by taking on this new
challenge, helping us in our
constant quest to keep our
children safe, happy and
healthy, said Gail Fromm,
the Diocesan compliance
officer.
The Diocese of Scranton established a policy to
deal with sexual abuse of
minors by clergy in 1993,
well before the issue received widespread public
attention. After the United
States bishops enacted the
national Charter for the
Protection of Children and
Young People in 2002, the
Diocese refined its policy
accordingly.
A Victim Assistance
Coordinator was hired to
provide outreach and confidential services to victims,
and the Diocese revised
the membership of its Review Board that assesses
allegations and advises the

APRIL 9, 2009 CATHOLIC LIGHT PAGE 13 BLACK

Bishop. The procedures


and process for filing complaints have been published
in brochures, on the Diocesan website and in all
parish bulletins.
The Diocesan policy
requires reporting of all
allegations of sexual abuse
of a minor to civil authorities, no matter the current
age of the victim; and the
Diocese has a clear policy
that addresses the process
of dealing with complaints,
including a prompt preliminary investigation and
placing the accused priest
on administrative leave. The
Diocese requires that, when
sexual abuse is admitted or
established, the offending
priest is permanently removed from ministry.
Every diocese in the
U.S. undergoes an annual
audit to determine if it is
complying with the provisions of the Charter for
the Protection of Children
and Young People. The
audits are conducted by The
Gavin Group, Inc., which
has been commissioned by
the National Review Board,
formed by the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops to
oversee the implementation
of the charter.
Each of the annual audits has confirmed the Diocese of Scrantons compliance with the charter.

THE CATHOLIC LIGHT APRIL 9, 2009

Safe Environment Programs Promote Awareness, Prevention 13

APRIL 9, 2009 THE CATHOLIC LIGHT

14

Eucharistic Adoration in the Diocese of Scranton


Perpetual Adoration
Church of the Epiphany, Sayre
St. Gabriel, Hazleton
St. John the Evangelist, Honesdale -Eucharistic Chapel (St. Mary Magdalen Church)
St. Jude, Mountaintop -- Eucharistic Chapel
St. Patrick/Holy Ghost/St. Michael, Olyphant -Eucharistic Chapel (St. Patrick Church)

Daily Adoration
St. Rose of Lima, Carbondale -- Monday-Thursday,
9 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Friday, 1 to 9 p.m.; Saturday, 2 to
9 p.m.; Sunday, 12 noon to 9 p.m.
Our Lady of the Abingtons, Dalton -- St. Pio
Chapel, Daily, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.
St. Anthony of Padua, Exeter -- Eucharistic Chapel;
Daily, 11:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.
Exaltation of the Holy Cross, Hanover Township
Monday thru Friday, 7 to 7:45 a.m.
St. Mary of Mount Carmel, Dunmore -- Monday
to Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 8 p.m., altar server sacristy
St. Stanislaus, Hazleton -- One hour prior to 7:30
a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Masses; First Friday from
6:30-7:30 a.m. and 3-6:30 p.m.
St. Catherine of Siena, Moscow -- Eucharistic
Chapel; Daily, 6 a.m. to midnight
St. Joseph, St. Joseph (Friendsville) -- Monday,
9 a.m., through Saturday, noon, at St. John
Neumann Eucharistic Chapel

Weekly Adoration
St. Peters Cathedral, Scranton -- Every Friday,
8:30 a.m. to 11:45 a.m.
Holy Rosary, Scranton -- Wednesday, 4 to 11 p.m.,
in school chapel.
Immaculate Conception, Scranton -- Friday, 9 a.m.
to 5 p.m., in the Adoration Chapel.
St. Anns Basilica, Scranton -- Monday, following
noon Mass, until 3:30 p.m.
St. Michael, Scranton -- Tuesday, 7 to 7:50 p.m.,
and Saturday, 8 to 8:50 a.m.
SS. Peter & Paul, Scranton - Tuesday, 7 to 8 p.m.
St. Thomas Aquinas, Archbald -- Thursday, 7:15
to 8:15 p.m.
Immaculate Conception, Bastress -- Every Sunday,
7 p.m., to Monday, 7 p.m.
St. Gregory, Clarks Green -- Wednesday, 7:30 a.m.
to 7 p.m., at former Our Lady of Peace Convent
Gate of Heaven, Dallas -- Sunday, 5 to 6 p.m.
St. Matthew, East Stroudsburg -- Tuesday-Friday,
noon-6:30 p.m.
St. Martha, Fairmount Springs -- Tuesday,
following 8:30 a.m. Mass until 9 p.m.
St. Rita, Gouldsboro -- Friday, following 8 a.m.
Mass until 7 p.m.
Holy Redeemer, Harding Wednesday, 8:30 a.m.
to 5:30 p.m., followed by Rosary.
St. Joseph, Hudson -- Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
St. Martin of Tours, Jackson Thursday, 7 to
8 p.m.
St. Michael Chapel, Jessup -- Saturday, midnight
to midnight, in the convent chapel.

St. Marys Annunciation, Kingston -- Wednesday,


noon to 5 p.m.
Our Lady of Mount Carmel, Lake Silkworth -Friday, 9 a.m. to noon.
Our Lady of Lourdes, Montoursville -- Tuesday,
9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.
St. Joseph, Nanticoke -- Thursday, following
the 11 a.m. Mass, until 12:30 p.m.
St. Stanislaus, Nanticoke -- Tuesday, following
the 8 a.m. Mass, until 7 p.m.
St. Anthony, Newfoundland -- Tuesday,
9:30-10:30 a.m., following the 9 a.m. Mass.
All Saints, Plymouth (at St. Mary Church) -Wednesday, 7:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. (except
during 12:05 Mass).
St. Ann, Shohola -- Tuesday, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Nativity of the BVM, Tunkhannock -- Wednesday,
6 to 7 p.m.
St. Peter, Wellsboro - Tuesday, 8 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.
Holy Saviour, Wilkes-Barre - Monday, 7:30 a.m.
to 5:30 p.m.
St. Nicholas, Wilkes-Barre -- Tuesday, after the
8 a.m. Mass, until 5 p.m. (lower chapel).

Monthly Adoration
Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary, Scranton -First Friday, following 7 a.m. Mass until
benediction at 6:50 p.m.
St. Anns Basilica, Scranton -- First Friday, after
the 8:30 a.m. Mass until benediction at 4 p.m.
St. Anthony of Padua Church, Scranton
(St. Thomas More Society) -- First Sunday,
11 a.m. to 5 p.m., concluding with Evensong
and benediction.
St. Marys Assumption, Scranton -- First Friday,
8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.
St. Michael, Scranton -- First Friday, 8:30 a.m.
to 5:50 p.m.
St. Clare, Scranton -- First Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
St. Francis of Assisi, Scranton -- First Sunday,
9 to 10 a.m.
St. Leo, Ashley -- First Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
St. Michael, Canton -- First Friday, 8 a.m. to noon
Our Lady of the Snows, Clarks Summit -Second Sunday, 6 to 9 p.m.
St. John Bosco, Conyngham -- First Friday,
8:30 a.m. to noon.
Visitation of the B.V.M., Dickson City -First Friday, 8 to 9 a.m.
Our Lady Help of Christians, Dorrance -First Friday, 4 to 7 p.m.
St. Basil, Dushore -- First Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m.
St. John, East Stroudsburg -- First Friday, 9 a.m.
to 12 noon.
St. Mary, Eynon -- First Friday, 11 a.m. Holy Hour
& Benediction, prior to noon Mass.
St. Agnes, Forest City -- Thursday before
First Friday, 2 to 3 p.m.
National Shrine of the Sacred Heart, Harleigh -First Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. (ends with Mass).
Our Lady of Victory, Harveys Lake -- First Friday,
8 to 9 a.m.
Holy Trinity (Slovak), Hazleton -- Second Sunday
of each month, following the 10:30 a.m. Mass,

Most Precious Blood, Hazleton -- First Friday,


7 p.m. to 7 a.m. (Saturday).
St. Joseph, Hazleton -- First Friday, 8:30 a.m.
to 12 noon.
Sacred Heart of Mary, Jermyn -- First Friday,
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., with closing benediction.
St. Luke, Jersey Shore -- First Sunday, 9:30
to 11 a.m.
St. Ignatius, Kingston -- First Friday, 1 to 5 p.m.
in St. Ignatius Church.
St. Maria Goretti, Laflin -- First Friday, 8 a.m.
St. John Neumann, Lords Valley -- First Friday,
9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Holy Family, Luzerne -- First Friday, following
the 8 a.m. Mass until 12:10 p.m.
Holy Child, Mansfield -- First Friday, 5 p.m.
to 7 p.m.
St. Patrick, Milford -- First Sunday, follows
the 11 a.m. Mass, concluding with Evening Prayer
and benediction at 4 p.m.
St. Vincent de Paul, Dingman Twp. -- First Friday,
9:30 to 11 a.m.
Holy Name of Mary, Montrose First Friday,
12:10 to 11 p.m.; Saturday, 7 to 8:30 a.m.
St. Mary of the Mount, Mt. Pocono -- First Friday,
8:30 to 10 a.m.
Sacred Heart of Jesus, Peckville First Friday,
7:30 a.m. to 12 noon
St. John the Evangelist, Pittston -- First Friday,
8:30 a.m. to 8 p.m.
SS. Peter and Paul, Plains -- First Friday, 9 a.m.
to 6 p.m.
Our Lady of the Lake, Pocono Pines -- First Friday,
after morning Mass until 9:30 a.m.
Holy Name/St. Mary, Swoyersville -- First Friday,
9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
St. John the Evangelist, Susquehanna -First Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 12 noon.
Our Lady of Victory, Tannersville -- First Friday,
8:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.
SS. Peter & Paul, Towanda -- First Friday; begins
after the 8:30 a.m. Mass on the Thursday before
the First Friday through 3 p.m. on First Friday.
St. Francis of Assisi, West Hazleton -- First Friday,
following the 7:30 a.m. Mass until 11 a.m.
Transfiguration, West Hazleton -- Third Monday
of the month, following 7 a.m. Mass to 9 a.m.
Annunciation, Williamsport -- First Friday,
7 a.m. to 12:10 p.m.
Ascension, Williamsport -- One Sunday per month
(as announced), 12 noon to 2 p.m.
St. Ann, Williamsport -- First Friday, 8 a.m. to 7 p.m.
St. Mary/St. Joseph, Wilkes-Barre -- First Friday,
12:10 to 4 p.m.
St. Mary of the Maternity, Wilkes-Barre -First Friday, 4 to 6 p.m.
St. Therese, Wilkes-Barre -- First Friday, 8 a.m.
to 12 noon, followed by Mass at 12:15 p.m.
in the parish center chapel.

APRIL 9, 2009 CATHOLIC LIGHT PAGE 14 BLACK

15
THE CATHOLIC LIGHT APRIL 9, 2009

Parishes Will Implement Second Collections to Make Appeal Goals


James Quinn assumes responsibility for campaign
Parishes that have not yet
reached their goals for the 2008
Our Grateful Faith Appeal will
be taking up second collections
in May to raise the necessary
funds.
Bishop Martino has authorized the second collections
for the weekends of May 2-3
and May 9-10. These collections should be proposed to the
faithful as offerings requested
in lieu of unmet Appeal goals
which are essential for Diocesan services and programs.
I am deeply grateful to all
the parishes that have reached
and even exceeded their goals,
and especially to the thousands
of generous people who have
made that possible, Bishop
Martino said. In the case of
parishes that have not yet made
goal, I am also thankful for
the pledges and payments that
have been received thus far.
In a letter to pastors who
are still striving to reach their
Appeal goals, the Bishop said
he understood that many parishioners are experiencing

serious fiscal challenges during


these hard economic times.
While I recognize the difficulties confronting the people
in the pews, I can not lose
sight of the Churchs needs
and obligations to these same
people, he said. Therefore,
I rely on your pastoral zeal to
assist me with the Appeal so
that this worthy objective may
be accomplished.
The letter notes that pastors
are permitted to use parish savings to reach their Appeal goal
if they think this is necessary.
Also, the second collections
may be canceled if the unmet
parish goal is attained before
the two weekend collections
have occurred.
Bishop Martino also announced that James M. Quinn,
Diocesan Secretary for Financial Services, will serve as
director of development and
assume responsibility for the
Appeal on a temporary basis.
I am especially concerned
that this essential fund-raising
program to meet the 2008 Ap-

Status Report of Parishes Progress


Toward Appeal Goals
See pages 16-17

peal goal be accomplished,


the Bishop said. Mr. Quinn
brings to this task years of experience in the Finance Office,
which I know will be a valuable resource to the success of
the Appeal.
Mr. Quinn reported that
$4,521,609 has been raised
for the 2008 Appeal. This is
about $830,000 short of the
$5,350,000 goal.
Pledges have been received
from 33,277 contributors.
The 2007 campaign received
34,621 pledges.
In 2007, 46 parishes made
or exceeded their goal. So far
38 parishes have done so for
the current campaign.
Our 2008-09 Diocesan
budget is based on the Appeal
making its goal, Mr. Quinn
said. Without this funding,
programs and services would
be in jeopardy.
Programs supported by
the campaign include the recruitment and formation of
seminarians; care for retired
clergy; operation of The Catholic Light, Catholic Television
(CTV), and the Diocesan website; scholarships for students
in Catholic schools, religious
education programs and maintenance of Diocesan facilities.

While I recognize the difficulties confronting the people in the pews, I can
not lose sight of the Churchs needs and
obligations to these same people. Therefore, I rely on your pastoral zeal to assist
me with the Appeal so that this worthy
objective may be accomplished.
Bishop Martino
The many programs offered through the Office for
Parish Life and Evangelization
are funded through the Appeal. These include Campus
Ministry, the Pastoral Formation Institute, Ministry with
the Deaf and Hard of Hearing,
the Pro-Life Office, Youth and
Young Adult Ministry, Family
Life Ministries, Ministry with
Persons with Disabilities, and
the Office of Worship.
The 2008 Our Grateful
Faith Appeal provides an extra level of help for parishes
through scholarships for catechists to take online courses
at the Catholic Distance University and grants to parishes
with innovative approaches to
various ministry programs.

APRIL 9, 2009 CATHOLIC LIGHT PAGE 15 CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

Supplementary funding is
given to three soup kitchens
St. Francis of Assisi in Scranton, St. Vincent De Paul in Wilkes-Barre and St. Anthonys in
Williamsport and to Camp St.
Andrew /Project Hope, which
provides a summer camp experience for children from lowerincome households, and to St.
Anthonys Haven, a homeless
shelter in Scranton that provides
temporary refuge for those who
need a place to stay.
The 2008 Our Grateful
Faith Appeal also supports the
Diocesan Office of Child and
Youth Protection, maintaining programs that promote the
prevention of sexual abuse and
create safe environments for
children.

APRIL 9, 2009 THE CATHOLIC LIGHT

16

2008 Our Grateful Faith Diocesan Annual Appeal


Parish Status Report
PARISHES REACHING OR EXCEEDING GOAL
Parish
Epiphany, Sayre
St. Frances X. Cabrini, Carverton (Wyoming)
St. Peter, Wellsboro
St. Matthew, East Stroudsburg
St. Mary of the Mount, Mount Pocono
St. Joseph, Matamoras
St John Neumann, Hawley
St. John, East Stroudsburg
Blessed Virgin Mary - Queen of Peace, Hawley
St. Thomas the Apostle, Friendsville
St. James, Forest City
St. Joseph, Athens
St. Basil, Dushore
St. John the Evangelist, Susquehanna
St. Dominic, Wilkes-Barre
Immaculate Conception BVM, Williamsport
St. Ann, Shohola
St. Boniface, Williamsport
Holy Name of Mary, Montrose

Goal
$31,438
$17,478
$26,306
$64,081
$36,999
$29,713
$27,699
$48,407
$60,646
$ 8,285
$ 9,679
$16,441
$25,539
$19,122
$14,150
$25,608
$18,476
$60,061
$21,668

Pledges
$53,828
$26,940
$39,725
$92,713
$51,030
$40,944
$37,907
$63,681
$75,617
$10,270
$11,960
$19,929
$30,840
$23,080
$16,703
$29,912
$21,430
$69,555
$24,931

Percentage
171%
154%
151%
145%
138%
138%
137%
132%
125%
124%
124%
121%
121%
121%
118%
117%
116%
116%
115%

Parish
St. Francis Xavier, Friendsville
Holy Rosary, Scranton
Our Lady Queen of Peace, Brodheadsville
Our Lady of Victory, Tannersville
St. Vincent DePaul, Milford
St. Luke, Stroudsburg
St. Mary, Eynon
Mater Dolorosa (Italian), Williamsport
St. Stanislaus, Hazleton
St. Luke, Jersey Shore
St. Lawrence, Great Bend
St. Catherine of Siena, Moscow
St. Rita, Gouldsboro
St. Joseph, St. Joseph, Friendsville
St. Patrick, Milford
St. Thomas the Apostle, Elkland
Sacred Heart of Jesus, Peckville
St. Ann, Williamsport
St. Thomas More, Lake Ariel

Goal
$8,098
$42,500
$47,842
$47,688
$42,027
$104,895
$16,207
$32,211
$20,390
$17,144
$14,205
$56,350
$30,280
$14,818
$38,331
$13,583
$42,370
$53,240
$55,376

Pledges Percentage
$ 8,970
111%
$45,909
108%
$51,247
107%
$50,745
106%
$44,469
106%
$109,906
105%
$16,922
104%
$33,475
104%
$21,165
104%
$17,770
104%
$14,645
103%
$58,017
103%
$31,147
103%
$15,133
102%
$39,045
102%
$13,818
102%
$43,056
102%
$54,017
101%
$55,780
101%

Goal
$12,899
$47,224
$32,735
$10,838
$33,915
$19,552
$40,454
$13,819
$78,740
$13,929
$ 5,283
$15,282
$18,759
$40,761
$15,373
$10,760
$100,355
$33,535
$15,232
$35,036
$23,943
$55,534
$ 8,849
$17,024
$17,680
$61,929
$16,487
$12,526
$13,050
$60,491
$ 3,711
$28,250
$81,756
$10,451
$23,007

Pledges Percentage
$10,005
78%
$35,897
76%
$24,826
76%
$ 8,205
76%
$25,643
76%
$14,719
75%
$30,273
75%
$10,295
74%
$58,529
74%
$10,245
74%
$ 3,875
73%
$11,178
73%
$13,705
73%
$29,650
73%
$11,000
72%
$ 7,615
71%
$70,780
71%
$23,612
70%
$10,695
70%
$24,275
69%
$16,550
69%
$38,375
69%
$ 6,110
69%
$11,670
69%
$12,105
68%
$41,691
67%
$11,090
67%
$ 8,370
67%
$ 8,662
66%
$40,119
66%
$ 2,455
66%
$18,576
66%
$53,446
65%
$ 6,790
65%
$14,940
65%

PARISHES AT 99% 65% OF GOAL


Parish
St. Francis of Assisi, Dushore
St. Michael (Polish), Simpson
St. Peter Cathedral, Scranton
St. Thomas Aquinas, Archbald
Maternity BVM, Wilkes-Barre
St. Elizabeth, Bear Creek
St. John the Evangelist, South Waverly
SS. Peter & Paul, Plains
Our Lady of the Abingtons, Dalton
Ascension, Williamsport
Resurrection, Muncy
St. Pius X Royal, Carbondale
St. John the Evangelist, Honesdale
St. Lucy, Scranton
Holy Rosary (Polish), Duryea
St. Leo, Ashley
St. Anthony of Padua, Dunmore
St. Rose, Carbondale
St. Joseph (Lithuanian), Scranton
St. Patrick, Olyphant
St. Eulalia, Elmhurst
Holy Rosary (Italian), Wilkes-Barre
Holy Rosary, Williamsport
St. Joseph, White Mills
Holy Trinity (Slovak), Hazleton
Our Lady of Lourdes, Montoursville
Holy Family, Scranton
St. Mary of the Assumption, Scranton
St. Patrick, Scranton
St. Joseph (Slovak), Hazleton
Annunciation, Williamsport
Our Lady Help of Christians (Polish), Wapwallopen
St. Martha, Mocanaqua
Our Lady of Grace (Italian), Hazleton
St. Paul, Scranton
St. Bernadette, Canadensis

Goal
$ 9,119
$12,016
$50,355
$40,274
$32,363
$20,204
$17,254
$43,339
$24,125
$23,251
$30,979
$ 9,896
$61,500
$27,477
$28,797
$44,100
$45,710
$53,000
$17,629
$30,501
$50,711
$11,766
$ 6,675
$15,171
$17,301
$40,944
$13,283
$36,356
$60,000
$42,469
$68,353
$19,942
$11,920
$37,726
$46,522
$31,218

Pledges Percentage
$ 9,040
99%
$11,865
99%
$48,940
97%
$38,257
95%
$30,555
94%
$18,920
94%
$16,057
93%
$40,221
93%
$22,192
92%
$21,366
92%
$28,229
91%
$ 8,995
91%
$55,887
91%
$24,620
90%
$25,740
89%
$38,765
88%
$39,797
87%
$46,081
87%
$15,133
86%
$26,162
86%
$43,490
86%
$10,073
86%
$ 5,683
85%
$12,885
85%
$14,340
83%
$33,750
82%
$10,930
82%
$29,740
82%
$49,071
82%
$34,592
81%
$55,327
81%
$15,861
80%
$ 9,300
78%
$29,428
78%
$36,267
78%
$24,335
78%

Parish
Christ the King, Blakeslee
St. Maria Goretti, Laflin
Nativity Blessed Virgin Mary, Tunkhannock
St. Ann, Sayre
St. Lawrence, South Williamsport
Exaltation of the Holy Cross, Hanover Township
Holy Trinity, Swoyersville
St. Patrick, Nicholson
St. Gregory, Clarks Green
St. Michael the Archangel, Olyphant
St. Joseph (Slovak), Wilkes-Barre
St. Michael, Canton
Holy Name of Jesus, Scranton
St. Gabriel, Hazleton
St. Mary of the Assumption, Wyalusing
St. Joseph (Slovak), Nanticoke
St. Ignatius, Kingston
St. Therese, Wilkes-Barre
St. Martin of Tours, Jackson
SS. Peter & Paul, Towanda
Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary, Scranton
St. Joseph, Scranton
Immaculate Conception, Scranton
St. Joseph (Polish), Wyoming
Holy Ghost (Slovak), Olyphant
Gate of Heaven, Dallas
St. John the Evangelist, Scranton
Holy Trinity, Wilkes-Barre
St. Mary of the Lake, Lake Winola
St. John Bosco, Conyngham
St. Juliana, Rock Lake (Forest City)
Our Lady of Sorrows, West Wyoming
St. Therese, Shavertown
St. Joachim, Meshoppen
Sacred Heart, Plains

APRIL 9, 2009 CATHOLIC LIGHT PAGE16 CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

17

Parish
Goal
Pledges Percentage
Holy Name-St. Mary, Swoyersville
$46,703 $30,077
64%
St. Mary Annunciation (Lithuanian), Kingston
$18,574 $11,941
64%
St. Anthony of Padua, Scranton
$10,194 $ 6,398
63%
St. Joseph, Wilkes-Barre Township
$14,288 $ 8,960
63%
St. Francis of Assisi, Scranton
$35,517 $22,242
63%
St. John the Evangelist, Pittston
$76,972 $48,096
62%
St. Mary (Polish), Mocanaqua
$10,645 $ 6,651
62%
Sacred Heart of Jesus, Dupont
$38,632 $24,080
62%
Holy Child, Mansfield
$25,678 $15,981
62%
St. Mary Help of Christians, Pittston
$13,215 $ 8,180
62%
St. Mary, Waymart
$20,423 $12,625
62%
Corpus Christi, Olyphant
$30,282 $18,718
62%
St. Clare, Scranton
$32,024 $19,776
62%
Immaculate Conception, West Pittston
$29,564 $18,090
61%
St. Jude, Mountaintop
$117,272 $71,117
61%
Blessed Sacrament, Wilkes-Barre
$26,982 $16,355
61%
(includes St. Francis (Lithuanian) and St. John the Baptist, Wilkes-Barre)
Visitation of Blessed Virgin Mary, Dickson City
$54,910 $33,126
60%
Nativity of Our Lord, Scranton
$45,243 $26,925
60%
Our Lady of the Lake, Pocono Pines
$38,258 $22,515
59%
St. John the Baptist, Scranton
$ 9,831 $ 5,755
59%
St. Patrick, Wilkes-Barre
$18,267 $10,590
58%
St. John the Baptist, Plymouth
$32,501 $18,825
58%
St. James, Jessup
$25,135 $14,285
57%
(includes St. Michael (Slovak), Jessup)
Good Shepherd, Drums
$31,783 $17,834
56%
St. Mary Czestochowa, Scranton
$23,499 $13,091
56%
Holy Family, Luzerne
$52,414 $28,956
55%
St. Rocco, Dunmore
$10,400 $ 5,745
55%
SS. Peter & Paul, Avoca
$23,890 $13,145
55%
St. Joseph (Polish), Plains
$18,526 $10,070
54%
Our Lady of the Snows, Clarks Summit
$109,452 $59,273
54%
St. Francis of Assisi, Nanticoke
$24,511 $13,222
54%
Holy Redeemer, Pittston
$12,562 $ 6,694
53%
St. Mary Immaculate Conception, Wilkes-Barre
$42,779 $22,440
52%
St. Casimir, Wilkes-Barre
$15,855 $ 8,146
51%
St. Bridget, Throop
$ 4,025 $ 2,065
51%
Sacred Heart of Mary, Jermyn
$26,762 $13,670
51%
Our Lady of Victory, Harveys Lake
$39,231 $19,960
51%
Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception, Freeland $34,728 $17,536
50%
Sacred Heart of Jesus, Mayfield
$15,036 $ 7,570
50%
St. Mary of Mt. Carmel, Dunmore
$88,522 $44,394
50%
(includes All Saints and St. Casimir, Dunmore)
Our Lady of Mount Carmel, Pittston
$39,906 $19,995
50%
St. Nicholas, Wilkes-Barre
$65,580 $32,620
50%
St. Mary Assumption, Jessup
$25,769 $12,809
50%
Sacred Heart of Jesus, Weston
$16,652 $ 8,230
49%
Our Lady of Mt. Carmel, Carbondale
$41,618 $20,470
49%
Sacred Heart of Jesus, Duryea
$16,613 $ 8,105
49%
(includes St. Joseph (Lithuanian), Duryea)
Catholic Community of Forest City, Forest City
$36,445 $17,565
48%
St. Michael, Scranton
$17,474 $ 8,142
47%
St. Francis, West Hazleton
$21,314 $ 9,925
47%
St. Patrick, White Haven
$27,517 $12,756
46%
St. Aloysius, Wilkes-Barre
$47,792 $21,910
46%
Christ the King, Scranton
$ 9,729 $ 4,435
46%
SS. Peter & Paul, Scranton
$22,396 $10,122
45%
St. Stanislaus Kostka (Polish), Wilkes-Barre
$13,533 $ 6,056
45%
Immaculate Conception, Scranton
$54,718 $23,576
43%
Holy Family (Polish), Sugar Notch
$17,341 $ 7,331
42%
St. John Neumann, Mansfield
$15,812 $ 6,665
42%
Our Lady of Mt. Carmel, Hunlock Creek
$30,219 $12,583
42%
St. Anthony of Padua, Exeter
$29,988 $12,457
42%
St. Anthony (Polish), Throop
$13,542 $ 5,600
41%

Parish
St. Mary (Italian), Old Forge
St. Mark Inkerman, Pittston
St. Michael (Polish), Old Forge
St. John the Baptist, Exeter
Holy Trinity (Polish), Nanticoke
All Saints, Plymouth
St. Charles Borromeo, Sugar Notch
Most Precious Blood, Hazleton
St. Cecilia, Exeter
Holy Saviour, Wilkes-Barre
(includes St. Christopher, Wilkes-Barre)
St. Ann, Scranton
Holy Rosary (Italian), Hazleton
St. Mary Assumption, Pittston
St. Mary of Czestochowa, Nanticoke
St. Lawrence, Old Forge
Corpus Christi, Glen Lyon
St. Boniface, Wilkes-Barre
St. John the Baptist, Throop
Sacred Heart of Jesus, Hazleton
St. Rocco, Pittston
St. Ann, Tobyhanna
Transfiguration, West Hazleton
St. Mary, Avoca
Blessed Sacrament, Pittston
Sacred Heart - St. John, Wilkes-Barre
Ascension, Mocanaqua
St. Nazarius (Italian), Hazleton
St. Stanislaus, Nanticoke
St. Mary, Hazleton
SS. Peter & Paul, West Hazleton
Holy Child, Nanticoke
Our Lady of Mt. Carmel, Hazleton

APRIL 9, 2009 CATHOLIC LIGHT PAGE17 CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

Goal
$46,720
$10,692
$16,561
$ 9,353
$38,655
$85,022
$ 8,240
$41,585
$21,375
$30,849

Pledges
$19,046
$ 4,250
$ 6,576
$ 3,661
$15,052
$32,890
$ 3,155
$15,895
$ 8,083
$11,481

$56,019
$27,367
$12,647
$16,569
$15,010
$20,230
$21,598
$10,125
$ 8,580
$22,109
$32,006
$28,324
$34,361
$12,764
$48,205
$ 5,332
$ 6,543
$16,802
$ 8,056
$ 7,013
$ 5,782
$18,802

$20,633
$ 9,990
$ 4,425
$ 5,740
$ 5,053
$ 6,789
$ 6,785
$ 3,165
$ 2,625
$ 6,694
$ 9,070
$ 7,912
$ 9,594
$ 3,465
$12,855
$ 1,390
$ 1,690
$ 4,120
$ 1,969
$ 1,551
$ 1,235
$ 3,575

Percentage
41%
40%
40%
39%
39%
39%
38%
38%
38%
37%
37%
37%
35%
35%
34%
34%
31%
31%
31%
30%
28%
28%
28%
27%
27%
26%
26%
25%
24%
22%
21%
19%

THE CATHOLIC LIGHT APRIL 9, 2009

PARISHES BELOW 65% OF GOAL

APRIL 9, 2009 THE CATHOLIC LIGHT

18

Guardian of
the Redeemer
Bishop Addresses First
Gathering of New
Mens Fellowship
About 100 men of varying
ages from many different areas
of the Diocese of Scranton assembled at the St Josephs Oblate
Seminary in Pittston on March 28
for a Mens Holy Hour sponsored
by the Guardian of the Redeemer
Catholic Mens Fellowship.
Several priests administered
the Sacrament of Reconciliation
prior to the start of the Holy Hour.
Songs accompanied the Exposition of our Lord in the Blessed
Sacrament.
Father David Betts presided
over the Holy Hour, and preached
a homily in which he encouraged
the men to reach out and touch
the lives of other men, and to be
creative in finding ways to make

them thirsty for the faith.


The men spent time worshipping and adoring our Eucharistic
Lord in silence. Father Betts led a
communal prayer of entrustment
to St. Joseph, and Bishop Joseph
F. Martino led the group in praying the Chaplet of Divine Mercy.
Benediction and songs concluded
the service.
After the Holy Hour, Bishop
Martino was formally introduced,
and received a loud and prolonged
standing ovation.
He began his remarks by affirming the men for the robustness
of their singing. He then recounted
how inspired he was after attending a meeting about Catholic
mens movements in Chicago

(Mundelein) in 1998. This was the


meeting that spawned the National
Fellowship of Catholic Men.
Bishop Martino recalled that,
after being appointed prelate here
in 2003, one of the desires of his
heart was to have a mens movement in this Diocese. He described
it as a dream come true when
Glenn Yanik approached him
about starting a Catholic Mens
Fellowship, and Father Leo McKernan agreed to be the chaplain.
Bishop Martino noted that
todays culture can sometimes
lead to confusion about the
roles of men. This situation has
resulted in a need for Catholic
men to understand their true
place in the Church and society.

(The Catholic Light Photos/Jack Kelley)

Father David Betts presided over the Holy Hour and preached a homily.

Bishop Martino talks


to the men assembled
for the inaugural
gathering of the
Guardian of the
Redeemer Catholic
Mens Fellowship.
This is the purpose to which
Catholic mens movements can
contribute greatly.
Remembering the insightful
Letter to Women written by Pope
John Paul II, Bishop Martino speculated that perhaps Pope Benedict
XVI might write a similar Letter
to Men at some point.
The Bishop spoke about the
fact that God chose to reveal himself
as Father, and to send us his Son
to save us, highlighting the importance of a proper comprehension of
the male element. Understanding
this will help men to be more loving
husbands to their wives, and more
protecting fathers to their daughters,
he said.
After the talk, Mr. Yanik en-

couraged the men to get involved


in a parish-based mens sharing
group, or even to take the initiative and start one in their parish.
He assured the men that there
is no intent to poach men from
existing groups such as Holy
Name Societies or the Knights
of Columbus, but that these new
mens sharing groups were meant
to be a complement to those other
organizations.
Father McKernan and Father
Michael Salvagna also gave brief
exhortations prior to the men adjourning to the conviviality room.
Along the way, a room was set
up in which many resources were
available to help men in their
spiritual growth.

The Bishop spoke about the fact that


God chose to reveal himself as
Father, and to send us his Son to
save us, highlighting the importance of
a proper comprehension of the male
element. Understanding this will help
men to be more loving husbands to their
wives, and more protecting fathers to
their daughters, he said.

APRIL 9, 2009 CATHOLIC LIGHT PAGE 18 CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

April 19

19

The Feast of the Divine Mercy will be celebrated on Sunday,


April 19 the Second Sunday
of Easter with Masses and
special services being offered at
numerous locations throughout
the Diocese of Scranton.
Hosted by the Oblates
of St. Joseph
Divine Mercy Sunday services will be held April 19 in
the chapel of the Oblates of St.
Joseph Seminary, Highway 315,
Pittston.
Serving as principal celebrant
for the devotions will be Very
Rev. Paul A. McDonnell, OSJ,
provincial superior of the St. Joseph Oblate Fathers and seminary
rector.
Introductory remarks will be
offered by Cathy Mack, facilitator
of the local Divine Mercy Cenacle
and coordinator for the feast day
services.
Devotion begins with the
blessing of the image of the Divine Mercy of Jesus, followed by
celebration of Mass at 2 p.m. Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament
will be accompanied by the Divine
Mercy Chaplet in song.
A Marian devotion, recitation
of the Holy Rosary, benediction
and individual blessing with the
first-class relic of St. Faustina
will conclude the celebration. All
faithful are invited.

Celebrations in
Hawley, Olyphant
& Wellsboro
A Mass and Novena will be
offered in celebration of the Feast
of Divine Mercy at BVM Queen
of Peace Church in Hawley on
April 19.
Sunday liturgy will be celebrated at 2 p.m., followed by a
closing Novena to conclude the
Divine Mercy services. Celebrants
will include Father Richard Beck,
host pastor; Passionist Father
Cassian Yuhaus and Monsignor
Donald McAndrews.
Divine Mercy Sunday will be
celebrated April 19 at St. Michael
the Archangel Church, Lincoln St.
and Willow Ave., Olyphant. Host
pastor Father Thomas Muldowney
and Deacon Carmine Mendicino,
coordinator of events, announce
the following devotion schedule:
12:30 p.m. Rosary and
Sacrament of Reconciliation; 2
p.m. Eucharistic Liturgy, followed by exposition of the Blessed
Sacrament; and 3 p.m. Chaplet
of Divine Mercy, followed by Solemn Benediction, blessing with
relic of St. Faustina, and anointing. For more information, contact
the rectory at (489-0752).
The Church of St. Peter in
Wellsboro will celebrate Divine
Mercy Sunday, beginning with exposition of the Blessed Sacrament
immediately following the 11 a.m.

For All Your Printing & Copying Needs

Mass. The Divine Mercy Chaplet


will be recited at 3 p.m. and conclude with benediction. St. Peters
is located at 38 Central Ave.
At St. Ann Basilica &
in Clarks Summit
The Basilica of the National
Shrine of St. Ann will host a Divine Mercy Sunday celebration
in the basilica church, beginning
with Confessions being heard
from 2 to 3 p.m. Divine Mercy
Chaplet prayers will be recited at
3 p.m., followed by Holy Mass
at 3:15. Refreshments and fellowship will follow the liturgy
at 4 p.m.
Divine Mercy devotions will
be held April 19 from 3 to 4 p.m.
at Our Lady of the Snows Church
in Clarks Summit. Father Philip
Altavilla, V.E., Episcopal Vicar
of the Northern Pastoral Region,
will serve as guest homilist for
the celebration, which will also
include the Sacrament of Reconciliation, Eucharistic adoration,
Chaplet of the Divine Mercy and
benediction.

301 Mulberry Street

SCRANTON
570-343-0414 FAX 570-343-8716
Stauffer Industrial Park

TAYLOR

The

Death Penalty

In Luzerne County Churches


A celebration of Divine Mercy Sunday will be held at St. Leo/
Holy Rosary Church, 33 Manhattan St., Ashley, starting at 3 p.m.
The feast day event will include

A statement from
Sisters, Servants
of the Immaculate
Heart of Mary
Scranton, PA

Continued on Page 20
Sisters of Saints
Cyril & Methodius
Danville, PA

First Communion Gifts by Bliss

Books
Church Goods
Religious Articles

We have access to more than 450


different Patron Saint medals

Sisters of Mercy
of the Americas
Mid-Atlantic
Community

400 WYOMING AVE.


SCRANTON, PA 18503
(570) 342-8246 1-800-367-6610
Hours: Mon. through Sat. 9:00 to 5:30

Sisters of
Christian Charity
Mendham, NJ

e are committed to act in solidarity with all of


Gods people, and declare our opposition to the
use of the death penalty.
We believe that the use of the death penalty diminishes
the moral quality of our own lives and contributes to the
brutal cycle of violence. We grieve with families of victims
and pray that they experience Gods comfort and healing in
their lives.
In a society where people are still judged by their
economic standing and the color of their skin, we are
concerned that the death penalty disproportionately impacts
minorities and people who are poor.
We believe that society is challenged to find alternative,
compassionate and creative ways to address the effects of
violence in the world that would strengthen rather than
diminish the moral fabric of society.
In a society where we are all brothers and sisters, we
urge others to never give up on the sinner and always hold
out the possibility of repentance and conversion.

APRIL 9, 2009 CATHOLIC LIGHT PAGE 19 BLACK

THE CATHOLIC LIGHT APRIL 9, 2009

Divine Mercy Sunday Celebrations

APRIL 9, 2009 THE CATHOLIC LIGHT

20

CTV: CATHOLIC TELEVISION

Divine Mercy Sunday Devotions

Diocese of Scranton, 400 Wyoming Ave., Scranton, PA 18503 (570) 207-2219

Continued from Page 19

Community Broadcast Stations: W07BV-Ch. 7, Wilkes-Barre W19CI-Ch. 19, Berwick


Comcast Cable TV, Scranton: channel 12 Metrocast Cable TV, Berwick: channel 13;
Service Electric Cable, Wilkes-Barre: channel 18 Service Electric Cablevision, Hazleton: channel 21;
Adams Cable Service, Carbondale: channel 16 Comcast Cable TV, Williamsport, channel 16

exposition and benediction of


the Blessed Sacrament, recitation
of the Rosary and Divine Mercy
Chaplet, and blessing of the sacred
image of the Divine Mercy. Light
refreshments will be served following the services.

APRIL SCHEDULE
12:00 AM

SUNDAY

MONDAY

DAILY MASS (Encore)

SUNDAY MASS
(ENCORE)

1:00 AM

TUESDAY

LITANY OF THE
SACRED HEART

1:30 AM FATHER JOHN CORAPI

BENEDICTION &
DEVOTIONS (Encore)

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

EWTN LIVE
(Encore)

LIFE ON THE ROCK


(Encore)

THE WORLD OVER


LIVE (Encore)

REASONS TO BELIEVE

THE EUCHARIST

CATHOLIC LIVES

MARRIAGE WORKS IN
CHRIST: BROKEN AND
BLESSED

THEOLOGY OF THE
BODY FOR TEENS

DEFENDING LIFE

CHRIST IN THE CITY

BENEDICTION &
DEVOTIONS (ENCORE)

CATHOLICISM ON
CAMPUS

MAJOR RELIGIOUS
ORDERS OF MEN

DOES THE CHURCH


STILL TEACH THAT?

PAPAL AUDIENCE LIVE

VISIONARIES,
MYSTICS &
STIGMATISTS

DAILY MASS

THE JOURNEY HOME


(Encore)

MOTHER ANGELICA
LIVE CLASSICS

(Encore)

2:00 AM

2:30 AM

EWTN GLOBAL
SHOWCASE

3:00 AM

FIREWALK OF FAITH

3:30 AM

EWTN CATHOLIC
CLASSIC

SUNDAY NIGHT: LIVE


THE BEST OF MOTHER THRESHOLD OF HOPE
WITH FR. BENEDICT
(ENCORE)
ANGELICA LIVE
GROESCHEL (Encore)

EWTN GALLERY
FIVE PILLARS OF
THE SPIRITUAL LIFE

DANA AND FRIENDS

4:00 AM

4:30 AM

EWTN LIVE
(Encore)

FULFILLMENT OF ALL
DESIRE

CATHOLIC COMPASS

THE ABUNDANT LIFE


VOICES ON VIRTUE

5:00 AM
5:30 AM

6:00 AM

A WIDOWS WALK
WITH CHRIST

EWTN BOOKMARK

THAT THEY MIGHT


HAVE LIFE

THE CHURCH: GOD'S


PLAN

ONE IN THEIR HEARTS

CROSSING THE GOAL

CARDINAL NEWMAN
AT 2000

LITANY OF LORETO

LITANY OF THE HOLY


NAME

BACKSTAGE

REASONS TO BELIEVE

8:00 AM
8:30 AM
9:00 AM

WEB OF FAITH

PATH TO ROME: ST.


PAUL'S CAPTIVITY
EPISTLES

STATIONS OF THE
CROSS

MADE IN HIS IMAGE


FAMILY LIFE TODAY

SUPER SAINTS

DISCOVERING OUR
GLORIOUS FAITH

THE CHOICES WE
FACE

REASONS FOR OUR


HOPE

LITANY OF THE
SACRED HEART

LITANY OF ST. JOSEPH

LITANY OF THE
PRECIOUS BLOOD

PAPAL AUDIENCE

LITANY OF LORETO

Daily Mass (LIVE)

SUNDAY MASS (LIVE)

EWTN BOOKMARK

SUNDAY NIGHT: LIVE


WITH FR. BENEDICT
GROESCHEL (Encore)

LIVE WITH PASSION

THE FRIAR
THRESHOLD OF HOPE
(ENCORE)

EWTN LIVE
(Encore)

FOCUS
MY CATHOLIC
FAMILY

Fr. Ed Buchheit, C.P.

10:00 AM
ROME REPORTS
10:30 AM

THE JOURNEY HOME


(Encore)

CTV SPECIAL
PRESENTATION

FOOTPRINTS OF GOD
THE ABUNDANT LIFE

ANIMATED STORIES
FROM THE NEW
TESTAMENT
TRUTH IN THE
HEART

SUPER SAINTS

MADE IN HIS IMAGEFAMILY LIFE TODAY

THE QUEST FOR


SHAKESPERE

DISCOVERING THE
VATICAN

G.K. CHESTERTON

OCTAVA DIES

NOVENA
TO ST. ANN

KNIGHTS OF ST.
MICHAEL

HOLY ROSARY

THE CHOICES
WE FACE

NOVENA
TO ST. ANN

CHRISTOPHER
CLOSE-UP

LIVE
WITH PASSION

FAMILY THEATER

HOLY ROSARY

12:00 PM

1:00 PM

THE WORLD OVER


(Encore)

FAITH AND CULTURE

11:30 AM

12:30 PM

PRESENTS

HOLY LAND ROSARY


LITANY OF THE HOLY
NAME

9:30 AM

11:00 AM

EWTN

THE CHAPLET OF ST. MICHAEL

7:30 AM
7:50 AM

DISCOVERING THE
VATICAN

EWTN ORIGINAL PRODUCTIONS

7:00 AM

MY GOD & MY ALL: A


JOURNEY TOWARD
THE FRANCISCAN
SPIRIT

FIRST COMES LOVE

ADVENTURES IN
EXODUS

6:30 AM

IN CONCERT

SUNDAY MASS (Encore)

THE DAILY MASS FROM ST. PETER'S CATHEDRAL, LIVE AT 12:10 p.m.
"DIOCESAN DATEBOOK" airs before and after Mass.

LITANY OF THE
SACRED HEART

LIFE IS WORTH LIVING


FR. JOHN CORAPI

1:30 PM

BENEDICTION &
DEVOTIONS (Encore)

IN CONCERT
2:00 PM

THE JOURNEY HOME


(Encore)

CHRISTOPHER
CLOSE-UP

2:30 PM
JOY OF MUSIC

THE FOOTPRINTS OF
GOD

CATHOLIC COMPASS

THE ABUNDANT LIFE

EWTN GLOBAL
SHOWCASE

BECOMING A
CATHOLIC

Fr. Ed Buchheit, C.P.

ST. THOMAS AQUINAS


IN TODAY'S WORLD

PATH TO ROME: ST
PAUL'S CAPTIVITY
EPISTLES

3:00 PM

THE CHAPLET OF DIVINE MERCY IN SONG

3:15 PM
3:30 PM

REFLECTIONS
MYSTERIES OF THE
ROSARY

4:00 PM
WORLD OVER (Encore)
4:30 PM

LIFE ON THE ROCK


(Encore)

THE DAILY MASS FROM ST. ANN'S BASILICA, SCRANTON

EWTN DAILY MASS


(Encore)
EWTN RELIGIOUS
CATALOGUE
VISIONARIES,
MYSTICS &
STIGMATISTS
THE GREAT
ADVENTURE: A
JOURNEY THROUGH
THE BIBLE

ROSARY FOR LIFE

NOVENA
TO ST. ANN

CHRISTOPHER
CLOSE-UP

LIVE WITH PASSION

THE CHOICES
WE FACE

MUSIC AND
THE SPOKEN WORD

CRASH COURSE IN
JOHN PAUL II

MY LITTLE ANGELS

WE ARE CATHOLIC

THE FRIAR

LUCY AND FRIENDS

MY CATHOLIC FAMILY

THE CHURCH
AND
THE POOR

TRUTH IN THE HEART

IMAGE OF GOD

FIVE PILLARS OF THE


SPIRITUAL LIFE

ONE IN THEIR HEARTS

5:00 PM
THE CHOICES
WE FACE

KNIGHTS OF ST.
MICHAEL

HI LUCY / BIG AL

LIVE TRUTH IN THE HEART

5:30 PM
Fr. Ed Buchheit, C.P.

DANA AND FRIENDS

ROME REPORTS

EWTN BOOKMARK

THE WORD MADE


FLESH

CATHOLIC LIVES

THE CHOICES WE
FACE

THE QUEST FOR


SHAKESPEARE

THE CHURCH: GOD'S


PLAN

6:00 PM
FOCUS
6:30 PM
7:00 PM

7:30PM

8:00 PM
8:30 PM

EWTN GALLERY
CELEBRATION OF
THE MASS
LIVE
WITH PASSION
FR. CORAPI AND THE
CATECHISM OF THE
CATHOLIC CHURCH

SUNDAY NIGHT: LIVE


WITH FR. BENEDICT
GROESCHEL (Encore)

LIFE IS WORTH
LIVING
VOICES ON VIRTUE

THE DAILY MASS FROM ST. PETER'S CATHEDRAL, (Encore)


THE HOLY ROSARY

POPE'S AUDIENCE

THE HOLY ROSARY

MOTHER ANGELICA
LIVE CLASSICS

DIOCESAN DATEBOOK
THE JOURNEY HOME
(LIVE)

CTV
SPECIAL
PRESENTATION

REASONS TO BELIEVE

THE CHOICES
WE FACE

EWTN LIVE

LIFE ON THE ROCK


(LIVE)

THE WORLD OVER


(LIVE)

EWTN GLOBAL
SHOWCASE

Fr. Ed Buchheit, C.P.

CROSSING
THE GOAL

EWTN BOOKMARK

FAMILY
THEATER

LIVE WITH PASSION

HOLY ROSARY W
MOTHER ANGELICA

CATHOLICISM ON
CAMPUS

DEFENDING LIFE

FULFILLMENT OF ALL
DESIRE

MADE IN HIS IMAGE


FAMILY LIFE TODAY

9:00 PM
G.K. CHESTERTON
9:30 PM

FOCUS
HOLY ROSARY W
MOTHER ANGELICA

NOVENA
TO ST. ANN

CHRISTOPHER
CLOSE-UP

CATHOLIC COMPASS

THE ABUNDANT LIFE

THRESHOLD OF HOPE

EWTN PRESENTS

CHRIST IN THE CITY

FAITH & CULTURE

10:00 PM

10:30 PM
11:00 PM
11:30 PM

LIFE ON THE ROCK


(Encore)

THE WORLD OVER


(Encore)

MAJOR RELIGIOUS
ORDERS OF MEN

CATHOLIC CANVAS

ROME REPORTS

MARRIAGE WORKS IN
THEOLOGY OF THE
CHRIST: BROKEN AND
BODY FOR TEENS
BLESSED

THE QUEST FOR


SHAKESPEARE

FATHER JOHN
CORAPI

St. Jude Church in Mountaintop once again will host a Divine


Mercy Sunday Devotion, beginning at 3 p.m. The parish services
will include recitation of the Holy
Rosary and Chaplet of the Divine
Mercy, and benediction of the
Blessed Sacrament.

St. Padre Pio Group to Celebrate


Divine Mercy Sunday April 19
NANTICOKE St. Padre
Pio Prayer Group will gather to
celebrate the Feast of the Divine
Mercy on Divine Mercy Sunday,
April 19, at St. Joseph Church,
107 E. Noble St.
The annual devotion on the
Second Sunday of Easter will begin at 2 p.m. with the blessing of
the Divine Mercy image by Father
William Langan, host pastor and
group spiritual director.
Special Marian devotions,
including recitation of the Glorious Mysteries of the Rosary and
presentation of roses before the
Blessed Mother statue, will precede exposition of the Blessed
Sacrament and Eucharistic Adoration.
Time for private prayer will
be followed by sung recitation

of the Divine Mercy Chaplet at


3 p.m.
Serving as cantor and soloist
for the devotion will be Deacon
Leonard Kassick of Hazleton;
Robert Passetti will accompany
as organist.
Mercy Sister Elizabeth Brody
will proclaim a Scripture reading,
followed by a spiritual reflection
by Father Langan. The book of
prayer intentions will be presented
prior to intercessory prayers to St.
Padre Pio.
Litany of the Divine Mercy
will be followed by Eucharistic
procession, closing with benediction and blessing with the St.
Faustina relic.
All faithful are welcome to
attend. For more information, call
(735-6903).

Diocese of Scranton
Office for Parish Life
Ministry Component
MS034 Extraordinary Minister
of Holy Communion Training
The Extraordinary Minister of Holy Communion serves
Gods people, sharing the Body and Blood of Christ with
worshipers in the assembly and with those confined to their
homes and hospitals. Those enrolling in the seven-hour
training sessions are required to attend each of the three
dates given. A certificate will be given to each person upon
completion of the training. Fee: $30
Good Shepherd Academy, Kingston
Deacon Thomas Cesarini
April 16, 23, 30 (Thursdays) 6:30-9 p.m.
To register for the above training session,
please call the Office for Parish Life,
(570-207-2213, ext. 1107)

THE JOURNEY HOME


(Encore)

APRIL 9,2009 CATHOLIC LIGHT PAGE20 BLACK

Mark Your Calendar Events Around the Diocese


registered dietician/nutritionist;
topic: Heart-Healthy Eating.
Public is welcome. Applications for membership available;
for more information, call Jack
Walsh, chapter president, (3404842).
APRIL 18 Tricky Tray/
Theme Basket Fundraiser, hosted
by St. Mary of the Mount Parish,
Mount Pocono; begins 11 a.m.
at Monsignor McHugh School,
Route 390, Cresco. Drawing begins
at 12:45 p.m. Cost: $5 for initial
sheet of 25 tickets; each additional
sheet, $4.50. Featuring more than
50 prize theme baskets and raffle
prizes, including beach house vacation; refreshments for purchase
include traditional picnic foods
and hot/cold soft drinks. For more
information, call (839-7138).
APRIL 18 Fantasy Casino Night, sponsored by LaSalle
Academy, Jessup; held from 6 to 10
p.m. at Holy Cross High School,
Dunmore. Admission includes
play money for casino games,
dinner buffet, refreshment bar, and
live and silent auctions featuring
numerous prizes. Cost: $40 per person; $30 for senior citizens (age 55
and older). For more information
and tickets, call LaSalle Academy
(489-2010).

APRIL 19 Monthly Meeting of the St. Joseph Secular


Franciscan Fraternity; hosted
at St. Joseph Oblates Seminary,
Route 315, Laflin. Liturgy of the
Hours recited at 1:30 p.m. in the
seminary chapel. Fraternity meets
regularly on the third Sunday of
every month; all professed members of the Secular Franciscans
and interested men and women
welcome.
APRIL 19 Monthly Breakfast Buffet, hosted by St. Eulalia Church, Blue Shutters Road,
Elmhurst; serving from 8:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. in the church hall. Featuring full breakfast menu. Cost:
adults (age 12 to 64), $6; seniors
(age 65 & older), $5; children (age
6-11), $3; children age 5 & under
admitted free. Public is invited;
tickets at the door.
APRIL 19 Ziti & Homemade Meatball Dinner, sponsored
by St. Casimir Church, Hanover
Township; serving from 11 a.m.
to 3 p.m. in the church hall, 301
Delaney St. (take-out orders available). Cost: adults, $7; children

Country Day Nursery


ursery School

(under age 10), $3. Tickets may


be purchased at the door or in advance after all weekend Masses or
by contacting the rectory office at
(825-2598).
APRIL 20 Retreat: Last
Words of Jesus, hosted by St.
Anns Basilica, west Scranton;
held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Days
program includes prayer, spiritual

Continued on Page 22

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Diocesan Datebook
Support Group for Separated, Divorced & Widowed
Persons, April 17 7 to 9 p.m. at St. Ann Basilica Parish Center, 1200 St. Ann St., Scranton. Sponsored by the
diocesan Office for Parish Life, this Beginning Experience monthly session offers support to cope with sorrow, doubt, anxiety and loneliness after losing a spouse.
For more information/registration, call (489-7769).
Intermediate Sign Language, April 20, 27 & May 4, 11
(Mondays) 6 to 8 p.m. at Holy Redeemer High School,
Wilkes-Barre. A continuation of Introduction to Sign
Language, this course will present the language of the
Deaf Culture on a higher and broader level of learning.
Presenter: Sister Mary Beth Makuch, SSCM. Fee: $45.
For more information & registration, call (207-2213 ext.
1107).
Northeastern Pennsylvania Catholic Deaf Association Interpreted Mass, May 17 at St. Josephs Oblate
Seminary, 1880 Highway 315, Laflin. Bible study and
Sacrament of Reconciliation begin at 2 p.m., followed
by Mass (signed and interpreted), celebrated at 3 p.m.
Refreshments follow. For more information, contact Sister Mary Beth Makuch, SSCM, at (207-2213 ext. 1013
voice/tdd).

APRIL 9,2009 CATHOLIC LIGHT PAGE21 BLACK

Open House

April 25

Take a tour of campus,


meet with faculty, admissions,
and financial aid staff, and talk
with students. Starts at 9:30 a.m.
Call 610.282.1100, ext. 1277.

www.desales.edu

Julie Dielmann 10 Sport and Exercise Science Major

THE CATHOLIC LIGHT APRIL 9, 2009

APRIL 10 Good Friday


Dramatic Presentation: What
Jesus Saw from the Cross, featuring the combined ministries of
the Deanery Choir and St. John
Neumann Choir and Youth Group,
Lords Valley; begins at 7 p.m. at St.
John Neumann Church. Inspired
presentation includes drama, prayer
and music; all are welcome.
APRIL 15 Catholic Young
Adult Group Meeting, hosted
by Our Lady of Mount Carmel
Church, 241 William St., Pittston;
held on the first and third Wednesdays of each month at 7 p.m. in the
meeting room of the Parish Center.
Open to all young adult Catholics
(age 18 to 39), who seek to grow
in their faith, discuss current events
and participate in social outreach
activities. For more information,
contact Father Johnson, assistant
pastor, at (654-6902) or Lynne
Marie Busch (690-0512).
APRIL 16 Scranton
Chapter of Mended Hearts Support Group Meeting, for all heart
patients, their families and health
care professionals; 7 to 9 p.m.
at Mercy Hospital, 746 Jefferson Ave., Scranton (Ancillary
Building, second-floor Monsignor
McGowan Conference Center).
Guest speaker: Helen Pickering,

21

APRIL 9, 2009 THE CATHOLIC LIGHT

22

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reflection, conferences, quiet time,


Sacrament of Reconciliation and
Eucharistic Liturgy. For more information and reservations, contact
Gertrude Grimes at (383-2763).
APRIL 20-22 Spring
Rummage Sale, sponsored by
the Catholic Women of Holy
Trinity Parish, 116 Hughes St.,
Swoyersville; held in the church
hall. Sale hours: Monday, 9 a.m.
to 3 p.m. & 6 to 9 p.m.; Tuesday
and Wednesday ($2 Bag Day/HalfPrice Sale), 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Items
include clothing, jewelry, books,
household items & furniture; bake
sale and light luncheon available
each day. Call (287-6624) for more
information.
APRIL 23 Retreat: Last
Words of Jesus, hosted at Holy

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Trinity Parish Hall, S. Hanover


St., Nanticoke; held from 9 a.m.
to 3 p.m. Days program includes
prayer, spiritual reflection, conferences, quiet time, Sacrament of
Reconciliation and Eucharistic
Liturgy. For more information
and reservations, contact Gertrude
Grimes at (383-2763) or the parish
office at (735-4833).
APRIL 25 Craft Fair,
sponsored by St. John the Baptist
Church, 126 Nesbitt St., Larksville;
held from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Includes
food, refreshments, bake sale,
frozen pierogi sale and childrens
activities. Interested vendors seeking information or to reserve space,
may call the church office (7799620) or (417-4927).

Anointing of Sick
Slated in Elmhurst
ELMHURST The Pastoral
Outreach and Social Concerns
Committee of St. Eulalia Parish
will host the celebration of the
Sacrament of Anointing of the
Sick on Sunday, April 26, at 2
p.m. in St. Eulalia Church, Blue
Shutters Road, Elmhurst.
The Sacrament of Anointing is offered to anyone about to
undergo surgery, those suffering
from serious/chronic illness, the
terminally ill and all elderly and
infirm who seek the comfort and
grace of the sacrament.
The anointing service will
be followed by refreshments and
fellowship in the parish hall. All
are welcome to attend.

APRIL 26 Choral Music


Performance, presented by the
Choral Arts of Luzerne County;
3 p.m. at St. Nicholas Church,
Wilkes-Barre. Featuring the music
from Carmina Burana, with texts
by 13th-century German monks.
Choral Arts chorus will be accompanied by soloists and musicians;
directed by John Curtis. Admission
fee: $15 ($10 for students and seniors). Tickets available at the door
or by calling Mary at (288-8434
ext. 205).
APRIL 26 Chinese Auction, sponsored by the Greater
Nanticoke Area Catholic Youth
Group; doors open at 9:30 a.m.
at the Pope John Paul II School
building, 518 S. Hanover St.,
Nanticoke. Drawing begins at 1
p.m.; prizes include a variety of
theme baskets, household items,
numerous gift cards and a grand
prize of a one-week vacation.
Public is welcome.
APRIL 26 Penny Auction,
sponsored by the Altar & Rosary
Society of Our Lady of Mount
Carmel Parish, Pittston; begins 2
p.m. in the Mount Carmel Parish
Center, William St. Admission fee:
$1; refreshments will be served.
APRIL 28 Mass & Anointing of the Sick, hosted by St. Maria
Goretti Parish, Laflin; begins at
5:30 p.m. in St. Maria Goretti
Church, Laflin Road. Covereddish supper follows in the parish
banquet room. All are welcome
to attend.
APRIL 28 Parish Excursion: Behold the Lamb,
stage performance at the Sight
and Sound Theater in Lancaster;
sponsored by the Catholic Community of Jessup. Bus trip from
the St. Michael Church parking
lot at 8 a.m.; departs Lancaster at

approximately 4 p.m. Cost: $95,


includes transportation, luncheon
buffet and show. For more information & reservations, call the rectory
office (489-2252).
MAY 1 Men of the Sacred
Heart, Scranton Chapter, Monthly
Meeting, open to all Catholic men
in the greater Scranton area; every First Friday at Sacred Hearts
of Jesus & Mary Church, south
Scranton. Members gather for Mass
and communal prayer; spiritual adviser: Father Scott Sterowski, host
pastor. Benediction precedes 7 p.m.
Mass in Sacred Hearts Church;
meeting follows in the parish hall.
For more information, call Frank
Germain (346-3128).
MAY 1 First Friday Eucharistic Adoration, offered for
the special intention of vocations
to the priesthood; hosted by St.
Ann Basilica Parish, St. Anns
St., west Scranton. Adoration held
every First Friday of the month at
St. Anns, beginning with 8:30 a.m.
Mass and concluding with benediction at 4:45 p.m.
MAY 1 First Friday Rosary & Mass, hosted by St. Lucy
Parish, Scranton; begins with recitation of the Rosary at 6:30 p.m. in
St. Lucy Church, 949 Scranton St.
Followed by celebration of Mass
at 7 p.m. All faithful are welcome
to attend.
MAY 1 & 2 Spring Rummage & Bake Sale, sponsored by
St. Ann Church, Bentley Creek;
held both days in the church hall.
Hours: Friday, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., and
Saturday (Bag Sale Day), 9 a.m. to
12 noon. Public is welcome.
MAY 8 Catholic Underground Monthly Gathering,
featuring Holy Hour with sung

Continued on Page 23

Charismatic Mass, Healing Service


SCRANTON Catholic
Charismatic prayer groups in the
Diocese of Scranton invite all
faithful to participate in a Charismatic Mass
and healing
service on
Sunday, April
19, at Christ
the King
Church, 1214
Quincy Ave.,
Fr. Irudaya
Dunmore.
Raj Illuri
The liturgy will be preceded by the recita-

APRIL 9, 2009 CATHOLIC LIGHT PAGE22 BLACK

tion of the Rosary at 6:30 p.m.


Guest celebrant for the 7
p.m. Mass will be Father Irudaya
Raj Illuri, who serves as assistant pastor at St. Rita Church in
Gouldsboro.
A healing service will follow
the Mass, with Father Illuri and
leaders from various Charismatic
prayer groups ministering to those
desiring prayer for healing.
The Divine Mercy Charismatic Prayer Group will host the
evening of worship, prayer and
fellowship.

Continued from Page 22


evening prayer, praise and worship, and adoration of the Blessed
Sacrament; begins at 8 p.m. at St.
Gabriel Church, 122 S. Wyoming
St., Hazleton. Evening also includes coffeehouse with Catholic
entertainment in the church basement. Months featured guest:
Christian recording artist Marie
Miller. All are welcome free of

charge; free-will offering will be


accepted. For more information,
call (403-3094) or visit: www.
catholicundergroundpa.com
MAY 16 Call to Holiness Discernment Group Gathering, for young men and women in
grades 9-12, interested in discerning a vocation to the priesthood
or religious life; sponsored by
the Capuchin Sisters of Nazareth.
Group will meet from 2 to 5 p.m.

at the Capuchin Sisters convent in


Tunkhannock. For more information and registration, call Sister
Veronica (836-2737).
MAY 16 Night at the
Races, sponsored and hosted by
Little Flower Manor & St. Therese
Residence, Wilkes-Barre; doors
open at 6 p.m. Races begin at 7
p.m.; admission fee: $5.
MAY 17 Luncheon &
Fashion Show, sponsored by Our

Eucharistic Seminar May 2 at Scranton Church


SCRANTON St. Michael
the Archangel Church in west
Scranton will host a Eucharistic
Seminar next month, featuring
a daylong series of talks by Raymond de Souza, renowned Catholic apologist and program host on
Mother Angelicas Eternal Word
Television Network (EWTN).
The seminar, during which
Mr. de Souza will give three
presentations on the Eucharist,
Sacrament of Reconciliation and
the Liturgy, will be held Saturday,

May 2, at St. Michael Church,


1703 Jackson St. All talks will include a question-answer period.
The program will begin with
the celebration of Mass at 9 a.m.,
followed by registration, with
a light breakfast provided. The
seminars first talk, The Presence
of Jesus in the Eucharist, will
be presented at 10:30 a.m. in the
church hall.
Lunch and a free-time period will follow. Participants are
asked to bring their own lunch;

beverages and light snacks will


be provided.
Mr. de Souzas second presentation, focusing on Confessions,
will be given at 1:30 p.m. The
afternoon session will continue
with the Divine Mercy Chaplet at
3 p.m., followed by the third presentation, titled Rediscovering
the Sense of the Sacred Liturgy,
and benediction.
The seminar is open to all
faithful free of charge. For more
information, call St. Michaels at
(961-1205).

Ladys Guild of Our Lady of Victory Church, Tannersville; to be


held at Mount Airy Resort in the
Poconos. Doors open at 12 noon
for a tricky tray; lunch served
at 1 p.m., followed by the fashion show. Cost: $35 per person,
includes luncheon, fashion show,
$10 Mount Airy Resort voucher
and door prizes. Tickets are limited;
call Marlene at (619-5251) or Judy
at (619-8069).
Items for listing in the Calendar of Events must be submitted
in writing at least three weeks in
advance of the event. Because of
space limitations, priority will be
given to events that are sponsored
by the Diocese of Scranton, its
churches and schools, and other
Catholic organizations. Please call
(207-2229) with questions.

St. Eulalia's
Church Hall

Blue Shutters Road, Elmhurst

Sunday, April 19

T
ALL YOU CAN EAT

BREAKFAST
BUFFET
8:30 am til 12:30 pm
SERVING:
Homefries, Ham, Scrambled Eggs,
Sausage, Pancakes, Eggs to order, Fresh
Rolls, Toast, Juice, Coffee and Tea

Adult $6.00 / Child $3.00


(under 12) Under 6 Free
SUNDAY MASS SCHEDULE
8:00 A.M.; 10:00 A.M.; 11:30 A.M.

Karpentry by Keiper
Specializing in windows, doors, paneling, decks, kitchens,
bathrooms, roong, siding, gutters, all phases of carpentry

Licensed General Contractor - Call 563-2766


)

Quality over volume, one job at a time )

Blue Army Reparation Vigil


When you did it for the least of My children,
you did it for Me.
In
Ingood
goodtimes
timesand
andininbad...in
bad...inbull
bullmarkets
markets and
andbear
bearmarkets...in
markets...in winter
winter blizzards
blizzards
and
nancial despair...in
despair...in the
the
and summer
summer heat
heat waves...in
waves...in economic
economic prosperity
prosperity and
and fifinancial
midst
one friend
friend that
that can
be counted
counted on
on is
is St.
St.
midst of
of all
all of
of lifes
lifes uncertainties,
uncertainties, one
can always
always be
Francis
of Assisi
AssisiKitchen.
Kitchen. People need us now more than ever.
Francis of
Since
1978, the
the Kitchen
Kitchen has
hasserved
serveda afree
free
daily
meal
to needy
women
Since 1978,
daily
meal
to needy
men,men,
women
and
and
children
-- more
2.5 million
free meals
In addition
the noon
daily
children
-- more
thanthan
2 million
free meals
in all. in
In all.
addition
to the to
daily
noon
the Kitchen
serves
evening
mealononTuesday,
Tuesday, Wednesday
Wednesday and
and
meal,meal,
the Kitchen
alsoalso
serves
an an
evening
meal
Thursday from
from 5-6
5- 6p.m.
p.m.The
Themeals
mealsare
areavailable
available to
to anyone
anyone --- no
no questions
questions asked
asked.
Thursday
and all
all guests are
---- and
are treated
treated with
withdignity
dignityand
andrespect.
respect.
The next monthly First Friday Reparation Vigil dedicated to the Sacred Heart of Jesus and Immaculate Heart
of Mary, sponsored by the Blue Army, will be held May
1 at St. Josephs Oblate Seminary, 1880 Highway 315,
Laflin (Pittston). Very Rev. Paul A. McDonnell, OSJ, provincial superior of the Oblates of St. Joseph and seminary rector, will serve as host for the vigil.
Devotions begin Friday evening at 8 p.m. with recitation of the Luminous Mysteries of the Rosary, during
which time confessions are heard. Mass of the Sacred
Heart of Jesus is celebrated at 8:55 p.m., followed by
benediction, litany and consecration to the Sacred
Heart.
The vigil continues with the crowning of the Blue
Army Pilgrim Virgin Statue, the Blue Army Pledge,
Fatima prayers and Marian hymns, followed by litany
and consecration to the Immaculate Heart of Mary. The
vigil concludes with scapular enrollment at 10:15 p.m.

The Kitchen
Kitchen has been able
The
able to
to remain
remainfaithful
faithfultotoits
itsmission
missionthrough
throughthe
thegenerosity
generosof of
thethe
community,
ininparticular
ity
community,
particularthrough
throughsupport
supportofofthe
the annual
annual Host-for-a-Day
Host-for-a Day
campaign, which
which isisthe
support
forfor
thethe
operation.
campaign,
theprimary
primarymeans
meansofoffinancial
financial
support
operation.
campaign
is attempting
raise $175,000
through
Thisyears
years campaign
30th anniversary
The
is attempting
to raise
$175,000tothrough
contributions
of
contributions
$100
or more.
This is costs
the approximate
providing
$100
or more. of
This
is the
approximate
of providingcosts
one of
meal
for the one
200
meal women
for the 200
women
children
come
to the
each conday.
men,
and men,
children
who and
come
to the who
Kitchen
each
day.Kitchen
Thus, each
Thus,
each
contributor
becomes
a
host
for
one
days
meal.
Contributors
may
tributor becomes a host for one days meal. Contributors may then select a date
then
select
a date
on whichthey
they,designate,
or someone
designate, as
willthe
beprovider
recognized
on
which
they,
or someone
willthey
be recognized
for
as the
provider for that meal.
that
meal.
Please
help us HELP
feed the US
hungry.
Call the
Kitchen
at 342-5556.
PLEASE
FEED
THE
HUNGRY.

Call
570-342-5556
Or you may
send
your gift to:
St. Francis
of Assisi
Send
yourKitchen
gift to:
500 Penn Ave. Scranton, PA 18509
St. Francis of Assisi Kitchen
500 Penn Ave.
Scranton,
PA 18509
Your generosity
will never
be forgotten.

Donate online at www.stfranciskitchen.org

APRIL 9, 2009 CATHOLIC LIGHT PAGE23 BLACK

23
THE CATHOLIC LIGHT APRIL 9, 2009

Mark Your Calendar Events Around the Diocese

wishes you
Blessings & Peace
at Easter

APRIL 9, 2009 THE CATHOLIC LIGHT

24

ADVERTISERS!
Reach out to our
faithful readers!

June

August

September

as we discover
)

2 Trips departing September 2010


Call for details and early booking discounts
Abington Travel
535 S. State Street, Clarks Summit PA 18411
570-586-1666 570-963-8747

The Catholic Light


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For info on monthly pilgrimages to Medjugorje


Call: (570) 587-5331

ABINGTON TRAVEL

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with Oberammergaus Passion Play

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BROADWAY Jersey BoysSouth PacificWickedWest Side StoryBilly
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PEDDLERS VILLAGE STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL MAY 2 New Hope option
LEWISBURG MOTHERS DAY TEA MAY 7 Victorian Mansions & Tea, Brunch
HUDSON VALLEY CULINARY INSTITUTE MAY 15 Vanderbilt Mansion, Meal
LONGWOOD GARDENS & QVC STUDIO TOUR MAY 16
NYC SIGHTSEEING RIDE & WORLD YACHT BRUNCH CRUISE MAY 17
INTREPID & FLEET WEEK NYC 1-DAY MAY 23 Intrepid Admission
CAPE MAY WORLD WAR II WEEKEND JUNE 5-7 Physick Estate, 4 Meals
STRASBURG RAILROAD MURDER MYSTERY JUNE 6 Dinner on Train
WORLD WAR II RE-ENACTMENT JUNE 6 Reading. Admission, Dinner
BASEBALL HALL OF FAME CLASSIC GAME JUNE 21 Cooperstown
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WINE FESTIVAL $45
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AUGUST 15 - ATLANTIC CITY
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APRIL 9, 2009 CATHOLIC LIGHT PAGE 24 BLACK

DANVILLE A Mass of
Christian Burial was celebrated
for Sister M. Emerita Cherniga,
a member of the Sisters of SS.
Cyril and Methodius, on March
23 in the Basilica of SS. Cyril
and Methodius. A native of Holy
Ghost Parish in Olyphant, Sister
Emerita died March 20 at Emmanuel Center, Danville, at the
age of 88.
Born Theresa Cherniga on
July 5, 1920, in Turiany, Slovakia, daughter of the late John and
Elizabeth Sofranko Cherniga,
Sister Emerita entered the SSCM
congregation from Holy Ghost

on March 28, 1943, and made


her profession of vows on Aug.
13, 1945.
During her religious life,
Sister Emerita ministered in the
culinary department at her communitys large institutions of
Immaculate Conception Orphanage, Middletown; and the Villa
Novitiate, St. Cyril Academy and
St. Methodius Convent, Danville,
for 45 years.
In the Diocese of Scranton,
she served at St. Joseph Convent,
Hazleton, and Sacred Heart Convent, Wilkes-Barre. She was also
stationed with the SSCM commu-

nity of sisters serving in Charleston, S.C., and New York City.


Sister Emerita was assigned
to general duties at St. Methodius
Convent in 1997, retiring to Maria
Hall in 2006 and later to Emmanuel Center.
Surviving are a sister, Helen
Cherniga, Olyphant; two brothers,
John, also of Olyphant, and Joseph,
Fort Walton Beach, Fla.; and two
nephews, Michael Cherniga, Tallahassee, Fla., and John Cherniga,
Satellite Beach, Fla.
She was also preceded in
death by a sister, Mary Anne
Cherniga.

25

4 3 AAA BUYERS 68
Buying Antiques and Estates, Furniture, Wicker, Toys,
Linens, Quilts, Old Sewing Machines, Old Light Fixtures and Lamps, Railroad and Mining Items, Bookcases, Bedroom and Dining Rooms, French Doors,
Radios, Books, Cedar Chests, Anything Old

OUR 35th YEAR 570-343-5628

ANTIQUES & COLLECTABLES WANTED


1 ITEM OR COMPLETE ESTATES

Prayer Requests for Priests Serving Our Diocese


Bochinski; April 11, Monsignor
David Bohr; April 12, Father
Joseph Boles; April 13, Jesuit
Father Louis Bonacci; April 14,
Passionist Father Vincent Boney;
April 15, Father Martin Boylan;

Pro-Life Group Forms in Luzerne County


Serving as guest speaker for
the event was Theo Purington, of
United Choice for Life in New
Hampshire, who discussed his
own personal experiences that
led him to begin his pro-life
mission.
SLA Catholics for Life meet
on the first Thursday of each
month, at 5 p.m. at St. Gabriels
Rectory. New members are
welcome.

Pilgrim Statue Schedule for April

The traveling Diocesan


Pilgrim Virgin Statue is scheduled to be at the following
homes during the month of
April:

April 5-11 Mr. & Mrs.


Thomas Geffert, 252 Parrish
St., Dallas; April 12-18 Mr.
& Mrs. Norman Miller, 48
Waller St., Larksville; April
19-25 Mr. & Mrs. Martin
Sapiego, 126 First St., Exeter;
April 26-May 2 Mr. &
Mrs. Raymond Franco, Falls.
An Hour of Reparation
begins each evening at 7:30
p.m. and includes the Rosary,
Litany, and Act of Consecration. Prayers are offered for
world peace, an increase in
religious vocations, special
intentions of the Holy Father,
and an end to abortion, terrorism and pornography.
For more information, call
George Sailus (693-2126).

Post Cards
Books
Military
Mining Items
Tools

Sewing
Guns
Sporting Items Machines
Light
Glassware
Fixtures
Toys
Magazines
Clocks

570-430-2370
COMPLETE ESTATE CLEANOUT SERVICE ) COMPLETE ESTATE CLEANOUT SERVICE

Buying Antiques & Furniture


If you are settling an estate, or have any: Gold; Silver; Coins;
Mining or R/R items; Old Sewing Machines; Bookends; B/R or
D/R Furniture - ANYTHING OLD, please give us a call. We have
been in the estate furniture business since 1972 (no other
antique dealer in this valley has been in business longer) and we
do it full time. COMPLETE ESTATE CLEANOUT SERVICE

KEYSTONE ANTIQUES
PAUL L. CICON, PRESIDENT - CALL 498-6068

PLEASE SAVE THIS AD




HAZLETON Catholic
faithful in the southern Luzerne
County area (SLA) announce
the formation of a new pro-life
group in the region SLA
Catholics for Life.
The newly formed organization hosted their first formal
event on March 29, when they
sponsored a pro-life dinner at
the St. Gabriel Church hall in
Hazleton.

April 16, Father Eric Bergman;


April 17, Father John Boyle;
April 18, Passionist Father Michael Brennan; April 19, Father
Albert Brogus; April 20, Father
Joseph Brozena; April 21, Father
Michael Bryant; April 22, priestly
& religious vocations; April 23,
Passionist Father Edward Buchheit; April 24, Passionist Father
Richard Burke; April 25, Father
Robert Burnett (memorial); April
26, Bishop John M. Dougherty;
April 27, Father Robert Busteed
(memorial); April 28, Father Leonard Butcavage; April 29, Holy
Cross Father Thomas Bertone.
For more information on the
Prayer Request for Priests project
or to obtain a card with the twomonth schedule, write to HESED/
MPRP, Box 35, Montrose, PA
18801.

PLEASE SAVE THIS AD




MONTROSE The Monthly Prayer Request for Priests


schedule for the next three weeks
is as follows:
April 9, Father William
Blake; April 10, Father Mark

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APRIL 9, 2009 CATHOLIC LIGHT PAGE 25 BLACK

628 Spruce St. Scranton


Tel: (570) 969-2524

THE CATHOLIC LIGHT APRIL 9, 2009

Sister Emerita, SSCM, Olyphant Native, Dies

26

Lets Go to the Movies

APRIL 9, 2009 THE CATHOLIC LIGHT

USCCB Office Offers Catholic Ratings on Latest Films


Adventureland (Miramax) Sensitive but downbeat coming-of-age tale, set in 1987 Pittsburgh, about an
awkward college graduate (Jesse Eisenberg) who takes a
summer job at a third-rate amusement park and falls for
one of his co-workers (Kristen Stewart), not realizing she
is having an adulterous affair with an older employee (Ryan
Reynolds). Nongraphic adulterous and premarital sexual
activity, brief partial nudity, repeated drug use, some sexual
and fleeting scatological humor, pervasive rough and crude
language, and a few uses of profanity. USCCB classification, L limited adult audience, films whose problematic
content many adults would find troubling. MPAA rating,
R restricted.

NEW YORK (CNS) Here is a list of


recent films the Office for Film & Broadcasting of the U.S. Conference of Catholic
Bishops has rated on the basis of moral
suitability.
The symbol after each title is the
USCCB Office for Film & Broadcasting classification: A-I general patronage; A-II
adults and adolescents; A-III adults;
L limited adult audience, films whose
problematic content many adults would
find troubling; O morally offensive.
These capsule reviews are published to
provide our readers with information on
the content of the movies. The reviews do
not imply a recommendation of a movie
by the USCCB Office for Film and Broadcasting, the Catholic News Service or The
Catholic Light. They are published solely
to avoid leaving our readers with no guidance in making film choices.

Duplicity (Universal/Relativity) Sophisticated


romantic caper about two intelligence officers (Julia Roberts and Clive Owen) who turn to industrial espionage
hoping to exploit the no-holds-barred feud between the
CEOs (Tom Wilkinson and Paul Giamatti) of rival pharmaceutical companies. Brief, nongraphic, premarital sexual
activity; some sexual humor and references; occasional
crude and crass language; and at least a dozen profanities. USCCB classification, A-III adults. MPAA rating,
PG-13 parents strongly cautioned. Some material may
be inappropriate for children under 13.
Fast & Furious (Universal/Relativity) Overheated, morally swerving action sequel in which an ex-con
(Vin Diesel) pursuing a vendetta and an undercover FBI
agent (Paul Walker) renew their rivalry as they both use
their driving skills to infiltrate a cross-border drug smuggling ring and identify its secretive leader. Vigilantism,
brief nongraphic sexual activity, partial nudity, cohabitation, occasional rough language and profanity. USCCB
classification, L limited adult audience, films whose
problematic content many adults would find troubling.
MPAA rating, PG-13 parents strongly cautioned.
The Haunting in Connecticut (Lionsgate/Gold
Circle) Reasonably effective, allegedly fact-based

chiller about a Catholic couple (Virginia Madsen and


Martin Donovan) who rent a former funeral home near
the hospital where their teenage son (Kyle Gallner) is
being treated for cancer, only to find themselves in a
specter-ridden maelstrom, eventually turning for help to
a clergyman (Elias Koteas) versed in the occult. While its
efforts to place these supernatural goings-on within a larger
spiritual and religious context may draw mixed reactions,
director Peter . Disturbing images, including charred and
gory corpses, and a couple of profanities. USCCB classification, A-II adults and adolescents. MPAA rating,
PG-13 parents strongly cautioned. Some material may
be inappropriate for children under 13.

I Love You, Man (DreamWorks) A socially


awkward Los Angeles realty agent (Paul Rudd) becomes
engaged to his live-in girlfriend (Rashida Jones) but lacks a
male friend close enough to be his best man until a chance
meeting with a crudely uninhibited slacker (Jason Segal)
leads to almost obsessive bonding. Premarital cohabitation, a promiscuous gay character, much sexual and some
gross-out humor, pervasive rough and crude language, and
at least one profanity. USCCB classification, O morally
offensive. MPAA rating, R restricted. Under 17 requires
accompanying parent or adult guardian.
Knowing (Summit) A Boston astrophysicist
(Nicolas Cage) discovers that a time-capsule document
buried 50 years ago at his sons (Chandler Canterbury)
school accurately predicted all the major disasters of the
intervening decades, and sets out to prevent the three
calamities, one of them potentially global, it warns will
transpire in the near future, eventually aided by the daughter
(Rose Byrne) of the woman who wrote it as a schoolgirl
(Lara Robinson). Disturbingly realistic catastrophe scenes,
brief sexual humor and a few instances of crude language.
USCCB classification, A-II adults and adolescents.
MPAA rating, PG-13 parents strongly cautioned. Some
material may be inappropriate for children under 13.
Monsters vs. Aliens (Paramount) Affable animated comedy-adventure in which a trio of kindly monsters
(voices of Seth Rogen, Hugh Laurie and Will Arnett) led
by a once-ordinary woman (voice of Reese Witherspoon)
who became a giant after being struck by a meteor, are
released from government captivity in the custody of a
gung-ho general (voice of Keifer Sutherland) and commissioned by the president (voice of Stephen Colbert)
to combat an evil alien (voice of Rainn Wilson) whose
schemes threaten humanity. Moderate action violence and
a bit of vaguely sexual and slightly crude humor. USCCB
classification, A-II adults and adolescents. MPAA rating,
PG parental guidance suggested. Some material may
not be suitable for children.

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trimming, foundation repair. Cleaning basements/attics/garage. No job too small or too
high. Working Wyom. Valley, Mt. Top, Bk. Mt.
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Estimate 287-3262 Leave Mess.

Old books, postcards, cigarette lighters,


mining & railroad items, match box toys, all
antiques & anything old. 570-430-2370.

LONG BEACH ISLAND, NJ - Ocean Side,


Modern Contemp., Beach Haven Crest, 5
BR, 2 Master Suites, 3 Bath, AC, wireless, 6tv's. Avail 6/20/09-6/27/09 - $2,700
8/22/09 thru 8/29/09 - $3000 per week.
Call Tony at 570-885-4605.

OCEAN CITY, MD-Very Reasonable


Summer Vacation. Beautiful, modern
1BR condo. Sleeps 4 comfortably. 120th
& Bayfront/Heron Harbor Isle. 3 outdoor
pools. Short walk to beach. Quiet streets
for biking.Book now for greatly reduced prices! Linda/John 570-825-6177

Completely renovated TRIPLEX $200,000.


(1)-6rms/2 bths, (2)-3rms/bth. Owner Financing poss for buyer with subst. down
pymnt. South Scr. Call 342-7995 for appt.
Plymouth-40 Davenport, 6 car gar. 2 baths,
large lot, fenced in yard, interior need finishing $99,000 570-287-3262.
Nanticoke-83 Honey Pot St. Handyman
Special, Creek, 4BR $39,900. Hard wood
floors, woods 287-3262

DRIVER- for all your long distance driving needs.Travel in the comfort of your
own vehicle. I am reliable, courteous &
dependable. Call Stu Abrams 287-1733.

ALL SILVER & GOLD COINS & collections.


Immediate cash payment, large or small
collections. 570-762-1298
WILL MAKE HOUSE CALLS
2002-2004 WINNEBAGO VISTA
Class C Motorhome. 21 feet
Call 287-3262.

VACATION RENTALS

BAGPIPER For Weddings, Funerals or


Special Occasions: Call 570-857-5153
or pabagpiper@yahoo.com

BRIGANTINE, NJ - 5 minutes from Atlantic


City. Sleeps 2-6 comfortably. Bath and a
half, ocean view and pool. Call for rates
570-839-8694.

TOURS TO ITALY
See the best of Italy and the town of your
family roots in Abruzzo, Puglia, Calabria,
Sicily, etc. Customized tours for churches,
clubs, seniors, family groups is also our
specialty.
Call: 1-800-829-2201
www.italianheritagetours.com
e-mail: italiantours@aol.com
Doing tours for 31 years!

CAPE MAY, NJ - Victorian Accom., avail.


year round. Walking distance to everything,
incl. church. V/MC/D accepted. Call Bill
570-690-4608.
LONG BEACH ISLAND, NJ-Lovely
Brandt Beach Yacht Club area. 4BR Cape
Now booking fall/summer 570-343-5223.
LBI, NJ - Beach House Rental - Close to
Beach, Sleeps 11, Central Air.Call 570822-5514.

MYRTLE BEACH CONDO, SC


1st Flr, 2 Bedroom, Ocean View & Pool.
Call for rates 570-961-8509
CLEARWATER, FL-2BR, 2Bth, in retirement park w/pool. Near restaurants/shopping/beaches. Call 570-357-6909
FT. MYERS, FL-Plan your Spring/Summer Getaway Now! 3Br, 2Bth condo, pool,
exc. rm, close to golf/beaches, high spd
wrless internet inc. Special Deal for Multiple
Months. Call 287-5836 For more info.
Hilton Head Harbor Town- beautifully
frnshd 3BR, 3Bath home. Great room,
jacuzzi, wet bar, fireplace, & internet. Patio
overlooks sea marsh & wildlife. Priv. courtyard & guest house also avail. Pool/Tennis
on sight. Bike or trolley to beach. HT Yacht
club amenities/Golf inc. Wkly or mnthly
rates. Pic's at www.vrbo.com #147334.
Call 570-840-9528.

CES

COCOA, FL -Fully furnished 2BR, 2Bth


condo for rent. Features river views, exer.
rm, pool & indoor garage. Unique restaurants/shops w/in walking dist. Ten mins.
to beaches. rental req'd, all util's included.
Call 570-344-9440.
Beautiful Pine Creek Home Available for
Rent, 3 bedroom, front and back decks,
sleeps 10-12. Borders the rails to trails, 63
mile bike path, right next to the water and
so much more. $700.00/week. $450.00/
weekend. Call Cheryl @ 570/745-7653,
leave message if needed.

RETROUVAILLE PROGRAM
Help for Troubled and Hurting Marriages.
To inquire please call...
570-655-1916 or 1-800-470-2230.
ALL CALLS CONFIDENTIAL

APRIL 9, 2009 CATHOLIC LIGHT PAGE26 BLACK

FOR RENT
NON-SMOKER- 2nd Fl, 3 Rms & Bath $600
Furnished. Inc. appliances, cable, utilities,
trash fee, sec/ref Call 342-7995
NORTH SCR. - 2nd Fl., 3rms & bath + walk
up attic, alot of storage, no pets/smoking.
Stove/ref/kitch/wash/dry/ceiling fans & off
st. pking., sewer/trash paid. $425 + utiliies.
Call 570-343-3578.
Lincoln Heights Sec/Taylor - 4rms, 2nd
Fl. Security required. Utils included, Ref/
Stove, new carpeting. Call 346-3547
6 GARAGE BAYS FOR RENT
20x10, 40 Rear Davenport St.,
Plymouth Pa. $45/MTH. 287-3262.

Mission Message

Words Heard Round


the World: Do This in
Memory of Me

5IF4PDJFUZGPSUIF1SPQBHBUJPOPGUIF'BJUI
)PMZ$IJMEIPPE"TTPDJBUJPO
5IF4PDJFUZPG4U1FUFSUIF"QPTUMF
.JTTJPOBSZ6OJPOPG1SJFTUTBOE3FMJHJPVT
www.worldmissions-catholicchurch.org

In churches all over the world,


people will gather on Holy Thursday to remember and to celebrate
the institution of the Eucharist in
the holy sacrifice of the Mass.
On this very holy night of
the year, Christians everywhere
reflect back to over 2,000 years
ago, to that Upper Room where
the Apostles gathered. It was there
that the Eucharist came to be.
What does the Eucharist
mean? The answer to that question was given on that first Holy
Thursday when Jesus, as servant,
washed the Apostles feet and
offered the bread and wine as the
gift of his own life concluding with a command: Do this in
memory of me. It was an action
mandate.
Jesus, fully aware that He had
come from God and was going to
God, did the unexpected. Without
a word of explanation, He rose
from the table, took off his cloak,
picked up a towel, and poured
water into a basin. Kneeling, he
washed the disciples feet. They
were stunned! When it was Simon
Peters turn, he refused to allow it.
You will never wash my feet,
Peter said. Is Simon Peter feeling
too proud or too unworthy? Jesus
then said, Unless I wash you, you
have no share with me.
Our Lord teaches by doing.
His actions are His words. What
more dramatic way could Jesus

Apostleship of Prayer

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AUTO COMMERCIAL
SCRANTON WILKES-BARRE HONESDALE ALLENTOWN
HOME

Miss Mollys Tea Time

By Deacon Edward T. Kelly


Diocesan Director,
Pontifical Mission Societies

have illustrated His own words,


Whoever wishes to become great
among you must be your servant,
and whoever wishes to be first
must be your slave?
This story teaches us one
primary lesson, and it is this: The
closer we get to God, the more we
care about people. And the days
when we are most fully aware
of His presence is the time when
we are most fully committed to
service. As I have done for you,
so you must do.
Do this in memory of me
This is my Body given for all
of you This is my Blood shed
for all. Jesus in our midst urges
us to take His body and give it for
others, in love. Take the cup, a cup
filled at the beginning of each day,
and empty it to help restore others
so that humankind can be made
whole. The Eucharist would be
forever a living presence that God
is in our midst urging us to wash
the feet of the world.
This Holy Thursday night
as I watch the priest wash the
feet of 12 members of my parish,
young and old and from different
backgrounds, I will think of every

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570-824-1831

priest all over the world kneeling


to wash feet as a symbol of Jesus
greatest commandment, Love
one another.
My thoughts will also go
to places like Quito in Ecuador,
Haiti, and Mexico where I served
Mass as a Deacon. All people from
every corner of the world join you
and me tonight at the Mass of the
Lords Supper. When it comes to
the Mass, distance is not a factor. We are not alone. The whole
Church is here.
To be a Christian means,
among other things, to be a servant
of others. In order to serve, we
must get on our knees and wash
the feet of all black or white
or red or yellow; man or woman,
slave or free, master or servant,
Jew or Gentile. The Eucharist is
the sacrament of the universal
Church, the sacrament of world
mission. Do this in memory of
me.
The Eucharist sends us forth
with its Gospel to the whole
world: Go in peace to love and
serve the Lord. And to that we
answer: Thanks be to God.

We carry assorted
teas, tea accessories,
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Serving Lunch
Tuesday - Saturday
11am to 3pm

Evenings & Sundays Available for Private Parties


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1230 Sanderson Ave., Scranton 570-347-9453 Fax: 570-347-3074

Does Your Loved One Need. . .

Intentions for April 2009


GENERAL INTENTION
Farmers and World Hunger
That our Lord may bless farmers with abundant harvests
and sensitize the richer nations to respond to the ravages
of hunger throughout the world.

The Difference is Love

and Saint Therese Residence


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MISSION INTENTION
Christians as Signs of Hope
That Christians working in desperate conditions among women,
children, the poor, and the weak, may be signs of hope in their
courageous witness to the Gospel of solidarity and love.

Little Flower Manor

823-6131

of The Diocese Of Scranton


200 S. Meade St., Wilkes-Barre

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APRIL 9, 2009 CATHOLIC LIGHT PAGE 27 BLACK

27
THE CATHOLIC LIGHT APRIL 9, 2009

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APRIL 9, 2009 THE CATHOLIC LIGHT

28
BE PART OF AN EVANGELISM
TEAM
)
Re-Energize Parishes Paid Part Time
Positions No Experience Necessary
Training Provided Flexible Hours
Bring Fallen Away Catholics Home

CALL CAROL @570/443-7678


or join the
Each month, members receive an exciting talk by
one of the great Catholic speakers of our time,
like Fr. John Corapi, Dr. Scott Hahn, Jeff Cavins,
Archbishop Fulton Sheen, and many more.
ENTER PROMO CODE 1489

Diocesan College Scholarship Program Attracts


Students in Catholic Secondary Schools
Seeking ways to enhance
the educational quality of Catholic schools in the Diocese of
Scranton, the Catholic Schools
Office in collaboration with
Catholic institutions of higher
learning have since the year
2001 afforded seniors in sec-

Religious book by a local Catholic


WITH GOD THERE IS HOPE:
HOPE FOR HUMANITY
BY HELEN SILVESTRI
(pen name Ellen Chaksil)

COVER ILLUSTRATION BY COLLEEN GEDRICH


AVAILABLE AT:

BORDERS IN SCRANTON, CALL 570-876-2416 OR AMAZON

Agios Icons
A Selection of Imported Greek
Icons
Please visit our website at www.agiosicons.com
570-744-1576

Images
x

Our Lord

Saints

Our Lady

Feasts

Hanging Icon Lamps

ondary schools opportunities to


broaden their educational experience through the Diocesan College Scholarship Program.
Through this program, Catholic high school seniors participate
in classes held at a local college/
university while simultaneously
matriculating on the high school
level.
The Diocesan consortium is
comprised of Catholic institutions
that provide educational excellence rooted in the Catholic faith
and tradition. These institutions of
higher learning are: Misericordia
University, Dallas; Kings College, Wilkes-Barre; Marywood
University, and The University of
Scranton, Scranton.
The five Catholic schools
include: Holy Cross High School,
Dunmore; Holy Redeemer High
School, Wilkes-Barre; St. John
Neumann Regional Academy
High School, Williamsport;
Notre Dame High School, East
Stroudsburg, and Scranton Preparatory High School, Scranton.
Designed for exceptional
students enrolled in the Diocesan
school system and who seek a
challenging extension from their
high school environment, the
program allows the high school
senior to participate in a college
study experience. Additionally,
the program offers high schools
the opportunity to expand their
learning environments, and for the

institutions of higher learning to


strengthen their relationships with
the Diocese and to increase local
student enrollment.
Among the criteria for acceptance into the program, the Diocesan Scholar must be enrolled in
the spring/summer of the junior
or fall/spring of the senior year
in a diocesan Catholic school;
be in the top quintile of his/her
class or have an exception
recommendation from the guidance department; have achieved
a cumulative average of B+ or
3.5 GPA or have an exception
recommendation from the guidance department; have an SAT
score of 1575 prior to submission
of application; and have demonstrated maturity of character and
leadership potential.
Joseph G. Casciano, Diocesan
Secretary for Catholic Schools/
Superintendent of Schools, extolled the continued success of

the program. Mr. Casciano noted,


The success of the Diocesan College Scholarship Program lies in
the students who challenge themselves further in their educational
journey, balancing the requirements in their respective schools
with yet a more intense college
study initiative.
He continued, I highly commend our Catholic secondary
schools for their commitment to
this program, and I am grateful
to our Catholic institutions of
higher learning for their openness
to another avenue of education for
students and for their belief in our
Diocesan school system.
Since the programs inception
in 2001, more than 300 students
in Catholic secondary schools
have merited the distinction of
Diocesan Scholar, and have been
fittingly recognized as such during
their respective commencement
exercises.

Remember Our Priests


Remember in your prayers those
who have labored in your diocese:
Father James Nolan, April 11, 1957
Father John Loughran, April 12, 1940
Father Rudolph Borgogno, OSJ, April 12, 1977
Father Joseph Coroner, April 13, 1921
Father Philip Rader, April 13, 1983
Father William Lynch, April 13, 1969
Father John Valunas, April 14, 1961
Father Joseph Corcoran, April 15, 1975
Father Richard Walsh, April 15, 1925
Father Nazarius DeScianni, April 15, 1952
Father James Mulholland, April 15, 1956
Father Quirino Rauzi, April 15, 1962
Father James Gryczka, April 16, 1957
Msgr. Joseph Fadden, April 17, 2005
Father Valentine Biczysko, April 18, 1961
Father Paul Cottone, April 19, 2006
Father Robert Gardzalla, April 19, 1996
Father Bernard Fath, April 19, 1994
Father Thomas Kurylowicz, April 19, 1926
Father Andrew Jurica, April 19, 1965
Father Joseph Gilbert, April 20, 2008
Father Thomas Ahearn, April 20, 1946
Father William Sherman, April 20, 1953
Father Gerald Keegan, April 21, 1949
Father John White, April 21, 1968
Father John OHaire, April 22, 2003
Father Henry Diehl, April 23, 1960
Msgr. Raymond Larkin, April 23, 1983
Father Arthur McAndrews, April 25, 1996
Msgr. John Podkul, April 25, 1977
Father Stanislaus Banas, April 25, 1977
Msgr. Thomas Knight, April 25, 1987

APRIL 9, 2009 CATHOLIC LIGHT PAGE 28 BLACK

The Scranton Times-Tribune


reported on its March 18 front
page that the dinner conducted
the previous night by the Friendly
Sons of St. Patrick of Lackawanna
County featured . . . plenty
of jokes about Bishop Joseph
Martinos public crusade against
abortion. This is troubling on
several levels.
The Catholic Church teaches
that abortion is an intrinsic evil
that must always be opposed. As
a bishop of the Catholic Church,
Bishop Martino is obligated to
uphold and proclaim this teaching;
by the way, so is every Catholic.
Since abortion was legalized in
the U.S. in 1973, approximately
50 million unborn children have
been killed. This is no laughing
matter.
Apparently there were also
sarcastic allusions to the Bishops
stance on Misericordia University
hosting a speaker who advocates
homosexual behavior and the
Bishops decision that the restructured school system would be better served without the involvement
of the former teachers union.
Was the dinner meant to
tell the Bishop to just overlook
the abomination of abortion, the
sinfulness of homosexual acts
and the Catholicity of the Catholic schools in the Diocese? The
Times-Tribune certainly made it
look that way.
The late Pope John Paul II
described the Catechism of the
Catholic Church to be a sure
norm for teaching the faith.
The Catechism says the following about the Churchs bishops:
Bishops, with priests as co-workers, have as their first task to
preach the Gospel of God to all
men, in keeping with the Lords
command. They are heralds of
faith, who draw new disciples to
Christ; they are authentic teachers
of the apostolic faith endowed
with the authority of Christ. In
order to preserve the Church in
the purity of the faith handed on
by the apostles, Christ who is the
Truth willed to confer on her a
share in his own infallibility. By
a supernatural sense of faith the
People of God, under the guidance

of the Churchs living Magisterium, unfailingly adheres to this


faith.
Beyond that, it is disturbing
that a dinner held by an organization named for a great Catholic
saint would be the forum for
plenty of jokes about a Catholic
bishop. There is a difference between disagreeing with a persons
position, and disrespecting the
person.
The day before the dinner,
Friendly Sons President John
Keeler was interviewed on a local radio program, and he stated
emphatically that his organization
had no intention of offending
Bishop Martino in any way, shape
or form. On St. Patricks Day,
Mr. Keeler was on the altar at the
Cathedral, serving as the lector for
the 12:10 p.m. Mass and receiving Holy Communion. Many of
the Friendly Sons were there to
participate in the liturgy. A few
hours later, Mr. Keeler presided
at the dinner and, according to
the Times-Tribune story, he told
at least one of the jokes ridiculing
Bishop Martino.
Fortunately, Bishop Martinos
mother, who was born in County
Derry, was not there to hear her
son denigrated by individuals who
also trace their ancestry to Ireland.
A number of people who were
at the dinner have contacted the
Diocese to express their dismay
about the proceedings.
It must have been particularly
uncomfortable for Bishop Emeritus James Timlin, Rev. Timothy
Lannon, S.J., the guest clerical
speaker, and other clergy who
were in attendance.
Even Scranton Mayor Chris
Dohertys political consultants
got in on the act, composing and
singing a ditty called The Irish
Trilogy. The song made fun of
Bishop Martino and some local
political figures, in a way that
could be construed as a slight to
certain ethnic groups.
This performance and another short video clip containing
some of the jokes were posted on
the Times-Tribune website. It is
interesting that the newspapers
coverage highlighted these activi-

ties on a night that was undoubtedly filled with many fine, positive
moments.
The Friendly Sons of St.
Patrick is an organization with a
proud history of celebrating Irish
heritage and the many outstanding
contributions the Irish people have

made to our community. Many of


the members profess to be Catholic. So you have to wonder why
some of these members and their
guests would conduct themselves
in this way.
You also have to wonder if St.
Patrick was laughing.

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THE CATHOLIC LIGHT APRIL 9, 2009

Friendly Sons Dinner Includes Troubling Comments About Bishop VOLKSWAGENS 29

APRIL 9, 2009 THE CATHOLIC LIGHT

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Developing a Spiritual Life was the topic when keynote speaker Ken Ogorek addressed teachers and administrators from the four regional Catholic school systems as they gathered recently for a Day of Christian
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in Kingston; from left: Elizabeth Gushka, Lynn Prociak, Janice Ambrulavage and Michelle OBrien.

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Teachers and administrators


from the four regional Catholic
school systems gathered recently
for a Day of Christian Formation,
providing them time to pray and
reflect on the vital mission of the
Catholic school teacher.
The teachers attended Mass,
prayed before the Blessed Sacrament and had the opportunity for
the Sacrament of Reconciliation.
The faculty members of the
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They were greeted by pastor,


Father Richard E. Czachor. After morning refreshments, the
teachers gathered in the church
for prayer and reconciliation, followed by Mass concelebrated by
Father Joseph R. Kopacz, V.G.,
chaplain for Monsignor McHugh
Elementary School, and Monsignor John Bergamo, director
of religious formation for Notre
Dame High School.
On March 12, teachers and
administrators of the St. John
Neumann System met at Mater
Dolorosa Church in Williamsport.
Father Edward L. Michelini, administrator for Mater Dolorosa
Church and chaplain of the St.
John Neumann Regional Academy High School, led the group
in prayer, offered the sacrament
of Reconciliation and celebrated
Mass.
The faculty members of the
Holy Redeemer and Holy Cross
Systems met at Holy Redeemer
High School on March 13. Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament, the
Sacrament of Reconciliation, and
Mass were held in St. Mary of the
Immaculate Conception Church.
Father Brian J.T. Clarke, chaplain
of Holy Redeemer High School,
was the principal celebrant at
Mass.
Ken Ogorek, director of
catechesis for the Archdiocese

APRIL 9, 2009 CATHOLIC LIGHT PAGE 30 BLACK

of Indianapolis and author of


the book Gospel Truth, was the
keynote speaker for each gathering. His topic was Developing a
Spiritual Life.
As Catholic school teachers
entrusted with educating the next
generation of Catholics, Mr. Ogorek reminded his listeners that
they need a deep well to draw
from. To emphasize this, he
shared this prayer in song: Deep
within us, shared among us, may
we ever keep the mind and heart
of Jesus Christ.
Citing the five universal
precepts of the Church, he suggested ways in which the personal
spiritual life will gain an ecclesial
dimension as each individual enters more deeply into the life and
mission of the Church.
Mr. Ogorek said those who
develop a spiritual life will find
that God is constantly communicating with them through Sacred
Scripture, Sacred Tradition, the
sacraments and prayer, especially in silent prayer. God communicates as well through other
people and through life events,
he added.
Married and the father of three
children, Mr. Ogoreks sincere love
of God and the Church was apparent
in his message, and that message
was well-received by teachers and
administrators alike.

NEWS BRIEFS
POPE OFFERS CONDOLENCES TO VICTIMS
OF ITALIAN EARTHQUAKE
VATICAN CITY (CNS) -- Just hours after an earthquake hit
the city and province of LAquila in central Italy, causing more than
200 deaths and major damage to churches and other buildings, Pope
Benedict XVI offered his prayers for the dead, their loved ones and
rescue workers. The quake struck April 6 at 3:30 a.m. local time and
was felt strongly even in Rome, about 70 miles west of LAquila.
Among the victims was Abbess Gemma Antonucci, head of the Poor
Clares Convent of St. Clare in Paganica, outside LAquila. Father
Dionisio Rodriguez Cuartas, the pastor in Paganica and director of
Caritas LAquila, said the roof of the Poor Clares convent caved
in. In the early afternoon, rescue workers were able to recover the
body of the abbess and to free another nun from the debris. Two
of the dozen members of the community were hospitalized with
broken bones; the others were unharmed.

Franciscans ready to celebrate


anniversary of orders founding
VATICAN CITY (CNS) -- Some 1,800
Franciscan friars from all over the world
were expected to converge on the Umbrian
hill town of Assisi, Italy, to celebrate the
800th anniversary of papal approval of the
Franciscan rule.
For the first time, representatives from the
four main Franciscan branches were to meet
in Assisi the birthplace of their founder,
St. Francis to take part in an International
Chapter of Mats April 15-18.
A Chapter of Mats gets its name from
the time in 1221 St. Francis called more than
3,000 friars to the Portiuncula chapel in Assisi
for a general meeting or chapter.
Because the small town could not accommodate the large number of visitors, the
friars lived in huts made out of reeds and
slept on mats, said Father Jose Rodriguez
Carballo, minister general of the Order of
Friars Minor.
The three other Franciscan groups participating are the Capuchins, the Conventual
Franciscans and the Third Order Regular
Franciscans.
The chapter falls on the 800th anniversary of the formal founding of the Franciscan order when St. Francis presented
his rule to Pope Innocent III for approval
in 1209.
During a press conference April 7 at
Vatican Radio, Father Rodriguez underlined the spiritual nature of the gathering
and said organizers hope it will be an
occasion for coming together as a family, offering the church and the world our
witness of brotherhood and celebrating our
beginnings.
With days dedicated to testimonials,
penance, fasting, prayer and pilgrimage, the
gathering will also be a call to conversion
and to live the Gospel as St. Francis asked his
disciples to, the minister general said.
Men and women religious will have an
occasion to profess their continued fidelity to
the pope when they meet with Pope Benedict
XVI April 18 during a special audience at
Castel Gandolfo, he said.
St. Francis, who was born to a wealthy
family in Assisi sometime around 1181,
dedicated himself to the poor and preached

St. Francis is pictured preaching to the birds in


this fresco in the upper church of the Basilica of St.
Francis in Assisi, Italy. Some 1,800 Franciscan friars
from all over the world will meet in Assisi in midApril for a general chapter that will fall on the 800th
anniversary of the formal founding of the Franciscan
order. (CNS photo/Octavio Duran)

living a way of peace. He founded three religious


orders the Friars Minor, the Poor Clares, and the
Brothers and Sisters of Penance giving each one
a special rule.
The orders evolved over time and today
include:
The first order, which is made up of three
separate bodies the Friars Minor, the Conventual
Franciscans and the Capuchins.
The second order, the Poor Clares, which includes all monasteries of cloistered nuns professing
the Rule of St. Clare as well as the Sisters of the
Annunciation and the Conceptionists.
The third order, which is made up of the
Third Order Regular Franciscans, a secular order
and new foundations.
Father Rodriguez said while the Franciscan
branches are juridically separate from one another
they are united spiritually and collaborate on a
number of projects around the world.
Instead of considering the orders as divided,
he said they represent the diversity and plurality
in the world.
The Franciscan order flows from a very rich
charism that can find expression in many people
and places, he said.
There are also countless groups, including
Anglicans, Lutherans and Presbyterians, who find
inspiration in St. Francis and live according to his
rule, he said.
Even some Buddhists and Muslims have a
special devotion to the Franciscan St. Anthony of
Padua, Capuchin Father Mariano Steffan said at
the April 7 press conference.

SHOOTING VICTIMS, OUTPOURING OF GRIEF


REFLECT CITYS IMMIGRANT ROOTS
BINGHAMTON, N.Y. (CNS) -- The 14 people who died
April 3 in the shooting at the American Civic Association and
the dozens who escaped reflected the citys immigrant past
and present, as has the outpouring of support and grief from the
region, according to area priests and others. As word of events at
the immigrant services center spread that Friday, Buddhist, Muslim, Jewish, Catholic and Protestant religious leaders flocked to
a Catholic Charities office nearby to provide support for anxious
relatives and friends of people who were believed to be inside the
agency. While police tried to understand what was happening at
the center, counselors, clergy, translators and others gathered at
Catholic Charities, said staff member Marsha Maroney.
IOWA BISHOPS SAY ALLOWING GAY MARRIAGE
WILL GRIEVOUSLY HARM FAMILIES
DAVENPORT, Iowa (CNS) -- Iowas Catholic bishops vigorously disagreed with the Iowa Supreme Courts unanimous decision
April 3 that strikes down state law defining marriage as a union
of one man and one woman. This decision rejects the wisdom
of thousands of years of human history. It implements a novel
understanding of marriage, which will grievously harm families
and children, the bishops said in a statement prepared by the Iowa
Catholic Conference. The bishops vowed to continue to protect
and promote marriage as a union between a man and a woman and
asked Catholics and other citizens of Iowa to call for a constitutional amendment on marriage. With the high courts ruling, Iowa
becomes the third state in the nation to recognize marriages for gay
and lesbian couples, after Massachusetts and Connecticut.
PITTSBURGH AUXILIARY BISHOP NAMED
TO HEAD DIOCESE OF KALAMAZOO
WASHINGTON (CNS) -- Pope Benedict XVI has named Pittsburgh Auxiliary Bishop Paul J. Bradley, 63, to head the Diocese of
Kalamazoo, Mich. The appointment was announced in Washington
April 6 by Archbishop Pietro Sambi, apostolic nuncio to the United
States. In a statement Pittsburgh Bishop David A. Zubik called the
appointment bittersweet. We celebrate with the faithful of the
Diocese of Kalamazoo, who will be blessed with Bishop Bradleys
ministry, he said. At the same time, we realize that we are losing
an adviser, a leader, a spiritual mentor and a friend who has served
the church of Pittsburgh so well since his ordination as a priest nearly
38 years ago. Bishop Bradley said he felt humbled and honored
by the appointment, and is eager to become one with the faithful
of Kalamazoo. But he admitted he will surely miss the clergy,
religious and faithful of Pittsburgh, his home for his 63 years. He
will be installed June 5 at St. Augustine Cathedral in Kalamazoo.

APRIL 9, 2009 CATHOLIC LIGHT PAGE 31 CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

THE CATHOLIC LIGHT APRIL 9, 2009

800 Years
of Faith

31

APRIL 9, 2009 THE CATHOLIC LIGHT

32

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UNITED NATIONS (CNS)
-- The Vaticans nuncio and permanent observer to the United
Nations has challenged the world
body to focus on greater social
and economic development rather
than seeking ways to control the
worlds population to achieve the
Millennium Development Goals
of reducing poverty and promoting
greater sustainability by 2015.
Archbishop Celestino Migliore
said April 1 that people from all
backgrounds around the world should
be considered vital contributors in
the drive to improve education, basic
health care, access to water, sanitation
and employment.
He made the comments during the March 30-April 3 session
of the U.N. Economic and Social
Councils Commission on Population and Development.
The Holy See continues to
believe that the proper focus for addressing global development should
primarily be on programs and
values which support personal and
social development, Archbishop
Migliore said. Access to education,
economic opportunity, political
stability, basic health care and support for the family must remain the
basis for achieving the (Millennium
Development Goals).

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People pray near candles on the fourth anniversary of the death of Pope John Paul II at the Vatican
(CNS photo/Emanuela De Meo, Catholic Press Photo)
April 2. The candles form the initials of the late pontiff.

Pope: Torch of Faith, Hope was Pope John Pauls Legacy


VATICAN CITY (CNS)
The heritage Pope John Paul II left
to the church, and especially to its
younger members, was a torch of
faith and hope to lead them and
the world through the darkness,
Pope Benedict XVI said.
Celebrating Mass with
young people April 2, the fourth
anniversary of the death of Pope
John Paul, Pope Benedict said
his predecessor was able to
communicate a strong feeling of

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hope founded on faith in Jesus


Christ.
If Christs word remains
in us, we can spread the flame
of that love that he ignited on
the earth; we can carry high the
torch of faith and hope, the pope
told the young people who were
preparing for the April 5 celebration of World Youth Day as they
remembered Pope John Paul.
At the end of the Mass,
young people carrying oil lamps
led Pope Benedict into the grotto
of St. Peters Basilica, where they
all knelt and prayed at the tomb
of Pope John Paul.
During his homily, Pope
Benedict said the torch of faith
and hope was what Pope John
Paul left us as a heritage. He consigned it to me, as his successor,
and this evening I pass it on once
again to you, the young people of
Rome, so that you would continue
to be sentinels of the morning,
vigilant and joyful.
Throughout his life Pope

APRIL 9, 2009 CATHOLIC LIGHT PAGE 32 CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

John Paul did not hesitate using all his energy to spread the
light (of Christ) everywhere, the
pope said. He was not willing to
compromise when it came to proclaiming and defending Christs
truth. He never tired of spreading
his love, he said.
The fruitfulness of Pope John
Pauls life and ministry, he said,
is seen in the faces of the young
men and women who crowded
into St. Peters Basilica for the
anniversary Mass.
How many vocations to the
priesthood and consecrated life,
how many young families committed to living the Gospel ideal
and aiming for holiness are tied
to the witness and preaching of
my venerated predecessor, the
pope said.
How many young men and
women converted or persevered
in their Christian journey thanks
to his prayers, his encouragement,
his support and his example,
Pope Benedict said.