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September 2014 • Issue 12 • Volume 1

BOYD

STREET MAGAZINE

Pg. 14 Success by 6:

The United Way of Norman is striving to prepare all children academically by the time they start school. You can donate monetarily or by donating books and your time by reading to children.

Pg. 40 Game Day Gear:

Looking cute on Game Day isn’t just for ladies.

Men have more and more options when it comes to picking out what to wear every Saturday. Head

to Campus Corner to pick up your new Game Day gear.

Pg. 19 Marching to Success:

The Norman marching bands are ready for the new season. The Tigers and the Timberwolves are set to entertain their home fans and support their teams. Stop by their annual fundraiser Taste of Norman on September 4.

Pg. 20 OEC Annual Meeting:

The Oklahoma Electric Cooperative brings in thousands of customers each year for BBQ, country music and lots of

family fun! Take a look at all this year’s Annual Meeting had

to offer for OEC customers.

Pg. 26 David Goodspeed:

This Normanite in the Spotlight is more than just an IT guy. He’s responsible for the massive overhaul of electronics on OU’s

campus. Thanks to Goodspeed students have access to the newest technology available including free 3D printing. The future is bright for OU students thanks to Goodspeed.

Pg. 29 The Cube:

Convince just got a lot easier thanks to The Cube. This new neighborhood concierge on Main Street is a drive through convenient store and restaurant. Need some milk but not In the

mood to change out of your PJ’s? The Cube has you covered.

Pg. 32 The Pride of Oklahoma:

The football players aren’t the only ones taking Owen Field

Saturdays, the Pride of Oklahoma is back to entertain their Sooner fans. With Dr. Justin R. Stolarik in command,

there’s no doubt that the Pride will be anything but their

best this season.

Pg. 37 Junior League of Norman:

The Junior League of Norman is a community organization for woman that works to increase opportunities and

decrease obstacles facing at-risk youth in Norman’s

community. Check out what they have in store for this year

and find out how you can get involved.

Pg. 43 Bash on Asp:

Every year, Boyd Street Magazine partners with local businesses to bring you the Bash on Asp tailgate. This year, the Newcastle Casino Bash on Asp will help you kickoff in style!

Pg. 51 Second Wind:

Not just another coffee shop, Second Wind runs solely on donations. With a new leader in tow, the employees are back from summer break and are ready to keep the tradition of donations only coffee strong.

Pg. 53 The Earth:

Lavender cake, farmer’s cheese and fresh

bread, yum! The Earth store is now part café

and part grocery store. Stop by their location at 309 South Flood for organic groceries, spices, herbs and delicious food served right at the counter.

Pg. 56 OU Football History:

From brawling to foot-balling, OU football

wasn’t always state-of-the-art. When the sport first came to OU’s campus in 1895 there was

a buffalo wallowed field rather than a stadium. One thing’s the same from the first game to

the last, Oklahoma football will always be a tradition.

Pg. 58 Grand Prix:

The United Way of Norman’s annual Grand

Prix is back September 27. Registration ends September 13 so make sure you get your trike registered! There will be food, fun and adults riding tricycles. Yes, tricycles.

Editor’s Note

School is back in session and there is only one thing on everyone’s minds--football. This issue has

what you need to start your season off right. We ahve articles on high school and college football, marching band, tailgating, and even football fashion! We also have articles for those returning to cam-

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF • Haley Mowdy

ART DIRECTOR

Haley Mowdy

COPY EDITOR & ADVERTISING MANAGER

Alexandra Bare

PHOTOGRAPHY

Mark Doescher | Kathryn Shauberger

Nick Powers | Melodie Lettkeman

CONTRIBUTORS

Chris Joseph

Tyler McComas

Lacey Swope

Arianna Pickard

Lindsey Jackson

Lindsay Cuomo

Mary Newport

Jen Elsner

Leighann Carroll

Kylee Gwartney

Tyler Worsham

Stefanie Brickman

DESIGN

Joanna Jayakaran

Savanna Cometa

Rachel Campbell

ADVERTISING

REPRESENTATIVES

Joe Wilhite Randy Laffoon | Perry Spencer Tracie Gray | Shar Rother

PUBLISHER=-

Joe Wilhite

BOYD STREET MAGAZINE Pg. 14 Success by 6: The United Way of Norman is striving to

IN PARTNERSHIP WITH

BOYD STREET MAGAZINE Pg. 14 Success by 6: The United Way of Norman is striving to

Boyd Street Magazine P.O. Box 721494 Norman, Oklahoma 73070

Phone: (405) 321-2400 E-mail: joe@boydstreet.com

Copyright © Boyd Street Magazine

Any articles, artwork or graphics created by Boyd Street Magazine or its contributors are sole property of Boyd Street Magazine and cannot be reproduced for any reason without permission. Any opinions expressed in Boyd Street are not necessarily that of Boyd Street management.

pus without an interest in football, including coverage on the non-profit study haven/concert venue/

coffee shop, Second Wind. Boomer Sooner!

Haley Mowdy Editor-in-Chief
Haley Mowdy
Editor-in-Chief
  • boydstreet.com

  • /boydstreetmagazine

  • @boydstreet

Swope Scope by Lacey Swope
Swope Scope
by Lacey Swope

Above average precipitation and below average temperatures—this is not what Oklahoma

summers are made of. This year, however, has been anything but normal. It’s a nice cycle

we have found ourselves in. The rain and moisture keep on coming, which keeps all the

vegetation nice and green. This also keeps the heat from running away and getting out of control. Since our summer has been on the mild side, this gets everyone wondering what

this means for winter. It’s a perfectly logical question most of us ask. What will all of this moisture mean for the winter? Is it going to be brutally cold? Does all the rain mean a lot of snow for snowmen?

Unfortunately, or fortunately depending on how you look at it, our atmosphere is much

more complex than this. A cool summer does not equal a cold winter. Wet summers do

not equal snowy winters. In fact, there is no direct correlation from any season to another

here in Oklahoma. We know this by looking back at other cool wet summers. Those years

were followed by warm dry winters, warm wet winters, cold dry winters and cold wet winters. Long range forecasting is one of the most complicated and challenging things we face in this science. We are limited by technology and our own understanding of global atmospheric interactions.

One thing that can have enormous impacts on Oklahoma winters is El Nino. El Nino is

not a storm. It is a pattern change in air flow and oceanic currents off the coast of South

America. This leads to warmer than average waters and typically steers the jet stream over the southern plains. This can mean more storms and thus more precipitation in the

winter months, and typically means close to average temperatures. We are expecting a weak El Nino to take effect into the fall and winter. As more data becomes available I will

give a more updated outlook for the upcoming winter months. For now, let’s enjoy what is

left of this amazing summer and cheer on our favorite Oklahoma Sooners!

Boomer Sooner!

Swope Scope by Lacey Swope Above average precipitation and below average temperatures—this is not what Oklahoma
  • /laceyswope.wx

  • @laceyswope

BOYD STREET MAGAZINE // 5
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OFF THE CORNER

SPORTS

Tigers Will Use Speed on Offense

OFF THE CORNER SPORTS Tigers Will Use Speed on Offense Kolar to Lead Timberwolves by Chris
OFF THE CORNER SPORTS Tigers Will Use Speed on Offense Kolar to Lead Timberwolves by Chris
OFF THE CORNER SPORTS Tigers Will Use Speed on Offense Kolar to Lead Timberwolves by Chris
OFF THE CORNER SPORTS Tigers Will Use Speed on Offense Kolar to Lead Timberwolves by Chris
OFF THE CORNER SPORTS Tigers Will Use Speed on Offense Kolar to Lead Timberwolves by Chris

Kolar to Lead Timberwolves

by Chris Joseph

The last two years have seen some great football by Norman North. After a trip to the state title game and another playoff appearance last year, the T-Wolves are poised to make another playoff run. However, it may be a little tougher this year. New districting has the T-Wolves in a pretty tough group of teams but should make for an exciting season.

by Tyler McComas

A year ago, the Norman Tigers ended their season in a hard way. Dreams of a deep run in the playoffs were smashed after the Tigers suffered a loss to Lawton in the last game of the regular season, which cost them postseason play.

The thought of that night

is still on the minds of every player on the

roster. That’s what is

pushing them through grueling summer workouts and two-a-

OFF THE CORNER SPORTS Tigers Will Use Speed on Offense Kolar to Lead Timberwolves by Chris

tougher. As Nation put

it, “It’s like [seeing OU’s

football team] stepping up and playing in the SEC.”

Several starters are

gone from last year’s squad, but new faces

have the chance to step

up as major contributors

in the upcoming season. What the Tigers lack

in experience, they’ll

make up for with a

solid core of talented underclassmen waiting in the wings for their chance to shine.

day practices in the

Oklahoma heat. That’s

The talent of new

what will be on their minds when they start their journey through the 2014 season.

players, plus familiar faces Sayvon Foley, George Carter, Gavin Nadeau, Sean Wilson and Darius Manning,

Head coach Greg Nation

create a team that’s

isn’t keeping what his

ready to right the ship

team has accomplished

and make a serious

this summer a secret.

push for the playoffs in

In fact, he said it’s one

2014.

of the most impressive

off-seasons he’s been a

part of.

However, Nation also realizes the task his team faces with the new district pairings in 6A. Adding formidable foes such as Jenks, Westmoore, Broken Arrow, Yukon and Edmond Santa Fe will make the journey to the postseason that much

The first seven games for the Timberwolves are no joke. They start with the Cross-

Town Clash against rival Norman High before taking on tough Yukon and Westmoore teams the Timberwolves have struggled with in recent years.

Follow that up with games against new district 6A foes, the always powerful Owasso Rams and the Tulsa Union Redskins.

Up next is Mustang, the team that knocked the Timberwolves out of the playoffs last year with Chandler Garrett back at the helm. Edmond North will be next and is loaded as well. Putnam City North and Moore follow after that, before wrapping up the year

with a young, but talented Southmoore squad.

Hoping to continue his good play John Kolar, the Oklahoma State commit, will

lead the Timberwolves as quarterback, with Z’Quan Hogan carrying the bulk of the

play making responsibility. A mature offensive line should be a strong point for the

6 // BOYD STREET MAGAZINE

T-Wolves if they can find some skill players for Kolar to target.

The defensive side of the ball was a weakness last year for the Timberwolves and led to many shoot-outs. This year Mason Volk will lead the way at linebacker and Cory Tipsword will look to be an anchor for the defensive line.

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Norman Next
Norman Next
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CCFI
CCFI
Norman Next CCFI BOYD STREET MAGAZINE // 9
Norman Next CCFI BOYD STREET MAGAZINE // 9
Norman Next CCFI BOYD STREET MAGAZINE // 9

Stuff the Bus

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Stuff the Bus the ride 10 // BOYD STREET MAGAZINE
Stuff the Bus the ride 10 // BOYD STREET MAGAZINE
Stuff the Bus the ride 10 // BOYD STREET MAGAZINE
Stuff the Bus the ride 10 // BOYD STREET MAGAZINE

the ride

Stuff the Bus the ride 10 // BOYD STREET MAGAZINE
Stuff the Bus the ride 10 // BOYD STREET MAGAZINE
Stuff the Bus the ride 10 // BOYD STREET MAGAZINE

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BOYD STREET MAGAZINE // 11
  • 5 Visit Norman September Must-Dos

Now that we are in the heart of “It’s Football Time in Oklahoma” time, how about some other Norman must-dos for September?

  • 1. Take in the last Summer Breeze concert of the season. Kim Lenz and the Jaguars will play at 7:30 p.m. at Lions

Park, 450 S. Flood. The Los Angeles-based musician Kim Lenz has been cultivating her take on rockabilly since 1998, releasing three albums, including a pair for Hightone Records – one of the most influential labels in the genre

– and playing hundreds of dates around the world.

  • 2. Stroll through the Cleveland County Free Fair, Sept. 4-7. Chomp on some corn dogs, drink some lemonade

and inhale some cotton candy out at the Cleveland County Fairgrounds, 601 E. Robinson. Come to this traditional county fair for everything from goat roping to carnival rides. Enjoy a variety of tasty fair food, kick back and listen to endless live entertainment or browse through livestock displays. The Cleveland County Free Fair will also feature its Celebrity Cow Milking Contest, 4H, FFA and OHCE exhibits and a carnival midway full of fun games for kids and adults.

  • 3. Put on your best walking shoes for Second Friday Circuit of Art on Sept. 12. The night before the Sooners play

the Tennessee Volunteers, make plans to visit Downtown Norman for the art walk. The galleries open their doors

along with almost every other Main Street business for Friday night fun. VisitNorman has been coordinating Food Truck Central so check out VisitNorman.com for more information about where the trucks will be parked.

  • 4. No Sooner September would be complete without cruising by Groovefest at Andrews Park. The music starts at

noon and lasts through 10 p.m. Groovefest was created by the OU artists, musicians, and activists in 1986 to raise human rights awareness all over the world. Norman Groovefest hopes to highlight the great work of many local organizations, artists, and businesses that promote human rights. The event will feature live music, art activities, and inspirational speakers. Admission is free.

  • 5. Beginning Sept. 9, take in a Tuesday noon concert at the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, 500 Elm Avenue. The

Tuesday Noon Concert series is a cooperative effort between the OU School of Music and the FJJMA. Set aside part

of your lunch hour for these 30-minute concerts performed by OU music students and faculty.

Agree with our list? Disagree with the list? Tag your #SeptemberInNorman must-do list via Twitter or Instagram @VisitNorman.

The Norman Convention and Visitors Bureau exists to promote the city, to attract overnight meeting, convention, sport and tourism business to the community, and to enhance and contribute to the overall identity and economic wellbeing of the city. VisitNorman’s vision is to be the leader who proactively markets and develops Norman as the preferred destination in Oklahoma.

Success by 6: The Smart Start for Norman

by Jen Elsner

Christy Emig, the Director of the Success By 6/

Smart Start Norman initiative, led me back to her office

at the United Way Plaza for our interview. The first thing

I noticed was the side wall full of plastic bins, neatly

organizing several children’s books. However, many of the

bins were empty or had very few in them. After some brief

introductions, we got our interview under way.

Success By 6/Smart Start Norman is a school

readiness initiative. Mrs. Emig oversees the program for

Cleveland, as well as McClain counties here in Oklahoma.

Success by 6 is a nationwide United Way initiative.

However, the one here in Norman is funded by Smart

Start Oklahoma. The overall mission of Success By 6 /

Smart Start Norman, is to ensure that “all children are safe,

healthy, eager to learn and ready to succeed by the time

they enter school.”

How does the organization do this? One way is

by going out into the community and performing formal

and informal analyses. These analyses look at what

challenges families might be facing in order to help their

children be prepared for school cognitively, socially and

emotionally. They look at who in the community might be

able to help address those challenges, and then help set

up those collaborations to ensure those needs are met.

They also work closely with parents, childcare providers,

pediatricians and anyone who works with kids in order

to help educate people about how critical the early years

before the age of six really are. Emig states that the brain

becomes fully developed in the first three years: “It’s a

critical window,” she says. If children are read to every

day when they are young, especially in those critical years,

and have positive learning experiences through regular

interaction, it “will help ensure a more healthy, successful

future” for them. She further states that if they are ready to

learn by the time they reach school, then they will be ready

to read on a third grade level by the time they get there.

If they are ready for that, then they are more likely to

graduate from high school and lead more successful

lives. Emig says that “third grade is so critical

because up until third grade you are learning to read,

but from third grade on, you are reading to learn.”

In 1988, Success By 6 became a national

movement. In 1999, several business communities

around the state came together to ensure they

were doing their part to build a strong and healthy

Oklahoma. It was clear starting with the early years

of child development was imperative in order to help

build a strong workforce for the future of Oklahoma,

as well as being able to understand and address

challenges for their current employees and their

family’s needs. By 2003, Smart Start became a piece

of legislation signed to existence by Governor Brad

Henry, and was officially known as the Oklahoma

Partnership for School Readiness Act.

Even though Success By 6 is a nationwide

program, the locations are very individualized. Each

Success By 6 is a local movement because each

community has different needs and different means

and opportunities to meet those needs, however

they all share the same mission. The Success By 6/

Smart Start Norman branch’s collaborations have

resulted in successful programs and services for our

community. For instance, Early Birds is a partnership

with Norman Public Schools, and is a “school writing

as a parent” class for families with children from the

ages of birth to five. In this class, families are given

informative materials in order to assist them in being

teachers to their children so that the kids are better

prepared to enter school. Prescription for Reading

is a partnership with local pediatricians and family

doctors where they are provided with a free book and

a “prescription” for physicians to hand out to families

of young kids, directing them to read every day. The

organization also has a community resource van they

14 // BOYD STREET MAGAZINE

  • 6 use for an initiative called Storytimes. They use the van to drive out to apartment complexes in the community and read to those families. They also help coordinate free health screenings, community educational and literacy events and dole out lots and lots of books at different events held throughout the year.

Want to get involved? There are two major

ways that you can help the Success By 6/Smart

Start Norman initiative: 1) by volunteering to read

and 2) through donations.

The organization is always looking for

volunteers to read in local child care centers. If

you are interested in volunteering your time in

this way, please contact Miss Emig at cemig@

unitedway-norman.org.

There are three specific ways that you can

donate. Remember the lots and lots of books

I talked about them giving away? According to

Emig, the organization gives away anywhere from

5,000-6,000 books per year to children in our

community. “It’s probably the biggest impact we

have because we know there are children in this

community that don’t own a single book, and they

come to Storytimes [and other sponsored events]

to get those books,” said Emig. So the first items

you can donate that would be the biggest help are

children’s board books, or picture books, (ages 0-5

years). Donations can be sent or brought directly

to the office of the United Way of Norman, at 2424

Springer Dr., Suite 304, Norman, OK 73069.

The second and third ways to donate

are financial. You can give a general donation

to the United Way Success By 6/Smart Start

Norman. Or you can donate through a $55 per

child sponsorship for the Early Birds program,

where your donation would ensure that each

family participating in the program gets a bag

of helpful items and information in order to help

get their children ready to succeed by the time

they get to school. If you choose to donate or

sponsor a child, please contact Christy Emig at

405-329-2025, or by the email address listed

above.

Emig says, “Having books in your home

and being read to on a regular basis, are the

two most important predictors of future success.

And it’s an easy thing to do.” She’s right; it is

an easy thing to do if you have the resources

and knowledge to do it. If you would like to help

foster the success of the children in our district,

you might consider looking into the Success By

6/Smart Start Norman initiative to help create a

brighter future for Norman and our neighboring

communities.

For more information on Success By

6/Smart Start Norman by visiting them on

Facebook.

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YouthPerformance

Alexandra Bare

Chat Williams and the staff at Youth Performance have dedicated their talents to helping elementary, middle school and high school athletes enhance their sports performance. In the three years Youth Performance

has been open they have moved to three different locations. It first began

as a 1,500 square foot facility and has grown to a 5,400 square foot state-

of-the-art training facility that includes 30 yards of turf for running sprints. The new facility is located at 500 West Main Street across from Sprouts and provides enough room for the growing number of student athletes the trainers see every day. From football and soccer to swimming, the trainers at Youth Performance

are able to train athletes for any sport. Swimming may seem like a sport best practiced in the water, but Chat Williams, performance director, assures that total body training in the facility can help prepare for swimming. By breaking down each stroke, turn and movement, they are able to strengthen muscles to enhance performance. Building and strengthening these muscles not only helps performance but also helps to prevent injury.

“No matter the age, I take each kid and do everything I can to motivate them,” Williams said. He’s been train- ing athletes for 10 years, in the profession for 20 and chooses not to be another “yelling coach.” He prides himself on being uplifting and supportive to the stu-

dents. “I have the biggest impact in confidence and

self-esteem.”

Look no further for qualified, certified and encouraging

coaches for any young athlete. Combining the experience and talent of the trainers and the new

state-of-the-art athletic facility, Youth Performance is a top pick for a youth training facility. They are open

Monday through Friday 2 to 8 p.m. and Saturday 9

a.m. to 12 p.m. Get more information about signing up for their programs at www.youthperformance.net. Visit and like them on Facebook and follow them on Instagram at @ youthperformance.

Chat Williams graduated with his bachelor’s in health promotion from Emporia State University and received his master’s from the University of

Oklahoma in health and exercise science. He has four certifications from

the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA). Every member

of the training staff is also certified from the NSCA and are Norman

Regional Health System employees.

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Norman High School Band
Norman High School Band
Norman High School Band HIGH SCHOOL MARCHING BAND Norman prepares for the season It’s football season

HIGH SCHOOL MARCHING BAND

Norman prepares for the season

It’s football season in Norman. Changing leaves, fresh classes and

Sooner Saturdays await as the weather cools and the anticipation of

watching your favorite team rises. Not only does autumn bring lazy

football weekends and cooler weather, but also marching season. Norman is proud to host two of the best marching bands in the state, the Norman North Timberwolves and the Norman High Tigers. Fresh out of band camp, these schools are ready to show off both their musical talent and marching skills in competitions across the state. The Norman North Timberwolves marching band is under the direction of Trent Davis along with percussion director Brian Dailey. Both directors are alumni of the University Of Oklahoma and have bachelors in music education and music of percussion performance, respectively. Head Director Davis also holds a doctorate in musical

arts. Their talent is illustrated through the style and technique

of the high school band members as they compete and place in competitions year after year. Watch the Timberwolves perform at every halftime game starting with their season opener Thursday, September 4. They play their local rival Norman High after the Taste of Norman, and spectators will get

their first glimpse of how the Norman marching bands are doing. The

Norman North band is known for local, statewide and national titles. They are recipients of the Sweepstakes with Accent and Outstanding Achievement Awards from the Oklahoma Secondary Schools Activities Association. The Norman North band has a variety of bands in order to help students gain recognition and perform in different areas of music. Students can audition for the wind ensemble, an elite varsity band that showcases talented older members. Other bands include a symphonic band, a jazz band, a big band and an orchestral winds and percussion bands. My favorite, the big band, plays popular music from the ages and has earned a spectacular reputation not only in

Norman North High School Band
Norman North High School Band
Norman High School Band HIGH SCHOOL MARCHING BAND Norman prepares for the season It’s football season
Norman High School Band HIGH SCHOOL MARCHING BAND Norman prepares for the season It’s football season
Norman High School Band HIGH SCHOOL MARCHING BAND Norman prepares for the season It’s football season

Norman but also throughout Oklahoma. Norman High ended their band camp August 13 and begins their season on a good note. The band previews on

September 4 at the Taste of Norman and performs at halftime during the Norman High and Norman North football game. The Norman High Band has many showcases throughout the next few weeks. They will compete in the state marching tournament at the end of October and in OMEA/CODA only a few weeks later. Their most talented members will be showcased in the CODA band and members will also be

featured in Norman High’s musical,

White Christmas. Norman High has many bands to showcase the talent of their members. Students can demonstrate their talents in

Norman High’s jazz band, wind bad and

symphonic band. Members and directors are excited to see the success that will come with this season. Go Tigers!

If you’re unable to wait for football

season to watch these talented bands perform, make sure to check them out in

The Taste of Norman September 4.

The taste of Norman is a benefit that

helps raise over $200,000 dollars for the Norman bands every year. Norman restaurants donate food and for $15 you can purchase a ticket for ten food items.

Use your ticket to find food items up and

down Boyd Street from popular Norman

venues. If you don’t want to wait in line

on the fourth, make sure to get a ticket from band members and do not forget to get free tickets from the directors. During the festivities both bands will give a performance showcasing all that they have been working on. Find a Norman band member for an advance ticket to

the unique show.

Football season is here, which means your favorite bands will be showcasing their talents all season long. Make sure to check out their performances at the many showcases, football halftimes, band competitions and events around Norman. Go Sooners, go Tigers and go Timberwolves! The Norman residents look forward to your successful marching seasons.

OEC Annual Meeting

Oklahoma Electric Cooperative continually works hard to keep its members happy, not just through reliable, affordable electricity and service, but also through the OEC Annual Meeting. Each year OEC invites its members (those who receive electricity from OEC) along with their families to an annual night of BBQ, live music and fun for all ages.

“We like having the annual meeting because members LOVE it,” says OEC’s CEO Max Meek. “They enjoy coming for fellowship, entertainment, food and prizes.” This year the event was held on August 8th at Lloyd Noble Center. There was catered BBQ from End O’ Main in Watonga and activities for everyone in the family. For the adults there were chances to win over 50 prizes, including a grand prize of $1,000 dollars. For the kids there was a “Kid’s Zone” with clowns making balloon animals as well as games and prizes suited for the younger members. Additionally, there were three performances by Graystone Bluegrass Revival (featuring OEC District Lineman Danny Watters), Les Gilliam and the Dove Brothers Band.

OEC’s business model is a little different from the other electric companies around. As a not-for-profit, OEC is owned by its members, not by investors. “A customer at another electric company just gets electricity, a member here gets electricity but actually own a piece of the company,” says Mr. Meek. This means tat they strive hard to please their members the way that other companies strive hard to please their investors. “We are in business strictly for members, to provide reliable electricity at the lowest possible cost. Any excess profit margins that we have we give back to our members with a capital credit check.”

What began as a small member of a cooperation of rural electric companies is now a powerhouse of service dedicated to taking care of its customers. Whether it’s through the Annual Meeting or through dedicated and reliable service, OEC is continually working to go above and beyond for its members. “It’s not just a company—we’re building a community with events like the Annual Meeting. And that’s the way it should be.”

If you or your loved ones live on OEC lines, look forward to attending next year’s Annual Meeting—it’s sure to be even better than this year’s awesome event! And if you don’t happen to be on OEC lines…well, then I suppose you’ll just have to be jealous of the ones who are.

OEC Annual Meeting Oklahoma Electric Cooperative continually works hard to keep its members happy, not just

20 // BOYD STREET MAGAZINE

coors
coors
coors BOYD STREET MAGAZINE // 21
coors BOYD STREET MAGAZINE // 21
coors BOYD STREET MAGAZINE // 21

BOYD STREET MAGAZINE // 21

Moore Events Center

Are you looking for somewhere to host your next

wedding, business meeting or baby shower? If

so, look no further than Lynlee Mae Chapel and Reception Center. Located at 507 E. Main Street in Moore, Lynlee Mae serves as a central location for people in the Oklahoma City metro area and has become the standard for hosting events and parties. Though Lynlee Mae offers a variety of resources such as several catering options, a spacious dining

area and an on-site chapel, what sets them apart is their customer service and overall experience.

“We’re always here for our customers,” said event

coordinator Victoria Ireland. “We’ll cater to your needs and I think that’s what sets us apart, because we’re not going to turn anyone away from our

doors.” Ireland, who has had always had aspirations of

becoming an event planner, took over as head of

the Lynlee Mae staff in January. Since then, she’s

seen her business continue to grow while keeping

her customers extremely satisfied.

Pricing can sometimes be a hassle when planning

big events such as weddings, but with several

packages to choose from, Lynlee Mae simplifies

that process for their customers.

“We offer package pricing in our facility and we also rent it out by the hour,” said Ireland. “We can work with anyone no matter what their budget is because we want everyone to have their vision of

their ‘Big Day’ to be exceeded.

Ireland and the rest of her staff are wrapping up what has been a busy summer wedding schedule

and they’re eager to give you information on

hosting your next event. For more information, you can contact them by

phone at 405-735-8900. You can also visit their

website at www.lynleemae.com to see pictures

of the their facilities, as well as for event booking

requests.

22 // BOYD STREET MAGAZINE

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by Alexandra Bare Norman Regional HealthPlex Shines in Women’s Bone Health
by Alexandra Bare
Norman Regional HealthPlex
Shines in Women’s Bone Health

The Women’s Choice Award Seal for an America’s

Best Hospital for Orthopedics was awarded to Norman

Regional HealthPlex in August for excellence in women’s

health.

“As one of America’s Best Hospitals for Orthopedics,

Norman Regional’s HealthPlex is demonstrating their commitment to fulfill the needs and preferences of

women by meeting the highest standards of excellence and performance,” states Delia Passi, CEO and founder

of the Women’s Choice Award program. According to the Women’s Choice Award (WCA),

the award is chosen by judging services, surgeries,

post-operative recovery and most importantly, patient

recommendations. In fact, the America’s Best Hospitals

for Orthopedics award is the only WCA award that focuses on patient satisfaction. The WCA hold the opinions of women at great importance and make sure their voices are heard. The WCA website states, “Women account for over

85% of all consumer purchases and 90% of all family

healthcare decisions, and control the wealth in the US. There is no stronger consumer segment than women.” The organization understands the importance of

women’s healthcare and strives to give them the best

possible options. The seal is a way for women to know

that their hospital will make their health a top priority. The Norman Regional HealthPlex joined the ranks of

the best hospitals for women’s health in the country.

Their seal shines as a beacon of excellence and

empowerment to female patients not only in Norman, but

across the state. “Our team at Norman Regional is committed to providing

quality care delivered with a compassionate spirit,” said

Norman Regional President and CEO David Whitaker. “This award is proof of their commitment to patients.” With the statistics for osteoporosis in women

dangerously high, it’s important that these women have a

hospital they can trust and count on to take care of them.

According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation, 80 percent of Americans with osteoporosis are female. It’s

reassuring to know that women across Oklahoma can trust in Norman Regional HealthPlex for outstanding care with their bone health.

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This September 26th and October 31st, you can join your friends at the CLEVELAND COUNTY FAMILY YMCA for a free day of fun, health, and friendship. Experience the power of the Y – it’s on us!

We’ll show you everything you need for a healthy spirit, mind and body through healthy living, community involvement and social responsibility.

There are great ways for all ages to get active; individual or the whole family. Get in a work out, take a swim, jog the track, attend a group fitness class and make new friends along the way. When you’re done, we’ll be available to tell you all about membership so you’ll never miss out again.

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BOYD STREET MAGAZINE // 25

Normanite in the Spotlight David Goodman A Sooner Legacy The popular saying, “Sooner born and Sooner

Normanite in the Spotlight

David Goodman

A Sooner Legacy

The popular saying, “Sooner born and Sooner

bred,” from one of the most recognizable college

fight songs in the country,

Boomer Sooner, speaks of the long legacy at the University of Oklahoma. The lyrics ring true for many Sooner fans and it certainly does for David Goodspeed, the program manager of the campus stores with OU IT. “I come from a long line of OU graduates,” recounts Goodspeed. His family legacy began decades ago in the 1940s with his grandmother.

“It all began with my grandma. She got her master’s in

English at OU,” says Goodspeed. “My wife, mom, dad, uncle, sister and brother-in-law have all gone to OU.” And that legacy continues today with his children. His

son, Collin, is a sophomore at OU beginning his first year as

a Ruf/Nek. Rylee, his eleven year-old daughter, is diligently

training to reach her dream of being an OU gymnast. She aspires to then teach gymnastics. Goodspeed, a transplant from Texas, moved to

Norman in 1985 and has never left.

“I love the charm of this town,” says Goodspeed. “Norman is such a special place to me. I never wanted to

leave even if it might have meant slowing my career a bit. I wanted to raise my family here.” He attended Norman High School, graduating in

1989 and then went straight to OU to study criminal justice,

influenced by family and friends that were attorneys or in law

enforcement. Despite graduating with a degree in criminal justice, Goodspeed felt more at home working in retail.

“It may sound cliché but for me it’s true. I got into retail

because I love people,” explains Goodspeed. “I am a social

butterfly and it fits me.”

So when his wife, Suzanne, told him about an

opportunity to work at OU in the IT department, Goodspeed

knew it was a good fit for him.

“It was an opportunity for an exciting career change for me,” recalls Goodspeed. “I get to be involved in a little bit of everything. It has allowed me to do a lot of different things.”

Goodspeed helped open the first OU IT store in 2008, using his expertise from his years working at Target

and as the general manager of the retail shops in Will

Rogers World Airport. He left OU for a few years to work for Apple, helping other universities wanting to sell Apple products. He returned to OU in May of 2013 when he heard about the proposed idea of opening another IT store, intrigued by what the store was intended to be. “When I heard what they are doing I was excited to come back,” remembers Goodspeed.

He spent the following five months gearing up to

open the ONE University Store in the Union. “My main job is to set the tone in each store,” says Goodspeed. “I wanted to get beyond whether or not we were going to sell a computer but rather focus on enhancing the student experience.”

“I’ve worked with schools from Texas to Florida,

the Carolinas, Tennessee, a lot of big universities. No one

else is doing this,” says Goodspeed. “Colleges around the

country are calling us to find out what we are doing.”

In our high tech world, students today need

access to the cutting edge products that are shaping their prospective industries.

“In higher education, students are supposed to find

new creative ways of doing things,” believes Goodspeed. The two OU IT stores have taken shape into two

very different stores and each fill a very different purpose.

The store on Boyd Street offers students a place to buy

essential technology that will help them not only during their time at OU but also into their prospective careers. “We are not just selling products,” comments Goodspeed. “Instead, we educate students on what they should buy and what they can do with it.” The stores are staffed with current students from all levels, beginning freshmen to graduate level, so

chances are someone will have firsthand knowledge of

what students from most colleges really need to succeed, according to Goodspeed. “Just the other day, a dad and his daughter came

in to get a laptop for her engineering classes,” says Goodspeed. “One of my staff who is a chemical engineering

student helped her find what she needed.”

The ONE U Store, in the Union, is the brick and

mortar part of ONE University, offering students something

26 // BOYD STREET MAGAZINE

quite unique. The ONE U Store is an innovative technology store and learning space. “Its focus
quite unique. The ONE U Store is an innovative technology store and learning space. “Its focus
quite unique. The ONE U Store is an innovative technology store and learning space. “Its focus

quite unique. The ONE U Store is an innovative technology store

and learning space. “Its focus is the new technology that is coming,” shares

Goodspeed. “The store is really a huge playground. It’s kind of

like the science museum of the future. You can play around with ground-breaking technology.” “We have a whole different way of looking at emerging technology and how to use it to drive down the cost of education,” explains Goodspeed. “We, as leaders, care about giving the students the best experience during their time at OU.” From iPad programs to iTunes U, ONE University is a university-wide digital initiative utilizing technology and digital content to enhance the student experience and save students money. Not only offering students simple and cheaper solutions like access to free digital textbooks and free apps instead of

$50 clickers to use in the classroom, the ONE U Store goes

further, offering students access to technology like Google Liquid

Galaxy, Google Glass, Leap Motion, iBooks, 3D Printing, Janux

and other cutting edge technologies. “We have 3D printers that are free to the public. Over 500 people have used it logging over 2000 build hours,” says Goodspeed. “This technology goes beyond just the engineering classrooms and into other colleges like the college of business.” “Imagine you are in a product management class,” offers Goodspeed. “You can create a product in the classroom.” With the 3D printer, students can make prototypes for pennies on the dollar when compared to typical traditional methods, reveals Goodspeed. Some professors even hold class in the store.

“We have a GPS tracking class using the Google Liquid

Galaxy,” says Goodspeed. ONE University goes beyond the OU campus. “After meeting with the principal of Bridge Creek Middle School, I challenged his students to help create 3D renderings

of buildings on OU’s campus, of their school and for extra credit

even their own homes,” says Goodspeed. New projects are beginning all the time which will create more public educational content and promote new learning

opportunities. Be on the lookout for a drone to be hanging around the store soon, entices Goodspeed. “Our store is fully staffed by students,” says Goodspeed.

“We use the students’ expertise to make all this happen.”

With a son currently at OU and a daughter working toward that goal, Goodspeed has a vested interest in making OU

the best it can be. “The OU today is very different than it was even a few

years ago,” shares Goodspeed. “We don’t want to pigeon-hole ourselves; instead, we ask the students what do you want to do?

The vision is whatever we want it to be for OU.”

“I want to open their eyes to things they didn’t know was

possible. We sell dreams and ideas. The technology will sell itself.”

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28 // BOYD STREET MAGAZINE

The convenience

cube

is coming

The convenience cube is coming By Mary Newport It’s big. It’s fast. And this October, The

By Mary Newport

It’s big. It’s fast. And this October, The Cube is coming

to Norman.

It sounds like alien transport, a futuristic band or a

science fiction device, but Joe Lawrence, CEO of

The Cube Convenience Stores LLC, describes it as a “neighborhood concierge.”

“The Cube is a business model providing an exclusive drive-through shopping experience like no other convenience store,” Lawrence said. “The goal is simple.

At the Cube, [customers] can buy groceries, fresh-

made hot food, real coffee, great fountain drinks and a whole host of other daily need items – promptly and courteously, all without getting out of the car.”

If all goes according to plan, The Cube will be Norman’s

number one stop for busy people in urgent need of

a bottle of dish soap on the fly – or lazy people who

want to purchase a pack of sodas without leaving their vehicle. Lawrence said the planned selection will consist of just about anything customers could need in a hurry, including snacks and beverages, beer and tobacco, grocery items and health and beauty products.

“Most notable is our fresh-made food,” he said. “Our executive chef, Andre Revella, has a European culinary education and has been working in the food industry for over 40 years. He has put together a delicious and wholesome menu for The Cube that is as fast as it is tasty.”

The store will be open sometime this October, with the exact opening date depending on the progress of hir- ing and training, which begin in August and September

respectively. The Cube’s first location will be at 1415 W

Main Street. Lawrence said the location is ideal for the

first store because Norman is as bustling as The Cube

hopes to be.

“It’s a great city with people that are always

on the go,” he said. “We thought it had a vibe that matched what we were trying

to accomplish with The Cube. It’s been a

great reception, too. People are as excited about The Cube as we are.”

The store’s planned second location,

however, is something of a mystery. Lawrence said a second Cube will eventually be going up, but not until the

original Cube has been running for six

months or so. Until then, he’s keeping the second location quiet. If it works out,

he said there are plans for a few Cube locations in Norman before it branches out to other cities.

Overall, he said the idea behind The Cube is to bring real convenience to customers. “The Cube started with a conversation

… about what was ‘convenient’ about a

convenience store,” he said. “What would

it look like if it was truly ‘convenient’?

We designed our store around these

concepts. It’s clean and attractive, the staff

is motivated and well-trained, the food is wholesome, the coffee is great and the selection is diverse.”

30 // BOYD STREET MAGAZINE

The Pride

of Oklahoma

The University of Oklahoma students, faculty, alumni

and fans flock by the thousands to the Gaylord Stadium each fall to cheer on their Sooner football team. It’s not

just the football that brings pride to the Sooner legend. At

halftime, the field comes alive with music as The Pride of

Oklahoma shows off the best of the best musical talent.

It all started in 1904 when The Pride of Oklahoma was

founded as a pep band to play at the football games. Originally, the band was made up of Norman residents

and was disbanded at the end of every season. It wasn’t

until 1929 that William R. Wehrend was hired to direct the band full-time and a student band was formed.

Since then, The Pride has been directed by many, and as of 2013, Dr. Justin R. Stolarik has joined the ranks. Dr. Stolarik is currently the director of athletic bands and associate director of bands at the University of Oklahoma, where his primary role is as director of The Pride of Oklahoma Marching Band. Prior to his role at OU, he served four years as assistant director of bands at The University of Wisconsin-Madison and one year as assistant director of bands at Henderson State University. While at UW-Madison, Dr. Stolarik coordinated three consecutive Wisconsin Band trips to the Rose Bowl Game, which included notable performances at L.A. Live! with Everlast from the House of Pain and will.i.am from the Black Eyed Peas. He worked closely with the legendary Professor Michael Leckrone, who continues to hold the longest marching band director tenure in the country.

Dr. Stolarik has taught and arranged for marching

bands in Florida, Texas, Arkansas and Wisconsin, as well as for the Madison Scouts Drum and Bugle Corps.

He holds a bachelor’s degree with highest honors

in music education from The University of Florida,

and master’s and doctorate degrees in percussion

performance from The University of Texas in Austin. Dr.

Stolarik’s past performances are featured in issues of

Modern Drummer and Percussion News.

Dr. Stolarik has big plans for the upcoming season at

OU. “We’re all very excited about the 2014 season,”

Stolarik told us. “We have 274 members in the fall

2014 Pride of Oklahoma — 106 new members and 168 returning members. This year we’re excited to present

the music of Stan Kenton, Bernard Herrmann, The Everly Brothers, Aretha Franklin, The Eagles, Starship,

will.i.am, The Beatles, Queen and Broadway’s “Miss

Saigon.”

One of the six halftime shows will be a celebration of all things Oklahoma. Solarik says that they are also looking forward to performing with live guest soloists, OU saxophone professor Dr. Jonathan Nichol and OU oboe professor Dr. Dan Schwartz.

Sounds like it’s turning into quite a bang up season for

The Pride.

About the Pride

The Pride of Oklahoma is a long standing music program at the University of Oklahoma for over a century. From humble

beginnings, the band has been the recipient of many awards in the music field including the prestigious Sudler Trophy, an award equivalent to the Heisman Trophy for bands and one that cannot be awarded to a band twice. The Pride of Oklahoma was the

sixth recipient of this award.

The Pride of Oklahoma includes members from over 70 different majors across campus. Members of the band have an

average GPA of 3.0 and are involved in many distinguished academic programs including National Merit Scholars, Regent’s Scholars, Dean’s List, Honors College, Eagle Scouts, Byrd Scholars and Goldwater Scholars. The Pride of Oklahoma stands

for excellence in musicianship, academics, school spirit and commitment to the role in the surrounding community. For more

information about the band and music programs at OU, visit http://bands.ou.edu.

32 // BOYD STREET MAGAZINE

Terry Kingsbery Celebrates

by Alexandra Bare

  • 20 Years

Terry Kingsbery of ICS, Investment Counseling Services Inc., is celebrating 20 years in Norman. He is in his 43 rd year as a securities representative and financial planner. Since starting his financial and investment guidance

career in Norman in 1994, Kingsbery has obtained a long list of accomplishments. He has been recognized as a Leading Provider of Wealth Management for the Central Region of the US by Goldline Research. He has also been published in Forbes magazine and chosen by the Norman Transcript as a Best Investment Firm and Securities.

Terry Kingsbery Celebrates by Alexandra Bare 20 Years Terry Kingsbery of ICS, Investment Counseling Services Inc.,

Terry’s mission statement, “Our client’s interest always comes first. Always,” is a true signifier in what he believes in. Kingsbery says he values his clients’ trust in him, because being known for having good integrity is essential.

Financial literacy is his top priority for his clients. Instead of rambling off numbers and advice and expecting his

clients to blindly take it, Kingsbery explains his suggestions in a way they can better understand.

Kingsbery formed ICS in 2010 and works with the University of Oklahoma to lower volatility of 401a and 403b

plans. ICS holds a fiduciary standard and works to insure unbiased judgment and sound financial advice for its clients. They want to create an easy-to-follow path to clients’ financial future. ICS pride themselves on outstanding retirement plan management, helping their clients plan a successful financial future and worry-free retirement.

University of Oklahoma and OUHSC employees rely on ICS to plan their retirement.

Kingsbery and ICS offer a free first consultation that is “informative, without obligation and potentially life- changing.” Visit Terry Kingsbery and his staff to get your financial future mapped out. They’re located on Campus Corner between Starbucks and New York Pizza. For more questions you can reach them by phone at 405-447- 6676, by email at terry@icsadvisors.com or visit them online at icadvisors.com.

34 // BOYD STREET MAGAZINE

Sooner Futbol

Starts Along with

by Chris Joseph

It seems that every four years, the world becomes enamored

be followed by a home contest against Central Arkansas on September 7th before the Sooners hit the road for four straight games. The Sooners will visit North Texas, Tulsa, UC-Irvine and San Diego before returning home on September 26th to take on in-state foe Oral Roberts.

with the beautiful game of soccer, fùtbol if you will. Team USA advanced and the nation was captivated. Record numbers of people watched the World Cup in Brazil this summer and are

already talking about the next one. Is soccer gaining popularity?

The University of Oklahoma soccer coach, Matt Potter, who will be going into his third year as the head man for the Sooner soccer team, hopes so.

Potter has seen how this town loves soccer, with the max capacity crowd every year at the Cross-Town Clash soccer game at the John Crain Soccer Complex. If you have not been to the OU soccer complex, you have to go check out a game there. The complex has a top-notch facility that has a world class-playing surface Sooner Nation should be proud of.

Big 12 play opens up with Texas Tech. The Lady Red Raiders became the seventh team to go undefeated in the Big 12 conference season since inception in 1996. Then

it’s off to Ames, Iowa to take on Iowa State on October 5th.

OU then has back-to-back home games against Baylor and TCU on October 9th and 12th.

Next up for the Sooners is Bedlam in Stillwater on October 17th, before the Red River
Next up for the Sooners is Bedlam in Stillwater on October
17th, before the Red River Soccer Match comes to Norman
on October 24th. The Sooners will finish the Big 12 season
with a road trip to the defending Big 12 regular season and
tournament champion West Virginia, before wrapping the
season up with Kansas at home on Halloween night.
A couple names to watch this year are sophomore Caren
Nelson from Colorado Springs, an exciting forward who
missed seven games due to injury but has great potential
to be dynamic up front for the attack. Jemma Cota, the
sophomore mid-fielder who was an all Big 12 freshman
team selection should filter the action to Nelson. In goal
Kassidie Stade returns after posting three shutouts, but
may be challenged by local star Kali Newman from Norman
North.
Whether you call it fùtbol or soccer, it’s going to be a great
Sooner season.
BOYD STREET MAGAZINE // 35
BOYD STREET MAGAZINE // 35

The Big 12 has some pretty tough competition from the likes of West Virginia, who spent the majority of the year in the top 10, and Texas Tech who was in the top 15 most of the year. Texas and Oklahoma State, the usual rivals for the Sooners, are pretty good on the pitch as well.

Potter is looking to build a winning program and get the Sooners back to the NCAA tournament, a place they have not been since the 2010 season. Last season the Sooners struggled to a 4-13-1 record and failed to make it to the Big 12 tournament. While the record was not what Potter and the Sooners wanted, there

are things to build on. In the 18 games the Sooners played last

year, they were involved in 10 games decided by one goal. The Sooners also had three games that went into double overtime with a 0-2-1 record in those games, while also going 0-6 against the top 25 in the country.

The schedule this year wasn’t any easier for Potter and the

Sooners as they started the year with a bang and welcomed their Bedlam rivals, the Oklahoma State Cowgirls, to the OU Soccer Complex to start the season on August 22 followed by three more

tough home games with Utah on the 24th, national power Florida and Florida State the 29th and 31st.

A trip to Lincoln, Nebraska to take on the Lady Cornhuskers

is the first road test for the Sooners September 5. That will

The Junior League of Norman

The Junior League of Norman is back from summer vacation and is more ready than ever to tackle issues in Norman’s community. The Junior League of Norman is a service and social organization for Norman’s women and is a member organization within AJLI, the Association of Junior Leagues International. This spring, the League came up with a new Community Based Impact Statement to realign their focus on what really matters—Norman’s youth. According to the new statement, “The Junior League of Norman works to increase opportunities and decrease obstacles facing vulnerable and at-risk youth in Norman’s community.” And from the variety of projects they take on, you can see just how the League is accomplishing this mission.

Baby Steps: Oklahoma consistently has one of the highest teen birth rates in the country. This statistic sets many young Oklahomans at a disadvantage from the get-go, either from their own birth in a teen parent household or as a teen parent themselves. The League, in partnership with several other organizations including Norman Public Schools, founded Baby Steps in 1993 as a resource for teen moms (and some dads). According to the website, “The goal of Baby Steps is to help teen parents complete their high school education so that they can reach their goals and become productive citizens and effective, nurturing parents.” Baby Steps has a facility managed by the Junior League that allows teen mothers to place their children in safe, free childcare while they finish up their high school education. Additionally, the Baby Steps program provides resources such as pregnancy and parenting education and necessities like diapers, formula and clothing to its parents. Since the beginning of the program, more than 130 pregnant and parenting teens have graduated high school as a result of their membership in the program.

The Junior League of Norman The Junior League of Norman is back from summer vacation and

Food for Kids: Another scary statistic about Oklahoma—somewhere in between 20-25% of all children in Oklahoma worry about where their next meal will come from. This statistic holds true right here in our own community, where many students leave their schools on Friday afternoon and may not get another real meal until Monday rolls around. That means for three days many of Norman’s kids battle symptoms of malnutrition and hunger when they don’t have access to their schools’ cafeterias. The League partners with McFarlin Memorial United Methodist Church and Oklahoma Regional Food Bank in order to provide inconspicuous backpacks full of food to provide to hungry middle schoolers to take home to feed themselves and their siblings over the weekend. Each weekend the League feeds over 100 children in Norman’s community. Additionally, the League helps to operate a food pantry at both of our Norman high schools to offer food to hungry older students.

Girl Power: Girl Power is a relatively new program put on specifically by the new member class of the League. Girl Power is a one day camp for fourth and fifth grade girls in the community in order to foster self-esteem and healthy behaviors in at-risk girls. This day is filled with fun activities, speakers ranging from police officers, nutritionists and child psychologists and an opportunity to connect one-on-one with peers facing similar struggles. The children who participate in this program are chosen by their schools’ counselors on a basis of particular vulnerability or risk to bullying, low self- esteem, domestic violence, depression and eating disorders. The workshops are geared around common issues facing fourth and fifth graders and help give them the tools for successfully combating these issues.

Done in a Day: As if Baby Steps, Food for Kids and Girl Power aren’t enough, the League also has something called “Done in a Day.” The DIAD committee chooses a different community organization to partner with several times per season to branch out for a day of service. Some of the projects that have been “done in a day” recently are a Valentine’s Day celebration for the local veteran’s center, decorating for the holidays for the Mary Abbott children’s house and serving meals to Norman Public Schools families at a family literacy night. This is a great way for the League to help out other organizations in the Norman area and to partner with organizations that could use an extra few hands!

36 // BOYD STREET MAGAZINE

How to Give: The Junior League of Norman has two big fundraisers per year: the Monster Dash 5K and the annual Charity Ball. Monster Dash is an event put on around Halloween as a healthy alternative to conventional Halloween celebrations for local kids and involves a costume contest and a one-mile fun walk/run. Adults are also welcome to dress up and participate through the one-mile run or 5K. The proceeds from the registration fees go directly into helping the League’s many projects. Additionally, the annual Charity Ball is an incredible night of dancing and community, along with the always awesome Taster’s Affair. Local restaurants and bakeries around Norman use this event to show off their best creations and attendees can pig out while participating in a silent auction for some of Norman’s finest gifts from local businesses. Finally, the evening culminates in a live auction and a DJ. The proceeds from this also help run the League’s many branches.

How to Give: The Junior League of Norman has two big fundraisers per year: the Monster

How to Join: This is probably the most important information out there. The League is constantly looking for women who are at least 21 years of age who have a desire to serve the community while making life-long friends. September is the time when new members are joining the League, having socials and getting trained. For more information about membership, please visit http:// www.juniorleagueofnorman.org/how-to-join

Help the Junior League of Norman work towards their goal of increasing opportunities and decreasing obstacles facing vulnerable and at-risk youth in our community this year by supporting the League through your membership, partnership and giving!

For more information about any of the programs or events discussed, please visit the Junior League of Norman website at www.juniorleagueofnorman.org

How to Give: The Junior League of Norman has two big fundraisers per year: the Monster
How to Give: The Junior League of Norman has two big fundraisers per year: the Monster
38 // BOYD STREET MAGAZINE

38 // BOYD STREET MAGAZINE

Get

Ready

by Kylee Gwartney

The unmistakable toll of the clock tower, the roar

of over 80,000 fans, the delicious scent of “game

dogs” in the air – the start of Sooner football

never fails to bring a spark of magic back to OU’s

gorgeous campus. But there is always one very important detail to take care of before the game starts: what to wear.

Another Sooner favorite for football games has always been the OU T-shirt dress, but who wants to go through the hassle of buying a huge shirt and

having it custom made? That is way too much work. Antique Garden has

Oklahoma-inspired, high-low dresses ($44) made out of comfy jersey fabric that are a refreshing take on this timeless trend. The matching gray tribal pattern tank and red short sleeve hoodie (both $34) are also game day

must-haves.

Luckily, Boyd Street has already scoped out the latest styles that are sure to leave you looking your game-day best! Whether you want a comfy and casual look or something a little sassier, our friends on Campus Corner have just what you need. Here is a sneak peek at the items we love for the 2014-2015 football season:

Trendy Women’s Clothing

When it comes to finding cute, quality women’s

clothing for game day, two names always pop in

my mind first: Blush and Antique Garden. These

Norman staples have been going strong for years

and never disappoint when you need an awesome

outfit in a hurry.

Classic Men’s Clothing

If there is one ever-lasting trend in men’s clothing, it is that “good ol’ boy” all-American style – better known on campus as dressing like a frat star. It is a classic look for a reason, and makes any guy look instantly ten times

more attractive (but that’s just me). Threads Menswear has so many sharp-

looking options for the guys that it almost makes me jealous. Clothing items

with the state of Oklahoma on them is definitely a thing this year, like a red State Tradition polo ($68), visor ($30) and crimson and cream belt ($55).

They also carry items from Rhode Island designer, Kiel James Patrick (like the rope anchor bracelet), who makes some of the most effortlessly cool

oxfords, bowties, and accessories you’ll ever see. All of KJP’s items are

handcrafted in New England where the company is overseen by Kiel and

his co-founder/fashion blogger fiancée, Sarah Vickers. This classic designer is sure to become popular quickly in Oklahoma as well. Threads Menswear

has everything OU fans need to look like the perfect southern gentleman.

The sheer paneled red dress ($49.95 – Blush)

makes a beautiful addition to any Sooner gal’s

clothing collection. It is breezy enough for the scorching Oklahoma heat, yet still dressy enough

that you could easily re-wear it to a friend’s

wedding. Pair it with a sparkly state of Oklahoma necklace ($14.95), colorful beaded headband ($12.95) and your favorite cowboy boots, and jaws are bound to drop!

Casual Men and Women’s Clothing

Sometimes there is just nothing better than slipping into your favorite jeans or shorts and a comfy OU football T-shirt. The Apothem on Campus Corner has great casual options for both men and women alike! From breezy

OU golf shirts and bold snap-backs, to fitted jersey-knits, OU scarves and jewelry, there is something for everyone inside this campus fixture. They

always have a ton of traditional and fun Sooner items coming in every season.

Not wanting to be quite as dressy? Try pairing a

darling polka dot Boomer Sooner tank ($34.95) with a red or white skater skirt instead. And you can’t beat a lace kimono ($34.95) with a white

tank and denim capris either.

40 // BOYD STREET MAGAZINE

So here’s to playing like champs and dressing like champs, because when it comes to Oklahoma, we don’t accept anything less than the best!

Sports Talk Network “I think it gives us the opportunity to reach out to a more

Sports Talk Network

“I think it gives us the opportunity to reach out to a more broad audience and further expand our footprint in the market.”

“There are certain listeners who are only interested in the FM side of the dial,” said Sports Talk Network owner Randy Laffoon.

anywhere in the world on Sportstalk1400.com.

streaming application makes it possible for listeners to catch all of the action through their smart phone, tablet or computer

The Sports Talk Network is always finding new and innovative ways to better suit their listeners. In fact, their online

The additions of the 98.5 FM signal now gives listeners the option to tune in on
The additions of the 98.5 FM signal now gives listeners the option to tune in on both sides of the dial.
The growth that Perry referred to has been a constant word used around the Sports Talk Network for the last three years.
As they continue to make their presence felt in the Oklahoma City market, the demand for more outlets among listeners
has only continued to grow.
can continue to reach people and give options is great for our growth.”
“Some people stay strictly on the FM side and would have never discovered us, but obviously now they will. Any way we
“Any avenue we can use to reach more of an audience is going to beneficial,” said KREF program director TJ Perry.
state, the new FM signal has only added to the several amenities that the Sports Talk Network provides.
Last spring, the new 98.5 FM signal was launched, creating a much more crisp and clear alternative for listeners in the
Norman area. Coupled with the online streaming application, the 1400 AM frequency and the many affiliates around the
But for several years, Sports Talk Network listeners have been clamoring for an FM signal. Well, that wish is now a reality.
One of America’s Best Hospitals for Orthopedics Norman Regional was given a Women’s Choice Award® and
One of America’s Best Hospitals for Orthopedics Norman Regional was given a Women’s Choice Award® and

One of America’s Best Hospitals for Orthopedics

Norman Regional was given a Women’s Choice Award® and named one of 2014 America’s Best Hospitals for Orthopedics. The America’s Best Hospitals for Orthopedics scoring process is unique in that it is the ONLY national list that focuses on female patient satisfaction. The best hospitals for orthopedics is determined rst by identifying hospitals that provided comprehensive orthopedic services and provided a minimum number of arthroscopy, joint replacement and spine surgery services, as well as onsite MRI and physical therapy. Those full service hospitals were then judged on their HCAHPS results for patient recommendations and post-operative recovery, measures that are very important to women in choosing a hospital.

Norman Regional is committed to quality from pre- admission education and consultations to our expert surgeons and recovery team. Norman Regional’s HealthPlex hospital on Tecumseh Road is your premier source for orthopedic care. Our surgeons o er minimally invasive surgery for common problems such as shoulder, ankle and foot injuries. Our minimally invasive surgeries also include Total Joint replacement for the knee and hip.

Norman Regional was given a Women’s Choice Award® and named one of 2014 America’s Best Hospitals

For more information about our Orthopedic Services visit NormanRegional.com/Ortho.

Orthopedic & Spine Institute

NORMAN REGIONAL HEALTHPLEX

3300 HealthPlex Parkway Norman, OK 73072

One of America’s Best Hospitals for Orthopedics Norman Regional was given a Women’s Choice Award® and
Make plans to attend the third annual Newcastle Casino Bash on Asp at the corner of
Make plans to attend the third
annual Newcastle Casino Bash
on Asp at the corner of Asp &
White every home game.
SPONSORED BY
BOYD STREET MAGAZINE // 43
One University by David Goodspeed Well here we are knee deep into classes at OU and
One University
by David Goodspeed
Well here we are knee deep into classes at OU and all around the state. It’s a great time of
year! Our children are hopefully dreaming about their futures and what they want to do
to make their impact on the world.
One innovative technology that is taking the world by storm and making dreams come to
life is 3D Printing.
“If you’re not excited by 3D printing it’s because you’re not thinking big enough,” say some
technology visionaries who predict life on Earth will soon radically change because of it.
According to these futurists, 3D printing will make life as we know it barely recognizable
in 50 to 75 years.
In fact, 3D printing technology is advancing at a staggering rate. American designers are
now working on 3D printed cars while 3D printers in China and Holland are building
entire houses. The first 3D printed hamburgers and pizza were recently created in
England, showing the possibility of a man-made food supply. They are thinking bigger and bigger every day!
Boeing, GE and other industry leaders are manufacturing state-of-the-art aerospace equipment with the new technology. While NASA,
using Zero-G technology, is demonstrating how 3D printers will one day be used in space.
Perhaps most dramatic are the advances being made in the medical field. Research and development of 3D printing-based medical
techniques have already saved countless lives and opened the doors to previously unimaginable possibilities in medicine.
Does this mean that you can sit in your kitchen and create a new heart valve or space age piece that you can sell to NASA?
It might just be possible. With 3D printing we are all becoming creators of the world we live in and the only limits you have are what you
place on yourself.
At the One U Store in the Union we have eight 3D printers available for anyone to print their personal creation or something they found on
the internet for free! So stop by and talk to our student employees and learn what the future holds.
Who knows, you might be the next inventor!

WE LOVE

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One University by David Goodspeed Well here we are knee deep into classes at OU and

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    OKLAHOMA MEMORIAL UNION

  • 9AM - 5PM Mon - Fri, 11AM - 3PM Sat

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SOONER SPIRIT

Get Your Tailgate On!

Tailgating has long been a tradition when it comes to sports. But did you know that the first tailgate was not actually at a sporting event, it was during the Civil War of all things! Civilians from the Union side arrived at the Battle of Bull Run in 1861 with food to support their side. The first noted tailgating sporting event was in 1869 at an inaugural intercollegiate football game between Princeton and Rutgers.

Driving onto the University of Oklahoma’s campus the Friday before home football games, you will find fans staking their spots for the big day. Grills, tents and tv’s line the grounds of the Universityof Oklahoma.

Sooner spirit is in the air along with the aroma of delicious tailgating foods. Whether you tailgate in your kitchen or on the bed of your truck, we are here to make your football season a cinch as well as yummy!

SOONER SPIRIT Get Your Tailgate On! Tailgating has long been a tradition when it comes to

Here are some of our favorite tailgating tips. If you want to eliminate the hassle of plates, consider serving finger foods; For example, serving chicken legs instead of a chicken breasts, brushed with Robert Rothschild Anna Mae’s Smoky Sweet Sauce (see recipe above). If serving dips or other food items that require staying chilled, give our “chilled on ice” dip server, along with all our other “chill on ice” serving pieces a try. Prefer your drink with a salted rim and a twist of lime, consider the Rita Rim’s, a pre-salted, pre-limed plastic cup (available plain or with Go Big Red to show your spirit).

Also available is the strawberry and sugar rim for your sweeter drinks (available in plain only). If you need a drink that will be perfect for everyone at your tailgate, try the Touchdown Punch (see recipe above). Talk about easy! These cups take the hassle out of rimming cups for your favorite beverages.

46 // BOYD STREET MAGAZINE

SOONER SPIRIT Get Your Tailgate On! Tailgating has long been a tradition when it comes to
Dan Quinn
Dan
Quinn
Dan Quinn
Dan Quinn
Dan Quinn
Dan Quinn
Enjoy this FREE, family-friendly, science- packed day of discovery and fun featuring demonstrations and hands-on activities.
Enjoy this FREE, family-friendly, science- packed day of discovery and fun featuring demonstrations and hands-on activities.
Enjoy this FREE, family-friendly, science-
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Enjoy this FREE, family-friendly, science- packed day of discovery and fun featuring demonstrations and hands-on activities.
Enjoy this FREE, family-friendly, science- packed day of discovery and fun featuring demonstrations and hands-on activities.

a rock or a fossil? A piece of mammoth tusk

or a mineral? Bring in your natural history

objects to be identified!

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA 2401 CHAUTAUQUA AVE. NORMAN, OK 73072 The University of Oklahoma is an equal
UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA
2401 CHAUTAUQUA AVE.
NORMAN, OK 73072
The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution, www.ou.edu/eoo.
For accommodations on the basis of disability, call (405) 325-4712.
Enjoy this FREE, family-friendly, science- packed day of discovery and fun featuring demonstrations and hands-on activities.
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Second

Wind

by Alexandra Bare

Nestled between Buchannan Bikes and the First Presbyterian

Church on Campus Corner is a little blue square café called Second Wind Coffee. Closed the entire summer, regulars are excitedly making their way back as it opens this fall. It is a booming coffee shop, a meeting place for many, a weekly ministry and a venue for local artists complete with lumpy couches and solid wooden tables reminiscent of your grandmother’s kitchen.

The most remarkable thing about Secondwind is that it runs off of ‘just donations’. Numbers have been crunched, and on average a drink costs a little over a dollar and a half to make; however, the change from your pocket, or a smile on your face, is just as welcome. Serving locally roasted Mariposa coffee the volunteer baristas are trained to make everything from traditional macchiatos to the ‘Newcomer’ and other specialty drinks.

clear: everyone is welcome. The core student group comes from all backgrounds leading to intricate discussions from a variety of experiences. Rothman notes that it is a very spiritual community, but one based on acceptance and a search for understanding. Second Wind is a safe place for everyone.

In addition Jeff hopes to see a continued growth in Secondwind as a music venue. Zac Winters played on August 22 nd and Jahruba and the Broke Brothers, a reggae band will play on September the 19 th . Coming up will be names such as Sarah Reid, Plain Speak, John Calvin, and Buffalo Rider, but Second Wind welcomes all local artists, or artists passing through, to contact them and come play. Rothman explained that Secondwind is a bit of a hybrid between the typical ‘coffee house show’ and a larger music venue. The café moves tables and couches aside to make room for up to seventy people on a rockin night without losing the intimate atmosphere and the constant smell of espresso beans.

The volunteers are university students working 2-10 hours a week and these baristas do not simply fill the drip coffee. The lead baristas are trained by Mariposa’s Staff and in turn, they train the volunteers, a process which takes up and over a semester to master. The goal is to have a standard of excellence met with even drink that is made. That way visitors can come in for a ‘Dante’s Inferno’, or a latte, and be equally satisfied. Donations for drinks go into daily costs as well as volunteerism. Past projects include construction in New Orleans, the Big Event at the OKC Zoo, urban work in Denver, health and dental clinics in the Dominican Republic as well as volunteering around Norman as it is needed.

This year there is a new director. Josh Hammell, the previous director, has gone up to Boston bringing in Jeff Rothman to continue where he left off. Jeff is Jewish by birth, attended Catholic school through childhood, lived in a Zen monastery for nine months, and continues to practice Buddhist meditation while attending Presbyterian Church. Needless to say, there are going to be many interfaith dialogs going on at Second Wind this fall. Interfaith understanding is a concept near to Second Wind and First Presbyterian’s core values. While the café is affiliated with the church, offering bible studies on Tuesday nights and lunches on Sunday mornings, the message is very

Weekly, there are plans for a variety of events other than concerts such as movie screenings, poetry slams and open mike nights. One to look out for will be the Artist in Residence, Jahruba, putting on a night for “The Art of African Storytelling”. Jeff said that when he saw Jahruba showcase this previously it made him feel like he was five years old again. So if you are looking for some wonder mid-month, watch for the date announcement on their Twitter or Facebook page.

As visitors bubble over and the weather cools down Secondwind is planning on extending onto the patio. This had been done in the past with regulars pulling out tables and chairs, but watch out for umbrellas and twinkle lights in the future!

Personally, as a barista, and longtime Normanite, it is good to see that many new things are happening at Secondwind, but at least one thing is staying the same: the people who visit and volunteer are here for the love of coffee and community, creating a vibe which shapes people’s lives, even if they visit just once.

Don’t Miss the 2014 Newcastle Casino Bash on Asp!

What goes better with football than food, friends and fun times? Absolutely nothing. That’s why Boyd
What goes better with football than food, friends and fun times? Absolutely nothing.
That’s why Boyd Street Magazine are partnering up with Newcastle Casino to once
again bring you the annual Bash on Asp.
What is the Bash on Asp?
It’s a totally free town-wide tailgate!
Asp Avenue on historic Campus Corner will be the side of tents
selling beer and food, playing music and helping you to get ready for football! You
can find the Bash on Asp happening every single home game from September to
December starting before and during the game. Additionally there will be a jumbo-
tron to view the game as well as an ice cream truck for the kiddos! So come on out,
bring your friends and come ready to have a blast!
Sponsors Include:
Newcastle Casino
Clear Channel Radio
Coors/Miller
Fowler Toyota,
Ash & Whit’s Frozen Fun

Army

T Mobile

52 // BOYD STREET MAGAZINE

The

Earth

by Alexandra Bare

Since it opened in 1969, The Earth Natural Foods store has been a hub for natural and organic foods in Norman. With their café now a part of their store, The Earth is a powerhouse for anyone shopping for natural groceries or looking for a healthy and satisfying meal. They offer a variety of foods and goods including organic produce, beans, herbs and spices, organic dairy, meats and organic fair trade coffee.

The turquoise and green building is hard to miss on the east side of Flood Ave, just north of the Flood and Symmes inter- section. With a convenient location just a walk or quick ride from OU’s campus, The Earth is ideal for students looking to escape the over-processed and unhealthy food surrounding them.

I first went to The Earth when it was still just a store. I was fascinated by all of the produce, bulk products and healthy al- ternatives to mass-produced products. I also visited The Earth Café and Deli when it was in its previous location on Campus Corner. The menu provides enough options and variety to keep your taste buds happy. Don’t let the organic and health aspects of the café fool you. The Earth means business when it comes to flavor and their 93% rating on Urbanspoon proves it. From quiche and biscuits and gravy at breakfast to a variety of sandwiches, soups and salads for lunch and dinner, there’s something for everyone.

The Moon Maiden grilled cheese is my go-to meal at The Earth. Farmer’s cheese is melted and stacked with fresh avo- cado, tomato and sprouts on honey whole wheat bread. The cheese is salty and gooey and the vegetables are so bright and colorful you know they didn’t come from a jar. My favorite thing about The Earth is that you can see them putting the vegetables on your sandwiches. You see them cutting up the fresh veggies and find happiness in knowing that what you’re about to eat is good for you. The Earth maintains a garden behind the location that produces fresh vegetables and herbs. “We try to use everything from the garden to sell in the store and to use in making our food,” said Rian Cline, manager at The Earth.

If you’re looking for a caffeine fix, they’ve got you covered. They offer a variety of teas as well as your favorite coffee house staples: espresso, chai, drip coffee, lattes and cappuccinos. If you’re like me, the dessert menu is heaven. The Earth offers fresh baked goods daily. Cookies, scones and cake and pie by the slice are all available. If you happen to be there when lavender cake is available, don’t miss the opportunity to try a piece of your new favorite cake.

The Earth is more than just a health food store and restaurant. It’s a tight knit group, including the customers. The em- ployees knew several customers that came into the store by name and could already guess their order and they treat new customers like they’ve known them forever. The store has a laidback atmosphere that makes everyone who walks through the door feel comfortable and at home.

The new location at The Earth store gives less of a restaurant feel and is more of a café. “I’ve worked at the Earth for quite a while and I think this location compared to the other is more laid back,” said Cline. “It’s less stressful so it’s easier to have a conversation with the customers instead of having to run around the restaurant.”

The Earth is the best place for a good meal and conversation. Give them a call at (405) 364-3551 to see what the daily des- sert and quiches are or if you have any questions, they’re always happy to answer.

The Earth by Alexandra Bare Since it opened in 1969, The Earth Natural Foods store has
The Earth by Alexandra Bare Since it opened in 1969, The Earth Natural Foods store has
The Earth by Alexandra Bare Since it opened in 1969, The Earth Natural Foods store has
CELEBRATING NORMAN PUBLIC SCHOOLS

CELEBRATING

NORMAN PUBLIC SCHOOLS

Tobacco-Free Cleveland County can help every school in Cleveland County adopt a 24/7 tobacco-free policy. For more information contact Heather Sebero at hsebero@nrh-ok.com or 405-912-3584.

promote a 100% tobacco-free environment. The new policy prohibits the use of all tobacco products on all school-owned property 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

In an effort to recognize the importance of adult role modeling for students during formative years and to provide a healthy environment for students, staff, and citizens, these schools have adopted the new policy to

Tobacco-Free Cleveland County Coalition TSET. Better Lives Through Better Health.

Back to School and Keeping Your Kids Tobacco-Free

In Oklahoma, 87,000 of our kids that are now alive and under 18 years old will die prematurely from smoking. The best way for you to protect your kids from tobacco related health problems is to prevent them from starting. The design and contents of tobacco products make them extremely addictive. Today’s tobacco products deliver more nicotine and deliver it quicker than ever before. Nicotine is the highly addictive

drug in tobacco that keeps people using it, even when they want to quit. Youth are especially sensitive to nicotine and can feel

dependent earlier than adults. Many tobacco products are flavored to attract new users. Tobacco companies peddle sweet-flavored cigars and smokeless tobacco products that are flavored and colorfully packaged just like candy. All of these products can lead to nicotine addiction and serious health problems. To help keep your kids tobacco-free, take these important steps:

• Tell your children how dangerous smoking is, how addictive tobacco products are, and that you expect them to be tobacco-free. • Make your home and your car tobacco-free for everyone. • Don’t let your children see movies, TV programming, or video games that show tobacco use. • Set a good example by not using tobacco yourself.

• Join the Tobacco-Free Cleveland County Coalition; a coalition of

individuals and organizations with the vision of a community where

people live, work, play, and learn in a tobacco-free environment. For more information contact Heather Sebero at hsebero@nrh-ok.com.

CELEBRATING NORMAN PUBLIC SCHOOLS Tobacco-Free Cleveland County can help every school in Cleveland County adopt a
CELEBRATING NORMAN PUBLIC SCHOOLS Tobacco-Free Cleveland County can help every school in Cleveland County adopt a

Oklahoma Accordion Club 2nd Annual Concert

Oklahoma Accordion Club 2nd Annual Concert Oklahoma Accordion Club 2nd Annual Concert Alexandra Bare On Sunday
Oklahoma Accordion Club 2nd Annual Concert Oklahoma Accordion Club 2nd Annual Concert Alexandra Bare On Sunday

Oklahoma Accordion Club 2nd Annual Concert Alexandra Bare On Sunday August 10 the Oklahoma

Accordion Club (OAC) performed their second annual free concert at the Norman Train Depot. The organization was founded

  • 14 years ago to give accordion enthusiasts

around Oklahoma a chance to communicate,

share stories and play together. Group members vary in age from young to old.

According to the OAC’s newsletters, the

group holds monthly meetings where individuals and groups can perform and

everyone can come together at the end for a “jam session.” The OAC held a two-hour concert on August

  • 10 at 2:30 p.m. The event was emceed by

Lucas Ross, a comedian, writer, musician and performer from the metro area. Six

children performed with the youth band.

Blake Owens Memorial Golf Tournament

by Alex Bare

Several members of the OAC performed solos, duets, trios and orchestra numbers. There was a wide variety of music varying from jazz to classical.

Group member Roland Lohmann catered the event with sweet treats from

his store Lohmann’s Good Things. The

group’s monthly meetings are held the

second Sunday of each month at 3:30

p.m. at the Messiah Lutheran Church in Oklahoma City. For more information about the

Oklahoma Accordion Club or to find the

perfect musician to book for your event, visit www.okaccordions.com.

by Alex Bare

The seventh annual fundraising golf tournament

benefitting the Thunderbird Clubhouse is September

22 at the Trails Golf Club in Norman. The tournament

is in memory of Blake Owens, son of Heisman Trophy and Sooner football player Steve Owens, a member of the Thunderbird Clubhouse until his death in 1997.

The tournament benefits the Thunderbird Clubhouse,

a non-profit organization in Norman that supports

adults recovering from mental illness. The Thunderbird Clubhouse helps members obtain

housing and assists with job training and finding

employment. They also aid in furthering education by improving computer skills and writing. There is a GED teacher available three days a week to help members obtain their GED. The Clubhouse periodically has socials where members can spend time together watching movies, playing games, eating and going on

various trips shopping and to events in the community. To register your four person team, visit www. thunderbirdclubhouse.org or call Bob Thomas at

405-366-8804. The price for a team is $500 or

$125 per person and includes lunch. There are

several opportunities to sponsor the tournament:

hole sponsorship, $500 sponsorship and $1000 sponsorship. Check out their website for more information. The tournament will begin at 12:30 p.m. at The Trails Golf Club. To make a donation to The Thunderbird Clubhouse visit their website. Donations are available in monthly

and one-time donations.

BOYD STREET MAGAZINE // 55

OU’s First Football Game

by Jeff Provine

Football season is in full swing once again in Norman, as it has been for 119 years. As shown in Harold Keith’s Oklahoma Kickoff, things were very different in September of 1895. The only trees in town were once that had been recently planted, and soft water cost five cents a bucket from a private cistern company. Main Street was a collection of one-story rickety wooden structures that led out to High Gate, the Methodist college that would later become Griffin Memorial hospital. Just about everything in town was on the east side of the railroad tracks, except for the fledgling territorial university, which was connected to town by a half-mile long boardwalk. Students walked from their boarding houses in town to campus and back every school day.

A few old boys were hanging around Bud Risinger’s barber shop on the north side of Main when twenty-year-old Jack Harts suggested, “Let’s get up a football team.” Harts was perhaps the first Big Man on Campus at the university. He had come to Norman to take classes and serve as an instructor in elocution. He was handsome, well spoken, and energetic, wore his hair fashionably long, and, famously on campus, had played on the football team at Winfield College. His suggestion was immediately met with agreement and aplomb.

People had already played intramural football on campus. Professor DeBarr had taken up a collection to buy a football, and student teams led by Lem Dorrance of Lexington and Frank Taylor of Moore played pickup games every so often in 1893. Harts wanted more. He was elected team captain and coach, and he had his players drop everything and “go fight” in practice every afternoon. A game was scheduled for November 7th against the Oklahoma City Town team, who would be the first visitors to play in Norman.

They constructed a field where the Fred Jones, Jr., Museum of Art and the Fine Arts Center stand today. Students filled in buffalo wallows with dirt hauled by borrowed teams of horses. For seating, they strung a wire fence around the field that spectators could lean on. The Oklahoma City Town team arrived with “30 or 40 football cranks” as the Transcript called them, and the game began.

Very few of today’s rules and equipment for safety existed at the time. Players had at most some padding stuffed into their cut-off overalls. Without formal training, it was more of a brawl than an organized game. Jack Harts, OU’s star player, hurt his knee in practice and was relegated to shouting from the sidelines. Bert Dunn, a university baseball player, used the ball like a thrown weapon to smack the OKC player who tackled him, inadvertently causing a turnover. The carnage became so bad that Harts began pulling in Normanite replacements including barber Bud Risinger and accepting loans of players from Oklahoma City Town.

The game ended as a loss at 34 to 0. Despite being beaten both metaphorically and literally, the university players retired to Risinger’s barber shop to wash up, bandage their wounds, and talk about the game. Jap Clapham recalled, “I went out home to the farm and climbed in bed. I was too sore to do the chores. But I sure slept good… I learned more in that first football game than in any other I ever played, and I played five years at the university.”

Harts left school to prospect for gold in the Arctic the following year, but he would have found it here if he had stayed in Norman. The young team including Clapham would go undefeated in the next three seasons, with five of their six games being shut-outs. One of those was against Oklahoma City Town in 1897, evening their record.

A century later, every game day sees crowds of up to 82,000 people flow into the Memorial stadium with thousands more swarming the campus. It stands as a testament that from humble beginnings come great things.

56 // BOYD STREET MAGAZINE

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The Ride Grand Prix

Adults get to act like children at The Ride Grand Prix benefitting the United Way of Norman. The Ride Grand Prix began last year as a way to keep the Big Wheel fun

rolling for adults and raise even more funds for United Way. The event is open to individuals and business; however, participants must be 18 years or older. This adult

big-wheel race is a great event sponsored by First American Bank in Norman with proceeds going to the United Way. “The Ride Grand Prix is all about bringing the

community together for a little fun, food, and fundraising for The United Way,” said Neil Schemmer, President and CEO of First American Bank.

This event is a follow up to The Ride, the child’s big wheel race held earlier this year. As in the kid’s race, adults will have the chance to join in a little friendly

competition as they race on a predesigned course to the finish line. To join the race, there are a few rules to follow.

  • 1. Trikes

In order to qualify to compete, participants must have The Ride Grand Prix regulation trikes. Trikes must have a rubber front wheel and plastic back wheels. If you do

not have one, you may purchase one or rent one from the event for $50.

For information about adult trikes, please visit the links below.

http://www.hillkickerpro.com/

http://bigwheelrally.com/store/adult.htm

http://www.caranddriver.com/features/big-boy-big-wheels-tested-the-classic-all-growed-up-feature

  • 2. Helmets are Required

It’s important to stay safe and set a good example to our little big wheelers. Every participant is required to bring and wear his or her own helmet during the race.

  • 3. Fun Is The Name

This event is all about fun! Participants are encouraged to wear costumes and show off their inner child. An award will be given for the best costume. For those who

aren’t participating in the race, there will be sponsored games and fun for all. There will also be plenty of food to enjoy before, during, and after the event. Spectators

and participants can get a wristband for food and beverages for making a $10 donation to the United Way. New to the event will be two food trucks from Hal’s Pizza

Kitchen and Smokin’ Okies, who have graciously agreed to donate 10% of proceeds to benefit the United Way.

Remember to bring your own lawn chair to sit and cheer on your Grand Prix racers. Even if you’re not racing, costumes are encouraged by all and signs are a great

expression of your race support.

In last year’s race there were 20 participants total with six of them making it to the final heat. The top three finalists were Robert Green, representing St. John’s

Episcopal Church, in first place; Drew Eddington, of 405 Bicycles, in second place; and Chris Schemmer, of Schemmer Trike Sports, coming in at third. This year’s race

is certain to provide an afternoon of smiles for the whole family while helping support the United Way of Norman.

“Anything we can do to support the United Way of Norman, we’ll get behind,” says Leslie Christopher, Owner of Bold Multimedia. “This is a great way to help raise

money for the United Way and an opportunity to let the adults have a good time while raising community support.”

About the United Way

The United Way of Norman funds 43 programs at 27 agencies in the Norman area. These programs are broken into four impact areas including: education, income,

health and safety, and independence.

The United Way also provides services to the community through programs like Success By 6, Teen Advisors of Norman, FamilyWize discount drug cards, and the

ABC School Supply Program. The mission of the United Way is to unite and strengthen the community by empowering each person to change lives.

For more information on the United Way on ways you can get involved, visit http://www.unitedwaynorman.org/.

Registration for The Ride Grand Prix event is open now until September 13. The event will be held on September 27, 2014 at First American Bank in Norman located

at 570 24th Ave. NW. Racers can check in at 1:00 p.m. with races beginning at 2:00. Additional sponsors for the race include:

Citywide Mortgage

Landmark Fine Homes

Flair Body Works

Eide Bailly CPAs

Hey Day

Bold Multimedia

Republic National Distributing Company

Nexus Productions Inc.

Investment Centers of America, Inc.

Andy Alligator’s Fun Park

New Life Bible Church

Norman Regional Health System

And OG+E

For more information on how to become a sponsor and registration for the event, participants can

check out http://theridenorman.com/grand-prix.

58 // BOYD STREET MAGAZINE

The Ride Grand Prix Adults get to act like children at The Ride Grand Prix benefitting

Still Stamping in Norman

When the Lyle family opened Norman Stamp & Seal on the corner of Main and University in 1984 it was unlikely they realized what an impression their shop would have on the community. Specializing, as the name implies, on stamps and seals, the business expanded to offer engraved office products like name plates and name tags as well as markers that many tradesmen place on the equipment they install. With a customer base covering the city and including the University of Oklahoma, it would seem that a little piece of Norman Stamp & Seal is present in nearly every office in Norman.

Marianne Raleigh and her brother Doug Lyle continued to operate the business after their father, the business founder, passed away. The pair maintained the product quality and customer service that their client base had come to expect. After 30 years in the business, however, dreams of retirement enticed the brother-sister duo to consider selling the family biz.

Enter Tyler LaReau.

An independent insurance agent based in Norman, LaReau’s office has neighbored Norman Stamp & Seal for 15 years. When he heard a business sale was on the horizon, he stepped in.

“I’ve been a customer for years and I wanted to keep the business locally owned. I appreciate the quality work they’ve done for the past 30 years and I wanted to build on that rich history and expand the services and products offered.”

With that intent, LaReau purchased the business in May and has been going full throttle ever since. He maintained the existing staff and added to the team to increase capacity. In addition, the business has purchased equipment that will improve efficiency in their traditional products as well as open the door to a whole new line of products. Engraved natural products such as wood cutting boards, serving trays, phone cases and coasters are already making a splash as are photos engraved on granite and other natural materials.

“The possibilities of what we can do are virtually endless,” explains LaReau. “The name is Norman Stamp & Seal but really, we are so much more!”

The business has a new logo, new exterior signage, a new website and is undergoing an interior renovation. More information can be found at www.NormanStampAndSeal. com.

Still Stamping in Norman When the Lyle family opened Norman Stamp & Seal on the corner

Sooners’ Succes Hinges on the Arm of Knight

by Tyler McComas

It was nearly impossible this offseason to walk around the town of Norman without hearing the words “Sugar Bowl” being used in a sentence. But that was to be expected, especially after the overwhelming excitement the win over Alabama on that fateful, early January night in New Orleans created. To say the unexpected happened that night might be understatement. Not only did the massive underdogs win the game, but it came from the arm of an unlikely candidate. By now, you know the story. Trevor Knight, who entered the season as the starting quarterback, was not only wildly inconsistent throughout the regular season, but injury problems sidelined him for a majority of the season. But through all the criticism that was being thrown at Knight, and through all of the uncertainty that surrounded the quarterback position at Oklahoma last season, you can’t deny that when the lights were the brightest on the floor of the Sugar Bowl against an overwhelming favorite, he stepped up and delivered an unforgettable performance. That performance came with an enormous amount of expectations for Knight entering the 2014 season. Though he’s still only started five games, it’ll be his actions that will determine if the Sooners play for a national title this season. “If you look at where he started as a freshman, the confidence he played with, his decision making, his accuracy with the football – those are all components of the quarterback position that he can still develop and has a long way to go,” said co-offensive coordinator Josh Heupel. “But we’re excited about the work he put in over the summer and the way he has competed.” As experts from around the country break down and discuss all of the potential contenders for the national title, one question always seems to be raised when Oklahoma is discussed: Can Trevor Knight be consistent throughout the entire course of the season? To expect a repeat performance from the Sugar Bowl across the entirety of the season is wishful thinking, to say the least. In actuality, because of the talent that the Sooners possess on both sides of the ball, the Sooners don’t necessarily need him to be the hero he became during the Sugar Bowl. For Knight, the key word this season is consistency. That’s being consistently accurate, consistently making the right reads and perhaps most importantly, consistently knowing when to shield his body from opposing defenders and when to stay on the field. And frankly, that’s another big question that surrounds Knight as he enters the season: Can he stay healthy throughout the course of the season? “Some injuries you just can’t avoid and are going to happen,” said Bob Stoops. “But at the quarterback position, regardless of how much or little we run him, when he has the opportunity and he is out on the perimeter running, we want him to avoid and take as little contact as possible--to step out of bounds, slide, get down and avoid the big hits. It’s something that we’ll talk a lot about with him and even tried to a year ago. But I think with another year more experience he’ll be familiar and used to doing that.” To put simply, if Knight can’t stay healthy, the Sooners’ shot at a national title this season are all but doomed. Yes, you still want to utilize both his athleticism and his ability to pick up yards with his feet, but an injury that sidelines him for a significant amount of time would almost certainly derail the season. And for the Sooners, that would be a shame, especially considering that they seem to have all the tools to not only win the Big 12, but to be in the four-team college football playoff at season’s end. “I consider myself as a distributor now,” said Knight. “In high school, you’re a playmaker, but at this level, you have to get the ball into your playmaker’s hands. Being a dual-threat guy, I can get out on the edge and make plays with my feet, but I don’t want to be a playmaker, I want to be a distributor.” Truth be told, we don’t know what direction Knight’s game will take this season, and we don’t know if he’ll stay injury-free throughout the course of the season. It’s all mere speculation. However, what we do know is the capability of the Sooner offense if Knight does live up to all his preseason expectations. Sure, there will need to be youngsters that step up at both running back and receiver, but with the talent those units possess, along with a veteran offensive line, it’ll make life for Knight that much easier. The pieces are in place for a run at a national title, but make no mistake about it, this season for the Sooners will hinge on the arm of Trevor Knight.

Sooners’ Succes Hinges on the Arm of Knight by Tyler McComas It was nearly impossible this
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62 // BOYD STREET MAGAZINE

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