HCS 7355 Tuesdays 9 – 11:45 GR 4.

204 Spring, 2005

Dr. Marion K. Underwood Office: GR 4.118 972-883-2470 undrwd@utdallas.edu

Anger and Aggression among Children
“Anyone can get angry – that is easy, … but to do this to the right person, to the right extent, at the right time, with the right motive, and in the right way, that is not for everyone, nor is it easy, wherefore goodness is both rare and laudable and noble.” Aristotle My primary goal for this course is to help you develop a sophisticated understanding of current issues in the study of anger and aggression in children, with particular attention to the following questions. • What is aggression, and how does it relate to anger, conflict, aggression, bullying, conduct disorder, antisocial behavior, and violence? • Do girls and boys engage in similar or different types of aggressive behaviors? • What are the early, developmental origins of anger and aggression in children? • How stable is aggressive behavior during childhood and adolescence? • What types of causal factors contribute to individual differences in aggressiveness? • How do angry, aggressive behaviors influence children’s peer relationships? • What long-term, negative outcomes are associated with aggressive behavior in childhood and adolescence? Are these similar or different for girls and boys? • What interventions have been successful in reducing aggressive behavior in children? You will explore these questions in two ways: by reading and discussing state-of-the-art research and theory on anger and aggression, and by preparing a substantial, detailed proposal for an empirical research project on a topic of your own choosing. The course will be conducted in a conference format. What this means is that you will carefully read and critically evaluate each assigned chapter and article, and come to class prepared with focused questions. I will moderate the discussion and help the group try to formulate answers to questions, or at least plans for how questions could be answered. My hope is that most of our meetings will be predominantly discussions. I will lecture when I feel it is needed and useful in answering the questions you raise, but I will also encourage you to ask questions and comment at any time. The requirements for this course are as follows. Readings Prior to each class meeting, you need to read all of the assigned selections, which include book chapters and carefully selected primary source materials. Many book chapters are from our course text, Social Aggression among Girls. Most empirical articles are available online through the UTD library. All readings not available online may be found in a coursepack for sale at OffCampus Books (518 W. Campbell Rd., 972-907-8398). Readings may be modified somewhat depending on the needs and interests of this group. Discussion Questions For each assigned reading, you will write a brief, focused question for discussion, which you will send to the rest of the class by electronic mail no later than 1 PM on the Monday afternoon before we meet. These questions could be genuine questions of understanding 1

about the reading, or an argument or controversial issue that you plan to discuss in the conference. You should write one short comment or question for every chapter and article that you read. I will integrate and organize these questions in preparation for the class meeting. Part of your preparation for each class meeting should be to read and think about others’ questions. Research Proposal Throughout the semester, you will develop a research proposal for an empirical project pertaining to some aspect of anger and aggression in children. Detailed guidelines for the format of the proposal will be forthcoming later. So that you can work on the proposal over a long period of time and so that I can give you feedback along the way, your proposal will be due in installments. With each subsequent draft, it is important that you revise portions written earlier in response to my suggestions and your own ideas for improvement. The entire proposal will be handed in as a unit on April 19. Tuesday, 2/1 Statement of topic due in writing Brief oral presentation of initial plan for research project Introduction due Revised introduction and method due Entire proposal due Final oral presentation of research projects

Tuesday, 2/22 Tuesday, 3/22 Tuesday, 4/19

Grading and Course Policies Each of the following components will count equally toward your course grade: written questions and conference participation, introduction submitted on 2/22, revised introduction and method submitted on 3/22, entire proposal submitted on 4/19, and oral presentation on 4/19. Please refer to the UTD catalogue for policies concerning withdrawals, incompletes, and academic honesty. One final word The intellectual excitement of a course of this type depends on the active participation of all students. I look forward to each of your contributions, and welcome your feedback and suggestions.

Readings
1/18 Anger Chapters 1 and 4 from Underwood, M. K. (2003). Social Aggression among Girls. New York: Guilford. Lemerise, E. A., & Dodge, K. A. (2000). The development of anger and hostile interactions. In M. Lewis & J. M. Haviland (Eds.), The Handbook of Emotions, 2nd Edition (pp. 594 - 606). New York: Guilford. Underwood, M. K., Coie, J. D., & Herbsman, C. R. (1992). Display rules for anger and aggression in school-aged children. Child Development, 63, 366-380. Underwood, M.K., Hurley, J.C., Johanson, C.A., & Mosley, J.E. (1999). An experimental, observational investigation of children's responses to peer provocation: Developmental and gender differences in middle childhood. Child Development, 70, 1428-1446. 1/25 Aggression: Definitions and Subtypes 2

Coie, J. D., & Dodge, K. A. (1998). Aggression and antisocial behavior. In N. Eisenberg (Ed.), Handbook of child psychology (pp. 779 - 785). New York: Wiley. Chapter 2 from Underwood, M. K. (2003). Social Aggression among Girls. New York: Guilford. Hubbard, J. A., et al. (2002). Observational, physiological, and self-report measures of children’s anger: Relations to reactive versus proactive aggression. Child Development, 73, 1101 – 1118. Crick, N. R., & Grotpeter, J. K. (1995). Relational aggression, gender, and social-psychological adjustment. Child Development, 66, 710-722. Underwood, M. K., Scott, B. L., Galperin, M, Bjornstad, G. J., & Sexton, A. M. (2004). An observational study of social exclusion under varying conditions: Gender and developmental differences. Child Development, 75, 1538-1555. 2/1 Theories and Models: Biological and Frustration-Aggression

STATEMENT OF PROPOSAL TOPIC DUE IN WRITING A. Historical Overview

Coie, J. D., & Dodge, K. A. (1998). Aggression and antisocial behavior. In N. Eisenberg (Ed.), Handbook of child psychology (pp. 785-786). New York: Wiley. B. Biological Approaches

Coie, J. D., & Dodge, K. A. (1997). Aggression and antisocial behavior. In N. Eisenberg (Ed.), Handbook of child psychology (pp. 804-815). New York: Wiley. Bernhardt, P. C. (1997). Influences of serotonin and testosterone in aggression and dominance: Convergence with social psychology. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 6, 44-48. Brain, P. F., & Susman, E. J. (1997). Hormonal aspects of aggression and violence. In D. M. Stoff, J. Breiling, & J. D. Maser (Eds.), Handbook of antisocial behavior (pp. 314 – 323). New York: Wiley. C. Frustration-Aggression Approaches

Berkowitz, L. (1993). Chapter 2, Effects of frustration, 30-47; and Chapter 3, We’re nasty when we feel bad, 48-83. Aggression: Its causes, consequences, and control. Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press.

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2/8 D.

Theories and Models Continued: Social Learning Approaches

Coie, J. D., & Dodge, K. A. (1998). Aggression and antisocial behavior. In N. Eisenberg (Ed.), Handbook of child psychology (pp. 814-823). New York: Wiley. Patterson, G. R., DeBaryshe, B. D., & Ramsey, E. (1989). A developmental perspective on antisocial behavior. American Psychologist, 44, 329-335. E. Social Information-Processing Approaches

Crick, N. R., & Dodge, K. A. (1994). A review and reformulation of social-information mechanisms in children’s social adjustment. Psychological Bulletin, 115, 74-101. Crick, N. R., & Werner, N. E. (1999). Response decision processes in relational and overt aggression. Child Development, 69, 1630-1639. F. Gender

Chapter 3 from Underwood, M. K. (2003). Social Aggression among Girls. New York: Guilford. 2/15 Anger and Aggression in Young Children

Coie, J. D., & Dodge, K. A. (1998). Aggression and antisocial behavior. In N. Eisenberg (Ed.), Handbook of child psychology (pp. 786-790). New York: Wiley. Chapter 5 from Underwood, M. K. (2003). Social Aggression among Girls. New York: Guilford. Crick, N. R., Casas, J. F., & Mosher, M. (1997). Relational and overt aggression in preschool. Developmental Psychology, 33, 589-600. McNeilly-Choque, M .K., Hart, C. H., Robinson, C. C., Nelson, L. J., & Olsen, S. F. (1996). Overt and relational aggression on the playground: Correspondence among different informants. Journal of Research in Childhood Education, 11, 47 – 67. Hart, C. H., Nelson, D.A., Robinson, C. C., Olsen, S. F., & McNeilly-Choque, M. K. (1998). Overt and relational aggression in Russian nursery-school-age children: Parenting style and marital linkages. Developmental Psychology, 34, 687 – 697. 2/22 Development of Aggression: Stability and Change

INTRODUCTION DUE Coie, J. D., & Dodge, K. A. (1998). Aggression and antisocial behavior. In N. Eisenberg (Ed.), Handbook of child psychology (pp. 790-794, 801-804). New York: Wiley. Chapter 6 from Underwood, M. K. (2003). Social Aggression among Girls. New York: Guilford. 4

Keenan, K., & Shaw, D. (1997). Developmental and social influences on young girls’ early problem behavior. Psychological Bulletin, 121, 95-113. NICHD Early Child Care Research Network (2004). Trajectories of physical aggression from toddlerhood to middle childhood. Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development, 69, read as much of the monograph as you can, but skim methods and results if you must. 3/1 Peer Relationships and Friendships

Coie, J. D., & Dodge, K. A. (1998). Aggression and antisocial behavior. In N. Eisenberg (Ed.), Handbook of child psychology (pp. 828-834). New York: Wiley. Chapter 7 from Underwood, M. K. (2003). Social Aggression among Girls. New York: Guilford. Coie, J. D., Cillessen, A. H. N., Dodge, K. A., Hubbard, J. A., Schwartz, D., Lemerise, E. A., & Bateman, H. (1999). It takes two to fight: A test of relational factors and a method for assessing aggressive dyads. Developmental Psychology, 35, 1179-1188. Stormshak, E. A., Bierman, K. L., Bruschi, C., Dodge, K. A., Coie, J. D., and the Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group. (1999). The relation between behavior problems and peer preference in different classroom contexts. Child Development, 70, 169-182. Rose, A. J., Swenson, L. P., Waller, E. M. (2004). Overt and Relational Aggression and Perceived Popularity: Developmental Differences in Concurrent and Prospective Relations. Developmental Psychology, 40, 378-387. 3/15 Targets of Aggression: Peer Victimization

Schwartz, D., Dodge, K. A., & Coie, J. D. (1993). The emergence of chronic peer victimization in boys’ peer groups. Child Development, 64, 1755-1772. Paquette, J.A. & Underwood, M.K. (1999). Young adolescents' experiences of peer victimization: Gender differences in accounts of social and physical aggression. Merrill-Palmer Quarterly, 45(2), 233 - 258. Egan, S. K., & Perry, D. G. (1998). Does low self-regard invite victimization? Developmental Psychology, 34, 299-309. Kochenderfer-Ladd, B., & Skinner, K. (2002). Children’s coping strategies: Moderators of the effects of peer victimization? Developmental Psychology, 38, 267-278.

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Risk

REVISED INTRODUCTION AND METHOD DUE Coie, J. D., & Dodge, K. A. (1998). Aggression and antisocial behavior. In N. Eisenberg (Ed.), Handbook of child psychology (pp. 834-838). New York: Wiley. Underwood, M. K. & Coie, J. D. (2004). Future directions and priorities for prevention and intervention. In M. Putallaz and K. L. Bierman (Eds.), Aggression, Antisocial Behavior, and Violence among Girls: A Developmental Perspective (pp. 289 – 301). NY: Guilford. Serbin, L. A., Cooperman, J. M., Peters, P. L., LeHoux, P. M., Stack, D. M., & Schwartzman, A. E. (1998). Intergenerational transfer of psychosocial risk in women with childhood histories of aggression, withdrawal, or aggression and withdrawal. Developmental Psychology, 34, 1246 – 1262. Chapter 8 from Underwood, M. K. (2003). Social Aggression among Girls. New York: Guilford. Crick, N. R. (1997). Engagement in gender normative versus gender nonnormative forms of aggression: Links to social-psychological adjustment. Developmental Psychology, 33, 610 – 617. 3/29 Intervention with Aggressive Children

Coie, J. D., & Dodge, K. A. (1998). Aggression and antisocial behavior. In N. Eisenberg (Ed.), Handbook of child psychology (pp. 838-840). New York: Wiley. The Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group (2002). The implementation of the Fast Track Program: An example of a large-scale prevention science efficacy trial. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 30, 1 - 17. The Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group (2002). Evaluation of the first 3 years of the Fast Track prevention trial with children at high risk for adolescent conduct problems. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 30, 19-35. Chamberlain, P, & Smith, D. K. (2003). Antisocial behavior in children and adolescents: The Oregon Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care model. In A. E. Kazdin (Ed.), Evidence-based psychotherapies for children and adolescents (pp. 282-300). NY: Guilford Press. Chapter 9 from Underwood, M. K. (2003). Social Aggression among Girls. New York: Guilford.

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Family Factors

Minuchin, S. (1974). Families and family therapy. (pp. 46 – 66, “A Family Model”), Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. Bank, L., Burraston, B., & Snyder, J. (2004). Sibling Conflict and Ineffective Parenting as Predictors of Adolescent Boys' Antisocial Behavior and Peer Difficulties: Additive and Interactional Effects. Journal of Research on Adolescence, 14, 99-125. Wu Shortt, J., Capaldi, D. M., Dishion, T. J., Bank, L., & Owen, L. D. (2003). the Role of Adolescent Friends, Romantic Partners, and Siblings in the Emergence of the Adult Antisocial Lifestyle. Journal of Family Psychology, 17, 521 – 533. Chapter 10 from Underwood, M. K. (2003). Social Aggression among Girls. New York: Guilford. 4/12 4/19 Videotape and Discussion, The Trouble with Evan RESEARCH PAPERS DUE Student Presentations

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