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e20 Lite

version 0.5

Gary M. Sarli

Credits
Lead Designer & Developer
Gary M. Sarli

Additional Design
Robert Becker

Additional Development
Patrick Curtin, Jared Gaume, Lucas Jung, Randall Moe, Jimmy Plamondon, Frank Shea

Editing
Allison Bricker

Layout & Production


Gary M. Sarli

e20 Logo Design


Marc Caron

e20 Lite Cover Design


Marc Caron, Gary M. Sarli

Special Thanks
All the members of my semi-monthly STAR WARS game (Mark Valetutto, Deni Anderson, Kenneth Dollar, Nathan Probst, David Dockery, and Allison
Bricker) for letting me use them as test subjects for countless house rules; Moe at Kush in Denton, Texas (kushofdenton.com) for always having a
table ready for me at his hookah bar when I need to write away from home; and all the patrons who pledged their time and money to assist in the
creation of this product.
Based on the original roleplaying game rules designed by Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson and inspired by the third edition of the game designed by Monte Cook,
Jonathan Tweet, Skip Williams, Richard Baker, and Peter Adkison.
This product would not be possible without all the patrons who pledged their time and money to assist in its creation. Thank you for your efforts and
enthusiasm.
GMSarli Games
510 S Carroll Blvd
#150
Denton TX 76201
gmsarligames.com
Product Identity: The following items are hereby identified as Product Identity, as defined in the Open Game License version 1.0a, Section 1(e), and are not Open
Content: All trademarks, registered trademarks, proper names (characters, deities, etc.), dialogue, plots, storylines, locations, characters, artwork, and trade dress.
(Elements that have previously been designated as Open Game Content are not included in this declaration.)
Open Content: Except for material designated as Product Identity (see above), the game mechanics of this GMSarli Games product are Open Game Content, as
defined in the Open Gaming License version 1.0a Section 1(d). No portion of this work other than the material designated as Open Game Content may be
reproduced in any form without written permission.

e20 Lite version 0.5 is published by GMSarli Games under the Open Game License version 1.0a 2000 Wizards of the Coast, Inc. GMSarli Games, the GMS logo,
e20, e20 Lite, e20 System, and the e20 logo are trademarks of GMSarli Games. 2010 GMSarli Games.

Contents
CREDITS
CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION

Whats e20 Lite?


Whats Different?

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1: CHARACTER GENERATION

The Basics
The Core Mechanic
Dice
Rounding Fractions
Number Progression
Ability Scores
Generating Ability Scores
Characters at 1st Level
Character Advancement

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2: ORIGIN

Race
Human
Occupation
Occupation Descriptions
Changing Occupations

3: CLASSES

Class Descriptions
Class Features
Talents
Vanguard
Class Features
Talents
Dreadnought
Class Features
Talents
Corsair
Class Features
Talents
Savant
Class Features
Talents
Sentinel
Class Features
Talents
Envoy
Class Features
Talents
Multiclassing
Advanced Talents

4: SKILLS

Skill Basics

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Trained vs. Untrained Skills


Applications
Specialties
Metaskills
Skill Checks
Types of Skill Checks
Making a Skill Check
Target Number
Success or Failure
Cooperative Skill Checks
Challenges
Progress
Skills Used
Difficulty
Complexity
Limit
Time
Other Factors
Level and Experience
Running Challenges
List of Skills

5: FEATS

Defensive Feats
Style Feats
Class Feats
General Feats

6: TRAITS

Action Points
Resources
Resources Modifier
Purchasing Equipment
Losing Resources
Gaining Resources
Combining Resources
Cash on Hand
On-Hand Items

7: POWERS

Magic
Arcane
Divine
Pact
Primal
Psionics
Clairsentience
Psychokinesis
Psychometabolism
Telepathy

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Prodigies

8: EQUIPMENT

Using Items
Containers
Weapons
Weapon Tables
Ammunition
Armor
Armor Tables
Vehicles
Vehicle Table
General Equipment
Equipment Tables
Encumbrance
Weight and Load
Lifting and Dragging

9: ENHANCEMENTS

Enhancement Basics
Using Enhancements
Enhancement Slots
Acquiring Enhancements
Creating Enhancements
Creation Process

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10: COMBAT

Attacks
Attack Roll
Critical Hits
Defenses
Primary Defense
Fortitude Defense
Reflex Defense
Will Defense
Saving Throws
Injury and Healing
Hit Points and Reserves
Massive Damage Threshold
Healing and Repairs
Conditions
Combat Sequence
Surprise
Initiative
Combat Rounds
Actions in Combat
Stunts
Fighting Style
Driving
Dual Weapon

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Emplaced Weapon
One-Handed Weapon
Shield
Two-Handed Weapon
Movement
Limited Movement
Aerial Movement
Maneuvers
Losing Control
Occupied Spaces
Collisions
Map Scale
Special Combat Rules
Area Attacks
Concealment
Cover
Damage Reduction
Damage Types
Disadvantaged Opponents
Dynamic Damage
Hardness
Range
Size
Threatened Areas
Transport Combat
Characters on Transports
Transport Movement
Attacking a Transport

11: GAMEMASTERING

Experience Awards
Encounter XP Targets
Encounter Difficulty
Allies & Opponents
Character Ranks
Game Statistics by Level
Templates

12: GENRE & SETTING

Genre
Genre as Mood
Genre as Setting
Campaign Settings
Ruins of Empire
The Hollow Sky
Metahuman Zero

OPEN GAME LICENSE V1.0A

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Introduction
The goal of the e20 System Evolved project is to design a roleplaying
game whose mechanics allow for fast game play, streamlined character
creation and advancement, and a cinematic storytelling experience
adaptable to any genre or style of play. Its name inspired by the D20
SYSTEM family of games, this project intends to help that venerable rules
system evolve into its newest incarnation.

Classes: There are six classes, each of which is roughly analogous to


the six basic classes found in d20 Modern: Vanguard (Strong Hero),
Dreadnought (Tough Hero), Corsair (Fast Hero), Savant (Smart Hero),
Sentinel (Dedicated Hero), Envoy (Charismatic Hero). Each has an
assortment of class skills, and the number of skills chosen at 1st level is
determined by your starting class.
Multiclassing is possible without penalty. There are no advanced
classes or prestige classes, but advanced talent trees are available for
higher-level characters.
Talents: Rather than fixed class features, in the e20 System you select
talents from lists called talent trees, each of which is associated with a
particular class. Some talents require a minimum class level to be
selected, so if you dedicate yourself to one class you can access exclusive
talents that a multiclass character might not be able to learn.
Talents are divided into two categories: core talents (usable once per
round) and major talents (usable once until you rest for 1 minute).
Talents scale to match your overall power at any given level, and all
talentscore and majorhave approximately equal value.
Skills: Like STAR WARS Saga Edition and DUNGEONS & DRAGONS 4th
edition, the e20 System does not use skill points and ranks to measure
proficiency. Instead, all skill improve automatically as you gain levels
(bonus equal to half your level), and you are either untrained (+0),
trained (+2), or focused (up to +5) in a given skill.
Unlike previous d20-based games, e20 System skills are not associated
with a single ability score. Instead, you match your skill modifier with the
most appropriate ability modifier, determined by the specific action you
are taking.
Challenges, inspired by complex skill checks in Unearthed Arcana and
skill challenges in DUNGEONS & DRAGONS 4th edition, provide game
mechanics for resolving situations that are too long, complex, or
dangerous for a single skill check. The rules contain extensive guidelines
on how to build a challenge (including several variant options that serve
to make your encounter unique) and even how to use a challenge as a
standalone encounter.
Feats: For the most part, feats work similarly to those found in previous
d20-based games. However, feats that had previously granted a unique
action that required a task resolution roll (such as Whirlwind Attack) are
usually recast as talents. In addition, feats generally have fewer
prerequisites.
There are four types of feats: general, class, defensive, and style.
Anyone who meets the prerequisite can take a general or defensive feat,
but some defensive feats are limited to characters who have at least one
level in one of two classes. Class feats provide signature abilities that
help to define each classs role (such as Sneak Attack for a Corsair), and
only members of a given class can take its associated class feats. Style
feats work with your fighting style (such as two-handed weapon or
weapon and shield), providing a specific benefit to match your approach
to combat. You can use only one style feat at a time, but you can switch
to a different style feat you know as a free action once per round on your
turn.
Enhancements: Enhancements are abilities acquired through play
rather than because of your class and level. They might be physical items
(like magic items in a high fantasy setting) or learned tricks and exploits
your character has acquired as a direct result of overcoming a particular
challenge. In addition, you can build or learn enhancements between
adventures; however, enhancements that you build yourself are less
powerful than the best that you might acquire during an adventure.

Whats e20 Lite?


This product gives you an overview of the lead designers vision of the
game mechanics that will be found in the final version of the e20 Core
Rulebook. In addition to building directly on Open Game Content from
sources such as Unearthed Arcana (DUNGEONS & DRAGONS), Pathfinder,
and Mutants & Masterminds, it draws inspiration from the innovations
found in other games such as STAR WARS ROLEPLAYING GAME Saga Edition,
DUNGEONS & DRAGONS 4th edition, Savage Worlds, and many other games.
Above all else, e20 Lite is very much a work in progress. This product
contains the current game mechanics and concepts preferred by the lead
designer, but patron input can and will result in substantial changes from
this starting point. This product is a living document that serves as a beta
test for exploring new game mechanics; as such, it is given a distinct
version number (starting at version 0.1) to represent major revisions as
the process moves forward.

Whats Different?
If youre familiar with d20-based games in general, much of the
structure of the e20 System will be familiar despite having been
substantially rebuilt. Unless described as changing in e20 Lite, assume
that other rules work roughly the same as they did in DUNGEONS &
DRAGONS edition 3.5 or d20 Modern. (There are exceptions, but most
major changes are covered, at least in brief.)
Character Advancement: You gain feats, talents, and stunts (see below)
based on your total character level rather than your individual class
levels. Ten encounters of average difficulty will provide enough
experience points to advance a level, and you always gain at least one
talent, feat, or stunt when you advance. You can retrain these mechanics
as you gain levels, so it is not necessary to pre-plan your characters
entire adventuring career in order to have a relatively optimized
character.
Races: Races play the same role as they did in previous d20-based
games. Inspired by DUNGEONS & DRAGONS 4th edition, racial modifiers to
ability scores are always positive, never negative. As before, humans are
the most customizable race, gaining +2 to an ability score of their
choice, an additional trained skill, an additional feat, and an additional
stunt at 1st level. Most setting-specific races (such as elves or dwarves in
high fantasy) gain +2 to two specific ability scores and several fixed
racial traits, trading flexibility for greater specialization. In addition, your
race provides some of your possible skill choices at 1st level.
Occupations: Occupations help to define your characters background
and experience prior to becoming a 1st-level character. Your occupation,
like your race and class, provides some of your possible skill choices at
1st level. In addition, your occupation provides some other details (such
as starting resources) that help to flesh out a characters standing in the
campaign world.

Enhancements are particularly useful for niche situations that are too
unusual to be worth spending a talent or feat.
Stunts: Stunts provide you with special options when you make an
attack, allowing you to produce an additional effect such as disarming,
tripping, or bull rushing a character. In addition, you can perform any
talent as a stunt so long as you know at least one talent of the same
type from the same talent tree and you otherwise meet the talents
prerequisite.
Because of their complexity, stunts require either significant effort
(you take a 5 penalty on your attack roll) or a bit of luck (on a critical
hit, you can perform a stunt instead of dealing double damage). You
learn to master individual stunts and avoid the 5 penalty as you
advance in level, and you can choose to learn additional stunts by taking
the Stunt Mastery feat.
Hit Points: Players familiar with other d20-based games might find
that hit points and damage levels are a bit higher than they were in
other games. However, relative power levels (damage compared to hit
points) are generally similar to those in comparable game systems.
In addition to hit points, in the e20 System you have reserves, which
are essentially a pool of backup hit points that you can use to recover
more quickly than typically possible in d20-based games. Once your
reserves are drained, however, damage has the potential to cause serious
injury and death.
Defenses and Saving Throws: Much like STAR WARS Saga Edition and
DUNGEONS & DRAGONS 4th edition, the e20 System has multiple static
defenses (Primary, Fortitude, Reflex, and Will) that serve as the target
number for an attack roll. In addition, the e20 System uses a simple
saving throw mechanic for recovery from lasting conditions.
Attacks: Unlike previous d20-based games, you do not have a base
attack bonus. Instead, each weapon group has an associated skill, such as
Firearms or Melee. Because of this, attacks, defenses, and skills all scale
at exactly the same rate as you gain levels.
Equipment: Weapons are similar to those in previous d20-based
games, and damage levels are comparable if not actually identical to
their earlier counterparts. Range modifiers function differently, using
broad range categories instead of flat range increments. For example, a
typical pistol has a point blank range of 5 squares, a short range of 10
squares (2 to attacks), a medium range of 25 squares (5 to attacks), a
long range of 50 squares (10 to attacks), and an extreme range of 100
squares (20 to attacks).
Armor provides a modest bonus to both your Primary Defense
(analogous to Armor Class in DUNGEONS & DRAGONS) and your massive
damage threshold, making you less likely to be fatigued, impaired,
disabled, or killed by an attack.

Whats Lite About This?


In its current incarnation, e20 Lite has been expanded in scope to provide
a virtually complete rules engine for the game, giving playtesters
everything they need to run scenarios, adventures, and even whole
campaigns. In addition, it serves as a core development guide for those
patrons who wish to contribute design work for the game.
Because of this, the document is quite large, and playtesters will have
access to additional material as the project moves forward in its final
stages of development.
By the time e20 Lite reaches version 1.0, it will be trimmed down to
provide a solid set of quick start rules that give new players a quick
introduction to the essentials of the e20 System.
Encounters: Combat encounters are more fluid and volatile than in
previous d20-based games; combatants rarely remain in fixed positions
for very long. Drawing inspiration from DUNGEONS & DRAGONS 4th edition,
threat levels are scaled such that a standard 1st-level opponent is an
appropriate challenge for a single 1st-level character. Encounters are
thus very easy to scale for parties of different sizes; if you have six 3rdlevel characters, pick out six 3rd-level standard opponents (or any other
combination that adds up to roughly the same amount of experience
points).
Opponents are rated as basic (simpler attack options and lower hit
points, much like minions in DUNGEONS & DRAGONs 4th edition), standard,
or elite (higher hit points and defenses, and an even match for a
character of the same level). As a comparison, a 4th-level elite opponent
is roughly the equivalent to a 6th-level standard opponent or a 10thlevel basic opponent.
Experience Points: Much as in DUNGEONS & DRAGONS 4th edition, levelindependent experience awards help to make encounter building easier
and more intuitive.
Genre and Setting: Though its base rules nicely fill the action and
adventure genres appropriate to many roleplaying games, the e20 System
is a universal system that allows true compatibility between games of
many different genres and settings. To that end, the rules are generally
modular by design and easy to plug into any campaign. Whether youre
looking for comic book superheroics, cinematic action, or grim and gritty
horror, the game can be set anywhere, and with the addition of new
talent trees and feats you can represent genre-specific tropes such as
magic and psionics.

1: Character Generation
Regardless of your specific origin and class, your characters progression
and ability scores operate using the same mechanics throughout your
campaign.

Variations: In cases where values deviate from these progressions, the


rules will clearly explain what pattern to use. For example, size modifiers
mostly follow the standard progression, but the growth is truncated and
expands by only 5 at every step beyond +10.

The Basics

Ability Scores

If youve played other d20-based games, youre probably familiar with


many of the concepts at the heart of the e20 System. The following basic
rules apply in almost every aspect of the game.

Ability scores are calculated with the standard formula used in previous
d20-based games. The ability modifier for a given ability score is equal to
the following:

The Core Mechanic

(ability score)/2 5, rounded down

Whenever you attempt an action that has some chance of failure, you
roll a twenty-sided die (d20). To determine if your character succeeds at
a task you do the following:

The function of each ability score is summarized below.


Strength: Power, musculature, and the ability to apply force to other
characters.
Constitution: Toughness, mass, and overall resistance to physical
effects.
Dexterity: Speed, movement, and fine motor skills.
Intelligence: Logic, reason, abstract thought, and accumulated
knowledge.
Wisdom: Awareness, intuition, and insight.
Charisma: Self-confidence, presence, and force of personality.

Roll a d20.
Add any relevant modifiers.
Compare the result to a target number.
If the result equals or exceeds the target number, your character
succeeds. If the result is lower than the target number, you fail.

Dice

Generating Ability Scores

Dice rolls are described with expressions such as 3d4+3, which means
roll three four-sided dice and add 3 (resulting in a number between 6
and 15). The first number tells you how many dice to roll (adding the
results together). The number immediately after the d tells you the type
of die to use. Any number after that indicates a quantity that is added or
subtracted from the result.
d%: Percentile dice work a little differently. You generate a number
between 1 and 100 by rolling two different ten-sided dice. One
(designated before you roll) is the tens digit. The other is the ones digit.
Two 0s represent 100.

The Gamemaster chooses which of the following methods to use for


generating ability scores. All of these produce heroic characters
appropriate for any action or adventure game; genre-specific materials in
the e20 System Core Rulebook provide other methods that create
characters with lower or higher ability scores.

Point Buy Method

All ability scores start at 8, and you have an allotment of points to spend
to improve them above that. In a standard heroic campaign (the assumed
default for the e20 System), you have 30 points to spend on your ability
scores. Other campaign styles might have higher or lower point totals
available.

Rounding Fractions
In general, if you wind up with a fraction, round down, even if the
fraction is one-half or larger.
Exception: Certain rolls, such as damage, have a minimum of 1.

Ability Score
9
10
11
12
13

Number Progression
Many numbers in the game use a common pattern in their growth,
making it easy for you to extrapolate higher and lower values as needed
in different situations.
Standard Progression: The standard progression is the most commonly
used. Each step up is roughly twice as large as the one before it, and
every three steps up is exactly ten times larger.
The standard progression follows this pattern: 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50, 100,
and so on. It can be extended upward or downward, as needed.
Expanded Progression: The expanded progression is used for some
specific mechanics that require more nuance. Each step up is roughly
50% larger than the one before it, every two steps is roughly twice as
large, and every six steps is exactly ten times larger.
The expanded progression follows this pattern: 1, 1.5, 2, 3, 5, 7.5, 10,
15, 20, 30, 50, 75, 100, and so on. Like the standard progression, it can
be extended upward or downward, as needed.

Point Cost
1
2
3
4
5

Ability Score
14
15
16
17
18

Point Cost
7
9
12
15
19

Default Array Method

You start with a specific set of ability scores15, 14, 13, 12, 11, 10and
you arrange them as desired among your six abilities.

Random Scores Method

Roll 4d6, drop the lowest single die, add the other three, and note the
total. Repeat this five more times to generate a set of six ability scores,
and you arrange them as desired among your six abilities.

Table 11: Character Advancement


Total XP
0
1,000
2,500
4,500
7,500
12,500
20,000
30,000
45,000
65,000
95,000
145,000
220,000
320,000
470,000
670,000
970,000
1,470,000
2,220,000
3,220,000

Level
1st
2nd
3rd
4th
5th
6th
7th
8th
9th
10th
11th
12th
13th
14th
15th
16th
17th
18th
19th
20th

Level
Bonus
+0
+1
+1
+2
+2
+3
+3
+4
+4
+5
+5
+6
+6
+7
+7
+8
+8
+9
+9
+10

Summary
1 core talent, 1 major talent, 1 feat, 1 stunt, class and origin traits
+1 stunt
+1 feat, +1 core talent
+1 major talent
+1 feat, +1 to 2 abilities, +1 specialization
+1 stunt
+1 feat, +1 core talent
+1 major talent
+1 feat, +1 to 3 abilities, +1 specialization
+1 stunt
+1 feat, +1 core talent
+1 major talent
+1 feat, +1 to 4 abilities, +1 specialization
+1 stunt
+1 feat, +1 core talent
+1 major talent
+1 feat, +1 to 5 abilities, +1 specialization
+1 stunt
+1 feat, +1 core talent
+1 major talent

Core
Talents
1
1
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
4
5
5
5
5
6
6

Major
Talents
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
4
5
5
5
5
6

Feats
Known
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
6
6
7
7
8
8
9
9
10
10

Stunts
Known
1
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
4
5
5
5
5
6
6
6

Core Talent: Select one core talent from any talent tree available to
your class.
Major Talents: Select one major talent from any talent tree available
to your class.
Stunts: Select any one stunt, which you can now perform without
the normal 5 penalty. You can select either a universal stunt or a
talent stunt. (A talent stunt allows you to use a talent you already
know to perform another talent from the same tree and of the same
typecore or majorso long as you otherwise meet the prerequisite
of the talent you select.)
Specializations: For any trained skill that has specializations (such as
Knowledge), select one specialization that you know. Select another
specialization if you have Skill Focus for the skill. In addition, you
can select a number of bonus specializations equal to your
Intelligence modifier (if positive). Among other things, you can use
these specializations to learn additional languages (specializations of
the Linguistics skill).

Characters at 1st Level


To create a 1st-level character, use the following checklist. You dont
necessarily have to follow this checklist in order, so you can adjust earlier
decisions if you change your mind later in the process.
Ability Scores: Use the method your Gamemaster selects (described
above).
Class: You can be a Vanguard, Dreadnought, Corsair, Savant,
Sentinel, or Envoy. Your class determines your starting hit points,
your number of trained skills at 1st level, and a list of possible skills
at 1st level. In addition, your class provides three automatic feats
and your choice of one class feat and one bonus feat, and it
determines which talents you are eligible to select.
Race: Your race modifies your ability scores, provides one or more
racial traits, and adds one or more racial skills to your list of possible
skills at 1st level.
Occupation: Your occupation provides a list of possible skills at 1st
level and a modifier to your starting Resources score.
Starting Skills: Your class determines your number of starting skills
at 1st level. These skills can be chosen from any skill on your class,
occupation, and racial skill lists. In addition, you have the option to
use a starting skill slot to gain Skill Focus for a trained skill instead
of becoming trained in a new skill. At 1st level, at least half your
trained skills (rounded down) must be nonweapon skills.
Automatic Feats: Your class provides three defensive feats
automatically.
Class Feat: Your class provides a choice of one class feat.
Bonus Feat: Your class provides a choice of one bonus feat.
Other Feats: Select any one additional feat for which you meet the
prerequisite.

Character Advancement
As you gain levels, you gain additional talents and feats as well as
increases to your ability scores, as summarized in Table 11: Character
Advancement.
Retraining: Every time you gain a level, you have the option to retrain
one feat, talent, or stunt you already know. This represents a gradual
shift in what techniques you practice; over time, the old falls into disuse
as you focus on something new. You must meet the prerequisite of the
new selection, and you cannot retrain something if doing so would
prevent you from meeting the prerequisite for another feat, talent, or
stunt you still know.

2: Origin
Origins reflect your characters history before becoming a 1st-level hero.
Some of these details can change over the course of a campaign.

Skills: Analytics, Focus, Influence, Knowledge, and Linguistics.


Resources Modifier: +0.

Administrative

Race

Office workers such as clerks, administrative assistants, and secretaries


are the backbone of any large organization. Their duties require them to
be flexible enough to navigate bureaucracies, keep abreast of office
politics, and multitask on a wide range of day-to-day tasks.
Prerequisite: Age 18+.
Skills: Deception, Influence, Intuition, Knowledge, and Perception
(awareness).
Resources Modifier: +0.

A race represents your biological (and, in some settings, cultural)


heritage. Each race provides a list of racial traits, such as your base
speed, your size, modifiers to your ability scores, and one or more others.
Racial modifiers to ability scores are always positive, never negative.
Most setting-specific races (such as elves or dwarves in high fantasy)
gain +2 to two specific ability scores and several fixed racial traits,
trading flexibility for greater specialization. In addition, all races provide
some additional skills that you can choose at 1st level from your starting
skill allotment (determined by your class).
A sample racehumanis described below.

Adventurer

Adventurers include professional daredevils, big-game hunters, relic


hunters, explorers, extreme sports enthusiasts, field scientists, thrillseekers, and others called to face danger for a variety of reasons.
Prerequisite: Age 15+.
Skills: Acrobatics, Athletics, Mechanics, Nature, Perception
(awareness), Stealth, Vehicles, and any one weapon skill.
Resources Modifier: 3.

Human
In most settings, human is the default race unless otherwise specified.
Humans are particularly adaptable and flexible in their capabilities,
making them suited to specialize in nearly any task.
Size: Medium.
Speed: 5 squares.
Ability Modifiers: +2 to a single ability score of your choice.
Bonus Skill: Choose one additional skill, which need not be on your
occupation or class skill lists. You are trained in this skill.
Bonus Feat: Choose one additional feat for which you meet the
prerequisite.
Bonus Stunt: Choose one additional stunt. This can be either a
universal or a talent stunt.

Athlete

Athletes include amateur athletes of Olympic quality and professional


athletes of all types, including gymnasts, personal trainers, wrestlers,
boxers, martial artists, swimmers, skaters, coaches, and others who
engage in any type of competitive sport.
Prerequisite: Strength 13, Constitution 13, or Dexterity 13.
Skills: Acrobatics, Athletics, Influence, Focus, Perception (awareness),
and any two weapon skills except Gunnery.
Resources Modifier: 2.

Blue Collar

Occupation
Your starting occupation presents your background prior to becoming a
1st-level character. It provides a list of possible starting skills as well as
other details, such as your overall resources and social standing. A hero
may hold other jobs as his or her career unfolds.

Blue collar occupations include factory work, food service jobs,


construction, service industry jobs, taxi pilots, postal workers, and other
types of work that are usually not considered to be desk jobs.
Prerequisite: Age 18+.
Skills: Athletics, Influence, Mechanics, Nature, Vehicles, and any one
weapon skill except Gunnery.
Resources Modifier: 1.

Occupation Descriptions

Celebrity

A celebrity is anyone who, for whatever reason, has been thrust into the
spotlight of the public eye. Actors, entertainers of all types, newscasters,
radio and television personalities, and more fall under this starting
occupation.
Prerequisite: Age 15+.
Skills: Influence.
Resources Modifier: +4.

Choose one occupation from the available selections and apply the
benefits to your character as noted in the occupations description. When
creating a 1st-level character, your starting occupation provides some
possible selections for your starting skills and a bonus to your starting
Resources equal to its listed modifier. After character creation, your
occupations Resources modifier also provides a bonus to skill checks
made to earn money by working at a job.
Specializations: Some occupations list a specialization with a given
skill, such as Influence (persuasion). If you select this skill as a trained
skill, you must select the designated specialization as well unless other
specializations are available from your race or class skill lists.

Academic

Academics include librarians, scholars, professors, teachers, and other


education professionals.
Prerequisite: Age 23+.

venture. These owners of small to large businesses have a knack for


putting together business plans, gathering resources, and getting a new
venture off the ground. Some dont like to stick around after the launch,
however, as they prefer to put their energies into the next big thing.
Prerequisite: Age 18+.
Skills: Computers, Influence (persuasion), Intuition, and Knowledge
(business)*.

Creative

The creative starting occupation covers artists of all types who fan their
creative spark into a career. Illustrators, copywriters, cartoonists, graphic
artists, novelists, magazine columnists, actors, sculptors, game designers,
musicians, screenwriters, photographers, web designers, and dancers all
fall under this occupation.
Prerequisite: Age 15+.
Skills: Acrobatics, Athletics, Computers, Deception, Influence, Intuition,
Knowledge, and Perception.
Resources Modifier: 3.

* Required skill.

Resources Modifier: +2.

Investigative

There are a number of jobs that fit within this occupation, including
investigative reporters, photojournalists, private investigators, police
detectives, criminologists, criminal profilers, espionage agents, and others
who use their skills to gather evidence and analyze clues.
Prerequisite: Age 23+.
Skills: Deception, Influence (persuasion), Intuition*, Knowledge
(streetwise), Perception (awareness), Stealth, and any one weapon skill
except Gunnery.

Criminal

This illicit starting occupation reveals a background from the wrong side
of the law. This occupation includes con artists, burglars, thieves, crime
family soldiers, gang members, bank robbers, and other types of career
criminals.
Prerequisite: Age 15+.
Skills: Athletics, Deception*, Intuition, Knowledge (streetwise),
Mechanics, Perception (awareness), Stealth, and any one weapon skill
except Gunnery.

* Required skill.

Resources Modifier: +0.

* Required skill.

Law Enforcement

Resources Modifier: 2.

Law enforcement personnel include uniformed police, state troopers,


federal police, federal agents, SWAT team members, and military police.
Prerequisite: Age 20+.
Skills: Influence (persuasion), Intuition, Knowledge (civics or
streetwise), Perception (awareness), Tactics, Vehicles, and any one
weapon skill.
Resources Modifier: 1.

Dilettante

Dilettantes usually get their wealth from family holdings and trust funds.
The typical dilettante has no job, few responsibilities, and at least one
driving passion that occupies his or her day. That passion might be a
charity or philanthropic foundation, an ideal or cause worth fighting for,
or a lust for living a fun and carefree existence.
Prerequisite: Age 18+.
Skills: None.
Resources Modifier: +5.

Law and Politics

This occupation covers lawyers, legal scholars, judges, and politicians at


all levels of government.
Prerequisite: Age 23+.
Skills: Deception, Influence (persuasion or bureaucracy), Intuition, and
Knowledge (civics)*.

Doctor

A doctor can be a physician (general practitioner or specialist), a surgeon,


or a psychiatrist.
Prerequisite: Age 25+.
Skills: Analytics (life sciences or behavioral sciences), Knowledge, and
Medicine*.

* Required skill.

Resources Modifier: +2.

Military

* Required skill.

Resources Modifier: +3.

Military covers any of the branches of the armed forces, including army,
navy, air force, and marines, as well as the various elite training units
such as Seals, Rangers, and Special Forces.
Prerequisite: Age 18+.
Skills: Athletics, Mechanics, Nature (survival), Perception (awareness),
Tactics*, Vehicles, and any one weapon skill.

Drifter

Not everyone has a traditional occupation. Characters that have no


permanent job (and often no permanent home other than a vehicle) are
survivors, adapting to circumstances to make a living in whatever way
they can.
Prerequisite: Age 15+.
Skills: Athletics, Deception, Influence, Intuition, Mechanics, Nature,
Perception, Vehicles, and any one weapon skill other than Gunnery.
Resources Modifier: 4.

* Required skill.

Resources Modifier: 1.

Religious

Ordained clergy of all persuasions, as well as theological scholars and


experts on religious studies fall within the scope of this starting
occupation.
Prerequisite: Age 23+.
Skills: Focus, Influence (persuasion), Intuition, Knowledge (history or
religion), Linguistics, Perception.
Resources Modifier: +0.

Emergency Services

Rescue workers, firefighters, paramedics, hazardous material handlers,


and emergency medical technicians fall under this category.
Prerequisite: Age 18+.
Skills: Athletics, Knowledge, Medicine, Perception (awareness),
Vehicles, and any one weapon skill other than Gunnery.
Resources Modifier: 1.

Entrepreneur

Entrepreneurs have an obsession about being their own boss. They


believe in themselves, have an abundance of confidence, and the ability
to acquire the funds necessary to bankroll their newest moneymaking

Rural

White Collar

Student

Changing Occupations

Professional occupations such as accountants, insurance agents, bank


personnel, financial advisors, tax preparers, sales personnel, real estate
agents, and a variety of mid-level managers fall within the scope of this
starting occupation.
Prerequisite: Age 23+.
Skills: Computers, Influence, Intuition, and Knowledge.
Resources Modifier: +1.

Farm workers, hunters, and others who make a living in rural


communities fall under this category.
Prerequisite: Age 15+.
Skills: Athletics, Mechanics, Nature, Perception (awareness), Vehicles,
and any two weapon skills except Gunnery.
Resources Modifier: 2.
A student can be in high school, college, or graduate school. He or she
could be in a seminary, a military school, or a private institution. A
college-age student should also pick a major field of study.
Prerequisite: Age 15+.
Skills: Analytics, Focus, Knowledge, Perception, any four nonweapon
skills, and any one weapon skill except Gunnery.
Resources Modifier: 4.

You can change your occupation at any time after creating your
character, but there are some requirements to do so. First, you must be
trained in at least one skill listed in the occupations description,
including all of the occupations required skills (if any). Second, you must
spend time finding your new job; the difficulty depends on the jobs
normal salary as well as the size and wealth of the community or
company in which you search.
Finding a job is a challenge: Check SKILL (Cha) DC 15 + occupations
Resources modifier; Complexity 60 Resources modifier of community or
company; Base Time 1 day; Completed you find a job in the occupation
you seek; Terminated your search has exhausted every lead and you must
start from scratch after polishing your resume, practicing your
interviewing techniques, and researching new job opportunities.

Technician

Scientists, engineers, and programmers of all types fit within the scope of
this starting occupation.
Prerequisite: Age 23+.
Skills: Analytics, Computers, Knowledge, and Mechanics.
Resources Modifier: +1.

10

3: Classes
The e20 System has six universal classes suitable for any campaign
setting and genre, and each class has access to talent trees and exclusive
feats that fit their role in the game. A summary of each class is provided
below.
Class
Vanguard
Dreadnought
Corsair
Savant
Sentinel
Envoy

Starting hp
(hp/level)
110 (11)
120 (12)
90 (9)
70 (7)
100 (10)
80 (8)

Trained Skills1
6
5
8
10
7
9

valuable in any given encounter, these talent represent unique


capabilities that you cant learn except by continuing to take levels in the
Savant class.

Talent Tree

A talent tree includes a thematically consistent group of talents that


represent a specific approach to problem-solving common to a particular
class. Each talent tree includes three core talents and six major talents.
Prerequisite: Some talent trees have a prerequisite that you must meet
in addition to having levels in an associated class. When applicable,
talent trees description lists them here.

Defense Bonus2
+3 Fort, +2 Reflex
+3 Fort, +2 Will
+3 Reflex, +2 Fort
+3 Reflex, +2 Will
+3 Will, +2 Fort
+3 Will, +2 Reflex

Talent Name

[Type]

Type: Each talent has a typecore or majorlisted in brackets


immediately following the talents name.

1 At least 1/2 of your starting trained skills must be nonweapon skills


2 Defense bonus provided by automatic feats at 1st level

Core Talents: These represent the fundamentals of a given series of


talents, serving as prerequisites for some major talents in each talent
tree and providing the ability to perform relatively simple actions
that you can use once per round.
Major Talents: More complex than core talents, major talents provide
you with more powerful options. However, they are more taxing to
perform, difficult to duplicate once an opponent has witnessed them,
or both, so they can be used only once per encounter. You can use a
major talent again after you take 1 minute to rest or you spend an
Action Point to regain it.

Class Descriptions
The six character class descriptions use a common format to summarize
the most important information.

Class Features
Every class provides a specific set of features that help to determine your
characters game statistics.

Description: Below the talents name and listed in italics, the talent
provides a brief description that provides some insight into how the
talent works or what it might look like in play.
Prerequisite: If a talent has any specific prerequisite (such as a
minimum level in a class), it is listed here. You cannot select a talent
unless you meet its prerequisites.
Requirement: If a talent works only in specific circumstances, its
description specifies them here.
Trigger: If a talent allows you to respond immediately to an event, its
description specifies it here. Any talent that is an interruption or reaction
has a trigger.
Action: The talents action type (standard, move, swift, free, reaction,
or interruption) is specified here. For standard, move, and swift actions,
you can perform the talent only if you have the listed action available on
your turn.
Keywords: Many talents have keywords, which identify important
details that can interact with other mechanics. Some common keywords
are described below.

Hit Points

At 1st character level, you gain a set number of starting hit points based
on your starting class. As you gain levels, you gain a smaller number of
hit points determined by the class you select. If you multiclass, you do
not gain your new classs starting hit points.

Starting Skills

At 1st character level, your class grants you a set number of skills
(including a minimum number of nonweapon skills) chosen from your
class, racial, and occupation skill lists. If you multiclass, you do not gain
any starting skills from your new class.

Starting Feats

At 1st character level, your class grants you some feats automatically in
addition to giving you the choice of one class feat and one bonus feat. If
you multiclass, you do not gain any starting feats from your new class.

Talents

Weapon: The talent is performed using a weapon of some sort. You


must be trained with the weapon you wield to use it with this talent.
Some characteristics of the talent (such as the skill used, the talents
range, the talents damage, and so forth) might be effected by the
weapon you wield; in that case, use the appropriate weapon statistic
to determine the talents statistics. In addition, some weapon talents
have an additional keyword that limits them to specific types of
weapons.
o Autofire: The talent can be performed only with an automatic
weapon, such as a machine gun. Unless otherwise specified, an
autofire talent expends 10 shots, and your weapon must have at
least 10 shots remaining to use this talent.

In the e20 System, you customize your capabilities both in and out of
combat by selecting different talents from the talent trees available to
each class.
Fundamentally, talents provide exclusive skill applicationsthat is, a
new way to use a skill you already know. All talents scale by character
level, and talents available at higher levels arent more powerful than
low-level talents in any absolute sense. However, higher-level talents
provide unique and exclusive options that you cant get without focusing
on a single class.
In a fantasy setting, for example, a 1st-level Savant might learn arcane
magic talents such as Sleep or Magic Missile, and their power levels scale
up as the Savant gains levels. At higher levels, the Savant might learn
talents such as Flight or Invisibility; though designed to be equally

11

Talent Tree Structure

Talent trees use a common structure that provides ample variety at 1st
level in addition to several higher-level talents that reward you for
focusing on a given class. Basic talent trees have 3 core talents and 6
major talents with the following level requirements:

1st level: 2 core talents, 2 major talents


2nd level: 1 major talent
3rd level: 1 core talent
6th level: 1 major talent
10th level: 1 major talent
14th level: 1 major talent

Target: This line specifies the target or targets of the talent. It can be a
set number of characters, a specific type of character (such as creatures,
objects, or vehicles), all characters in a specified area, or some
combination of the above. Area attacks might list an area that modifies a
weapons normal area; for example, all characters in area [WEAPON +
1] would mean that a machine gun that normally affects an area 2
squares wide on each side would instead affect an area 3 squares wide
on each side. All targets must be within the talents maximum range (see
below).
Range: This specifies the range at which you can use the talent and
under what circumstances you suffer a penalty. A talent can have more
than range type listed; in that case, you must satisfy the requirements of
all listed range types when using the talent.

Advanced talent treesavailable to two or more classes at higher level


also have 3 core talents and 6 major talents, but their level requirements
increase:

qualify, but an assault rifle does because it can use both


automatic and semiautomatic fire.)
Transport: You must be driving a transport (either riding a mount or
piloting a vehicle) to use the talent.
Mind-Affecting: The talent depends on the target having a conscious
mind, so it affects only creatures with an Intelligence score.
Healing: The talent restores hit points or provides some other benefit
to living creatures. It does not affect objects or nonliving creatures
unless otherwise specified.
Magic: The talent produces a magic effect and is available only in
settings that include magic.
Psionic: The talent produces a psionic effect and is available only in
settings that include psionics.

7th level: 2 core talents, 2 major talents


8th level: 1 major talent
9th level: 1 core talent
12th level: 1 major talent
16th level: 1 major talent
20th level: 1 major talent

On its surface, the talent tree structure might seem somewhat front
loaded, with no immediate reward for going beyond 3rd level in a class.
However, class feats help to fill the gaps: New class feats become
available at most levels, and most existing class feats improve as you
gain class levels. Upon advancing to any level in a class, youre almost
certain to gain access to a new talent, new class feat, or an improvement
in a lower-level class feat.
The level requirements for talents dont align perfectly with when you
gain new talents for three reasons. First, when you gain a new known
stunt, you can use it to learn a talent stunt of the same tree and type as
any talent you know; therefore, you might learn new talents as stunts
instead of as talents.
Second, every time you gain a level you can retrain one feat, talent, or
stunt you already know. Even if you dont gain a talent selection at the
time you qualify for a new talent, you could choose to replace an
existing talent to learn it right away.
Third, you might have more than one class, so your class level (which
determines which talents you can learn) wont necessarily line up with
your character level (which determines when you learn new talents and
stunts). You have an incentive to continue taking levels in any given
class because the next set of new options usually becomes available in
only one more level.

[number]: This specifies the talents point blank range. You take a
range penalty against targets beyond this range: Short (range 2),
2; Medium (range 5), 5; Long (range 10), 10; Extreme (range
20), 20. You cannot use the talent beyond extreme range.
Within [number]: The talent cannot be used at all beyond the
specified range.
Weapon: The talents range equals that of the weapon you wield. All
weapons also have a direct range (see below) unless otherwise
specified.
Sight: The talent requires line of sight and can affect any target that
does not have total concealment against you so long as you are
aware of the target (such as when you have noticed its presence
with a Perception check).
Direct: The talent requires a direct line of effect and can affect any
target that does not have total cover against you. In addition, if the
target has total concealment, you must guess the targets location; if
you guess wrong, your action is wasted.
Communication: The talent can affect any target that can
understand you and your language. For verbal communication, the
target must be able to hear you; for written communication,
gestures, or signals, the target must be able to see you.
(Communication devices might allow a target to see or hear you at
very great distances.)

o Barrage: The talent can be performed only with an automatic or


semiautomatic weapon, such as a 9mm pistol. Unless otherwise
specified, a barrage talent expends 5 shots, and your weapon
must have at least 5 shots remaining to use this talent.
o Blast: The talent can be performed only with a blast area weapon,
such as a grenade or other explosive device.
o Light: The talent can be performed only with a light weapon
wielded in one hand.
o Melee: The talent can be performed only with a melee weapon.
(Natural weapons count as melee weapons, and unarmed
attacks count as melee weapons so long as you are trained in
the Unarmed skill.)
o Ranged: The talent can be performed only with a ranged weapon
that isnt limited to automatic fire. (A machine gun doesnt

Attack: If a talent harms, impairs, or otherwise limits the target in


some way, it is an attack. Make the attack roll using the listed skill and
modifiers (if any) and compare to the targets listed defenses. When an
attack uses a weapon skill, it will often say SKILL rather than any
specific weapon skill; in this case, use whichever skill matches the
weapon you wield.
If your attack roll equals or exceeds the targets defense, you hit;
otherwise, you miss. If you roll a natural 1, your attack automatically
misses. If you roll a natural 20, you automatically hit if your attack bonus
is +0 or more (after subtracting penalties for range, concealment, and so
forth) and you score a critical hit if your attack roll equals or exceeds the
targets defense.

12

Hit: This describes the effect of a successful attack. If the target suffers
any effect in addition to damage dealt, it is listed here.

you attract on the battlefield. This class is most analogous to the Strong
Hero in d20 Modern.

WEAPON: Add the weapons damage dice to the damage dealt.


[Skill]: Add your skill modifier to the damage dealt. If SKILL is
listed, use whichever skill matches the weapon you wield. If any
abilities are listed in parentheses after the skill, add that ability
modifier to your skill modifier when determining damage.
+[Number] dice: If additional dice are specified, use your weapons
damage die type. For example, +1 die when wielding a rifle (2d8)
would add +1d8 to the damage dealt.
[Type] damage: This specifies the attacks damage type (see page
76). If no type is specified, the attack deals the normal damage type
for the weapon you wield.
[Penetrating/Devastating/Ongoing] [number]: The target suffers the
effect of the indicated type of dynamic damage (see page 77).
([Defense] save ends): The specified effect ends if the target makes
the indicated saving throw at the end of its turn. Some effects might
worsen if a save is failed, as noted in the talents description.
Hit by [number]: If your attack roll exceeds the targets defense by
the listed amount, the specified additional effect occurs.

Class Features
The following are features of the Vanguard class.

Hit Points

At 1st character level, Vanguards have (110 + Constitution modifier) hit


points. You gain (11 + Constitution modifier) hit points for each
additional level in Vanguard.

Starting Skills

At 1st character level, you are trained in your choice of six skills
(including at least two nonweapon skills) from your class, racial, and
occupation skill lists.
Class Skills: Athletics, Perception, and any three weapon skills.

Starting Feats

At 1st character level, you gain the following feats:


Automatic Feats: Great Fortitude, Improved Great Fortitude, Lightning
Reflexes
Class Feats: any one Vanguard class feat for which you meet the
prerequisite (see Feats, page 32)
Bonus Feats: Advanced Weapons, Armor Proficiency, Combat Reflexes,
Dodge

Miss: If the attack has any special effect on a miss, the description
notes it here.
1/2 damage: Roll damage as if you had hit and divide the result by 2
to determine how much damage you deal to the target. Unless
otherwise specified, the target is not subject to any other effect that
occurs on a hit.
Miss by [number]: The miss effect applies only if the targets defense
exceeds your attack roll by less than or equal to the listed number.

Talents
The following three talent trees show some sample talents available to
the Vanguard.

Check: Any talent that is not an attack is resolved as a task with a


normal skill check. Make the skill check using the listed skill and
modifiers (if any) and compare to the listed DC, opposed check, or
targets defense.
Success: If your skill check result equals or exceeds the target number,
the listed effect occurs. Some talents have additional that effects if you
beat the target number by some amount (Success by [number]), just as
with attacks.
Failure: If the skill check has some effect that occurs on a failure, the
description notes it here. Some failure effects apply only if the target
number exceeds your check result by less than or equal to the listed
number (Failure by [number]), just as with attacks.
Effect: If the talent has any effect that occurs regardless of the result
of your attack roll or skill check, the description notes it here.
Action Point: All major talents have an additional effect that you can
trigger by spending an action point prior to making your attack roll or
skill check. Unless otherwise specified, this effect stacks with the normal
effect of the talent.
Stunt: You can use any talent to perform a universal stunt
corresponding to its keywords. In addition, you can use a talent to
perform any other talent of the same type (core or major) from the same
talent tree so long as you meet its prerequisite. If you can perform any
other stunt with this talent, the description notes it here.
Special: If the talent has any other effect, restriction, or situational
modifier that does not fit into any of the above categories, the talents
description notes it here.

Assault Talent Tree

In the belief that there is no problem so great that it cant be solved with
sufficient firepower, you have become an expert with modern heavy
weapons such as machine guns, missile launchers, and artillery.
Prerequisite: trained in Gunnery or Advanced Weapons (Firearms)

Strafe

[Core]

Your experience with automatic weapons allows you more flexibility in


how you lay down your fire.
Action: Standard; autofire, weapon

Target: all characters in (1) adjacent area 4 or (2) area 3; Range: weapon
Attack: SKILL (Str) vs. Primary
Hit: WEAPON + SKILL damage
Miss by 5 or less: half damage

Rolling Barrage

[Major]

You lay down a heavy assault, hitting one target after another over a
wide area.
Action: Standard; barrage, weapon

Target: 1 character; Range: weapon


Attack: SKILL (Str) vs. Primary
Hit: WEAPON + SKILL (Str) damage, and repeat this attack at a
cumulative 2 penalty against a different character within 5 squares.
You cannot attack any target more than once.
Miss by 5 or less: half damage
Action Point: Instead take cumulative 1 penalty on each successive
attack.

Vanguard
If you want to be a front-line fighter who uses brute strength and your
intimidating presence to dominate opponents, the Vanguard class is a
good choice that has a great deal of hit points to absorb the punishment

13

Devastating Blast

[Major]

Cleaving Strike

Your focused attack overwhelms the target and inflicts massive damage.
Action: Standard; weapon

Target: 1 character; Range: weapon


Attack: SKILL (Str) vs. Primary and Fortitude
Hit vs. Primary: WEAPON + SKILL (Str + Dex) damage (devastating 5)
Hit vs. Fortitude: target is slowed until the end of its next turn
Hit by 5 or more vs. Fortitude: target is instead staggered (Fort save
ends)
Action Point: If damage exceeds targets threshold, it takes double the
normal fatigue or impairment penalty.

Target: 1 character; Range: reach


Attack: SKILL (Str) vs. Primary
Hit: WEAPON + SKILL (Str) damage, and make a secondary attack
against a different character in range.
Attack: SKILL (Str) 5 vs. Primary
Hit: WEAPON + SKILL damage

Combat Throw

Brute Talent Tree

Trigger: a creature misses you with a melee attack


Target: creature that missed you; Range: reach
Attack: Unarmed vs. Reflex
Hit: Target is knocked prone.
Hit by 5 or more: Force target into an unoccupied square within your
reach, dealing WEAPON + Unarmed (Str) damage

[Core]

You throw all of your weight into your savage attack, crushing your
target with a ferocious blow.

Requirement: You must move at least 1 square this turn prior to your
attack.
Action: Standard action; weapon, melee
Target: 1 character; Range: reach
Attack: SKILL (Str) vs. Primary
Hit: WEAPON + SKILL (Str + Con) damage

Furious Charge

Whirlwind Attack

[Major]

Your awareness of your surroundings allows you to strike all foes in


range with a flurry of blows.
Action: Standard action; weapon, melee

Target: all enemy characters; Range: reach


Attack: SKILL (Str) vs. Reflex of each target
Hit: WEAPON + SKILL (Str) damage
Miss by 5 or less: half damage
Action Point: Instead deal WEAPON + SKILL (Str + Dex) damage on hit.

[Major]

You charge your foe, landing a mighty blow that leaves your target
fatigued.

Requirement: You must be able to charge your target.


Action: Standard action; weapon, melee
Target: 1 character; Range: reach
Effect: You move adjacent to your target, subject to the same
requirements as the charge action. Your turn ends immediately after
your attack.
Attack: SKILL (Str) + 2 vs. Primary and Fortitude
Hit vs. Primary: WEAPON + SKILL (Str + Con) damage
Miss by 5 or less vs. Primary: half damage
Hit vs. Fortitude: Target takes 1 fatigue penalty
Action Point: On hit vs. Fortitude, target is also slowed (Fort save ends).

Knockout Blow

[Core]

You take advantage of a foes momentum to throw him to the ground


after a missed attack.
Action: Reaction; weapon, melee

By capitalizing on brute strength and furious rage, you crush your


enemies, see them driven before you, and hear the lamentations of their
spouses.
Prerequisite: trained in Melee or Unarmed

Melee Smash

[Core]

Your might allows you to build momentum as you smash through one
target so you can strike another.
Action: Standard action; weapon, melee

Dreadnought
If you want to be a tireless warrior who protects allies and pilots enemies
to his advantage in combat, the Dreadnought class is an excellent choice,
typically having the most hit points in a given group of characters and
continuing to fight after anyone else would have succumbed to enemy
attacks. This class is most analogous to the Tough Hero in d20 Modern.

Class Features

[Major]

The following are features of the Dreadnought class.

You strike a vulnerable point on a disadvantaged foe to knock out your


target.
Action: Standard action; weapon, melee

Hit Points

At 1st character level, Dreadnoughts have (120 + Constitution modifier)


hit points. You gain (12 + Constitution modifier) hit points for each
additional level in Dreadnought.

Target: 1 disadvantaged living creature; Range: reach


Attack: Unarmed (Str) vs. Primary and Fortitude
Hit vs. Primary: WEAPON + Unarmed (Str + Dex) nonlethal damage.
Hit vs. Primary and Fortitude: Target is dazed (Fort save ends).
Hit by 5 or more vs. Fortitude: Target is instead stunned (Fort save
ends). If the target fails its save, it becomes disabled.
Action Point: On hit vs. Primary, you deal double damage.

Starting Skills

At 1st character level, you are trained in your choice of five skills
(including at least two nonweapon skills) from your class, racial, and
occupation skill lists.
Class Skills: Athletics, Tactics, and any three weapon skills.

Tempest Talent Tree

Starting Feats

Like a gladiator, street fighter, or martial artist, you have become an


expert at fighting while surrounded by multiple foes.
Prerequisite: trained in Melee or Unarmed

At 1st character level, you gain the following feats.


Automatic Feats: Great Fortitude, Improved Great Fortitude, Iron Will
Class Feats: any one Dreadnought class feat for which you meet the
prerequisite (see Feats, page 32)
Bonus Feats: Advantageous Cover, Armor Proficiency, Dodge,
Toughness

14

Talents

Powerful Charge

The following three talent trees list some sample talents available to the
Dreadnought.

Requirement: You must be able to charge your target.


Action: Standard action; weapon, melee
Target: 1 character; Range: reach
Effect: You move adjacent to your target, subject to the same
requirements as the charge action. Your turn ends immediately after
your attack.
Attack: SKILL (Con) + 2 vs. Primary and Fortitude
Hit vs. Primary: WEAPON + SKILL (Con) damage
Hit vs. Fortitude: Target is forced 1 square away from you.
Hit by 5 or more vs. Fortitude: Target is disadvantaged until the end
of its next turn.

Bulwark Talent Tree

With your unshakable, unmovable might, you stand fast in the face of
overwhelming force and become the anvil on which your foes are
crushed.

Hold the Line

[Core]

Your relentless assault cuts off an enemys room to maneuver.

Requirement: You cannot move this turn.


Action: Standard action; weapon
Target: 1 creature; Range: weapon
Attack: SKILL (Con) vs. Primary
Hit: WEAPON + SKILL (Con) damage, and the target is slowed until the
start of your next turn.

Trap Enemy

Overwhelming Charge

[Major]

You plow through one target to reach another with your unstoppable
charge.

[Major]

Requirement: You must be able to charge your target.


Action: Standard action; weapon, melee
Target: 1 creature; Range: reach
Effect: Your speed is increased by 2 during this action. You move
adjacent to your target, subject to the same requirements as the
charge action. Your turn ends immediately after your attack.
Attack: SKILL (Con) + 2 vs. Primary and Fortitude
Hit vs. Primary: WEAPON + SKILL (Con) damage
Hit vs. Fortitude: Target is knocked prone, and you can continue your
movement through its space. If your movement brings you in contact
with another target, you can repeat this attack against that target.
You cannot move more than your speed during this action.
Hit by 5 or more vs. Fortitude: Target is dazed until the end of its
next turn.
Action Point: On hit vs. Primary, instead deal WEAPON + SKILL (Con)
damage.

You cut off your opponents every avenue of escape as you crush it under
a withering assault.
Action: Standard action; weapon

Target: 1 creature; Range: weapon


Attack: SKILL (Con) vs. Primary
Hit: WEAPON + SKILL (Str + Con) damage. If your target moves before
the start of your next turn, make a secondary attack as an
interruption.
Attack: SKILL (Con) vs. Primary
Hit: WEAPON + SKILL (Str + Con) damage, and your targets
movement ends immediately.
Action Point: On hit, target is slowed until the end of its next turn.

Shift Formation

[Core]

You mount a crushing charge, leaving your target out of position and
disadvantaged.

[Major]

Your attacks force your enemies to move to defend themselves, putting


them at a disadvantage.
Action: Standard action; weapon

Crushing Advance

[Major]

Your tireless onslaught drives your enemies before you.


Action: Standard action; weapon

Target: all enemy creatures in reach or area 2; Range: weapon


Attack: SKILL (Con) vs. Primary and Fortitude
Hit vs. Primary: WEAPON + SKILL damage
Hit vs. Fortitude: Target is forced a number of squares equal to your
Wisdom modifier (minimum 1) and slowed until the end of its next
turn.
Hit by 5 or more vs. Fortitude: Target is disadvantaged (save ends)
Action Point: On hit vs. Primary, instead deal WEAPON + SKILL (Con +
Int) damage

Target: 1 creature; Range: weapon


Attack: SKILL (Con) vs. Fortitude
Hit: WEAPON + SKILL damage, and you force the target 1 square away
from you. In addition, you can step 1 square and repeat this attack
(cumulative 2 penalty for each previous hit) against the same
target or another character adjacent to that target. Your total
movement cannot exceed your speed.
Action Point: Gain +2 bonus to all attacks you make with Crushing
Advance this turn.

Juggernaut Talent Tree

You capitalize on your size, mass, and momentum to plow through the
ranks of your enemies, pummeling them into submission and leaving
them in disarray.
Prerequisite: trained in Melee or Unarmed

Soldier Talent Tree

You dominate the battlefield, drawing fire away from your allies and
helping them to maneuver toward victory.

Draw Fire

[Core]

You dominate the attention of your enemies, forcing them to focus on


your rather than your allies.
Action: Swift action; weapon

Target: all enemy characters in area 2; Range: weapon


Attack: SKILL (Con) vs. Will of all targets in area
Hit: Until the start of your next turn, the target cannot make an attack
that doesnt include you as a target so long as you are not
unconscious and you are an eligible target.
Stunt: Suppress

15

Covering Attack

[Major]

Shadow Talent Tree

Your focused attacks create an opening that allows your allies to


reposition before the enemy can respond.
Action: Standard action; weapon

You thrive in the shadows, feeding on your enemies fear as you stalk
them and silently move in for the kill.
Prerequisite: Sneak Attack feat or trained in Stealth

Target: 1 character; Range: weapon


Attack: SKILL (Con) vs. Primary
Hit: WEAPON + SKILL (Con) damage, and one allied creature in sight of
both you and the target can step up to its speed as an immediate
free action.
Action Point: One additional allied creature can step up to its speed as an
immediate free action.
Stunt: Suppress

Sudden Assault

Fleeting Ghost

[Core]

You quickly move from shadow to shadow to remain out of sight.

Action: Move action


Target: all characters that gain line of sight as you move; Range: sight
Effect: You move up to your base speed through areas with concealment.
Check: Stealth (Dex) vs. passive sense (Wis)
Success: If you have concealment to the target throughout your
movement, you instead gain total concealment.

[Major]

Disappear

You make a quick move to take advantage of an enemy, forcing it to shift


its attention to you.
Action: Standard action; weapon

[Major]

You step back into the shadows, disappearing from view as you hide in
plain sight.
Requirement: You must have concealment.
Action: Swift action
Target: all characters with line of sight to you; Range: sight
Check: Stealth (Dex) vs. passive sense (Wis)
Success: You gain total concealment to target.
Action Point: Your sudden disappearance leaves your opponents
dumbfounded. Choose one target you hit; target is stunned until the
end of its turn.

Target: 1 character; Range: weapon


Effect: You move up to your speed, ending your movement in a position
where you can attack your target.
Attack: SKILL (Con) vs. Primary and Will
Hit vs. Primary: WEAPON + SKILL (Dex) damage
Hit vs. Will: Target is disadvantaged and slowed (Will save ends both).
Action Point: On hit vs. Will, target is instead stunned (Will save ends).
Stunt: Suppress

Unseen Strike

Corsair

[Major]

The sting of hot steel in your enemys flesh is the first hint of danger.

Requirement: You must have concealment.


Action: Standard action; weapon
Target: 1 creature; Range: weapon
Attack: Stealth (Dex) vs. Primary and opposed sense (Wis)
Hit vs. opposed sense (Wis): You gain total concealment to the target.
Hit vs. Primary: WEAPON + Stealth (Dex) damage
Massive Damage: Target is stunned (Fortitude save ends) and takes
additional 1 impairment penalty.
Action Point: If you deal massive damage, target is disabled instead of
stunned.

If you want to be a quick and agile combatant, the Corsair class is a good
choice that combines speed and sudden, unexpected strikes to eliminate
enemies quickly while avoiding their counterattacks. This class is most
analogous to the Fast Hero in d20 Modern.

Class Features
The following are features of the Corsair class.

Hit Points

Sharpshooter Talent Tree

At 1st character level, Corsairs have (90 + Constitution modifier) hit


points. You gain (9 + Constitution modifier) hit points for each additional
level in Corsair.

You have everything you need to be a deadly gunslinger or sniper: a keen


eye, a steady hand, a full load of ammunition, and a complete lack of
remorse.
Prerequisite: trained in at least one ranged weapon

Starting Skills

At 1st character level, you are trained in your choice of eight skills
(including at least four nonweapon skills) from your racial and
occupation skill lists.
Class Skills: Acrobatics, Deception, Stealth, Vehicles, and any two
weapon skills.

Deadeye

[Core]

Your steady hand and keen senses make you an exceptional sharpshooter.
Requirement: You must have aimed at your target this turn.
Action: Standard action; weapon, ranged
Target: 1 character; Range: weapon
Attack: SKILL (Dex) + 1 vs. Primary
Hit: WEAPON + SKILL (Dex + Wis) damage
Stunt: Disarm

Starting Feats

At 1st character level, you gain the following feats:


Automatic Feats: Great Fortitude, Improved Lightning Reflexes, and
Lightning Reflexes.
Class Feats: any one Corsair class feat for which you meet the
prerequisite (see Feats, page 32)
Bonus Feats: Dodge, Improved Initiative, Nimble, Sprint

Talents
The following three talent trees list some sample talents available to the
Corsair.

16

Hail of Fire

[Major]

Savant

Your furious hail of fire damages a group of opponents and leaves them
off balance, giving your allies the edge against them.

Requirement: Your weapon must have at least 10 shots remaining, which


are expended during your action.
Action: Standard action; weapon, barrage
Target: all enemy characters in area 3; Range: weapon
Attack: SKILL (Dex) vs. Primary and Reflex of each target
Hit vs. Primary: WEAPON + SKILL damage
Hit vs. Reflex: Target is disadvantaged until the start of your next turn.
Action Point: WEAPON + SKILL (Int) on hit vs. Primary, and target is
disadvantaged (Reflex save ends) on hit vs. Reflex.

If you want to be an embodiment of the maxim brains over brawn, the


Savant class is a good choice that uses superior planning, analysis, and
knowledge to outsmart opponents and find the most efficient path
toward overcoming any obstacle. This class is most analogous to the
Smart Hero in d20 Modern.

Quick Shot

Hit Points

Class Features
The following are features of the Savant class.

[Major]

With blinding speed, you squeeze a round into your target.


Action: Swift; weapon, ranged

At 1st character level, Savants have (70 + Constitution modifier) hit


points. You gain (7 + Constitution modifier) hit points for each additional
level in Savant.

Target: 1 character; Range: weapon


Attack: SKILL (Dex) vs. Primary
Hit: WEAPON + SKILL (Dex) damage
Action Point: Target is disadvantaged to you for this attack. If you deal
massive damage, target is stunned until the end of its next turn.

Starting Skills

At 1st character level, you are trained your choice of ten skills (including
at least six nonweapon skills) from your class, racial, and occupation skill
lists.
Class Skills: Computers, Focus, Knowledge, Mechanics, Analytics,
Tactics, and any one weapon skill.

Skirmisher Talent Tree

Like a swashbuckler or master duelist, you evade opponents attacks as


you make quick, nimble attacks that exploit holes in your targets
defenses.
Prerequisite: trained in Acrobatics

Clever Strike

Starting Feats

At 1st character level, you gain the following feats:


Automatic Feats: Improved Lightning Reflexes, Iron Will, and Lightning
Reflexes
Class Feats: any one Savant class feat for which you meet the
prerequisite (see Feats, page 32)
Bonus Feats: Dodge, Educated, Gearhead, Skill Mastery

[Core]

You make a quick, calculated attack that exploits your targets


weaknesses.
Action: Standard action; weapon, light
Target: 1 creature; Range: weapon
Attack: SKILL (Dex) vs. Primary
Hit: WEAPON + SKILL (Dex + Int) damage
Stunt: Trip

Nimble Strike

Talents
The following three talent trees list some sample talents available to the
Savant.

[Major]

Logic Talent Tree

Your knack for weaving through armor and defenses leaves your target
flat-footed after your unexpected strike.
Action: Standard action; weapon, light

Your method is as rigorous as it is emotionless: observe; evaluate;


hypothesize; test hypothesis; confirm hypothesis; exploit newly
discovered weakness with cold precision.
Prerequisite: trained in Analytics

Target: 1 creature; Range: weapon, within point blank


Attack: SKILL (Dex) vs. Reflex
Hit: WEAPON + SKILL (Dex + Int) damage, and target is slowed until
the start of your next turn.
Action Point: On hit, target is dazed (Reflex save ends) instead of slowed.

Defensive Roll

Find Weakness

[Core]

Your analytical mind critiques your targets defenses, systematically


testing by trial-and-error them until you find a weakness.
Action: Standard action; weapon

[Major]

Target: 1 character; Range: 5


Attack: Analytics (Int) vs. Fortitude
Hit: WEAPON + Analytics damage
Miss: Until you hit this target with an attack or the encounter ends,
you gain a cumulative +2 bonus to attacks against this target.

You roll with a potentially lethal attack to take less damage from it.

Action: Interruption
Trigger: You take damage from an attack that exceeds your current hit
points.
Check: Acrobatics (Dex) vs. damage dealt
Success: you take half damage
Fail: Defensive Roll is not expended for this encounter.
Action Point: On success, you take no damage from the attack.

17

Crucial Insight

[Major]

Outflank

You have a flash of insight, recognizing a crucial weakness in the target


that can trigger cascading debilitating effects.
Action: Standard action
Target: 1 character; Range: sight, 5
Attack: Analytics (Int) vs. Primary, Fortitude, Reflex, and Will
Hit vs. Primary: Target is disadvantaged (Reflex save ends).
Hit vs. Fortitude: Targets massive damage threshold is treated as if it
were 5 points lower (Fortitude save ends).
Hit vs. Reflex: Target is slowed (Reflex save ends).
Hit vs. Will: Target is dazed (Will save ends); this is a mind-affecting
effect.
Action Point: Target takes 2 penalty on all saving throws against the
effect of this talent.

Anticipate Action

Requirement: At least one ally in sight must have line of sight to the
target.
Action: Standard action; weapon
Target: 1 character; Range: sight, allys weapon
Effect: Your ally moves up to its speed as an immediate free action,
ending its movement in a space from which it can make a simple
melee or ranged attack against the target.
Attack: Tactics (Int) vs. Will
Hit: allys WEAPON + Tactics (Int) damage, and the target is
disadvantaged (Will save ends).
Action Point: One additional ally can move up to its speed as an
immediate free action, and you gain a +2 bonus to your attack.

[Major]

Your quick mind allows you to profile the target to anticipate and
preempt its next action.

Technophile Talent Tree

You push machines so far beyond their specified operating limits that
even experts can only watch in awe. You know better than to believe the
manuals written specifications, of course; you wrote them.
Prerequisite: trained in Computers or Mechanics

Action: Standard action


Target: 1 character; Range: sight, 5
Check: Analytics (Int) + 2 vs. Reflex
Success: You gain a +2 bonus to your Primary and Reflex Defenses
against the target until the start of your next turn. During the
targets next turn, you can perform any single action as an
interruption.
Failure: Anticipate Action is not expended for the encounter.
Action Point: You instead gain a +5 bonus to your Primary and Reflex
Defenses against the target until the start of your next turn.

Override

Action: Swift action


Target: 1 computer; Range: communication
Attack: Computers (Int) vs. Will
Hit: Target computer treats you as an administrator until the start of
your next turn.
Miss: You take a cumulative 2 penalty to any Computers checks
against the target computer for the rest of the encounter.
Miss by 5 or more: The computers administrator is notified of your
attempt.

You command the battlefield with absolute precision, executing gambits


and moving your pawnser, your alliesto outwit and outflank the
enemy. Checkmate.
Prerequisite: trained in Tactics

[Core]

Demolish

Your tactical savvy allows you to spot openings for your allies, allowing
them to make additional attacks during your turn.

[Major]

In a feat of applied engineering, you use an explosive device to its


maximum potential.

Requirement: At least one ally in sight must be able to make a simple


melee or ranged attack against the target.
Action: Standard action; weapon
Target: 1 character; Range: sight, allys weapon
Attack: Tactics (Int) vs. Primary
Hit: allys WEAPON + Tactics (Int) damage
Stunt: Suppress

Trick

[Core]

Your hacking expertise allows you to bypass a computers security


protocols temporarily.

Strategist Talent Tree

Exploit Opening

[Major]

You notice a gaping hole in a targets defenses, allowing your attack to


create a distraction necessary for your allies to reposition themselves
to take advantage of the lapse.

Requirement: You must be wielding an explosive weapon.


Action: Standard action; weapon, area
Target: all characters in [WEAPON + 1] area; Range: 5
Attack: Mechanics (Int) vs. Reflex and Fortitude
Hit vs. Reflex: WEAPON + Mechanics (Int) damage (penetrating 5)
Miss by 5 or less: half damage
Hit vs. Fortitude: Target is dazed (Fort save ends)
Action Point: On hit vs. Reflex, deal + 1 die of damage. On hit vs.
Fortitude, target is instead stunned (Fort save ends).

[Major]

You pull off a deceptive ploy that leaves your target befuddled and
confused.

Customized Modification

Requirement: Target must have line of sight to you.


Action: Standard action; mind-affecting
Target: 1 character; Range: 5, sight
Attack: Tactics (Int)* vs. Will
* If you are trained in Deception, you gain a +2 bonus to your attack.
Hit: Target is dazed (Will save ends). If the target fails its save, it
becomes stunned (Will save ends).

[Major]

You make a quick adjustment to your equipment to better suit the task
at hand.
Action: Standard action
Target: 1 character; Range: 5, sight
Effect: Designate a single held item that you wish to modify.
Check: Mechanics (Int) vs. Fortitude
Success: Until the end of the encounter, you can reroll skill checks
made against the target so long as you use the designated item to
make that check.
Action Point: Instead affect 2 targets in range.

18

Sentinel

Second Chance

[Major]

You provide emergency lifesaving techniques to give your ally a second


chance to overcome debilitating conditions.
Action: Swift action; healing

If you want to be your allies consummate defender and protector, the


Sentinel is the idea class because it specializes both in helping allies to
continue fighting in the face of an enemys onslaught and in leading
them to greater heroics though your fearless example. This class is most
analogous to the Dedicated Hero in d20 Modern.

Target: 1 living creature; Range: reach


Check: Medicine (Wis) vs. DC 15
Success: Target can make an immediate saving throw against each
condition currently affecting it, and it suffers no ill effect on a failed
save.
Success by 5 or more: Target can recover as an immediate free
action.
Action Point: Target heals 1 per point by which your check result exceeds
the DC. On success, target gains +2 bonus to its immediate saving
throws.

Class Features
The following are features of the Sentinel class.

Hit Points

At 1st character level, Sentinels have (100 + Constitution modifier) hit


points. You gain (10 + Constitution modifier) hit points for each
additional level in Sentinel.

Exploit Anatomy

[Major]

Learning how to mend bodies has also taught you a few tricks about
breaking them.

Starting Skills

At 1st character level, you are trained in your choice of seven skills
(including at least four nonweapon skills) from your class, racial, and
occupation skill lists.
Class Skills: Focus, Intuition, Medicine, Perception, and any two
weapon skills.

Action: Standard
Target: 1 living creature; Range: reach
Attack: Medicine (Wis) vs. Fortitude
Hit: Target is stunned (Fortitude save ends). For every 5 points by
which your attack roll exceeds the targets Fortitude, the target takes
a 1 fatigue penalty (or 1 impairment penalty if the target has no
reserves remaining).
Action Point: On failed save, target becomes disabled.

Starting Feats

At 1st character level, you gain the following feats:


Automatic Feats: Great Fortitude, Improved Iron Will, Iron Will
Class Feats: any one Sentinel class feat for which you meet the
prerequisite (see Feats, page 32)
Bonus Feats: Alertness, Armor Proficiency, Dodge, Surgical Expert

Investigator Talent Tree

Todays to-do list: (1) Evaluate crime scene; (2) Profile perpetrator; (3)
Track fugitive; (4) Interrogate suspect; (5) Eat breakfast.
Prerequisite: trained in Intuition

Talents

Profile Target

The following three talent trees list some sample talents available to the
Sentinel.

[Core]

You learn to read your opponents body language, tailoring your attacks
to exploit his tells.
Action: Standard action; weapon

Healer Talent Tree

First, do no harm. Second, the first rule doesnt define what harm
means. Third, a little creativity and unorthodox medicine never hurt
anyone. Fourth, let me tell you about pressure points
Prerequisite: trained in Medicine

Target: 1 creature; Range: weapon, 5


Attack: Intuition (Wis) vs. Primary and Will
Hit vs. Primary: WEAPON + Intuition (Wis) damage
Hit vs. Will: You gain a +2 bonus to your next attack against this
target during this encounter.

Render Aid

Empathy

[Core]

Your medical expertise brings critical aid to your allies.


Action: Standard action; healing

[Major]

Your intuitive grasp of emotion and deception allows you to better


understand others.
Action: Standard action; mind-affecting

Target: 1 living creature; Range: reach


Check: Medicine (Wis) vs. DC 15
Success: Target heals 1 per point by which your check result exceeds
the DC, and target can recover as an immediate free action.
Special: This counts as assisted recovery (page 61). You take a cumulative
5 penalty to your check for each successful assisted recovery
performed on your target by any character in the same encounter.

Target: 1 living creature; Range: 5, sight


Attack: Intuition (Wis) vs. Will
Hit: For the rest of the encounter, you can reroll any Deception,
Influence, Intuition, or Perception check you make against the target.
Action Point: On a success, you can reroll and keep the better result with
any of the listed skill checks against the target.

Takedown

[Major]

Finding fugitives is one thing, but actually catching them is something


else.
Action: Standard action; weapon, melee

Target: 1 creature; Range: reach


Attack: Unarmed (Wis) vs. greater of Fortitude or Reflex
Hit: Target is knocked prone, staggered (Fortitude save ends), and
grappled until the end of your next turn.
Action Point: On hit, target is stunned (Fortitude save ends) instead of
staggered.
Stunt: Pin

19

Class Skills: Deception, Focus, Influence, Intuition, Linguistics,


Perception, and any one weapon skill.

Protector Talent Tree

Vigilant, loyal, swift, and fearless, you exemplify everything that a


guardian strives to become: the last, best line of defense.
Prerequisite: trained in Perception

Shielding Maneuver

Starting Feats

At 1st character level, you gain the following feats:


Automatic Feats: Improved Iron Will, Iron Will, Lightning Reflexes
Class Feats: any one Envoy class feat for which you meet the
prerequisite (see Feats, page 32)
Bonus Feats: Confident, Dodge, Trickster, Trustworthy

[Core]

You anticipate danger and make preemptive moves to avoid it.


Action: Standard action; weapon

Target: 1 character; Range: weapon


Attack: Perception (Wis) vs. Primary
Hit: WEAPON + Perception (Wis) damage, and designate either yourself
or an ally in sight within 5 squares. Until the start of your next turn,
the designated character gains a bonus to its Primary or Reflex
Defense (your choice) equal to your Dexterity modifier (minimum
+1).

Resolute Defense

Talents
The following three talent trees list some sample talents available to the
Envoy.

Charm Talent Tree

Your charismacaptivating, compelling, enthralling, irresistible, perhaps


even hypnoticis truly a thing of beauty, a wonder to behold, and a
memory to cherish; best of all, other people think so, too.
Prerequisite: trained in Deception or Influence

[Major]

Your tireless counterattacks give your allies a moment of reprieve.


Action: Standard action; weapon, healing

Target: 1 character; Range: 5


Attack: SKILL (Wis) vs. Primary
Hit: WEAPON + SKILL (Con) damage, and designate a number of allies
equal to your Wisdom modifier and within 5 squares of you.
Designated allies can recover as an immediate free action.
Action Point: If a designated ally is attacked before the start of your next
turn, you can make a simple melee attack or simple ranged attack
against the attacker as an interruption.

Unending Vigilance

Fast Talk

[Core]

Your glib words leave your target dumbfounded and unprepared for a
sudden attack.
Action: Standard; mind-affecting

Target: 1 creature; Range: weapon, communication


Effect: You take a cumulative 2 penalty to your attack roll for each
previous use of this talent during the same encounter.
Attack: Deception (Cha) + 2 vs. Will
Hit: WEAPON + Deception (Cha) damage
Hit by 5 or more: Target is dazed until the start of your next turn.
Action Point: You take a cumulative 2 penalty to your attack roll for
each previous use of this talent during the same encounter.
Stunt: Riposte

[Major]

Your instincts allow you to react when others havent even detected a
threat.

Trigger: You become disadvantaged.


Action: Interruption
Check: Perception (Wis) vs. DC 15
Success: You are no longer disadvantaged.
Success by 5 or more: You can perform one swift action as an
immediate free action.
Success by 10 or more: Instead perform move action.
Success by 15 or more: Instead perform standard action.
Action Point: On a success, select a number of creatures in sight equal to
your Wisdom modifier (minimum 1). These targets are disadvantaged
to you until the end of your next turn.

Dazzle

[Major]

Whether by spinning a captivating tale or performing to entertain, you


capture your targets focus.
Action: Standard action; mind-affecting

Target: [Charisma mod., min. 1] creatures; Range: communication


Attack: Influence (Cha) vs. Will*
* Target gains +2 Will if unfriendly or +5 Will if hostile.
Hit: Target is stunned and takes a 5 penalty to Perception checks until
the start of your next turn.
Maintain: Standard action
Miss: Target cannot be affected by your Dazzle for the rest of the
encounter.
Action Point: Double the number of targets affected.
Special: If a target is attacked by any other character while affected by
Dazzle, its effect ends and the target cannot be affected by your
Dazzle for the rest of the encounter.

Envoy
If you want to be a brilliant negotiator, leader, and facilitator, the Envoy
is an ideal choice, manipulating opponents with savvy and deceptive
ploys and rallying allies with inspirational words and deeds. This class is
most analogous to the Charismatic Hero in d20 Modern.

Class Features

Irresistible Charm

[Major]

Your powers of persuasion can talk someone into almost anything.


Action: Standard action; mind-affecting

The following are features of the Envoy class.

Target: 1 creature; Range: communication


Attack: Influence (Cha) vs. Will*
* Target gains +2 Will if unfriendly or +5 Will if hostile.
Hit: Target performs an action of your choice on its next turn. The
action cannot be obviously harmful to the target or its allies.
Maintain: Standard action
Miss: Target cannot be affected by your Irresistible Charm for the rest
of the encounter.
Action Point: Every time you hit for the duration of the encounter, the
targets attitude toward you improves by one step.

Hit Points

At 1st character level, Envoys have (80 + Constitution modifier) hit


points. You gain (8 + Constitution modifier) hit points for each additional
level in Envoy.

Starting Skills

At 1st character level, you are trained in your choice of nine skills
(including at least six nonweapon skills) from your class, racial, and
occupation skill lists.

20

A Seed of Doubt

Leadership Talent Tree

Strategy might tell an army where to fight, and tactics might tell a
regiment how to fight, but it all comes down to a soldier walking point
and leadership is telling him why he fights.
Prerequisite: trained in Influence or Tactics

Lead by Example

Target: 1 living creature; Range: 2, communication


Attack: Deception (Cha) vs. Will
Hit: Target takes a 2 penalty to all skill checks (Will save ends).
Miss: Target takes a 1 penalty to all skill checks until the start of your
next turn.
Action Point: On hit, target instead takes a 5 penalty to all skill checks
(Will save ends).

[Core]

Your courageous attack inspires an ally to follow suit and make an


advantageous strike against the same target.
Action: Standard action; weapon

Target: 1 character; Range: weapon


Attack: Tactics (Cha) vs. Primary
Hit: WEAPON + Tactics (Cha) damage, and one ally in sight gains +2
morale bonus to its first attack against that target before the start
of your next turn.

Rally

Break Their Spirit

[Major]

Target: 1 living creature; Range: 2, communication


Attack: Influence (Cha) vs. Will
Hit: 2d8 + Influence (Cha) nonlethal damage. If target attacks or ends
its turn adjacent to you or your allies, it takes Influence (Cha)
nonlethal damage (Will save ends).
Action Point: Target fails save: Target is dazed until the end of its next
turn.

Target: 1 allied creature; Range: communication


Check: Influence (Cha) vs. DC 15
Effect: The target heals 1d6 plus 1 for every point by which your check
result exceeds the DC. The target can recover as an immediate free
action.
Action Point: Double healing to target.

Multiclassing

[Major]

In the e20 System, you can multiclass with few restrictions. Because
each talent tree has higher-level talents that are exclusively available to
characters who have specialized in a given class, the advantage of
multiclassing is gaining diversity by learning different types of talents,
but the disadvantage is that you learn fewer talents from any particular
talent tree.

You shout a quick command as you make an attack to give your allies
room to maneuver.
Action: Standard action; weapon

Target: 1 character; Range: weapon


Effect: Move up to your speed, either before or after your attack.
Attack: Tactics (Cha) vs. Primary
Hit: WEAPON + Tactics (Cha) damage. Two allies in sight can
immediately move up to their speed as a free action. This movement
is a mind-affecting effect.
Miss: Inspire Haste is not expended.
Action Point: On hit, target is dazed (Will save ends).

Advanced Talents
The e20 System does not include advanced classes or prestige classes
that provide greater specialization in a particular role. Instead, it features
advanced talent trees that are available only after meeting certain
prerequisites. Advanced talent trees are not necessarily exclusive to any
class, but characters with levels in a particular class might find it easier
to learn these talents.

Negotiator Talent Tree

Whether its a tense round of negotiations or a hostage standoff, you


remain in control in a volatile situation. Your calm and confidence
gradually manipulate your opponent into making mistakes, so all you
have to do is wait for your opening.
Prerequisite: trained in Influence

Add Insult to Injury

[Major]

With a look that chills your enemy to the bone, you let them know its
not a good idea to mess with you or your friends.
Action: Standard; mind-affecting

When things look their darkest, you bring your allies back from the edge
of defeat.
Action: Swift action; healing, mind-affecting

Inspire Haste

[Major]

Your ability to read people allows you to exploit their insecurities and
throw them off balance.
Action: Standard; mind-affecting

[Core]

With a witty jibe as your attack makes contact, you send your target into
a fit of rage.
Action: Standard; weapon, mind-affecting

Target: 1 living creature; Range: weapon, communication


Attack: Influence (Cha) vs. Primary and Will
Hit vs. Primary: WEAPON + Influence (Cha) damage
Hit vs. Will: The target gains a +1 bonus to its first attack against you
before the start of your next turn. If you are an eligible target and
the target does not attack you on its next turn, it takes 1d8 + your
Charisma modifier nonlethal damage.

21

4: Skills
Skills in the e20 System are substantially different from those found in
earlier d20-based games.

(Dex or Str), Jump (Str), and Swim (Con or Str), each of which apply to a
particular type of specialized movement.
A skills listed applications provide guidelines on how you might use a
skill. You can use a given application to perform any number of different
actions, and the applications description often includes particularly
common tasks and challenges that frequently occur in play.

All skills can be used untrained, but skills have some trained-only
applications.
All skills automatically improve as you gain levels.
If you are trained in a skill, you have a +2 training bonus to your skill
modifier. You start with several trained skills at 1st level (chosen
from your class, race, and occupation skill lists), and you can take
the Skill Training (SKILL) feat to become trained in any new skill
(even those not on your skill lists).
If you take the Skill Focus (SKILL) feat, your training bonus increases
to +3 (+4 at 9th level, +5 at 17th level).
Skills are not associated with a single ability score. Instead, the
specific application of the skill determines which ability score
modifier to add to the skill check.

Improvised Applications

Often, you want to perform an action not explicitly described by any


existing skill application. In this case, the Gamemaster can take
advantage of the flexibility of the e20 Systems skill system, improvising
a new skill application by pairing a skill with one or more ability scores.
For example, what if you want to participate in an organized sport
such as American football? The Athletics skill is clearly the most closely
related, but most sports other than swimming or track and field events
wouldnt fall under a single application. To cover this situation, the
Gamemaster can create an improvised application that fits the situation
in question. A teams coach might make an Athletics (Int) check to call
plays, and a defensive back might make an Athletics (Wis) check to
anticipate or read that play. An offensive lineman might make an
Athletics (Con) check to control the line of scrimmage and prevent
defenders from reaching the backfield, and a running back might make
an Athletics (Str) check to force his way past defenders on a draw play. A
quarterback might make an Athletics (Cha) check to fake a handoff on an
option play, and a receiver might make an Athletics (Dex) check to catch
a forward pass.
When using an improvised skill application, use the following
guidelines to determine which ability score to apply to the skill check:

Skill Basics
Your skills represent a variety of related abilities, and you get better at
them as you go up in level. A skill check takes into account your training
(skill modifier), natural aptitude (ability modifier), and luck (the die roll).
It can also take into account your knack for a particular skill as
represented by a feat or racial trait, the advantages provided by learning
an enhancement related to that skill, the technological edge you gain by
using a high-quality piece of equipment, the disadvantages inherent in
wearing bulky or unfamiliar armor, and any number of situational
modifiers that reflect the circumstances in which you make your skill
check.

Strength: Application of physical force, such as breaking or moving


objects. Example: Computers (Str) might be used to physically break
the internal components of a computer system.
Constitution: Persistence during long tasks and the resistance of
physical force. Example: Mechanics (Con) might be used when taking
extra time to ensure that youve thoroughly inspected a vehicle prior
to a combat mission.
Dexterity: Avoiding obstacles, quick reactions, and accurately
performing complex tasks in limited time. Example: Knowledge (Dex)
might be used when trying when performing very rushed research in
a crowded library.
Intelligence: Planning, coordination, and design of complex systems.
Example: Acrobatics (Int) might be used plan and execute a
sequence of acrobatic maneuvers to slip through a security laser
grid.
Wisdom: Evaluation, awareness, and anticipation. Example: Vehicles
(Wis) might be used to estimate the difficulty of a particular
aerobatic maneuver before you attempt to perform it.
Charisma: Teaching, obfuscation, and suggestion. Example: Nature
(Cha) might be used to coach your allies on how to prepare for a
long overland journey.

Trained vs. Untrained Skills


The major difference between a trained skill and an untrained skill is that
you gain a +2 training bonus to skill checks if youre trained in the skill.
However, some skill applications cant be used untrained.

Starting Skills

When you make your character, you select a number of skills as trained
skills. You receive a number of trained skills based on your character
class at 1st level, and you select these trained skills from your
occupation, race, and class skill lists.

Skill Training

You can acquire new trained skills at any time by taking the Skill Training
feat, learning skills even if they arent listed in your occupation, race, or
class skill lists.

Skill Focus

In addition to Skill Training, you can take the Skill Focus feat for a
particular trained skill to gain an even higher training bonus to your skill
checks. Your training bonus improves to +3 at 1st level, +4 at 9th level,
and +5 at 17th level.

Specialties
Some skills have distinct specialties that represent a particular area of
expertise. For example, weapon skills have a separate specialty for each
associated weapon group, so someone proficient with swords might not
be equally skilled with fencing weapons or hafted weapons.
If you do not know the specialty for a particular task or challenge, you
are treated as if you are not trained in the skill: Your skill bonus is +0,

Applications
A skill application is a particular area of expertise that is associated with
one or more ability scores. For example, the Athletics skill covers all
manner of athletic activity, and it includes applications such as Climb

22

you cannot attempt trained-only applications, you are subject to


mishaps, and so forth. Fortunately, you automatically learn specialties
when you learn skills, and you can learn more during play.

Nature when riding a mount (trained only)


Vehicles when operating a vehicle (trained only)

Power

Learning Specialties

To use an extraordinary or supernatural power of any kind (see Powers,


page 39), use the following skills to make a power check:

You have several different ways to learn specialties both at 1st level and
through play.
At 1st Level: For any trained skill that has specialties (such as
Knowledge), select one specialization that you know. Select an additional
specialty if you have Skill Focus for the skill. In addition, you can select a
number of additional specialties equal to your Intelligence modifier (if
positive). Among other things, you can use these specialties to learn
additional languages (specializations of the Linguistics skill).
Intelligence Modifier: If your Intelligence modifier increases during
play, you can select an additional specialty. You gain another specialty
for every time you have taken the Specialized Experience feat (see
below).
Skill Training: If you take the Skill Training feat to learn a new skill,
select one specialty from that skill (if any).
Skill Focus: If you take the Skill Focus feat, select one additional
specialty for that skill (if any).
Specialized Experience: If you take the Specialized Experience feat, you
gain a number of new specialties equal to your Intelligence modifier
(minimum 1).
Practice: You can learn new specialties through dedicated practice and
training. Training is a challenge: Check SKILL (Wis) DC 15 (trained skill) or
DC 20 (focused skill); Complexity DC 2; Base Time 1 week; Completed
you learn the specialty; Terminated you dont learn the specialty and
must start from scratch.
If you have a teacher to assist you, he can make a SKILL (Cha) check to
participate in the challenge. The teacher must be trained in the skill and
know the specialty in question, and a maximum of one teacher can assist
you during the challenge.

Restoration

To treat injuries, perform surgery, jury-rig, or conduct repairs (see


Restoration, page 61), use the following skills to make a restoration
check:
Medicine for any living creature
Mechanics for any object or nonliving creature
Nature for ordinary animals and plants (trained only)
Computers for computer systems and other electronic devices
(trained only)
Any weapon skill for a weapon from that group (trained only)

Sense

To perceive your environment, detect opponents, or resist attempts to


deceive or misdirect, use the following skills to make a sense check:
Perception to perceive your physical environment
Intuition to detect lies, feints, and other forms of misdirection
Tactics to resist misdirection or feints made by a commander
directing a group of characters (trained only)
Computers to operate sensor systems such as radar or sonar to
perceive your physical environment (trained only)

Metaskills

Skill Checks

Metaskills represent broad groups of skills used for a similar purpose. In


the rules text, metaskills can stand in for the skills they represent.
For example, when you attempt to perform a maneuver during your
movement (page 68), you would make a control check using a skill
determined by how you move: Athletics when on foot, Nature when
riding a mount, Vehicles when piloting a vehicle, and so forth. Thus, if
rules refer to a control (Dex) check and youre riding a horse, you would
make a Nature (Dex) check.
Several metaskills and the most commonly used skills associated with
them are outlined below. Other skills might be used in specific
circumstances.

When you use a skill, you make a skill check to see how well you do. The
higher the result of the skill check, the better you do. Based on the
circumstances, your result must equal or exceed a particular target
numberone or more of a targets defenses, a static Difficulty Class (DC),
or the result of an opposed skill checkfor the check to be successful.
The harder the task, the higher the number you need to roll.
Circumstances can affect your check. When free to work without
distractions, you can make a careful attempt and avoid simple mistakes.
If you have lots of time you can try over and over again, thereby assuring
the best outcome. If others help, you might succeed where otherwise you
would fail.
The amount of time necessary to make a skill check is specified in its
description. A skill check might require a single action (standard, move,
swift, reaction, interruption, or free) or it might take several rounds,
minutes, hours, days, or even weeks to accomplish.

Control

To perform maneuvers during your movement (page 68) or to avoid


falling, slipping, or otherwise losing control (page 70), use the following
skills to make a control check:

Focus for most extraordinary or supernatural powers


Knowledge (arcana) for arcane magic (trained only)
Knowledge (religion) for divine magic (trained only)
Nature for primal magic (trained only)

Athletics for a creature


Acrobatics for a creature (trained only)
Nature for a driver riding a mount
Vehicles for a driver operating a vehicle

Types of Skill Checks


Every skill check is either a task or a challenge. In addition, any task or
challenge can also be an attack. The different types of skill checks are
described below.

Initiative

To determine the order in which characters take their actions (see


Combat Sequence, page 63), use the following skills to make an initiative
check:

Tasks

Tasks cover simple actions that you can complete in a single skill check,
such as jumping over an obstacle or making a simple melee attack.
You resolve a task with a single skill check. If your skill check result
equals or exceeds the target number, you succeed. Otherwise, you fail.

Intuition for most situations


Tactics for most situations (trained only)

23

Skill (Ability + Ability): If two abilities abbreviations are listed in


parentheses and joined by a plus sign, add both ability modifiers to
your skill check. Example: Firearms (Dex + Wis) check.
Skill: If no ability abbreviation is listed in parentheses, you dont add
any ability modifier to your skill check. Example: Analytics check.

Some tasks have an additional effect if you succeed or fail by a particular


margin. (See Making a Skill Check, below.)

Challenges

Challenges represent a set of related skill checks. They cover complex


actions that might take several distinct steps to complete, such as
navigating through the trackless wilderness or building a device. Some
challenges allow (or require) more than one character to participate. You
complete a challenge by accumulating progress equal to the complexity
of the challenge.
You resolve a challenge with multiple attempts, each of which is
resolved like any other skill check. A later section outlined the complete
rules for challenges (see Challenges, page 26).

Ability Checks: Sometimes you want to do something where no specific


skill really applies. In these cases, you make an ability check. An ability
check is a roll of 1d20 plus the appropriate ability modifier. For example,
you might make a Strength check to force a stuck or blocked door.
In some cases, an action is a straight test of ones ability with no luck
involved. Just as you wouldnt make a height check to see who is taller,
you dont make a Strength check to see who is stronger.
Miscellaneous Modifiers: Different situations can affect your skill
check for better or worse. For example, attacking a disadvantaged target
grants you a +2 bonus to your attack roll, and attacking a target beyond
point blank range imposes a range penalty to your attack roll. In addition,
some skill checks include a built-in modifier to reflect its advantages or
disadvantages relative to a typical skill check.
In situations where no specific modifier is listed, the Gamemaster can
adjust the miscellaneous modifier in one of the following two ways to
account for exceptional circumstances.

Attacks

Attacks directly harm or impair a target, either by dealing damage or by


imposing conditions or other penalties. A skill check made to perform an
attack is called an attack roll.
Because attacks represent actions that take place in the chaotic
environment of combat, they are subject to some special rules. For
example, so long as your skill modifier is at least +0, you automatically
hit on a natural 20, and you score a critical hit if your attack roll is
greater than or equal to the targets defense. At the other extreme, you
automatically miss on a natural 1. A later chapter outlines the complete
rules for attacks (see Combat, page 58).

Give a +2 circumstance bonus to represent conditions that improve


performance, such as having the perfect tool for the job, getting help
from another character (see Cooperative Skill Checks, page 26), or
possessing unusually accurate information.
Give a 2 penalty to represent conditions that hamper performance,
such as being forced to use improvised tools or having misleading
information.

Making a Skill Check


To make a skill check, roll 1d20 and add your skill modifier and any
specified ability modifiers to the total, then compare that check result to
the target number to determine success:

Larger or smaller adjustments are possible, but these should be reserved


for exceptional circumstances. In most cases, the Gamemaster should
apply modifiers using the standard progression (1, 2, 5, 10, 20, and so
forth).

Skill check = 1d20 + skill modifier + ability modifier + misc. modifiers


The individual components of a skill check are outlined below.
Skill Modifier: Your skill modifier represents your level of experience,
your degree of training in the skill, and any enhancements you are using
to augment your skill.

Target Number
The target number for a skill check can be determined in one of three
ways. It can be compared to a Difficulty Class (DC), a measure of how
hard a skill check is (either relative to your level or in absolute terms); it
can be compared to one or more of a targets defenses (Primary,
Fortitude, Reflex, or Will); or, it can be compared to an opposed skill
check made by the target.

Skill modifier = 1/2 level + training bonus + enhancement bonus


The individual components of your skill modifier are outlined below.
1/2 Level: Add 1/2 your character level (rounded down) to your skill
modifier. This represents your overall experience as opposed to any
specific training, techniques, or equipment that might affect your skill
modifier.
Training Bonus: If you are trained in the skill (either by selecting it as a
trained skill at 1st level or by taking the Skill Training feat), add a +2
training bonus to your skill modifier. If you also have the Skill Focus feat
for the skill, your training bonus increases to +3 at 1st level, +4 at 9th
level, and +5 at 17th level.
Enhancement Bonus: If you have an active enhancement that applies
to the skill, add the enhancement bonus (+1 to +5, depending on quality)
to your skill modifier. Enhancements represent either learned advantages
(such as techniques, stances, or disciplines) or specialized equipment
(such as a high-quality weapon or an optimized computer system) that
provide you with an edge when using the skill.
Ability Modifier: Most skill checks account for natural aptitude by
adding one or more ability modifiers to your skill check. When this
applies, the ability is indicated with the skill check in parentheses.

Difficulty Class (DC)

Some skill checks are made against a Difficulty Class (DC). The DC is a
number (set using the skill rules as a guideline) that your skill check must
equal or exceed for your skill check to be successful.
Absolute DCs: Often, you want to measure the difficulty of a skill check
in absolute terms. What kind of character could be expected to make a
given skill check, and under what circumstances? The Gamemaster can
use Table 41: Difficulty Class Examples as a guideline, picking one that
best matches the task at hand.
As a comparison, consider that an average, untrained 1st-level
character will have a skill modifier of +0. Such a character will usually
succeed at a very easy task even under stress, an easy task if not under
pressure, and even a moderate or difficult task if given enough time to
try the task repeatedly (see Checks without Rolls, page 26).
Relative DCs: Sometimes, the Gamemaster needs to pick a DC that is
appropriate for the heroes level rather than by comparing it to the world
as a whole. In these cases, the Gamemaster can use a relative DC for the
skill check. (Relative DCs are particularly useful for constructing
challenges; see page 26.)

Skill (Ability): If a single abilitys abbreviation is listed in parentheses,


add that ability modifier to your skill check. Example: Athletics (Str)
check.
Skill (Ability/Ability): If two abilities abbreviations are listed in
parentheses and joined by a slash, add the better of the two ability
modifiers to your skill check. Example: Unarmed (Dex/Str) check.

24

Table 41: Difficulty Class Examples


Difficulty (DC)
Trivial (0)
Very easy (5)
Easy (10)
Moderate (15)
Difficult (20)
Very difficult (25)
Heroic (30)
Nearly impossible (40)

Example
Notice something large in plain sight
Climb a knotted rope
Hear an approaching guard
Rig a vehicles wheel to fall off
Swim in stormy water
Open an average lock
Leap across a 30-foot chasm
Track a squad across hard ground after 24 hours of rainfall

Skill (Ability)
Perception (Wis)
Athletics (Str)
Perception (Wis)
Mechanics (Int)
Athletics (Dex)
Mechanics (Dex)
Athletics (Str)
Nature (Wis)

Table 42: Sample Opposed Checks


Opposed Check
Con someone
Pretend to be someone else
Negotiate for goods or services
Create a false map
Hide from someone
Pick someones pocket
Tie a prisoner securely

Skill (Ability)
Deception (Cha)
Deception (Cha)
Influence (Cha)
Deception (Int)
Stealth (Dex)
Deception (Dex)
Athletics (Dex)

Opposing Skill (Ability)


Intuition (Wis)
Perception (Wis)
Influence (Cha)
Intuition (Int)
Perception (Wis)
Perception (Wis)
Acrobatics (Dex)

Simple (DC = 9 + 1/2 level): Simple DCs are best for skill checks that
any hero should be able to pass multiple times. Experts in a given skill
will pass these checks easily.
Moderate (DC = 11 + 3/4 level): Moderate DCs are best for skill checks
that an expert should be able to pass multiple times. Any hero has a good
chance to pass the check most of the time, but repeated checks will be
formidable.
Hard (DC = 13 + level): Hard DCs are best for skill checks that an
expert should be able to pass most of the time, but repeated checks will
be formidable.
Very Hard (DC = 15 + level): Very hard DCs are challenging even for an
expert, with success and failure almost equally likely. Repeated checks
require significant help or very good luck to avoid failing at least once.
Adjusting DCs: Some situations may make a task easier or harder to
accomplish, resulting in a change to the DC of the skill check. In
situations where no specific modifier is listed, the Gamemaster can
adjust the DC in one of the following two ways to account for
exceptional circumstances.

If your skill check equals or exceeds the targets defense, you succeed;
otherwise, you fail.
If a skill check is made against more than one of a targets defenses,
make a single skill check and compare the result to both defenses. In
most cases, different effects occur depending on which defense your
check result beats, if any.

Opposed Checks

An opposed check is one whose success or failure is determined by


comparing your check result to another characters check result. In an
opposed check, the higher result succeeds, while the lower result fails. In
case of a tie, the higher skill modifier wins. If these scores are the same,
roll again to break the tie.
Passive Opposed Checks: When a skill check affects multiple targets,
use a passive opposed check instead of actually rolling each targets
individual check. A passive opposed check is equal to the following:
10 + skill modifier + ability modifier + miscellaneous modifiers
A passive opposed check provides the same result as taking 10 (page 26);
unlike taking 10, you can perform them under stress, and you never
initiate a passive opposed check (that is, they always occur as a result of
being the target of anothers action).

Reduce the DC by 2 to represent circumstances that make the task


easier, such as having a friendly audience or doing work that can be
subpar.
Increase the DC by 2 to represent circumstances that make the task
harder, such as having an uncooperative audience or doing work that
must be flawless.

Success or Failure
As described above, if your skill check result equals or exceeds the target
number, you succeed; otherwise, you fail. In addition, some skills allow
for varying degrees of success or failure. For example, if you fail a
Mechanics (Int) check to disarm a bomb by 5 or more, the device
detonates prematurely. If a given skill application or task has varying
degrees of success or failure, it is included in its description in the e20
System Core Rulebook.

Larger or smaller adjustments are possible, but these should be reserved


for exceptional circumstances. In most cases, the Gamemaster should
apply modifiers using the standard progression (1, 2, 5, 10, 20, and so
forth).
As a rule of thumb, conditions that affect your ability to perform the
skill apply a miscellaneous modifier to your skill check, and conditions
that modify how well you have to perform the skill to succeed change
the DC. Both have the same resultthey create a better or worse chance
of successbut they represent different circumstances, and sometimes
that difference is important.

Mishaps

An untrained character can attempt most skill checks, but at times such
an attempt can be risky. If you are untrained in a skill and you roll a
natural 1 on your skill check (that is, the d20 comes up with 1 on its
face), you suffer some sort of mishap.
The details of a mishap are left to the discretion of the Gamemaster.
For attacks, you might drop your weapon, your weapon might jam and
require a quick repair, or you might hit an unintended target with your
attack. For social skills, you might grievously offend another character
(possibly provoking a fight), or your subject might intentionally mislead

Targets Defense

Most attacks are made against one or more of the targets defenses
(Primary, Fortitude, Reflex, and Will). In addition, some other skill checks
are made against a targets defense, such as an Influence (Cha) check
made against a targets Will to improve the targets attitude toward you.

25

you. For expert or technical skills, you might make a terrible


miscalculation that causes an accident, or you might reach a grossly
incorrect conclusion about a subject.
The possibilities are limited only by the Gamemasters creativity, but
keep in mind that a mishap should introduce some meaningful
complication or obstacle into the encounter; it should not produce a
truly catastrophic outcome that brings the game to a halt.

In cases where the skill restricts who can achieve certain results, you
cant aid another to grant a bonus to a task that your character couldnt
achieve alone. In addition, the Gamemaster can impose reasonable limits
on how many characters can assist on a single skill check. For example, it
would be difficult for more than a handful of characters to assist a
Medicine check made to perform surgery.

Trying Again

Many challenges allow or even require that multiple characters


participate to complete the challenge. Generally, challenges provide for
more interesting dynamics than simply assisting an ally with a skill
check. (See Challenges, below, for more detail.)

Multi-Character Challenges

In general, you can try a skill check again if you fail, and you can keep
trying indefinitely. Some applications, however, have consequences of
failure that must be taken into account. A few applications are virtually
useless once a check has failed on an attempt to accomplish a particular
task. For most applications, when you have succeeded once at a given
task, additional successes are meaningless.
If a given skill application cannot be retried, this is included in the
skills description in the e20 System Core Rulebook. For situations not
explicitly covered by the rules, the Gamemaster makes a ruling about
whether the skill check can be tried again (and if so, whether any
additional modifiers apply to the new check.)

Challenges
Challenges represent a set of related skill checks. They cover complex
actions that might take several distinct steps to complete, such as
navigating through the trackless wilderness or building a device. Some
challenges allow (or require) more than one character to participate. You
complete a challenge by accumulating progress equal to the complexity
of the challenge.
Because challenges can be as big an obstacle as an armed opponent,
they have a level and you earn experience for overcoming them. If a
challenge has little or no risk attached, however, the experience earned is
substantially reduced.

Checks without Rolls

A skill check represents an attempt to accomplish some goal, usually


while under some sort of time pressure or distraction. Sometimes,
though, you can use a skill under more favorable conditions and
eliminate the luck factor.
Taking 10: When you are not threatened or distracted, you may choose
to take 10. Instead of rolling 1d20 for the skill check, calculate your
result as if you had rolled a 10. For many routine tasks, taking 10 makes
them automatically successful. Distractions or threats (such as combat)
make it impossible for you to take 10. In most cases, taking 10 is purely a
safety measure: You expect that an average roll will succeed but fear
that a poor roll might fail, so you elect to settle for the average roll (a
10). Taking 10 is especially useful in situations where a particularly high
roll wouldnt help.
Taking 20: When you have plenty of time, you are faced with no
threats or distractions, and the task being attempted carries no penalties
for failure, you can take 20. Eventually, you will get a 20 on 1d20 if you
roll enough times, and thats what this option represents (without taking
the time to roll each individual attempt). Instead of rolling 1d20 for the
skill check, just calculate your result as if you had rolled a 20.
Taking 20 means you are trying until you get it right, and it assumes
that you fail many times before succeeding. Taking 20 takes twenty
times as long as making a single check would take, and you cannot do
anything else while taking 20 (even if you would have other actions
remaining each round).

If you accumulate progress equal to the complexity the challenge, the


challenge is completed and the indicated effect occurs. If your progress is
ever reduced below 0, the challenge is terminated; you might be able to
attempt the challenge again, but youll have to start from scratch. (If
expensive materials were necessary, half of them are ruined in the
attempt and must be replaced.)

Cooperative Skill Checks

Attacks as Progress

Progress
The individual skill checks that make up a challenge are called attempts.
(See Making a Skill Check, page 24.)
If your attempt is successful (that is, your check result equals or
exceeds the target number), you accumulate progress toward
completing the challenge. You gain 5 points of progress for a
successful attempt, plus 1 additional point of progress for every
point by which your check result exceeds the target number.
If your attempt fails, you gain no progress toward completing the
challenge. In addition, if you fail by 5 or more points, you have made
a costly mistake that costs you 5 points of progress.

In some cases, making attacks might be a reasonable means of


approaching the challenge. For example, in a chase scene where the
heroes are trying to escape several armed pursuers, you can escape either
by successfully evading your opponents or by eliminating them outright.
In these cases, you can make attacks to earn progress.
Difficulty: By default, an attack is considered an improvised primary
skill application for the challenge. (See Difficulty, page 28.)
Progress: By default, you earn progress equal to the damage dealt by
your attack. The Gamemaster might apply modifiers to your damage, as
deemed appropriate. Continuing the chase example, above, the pursuers
vehicles should have Hardness and DR that will reduce the damage dealt.
On the other hand, if you are using a weapon that has penetration, this
would reduce the target vehicles Hardness and DR.

When more than one character tries the same skill at the same time and
for the same purpose, their efforts might overlap.

Individual Tasks

Often, several characters attempt some action and each succeeds or fails
independently. The result of one characters Climb check does not
influence the results of other characters Climb check.

Aid Another

You can help another character achieve success on your skill check by
making the same kind of skill check in a cooperative effort. If you roll a
10 or higher on your check, the character you are helping gets a +2
bonus to its check, as per the rule for favorable conditions. (You cant
take 10 on a skill check to aid another.) In many cases, your help wont
be beneficial, or only a limited number of characters can help at once.

26

that occurred during the challenge. As with action point loss, this is
a good option for moving the adventure past a challenge and onto
the next step in the adventure.

Terminated Challenges

When used as a part of an adventure, a terminated challenge should


have consequences. The specific consequences should be related to the
nature of the challenge. Several possible consequences are outlined
below, and the Gamemaster can create new consequences as
appropriate.

When creating new consequences, the Gamemaster should keep in mind


that a terminated challenge should never act as a roadblock that
prevents further progress in an adventure. The terminated challenge
should make things more difficult for the heroes, certainly, but it should
not stop them in their tracks.
For example, if the heroes are attempting to infiltrate an enemy
installation, a terminated challenge might result in a combat encounter
with the guards; if the heroes prevail in that encounter, they can proceed
into the installation (perhaps using the guards keys to open a locked
door) but now everyone inside is on high alert.

Combat Encounter: The simplest outcome of a terminated challenge


is to trigger a combat encounter of roughly the same XP value.
Alternatively, multiple encounters that add up to roughly the same
XP value might be used. When caught trying to infiltrate an enemy
installation, for example, the heroes might be confronted by a large
group of guards, or they might encounter several smaller patrols that
seek them out later in the adventure (perhaps reinforcing other
opponents in later encounters).
Allies Lost or Captured: If the adventure involves allied Gamemaster
characters, they might be killed or captured as a result of a
terminated challenge that involves combat or another high-risk
situation. In a social setting, allies might be lost by changing their
attitude toward the heroes; for example, failed negotiations might
result in a patron taking offense and becoming indifferent (or worse)
as a result of the heroes poorly executed attempt, or a failed
attempt to perform a mission for an ally might result in that ally
losing faith in the heroes.
Equipment Lost or Damaged: Sometimes, the most logical result of a
terminated challenge is that some significant equipment becomes
lost or damaged. For example, a terminated challenge to navigate an
asteroid field might result in the heroes spacecraft being seriously
damaged or even destroyed. Generally, equipment loss isnt
particularly significant unless its value is at least equal to an
individuals Resources modifier, but critical equipment (such as rope
when climbing a mountain) might be valuable enough to count as a
significant loss. (Because players really dont like losing their favorite
toys, you should use this option sparingly; at the very least, its
usually better to leave equipment damaged but salvageable rather
than destroyed outright.)
Resources Lost: In many cases, the most appropriate cost of a
terminated challenge is monetary. The heroes might be fined by the
authorities during a botched smuggling run, they might lose business
contacts because of harm to their reputation, or they might even be
fired by their current employer. Generally, a loss of 1 point of
Resources for each participating character is an appropriate
consequence.
Time Lost: By itself, lost time is not particularly meaningful, but it
might have secondary consequences that matter to the heroes
(usually in the form of lost allies, equipment, or resources); for
example, the heroes might not reach a town in time to save its
inhabitants from an approaching army. However, lost time can be an
appropriate consequence if it has some significant effect on the
heroes or their reputation, such as being incarcerated or marooned.
Such lost time is a great way to bring an adventure to a screeching
halt, though, so it should be used very sparingly (and even then only
if it ultimately moves the campaign forward).
Action Point Lost: A very simple way to penalize the characters for a
terminated challenge is to charge them 1 Action Point each as the
heroes expend extra effort to grasp victory from the jaws of defeat.
This is a good way to move past a challenge that needs to be
overcome in one way or another to continue the adventure. (If a
hero does not have an Action Point remaining, they might instead
take damage, below.)
Damage: Another simple way to penalize the characters is to deal
damage; generally, an amount equal to their recovery value (1/5
their maximum hit points) is appropriate. Alternatively, a hero might
gain a 1 impairment penalty to represent some physical trauma

Skills Used
Every challenge is associated with one or more skills. The specific skill
applications chosen should be thematically related to the challenge at
hand. For example, a social encounter is quite likely to involve skills such
as Deception, Influence, and Intuition. Similarly, almost any wilderness
encounter could include skills such as Athletics, Nature, and Perception.
Each means of approaching the challenge is a separate skill application
(that is, including both a skill and the relevant ability modifier). Primary
skill applications are those most directly related to the challenge at hand.
Secondary skill applications are those that play a supporting role that
nevertheless contribute meaningfully to the completion of the challenge.

Number of Skill Applications

Generally, a single-character challenge should have 1 to 2 primary skill


applications and 0 to 3 secondary skill applications. A single skill might
have more than one application in the challenge. Continuing our
wilderness example, Athletics (Con) might be a primary application to
represent your endurance on an overland trek, and Athletics (Str) might
be a secondary application used to climb over difficult terrain to gain
shortcuts on your journey.
For a multi-character challenge (that is, one that requires multiple
characters to participate), add 1 primary skill application per 2 characters
and add 1 secondary skill application per character. For example, a multicharacter challenge for four heroes should have 3 to 4 primary skill
applications and 4 to 7 secondary skill applications. In addition, a multicharacter challenge should involve a number of different skills at least
equal to the number of participating characters.
Primary Skill Applications: Primary skill applications produce progress
toward completing the challenge, and they represent the most
appropriate and directly related way to address it. For example, a social
challenge might include Deception (Cha), Influence (Int or Cha), and
Intuition (Wis) as primary skill applications.
Secondary Skill Applications: Secondary skill applications usually dont
produce progress toward completing the challenge. Instead, they reveal
new options (making a new primary skill application available), provide a
bonus to a primary skill application (usually +2), or change other factors
(such as reducing your current tally of complications by 5, or removing
the possibility of critical failure; see Other Factors, page 29).
If a secondary skill application provides progress toward completing
the challenge (rather than any of the options above), it can do so only
once during the entire encounter. Once a participant uses it successfully,
that application cant be used again.

Improvised Skill Applications

When designing a challenge, the Gamemaster should expect the players


to come up with relevant skill applications that are not on the original
list for the challenge. This is not only acceptable but also encouraged:
The players should exercise creativity when approaching a challenge, and
the Gamemaster should reward them for doing so.

27

Each skill in the e20 System Core Rulebook includes a section on


suggested improvised applications to give the players a few ideas for use
in play, but these suggestions should be considered a starting point for
creativity, not a limit on the skills use.
An improvised skill application can function as either a secondary or
primary skill application for the challenge, depending on how directly the
Gamemaster believes that it relates to the challenge at hand. Normally,
the difficulty of an improvised skill application is increased by one step
(from moderate to hard, for example), but the Gamemaster can ignore
this if the proposed application is particularly ingenious or well suited to
the challenge. As a rule of thumb, if a player proposes something so
appropriate that you would have included it yourself had you thought of
it, you dont need to increase the difficulty.

average complexity will keep all required participants busy for most or all
of an encounter, but if additional heroes can help, they might be able to
complete it fairly quickly. You should use challenges of extreme
complexity sparingly; even if additional heroes participate, the challenge
will take quite a while to complete.

Limit
Some challenges might allow only a limited number of attempts before
the challenge expires (that is, it ends without being completed or
terminated). These challenges usually represent a situation where the
quality of the outcome is variable; for example, an engineer designing a
new vehicle might create a design that is anywhere on a continuum from
inspired and ingenious to critically flawed and unusable.

Difficulty

Attempt Limit

The number of attempts allowed before the challenge expires is


determined by the complexity of the challenge. The minimum value of
the attempt limit is equal to (required number of participants) +
(complexity/10).
Higher Limit: Increasing the limit by 50% reduces the challenges level
by 1, and increasing the limit by 100% reduces the challenges level by 2.
Expiration Terminates: If a limited challenge treats anything less than
partial success (see below) as a termination rather than a neutral
outcome, increase its level by 1.

Difficulty can be set in absolute or relative terms, as with any other skill
check. A challenges difficulty also determines its base level for purposes
of experience earned for overcoming the challenge.
When building a challenge from scratch, use relative DCs of the desired
level to determine the difficulty of the challenge. Use a simple relative
DC for a secondary skill application in a multi-character challenge;
increase the difficulty by one step each for a primary skill application, an
improvised skill, or a single-character challenge. (Multi-character
challenges have lower DCs at a given level because not all participating
characters will be well suited to a particular set of skills.)
For ease of reference, the types of skill applications associated with
each relative DC are given below.

Partial Success

By default, limited challenges allow for partial success depending on how


much progress you accumulate before the challenge expires. Unless
otherwise specified, every 10 points by which your progress falls short of
the complexity reduces the quality of the outcome by one step; however,
you must accumulate progress equal to at least half the complexity to
achieve any partial success.
The quality of a partial success varies depending on the situation;
published challenges will specify particular effects, and when creating a
new challenge the Gamemaster should use his judgment to define each
tier of partial success.
Example: You are trying to improve the attitude of a detective so that
he will provide confidential information (complexity 40, limit 5). If you
complete the challenge (progress 40 or more after no more than five
attempts), the detective becomes helpful and will provide the
information you need, even if this would be moderately risky to him. If
you achieve the first tier of partial success (progress 30 to 39), the
detective becomes friendly; he wont provide confidential information
himself, but he will give you advice and guidance on where you might
find the information you seek. If you have the second tier of partial
success (progress 20 to 29), the detective is indifferent; he wont provide
any advice, but he wont try to get you in trouble, either. If you achieve
no partial success (progress 0 to 19, less than half the complexity of the
challenge), the detective becomes unfriendly; he is offended by your
request, and he might intentionally mislead you or notify his superiors. If

Simple (DC = 9 + 1/2 level): In multi-character challenges, use


simple relative DCs for secondary skill applications.
Moderate (DC = 11 + 3/4 level): In multi-character challenges, use
moderate relative DCs for primary skill applications and most
improvised secondary skill applications. In single-character
challenges, use moderate relative DCs for secondary skill
applications.
Hard (DC = 13 + level): In multi-character challenges, use hard
relative DCs for most improvised primary skill applications. In singlecharacter challenges, use hard relative DCs for primary skill
applications and most improvised secondary skill applications.
Very Hard (DC = 15 + level): In single-character challenges, use very
hard relative DCs for improvised primary skill applications.

Complexity
The complexity of the challenge determines how long it will take to
overcome, and it plays a major role in determining the experience award
the heroes receive for completing it.
Choose a complexity value that matches how much effort you want
the heroes to have to put into the challenge, as shown on Table 43:
Complexity. A challenge of minor complexity is best for minor obstacles
or distractions meant to sidetrack the heroes momentarily. A challenge of

Table 43: Complexity


Rank
Minor
Average
Extreme

Complexity per
Reqd Participant*
14 or less
(avg. 10)
15 to 29
(avg. 20)
30 or more
(avg. 40)

Description
The challenge serves as a relatively minor obstacle for the characters in the course of a larger encounter, most likely
requiring only a couple of rounds to complete.
The challenge is an obstacle equivalent to one standard opponent of the challenges level per participant. It should
occupy the majority of the participants attention even as a part of a larger encounter; if all heroes are required to
participate, it can function as an encounter by itself.
The challenge is a major obstacle, the equivalent of one elite opponent of the challenges level per participant. In
most cases, a challenge of extreme complexity should be an encounter unto itself unless it allows only one
participant.

* Complexity does not change if additional characters (beyond those required) choose to participate in the challenge.

28

you the challenge was terminated by achieving negative progress


(progress 1 or lower), the detective becomes hostile; he might attempt
to arrest you on the spot.
No Partial Success: If a limited challenge does not allow for partial
success when it expires, increase its level by 1.

Complications (+1 level)

Occasionally, a challenge has more than one dimension; lost progress not
only makes your job harder, but it also builds toward an undesired
outcome. Every time your attempt results in a loss of progress, you gain
an equal amount in complications. If your complications total ever equals
or exceeds half the challenges complexity, the challenge automatically
terminates.
Mitigating Complications (1 level): When a challenge has
complications, you might have the option to mitigate them with a
secondary skill application instead of building progress toward
completing the challenge. When you do so, calculate how much progress
your attempt would have earned (had it been a primary skill application)
and subtract that amount from your current complications total.
Sacrifice (+0 level): When you earn complications by a failed attempt,
you can choose to make a personal sacrifice to prevent the complication
total from increasing. You have three options: (1) Sacrifice an Action
Point; (2) Take damage equal to your recovery value (1/5 your maximum
hit points); (3) Take a 1 impairment penalty.

Time
Challenges can take place at any time scale, ranging from round-byround actions undertaken during a larger combat encounter to extended
and abstracted interactions that span weeks or even months. Published
challenges include the time required for each attempt in their
descriptions.
Base Time: If a challenge lists a base time (for example, Base Time 1
week), the total time required for the challenge is progressive rather
than determined by a flat amount per attempt. Creation challenges (such
as building a vehicle) are the most common challenges that use a base
time; a particularly skilled mechanic might be able to build a vehicle very
quickly, but an amateur mechanic might take much longer due to false
starts.
Every time a participant makes an additional attempt, the total time
expended increases by one step on the standard progression (1, 2, 5, 10,
20, and so on). For example, a challenge with a base time of 1 week takes
1 week if completed by the time all characters make a single attempt, 2
weeks if they needed two attempts, 5 weeks if they needed three
attempts, and so forth.
Limited challenges very rarely have a base time.
Initiative: In most cases, the order in which the heroes make their
attempts does not affect the outcome of the challenge. Generally, it is
best for the heroes to start with their most capable member. However, in
the case of a challenge that has an adversary (see Other Factors, below),
initiative should be determined normally to determine the order of
actions. An adversary cannot act until the challenge has started,
however, so if the adversary gets the highest initiative it must delay until
at least one hero has made an attempt.

Critical Failure (+1 level)

If challenge has opportunities for catastrophic failure, the Gamemaster


might apply this factor. If you roll a natural 1 on your attempt, you
automatically lose 10 progress regardless of your skill check result.

Critical Success (1 level)

If a challenge has opportunities for spectacular success, the Gamemaster


might apply this factor. If you roll a natural 20 on your attempt,
calculate the progress you would normally earn and then double it.

New Objectives (+0 level)

Some challenges have distinct phases that use different skill applications.
For example, once you find a downed pilot behind enemy lines
(Perception, Nature, Tactics), you now need to evade enemy pursuers and
keep the injured pilot alive (Athletics, Medicine, Stealth). Evolving
objectives are a good way to make sure that every participant in a
challenge has at least some time in the spotlight.
There is no set point at which a challenge should change to a new
objective, but a good guideline is to divide the progress into equal
segments for each. With two objectives, for example, you might change
the skill set needed once you cross the halfway point toward completing
the challenge.

Other Factors
Every challenge is different, and adding one or more of the following
factors can help to make a challenge more interesting and dynamic.
Generally, its a good idea for the Gamemaster to add at least one factor
to any challenge to ensure that it has something to differentiate it from
other challenges the heroes face in play.

Risky (+1 level)

Some challenges are particularly dangerous, providing a situation which


is less forgiving of mistakes. In a risky challenge, you lose 5 progress on
any failure, not just when you fail by 5 or more.

Adversary (+XP by type and level)

Sometimes a Gamemaster character is in a position to oppose the heroes


directly, interfering with their progress. The adversary makes skill checks
just as the heroes do, but the progress earned by the attempt is applied
in reverse: A success subtract from your progress, and a failure adds to
your progress.
Sometimes, you might have the option to engage the adversary in
combat; doing so might prevent the adversary from interfering with your
progress, but any character in combat cant contribute to the challenges
progress, either.
Just because a challenge features opponents doesnt mean that it
needs the adversary factor. Use this option only if an opponent is in a
position to directly sabotage and interfere with your work; for example,
when hacking a computer network, the system administrator is
specifically trying to isolate your connection, terminate your access, and
undo any changes you make, so that would qualify as an adversary. In an
ordinary chase scene, however, the challenge is evading the pursuers
themselves; unless you want to represent a single highly skilled opponent
(such as a legendary bounty hunter chasing you along with a bunch of
ordinary guards), theres no need to use the adversary factor.

Safe (2 levels)

Some challenges dont represent an immediate threat even on


termination, though the potential for some kind of confrontation is
present. For example, when negotiating with a bouncer to get into a
private club, the challenge is unlikely to result in combat unless the
characters do something particularly provocative (or if they choose to
start a fight on their own).
A safe challenge can be combined with the complications or critical
failure factors; in this case, a critical failure or terminating the challenge
by accumulating complications makes the threat immediate rather than
potential.

Very Safe (4 levels)

Some challenges dont have any real threat of failure other than the time
and resources expended in the attempt. These challenges are particularly
common outside of adventures, such as when using your skills to create
enhancements in your downtime. For example, a hero who spends time
writing a book with the Linguistics skill might have a lot to gain if the

29

prompt them to describe their actions in whatever detail they can,


framing their attempts in terms of how they try to tackle the challenge
rather than what they are trying to accomplish. If a player describes
something particularly appropriate (such as a very eloquent argument
when trying to gain the favor of a noble), feel free to reduce the
difficulty by one step (from hard to moderate, for example). Conversely, if
a player describes something particularly counterproductive (such as
trying to physically intimidate a noble protected by loyal and welltrained bodyguards), you might increase the difficulty by one step.
However, be sure that you dont penalize a character for a players lack
of knowledge. A skilled mechanic would logically know all the technical
details about disarming a trap, so let the player focus on a more general
approach rather than naming specifics (for example, I want to jam the
trigger, I want to block its firing port, or I want to search for a blind
spot that wont set it off). Similarly, a player might not know the correct
way to address a noble with his familys formal ancestral title, but a
quick Knowledge (Int/civics) check will determine if the character does.

Table 44: Challenge Experience Awards


Level Minor Average
1
50
100
2
75
150
3
100
200
4
150
300
5
200
500
6
300
750
7
500
1,000
8
750
1,500
9
1,000 2,000
10
1,500 3,000

Extreme
200
300
500
750
1,000
1,500
2,000
3,000
5,000
7,500

Level
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20

Minor Average
2,000
5,000
3,000
7,500
5,000 10,000
7,500 15,000
10,000 20,000
15,000 30,000
20,000 50,000
30,000 75,000
50,000 100,000
75,000 150000

Extreme
10,000
15,000
20,000
30,000
50,000
75,000
100,000
150000
200,000
300,000

challenge is successful (even a partial success might result in some


modest income), but a failure means that the hero has lost no more than
the time spent on an unworkable manuscript.
If a very safe challenge doesnt require any expenditure sufficient to
reduce your Resources modifier and requires one week or less of your
time, it does not represent a sufficient risk for you to gain any experience
at all.

Hidden Challenges

Depending on the challenge in question, the players might not need to


know mechanical details such as complexity and progress. Unless a
player initiated the challenge (such as when creating an item), the
players wont necessarily know the details of the challengeor even that
one has started!
When a challenges game mechanics might intrude on roleplaying, you
can safely tuck all the numbers behind the screen, out of sight (and out
of mind) of the players. Just let them interact with the game world in
whatever manner fits their characters personality, giving them feedback
on their actions as you go along. Continuing the earlier example, if a
player fails in a ill-conceived attempt to intimidate the noble, you might
say, The noble darkens visibly at your insulting attempt to intimidate
him in front of his own guards, and it seems to have strengthened his
resolve.
Nevertheless, dont overlook the current progress score as a source of
dramatic tension. In challenges that represent dangerous tactical
situations, letting the players see their current progress, the complexity
goal they have to reach, and (for limited challenges) how many attempts
they have remaining can really engage the players.

Level and Experience


Once you have determined the base level of the challenge, apply any
modifiers for limit or other factors to determine the adjusted level of the
challenge. Look up the experience point (XP) value corresponding to the
challenges complexity and adjusted level on Table 44: Challenge
Experience Awards.
As a comparison, a challenge of average complexity is the equivalent
of a single standard opponent of the same level (both in XP value and
approximate difficulty).
If the heroes complete the challenge, divide this XP among all
characters who participated. For a limited challenge where the heroes
achieve only partial success, divide the XP by 2 for every step below
complete success that they achieve.

Other Rewards

A challenge wont necessarily have any other awards attached to it, but
if the situation warrants the Gamemaster can provide for the characters
to find money or goods in the aftermath of a challenge. Alternatively, the
characters might receive a specific monetary reward if the characters
performed the challenge on behalf of a patron. If the challenges
adjusted level is greater than that of the heroes, a flat increase of 1 point
to all participants Resources modifiers is an appropriate award.
If you would prefer to give out a reward in cash or equipment, a value
equal to a purchase DC of (challenges adjusted level + 10), split among
all participants, is a reasonable amount.

List of Skills
Table 45: Skills lists the skills used in the e20 System, dividing them
into weapon skills and nonweapon skills. Specific applications within
each skillmany of them familiar to players of other d20-based games
are also listed.

Running Challenges
When running a challenge as the Gamemaster, you should encourage
creativity and roleplaying by taking the actions of the heroes and
translating them into an appropriate skill check. Players shouldnt think
about their actions in terms of skills and ability modifiers; instead,

30

Table 45: Skills


Skill

Nonweapon Skills
Acrobatics
Analytics

Athletics
Computers
Deception
Focus
Influence
Intuition
Knowledge
Linguistics
Mechanics
Medicine
Nature
Perception
Stealth
Tactics
Vehicles

Weapon Skills
Firearms
Gunnery
Melee
Ranged
Unarmed

Applications
Balance (Dex), Escape Restraints (Dex), Escape Grapple (Dex or Str), Soft Fall* (Dex or Str), Tumble* (Wis)
Create Chemicals* (Int), Collect Data (Wis), Evaluate Data (Int), Scientific Knowledge* (Int)
Specializations: behavioral sciences, life sciences, physical sciences, social sciences
Catch (Dex), Climb (Dex or Str), Endurance (Con), Jump (Str), Swim (Con or Str), Use Rope (Dex or Int)
Access System (Wis), Create Electronic Device* (Int), Create Program* (Int), Modify System* (Int), Protect System* (Wis),
Repair System* (Int)
Bluff (Cha), Create Forgery (Dex or Int), Create Disguise (Wis), Feint* (Cha), Innuendo (Cha), Sleight of Hand* (Dex)
Concentration (Con), Use Arcane Magic* (Cha or Int), Use Divide Magic* (Cha or Wis), Use Psionics* (Cha or Con), Additional
Recovery* (Con)
Improve Attitude (Cha), Intimidate (Cha or Str), Negotiate (Cha or Wis), Perform (Cha), Requisition (Int)
Specializations: acting, bureaucracy, dance, keyboards, percussion instruments, persuasion, singing, stand-up, stringed
instruments, wind instruments
Gamble (Cha or Int), Gather Information (Cha), Sense Motive (Wis), Sense Paranormal Activity* (Wis)
Appraise (Wis), Common Information (Int), Expert Information* (Int), Profession (Wis), Research (Int)
Specializations: arcana, business, civics, current events, entertainment, history, religion, streetwise
Create Document (Cha or Int), Cryptography* (Int), Innuendo (Cha), Read/Write Language (Int or Wis), Speak Language (Cha
or Wis)
Specializations: individual languages (by setting), composition
Create Machine* (Int), Create Object (Dex or Int), Create Structure* (Int), Demolitions* (Int or Wis), Disable Device (Dex or
Int), Jury Rig (Dex or Str), Repair (Int)
Create Pharmaceuticals* (Int), Treat Injury (Wis), Treat Disease (Wis), Treat Poison (Wis), Surgery* (Dex or Int)
Handle Animal (Cha), Train Animal (Cha or Wis), Ride (Dex), Survival (Wis), Track* (Wis)
Create Visual Artwork (Cha), Notice (Wis), Read Lips* (Int), Search (Int)
Specializations: awareness, cinematography, drawing, painting, photography, sculpture
Camouflage (Int), Conceal (Dex), Sneak (Dex), Snipe* (Wis), Tail (Cha)
Anticipate* (Wis), Coordinate Attack (Cha), Plan* (Int)
Dogfight* (Dex), Navigate (Int or Wis), Pilot (Dex), Repair Vehicle (Int), Use Fixed Weapon* (Dex or Int)
Specializations: light aircraft, light wheeled, heavy aircraft**, heavy wheeled, helicopter**, fighter aircraft**, powerboat,
rowboat, sailboat, ship, spacecraft**, teamster, tracked
All weapon skills: Use Weapon (by attack), Maintain Weapon* (Dex or Wis), Repair Weapon* (Int), Modify Weapon* (Int),
Create Weapon* (Int)
Specializations: handguns, longarms, shotguns
Specializations: mortars & artillery, explosives & incendiaries, rockets & missiles, machine guns & autocannons, cannons &
guns
Specializations: basic weapons, chained weapons, fencing weapons, hafted weapons, swords, pole weapons
Specializations: basic weapons, bows, crossbows
Specializations: brawling, grappling, natural weapons

* Trained only.
** This specialization has a prerequisite.

31

5: Feats
limited to characters who have at least one level in one of two classes.
As a 1st-level character, you get three free defensive feats (including
one second-tier defensive feat), determined by your starting class.

Feats take up too much space to describe fully, but the tables below
summarize the effect of each feat with enough detail to use it in a
simple adventure. Characters can learn four types of featsgeneral, class,
defensive, and styledescribed in more detail in the sections below.

Style Feats

Defensive Feats

Style feats work with your fighting style (such as two-handed weapon or
weapon and shield), providing a specific benefit to match your approach
to combat. You can use only one style feat at a time, but you can switch
to a different style feat you know as a free action once per round on your
turn. Anyone who meets the prerequisite can take a style feat, but some

Defensive feats improve one of your defenses (Primary, Fortitude, Reflex,


or Will), either directly or by allowing you to wear armor without penalty.
Anyone who meets the prerequisite can take a defensive feat, but some
second-tier defensive feats (such as Improved Great Fortitude) are

Table 51: Defensive Feats


Feat
Armor Proficiency
Armor Proficiency, Heavy
Dodge
Dodge, Improved
Great Fortitude
Great Fortitude,
Improved
Iron Will
Iron Will, Improved
Lightning Reflexes
Lightning Reflexes,
Improved

Prerequisite
Armor Proficiency
Dodge
Great Fortitude, either
Dreadnought or Vanguard
Iron Will, either Envoy or
Sentinel
Lightning Reflexes, either
Corsair or Sentinel

Effect
Wear armor without penalty.
Wear heavy armor without penalty.
+2 defense bonus to Primary Defense when not wearing armor.
+3 defense bonus to Primary Defense when not wearing armor (+4 at 9th level, +5 at 17th)
+2 defense bonus to Fortitude Defense and Fortitude saves.
+3 defense bonus to Fortitude Defense and Fortitude saves (+4 at 9th level, +5 at 17th)
+2 defense bonus to Will Defense and Will saves.
+3 defense bonus to Will Defense and Will saves (+4 at 9th level, +5 at 17th)
+2 defense bonus to Reflex Defense and Reflex saves.
+3 defense bonus to Reflex Defense and Reflex saves (+4 at 9th level, +5 at 17th)

Table 52: Style Feats


Feat
Autofire Assault
Burst Fire
Careful Shot
Combat Expertise
Dual Mastery
Evasive Maneuvers
Expert Duelist
Flurry of Blows
Mobility
Power Attack
Rapid Fire
Shield Bash
Shield Expert
Sustained Fire
Transport Dodge
Transport Mobility

Prerequisite

Effect
Emplaced or Two-Handed; must aim/brace; with autofire/barrage attack, deal 1/2 damage on a miss
by 5 more points (for example, on miss by 10 or less instead of miss by 5 or less).
Emplaced or Two-Handed; must aim/brace; automatic only; with ranged attack against 1 target, 3
to attack (2 with normal or light weapon), +2 damage dice; ammo 5.
Emplaced or Two-Handed; must aim; with ranged or area (blast, splash, or spread) attack, +1 attack
(+2 with light weapon)
Int 13
With attack on your turn, choose a value up to your Intelligence modifier (min. 1); until start of
your next turn, add value to your Primary and Reflex and subtract value from attacks.
Dual; +1 to attacks with primary and off-hand weapons.
Driving; enemies calculate range penalty using (2 transports current speed) or distance,
whichever is greater.
One-Handed; with melee or ranged attack, crit on natural 1920; with light weapon, +1 attack
Dex 13
Dual, One-Handed, Shield; with melee attack, 2 attack (1 with light weapon), +1 damage die.
Dex 13
If you move less than your speed and then use standard action, you can move again as swift action
so long as total movement doesnt exceed your speed.
Str 13
Two-Handed; with melee attack, 2 attack, +1 damage die.
Semiautomatic only; with ranged attack, 2 attack (1 with light weapon), +1 damage die; ammo
2.
Armor Proficiency (light) Shield; after hitting target with melee attack, deal Strength modifier (min. 1) bludgeoning damage
to 1 character in reach.
Armor Proficiency (light) Shield; add Constitution modifier (min. 1) to Primary Defense.
Emplaced or Two-Handed; must aim/brace; with autofire/barrage attack against same area as last
round, +1 damage die; double ammo spent.
Driving; as interruption 1/round, when your transport would be hit by an attack, transport gains +5
bonus to Primary and Reflex Defenses against that attack.
Dex 13
Driving; you take no speed penalty to attacks; if you move less than the maximum for your declared
speed and then use a standard action, you can move again as swift action (up to total allowed for
your declared speed).

32

Table 53: Class Feats


Feat
Bastion of Courage

Prerequisite
Sentinel 1st

Brilliant Tactician
Brutal Presence

Savant 1st, trained


in Tactics
Vanguard 1st

Calculated Risk

Savant 1st

Connections
Damage Reduction
Devastating Attack
(weapon group)
Energy Resistance
(type)
Evasion
Extreme Effort
Faith
Favored Enemy

Envoy 1st
Dreadnought 5th
Vanguard 3rd

Effect
Swift action; you and all allies in sight within 5 squares gain a +2 bonus on Will saves until start of
your next turn.
Swift action; you and all allies in sight within 5 squares gain a +2 bonus to attacks of opportunity and
+2 bonus to Primary Defense against attacks of opportunity until start of your next turn.
1/round, designate a target you hit with a melee attack. If that target is within reach and makes an
attack that doesnt include you as a target before the start of your next turn, it takes 1d6 damage
(2d6 at 6th level, 3d6 at 11th level, 4d6 at 16th level).
Can reroll attack, but take 5 penalty to all defenses until end of next turn (+1 to reroll at 5th, +2 to
reroll at 10th, +3 to reroll at 15th).
Treat Resources DCs as 2 points lower.
You gain DR 1 (DR 2 at 10th level, DR 3 at 15th level).
Attacks with weapon group gain devastating +2 (+3 at 5th level, +4 at 10th level, +5 at 15th level).

Dreadnought 1st

You gain resistance equal to your Constitution modifier (min. 1) against selected energy type.

Corsair 3rd
Vanguard 1st
Sentinel 1st
Corsair 1st

Take no damage from area attack or autofire attack on a miss.


Move action; can reroll next Strength-based skill check this turn.
When you spend Action Point to reroll, add your Wisdom modifier (min. 1) to reroll.
Select a group of characters (such as members of an organization, creatures native to one terrain type,
or one type of vehicle). Against this group, you can reroll sense checks or weapon attack rolls up to
2/encounter (3/encounter at 6th, 4/encounter at 11th, 5/encounter at 16th). You can take this feat
multiple times; pick a new group each time.
1/round, issue routine command to computer as free action.

Gimmick
Healing Knack
Heroic Surge
Ignore Hardness
Improved Influence
Increased Speed
Inspirational Presence
Lucky
Rage
Rage, Greater
Relentless
Remain Conscious
Robust
Second Wind
Situational Awareness
Sneak Attack
Sneak Attack, Greater
Stamina
Sudden Insight
Uncanny Dodge
Uncanny Luck

Savant 1st, trained


in Computers
Sentinel 1st
Sentinel 1st
Vanguard 1st

When you heal a target, healing is doubled. (Does not affect recovery.)
1/encounter, reduce action type necessary by 1 step for a given action (2/encounter at 11th level).
Ignore 2 points of targets hardness with melee attack (3 points at 6th level, 4 points at 11th level, 5
points at 16th level).
Envoy 1st
Treat target attitude as 1 step better for Influence checks.
Corsair 1st
Speed increases by 1 square (2 squares at 6th level, 3 squares at 11th level).
Envoy 1st
Swift action; you and all allies in sight within 5 squares reduce fatigue by 1 additional point on
successful save until the start of your next turn.
Corsair 1st
Spend Action Point to gain +1 to skill checks or +1 to defenses for rest of encounter.
Vanguard 1st
Spend Action Point to go into a rage: +2 to all Strength-based skill checks and damage; (Vanguard
level + 9) temporary hit points; 2 Primary, 2 Reflex, +2 Will. At end of encounter, effect ends and
you take (Vanguard level + 9) damage.
Vanguard 11th
When you go into a range, bonus to Will Defense and Strength-based skill checks and damage
improves to +3; other effects remain unchanged.
Dreadnought 1st
Once per round, when an enemy steps out of a space you threaten, you can step 1 square as an
immediate free action.
Dreadnought 5th
When you would become disabled, you are instead exhausted so long as you have at least 1/2 your
reserves remaining (or any reserves at all at Dreadnought 15th).
Dreadnought 3rd
You gain (Dreadnought level + 9) hit points. You gain an additional 1 hp every time you gain a level of
Dreadnought.
Dreadnought 1st
You can use the recover action 1 additional time per encounter.
Sentinel 1st
Once per encounter, you can reroll an Insight or Perception check and keep the better result.
Corsair 1st
Once per round when you hit a disadvantaged target with a weapon attack at point blank range, you
deal an additional 3d6 damage (4d6 at 6th level, 5d6 at 11th level, 6d6 at 16th level).
Corsair 5th
Use d8s rather than d6s for your sneak attack damage.
Dreadnought 3rd,
When you rest, your healing is doubled. When you successfully save to reduce your fatigue or
Robust
impairment penalty, your penalty is reduced by 2 instead of 1.
Savant 1st
1/encounter, can reroll an Intelligence-based skill check (2/encounter at 11th).
Corsair 5th, Evasion Not disadvantaged when flat-footed or struck by unseen attacker. At Corsair 10th, you also cannot be
flanked.
Corsair 5th
1/encounter, treat a natural roll of 16 or higher as a natural 20 (2/encounter at 15th).

style feats require that you use a particular fighting style to gain their
benefits.
You must be trained in all weapons you wield (and your transports
control skill, for driving style feats) to use a style feat.

Class Feats
Class feats provide signature abilities that help to define each classs role
(such as Sneak Attack for a Corsair), and only members of a given class

33

Table 54: General Feats


Feat
Advanced Weapons
Advantageous Cover
Alertness
Animal Affinity
Attentive
Blind Fight
Builder
Cautious
Combat Reflexes
Confident
Creative
Educated
Elusive Target
Far Shot
Gearhead
Guide
Improved Initiative
Medical Expert
Meticulous
Nimble
Precise Shot
Quick Draw
Skill Focus

Prerequisite
Skill Training (SKILL)

Skill Mastery
Skill Training
Specialized Experience
Sprint
Studious
Stunt Mastery
Surgical Expert
Toughness
Trickster
Trustworthy
Vehicle Expert

Skill Training (SKILL)

trained in Mechanics

trained in Knowledge

trained in Acrobatics
Skill Training (SKILL)

trained in Medicine

trained in Vehicles

Effect
Apply your training bonus to attacks with advanced weapons associated with selected SKILL.
When you have non-mobile cover against an attack, gain +1 bonus to Primary and Reflex Defenses.
Halve distance before determining range penalty on Perception checks.
Can take 10 on Nature checks to ride, handle animals, or train animals even under pressure.
1/encounter, can reroll Intuition check to sense motive or Analytics check to evaluate data.
Reduce concealment by 1 step in melee.
Double progress when creating devices, structures, and vehicles.
No mishap with explosives unless you fail Mechanics check by 10 or more.
1/round, can reroll attack of opportunity.
1/encounter, can reroll Intuition check to gamble or Influence check to intimidate.
Double progress when creating artwork or composition or when performing.
1/encounter, can reroll Knowledge check. Reduce difficulty by 1 step for unfamiliar subjects.
When you have mobile cover against an attack, gain +1 bonus to Primary and Reflex Defenses.
Reduce range penalties beyond point blank range: short, 1; medium, 2; long, 5; extreme, 10.
When restoring hit points to nonliving object (page 61), reduce challenges base time to 10 minutes.
Double progress when using Nature to orienteer or Vehicles to navigate.
Can reroll when making an initiative check.
1/encounter, can reroll Medicine check.
1/2 time to take 20 on Deception check to create forgery or Perception check to search.
1/encounter, reroll Acrobatics check to escape or use sleight of hand.
Ignore mobile cover for ranged attacks.
Draw or holster weapon as free action; must be trained with weapons skill.
+3 training bonus to selected SKILL (+4 at 9th level, +5 at 17th level); can train other characters to
use enhancements based on selected SKILL.
Roll of 4 or less on d20 is treated as a 5 when making skill check with selected SKILL.
+2 training bonus to selected SKILL, use trained-only SKILL applications.
Gain a number of new specializations equal to your Intelligence modifier (minimum 1).
When running, move up to 2.5 speed (2 speed when carrying medium or heavy load).
1/2 time to take 20 on Knowledge check to perform research or Linguistics check to decipher.
Perform the chosen stunt without the normal 5 penalty.
When restoring hit points to living creature (page 61), reduce challenges base time to 10 minutes.
Gain (9 + character level) hit points; every time you advance a level, gain +1 hit point.
Reduce difficulty by 1 step when determining penalty to Deception check to bluff or create disguise.
1/encounter, can reroll Influence check to improve attitude or gather information.
1/encounter, can reroll a Vehicles check.

can take its associated class feats. Many class feats require you to have
more than one level in a given class to select the feat.
As a 1st-level character, you get one free class feat, chosen from all
class feats available for your starting class at 1st level.

General Feats
General feats allow you to focus on particular situations in which you
want to excel, whether in or out of combat. Anyone who meets the
prerequisite can take a general feat.

34

6: Traits
Traits are game statistics that arent directly related to your class and
level. The two most important traits for any campaign are Action Points
and Resources; different genres and settings might have additional traits
that play a significant role (such as alignment, honor, sanity, and so
forth).

Perform Stunt: You can perform a stunt at no penalty even if you


dont have the associated Stunt Mastery feat.
Regain Talent: You can spend an Action Point to regain the ability to
use a major talent you have already expended without resting for 1
minute.
Reroll: You can reroll an ability check, skill check, attack, or saving
throw you just made, treating the new result as if it were the
original roll.

Action Points

Unless otherwise specified, you must spend your Action Point


immediately before taking the action it modifies. The effect of the Action
Point is applied before completing the action it modifies (if any).

Action Points allow you to perform exceptionally heroic acts or influence


your environment. You start with 1 Action Point, which you can expend
during play. Some actions and situations can change your Action Point
total; for example, you have the option to gain an Action Point when you
score a critical hit (rather than dealing double damage or some other
benefit). After one hour of rest, your Action Point total is reset to 1.
When you spend an Action Point, select one of the benefits listed
below. Some options for Action Points might be unavailable for different
styles of play; for example, the On-Hand Object option might be
disallowed in a less cinematic game. In addition, some genres might add
additional options for Action Points.

Resources
Every character has a Resources modifier that reflects his or her buying
powera composite of income, credit rating, and savingsin addition to
the ability to call in favors or requisition equipment for missions. A
characters Resources modifier serves as the basis of the characters
Resources check, which is used to purchase equipment and services for
the character.
Unlike the Wealth mechanic in d20 Modern, Resources are part of a
hybrid system that allows the easy movement from abstract assets
(composed of credit, savings, and intangibles such as favors and access
to wealthy patrons) to cash on hand, and back again.
Even in a campaign where almost all transactions are conducted in
cash, the Resources mechanic is still used for purposes of calculating the
difficulty of acquiring items through means other than purchase. For
example, the skill check DC and complexity for designing or creating
items is determined partially by the purchase DC of the item in question.
Similarly, because Resources are a wholly abstract mechanic, they are
useful for assets other than money. For example, if a powerful patron
owes you a favor or if a large organization provides you with access to its
property, your Resources modifier can be used to represent this access.
For simplicity, a single Resources modifier represents all your assets,
regardless of source. However, the Gamemaster has the option to give
characters separate Resources modifiers to represent very different
assets, perhaps creating separate modifiers for calling in favors, making
requisitions through a bureaucracy, and so forth. The e20 System Core
Rulebook provides additional guidance and options for using separate
Resources modifiers.

Emulate Feat: Until the end of your turn, you gain the benefit of a
single feat for which you meet the prerequisite.
Enhance Talent: Major talents have an Action Point line that
describes an enhanced effect that you can activate by spending an
action point.
Haste: You can perform an action as if it requires an action type one
step lower. You use a move action to perform a standard action, a
swift action to perform a move action, a free action to perform a
swift action, or perform a free action or reaction as if it were an
interruption.
On-Hand Object: Normally, you can make a Resources check to see if
you have a common object available on hand, but you are limited to
situations in which you would reasonably be expected to have an
assortment of common objects (such as in your home, in the trunk of
your vehicle, and so forth). If you spend an Action Point, you can
ignore this restriction on finding an on-hand object nearby.
However, the Gamemaster determines the objects specific location
(accessible to you, but not necessarily convenient), and the GM is
free to overrule any specific on-hand object you request if it would
not reasonably be present. For example, the GM would rightly say
that you cant find a set of lock picks inside a jail cell.

Table 61: Resources Modifiers


Resources Modifier
+0 or less
+1 to +3
+4 to +6
+7 to +9
+10 to +12
+13 to +15
+16 to +20
+21 to +30
+31 to +40
+41 to +45
+46 to +50
+51 to +55
+56 or more

Individual Finances
Impoverished or in debt
Struggling
Working class
Middle class
Affluent
Wealthy (millionaire)
Rich (multi-millionaire)
Very rich (billionaire)

Organization or Community Size

Small local business


Mid-sized local business, village, hamlet
Large local business, minor national corporation, town
Major national corporation, small city
Tiny/impoverished nation, large city, minor multinational corporation
Small/developing nation, major metropolis, major multinational corporation
Industrialized nation, giant multinational corporation
Wealthy nation, great power
Superpower

35

Table 62: Purchase DCs


Purchase DC
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25

Value 1
$2
$3
$5
$7
$10
$15
$20
$30
$50
$75
$100
$150
$200
$300
$500
$750
$1,000
$1,500
$2,000
$3,000
$5,000
$7,500
$10,000
$15,000
$20,000

Purchase DC
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
+6

Value 1
$30,000
$50,000
$75,000
$100,000
$150,000
$200,000
$300,000
$500,000
$750,000
$1,000,000
$1,500,000
$2,000,000
$3,000,000
$5,000,000
$7,500,000
$10,000,000
$15,000,000
$20,000,000
$30,000,000
$50,000,000
$75,000,000
$100,000,000
$150,000,000
$200,000,000
10

The Resources Check

A Resources check is a 1d20 roll plus your current Resources modifier. If


you succeed on the Resources check, you purchase the object or service
successfully. If you fail, you cant afford it at the time.
If your current Resources modifier is equal to or greater than the DC,
the purchase is automatically successful.
If you successfully purchase an object or service with a purchase DC
thats higher than your current Resources modifier, your Resources
modifier decreases by (purchase DC Resources modifier)/2, rounded up.

Shopping and Time

Purchases require an amount of time determined by the purchase DC, as


shown on the table below. You can make a purchase more quickly, but
this increases the purchase DC by 1 for every step by which you reduce
your shopping time; since youre rushed, you wont have sufficient time
to shop around for the best bargain.
You can take 10 and take 20 for legal purchases. Taking 20 takes 20
times as long as normal; this is most often the case for major purchases,
such as when you get a mortgage to buy a house. You cannot take 10 or
take 20 if you have a current Resources modifier of +0 or less.
Minimum Community Resources: Small communities very rarely have
extremely rare or expensive items available for sale through conventional
retail outlets. However, some residents might own the item in question
as personal property (rather than as store inventory), and you might be
able to talk the owner into selling it to you.
For every point by which the communitys resources is less than the
minimum for the item you seek, add 1 to the items purchase DC, take a
2 penalty to your Resources check result, and increase the time required
by 1 step on the table. You might also need to make an Influence (Cha)
check to negotiate with the owner and convince him or her to sell you
the item, at the Gamemasters discretion.

1 Value in US Dollars, circa 2011

Resources Modifier
Over the course of play, your Resources modifier will decrease as you
purchase expensive items and increase as you gain levels. There is no
limit to how high or low your Resources modifier can climb.
Since Resources is an abstract concept, its sometimes difficult to
determine how financially well off a character is. To get a general sense
of how financially solvent a character is at any given time, check the
table below.

Purchase DC
10 or less
11 to 15
16 to 20
21 to 25
26 to 30
31 to 35
36 to 40
41 or more

Resources and the Starting Hero

At 1st level, your starting Resources modifier is 7 + your occupations


Resources modifier.
Random Resources: At the Gamemasters option, your starting
Resources can be determined randomly. To do so, roll 2d6 and add your
occupations Resources modifier.

Time Required
1 hour
2 hours
4 hours
1 day
2 days
1 week
2 weeks
1 month

Minimum
Community Resources
Purchase DC + 1
Purchase DC + 2
Purchase DC + 3
Purchase DC + 4
Purchase DC + 5
Purchase DC + 6
Purchase DC + 7
Purchase DC + 8

Trying Again

You can try again if you fail a Resources check, but not until you have
spent an additional number of hours shopping equal to the purchase DC
of the object or service.

Low Resources

If your current Resources modifier is +0 or less, your dire financial


circumstances place some limitations on what you can do with your
Resources. You cannot take 10 or take 20 on any Resources check, and
you cannot make any withdrawals to gain cash.

Losing Resources
If you successfully purchase an object or service with a purchase DC
thats higher than your current Resources modifier, your Resources
modifier decreases by (purchase DC Resources modifier)/2, rounded up.

Purchasing Equipment
Resources checks are used to determine what you can afford and to what
gear you might reasonably have access. Your Resources modifier reflects
your buying power, and every object and service has a purchase DC. To
make a purchase, make a Resources check against the purchase DC.

Making Withdrawals

Sometimes, you dont want to buy a specific item, but you would like to
have some cash on hand. In this case, pick a purchase DC greater than
your current Resources modifier that corresponds to the amount of cash
youd like to withdraw. Make a Resources check as with a normal
purchase to determine if you are successful. If successful, compare the
purchase DC to your current Resources to calculate how much you
reduce your Resources modifier.

Purchase DCs

In the e20 System Core Rulebook, every item and service available in the
Equipment chapter has a purchase DC listed. For other items, you can
determine a purchase DC by looking up its value in US dollars (present
day, circa 2011) on Table 62: Purchase DCs.

36

Because making a withdrawal is simpler than actually making a


purchase (that is, you dont need to go shopping), treat the purchase DC
as 5 points lower when determining how long you must spend to make
the withdrawal. For example, a purchase DC of 15 would normally take 2
hours, so making a withdrawal of $500 (DC 15) instead takes only 1
hour, the same as a DC 10 purchase.
You cannot make a withdrawal if your current Resources modifier is +0
or less.

check.) The DC is equal to 20 + your current Resources, and you cannot


take 10 or take 20 on this check. After one week of dedicated work (at
least 40 hours), you can make one skill check to see if your Resources
improve.
You can work a job while adventuring, so long as you are able to put in
the necessary hours of work. The Gamemaster determines what
requirements your specific job might have, such as a specific work
schedule and whether overtime is possible (or perhaps required).
Depending on the job, time spent during adventures might count as work
hours; for example, a team of commandos working for a professional
military would count time spent conducting missions as a part of their
job.
The Gamemaster is the final arbiter of when you can and cannot work
to earn money, and it should never be allowed to disrupt adventures or
the campaign as a whole.

Gaining Resources
Your Resources modifier recovers as you advance in level. When you
advance a level, make a skill check using your best skill associated with
your current occupation, adding the occupations Resource modifier to
your check. If your check result equals or exceeds your current Resources
modifier, your Resources modifier increases by 1, plus 1 additional point
for every 5 points by which your check result exceeds your Resources
modifier.

Combining Resources
Multiple characters can combine their funds to make a large purchase or
split a large reward. Doing so reduces the financial strain on any single
member of the group, but it requires all participating characters to spend
time shopping together to make the purchase.

Resources Awards

Adventuring may result in characters finding valuable items or monetary


rewards. In such cases, the benefit might translate into a Resources
award. The award might be a direct bonus, such as every hero in the
group gaining 1 point of Resources; this is most appropriate when the
reward is largely intangible, such as earning favors from powerful
patrons or gaining access to an organizations assets.
Alternatively, the award might be in the form of cash, which each
character can either keep or deposit to increase their current Resources.

Combined Resources Modifier

To make a purchase as a group, you need to calculate a combined


Resources modifier. You have two options for doing this, and both will
yield similar results.
Add Purchase Values: Look up the value (in US$) corresponding to each
characters current Resources modifier. Add these values together, and
then find the greatest value on the table that is less than or equal to this
amount. The purchase DC listed for that value is the combined Resources
modifier for the group.
For example, characters with Resources +5, +6, and +8 want to
combine their efforts to make a purchase. Look up the values of for
purchase DCs of 5 ($10), 6 ($15) and 8 ($30), and then add these
together ($55). The greatest value on the table that is less than or equal
to $55 is $50 (purchase DC 9). Therefore, the group has a combined
Resources modifier of +9.
Combine Least Pairs: Start with the two lowest Resources modifiers
and combine them. If they have the same modifier, their combined
modifier is +2 higher. If one is 1 to 2 points higher than the other, their
combined modifier is +1 higher than the greater modifier. If one is 3 or
more points higher than the other, their combined modifier is equal to
the greater modifier (that is, the lower modifier is too small to
significantly increase the greater modifier). Repeat this process, always
combining the two lowest values, until you have a single combined
Resources modifier.
For example, the same three characters (Resources +5, +6, and +8)
want to combine their efforts to make a purchase. Starting with the two
lowest modifiers, we see that 6 is 1 point greater than 5, so this pair
combines to a value of +7 (1 point more than the greater modifier, +6).
Next, we combine the +7 and +8. Again, the greater modifier is 1 point
higher than the lesser modifier, so their combined modifier is +9 (1 point
more than the greater modifier, +8).

Making Deposits

You can take cash on hand and deposit it to increase your current
Resources. Determine the purchase DC equivalent to the cash value you
deposit; round down to the next lowest purchase DC. Your Resources
modifier increases by (purchase DC Resources modifier)/3, rounded
down.

Selling Stuff

To sell something, you first need to determine its sale value. Assuming
the object is undamaged and in working condition, the sale value is equal
to the objects purchase DC (as if purchased new) 3.
Selling an object can provide an increase to a characters Resources
modifier. Your Resources modifier increases by (sale DC Resources
modifier)/3, rounded down. Selling an object takes an amount of time
equal to that required to purchase the object, as determined by its
purchase DC.
A character cannot legally sell restricted objects unless the character is
licensed to own them. A character also cannot legally sell objects that
have been reported as stolen. Selling objects illegally usually requires
that the character have contacts in the black market, and reduces the
sale value by an additional 3.

Working a Job

When you arent adventuring, you might be able to work to earn money.
This option is available only if you have a regular job that provides you
with access to paid work, and in some settings that wont be available on
a reliable basis. In a high fantasy setting, for example, you cant expect
to work as a blacksmith for a week between adventures because most
trades are practiced by full-time apprentices and journeymen. (If you
own your own smithy, of course, you can pick up work whenever you
wantbut then youll also have to manage and train your apprentices
and journeymen so they can run the business in your absence.)
Working a job requires a skill check just as when you gain Resources
upon advancing a level, using your best skill associated with your
occupation and adding the occupations Resources modifier. (If your
occupation has a required skill, you must use that skill to make the

Making a Combined Purchase

Once you have calculated the combined Resources modifier, make the
purchase normally using the combined modifier. Calculate the Resources
lost for the group as a whole (comparing the purchase DC to the
combined Resources modifier), and apply that loss individually to each
character.
For example, if our group with a combined Resources modifier of +9
successfully buys something with a purchase DC of 13, this would result
in the loss of 2 points of Resources (13 9 = 4, 4/2 = 2). Therefore, each

37

specifically purchase such objects in order to employ themuse the


following rules.
With the GMs permission, you can make a Resources check to see if
you have a mundane object on hand, as long as the object has a
purchase DC of 10 or lower. The Resources check works the same as for
buying the object, except that you take a 10 penalty on the check and
you cant take 10 or take 20. In addition, you cant make a Resources
check to see if you have a mundane object on hand during character
generation or between adventuresonly during play. If you succeed, your
Resources modifier is unaffected, even if the objects purchase DC is
higher than your Resources modifier.
Depending on the situation, the GM can rule that a certain mundane
object is not available; for an object to be obtainable, the character must
be in a place where the object logically would be, such as in your home
or in the trunk of your vehicle.

member of the group loses 2 points from their Resources modifier,


reducing them to +3, +4, and +6.

Cash on Hand
The Resources mechanic abstracts the day-to-day monetary transactions
that characters in a modern setting might make, avoiding the minutia of
paying bills, collecting paychecks, and so forth. However, in many
settings it is entirely appropriate to conduct most transactions in cash
rather than resorting to Resources checks. In these cases, the options for
making withdrawals and making deposits allow you to move freely
between an abstract Resources modifier and specific cash funds.
When purchasing an item with cash, its cash value is equal to that
listed for its purchase DC in Table 62: Purchase DCs unless otherwise
specified.

On-Hand Items
To account for the mundane and innocuous objects that most people
have among their possessionsand not force every character to

38

7: Powers
Some genres and settings might provide access to powersextraordinary
or supernatural abilities not found in the real world. This chapter
provides a brief overview of the types of powers that you can find in the
e20 System Core Rulebook.

and bargain with supernaturaland often malevolententities. They


might be powerful but less-than-deific extraplanar beings (such as
demons and devils), but some might be forgotten elder gods whose vast
powers merely lie dormant as they sleep, dreaming of the unimaginable
horrors they will unleash when they awaken.
You can learn pact magic through sinister bargains that grant you
diabolic powers you channel into vicious attacks (Warlock Spellcasting,
Vanguard), unearthing forgotten occult symbols and rituals that allow
you to summon extraplanar beings and bind them to your will (Alienist
Spellcasting, Savant), or mastering the potential of your own infernal
bloodline (Hexblade Spellcasting, Dreadnought).

Magic
Magic is the art of manipulating the world around you through
supernatural means. Magic has four primary typesarcane, divine, pact,
and primaland it can employed by casting spells, performing
incantations, or using items with inherent magical properties.
Spellcasting: Each type of magic has its own talent tree, and you must
take one of the spellcasting feats for a given magic type before you can
learn any of its talents. Every spellcasting feat is associated with a single
class.
Because of the number of possible magical effects within even a single
type of magic, spell talent trees are larger than usual: They have 6 core
talents (three 1st, and one at 3rd, 7th, and 11th) and 12 major talents
(three at 1st, and one at 2nd, 4th, 6th, 8th, 10th, 12th, 14th, 16th, and
18th). Unlike normal talents, however, spells have some restrictions on
how you can use talent stunts, as determined by your spellcasting feat.
Incantations: In addition to spells, anyone with the necessary
spellcasting feat can perform incantationslonger rituals that produce
lasting effects. Each incantation is a challenge (page 26); you gain its
benefit when you complete it, but you can suffer a magical backlash if
the challenge is terminated.
Magic Items: Some objects have inherent magical properties in the
form of an enhancement (page 55). Anyone with a spellcasting feat can
produce magic items that use that type of magic.

Primal
Primal magic taps into the inherent power of the natural world, calling
upon the energies produced by all life or the spirits left behind after
death.
You can learn primal magic through devotion to the natural cycles of
life and death and guarding against those who would intrude upon it
(Druid Spellcasting, Sentinel), immersing yourself in the wild and learning
to call upon your inherent connection to it (Ranger Spellcasting,
Vanguard), or seeing, contacting, and traveling the spirit world (Shaman
Spellcasting, Corsair).

Psionics
Psionics is the practice of using your mind to produce paranormal effects
though intense meditative focus. Psionics has four typesclairsentience,
psychokinesis, psychometabolism, and telepathyand it can be employed
by manifesting psionic talents, performing meditations, or using items
empowered with psychic energy.
Manifestation: Each type of psionics has its own talent tree, and you
must take the Psychic Manifestation feat before you can learn them.
Each talent tree is associated with three classes.
Meditations: In addition to manifestations, anyone with the Psychic
Manifestation feat can perform meditations, lengthy delves into the
recesses of the mind that can produce lasting effects. Each meditation is
a challenge (page 26); you gain its benefit when you complete it, but you
can suffer a psychic backlash if the challenge is terminated.
Empowered Items: Some objects have inherent psionic properties in
the form of an enhancement (page 55). Anyone with the Psychic
Manifestation feat can produce psionic items.

Arcane
Arcane magic allows you to take direct control of universal forces,
shaping the underlying eldritch fabric of reality using arcane formulae,
invocations, and rituals that produce the desired effect.
You can learn arcane magic either through dedicated study of arcane
writings (Wizard Spellcasting, Savant), informal study and second-hand
knowledge picked up over time (Bard Spellcasting, Envoy), or a
completely intuitive and innate grasp of arcane magic (Sorcerer
Spellcasting, Corsair).

Divine

Clairsentience

Divine magic allows you to use your faith to call upon a supremely
powerful entity, which then intercedes on your behalf. This entity is often
a deity, but it can also be something more abstract, such as tapping into
the collective consciousness of the adherents to a particular philosophy
or ideology.
You can learn divine magic through pious reverence and dedicated
study of religious and philosophical teachings (Cleric Spellcasting,
Sentinel), a righteous devotion to serving your faith through bold deeds
(Paladin Spellcasting, Dreadnought), or by gaining divine favor through
the faith you inspire in others (Evangelist Spellcasting, Envoy).

Clairsentience provides various forms of extrasensory perception,


including powers such as clairvoyance, clairaudience, precognition,
postcognition, and psychometry. This talent tree is available to Corsairs,
Sentinels, and Envoys.

Psychokinesis
Psychokinesis is the mental manipulation of your physical environment,
including powers such as moving distant objects, starting fires,
controlling light or sound, and creating telekinetic shields to protect you
from attacks. This talent tree is available to Vanguards, Corsairs, and
Savants.

Pact
Pact magic delves into Things Man Was Not Meant To Know, forbidden
secrets that cross the line into madness and allow you to make contact

39

being a member of another species), but under very limited


circumstances it might be possible for a character to become a prodigy,
perhaps through the injection of a mutagenic serum, genetic
engineering, or a bizarre, freak accident.
During character creation, prodigies select their powers, which might
be in the form of feats (Superior Strength, Regeneration) or a talent tree
(Energy Manipulation, Teleportation); many prodigies have psionic or
magic talents, as well.
As they advance in level, prodigies can continue to improve their
existing powers or, in the case of prodigy talents, learn new powers
closely related to those they already know; they cannot gain new and
unrelated powers. (You might have an indestructible skeleton, retractable
claws, and uncanny regeneration, but you aint learning to fly, bub.)
Although they are too varied and complex to list here, the e20 System
Core Rulebook provides a wide range of prodigy powers appropriate for
any superhero or villain.

Psychometabolism
Psychometabolism is the mastery of the body, unlocking your physical
potential by opening your internal channels of energy. It includes powers
such as adrenaline control, biofeedback, regeneration, and even altering
your molecular structure. This talent tree is available to Vanguards,
Dreadnoughts, and Sentinels.

Telepathy
Telepathy is the ability to contact, read, and even control other
characters minds as well as to protect yourself from such intrusion. It
includes powers such as telepathic communication, mind reading,
psychic blasts, creating illusions, amplifying emotions, altering memories,
and even controlling actions. This talent tree is available to
Dreadnoughts, Savants, and Sentinels.

Prodigies
Prodigies are characters with inherent exceptional or supernatural
abilities that might be described as super powers. In most cases,
prodigies are born with these powers (either as a result of mutation or

40

8: Equipment
In most cases, equipment in the e20 System is similar to its earlier d20based counterparts.

A closed container (such as a holster with its safety strap attached, or


a briefcase) requires a swift action to open or close and an additional
swift action to unlock it, if necessary.

Using Items

Weapons

Before you can use an item to perform an action or gain its benefit, you
must first equip the item in the proper location on your body. Your
available locations are arms, back, fingers (two separate locations, one
on each hand), hands, head, held, legs, neck, torso, and waist.
Unless otherwise specified, you can only use or gain the benefit of one
item in each body location.
Held: Equipping or stowing a held item (such as a weapon or tool)
requires a swift action. You can also drop a held item as a free action.
Worn: Wearing or removing a single worn item requires a move action.
If the item includes multiple pieces (such as a pair of gloves, an intricate
costume, or most formal clothing), you must use one move action per
piece.
Because of their bulk and complexity, suits of armor require multiple
actions to wear or remove: Archaic armor requires (1 + defense bonus)
standard actions, and modern armor (1 + defense bonus) move actions.
Hasty Removal: In an emergency (such as when you fall into a river
while wearing heavy clothing or armor), you can remove a worn item
hastily at the cost of damaging it. You must spend the same number of
actions indicated above, but reduce the action type necessary by one
step (from standard to move, or from move to swift). During hasty
removal, the worn items hit points and reserves are both reduced to 0
and it is incapacitated (page 63), making it unusable until repaired.

Weapons are similar to those seen in previous d20-based games, and


damage levels are comparable if not actually identical. A wide variety of
weapons are detailed in the tables below.

Weapon Tables
The following section details the terms used in the weapon tables below.
Weapon: This lists the name of the weapon. Weapons are grouped by
skill and specialization within each skill. Some weapons can be used with
more than one skill or specialization, such as bayonets (Firearms/rifles or
Melee/simple), daggers (Melee/simple or Melee/fencing), short swords
(Melee/swords or Melee/fencing), or grenades (Gunnery/explosives &
incendiaries or Ranged/simple).
If a weapon has any special properties (such as providing a bonus to a
particular action or requiring the Advanced Weapons feat), they are
noted in the weapons entry in the table.
Damage: This lists the weapons damage. Weapon damage (before
adding any extra damage from your specific action) must equal or exceed
a targets Hardness for an attack to deal any damage.
Strength: Muscle-powered weapons include your Strength modifier as
a part of their weapon damage. When determining if you penetrate a
targets Hardness, be sure to include your Strength modifier.
Type: Some targets have resistance, vulnerability, or immunity to
particular types of damage. In addition, some Damage Reduction doesnt
apply to specific types of damage. In these cases, the weapons damage
type matters. (See Damage Types, page 76.)
Most weapons deal a single type of damage, but some have the option
to deal one of two types (for example, Pierc./Slash.) or deal damage
that counts as both types (for example, Bludg. + Pierc.). Some weapons
can deal different types of damage by using different ammunition. (See
Ammunition, page 46.)
Range: This lists the weapons point blank range. Beyond point blank
range, you take a range penalty to your attack: short range (2 range),
2; medium range (5 range), 5; long range (10 range), 10; extreme
range (20 range), 20.
Use the distance to the target or the targets current speed, whichever
is more, when calculating your range penalty. Some equipment and feats
can mitigate range modifiers.
Maximum Range: A weapon cannot attack a target beyond its
maximum range. (For area weapons, the entire area must be within the
weapons maximum range.) Unless otherwise specified, a weapons
maximum range is equal to its extreme range, but some weapons list a
maximum range in addition to its point blank range (for example, 2,
max. 5).
Area: For weapons that produce an area attack, this column lists how
wide (in squares) its area is on each side. (See Area Attacks, page 73.)

Containers
The actions listed above assume that the item in question has a
dedicated, accessible, and open container. If this is not the case, you
must spend additional actions to equip or remove it.
Accessible: An accessible container is one worn within easy reach, but
you can have only a limited number of accessible containers at any given
time. You can have up to four on your waist (such as belt pouches, hip
holsters, and pants pockets), two on your torso (such as shoulder
holsters, bandoliers, or shirt pockets), and two on your back (such as a
rifle slung over your shoulder, an arrow quiver, or the pockets of a jacket
or coat).
If the items container isnt accessible, you must spend an additional
move action to get to the container itself (such as by removing a worn
backpack or bending down to reach an ankle holster) before you can
equip or remove the item.
Dedicated: A dedicated container, such as a holster, holds only a single
item. If the item you seek shares its container with other objects (such as
in a bag, backpack, briefcase, or large pocket), you must spend an
additional move action to find the item.
Open: An open container has no lid, straps, or other restraints that
prevent you from easily retrieving the item you seek. The disadvantage of
an open container is that items can easily fall out, suffer damage from
the elements, or become the target of pickpockets. Because of this, most
adventurers prefer to keep important items secured (such as with the
safety strap on holster) unless they expect to need them in very short
order.

41

Table 81: Archaic Weapons (Unarmed and Melee)


Weapon
UNARMED

Damage

Type

Range

Area

Ammo

Wield

Size

Weight

Prep

Purch
DC

Unarmed strike
Martial arts2
MELEE

1d4+Str1
1d6+Str

Bludg.
Bludg.

Light
Light

M (+0)
M (+0)

Sai7,10
Dagger14
Sap
Club
Greatclub
Quarterstaff9,10,11
Shortspear
Spear

1d4+Str
1d4+Str
1d6+Str1
1d6+Str
1d10+Str
1d6+Str
1d6+Str
1d8+Str

Bludg.
Pierc./Slash.
Bludg.
Bludg.
Bludg.
Bludg.
Pierc.
Pierc.

2
2

5
5

Thrown
Thrown

Thrown

Thrown
Thrown

Light
Light
Light
Light
Heavy
Heavy
Normal
Heavy

M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)

1 lb.
1 lb.
2 lb.
3 lb.
8 lb.
4 lb.
3 lb.
6 lb.

Free
Free

Free

Free
Free

5
7
7
3
9
4
5
7

Flail, light7
Flail, heavy7
Spiked chain2,8,9
Nunchuku2,10
Whip2,3

1d6+Str
1d10+Str
1d8+Str
1d6+Str
1d4+Str

Bludg.
Bludg.
Pierc.
Bludg.
Slash.

Normal
Heavy
Heavy
Light
Normal

M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)

5 lb.
10 lb.
10 lb.
2 lb.
2 lb.

11
12
14
7
5

Main-gauche11
Stiletto12
Rapier13
Cutlass11
Saber13

1d4+Str
1d4+Str
1d6+Str
1d6+Str
1d6+Str

Pierc.
Pierc.
Pierc.
Slash.
Slash.

Light
Light
Light
Light
Light

M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)

1 lb.
1 lb.
2 lb.
3 lb.
2 lb.

8
8
13
14
13

Kama2,10
Pick, light12
Pick, heavy12
Hammer, light
Handaxe
Battleaxe
Greataxe
Mace, light
Mace, heavy
Morningstar
Scythe12
Warhammer

1d6+Str
1d4+Str
1d6+Str
1d4+Str
1d6+Str
1d8+Str
1d12+Str
1d6+Str
1d8+Str
1d12+Str
1d10+Str
1d8+Str

Slash.
Pierc.
Pierc.
Bludg.
Slash.
Slash.
Slash.
Bludg.
Bludg.
Bludg. + Pierc.
Pierc./Slash.
Bludg.

5
2

Thrown

Thrown
Thrown

Light
Light
Normal
Light
Light
Normal
Heavy
Light
Normal
Heavy
Heavy
Normal

M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)

2 lb.
3 lb.
6 lb.
1 lb.
3 lb.
6 lb.
12 lb.
4 lb.
8 lb.
12 lb.
10 lb.
5 lb.

Free

Free
Free

7
9
11
5
10
12
14
9
12
15
13
12

Halberd6
Longspear8
Lance5,8
Glaive8
Guisarme6,8
Ranseur7,8

1d10+Str
1d8+Str
1d8+Str
1d10+Str
1d8+Str
1d8+Str

Pierc./Slash.
Pierc.
Pierc.
Slash.
Slash.
Pierc.

Heavy
Heavy
Heavy
Heavy
Heavy
Heavy

M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)

12 lb.
9 lb.
10 lb.
10 lb.
12 lb.
12 lb.

11
9
11
10
11
11

Short sword
Longsword
Bastard sword2
Scimitar12
Falchion12
Greatsword

1d6+Str
1d8+Str
1d10+Str
1d8+Str
1d10+Str
1d12+Str

Pierc.
Slash.
Slash.
Slash.
Slash.
Slash.

Light
Normal
Normal
Normal
Heavy
Heavy

M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)

2 lb.
4 lb.
6 lb.
4 lb.
8 lb.
8 lb.

11
12
14
12
16
15

Brawling

Basic weapons

Chained weapons

Fencing weapons

Hafted weapons

Polearms

Swords

1
2
3
4
5
6
7

Nonlethal damage
Advanced weapon
On hit vs. Reflex and Fortitude, target is grappled
On hit vs. Primary and Fortitude, target is poisoned
+1 die of damage when charging
+2 to attack when using Trip stunt
+2 to attack when using Disarm stunt

8
9
10
11
12
13
14

42

Reach weapon
Double weapon
Martial arts weapon
+2 to Primary Defense with total defense action
+1 die of damage on critical hit
+2 to attack when using Riposte stunt
+2 to Stealth checks to conceal

bow, crossbow, or sling. You must draw another shot of ammunition as a


swift action, but placing it in the weapon is a free action.
Internal: The weapon holds its ammunition in an internal chamber,
such as in a bolt-action rifle or pump-action shotgun. You must spend at
least two swift actions to reload the weapon: one to acquire the
ammunition, and another to load a number of shots equal to 1 + your
Dexterity modifier (minimum 2 per swift action). If this isnt sufficient to
finish reloading the weapon, you can spend additional consecutive swift
actions to load more shots (number as above).
Cylinder: The weapon holds its ammunition in a cylinder, such as in a

Ammunition: All nonmelee weapons require ammunition to make an


attack. Loading or reloading ammunition requires an action determined
by the listing in this column. The action listed assumes that you have the
ammunition in an easily accessible location, such as a holster or a pouch
on a belt or bandolier. If the ammunition is stored in a worn item such as
a backpack, you must remove the item (a move action) before you can
access its contents.
Thrown: After using a thrown weapon, you must draw another one as a
swift action before you can make another attack.
External: The weapon holds its ammunition externally, such as on a

Table 82: Archaic Weapons (Ranged, Firearms, and Gunnery)


Damage

Type

Range

Area

Ammo

Wield

Size

Weight

Prep

Purch
DC

Sling
Net1,2
Bolas1,2
Dart
Javelin
Skuriken1,3

1d4+Str

1d4+Str
1d4+Str
1d6+Str
1d4+Str

Bludg.

Bludg.
Pierc.
Pierc.
Pierc.

10
1
2
5
10
2

1 ext.
Thrown
Thrown
Thrown
Thrown
Thrown6

Light
Heavy
Light
Light
Normal
Light

M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)

0.1 lb.
6 lb.
2 lb.
0.5 lb.
2 lb.
0.5 lb.

Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free

2
7
9
3
5
5

Shortbow4
Longbow
Greatbow1

1d6+Str
1d8+Str
1d10+Str

Pierc.
Pierc.
Pierc.

10
20
20

1 ext.6
1 ext.6
1 ext.6

Normal
Heavy
Heavy

M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)

2 lb.
3 lb.
4 lb.

Free
Free
Free

14
17
20

2d4
2d6
2d6
2d8
2d8

Pierc.
Pierc.
Pierc.
Pierc.
Pierc.

5
10
10
20
20

1 ext.
1 ext.
5 box
1 ext.
5 box

Light
Normal
Normal
Heavy
Heavy

M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)

2 lb.
4 lb.
6 lb.
8 lb.
12 lb.

Swift
Swift
Swift
Standard
Standard

17
14
20
15
21

Belt pistol, wheel-lock


Horse pistol, wheel-lock
Pistol, flintlock

2d4
2d6
2d4

Ball.
Ball.
Ball.

2
2
2

1 int.
1 int.
1 int.

Light
Normal
Light

M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)

3 lb.
4 lb.
3 lb.

2 Standard
2 Standard
Standard

11
12
13

Musket, flintlock
Musket, matchlock
Arquebus, matchlock
Caliver, matchlock

2d8
2d8
2d6
2d4

Ball.
Ball.
Ball.
Ball.

10
10
5
5

1 int.
1 int.
1 int.
1 int.

Heavy
Mounted
Heavy
Heavy

M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)

14 lb.
20 lb.
10 lb.
11 lb.

Standard
2 Standard
2 Standard
2 Standard

14
11
10
9

Blunderbuss, flintlock
GUNNERY

2d6

Ball.

1 int.

Heavy

M (+0)

7 lb.

Standard

13

3d4
3d4

Expl.
Fire

5
2

Thrown

Light
Light

M (+0)
M (+0)

1 lb.
1 lb.

12
7

Ballista, light6
Ballista, heavy
Catapult, light1
Catapult, heavy1
Trebuchet1

2d8+2
2d8+4
2d12+4
2d12+10
2d12+20

Pierc.
Pierc.
Bludg.
Bludg.
Bludg.

20
20
507
507
1007

1 ext.
1 ext.
1 ext.
1 ext.
1 ext.

Mounted
Crew (2)
Crew (2)
Crew (4)
Crew (6)

L (1)
H (2)
H (2)
G (5)
C (10)

75 lb.
150 lb.
0.5 lb.
1 ton
2 tons

Standard
Standard
2 Standard
2 Standard
2 Standard

18
20
21
23
25

Cannon, 1 lb.
Cannon, 3 lb.
Cannon, 6 lb.
Cannon, 12 lb.
Cannon, 24 lb.

3d6+2
3d8+4
3d8+10
3d8+20
3d8+40

Imp.
Imp.
Imp.
Imp.
Imp.

20
50
50
100
100

2
2
5
5
5

1 int.
1 int.
1 int.
1 int.
1 int.

Mounted
Crew (2)
Crew (3)
Crew (6)
Crew (8)

L (1)
H (2)
G (5)
C (10)
XC (20)

75 lb.
500 lb.
1 ton
2 tons
4 tons

Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard

18
21
24
26
28

Weapon
RANGED

Basic weapons

Bows

Crossbows

Hand crossbow1
Light crossbow5
Light crossbow, rptg1,5
Heavy crossbow
Heavy crossbow, rptg1
FIREARMS

Handguns

Longarms

Shotguns

Explosives & incendiaries

Explosive, black powder


Flaming oil

Ballistae & catapults

Cannons & guns

1
2
3
4

Advanced weapon
On hit vs. Reflex and Fortitude, target is grappled
Martial arts weapon
Must be wielded in two hands (regardless of wield type).

5
6
7

43

5 penalty to attack if wielded in one hand.


If you have the weapons specialization and Advanced Weapons feat,
requires only a free action to draw (thrown) or reload (ext.).
Indirect fire, cannot attack targets at point blank range

revolver. You must spend at least two swift actions to reload the
weapon: one to acquire the ammunition, and another to load a number
of shots equal to 1 + your Dexterity modifier (minimum 2 per swift
action). If this isnt sufficient to finish reloading the weapon, you can
spend additional consecutive swift actions to load more shots (number as
above).
In addition, you can use a speed loader to reload a cylinder. A speed
loader holds a number of bullets in a ring, in a position that mirrors the
chambers in a revolver cylinder. Using a pre-loaded speed loader allows
you to load all the bullets into the cylinder (instead of the normal 1 +
Dexterity modifier) with a single swift action. When filling an empty
speed loader, you must spend one swift action to load a number of shots
equal to 1 + your Dexterity modifier (minimum 2 per swift action).
Box: The weapon holds its ammunition in a box magazine, such as in a
semiautomatic pistol or an automatic rifle. You must spend two swift
actions to reload the weapon; one swift action to acquire the pre-loaded
box magazine, and another swift action to load it into the weapon. When
filling an empty box magazine, you must spend one swift action to load a
number of shots equal to 1 + your Dexterity modifier (minimum 2 per
swift action).
Linked: Often used on larger autofire weapons such as machine guns,
the weapons bullets are chained together with small metal clips, forming
a belt. You must spend two swift actions to reload the weapon; one swift

action to acquire the belt, and another swift action to load one end of
the belt into the weapon.
Typically, a belt holds 50 bullets. Any number of belts can be clipped
together by spending two swift actions: one to acquire the second belt,
and another to link it to the first one. In military units, as the gunner
fires, an assistant clips new ammunition belts together, keeping the
weapon fed.
Wield: This column indicates how you wield the weapon. This can
affect what fighting styles you can use with the weapon as well as what
key ability applies to your skill when you make an attack.
Light: The weapon is very light and quick, ideal for being wielded in
one hand. When using a light weapon, your penalty for using two
weapon fighting style is reduced by 1 point (from 3 to 2).
When making a melee attack with a light melee weapon, use Dexterity
rather than Strength as the key ability for your attack and damage.
Normal: The weapon is of average size, allowing you to wield it
comfortably in one or two hands.
Heavy: The weapon is very large, normally requiring you to use twohanded weapon style (page 66). If its weight is no more than your light
load, you can wield it with one-handed weapon style at a 5 penalty.
Emplaced: The weapon is so large that you operate it from some sort of
emplacement, such as a tripod, bipod, or permanent weapon mount on a
vehicle. You normally use two hands to operate the weapon, but you can

Table 83: Modern Weapons (Unarmed, Melee, Ranged, and Firearms)


Damage

Type

Range

Area

Ammo

Wield

Size

Weight

Prep

Purch
DC

spec.1

Bludg.

Light

M (+0)

1d6+Str
1d8+Str
1d4+Str
1d6+Str
2d8+Str
1d4+Str
1d6+Str

Bludg.
Bludg.
Slash.
Pierc.
Slash.
Bludg.
Bludg.

2
2

Light
Light
Light
Heavy
Heavy
Light
Heavy

M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)

2 lb.
3 lb.
1 lb.
+1 lb.
20 lb.

7
9
10
10
10

2d45
2d65

Poison6
Shock

1, max. 2
1, max. 5

1 int.
1 int.

Light
Light

M (+0)
M (+0)

0.5 lb.
2 lb.

Free
Free

6
8

Pistol, .222
Pistol, 9 mm
Pistol, .44 magnum
Submachine gun, 9 mm3

2d4
2d6
2d8
2d6

Ball.
Ball.
Ball.
Ball.

5
5
2
5

6 cyl.
15 box
6 cyl.
30 box

Light
Light
Normal
Normal

M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)

1 lb.
3 lb.
3 lb.
6 lb.

Semi
Semi
Semi
Semi/Auto

13 (L)
15 (L)
15 (L)
16 (R)

Rifle, .22LR7
Rifle, .3087
Assault Rifle, 5.56 mm3,7
Assault Rifle, 7.62 mm3,7
Sniper Rifle, .503,7

2d8
2d10
2d8
2d10
2d12

Ball.
Ball.
Ball.
Ball.
Ball.

20
50
20
50
100

5 int.
5 int.
30 box
20 box
11 box

Normal
Heavy
Normal
Heavy
Mounted

M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)

6 lb.
8 lb.
8 lb.
11 lb.
35 lb.

Swift
Swift
Semi/Auto
Semi/Auto
Swift

15 (L)
16 (L)
18 (R)
19 (R)
21 (R)

12-gauge7
12-gauge, sawed off2
12-gauge, semiautomatic7

2d8
2d8
2d8

Ball.
Ball.
Ball.

58
28
58

6 int.
6 int.
11 int.

Normal
Normal
Normal

M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)

7 lb.
4 lb.
10 lb.

Swift
Swift
Semi

15 (L)
15 (I)
19 (R)

Weapon
UNARMED

Brawling

Brass knuckles
MELEE

Basic

Baton, collapsible2
Baton, nightstick3
Bayonet, loose
Bayonet, mounted4
Chainsaw
Pistol whip
Rifle butt
RANGED

Simple

Pepper spray
Taser
FIREARMS

Handguns

Longarms

Shotguns

1
2
3
4
5

Increase brawling damage by 1 die type


+2 to Stealth checks to conceal
Advanced weapon
Double weapon
Nonlethal damage

6
7
8

44

On hit vs. Reflex and Fortitude, target is staggered until end of its next
turn; on hit vs. Fort by 5 or more, target is dazed (Fort save ends),
becoming stunned on failed save.
5 penalty to attack if wielded in one hand
Apply range penalty to weapon damage rather than attack roll.

complex that it requires more than one operator to function as intended.


The number listed in parentheses indicates the total number of crew
needed (including the gunner who performs the actual attack).
Before the gunner can take any action to reload, prepare, or attack
with the weapon, every member of the crew must use an equivalent
action to perform its part of the task while in or adjacent to the
weapons space. (For example, if the gunner spends a standard action to
attack, every other member of the crew must spend a separate standard

try to operate it with one hand at a 5 penalty to your attack. If you do


wield it in two hands, you can use emplaced weapon style (page 66) to
gain an additional benefit.
If the weapons weight is no more than your light load, you can remove
it from its mount and wield it with two-handed weapon style at a 5
penalty; however, you cannot aim or brace the weapon unless it is
mounted on its normal emplacement.
Crew: A crewed weapon is an emplaced weapon whose workings are so

Table 84: Modern Weapons (Gunnery)


Damage

Type

Range

Area

Ammo

Wield

Size

Weight

Prep

Purch
DC

2d10
2d10
2d12
2d12
2d12+4
2d12+4
2d12+10
2d12+10

Ball.
Ball.
Ball.
Ball.
Ball.
Ball.
Ball.
Ball.

20
20
50
50
100
100
100
100

Linked
Linked
Linked
Linked
Linked
Linked
Linked
Linked

Heavy
Mounted
Mounted
Mounted
Mounted
Mounted
Mounted
Mounted

M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)
H (2)
H (2)
G (5)
G (5)

22 lb.
72 lb.
75 lb.
200 lb.
75 lb.
250 lb.
150 lb.
0.6 ton

Auto
Auto1
Auto
Auto1
Auto
Auto1
Auto
Auto1

22 (M)
24 (M)
23 (M)
25 (M)
24 (M)
28 (M)
25 (M)
31 (M)

4d4
4d6
4d6
4d4

Expl.
Expl.
Expl.
Fire

2
5, max. 5

2
5
5
5

Thrown

Thrown
10 int.

Light
Light
Light
Heavy

M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)

1 lb.
1 lb.
1 lb.
50 lb.

Swift

Swift
Semi

12 (L)
12 (M)
15 (M)
17 (M)

Grenade launcher, 40 mm
Auto grenade lnchr, 40 mm
Mortar, 60 mm
Howitzer, 105 mm
Howitzer, 155 mm

4d4
4d4
4d6
4d10+20
4d12+30

Expl.
Expl.
Expl.
Expl.
Expl.

20
50
1003
5003
1,0003

2
2
5
10
20

1 int.
Linked
1 int.
1 int.
1 int.

Heavy
Mounted
Mounted
Crew (2)
Crew (2)

M (+0)
M (+0)
M (+0)
C (10)
XC (15)

7 lb.
75 lb.
100 lb.
0.8 ton
2 tons

Free
Semi
Free
Free
Free

15 (M)
21 (M)
23 (M)
31 (M)
32 (M)

Tank gun, 75 mm
Tank gun, 90 mm
Tank gun, 105 mm
Tank gun, 120 mm
Naval gun, 3-in.
Naval gun, 5-in.
Naval gun, 8-in.
Naval gun, 16-in.

4d10+10
4d12+10
4d10+20
4d12+20
4d8+20
4d8+30
4d8+40
4d10+50

Expl.
Expl.
Expl.
Expl.
Expl.
Expl.
Expl.
Expl.

100
100
200
200
2003
5003
1,0003
2,0003

5
5
5
5
5
10
10
20

1 int.
1 int.
1 int.
1 int.
1 int.
1 int.
1 int.
1 int.

Crew (2)
Crew (2)
Crew (2)
Crew (2)
Crew (2)
Crew (3)
Crew (6)
Crew (25)

G (5)
G (5)
C (10)
C (10)
C (10)
XC (15)
2XC (20)
3XC (25)

0.6 ton
0.8 ton
1.8 tons
2.5 tons
0.8 ton
4 tons
11 tons
125 tons

Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Standard

29 (M)
30 (M)
31 (M)
32 (M)
29 (M)
32 (M)
35 (M)
40 (M)

Rocket launcher4
Rocket pod, 70 mm
Missile, ultralight2
Missile, light2
Missile, medium2
Missile, heavy2
Missile, superheavy2

4d12
4d12+4
4d12+4
4d12+10
4d12+20
4d12+30
4d12+40

Expl.
Expl.
Expl.
Expl.
Expl.
Expl.
Expl.

20
50
1005
2005
5005
1,0005
2,0005

5
5
5
10
10
20
20

1 int.
19 int.
1 int./ext.
1 int./ext.
1 int./ext.
1 int./ext.
1 int./ext.

Heavy
Mounted
Heavy
Mounted
Mounted
Mounted
Mounted

M (+0)
H (2)
H (2)
G (5)
C (10)
XC (15)
2XC (20)

6 lb.
0.4 ton
20 lb.6
50 lb.6
100 lb.6
200 lb.6
500 lb.6

Free
Semi/Auto
Free7
Free7
Free7
Free7
Free7

15 (M)
24 (M)
23 (M)
24 (M)
26 (M)
28 (M)
31 (M)

Weapon
GUNNERY

MG & autocannons

Machine gun, 7.62 mm


Minigun, 7.62 mm
Machine gun, .50-cal.
Minigun, 12.7 mm
Autocannon, 20 mm
Gatling, 20 mm
Autocannon, 30 mm
Gatling, 30 mm

Explosives & incendiaries


Explosive, dynamite
Explosive, C4
Grenade
Flamethrower2

Mortars & artillery

Cannons & guns

Rockets & missiles

1
2
3
4
5
6
7

High rate of fire: By expending 100 shots during an autofire attack, deal +1 die of damage on hit by 5 or more and 1/2 damage on a miss by 10
or less.
Advanced weapon
Range listed is for indirect fire, which cannot attack targets at point blank range and requires Advanced Weapons (Gunnery). If used for direct
fire, range is decreased by two steps using the standard progression (for example, from 500 to 100).
This is a disposable, one-shot, shoulder-fired rocket launcher.
If a guided missile has a target lock, use its attack bonus (+5) or the gunners (including range penalty), whichever is better. Missiles move 1,000
squares per round during the attackers turn. High-speed missiles instead move 5,000 squares each round (purchase DC +2, weight 1.5). Longrange missiles have an extreme range equal to 100 range (purchase DC +5, weight 5).
Weight is for a single missile. A missile launcher has weight equal to (0.5 missile weight) (1 + missiles carried) and purchase DC equal to
(missiles purchase DC + 1 for every missile carried). Up to (2 vehicle size modifier) missiles can be carried on hardpoints at no additional cost,
but they are unprotected and increase aerodynamic drag (multiply weight by 5 when determining encumbrance for a fixed-wing flying vehicle).
Acquiring a missile lock for a guided missile is a swift action (Computers vs. Reflex). If a guided missile has a target lock, use its attack bonus
(+5) or the gunners (including range penalty), whichever is better. An unguided missile has range 50.

45

action first.) If a crew is short-handed, the gunner or remaining crew


must perform these extra actions, reducing the rate at which they can
fire the weapon.
Other than as listed above, crewed weapons function just like any
other emplaced weapon.
Size: A weapons size determines how easily you can aim it and how
much damage it deals. This column lists an abbreviation for the weapons
size (M = Medium, L = Large, H = Huge, G = Gargantuan, C = Colossal,
1XC = Extra-Colossal, 2XC = Double Extra-Colossal, 3XC = Triple ExtraColossal) followed by the penalty you take to attacks with this weapon
(determined by the weapons size modifier).
Each weapons listed damage already includes the addition of 2 its
size modifier.
Weight: A weapons weight matters when calculating encumbrance
and when determining how you can wield the weapon. You cannot wield
a weapon in one hand if it weighs more than your light load, and you
cannot wield a weapon in two hands if it weighs more than your heavy
load. You can wield an emplaced weapon regardless of its weight.
Preparation: Some ranged weapons require you to take an additional
action before firing even after you have loaded the ammunition. For
example, a crossbow must be cranked, and a bolt-action rifle requires
you to work the action to chamber a round for firing. Other ranged
weapons require no action at all before making an attack, possibly even
allowing you to fire multiple shots with a single attack.
If a weapon requires an action to prepare it for firing, you dont have
to do this action in the same round that you make your attack.
Automatic: Automatic weapons fire multiple shots with a single pull of
the trigger. Normally, automatic weapons make autofire attacks (using
10 shots) or barrage attacks (using 5 shots), and they cannot make
ordinary ranged attacks unless they can also use semiautomatic fire.
(Switching between automatic and semiautomatic modes is a swift
action.)
Some automatic weapons (such as Gatling autocannons and miniguns)
have a high rate of fire. With these weapons, you have the option to
expend 100 shots of ammunition in a single autofire attack; if you do so,
you deal +1 die of damage if you hit by 5 or more and you deal 1/2
damage if you miss by 10 or less (rather than a miss by 5 or less, the
norm for autofire attacks).
Semiautomatic: Semiautomatic weapons load the next shot into the
chamber automatically as you make attacks, allowing you to make
multiple attacks in rapid succession. Because of this, you can use the
Rapid Shot feat with these weapons.
Free: This weapon requires no special action before you make an
attack. If a weapon requires only a free action for preparation and you
are able to draw or load your ammunition as a free action (such as with
shuriken or bows when you have the appropriate Advanced Weapons
feat), you can treat that weapon as if it were semiautomatic.
Swift: This weapon requires you to work some sort of mechanical
action before being able to fire, such as a bolt-action rifle, a pumpaction shotgun, or a crossbow. You must spend a swift action to prepare
this weapon for an attack.
Standard: This weapon requires you to exert substantial effortone or
more standard actionsbefore you can fire it. This is common for archaic
weapons such as heavy crossbows, ballistae, catapults, and black-powder
firearms or cannons.
Purchase DC: This column lists the purchase DC for the weapon. If the
weapon has a purchase restriction, an abbreviation is listed in
parentheses: L = Licensed, R = Restricted, M = Military, I = Illegal.

Ammunition
Standard ammunition for firearms and other weapons is summarized on
Table 85: Ammunition, and several alternative types are described in the
sections below.
Depending on the ammunition used, an attack might produce an area
attack (page 73), deal a different type of damage (page 76), have a
dynamic damage trait (page 77), or produce some other special effect.

Bullet Types

Ballistic weapons (including firearms, machine guns, and autocannons)


default to using a solid bullet with no special characteristics. Ballistic
damage has the trait penetrating 2 against targets wearing archaic
armor.
Armor Piercing: Armor-piercing bullets have a dense, high-strength
core such as tungsten, hardened steel, or even (for very large weapons)
depleted uranium. This core can penetrate armor and even reach the
interior of larger targets without breaking up. Because it doesnt easily
expand inside the target, however, it reduces the chance of damaging the
targets internal organs or critical components.
Damage with an armor-piercing bullet has the traits penetration 10
and nondevastating.
Armor-Piercing Incendiary: Large ballistic weapons (minimum .50
caliber or 12.7 mm) can employ armor piercing incendiary rounds that
deal additional damage to the target after impact. These function as
normal armor-piercing bullets except that they deal both ballistic and
fire damage.
Armor-Piercing Explosive: Bigger ballistic weapons (minimum.50
caliber or 12.7 mm) can employ armor-piercing explosive rounds that
cause extensive damage after penetrating to the targets interior. These
function as a normal armor-piercing bullet except that they do not have
the nondevastating trait.
Availability: Armor-piercing bullets are available for any modern
ballistic weapon. For firearms smaller than .50 caliber or 12.7 mm
increase purchase DC by 2. For firearms, machine guns, and autocannons
of at least .50 caliber or 12.7 mm, armor-piercing bullets have no
additional cost, and armor-piercing incendiary and armor-piercing
explosive ammunition increases the purchase DC by 2. The minimum
restriction for armor-piercing ammunition of any type is Military.
Expanding: Expanding bullets (such as hollow-point, soft-point, or prefragmented bullets) begin disintegrating very quickly after striking a
target, shedding most or all of their kinetic energy in a larger area of the
targets interior. Because it breaks up so quickly upon impact, an
expanding bullet has great difficulty penetrating a hard, solid surface or
body armor.
Damage with an expanding bullet has the traits devastating 2 and
nonpenetrating.
Availability: Expanding bullets are widely available for modern
handguns and longarms with a purchase restriction of less than Military;
increase purchase DC by 2. Though routinely used by civilians and law
enforcement, the terms of the Hague Convention prohibit the use of
expanding bullets in international warfare.
High Explosive: Very large ballistic weapons (those with a size of 20
mm or larger) have sufficient size that they can house a significant highexplosive charge. This allows them to be especially effective in an antipersonnel role, especially when coupled with the high rate of fire of an
autocannon.
High-explosive bullets produce a blast area attack that deals explosive
damage.
Availability: High-explosive bullets are available for autocannons and
Gatling autocannons of 20 mm or larger. They have a purchase
restriction of Military, and increase purchase DC by 3.

46

Table 85: Ammunition

Shell, Warhead, and Grenade Types

Explosive weapons default to using a basic high-explosive charge that


deals damage to all characters in its area. When employed, they produce
a blast area attack.
Impact weaponssuch as archaic black-powder cannonsdont
normally have an explosive charge, but their impact has sufficient kinetic
energy to shower the target area with fragments. When employed, they
produce a splash attack. However, damage to secondary targets has the
nonpenetrating trait.
Fragmentary: A fragmentary shell uses a smaller explosive charge to
propel a high volume of fragments designed to damage lightly armored,
small, or hard-to-hit targets. A fragmentary shell designed for antiaircraft purposes usually employs a proximity fuse that allows it to
detonate without hitting the target. Because of the fragments small size,
they have difficulty penetrating a hard, solid surface or body armor.
When making a blast attack with a fragmentary shell, you deal 1/2
damage on a miss by 5 additional points (for example, on a miss by 10 or
less rather than on a miss by 5 or less). Damage with a fragmentary shell
has the nonpenetrating trait.
Availability: Fragmentary shells are available for modern grenades,
mortars, artillery, rockets, and missiles at no additional cost.
Black-power cannons can also use fragmentary shells, but they are
expensive (increase purchase DC by 3) and unreliable (mishap on natural
1 if trained or natural 12 if untrained).
Anti-Armor: An anti-armor shell (such as a shaped charge or armorpiercing explosive charge) provides exceptional penetration against a
heavily armored or very large target. Because it focuses its energy into a
single target, it deals less damage against others in its area of effect.
When used, an anti-armor shell produces a splash area attack. Against
the main target, damage with an anti-armor shell has the trait
penetrating 20.
Availability: Anti-armor shells are available for modern artillery, tank
guns, naval guns, rockets, and missiles.
Incendiary: Incendiary shells use a small explosive charge to distribute
a burning substance (such as white phosphorus) over its area, making it
ideal for use against living targets and flammable objects. Incendiary
shells produce a spread area attack and deal fire damage.
Availability: Incendiary shells are available for modern grenades,
mortars, artillery, rockets, and missiles at no additional cost. Incendiary
loads (such as flaming oil or Greek fire) are also available for archaic
catapults and trebuchet, but they increase the purchase DC by 10.
Tear Gas: Tear gas hinders and immobilizes living creatures without a
serious danger of causing lethal damage. A tear gas shell produces a
spread area attack that releases an inhaled poison: Hit vs. Fortitude
target staggered (Fort save ends); 1st Failed Save target dazed (Fort save
ends); 2nd Failed Save target stunned (Fort save ends).
In addition, tear gas produces a persistent hazard in its area that
provides concealment and attacks any living creature that moves into or
ends its turn in the area: Attack +0 vs. Fortitude; Hit as above. The
hazard lasts 1 round in high winds (over 20 mph), 2 rounds is moderate
winds (over 10 mph), 5 rounds in light winds, and 10 rounds in an
enclosed space (anything smaller than the attacks area).
Availability: Tear gas shells are available for modern grenades, mortars,
and artillery. Reduce purchase DC by 3. (Tear gas grenades have a
restriction of Licensed rather than Military.)
Smoke: Smoke obscures vision and conceals targets without dealing
damage. Different shells can produce different colors of smoke

Ammunition (Quantity)
Weight
Ranged Weapons (20 shots)
Arrow
3 lb.
Crossbow bolt
2 lb.
Sling bullets
10 lb.
Handguns (50 shots)
Black-powder handgun
2 lb.
.22 caliber
0.5 lb.
9mm
1 lb.
.44 caliber
3 lb.
Shotguns (10 shots)
Black-powder blunderbuss
1 lb.
12-gauge
1 lb.
Longarms, Machine Guns, and Autocannons (20 shots)
Black-powder longarm
2 lb.
.22LR caliber
0.3 lb.
.308 caliber
1 lb.
5.56mm
0.5 lb.
7.62mm
1 lb.
.50 caliber or 12.7mm
7 lb.
20mm
20 lb.
30mm
40 lb.
Ballistae and Catapults (10 shots)
Ballista, light
40 lb.
Ballista, heavy
200 lb.
Catapult, light
300 lb.
Catapult, heavy
750 lb.
Trebuchet
1.5 tons
Mortars, Artillery, Cannons, and Guns (10 shots)
40mm grenade
20 lb.
60mm mortar
30 lb.
Gun/artillery (L)
15 lb.
Gun/artillery (H)
50 lb.
Gun/artillery (G)
150 lb.
Gun/artillery (C)
500 lb.
Gun/artillery (1XC)
1,500 lb.
Gun/artillery (2XC)
2 tons
Gun/artillery (3XC)
10 tons
Explosives, Incendiaries, and Rockets (10 shots)
Flamethrower
30 lb.
Rocket, 70mm
350 lb.

Purchase DC
8
9
3
3
4
5
5
3
4
3
3
4
4
4
6 (M)
10 (M)
12 (M)
8
12
7
9
11
12 (M)
17 (M)
12 (M)
15 (M)
18 (M)
21 (M)
24 (M)
27 (M)
30 (M)
14 (M)
22 (M)

(commonly white, red, yellow, green, and purple), so they can serve as
signaling devices at very long range. Though not designed to cause harm,
a living creature can become fatigued from prolonged exposure to smoke.
A smoke shell produces a spread attack that deals no damage, but it
creates a persistent hazard that provides total concealment and makes
an inhaled poison attack against any living creature that ends its turn in
the area: Attack +0 vs. Fortitude; Hit target fatigued. The hazard lasts 1
round in high winds (over 20 mph), 2 rounds is moderate winds (over 10
mph), 5 rounds in light winds, and 10 rounds in an enclosed space
(anything smaller than its area).
Availability: Smoke shells are available for modern grenades, mortars,
and artillery. Reduce purchase DC by 5. (Smoke grenades have no
purchase restriction.)

47

or heavy). To gain the full benefit of armor, you must have the Armor
Proficiency feat for light armor or shields and the Heavy Armor
Proficiency feat for heavy armor.
Defense Bonus (Primary): All armor provides at least some degree of
protection that helps to deflect blows and prevent attacks from solidly
connecting with your body. If you are proficient in a suit of armor, add
its listed defense bonus to your Primary Defense. If you are not proficient,
you gain only 1/2 the listed defense bonus.
Style Bonus (Primary): If you wear a shield (arms location) and
proficient in their use, you gain the listed style bonus to your Primary
Defense. If you are not proficient, you gain only 1/2 the listed style
bonus.

Armor
Armor provides a modest bonus to both your Primary Defense (analogous
to Armor Class in DUNGEONS & DRAGONS) and your Massive Damage
Threshold (making you less likely to be fatigued, impaired, disabled, or
killed by an attack). Several types of armor are detailed here.

Armor Tables
The following section details the terms used in the armor tables below.
Armor: Each suit of armor is listed by name and grouped by type (light

Table 86: Archaic Armor


Defense Bonus
(Primary)

Style Bonus
(Primary)

Armor Bonus
(Threshold)

Max Ability
Bonus

Check
Penalty

Weight

Purchase
DC

Padded
Leather
Studded leather
Hide
Brigandine
Chainmail shirt

+0
+1
+1
+2
+2
+2

+1
+2
+3
+3
+4
+5

+5
+4
+4
+3
+3
+3

+0
+0
1
1
1
2

10 lb.
15 lb.
20 lb.
25 lb.
25 lb.
25 lb.

9
11
14
12
15
16

Scale, leather
Scale, metal
Lamellar
Chainmail suit
Breastplate
Splinted mail
Laminar (banded)
Half plate
Full plate

+3
+3
+3
+4
+4
+4
+5
+5
+5

+5
+6
+7
+7
+8
+9
+9
+10
+11

+2
+2
+2
+1
+1
+1
+0
+0
+0

2
2
3
3
3
4
4
4
5

25 lb.
30 lb.
30 lb.
40 lb.
30 lb.
45 lb.
35 lb.
45 lb.
50 lb.

15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
24

Buckler
Shield, light wooden
Shield, light steel
Shield, heavy wooden
Shield, heavy steel
Shield, tower

+1
+1
+1
+2
+2
+3

+0
+1
+2
+2
+3
+3

+5
+4
+4
+3
+3
+2

+0
1
1
2
2
5

5 lb.
5 lb.
6 lb.
10 lb.
15 lb.
45 lb.

12
8
11
10
13
14

Defense Bonus
(Primary)

Style Bonus
(Primary)

Armor Bonus
(Threshold)

Max Ability
Bonus

Check
Penalty

Weight

Purchase
DC

Leather jacket
Leather padding, light
Leather padding, heavy
Light undercover shirt
Pull-up pouch vest
Ballistic jacket
Undercover vest
Concealable vest

+0
+0
+1
+1
+1
+2
+2
+2

+1
+2
+2
+3
+4
+4
+5
+6

+5
+5
+4
+4
+4
+3
+3
+3

+0
+0
+0
+0
1
1
1
2

4 lb.
10 lb.
25 lb.
2 lb.
2 lb.
4 lb.
3 lb.
4 lb.

12
13
14
14 (L)
15 (L)
15 (L)
16 (L)
17 (L)

Light-duty vest
Light-duty armor
Tactical vest
Tactical armor
Tactical armor, heavy
Forced entry unit

+3
+3
+4
+4
+5
+5

+7
+8
+9
+10
+11
+12

+2
+2
+1
+1
+0
+0

2
3
3
4
4
5

8 lb.
12 lb.
16 lb.
20 lb.
34 lb.
38 lb.

18 (L)
19 (L)
20 (L)
21 (R)
22 (R)
23 (R)

Riot shield, heavy


Ballistic shield, heavy
Ballistic shield, tower

+2
+2
+3

+2
+3
+4

+3
+3
+2

2
2
5

6 lb.
20 lb.
27 lb.

11 (L)
18 (L)
19 (L)

Armor

Light Armor

Heavy Armor

Shields

Table 87: Modern Armor


Armor

Light Armor

Heavy Armor

Shields

48

vehicles might have crew stations for a vehicle commander, co-pilot,


engineer, or other system operators.
Most ground and air vehicles operate for no more than several hours at
a time, so their accommodations usually include no more than a crew
station (such as a seat next to an instrument panel). Vehicles that
operate for longer journeys (such as most water vehicles) include bunks
for each crewmember, cabins (usually shared), a galley, and other
facilities necessary to live for days, weeks, or months on board.
Crew and Saving Throws: If a vehicle has an engineer and at least 1/10
its listed crew, it gains the self-repairing trait and can make saving
throws to shake off the effects of different conditions. The engineer rolls
the saving throw on the vehicles behalf, adding his or her Mechanics
training bonus (+2 if trained, +3 to +5 with Skill Focus) to the result. This
represents the various actions that crewmembers take as a part of their
normal duties to keep the vehicle running smoothly.
If the vehicle has less than its listed crew, it takes a penalty on its
saving throw or might be unable to make saving throws at all: less than
1/2, 2 penalty; less than 1/5, 5 penalty; less than 1/10, vehicle does
not gain self-repairing trait and no saving throw is possible.
Passengers: This column lists the number of passengers the vehicle
normally carries. Passenger accommodations are similar to those for crew
(that is, seats for relatively short journeys and cabins for longer ones).
Cargo: Almost all vehicles have at least some cargo capacity, even if it
is no more than a small space under the drivers seat. A vehicle can carry
additional cargo if it doesnt have a full load of passengers; the space for
a seated passenger can carry 200 lb. of cargo, and the space for a
passenger in a cabin can carry 1,000 lb. of cargo.
Control Modifier: This column lists the net modifier (0 size modifier +
Dexterity modifier + armor check modifier) that applies to all control
(Dex) checks followed by the net modifier (0 + size modifier + Strength
modifier + armor check modifier) that applies to all control (Str) checks.
Speed: Each vehicle has a base speed and a maximum speed.
Base Speed: A vehicles base speed determines the minimum and
maximum values for each speed category. Traveling faster than Low
speed causes the driver and gunners to take a speed penalty to their
control checks and attack rolls.

Armor Bonus (Threshold): The most important benefit of armor is that


it helps to reduce the seriousness of injuries by absorbing some of the
impact and cushioning blows. An attack that might injure, incapacitate,
or kill an unarmored character might merely knock the wind out of one
wearing heavy armor. Against weapon attacks, add the listed armor
bonus to your massive damage threshold.
If you wear a shield, its style bonus stacks with that of your armor.
Maximum Ability Bonus: Armor is cumbersome, restricting your
movements and making it more difficult for you to move freely to avoid
incoming attacks. When calculating your Primary and Reflex Defenses,
the bonus you receive from your Dexterity or Intelligence modifiers
cannot exceed your armors listed maximum ability bonus.
Check Penalty: Because armor makes precise movements more
difficult, it can cause a penalty to certain skill checks. Apply your armors
listed check penalty to all nonattack skill checks with a key ability of
Strength, Constitution, or Dexterity. If you are not proficient in the armor
you wear, you also apply this penalty to all weapon attacks.
If your encumbrance also causes you to take a check penalty, they do
not stack; apply only the worst check penalty to the skill checks listed
above.
Weight: Because it is often the heaviest single piece of equipment you
carry, your armors weight is important for calculating your encumbrance
(see page 54). You cannot wear armor that weighs more than your heavy
load.
Heavy Armor: Due to its overall bulk, heavy armor can slow down even
the strongest of characters. When wearing heavy armor with which you
are proficient, you are treated as if you carry a medium load (or your
actual encumbrance, whichever is greater). When you take the run
action, you can move only up to 1.5 your base speed.
When wearing heavy armor with which you arent proficient, you are
instead treated as if you carry a heavy load (or your actual encumbrance
whichever is greater). Reduce your base speed to 3/4 normal; when you
take the run action, you can move only up to 1.5 your (reduced) base
speed.
Purchase DC: This column lists the purchase DC for the armor. If the
armor has a purchase restriction, an abbreviation is listed in parentheses:
L = Licensed, R = Restricted, M = Military, I = Illegal.

Stationary (no penalty): No movement, cannot turn unless it has


pivot or hover traits.
Low speed (no penalty): Move up to base speed; can turn 45 degrees
after moving forward (1/2 space) squares.
Moderate speed (1 penalty): Move up to 2 base speed; can turn
45 degrees after moving forward (1/10 space base speed) squares.
High speed (2 penalty): Move up to 5 base speed; can turn 45
degrees after moving forward (1/5 space base speed) squares.
Very High speed (5 penalty): Move up to maximum speed; can turn
45 degrees after moving forward (space base speed) squares a
maximum of once per round.

Vehicles
In combat, a vehicle typically has limited movement (page 67); its driver
must declare speed at the end of its turn each round, its movement must
fall within the minimum and maximum values for its declared speed, it
has facing, and it has limitations on how quickly it can turn.
In addition, vehicles and other transports have some special rules that
apply in combat. For example, a vehicles crew takes control of specific
positions within the vehicle, allowing each crewmember certain options
on its turn. See Transport Combat (page 79) for more detail.

Some vehicles do not have every speed category available because


their maximum speed is less than or equal to their High speed.
Maximum Speed: A vehicle cannot move more than its maximum
speed on its turn unless the driver successfully performs the Exceed
Maximum Speed maneuver. (See Maneuvers, page 68.)
Defenses: This column lists the vehicles Primary, Fortitude, and Reflex
Defenses, in that order. Add the drivers Dexterity modifier (min. 1) to the
vehicles Primary and Reflex Defenses. Add the engineers Intelligence or
Wisdom modifier (min. 1) to the vehicles Fortitude Defense. (The
commander and co-pilot might affect the vehicles defenses as well.)
Vehicles are not creatures so they do not have a Will Defense.
However, some effects might be able to target the Will Defense of a
vehicles crew.
Massive Damage Threshold: A vehicles massive damage threshold is
equal to 5 + its Fortitude Defense, as with any basic character.

Vehicle Table
For brevity, e20 Lite presents vehicle statistics in a condensed table
format, but the e20 System Core Rulebook provides each vehicle with a
full stat block.
The following section details the terms used in the vehicles table.
Vehicle: Each vehicle is listed by name, usually with a broad term
followed by a more specific descriptor (such as Car, full-size). The table
divides vehicles into groups based on their function and type of
locomotion.
Crew: This column lists the normal number of crew the vehicle needs
to operate normally. All vehicles have a crew station for a driver and a
number of gunners determined by its weapons (if any). Some larger

49

Table 810: Modern Vehicles


Vehicle

Motorcycles

Crew Pass Cargo

CTRL
Mod

Speed
(base/max)

Defenses Hard/
Prm/Frt/Ref DR hp

Abilities Weapons or
Size Str/Dex/Int Special Equipment

Adj Purch
Lvl DC

Racing1,2
Street1,2

1
1

1
1

0 lb.
5 lb.

+4/+0
+3/+2

30/300
20/200

14/12/17
13/15/15

5/ 8
5/1 12

M
L

10/19/
13/18/

1
1

24 (L)
23 (L)

Subcompact
Compact
Sports coupe
Full-size

1
1
1
1

3
4
1
5

150 lb.
275 lb.
250 lb.
425 lb.

+2/+2
+1/+3
+3/+2
+0/+5

15/150
20/200
30/300
20/200

12/14/15
11/15/14
13/14/16
10/18/12

5/1
5/1
5/1
5/2

12
15
12
20

L
L
L
H

12/17/
14/15/
13/18/
16/14/

1
1
2
2

22 (L)
23 (L)
26 (L)
25 (L)

Minivan
SUV, sport
SUV, full-size
Truck, full-size
Truck, hvy duty
Van, cargo

1
1
1
1
1
1

6
4
7
2
5
2

325 lb.
300 lb.
500 lb.
1 ton
2 ton
2.5 tons

+0/+6
+0/+5
1/+6
1/+7
1/+7
2/+7

20/150
20/200
10/150
10/150
10/150
10/150

10/19/12
10/18/12
9/19/11
9/20/11
9/20/11
8/20/10

5/2
5/2
5/2
5/2
5/2
5/2

20
20
24
20
20
24

H
H
H
H
H
H

18/14/
16/14/
19/12/
20/12/
21/12/
21/10/

2
2
2
2
2
2

25 (L)
25 (L)
26 (L)
25 (L)
26 (L)
26 (L)

Armored van
APC, wheeled
Limousine
Moving van
Passenger bus
Truck, semi
APC, tracked1

2
2
1
1
1
1
3

0
9
7
2
39
2
7

1.8 ton
450 lb.
425 lb.
3.5 tons
400 lb.
20 tons
425 lb.

2/+7
+0/+8
4/+9
4/+11
4/+11
5/+12
6/+11

10/150
20/100
10/150
10/100
10/100
10/150
10/80

12/25/9
14/27/11
7/23/9
6/24/8
7/25/9
5/25/7
9/27/6

10/2
10/2
5/5
5/5
5/5
5/5
15/5

24
28
40
50
50
50
60

H
H
G
G
G
G
G

20/10/
22/15/12
21/14/
23/12/
24/14/
24/10/
18/13/12

Tank1

425 lb.

8/+12

10/80

8/29/5

20/5 60

Light3,4
Attack3

1
2

4
0

250 lb.
60 lb.

3/+5
4/+6

20/200
30/300

7/17/10
9/19/10

5/5 30
10/5 40

G
G

Gunship3

14 4.5 tons

5/+6

10/300

5/19/7

5/5 50

Light prop4
Jet fighter4

1
1

3
0

1/+7
2/+8

100/400
200/2000

8/18/11
8/23/11

5/5 40
5/5 50

G
G

Private jet4
Jet airliner4
Jumbo jet4

2
2
3

9 500 lb.
108 2.5 tons
266 5 tons

3/+7 200/1000
8/+14 200/1000
10/+15 200/1000

6/19/8
1/26/3
1/27/1

5/5 50
5/10 60
5/15 80

G
C
1XC

Speedboat
Cabin cruiser
Yacht
Patrol cutter

1
1
2
75

4
6
8
10

350 lb.
+1/+3
2 tons
+0/+7
5 tons
6/+12
100 tons 11/+17

6/90
4/60
4/40
4/40

11/15/14
10/19/12
4/25/6
2/33/0

5/2
5/5
5/10
5/15

Bulk freighter

10

10 32k tons 20/+27

2/30

10/37/8

5/20 200 2XC

Cars

Vans and trucks

Heavy ground

Helicopters

Airplanes

Watercraft

120 lb.
30 lb.

20
H
50
G
80
C
160 1XC

3 gun ports (L, R, A)


.50-cal MG (T)

30mm autocannon (T)


7.62mm MG (T)
19/10/12 120mm tank gun (T)
.50-cal MG (T)

4 29 (R)
8 37 (M)
5 31 (R)
4 29 (R)
5 32 (R)
4 30 (R)
8 38 (M)

10/15/
11/15/12 30mm autocannon (F) 6
4 hardpoints (F) 6
13/11/12 2 7.62mm mini (PL, PR)
4 hardpoints (F) 6

6 33 (R)
9 40 (M)

14/19/
15/19/12 20mm Gatling (F) 6
9 hardpoint (F) 6
15/15/11
19/14/11
11/20/11

5 31 (R)
12 46 (M)
6 34 (R)
8 38 (R)
10 42 (R)

12/17/
14/18/
15/19/
13/20/12

2
3
5
10

30mm autocannon (PF)


2 .50-cal MG (PL, PR)
Helicopter pad
25/11/12 4 cargo cranes

9 40 (M)

9 39 (M)

26 (L)
28 (L)
32 (L)
42 (M)

10 42 (L)

1
2
3
4

Pivot trait (can turn while stationary)


5 penalty to control check when decelerating with Change Declared Speed maneuver
Hover trait (can turn while stationary and move laterally)
Airplanes have a ground speed used for taxiing, takeoff, and landing: base ground speed = (maximum air speed)/50; max ground speed = (base
ground speed) 20.
5 5 penalty to control check when accelerating with Change Declared Speed maneuver
6 Driver-operated weapon. If trained in Vehicles, the driver can make a control (Dex) check instead of the normal weapon skill check to make an
attack.
Hardness: Because of their metallic or high-strength composite
construction, almost all vehicles have Hardness 5 or more. Hardness 10
represents significant armor (enough to stop most small-arms fire), often
carried by light combat vehicles and ground-attack aircraft. Hardness 15
represents heavy armor, usually a thick layer of a conventional material

Hardness and Damage Reduction: This column lists the vehicles


Hardness and Damage Reduction (DR), in that order. When a vehicle
takes damage, subtract its Hardness and Damage Reduction from the
damage dealt.

50

(such as the thick steel on a tracked armored personnel carrier). Hardness


20 represents very heavy armor constructed of either exotic, high-density
materials (such as the depleted uranium used on a main battle tank) or
exceptionally thick conventional materials (such as a battleships armor
belt, which can be over a foot thick).
If an attacks weapon damage (before adding modifiers for skill and so
forth) does not equal or exceed a targets Hardness, the attack does not
penetrate and it deals no damage at all.
Damage Reduction: Like all characters, a vehicle greater than Medium
size has Damage Reduction equal to its size modifier. Even if an attack
can break through a vehicles exterior armor, an attack might not be able
to penetrate far enough into a larger vehicle to reach critical
components and cause significant damage.
Hit Points: As for other characters, a vehicles hit points provide an
abstract measure of how much punishment they can take before they
cease to function. Whenever a vehicle takes damage, subtract it from the
vehicles current hit points until they are reduced to 0, and then apply
the remainder to the vehicles reserves.
Any time the vehicles hit points take damage, the driver can choose to
apply some or all of the damage dealt to his or her own hit points
instead of the vehicles hit points, up to a maximum of the drivers
current hit points. (Only one character can perform this function in a
single encounter, even if a different character takes over as the driver.)
Reserves: Like other basic characters, vehicles have reserves equal to
1/2 their hit points. The engineer can make a DC 15 Mechanics check as
a standard action to allow the vehicle to recover up to 1/5 its maximum
hit points from its reserves.
Any time the vehicles reserves take damage (either by an attack or by
using the recover action), the engineer can choose to apply some or all of
the damage dealt to his or her own hit points instead of the vehicles
reserves, up to a maximum of the engineers current hit points. (Only one
character can perform this function in a single encounter, even if a
different character takes over as the engineer.)
Size: As with all characters, a vehicles size category determines its
space, size modifier, and size multiplier. (See Size, page 78.)
Space: This represents the width (in squares) of the vehicles space, and
it contributes to the vehicles turn rate when traveling above Low speed
(see Speed, above). Determine a vehicles space using its size category:
Medium (M), 1; Large (L), 2; Huge (H), 3; Gargantuan (G), 5; Colossal (C),
10; Extra-Colossal (1XC), 20; Double Extra-Colossal (2XC), 50.
Size Modifier: Each vehicles Primary, Fortitude, and Reflex Defenses
already include the vehicles size modifier. When attacking with a vehicle
weapon, use the size modifier of the weapon to determine the penalty to
your attack.
Size Multiplier: Each vehicles hit points already include the effect of
the vehicles size multiplier. When you need the vehicles size multiplier
for another purpose (such as during a collision), determine it using the
vehicles size category: Medium (M), 1; Large (L), 1.5; Huge (H), 2;
Gargantuan (G), 5; Colossal (C), 10; Extra-Colossal (1XC), 20; Double
Extra-Colossal (2XC), 50.
Abilities: This column lists the vehicles Strength, Dexterity, and
Intelligence (if any). Strength and Dexterity modifiers are already
included in the vehicles other statistics.
The vehicles Intelligence modifier represents the quality of its sensor
(such as radar or sonar), fire control, and computer systems. When you
make an attack with one of the vehicles weapons or make a senses
check from a designated crew position, reduce your skill checks total
range, speed, and concealment penalties by an amount equal to the
vehicles Intelligence modifier. If you use the vehicles computer systems
for any other Computer check, add its Intelligence modifier (positive or

negative) to your check result (just as you would with any other
computer system).
Weapons or Special Equipment: This column lists the vehicles weapons
and special equipment. Each weapon lists its firing arc in parentheses
after its name. Firing arcs are represented by a single letter (F = front, L =
left, R = right, A = aft, T = 360-degree turret). The prefix P added to a
firing arc indicates a partial turret that can fire into that arc and either
adjacent arc; for example, PF can attack into the front, left, or right arcs.
This column also indicates which weapons are driver-operated
weapons. Even if a vehicle has more than one driver-operated weapon,
the driver can use only one at a time. If trained in Vehicles, the driver can
make a control (Dex) check instead of a weapon skill check when
attacking with a driver-operated weapon.
Adjusted Level: This column indicates the vehicles approximate value
during an encounter, represented by what level of basic character would
be equivalent to the vehicle. For example, a jet fighter has an adjusted
level of 12, so it is worth one 12th-level basic character (1,500 XP).
When calculating the total XP for an encounter, add the XP value of
any vehicles used by opponents and subtract the XP value of any vehicles
used by the heroes. (The XP value of a vehicle does not include the XP
value of its crew.)
Purchase DC: This column lists the purchase DC for the vehicle. If the
vehicle has a purchase restriction, an abbreviation is listed in
parentheses: L = Licensed, R = Restricted, M = Military, I = Illegal.

General Equipment
This section covers a wide variety of general equipment available to
adventurers of all sorts.
Clothing: When you create a new character, assume that you own (1 +
Resources modifier) outfits of ordinary clothing with a purchase DC of 13
or less. Select them from the equipment table appropriate to your
setting.
Battery-Operated Items: Many of types of modern equipment are
battery-operated. Any device that uses batteries comes with them. As a
general rule, ignore battery life; assume that heroes (and their
antagonists) are smart enough to recharge or replace their batteries
during their down time, and that the batteries last as long as needed
during a typical adventure.

Equipment Tables
The following section details the terms used in the equipment tables
below.
Object: This column lists each object alphabetically by name, grouping
them by function (such as Bags and Boxes or Computers and
Electronics).
Weight: This column lists the typical weight of the object. Weights for
specific models of a given object might vary by up to 50%.
When needed, you can use an objects weight to estimate its size. See
Table 103: Size (page 79) for typical weights at each size, selecting the
size with the closest listed weight. Keep in mind that objects constructed
of heavier materials can weigh substantially more (about 5 as much for
solid stone or 10 as much for solid iron or steel), and largely hollow
objects can weigh much less.
Purchase DC: This column lists the purchase DC for the equipment. If
the equipment has a purchase restriction, an abbreviation is listed in
parentheses: L = Licensed, R = Restricted, M = Military, I = Illegal.

51

Table 88: Archaic Equipment


Item

Adventuring Gear

Bedroll
Bell
Blanket, winter
Block and tackle
Caltrops
Candle
Canvas (sq. yd.)
Chain (10 ft.)
Chalk, 1 piece
Crowbar
Firewood (per day)
Fishhook
Fishing net, 25 sq. ft.
Flint and steel
Grappling hook
Hammer
Ink (1 oz. vial)
Inkpen
Ladder, 10-foot
Lantern, bullseye
Lantern, hooded
Lock
Average
Good
Amazing
Manacles
Mirror, small steel
Oil (1-pint flask)
Paper (sheet)
Parchment (sheet)
Pick, miners
Piton
Pole, 10-foot
Ram, portable
Rations, trail (per day)
Rope, hempen (50 ft.)
Rope, silk (50 ft.)
Sealing wax
Signal whistle
Signet ring
Sledge
Soap (per lb.)
Spade or shovel
Spyglass
Tent
Torch
Whetstone

Weight

Purch
DC

5 lb.

3 lb.
5 lb.
2 lb.

1 lb.
2 lb.

5 lb.
20 lb.

5 lb.

4 lb.
2 lb.

20 lb.
3 lb.
2 lb.

1
5
3
9
5
0
1
14
0
7
0
1
9
5
5
3
11
1
1
12
10

1 lb.
1 lb.
1 lb.
2 lb.
0.5 lb.
1 lb.

10 lb.
0.5 lb.
8 lb.
20 lb.
1 lb.
10 lb.
5 lb.
1 lb.

10 lb.
1 lb.
8 lb.
1 lb.
20 lb.
1 lb.
1 lb.

15
17
19
12
11
1
3
1
8
1
1
11
3
5
11
5
4
9
5
3
7
23
11
0
0

Weight

Purch
DC

Alchemists lab
Artisans tools
Climbers kit
Disguise kit
Healers kit
Holly and mistletoe
Holy symbol, wooden
Holy symbol, silver
Hourglass
Magnifying glass
Musical instrument
Scale, merchants
Thieves tools
Water clock

40 lb.
5 lb.
5 lb.
8 lb.
1 lb.

1 lb.
1 lb.

3 lb.
1 lb.
1 lb.
200 lb.

21
9
17
15
15
0
5
14
14
17
9
7
14 (I)
23

Backpack (empty)
Barrel (empty)
Basket (empty)
Bottle, wine, glass
Bucket (empty)
Case, map or scroll
Chest (empty)
Flask (empty)
Jug, clay
Mug/Tankard, clay
Pitcher, clay
Pot, iron
Pouch, belt (empty)
Sack (empty)
Vial, ink or potion
Waterskin

2 lb.
30 lb.
1 lb.

2 lb.
0.5 lb.
25 lb.
1.5 lb.
9 lb.
1 lb.
5 lb.
10 lb.
0.5 lb.
0.5 lb.
0.1 lb.
4 lb.

7
7
3
7
3
5
7
0
0
0
0
3
5
0
5
5

Artisans outfit
Clerics vestments
Cold weather outfit
Courtiers outfit
Entertainers outfit
Explorers outfit
Monks outfit
Nobles outfit
Peasants outfit
Royal outfit
Scholars outfit
Travelers outfit

4 lb.
6 lb.
7 lb.
6 lb.
4 lb.
8 lb.
2 lb.
10 lb.
2 lb.
15 lb.
6 lb.
5 lb.

5
9
11
14
8
11
9
17
0
19
9
5

Item

Tools and Skill Kits

Containers

Clothing

52

Item

Food, Drink, and Lodging


Ale
Gallon
Mug
Banquet (per person)
Bread (loaf)
Cheese
Inn stay (per day)
Good
Common
Poor
Meals (per day)
Good
Common
Poor
Meat
Wine
Common (pitcher)
Fine (bottle)

Mounts and Related Gear


Barding
Medium
Large
Bit and bridle
Dog, guard
Dog, riding
Donkey or mule
Feed (per day)
Horse
Horse, heavy
Horse, light
Pony
Warhorse, heavy
Warhorse, light
Warpony
Saddle
Military
Pack
Riding
Saddle, Exotic
Military
Pack
Riding
Saddlebags
Stabling (per day)

Weight

Purch
DC

8 lb.
1 lb.

0.5 lb.
0.5 lb.

1
0
11
0
0

7
3
1

0.5 lb.

3
2
0
2

6 lb.
1.5 lb.

1
11

x1
x2
1 lb.

10 lb.

+2
+4
7
14
18
11
0

19
17
14
21
19
17

30 lb.
15 lb.
25 lb.

13
9
11

40 lb.
20 lb.
30 lb.
8 lb.

16
12
14
9
3

Table 89: Modern Equipment


Object

Bags and Boxes

Aluminum travel case


10 lb. Capacity
40 lb. Capacity
75 lb. capacity
Briefcase
Contractors field bag
Day pack
Handbag
Range pack
Standard
Oversized
Patrol box

Clothing

Clothing outfit
Business
Casual
Formal
Uniform
Outerwear
Coat
Overcoat
Parka
Photojournalists vest
Windbreaker
Tool belt

Computers and Electronics


Camera
Photo, digital
Photo, 35mm film
Film
Photo, disposable
Video, digital
Cell phone
Basic
Average
Smartphone
Computer
Desktop
Laptop
Netbook
Tablet
Digital audio recorder
Portable satellite phone
Printer
Walkie-talkie
Basic
Professional

Weight

Purch
DC Object

Weight

Survival Gear

5 lb.
10 lb.
15 lb.
2 lb.
2 lb.
2 lb.
1 lb.

11
12
13
9
8
8
7

2 lb.
3 lb.
4 lb.

9
11
11

3 lb.
2 lb.
3 lb.
2 lb.

13
10
15
11

2 lb.
3 lb.
3 lb.
1 lb.
1 lb.
2 lb.

10
11
11
11
8
11

0.5 lb.
2 lb.

0.5 lb.
2 lb.

14
17
6
7
16

0.1 lb.
0.2 lb.
0.3 lb.

10
12
14

10 lb.
5 lb.
3 lb.
1.5 lb.
1 lb.
2 lb.
3 lb.

16
17
14
15
11
17
11

1 lb.
1 lb.

9
15

Backpack
Binoculars
Standard
Rangefinding
Electro-optical
Chemical light sticks (5)
Climbing gear
Compass
Fire extinguisher
Flash goggles
Flashlight
Penlight
Standard
Battery flood
Gas mask
GPS receiver
Map
Road atlas
Tactical map
Mesh vest
Portable stove
Rope (150 ft.)
Sleeping bag
Tent
2-person dome
4-person dome
8-person dome
Trail rations (12)

Weapon Accessories

Box magazine
Detonator
Blasting cap
Radio controlled
Timed
Wired
Holster
Hip
Concealed carry
Illuminator
Laser sight
Scope
Standard
Electro-optical
Speed loader
Suppressor
Pistol
Rifle

53

Purch
DC
Object

3 lb.

11

2 lb.
3 lb.
4 lb.
1 lb.
10 lb.
0.5 lb.
3 lb.
2 lb.

9
15
16
5
12
8
10
15

0.5 lb.
1 lb.
2 lb.
5 lb.
1 lb.

6
7
8
14
11

1 lb.
0.5 lb.
7 lb.
1 lb.
12 lb.
4 lb.

7
6
10
11
8
11

4 lb.
7 lb.
10 lb.
1 lb.

12
13
14
8

0.5 lb.

0.5 lb.
0.5 lb.
0.5 lb.
1 lb.

7
11
9
8

1 lb.
0.5 lb.
0.5 lb.
0.5 lb.

8
8
9
15

0.5 lb.
3 lb.
0.5 lb.

12
17
6

1 lb.
4 lb.

13
14

Professional Equipment

Bolt cutter
Caltrops (25)
Chemical kit
Demolitions kit
Disguise kit
Duct tape
Electrical tool kit
Basic
Deluxe
Evidence kit
Basic
Deluxe
First aid kit
Forgery kit
Handcuffs
Steel
Zip-tie (25)
Instrument, keyboard
Instrument, percussion
Instrument, stringed
Instrument, wind
Lockpicks
Car opening kit
Lockpick set
Lock release gun
Mechanical tool kit
Basic
Deluxe
Medical kit
Multipurpose tool
Pharmacist kit
Search-and-rescue kit
Spike strip
Surgery kit

Surveillance Gear

Black box
Caller ID defeater
Cellular interceptor
Linemans buttset
Metal detector
Night vision goggles
Tap detector
Telephone tap
Line tap
Receiver tap
Telephone line tracer

Weight

Purch
DC

5 lb.
2 lb.
6 lb.
5 lb.
5 lb.
1 lb.

8
8
16
14 (L)
13
6

12 lb.
33 lb.

14
20

6 lb.
8 lb.
3 lb.
3 lb.

9
15
8
13

1 lb.
0.5 lb.
12 lb.
50 lb.
7 lb.
1 lb.

9
8
13
14
14
10

1 lb.
1 lb.
0.5 lb.

8 (L)
11 (L)
13 (R)

22 lb.
45 lb.
5 lb.
0.5 lb.
6 lb.
7 lb.
22 lb.
5 lb.

14
19
15
11
17 (R)
13
14
16 (L)

0.5 lb.
1 lb.
0.5 lb.
1 lb.
2 lb.
3 lb.
1 lb.

7 (I)
8
21
14 (L)
12
17
9

0.5 lb.
0.5 lb.
5 lb.

14 (L)
6 (R)
21

(A character with limited movement instead reduces its maximum speed


to 3/4 normal.)

Encumbrance

Heavy Load (up to carrying capacity)

You take a 5 check penalty when carrying a heavy load. Reduce your
base speed to 3/4 normal.
In addition, when you take the run action, you can move no more than
1.5 your (reduced) base speed. (A character with limited movement
instead reduces its maximum speed to 1/2 normal.)
To determine the minimum current speed for a flying character to
remain in flight, use the characters unencumbered base speed, not its
reduced base speed. Because of this, some characters might not be able
to fly at all when carrying a heavy load.

Encumbrance rules determine how much your armor and equipment slow
you down and inhibit your actions. Your Strength and size multiplier
determine your carrying capacity:
Carrying Capacity = (Strength size multiplier)2
For example, a Large creature (1.5 size multiplier) with Strength 14
would have a carrying capacity of 441 lb. (14 1.5 = 21, 212 = 441).
Some characters might apply an additional modifier to their carrying
capacity, depending on their mode of locomotion and overall stability:

Overloaded (up to 2 carrying capacity)

Ground creature, legless (snake, gastropod, etc.): 1.5


Ground creature, 4+ legs: 1.5
Ground vehicle, 4+ legs or wheels: 1.5
Ground vehicle, 6+ legs or wheels: 2
Ground vehicle, tracked: 3
Air vehicle, hover: 0.5
Water vehicle, Colossal or lesser size: 2
Water vehicle, 1X Colossal or greater size: 5
High-capacity vehicle: 2 to 10, depending on vehicles design

You can lift up to twice your carrying capacity off the ground, but you
can barely move or defend yourself while doing so. You take a 10 check
penalty when overloaded, and you are disadvantaged to all opponents.
You cannot perform any movement other than using a standard action to
move 1 square (character scale only).
No character can swim, fly, climb, or jump while overloaded. A
character in the water begins sinking, and a climbing or flying character
falls immediately.

Lifting and Dragging

Weight and Load

You can lift a weight up to your carrying capacity over your head. You
can lift up to double your carrying capacity off the ground, but you are
overloaded when you do so (see above).
When dragging a character (whether object or creature), you might be
able to move much more weight than you can normally carry. The
specific circumstances determine how much of its weight you must
count when calculating your current load.

If you want to determine whether your characters gear is heavy enough


to slow him or her down more than the armor already does, total the
weight of all your carried items, including armor, weapons, and gear.
Your carrying capacity determines how much weight you can carry as a
light load, medium load, or heavy load. If you try to carry more than your
carrying capacity, you become overloaded.
Check Penalty: Carrying more than a light load limits your movement
and causes you to take a check penalty to all nonattack skill checks
based on Strength, Constitution, and Dexterity.
Your check penalty from encumbrance does not stack with your check
penalty from armor; apply only the greater penalty.
Vehicles and Load: When calculating a vehicles current load, do not
count the weight of its crew or normal fuel capacity. Count the weight of
passengers and cargo normally. For a flying vehicle, count 5 the weight
of any weapons or equipment carried on hardpoints.

Low Resistance (1/10 weight): The dragged character and the surface
provide virtually no resistance, such as dragging a wheeled or slick
object on a smooth surface.
Moderate Resistance (1/5 weight): The dragged character and the
surface provide typical resistance overall, such as dragging a
wheeled object on rough terrain or moving a large piece of furniture
over a rough floor or low carpet.
High Resistance (1/2 weight): Either the dragged character or the
surface provide substantial resistance, such as a high-friction surface
like a thick carpet, rough or difficult terrain, or a dragged object that
snags on obstacles as you move it.
Very High Resistance (no reduction): The dragged character or
surface provides so much resistance that you gain no significant
advantage over carrying it, such as when dragging a creature that
actively resists you.

Light Load (up to 1/5 carrying capacity)

You can comfortably carry a light load without significant effort. You
take no check penalty, and you can move normally.

Medium Load (up to 1/2 carrying capacity)

You take a 2 check penalty when carrying a medium load. When you
take the run action, you can move no more than 1.5 your base speed.

54

9: Enhancements
Unique to the e20 System, enhancements are abilities not determined by
your class and level but rather acquired through play. Enhancements can
be gained by characters between adventures (just as DUNGEONS &
DRAGONS heroes can create magic items), but those you can create
yourself are less powerful than those you might find during play.
Enhancements are useful for highly specialized niches and situations
that come up too rarely to be worth investing a talent or feat. For
example, an ace pilot might have a wide variety of enhancements that
grant the ability to use unique maneuvers while operating a vehicle, but
most of the pilots talents and feats can be applied anywhere.
Enhancements are comparable to the rules for magic items in
DUNGEONS & DRAGONS. The complete rule set for enhancements is too
extensive to cover in e20 Lite, but the following should give you a feel
for what they do and how they are used.

Available Enhancement Slot: Every enhancement occupies a specific


enhancement slot (see below). The enhancements designated slot is
available only if you have no other active enhancement in that slot.
Your available slots are acumen, cadence, discipline, exploit, form,
method, secret, stance, stratagem, and technique (two separate slots).
Each slot has an affinity for a specific body location, which might affect
what physical enhancements you can use.
Available Body Location: A physical enhancement (such as a magic
sword) occupies a location on your body in addition to an enhancement
slot. The enhancements designated location is available only you have no
other item (whether a physical enhancement or mundane object) worn or
held in that location.
As with ordinary items, your available locations are arms, back, fingers
(two separate locations, one on each hand), hands, head, held, legs, neck,
torso, and waist.
Fighting Style, Slots, and Locations: Your fighting style might change
what slots and locations you have available. You cannot use your form
slot or arms location (for example, to wear a shield) when using crew,
dual weapon, one-handed weapon, or two-handed weapon fighting
styles. However, you gain an additional exploit slot and held item
location when using dual weapon style.
Other Requirements: Some enhancements might have other
requirements, such as particular feats, skill training, or class levels. The
enhancements description specifies any additional requirements you
must meet.

Enhancement Basics
Enhancements come in two distinct types. Mental enhancements
represent exercises, regimens, and tricks you learn during play, either as
the result of overcoming a particularly challenging encounter or by
deliberately studying them (perhaps with the assistance of an instructor).
Physical enhancements represent exceptional items that provide you
with some special capability or advantage, such as a high-quality
targeting system for an emplaced weapon or, in a fantasy setting, an
enchanted sword. You can find, build, and sometimes purchase physical
enhancements.

Activation and Deactivation

If you meet all the enhancements requirements, you can spend an action
to activate it. Deactivating an enhancement requires another action,
making that slot (and location, for physical enhancements) available for
you to activate a different enhancement.
The specific actions needed depend on whether you are activating or
deactivating a mental or physical enhancement.
Mental Enhancements: Gathering your wits to focus on activating a
mental enhancement requires you to spend a standard action. To
deactivate, you need to spend a swift action representing a slight mental
effort to shift your attention.
After resting for one minute, you can automatically deactivate or
activate any or all mental enhancements you have.
Physical Enhancements: Because a physical enhancement represents a
specific item, you need only spend whatever action you would normally
need to equip or remove that item. (See Using Items, page 41.)

Using Enhancements
To gain the benefit of an enhancement, you must meet its requirements
and then spend some sort of action to activate it. You can spend another
action to deactivate an enhancement, such as when you want to change
the enhancement you have in a given slot.
When you have one or more active enhancements, you gain the
following benefits:
Add all enhancement bonuses to your skills or defenses.
Enhancement bonuses do not stack; if you have two different
bonuses that apply to the same skill or defense, apply only the best
one.
Once per round, you can use any one core talent provided by any of
your active enhancements. (Only exploit enhancements can provide
core talents.)
Once per encounter, you can use any one major talent provided by
any of your enhancements. You can use another major talent by
spending an Action Point.
Once per encounter as a free action, you can use any one feat
provided by any of your enhancements. The effect of the feat lasts
until the start of your next turn.
If you have an enhancement that provides a trait, apply the effect
specified in the traits description.

Enhancement Slots
Each enhancement slot represents a particular physical or mental
approach to problem solving that can grants a character thematically
related capabilities. Enhancements can grant benefits that dont match
their natural strengths, but those that do tend to be more powerful,
easier to create, or both.
Each enhancement slot described below includes a brief description of
its common themes as well as its affinity for particular body locations,
skills, defenses, and classes. Affinities dont affect how an enhancement
functions when active, but they can have a significant effect when
determining an enhancements level as well as how difficult, costly, and
time-consuming it might be to create.

Requirements

Before activating an enhancement, you must meet all the requirements


outlined below.

55

Acumen

Stance

Acumen enhancements represent a deep understanding of and insight


into the world around you, and they help you to apply this rare
knowledge to protect you from harm.
Location Affinity: back (cloak, cape, jacket, coat)
Skill Affinity: Knowledge, Nature
Defense Affinity: Fortitude, Reflex, Will
Class Affinity: none

Stance enhancements focus on kinesthetic learning that enhances your


physical self-awareness, and you find your untapped potential to predict
and evade what you can so you can absorb and withstand what you
cant.
Location Affinity: torso (armor, robe, vest, shirt)
Skill Affinity: Gunnery, Vehicles
Defense Affinity: Primary, Fortitude
Class Affinity: none

Cadence

Stratagem

Cadence enhancements usually augment your speed, mobility, and


agility, and this leads naturally toward a better ability to evade attacks
and bypass danger.
Location Affinity: legs (shoes, boots, leggings, pants)
Skill Affinity: Acrobatics, Ranged, Stealth
Defense Affinity: Reflex
Class Affinity: Corsair

Stratagem enhancements illuminate, enlighten, organize, and solve the


enigmas of the world, and your epiphany of purest logic reveals the
breathtaking simplicity underneath it all.
Location Affinity: head (helmet, eyewear, circlet, crown)
Skill Affinity: Analytics, Computers, Mechanics, Tactics
Defense Affinity: none
Class Affinity: Savant

Discipline

Discipline enhancements spring from your internal discipline and


intuitive connection to your surroundings, and they grant you a deep
insight into the vitality, resilience, and life force of yourself and those
around you.
Location Affinity: waist (belt, sash, bandolier, baldric)
Skill Affinity: Intuition, Medicine, Perception
Defense Affinity: Will
Class Affinity: Sentinel

Technique

Exploit

Acquiring Enhancements

Technique enhancements provide an exceptional insight into your own


weaknesses while lacking a specific focus on one approach, so you can
adapt them to fill any niche or meet any need.
Location Affinity: fingers (ring, brass knuckles)
Skill Affinity: none
Defense Affinity: Primary, Fortitude, Reflex, Will
Class Affinity: none

Exploit enhancements seek the flawed defenses and the lingering


openings an opponent leaves exposed, allowing you to find the weak
links that most easily break under pressure.
Location Affinity: held (weapon, tool, implement)
Skill Affinity: Firearms, Gunnery, Melee, Ranged, Unarmed
Defense Affinity: none
Class Affinity: none

On average, your character will acquire two new enhancements in the


process of gaining one level. Acquiring can mean finding a physical
enhancement or learning a new mental enhancement during an
encounter. In either case, the enhancement usually relates directly to the
situation in which you acquire it.
The quality of an acquired enhancement is 1 to 5 levels greater than
your character level, and the Gamemaster should allocate them in a way
that keeps their distribution even among the players. For example, if you
get one enhancement at level + 5, the other enhancement you gain
during this level should be lower (ideally level + 1). Over multiple levels,
the GM should try to make sure every players character gets a turn at
acquiring the best enhancement at a given level.
One way you can acquire enhancements is by defeating elite
opponents of your level or higher; in this case, you might learn the new
enhancement because you saw it in action and learned from the
experience. The e20 System Core Rulebook provides a template that the
GM can use to turn the defeated opponents talents, feats, or stunts into
a comparable enhancement appropriate for a given level.

Form

Form enhancements focus on strict, repeated, and exhausting defensive


exercises that burn themselves into your mind, and soon you find that
every move, shift, parry, and counterattack comes automatically.
Location Affinity: arms (shield, bracers)
Skill Affinity: Focus, Melee
Defense Affinity: Primary
Class Affinity: Dreadnought

Method

Method enhancements translate physical prowess into accuracy and


power, and you learn to apply your bodys strengths toward direct and
bold actions.
Location Affinity: hands (gauntlets, gloves)
Skill Affinity: Athletics, Firearms, Unarmed
Defense Affinity: Fortitude
Class Affinity: Vanguard

Creating Enhancements
Whether the enhancement is a physical item or a trick learned through
intense training, it costs both time and money to createand they are
even more expensive to buy from someone else. Creating enhancements
is a good way for you to use your expertise to help your comrades
improve. In this way, both you and your entire party benefit from your
personal strengths.
Every enhancement has a slot, a bonus to one or more skills or
defenses, level, prerequisite, and cost, and some allow a user to gain the
benefit of one or more talents, feats, or traits.

Secret

Secret enhancements represent the ephemeral keys to the psyche, and


your intimate understanding of emotion, desire, and expression allow you
to manipulate those around you.
Location Affinity: neck (necklace, amulet, charm, medal)
Skill Affinity: Deception, Influence, Linguistics
Defense Affinity: Will
Class Affinity: Envoy

56

Slot: Choose a slot for the enhancement to occupy (see above). The slot
you choose determines the location, skill, defense, and class affinities for
the enhancement.
Physical Enhancement: If creating a physical enhancement, choose the
enhancements base item and the body location it occupies when
equipped. For example, the base item for a magic longsword is an
ordinary longsword, and its body location is held.
Skills and Defenses: Every enhancement provides a +1 to +5
enhancement bonus to at least one skill or defense.
Talents: If an enhancement provides a bonus to a skill, it can also
provide the ability to use a talent that uses that skill. Exploits can
provide core or major talents, and other enhancements can provide only
major talents.
Feats: Enhancements can allow a user to gain the benefit of a class,
general, or style feat.
Traits: Some enhancements have traits that produce a special effect
other than a talent or feat in exchange for increasing the enhancement's
level. For example, a flaming sword might add +1d6 of fire damage on a
hit and add +1 to the enhancements level. Most traits are magical or
psionic in origin, and a wide variety of traits are described in the e20
System Core Rulebook.
Level: An enhancement's level is a function of its enhancement
bonuses to skills and defenses as well as the talents, feats, and traits it
provides. Calculate the level using the following steps; if the
enhancement does not have affinity for a given skill, defense, or class
(for a talent or class feat), double that value when calculating the
enhancements level.

Your character level must equal or exceed 4 (greatest


enhancement bonus provided).
You must have Skill Focus for any skill that receives an enhancement
bonus.
You must have the second-tier defensive feat (Improved [Feat]) for
any defense that receives an enhancement bonus.
You must know any talent or feat the enhancement provides.
You must meet the prerequisite specified in the description of any
trait the enhancement provides.
Cost: To create an enhancement, you must first acquire the necessary
components. In the case of a physical enhancement, one of the
components is the base item the enhancement occupies.
Unless otherwise specified, the market value of an enhancement is
(purchase DC of components) + 3.
Mental Enhancement: The component purchase DC is 15 +
enhancement's level.
Physical Enhancement: The component purchase DC is either 15 +
enhancements level or 2 + base items purchase DC, whichever is
greater.

Creation Process
Once you have determined the enhancements level and cost, met its
prerequisite, and purchased its components, you can begin creating the
enhancement by participating in the challenge described below.

Create Enhancement

[Challenge]

Participants: 1 character, but additional characters can participate if they


meet the prerequisite for the enhancement. If you are teaching the
enhancement to another character, the recipient must be present
during the entire creation process.
Primary Skill: SKILL (Int) for physical enhancements, SKILL (Wis) for selftaught enhancements, or SKILL (Cha) for enhancements taught to
another character.
DC: 15 + enhancement's level.
Complexity: 20 + enhancement's level.
Factors: If you interrupt the creation process, you lose 5 progress for
every week (or fraction thereof) that you are not participating in the
challenge.
Time: 1 day (base).
Result: If the challenge is completed, the enhancement is created
successfully. If the challenge is terminated, you lose half the value of
the components needed to create the enhancement. (Replacing the
lost half of the components has a purchase DC 2 points lower.)

Skills and Defenses: Add 3 (best enhancement bonus + 1 per


additional enhancement bonus).
Talents: Add 2 (largest level prerequisite of any talent provided + 1
per additional talent provided).
Feats: Add 4 (largest level prerequisite of any feat provided [min.
1] + 1 per additional feat provided).
Traits: Add the level modifier of each trait the enhancement
provides.
Body Location: After adding all values above, double the total level if
the enhancement does not have affinity for the body location you
choose.
The resulting total gives you the enhancements level.
Prerequisite: To create the enhancement, you must meet all of the
following prerequisites.
Your character level must equal or exceed the enhancement's level.

57

10: Combat
Combat or its threat is an important part of most roleplaying games, and
the e20 System is no exception. The combat rules are similar to those
found in previous d20-based games except as noted here.

Defenses

Attacks

The e20 System uses static defense scores to determine the success of an
attack and a simple saving throw mechanic to handle recovery from
lasting effects. Defense scores are calculated using the following
formula:

An attack is any action that uses the word attack to describe its d20
task resolution roll. Attacks damage or inhibit the target in some way.

10 + 1/2 level + ability modifier + defense bonus + enhancement bonus

Attack Roll

The specific ability modifiers used and the source of defense bonuses are
different for each of the four types of defenses.

An attack roll is a skill check using the listed skill modifier, ability
modifier, and other modifiers as described in the actions summary.

Primary Defense
Primary Defense is the target defense for most weapon-based attacks
that are directed at a single target (as opposed to area attacks).
Ability Modifier: Dexterity or Intelligence. If youre wearing armor, it
can limit your ability modifier.
Defense Bonus: Dodge grants a +2 defense bonus and Improved Dodge
grants a +3 defense bonus (increasing to +4 at 9th level and +5 at 17th
level). If you are wearing armor, you instead add the armors listed bonus.

Attack Roll = d20 + skill modifier + ability modifier + misc. modifiers


Some attacksparticularly those by inanimate objects such as traps and
hazardsdo not use a skill at all; instead, they use a flat modifier. If you
are not Medium size, subtract your size modifier (or your weapons size
modifier, if different) from all weapon attacks.
When you make an attack, compare your attack roll to the targets
Primary, Reflex, Fortitude, and/or Will Defense, as described in the
actions summary. If your attack roll equals or exceeds the targets
defense, the attack hits. Otherwise, it misses.
Natural 20: When you roll a natural 20 (the d20 comes up with 20 on
its face), you gain two benefits:

Fortitude Defense
Fortitude Defense is the target defense for attacks that directly affect
your characters physical health (such as diseases or poisons) and
anything wherein sheer toughness and bulk comes into play (such as
resisting being pushed).
Ability Modifier: Strength or Constitution.
Defense Bonus: Great Fortitude grants a +2 defense bonus and
Improved Great Fortitude grants a +3 defense bonus (increasing to +4 at
9th level and +5 at 17th level).

If your total attack modifier is at least +0 after applying all penalties


(such as for range and concealment), you automatically hit the
target.
If your attack roll equals or exceeds the targets defense, you score a
critical hit (see below).
Natural 1: When you roll a natural 1 (the d20 comes up with 1 on its
face), your attack automatically misses. In addition, if you are not trained
in your weapons skill, you suffer a mishap. (See Mishaps, page 25.)

Reflex Defense
Reflex Defense is the target defense for area attacks and environmental
hazards (such as landslides or pit traps). In addition, Reflex Defense fills
the same role as touch Armor Class did in previous d20-based games.
Ability Modifier: Dexterity or Intelligence. If youre wearing armor, it
can limit your ability modifier.
Defense Bonus: Lightning Reflexes grants a +2 defense bonus and
Improved Lightning Reflexes grants a +3 defense bonus (increasing to +4
at 9th level and +5 at 17th level).

Critical Hits
Critical hits are handled somewhat differently in the e20 System than in
previous d20-based games. When you score a critical hit with an attack,
choose one of the following effects:
Double Damage: Your attack deals double damage against the
target. Roll damage normally, apply all modifiers, and then double
the result.
Gain Action Point: You gain one Action Point, which you can use to
gain other benefits during an encounter. (See Action Points, page
35.)
Perform Stunt: In addition to the normal effect of your attack, you
can perform a stunt such as tripping, disarming, or pinning your
target. Different stunts have requirements that might make them
unavailable for a given attack. (See Stunts, page 64.)

Will Defense
Will Defense is the target defense for attacks that are resisted by mental
or emotional stamina and willpower (such as morale or psychic effects).
Ability Modifier: Wisdom or Charisma.
Defense Bonus: Iron Will grants a +2 defense bonus and Improved Iron
Will grants a +3 defense bonus (increasing to +4 at 9th level and +5 at
17th level).

58

Combat Terms
Several combat-related terms have specific meanings that are
important for understanding the combat rules in this chapter.
Attack: An attack is any skill check that directly restricts the actions
of or harms another character. An attack is usually made against one
or more of a targets Defenses.
An attack hits if the attack roll equals or exceeds the targets
Defense, and it misses if the attack roll is less than the targets
Defense. If your skill modifier is +0 or more after applying all
penalties, you automatically hit on a natural 20; if your attack roll
equals or exceeds the targets defense, you also score a critical hit.
You automatically miss on a natural 1, and you suffer a mishap if
you are untrained with your weapon.
Damage: Many effects can deal damage. Subtract damage taken
from the targets hit points until none remain, and then subtract the
remainder from the targets reserves.
If an attack deals half damage in a given circumstance, calculate
damage normally (as if it hit) and then divide by 2. Unless otherwise
specified, other effects caused by a hit do not apply on a miss.
Defense: A characters ability to resist attacks is represented by four
Defense scores.
Primary Defense applies to most weapon attacks that deal damage.
Fortitude Defense applies to attacks that affect a targets health or
conditions, such as poisons.
Reflex Defense applies to effects that cover an area rather than a
single target, such as an explosion. It is also used when a targets
armor and ability to dodge do not apply against an attack.
Will Defense applies to mental attacks that affect a targets morale
or mental condition.
Target: A target is a character designated as being the subject of an
attack or other skill check.
Character: A character is anything that can be the target of an
action. If you can affect it in a significant way, its a character.
An incorporeal character has no Strength score and cannot exert
force physically. A nonliving character has no Constitution score and
cannot heal naturally. An immobile character has no Dexterity score
and cannot move. A mindless character has no Intelligence score and
acts on preprogrammed instructions or stimulus-response behavior.
Creature: A creature is any character with a Wisdom and Charisma
score. It is self-aware and it perceives its environment.
Object: An object is any character with no Wisdom or Charisma
score. It has no awareness, and any action it takes must be
preprogrammed or automatic. Tables, chairs, and nonpowered melee
weapons are objects.
A device is any object that performs a mechanical, electronic, or
supernatural function. Guns, computers, locks, and doors are devices.
Noncharacter: Impassable barriers and environmental effects are
not characters and cannot be a target unless an actions description
specifies otherwise. They can affect other characters, however, for
example by blocking movement or by producing a hazard. If a specific
action can target a noncharacter, it is treated as an object.

Barrier: A barrier is any solid obstacle that physically blocks movement.


Solid walls, cliffs, and the ground are all barriers. Barriers are most often
encountered as obstacles during movement.
Environmental Effect: An environmental effect is nonsolid but might
affect characters either by changing conditions (such as fog or light) or by
creating a hazard (such as smoke or fire).
Size: A characters size represents its relative length, width, and mass
compared to other characters.
Size Modifier: Subtract a characters size modifier from its Primary and
Reflex Defenses, weapon attack rolls, and Dexterity-based skill checks
other than attacks. Add a characters size modifier to its Fortitude
Defense, grappling attack rolls, and Strength-or Constitution-based skill
checks other than attacks. Add twice a characters size modifier to its
weapon damage.
Size Multiplier: This value applies to certain special situations, such as
calculating a characters encumbrance or collision damage.
Space: A characters space is the area it takes up on the battle grid,
measured by its width in squares.
Reach: Creatures and anthropomorphic vehicles have a reach that
defines how large an area they threaten for purposes of attacks of
opportunity and how far away they hit a target with a melee attack.
Speed: A characters speed represents how far it can move on the battle
grid.
Movement Type: A character with simple movement (including most
creatures) can move in any direction it wants, and it doesnt have a
specific facing. A character with limited movement (including transports
driven by another character and most flying creatures) have more
restrictions on their movement; they have facing, can turn only under
specific circumstances, and must declare their speed at the end of their
turn.
Base Speed: A characters base speed is listed in its game statistics.
Depending on the specific action taken, the character might move some
multiple of its base speed as a single action (up to its maximum speed).
Declared Speed: At the end of its turn, a character with limited
movement declares its speed category for its next turn. Its can declare a
speed up to one speed category higher or lower than its current speed.
Current Speed: A characters current speed is equal to the distance in
squares it has moved this turn, the minimum value for its declared speed,
or its falling distance in feet (up to 200), whichever is greatest.
Range: Many attacks can affect a target at range. Range is calculated
by counting the number of squares between you and your target,
including the targets square but not your own square. Determine your
range penalty based on the distance to the target, the targets current
speed, or the difference in altitude between you and the target,
whichever is greatest.
Depending on your range, you might take a range penalty to your
attack.

59

defend yourself, withstand damage, and shake off the effects of attacks.
All temporary hit points expire after a specified time has elapsed (most
often at the end of the current encounter or after 1 minute).
Temporary hit points are separate from your current hit points; do not
add them together. When you take damage, subtract the damage from
your pool of temporary hit points until they are reduced to 0, and then
apply the remainder to your current hit points.
Temporary hit points do not stack: If two or more effects would grant
you more than one pool of temporary hit points, you keep only the
largest pool rather than adding them together.
Once they expire or you lose them from taking damage, temporary hit
points cannot be recovered or healed in any way. However, you might be
able to gain a new pool of temporary hit points later, from the same or a
different source.

Saving Throws
When an attack or other condition includes some sort of lasting effect,
you make a saving throw (also called a save) at the end of your turn
each round to try to end the effect. The e20 System has three different
saves, each of which are made with a d20 roll plus your defense bonus
from the defensive feats you know. (Add only your defense bonus, not
your entire defense score.)
Fortitude save: 1d20 + Fortitude defense bonus vs. DC 10
Reflex save: 1d20 + Reflex defense bonus vs. DC 10
Will save: 1d20 + Will defense bonus vs. DC 10
Your fatigue and impairment penalties (if any) apply to your saving
throw. As you become increasingly worn down by damage, you find it
much harder to shake off the effects of conditions.

Reserves

Reserves represent how easily you can recover from damage or, when
theyre running low, how close you are to your breaking point. In a way,
your reserves are like a pool of backup hit points: Damage that exceeds
your current hit points is subtracted from your reserves, and you can use
your reserves to replenish your hit points.
You have maximum reserves equal to your maximum hit points. Any
time you take damage that exceeds your current hit points, subtract the
excess damage from your current reserves. Like hit points, your reserves
cannot be reduced below 0, and they cannot increase above your
maximum reserves.
After you've rested for 1 minute, you automatically recover as many hit
points as possible from your current reserves, returning you to full hit
points if sufficient reserves remain. Once per encounter, you can recover
hit points as a standard action, drawing an amount up to 1/5 your
maximum hit points from your reserves to help get you back into the
fight.
If you have at least 1 reserve point remaining, you are able to recover
from damage very quickly. If both your hit points and reserves are
reduced to 0, you are incapacitated and must make a Fortitude save
every hour to see if you recover hit points and regain consciousness,
remain incapacitated, or start to weaken and die. (See Conditions, page
62.)

Injury and Healing


The e20 System uses a hybrid system to track damage and lingering
effects on a character.

Hit Points and Reserves


Your hit points and reserves provide an abstract representation of your
how well you can survive or avoid the effects of an attack or hazard, how
much damage you can survive, and how easily you can recover.

Hit Points

Your hit points represent how much punishment you can take before
youre in danger of losing consciousness or dying. Your maximum hit
points are determined primarily by your class levels and your Constitution
score, as specified in each class description (see Classes, page 11). Other
game statistics, such as feats you know or your size, can also affect your
hit point total.
Hit points do not represent physical toughness alone. Highly
experienced characters have a great number of hit points because they
are skilled enough to avoid or minimize the effects of an attack, but their
ability to do so is gradually worn down over the course of a fight. In
contrast, a large object has a great number of hit points because it has
so much mass and resilience that it can withstand a great deal of
physical punishment.
When you take damage from any source, subtract the damage dealt
from your current hit points; if your hit points are reduced to 0, subtract
the remaining damage from your reserves (see below). Your hit points
cannot be reduced below 0, and they cannot increase above your
maximum hit points.
If you have at least 1 hit point remaining, you can act normally on your
turn. If your hit points are reduced to 0, you are exhausted and unable to
take more than a single action each round. In addition, if you take a
standard action while exhausted, you must make a Fortitude save at the
end of your turn to avoid becoming disabled. (See Conditions, page 62.)
Temporary Hit Points: Some sources (such as the Vanguards Rage class
feat) can grant you temporary hit points, which represent an effect that
provides an extraordinary boost of vitality that helps you to better

Massive Damage Threshold


Your massive damage threshold represents how much damage you can
take in a single attack without suffering any lingering debilitating effect
beyond that specified by the attack itself.
You calculate your massive damage threshold with the following
formula:
Threshold = 10 + Fortitude Defense + armor bonus + misc. bonus

Fortitude Defense: Include your Fortitude Defense (not just your


Fortitude defense bonus) when calculating your massive damage
threshold.
Armor Bonus: When you are wearing a suit of armor, you gain its listed
armor bonus to your massive damage threshold. (This bonus applies even
if you are not proficient with the armor you wear.)
Miscellaneous Bonuses: Some feats, racial traits, and other effects
might modify your massive damage threshold.

60

Table 101: Massive Damage


Hit Points
1+

Reserves
1+

1+

1+

Effect1
You are fatigued, causing a 1 fatigue penalty to all skill checks and saving throws; these penalties stack if you take massive
damage additional times. At the end of your turn, make a Fortitude save to reduce your fatigue penalty by 1. Fatigue
penalties end automatically if you rest for one full minute.
You are impaired, causing a 1 impairment penalty to all skill checks and saving throws; these penalties stack if you take
massive damage additional times. After a long rest (6 hours or sleep or the equivalent), make a Fortitude save to reduce
your impairment penalty by 1.
You take a 1 fatigue penalty and fall unconscious (disabled). At the end of your turn, make a Fortitude save. On a success,
you regain consciousness (removing the disabled condition). On a failure, your condition does not change. On a failure by
10 or more, your condition worsens to incapacitated.
You take a 1 impairment penalty and begin dying (weakening). At the end of your turn, make a Fortitude save. On a success,
you stabilize and become incapacitated. On a failure, you continue weakening and take an additional 1 impairment
penalty. On a failure by 10 or more, you are dead (destroyed).
Overwhelming Damage: If the damage dealt equals or exceeds 2 your massive damage threshold, you are immediately
killed (destroyed); the damage is too extensive for you to have any chance of survival. Vehicles and other volatile objects
explode when destroyed by overwhelming damage.
In addition, you can make a Fortitude saving throw to reduce your
current impairment penalty by 1 after a long rest.

Effects of Massive Damage

If you take damage equal to or greater than your maximum damage


threshold in a single attack, the attack causes some additional lasting
effect determined by how many hit points and reserves you have
remaining after applying the damage, as shown in Table 101: Massive
Damage.

Restoration

Restoration is a metaskill (page 23) that covers any attempt to treat


injuries, perform surgery, attempt a jury-rig, or conduct major repairs on
a character that has been damaged or affected by a condition (page 62).
The skill you use to make a restoration check depends on what type of
character you want to help:

Healing and Repairs

Medicine for any living creature


Mechanics for any object or nonliving creature
Nature for ordinary animals and plants (trained only)
Computers for computer systems and other electronic devices
(trained only)
Any weapon skill for a weapon from that group (trained only)

After losing hit points and reserves or being affected by various


conditions (page 62), you have several ways to get back into fighting
form either on your own or with assistance from other characters.

Rest and Healing

A living or self-repairing character can regain lost hit points and remove
conditions that affect it in several ways.
Recovery: Once per encounter as a standard action, you can recover up
to 1/5 your maximum hit points from your reserves (but not more that
the current reserves you have remaining). Subtract this amount from
your current reserves and add it to your current hit points.
Saving Throws: Most conditions (such as fatigue) allow you to remove
them by making a successful saving throw at the end of your turn; the
type of saving throw is identified in the condition or the attack that
caused it. Some conditions require you to wait for a specified period
before you can make a saving throw; for example, you make your saving
throw after 1 hour when youre incapacitated or a full nights rest (6
hours) when youre impaired.
Make a separate saving throw against each condition, and you can
decide the order in which you make your saving throws. If you are
fatigued or impaired, apply the total of your current fatigue and
impairment penalties to all saving throws.
Short Rest: If you rest for 1 minute (10 rounds) without engaging in
any strenuous activity, you automatically recover up to your maximum
hit points from your reserves and remove all current fatigue penalties.
In addition, you regain the ability to use all your expended major
talents after a short rest.
Moderate Rest: If you rest for 1 hour without engaging in any
strenuous activity, you can make a Fortitude saving throw to regain 1/5
your maximum hit points. Apply this healing first to your current hit
points, and then apply any remainder to your reserves.
In addition, your Action Points reset to 1 after a moderate rest.
Long Rest: If you spend 6 hours sleeping (or otherwise helpless, for
non-sleeping characters), you automatically regain your maximum hit
points. As during a moderate rest, apply this healing first to your current
hit points, and then apply any remainder to your reserves.

To make a restoration check, you must be within reach of the target for
the duration of the check. If you dont have an appropriate tool kit (such
as a first aid kit, surgery kit, tool kit, or electronics kit), you take a
penalty of 5 to your check, and you might not be able to attempt it at
all. Finally, since extensive or widespread damage is more difficult to
mend, you take a penalty to your restoration check equal to the targets
combined fatigue and impairment penalties.
Assisted Recovery: If a target has reserves remaining, you can attempt
first aid or a jury-rigged repair to help restore it to working condition. As
a standard action, make a DC 15 restoration (Wis) check to allow the
target to recover 1/5 its maximum hit points from its reserves. You take a
5 penalty to your restoration check if you do not have a first aid kit (for
living creatures) or appropriate basic tool kit (for other targets).
For every successful assisted recovery that target has received in the
same encounter (that is, without resting for one minute), you take a
cumulative 5 penalty to your restoration check. (Theres only so much
you can with bandages and duct tape.)
Restoring Hit Points: You can restore a characters hit points with
surgery or major repairs by completing a challenge: Check restoration
(Int) DC 20; Complexity 10 size multiplier (min. 5); Base Time 1 hour;
Completed target heals 1/5 its maximum hit points; Terminated target
takes damage equal to 1/5 its maximum hit points (which might qualify
as massive damage).
Because of its delicate nature, this procedure requires you to have a
surgery kit (for living creatures) or a deluxe tool kit of the appropriate
type (for other targets) to avoid taking a penalty to your restoration
check. If you instead use a first aid kit or basic tool kit, you take a 5
penalty to your restoration check; without an appropriate kit of some
kind, you cannot attempt to restore hit points at all.

61

Depending on the circumstances of its destruction (disintegrated,


shattered, imploded, exploded, or killed by more conventional means), it
might leave behind a relatively intact body, mutilated remains, scattered
fragments, a pile of ashes, or anything in between.
If a powered vehicle or other volatile object (such as a generator or
fuel tank) is destroyed by overwhelming damage (damage that equals or
exceeds 2 its massive damage threshold), it explodes: Target all
characters within (size modifier) squares of destroyed character; Attack
+5 vs. Reflex; Hit 4d6 + (2 size modifier) explosion damage; Miss by 5
or less 1/2 damage; Special double damage to any character in contact
with or inside the destroyed character.
Restoration: Normally none, but some settings might have special
supernatural or technological means of resurrecting or reassembling a
destroyed character.
Disabled: The character is helpless, unconscious, and unable to take
any actions.
A living or self-repairing character can remove the disabled condition
without assistance. At the end of its turn, the character makes a
Fortitude save. On a success, remove this condition. On a failure, its
condition does not change. On a failure by 10 or more, its condition
changes to incapacitated.
Restoration: As a standard action, a character can make a DC 20
restoration (Wis) check to remove this condition from a disabled target.
On a failure by 5 or more, the target instead takes a 1 fatigue penalty.
Disadvantaged: Opponents gain a +2 bonus to attacks against a
disadvantaged character (+5 if it is helpless). Depending on the specific
circumstances, the character might be disadvantaged to all opponents
(such as when it is stunned) or only to specific opponents (such as when
an enemy uses the feint action).
Exhausted: The character can take only a single action (standard,
move, or swift) on its turn, and it has only 1/2 its normal carrying
capacity. If an exhausted character takes a standard action, it must make
a Fortitude save at the end of its turn. On a failed save, its condition
becomes disabled.
This condition ends automatically when the character gains at least 1
hit point and the total of its current fatigue and impairment penalties
does not exceed 5 + its Constitution modifier.
Fatigued: The character takes a 1 fatigue penalty to all skill checks
and saving throws. If a character is fatigued multiple times, these
penalties stack.
If the total of a characters current fatigue and impairment penalties is
greater than 5 + its Constitution modifier, the character automatically
becomes exhausted.
A living or self-repairing character can reduce its fatigue penalty
without assistance if it has had sufficient sustenance (food, water, air,
and sleep). At the end of its turn, a fatigued character can make a
Fortitude save to reduce its fatigue penalty by 1 point. This condition is
removed when a characters fatigue penalty is reduced to 0 or it rests for
1 minute (10 rounds).
Restoration: As a standard action, a character can make a DC 15
restoration (Wis) check to reduce a targets fatigue penalty by 1. On a
failure by 5 or more, the targets fatigue instead increases by 1.
Grabbed: When a character hits vs. Reflex with a grapple attack, both
the attacker and target are grabbed. A grabbed character can perform
most actions normally, but it can move only 1 square as a standard
action if its opponent is the same size and cannot move at all if its
opponent is larger. A grabbed character drags its opponents with it when
moving.
The grabbing character cannot perform any action that requires two
hands other than a grapple attack.
This condition ends in one of four ways: (1) The grabbed character
successfully shakes off the grab as a swift action; (2) The grabbing
character becomes helpless; (3) At the end of the grabbing characters
next turn after its most recent successful grapple or maintain hold

Excessive Damage
The default massive damage rules represent a cinematic heroic style of
play appropriate for most settings and campaigns in the action and
adventure genres. As an optional rule for less cinematic styles, taking
damage that exceeds your massive damage threshold by a great amount
can cause additional fatigue or injury.
This rule provides options for two less cinematic styles of playheroic
realism or gritty realismand it provides a good example of how the e20
System can be adapted to very different genres and settings.
Heroic Realism: Heroic characters can still perform cinematic and
sometimes over-the-top actions during their adventures, but they are
much more likely to find themselves limping, bleeding, or worse before
the day is out. The original Die Hard might fit this style of play, with
John McClane being bloodied, bludgeoned, and almost unable to walk by
the end of the movie.
For every 10 points by which an attacks damage exceeds your massive
damage threshold, you take an additional 1 fatigue or impairment
penalty (determined by whether you have any remaining reserves, as
normal).
Because you are automatically exhausted your combined fatigue and
impairment penalties exceed 5 + your Constitution modifier, you are
much more likely to be significantly hindered even if you have hit points
or reserves remaining.
Gritty Realism: Though you might have the ability to perform some
amazing acts of heroism, the very real and immediate threat of serious
injury or death virtually requires that you act in a more cautious (and
realistic) manner. Youll want to find and stay in cover as much as
possible, so you will tend to be less mobile during a fight. Even then, a
single lucky shot can take you out of actionperhaps permanently. Many
war movies (such as Saving Private Ryan) fit this style of play, and it
strives to capture the terror, brutality, and inhumanity of combat.
For every 5 points by which an attacks damage exceeds your massive
damage threshold, you take an additional 1 fatigue or impairment
penalty (determined by whether you have any remaining reserves, as
normal). In addition, if you ever take damage equal to or greater than 2
your massive damage threshold, you are automatically disabled (if you
have reserves remaining) or destroyed (if you do not), regardless of your
current hit points.
With this variant, you are very likely to become exhausted due to
fatigue and impairment during any lengthy battle, and a single critical
hit (or regular hit from a particularly powerful weapon) has the real
potential to kill you outright.
Removing Conditions: Although most targets can recover from
conditions on their own, you can make a restoration check to speed the
process along. In a conditions description (see below), it indicates if you
can make a restoration check to assist in removing a condition from a
target.
When removing a condition, you take a 5 penalty to your restoration
check if you do not have a first aid kit (for living creatures) or
appropriate basic tool kit (for other targets).

Conditions
A number of adverse conditions can affect a character. If more than one
condition affects a single character, apply both if possible. If not possible,
apply only the most severe condition.
Dazed: Living creatures only. The character cannot take any actions.
Destroyed: The character is no more. It has ceased to be. It has expired,
kicked the bucket, shuffled off this mortal coil, run down the curtain, and
joined the choir invisible. It is an ex-character.

62

A prone creature on a solid surface is treated as having cover from a


low object (+2 cover bonus to Primary and Reflex Defenses, but an
attacker ignores low objects within its reach). A prone character takes a
5 penalty to attack with melee weapons, and the only other weapons it
can use are firearms, emplaced weapons on bipods, crossbows, and
shuriken.
Slowed: The character (or driver, for a transport) loses its move action
on its turn. It can trade its standard action for another move action,
however.
Staggered: The character (or driver, for a transport) loses its standard
action on its turn.
Stunned: Living creatures only. The character cannot take any actions,
and it is disadvantaged.
Unconscious: Creatures only. The character is helpless and unaware of
its surroundings. If standing when it becomes unconscious, it also falls
prone.
If the character is sleeping (as opposed to being unconscious because
of another condition), it can make a Perception (Wis) check at a 10
penalty to wake up in response to any unexpected sound, light, or
movement.
Restoration: A character can automatically wake a sleeping target
within its reach with a standard action.
Uncontrolled: Creatures and vehicles only. An uncontrolled creature
immediately falls prone. If swimming, it begins to sink, and if flying or
climbing, it falls from its current height.
An uncontrolled vehicle continues moving, turning randomly and
reducing it declared speed by one category each round (or losing an
equal amount of altitude, if flying). It remains uncontrolled until its
driver makes a control (Dex) check to regain control or the vehicles
declared speed is reduced to stationary. (See Losing Control, page 70.)
Weakening: The character is helpless, unconscious, and unable to take
any actions. At the end of its turn, the character makes a Fortitude save.
On a success, its condition changes to incapacitated. On a failure, its
impairment penalty increases by 1. On a failure by 10 or more, the
character is destroyed.
Restoration: As a standard action, a character can make a DC 20
restoration (Wis) check to stabilize a weakening target and change its
condition to incapacitated. On a failure by 5 or more, the targets
impairment penalty increases by 1.

attack; (4) The grabbling character voluntarily releases the grab as a free
action.
Grappled: When a character hits vs. Reflex and Fortitude with a
grapple attack, the target is grappled. A grappled character is
disadvantaged against all characters other than opponents grappling it,
its reach extends only into its own space, and it cannot voluntarily move
from its space. It can make weapon attacks only against an opponent
grappling it and only if wielding a light weapon. It takes a 5 penalty to
all attack rolls except those made with unarmed attacks or natural
weapons.
This condition ends in one of four ways: (1) The grappled character
successfully escapes the grapple as standard action; (2) The grappling
character becomes helpless; (3) At the end of the grappling characters
next turn after its most recent successful grapple attack; (4) The
grappling character voluntarily releases the grapple as a free action.
Helpless: The character is disadvantaged, and opponents gain a +5
bonus to attacks against it rather than the usual +2. Opponents can
attempt to kill a helpless character outright by using the coup de grace
action.
This condition is always caused by another effect, so it continues until
the effect ends.
Unattended, stationary objects are always helpless.
Impaired: The character takes a 1 impairment penalty to all skill
checks and saving throws. If a character is impaired multiple times, these
penalties stack.
If the total of a characters current fatigue and impairment penalties is
greater than 5 + its Constitution modifier, the character automatically
becomes exhausted.
A living or self-repairing character can reduce its impairment penalty
without assistance if it has had sufficient sustenance (food, water, air,
and sleep). After a long rest (6 hours of sleep or the equivalent), an
impaired character can make a Fortitude save to reduce its impairment
penalty by 1 point. This condition is removed when a characters
impairment penalty is reduced to 0.
Restoration: A character can attempt to remove this condition from an
impaired target by completing a challenge: Check restoration (Int) DC 15;
Complexity 10 size modifier [min. 5]; Base Time 1 hour; Completed
reduce targets impairment penalty by 1; Terminated increase targets
impairment penalty by 1.
Incapacitated: The character is helpless, unconscious, and unable to
take any actions.
A living or self-repairing character can remove the incapacitated
condition without assistance. After one hour, the character makes a
Fortitude save. On a success, it heals 1/5 its maximum hit points and this
condition is removed. On a failure, its condition does not change. On a
failure by 10 or more, its condition changes to weakening.
Restoration: A character can attempt to remove this condition from an
incapacitated target by completing a challenge: Check restoration (Int)
DC 20; Complexity 10 size modifier [min. 5]; Base Time 1 hour;
Completed target regains 1/5 maximum hit points and is no longer
incapacitated; Terminated targets condition changes to weakening.
Prone: Creatures only. A prone creature falls flat on the ground.
If the creature is not walking on solid ground when knocked prone, it is
subject to an additional effect. A mounted creature is thrown from its
mount, falling 5 feet for every square of its mounts reach. A climbing
creature falls from its current height. A swimming creature sinks 1
square each round until it makes a DC 15 control (Str) check to regain
control. A flying creature falls 100 squares the first round and 200
squares each subsequent round until it makes a DC 15 control (Dex)
check to regain control.
While prone, a creature can move only by crawling (4 normal
movement cost per square), and it can end this condition by using a
move action to stand up.

Combat Sequence
The basic combat sequence of the e20 System is similar to that seen in
previous d20-based games.

Surprise
At the beginning of an encounter, the Gamemaster decides who is
surprised and who is prepared for combat. The GM can call for Perception
checks, Insight checks, or any other skill check that he deems appropriate
in order for characters to become aware of the imminent danger. (See
Sense metaskill description, page 23.)
If there is at least one surprised character and at least one unsurprised
character, a surprise round occurs. A surprise round is like an ordinary
combat round, but each unsurprised combatant is allowed only one
standard, move, or swift action on its turn.

Initiative
Every character makes an initiative check to determine their order for
taking turns during the battle. For most characters, an initiative check is

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an Insight (Dex) check. If you are trained in Tactics, you can substitute a
Tactics (Int) check. (See Initiative metaskill description, page 23.)

Reactions: These are special actions that allow you to act on another
characters turn, but only after the action that triggered it is
complete. After you resolve your reaction, the original character can
complete its turn.

Combat Rounds

Table 102: Actions in Combat summarizes the effect of several sample


actions.

Each character takes its turn in initiative order until everyone has had
their turn; at that point, a new combat round begins and everyone is
entitled to a new turn in the same order. Until you have started your first
turn in combat, you are disadvantaged and vulnerable to some types of
special attacks (such as a Sneak Attack).

Stunts
Stunts are options that allow you to produce a specified effect or alter
the effect of a normal attack.

During Other Characters Turns

You can perform free actions, reactions, and interruptions during other
characters turns, but only interruptions can prevent an action already in
progress from being completed.

Performing a Stunt

You can perform a stunt as a standard action or as the benefit provided


by scoring a critical hit. Every stunt is resolved by comparing your attack
roll to one or more of the targets defenses.
Separate Action: As a standard action, you can produce the effect of
one stunt. You take a 5 penalty on your attack roll unless you have the
Stunt Mastery feat for that stunt; alternatively, you can spend an Action
Point to perform a stunt at no penalty. Use the specified attack roll to
determine if you are able to perform the stunt.
Critical Hit: If you score a critical hit, you have the option of gaining
the benefit of one eligible stunt in addition to the normal effect of your
successful attack roll. You do not make a separate attack roll; instead,
compare the result of your attack roll to the specified defense. (Even if
you rolled a natural 20 on your attack roll, the stunt is not automatically
successful.)

During Your Turn

Your turn breaks into three distinct phases.


Beginning of Your Turn: Most beneficial effects are listed as lasting
until the beginning of your turn. At the beginning of your turn, you
can choose to delay and wait for another character to complete its
turn before acting; however, the delay will not extend the duration
of any beneficial effects.
Middle of Your Turn: You can perform a standard action, a move
action, a swift action, and one or more free actions in any order.
Some situations and conditions might restrict or expand the actions
available to you on your turn.
End of Your Turn: Most detrimental effects last at least until the end
of your turn. At the end of your turn, make a separate saving throw
for each condition that allows it (such as fatigue). See the individual
conditions description for details on the results of the saving throw
(including whether any special effect occurs on a failed save).

Types of Stunts

There are two types of stunts: Universal stunts, which are available to all
characters, and talent stunts, which are available only to characters who
have a specific talent.
Universal Stunts: Universal stunts are available for a wide range of
attacks. In addition to performing a stunt as a separate action, each
stunt can be performed with some types of attacks by spending an action
point or by scoring a critical hit. The specific attacks that are eligible for
each stunt are listed in parentheses.

Actions in Combat
You can perform several different types of actions during combat. Each
round on your turn, you can perform one standard action, one move
action, and one swift action. You can also perform one or more free
actions even when it is not your turn, and some situations might call for
you to make an action in reaction to (or even interrupting) another
characters action.

Bull Rush (any melee attack or charge): Target within reach; SKILL
(Con) vs. Fortitude. On a hit, target is forced 1 square away from you,
plus 1 additional square for every 5 points by which your attack roll
beat the targets Fortitude Defense. You can move to remain within
reach of your target, and this movement does not provoke an attack
of opportunity from your target. Regardless of how much your attack
roll beats the targets defense, you can move no more than your
speed in squares; any movement performed as a part of a charge
counts toward this limit.
Crush (grapple): Grappled target within reach; Unarmed (Con) vs.
Fortitude. On hit, WEAPON + Unarmed (Str) damage and target is
grappled until the start of your next turn.
Disarm (grapple or any melee attack): Target within reach; SKILL
(Dex) vs. Reflex or Fortitude, whichever is higher. (You gain a +2
bonus to your attack if you are wielding a two-handed weapon, and
you take a 2 penalty to your attack if your target is wielding a twohanded weapon; these modifiers stack.) On hit, target drops its
weapon in a space of your choice that is within reach of both you
and the target. If you disarm a target while unarmed, you can choose
to wield the weapon instead of dropping it so long as you are
otherwise able to do so.
Pin (grapple): Grappled target within reach; Unarmed (Str) vs. Reflex
or Fortitude, whichever is greater. On hit, target is grappled and
cannot take any actions until the end of your next turn.

Standard Actions: These require the most effort and focus during
your turn; most attacks are standard actions. You can trade your
standard action for a move action or a swift action.
Move Actions: These involve movement and other substantial bodily
adjustments, such as removing an article of clothing or standing up
from a prone position. You can trade your move action for a swift
action.
Swift Actions: These are generally used to enable other actions, and
they are sometimes used to enhance or build on a standard action.
Free Actions: These require very little effort, and you can perform
more than one each round (subject to the GMs approval), even
during another characters turn. However, you cannot interrupt
another characters action when performing a free action.
Interruptions: These are special actions that interrupt another action
(either your own or another characters); resolve your interruption
first, and when your interruption is resolved determine whether or
not the other action is allowed to proceed. (For example, if you make
an attack of opportunity when a target moves out of your
threatened area and disable the target, that target would be unable
to complete its movement.) You can perform only one interruption in
response to any single action.

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Riposte (feint, melee only): Target within reach; SKILL (Int) vs. Reflex.
On hit, you gain a +2 bonus to your Primary and Reflex Defenses
against that target until the start of your next turn. In addition, if
your target makes an attack against you before the start of your
next turn, you can make an attack of opportunity against the target
as an immediate interruption.
Suppress (aid another or any area, autofire, or ranged attack): SKILL

(Int) vs. Will. On hit, the target immediately uses the lean action to
increase its cover (if it has cover against your attack) or uses the fall
prone action (if it does not have cover against your attack). The
target loses its swift action on its next turn.
Throw (grapple): Grappled target within reach; SKILL (Str) vs.
Fortitude. On hit, force target 1 square away from you, plus 1
additional square for every 5 points by which your attack roll beats

Table 102: Actions in Combat


Action

Standard Actions

Effect

Aid Another
SKILL (Int) vs. DC 10; on success, one ally gains +2 bonus or one enemy takes 2 penalty to designated skill check.
Attack, Simple Area
SKILL (Int) vs. Reflex; area by weapon; on hit, WEAPON + SKILL damage; on miss by 15, half damage.
Attack, Simple Autofire Automatic weapons only; area 2; SKILL (Str for held weapon, Int for emplaced weapon) vs. Primary; on hit, WEAPON +
SKILL damage; on miss by 15, half damage; expends 10 shots.
Attack, Simple Barrage Automatic or semiautomatic weapons only; SKILL ( Str for held weapon, Int for emplaced weapon ) vs. Primary; on hit,
WEAPON + SKILL damage; on miss by 15, half damage; expends 5 shots.
Attack, Simple Melee
SKILL (Str) vs. Primary; on hit, WEAPON + SKILL (Str) damage.
Light Weapon: SKILL (Dex) vs. Primary; on hit, WEAPON + SKILL (Dex) damage.
Attack, Simple Ranged SKILL (Dex) vs. Primary; on hit, WEAPON + SKILL (Dex) damage.
Charge
Move up to speed in straight line, ending adjacent to target; SKILL (Con) + 2 vs. Primary; on hit, WEAPON + SKILL (Con)
damage; disadvantaged until start of next turn.
Coup de Grace*
Make simple melee or ranged attack against helpless target; on hit, automatic critical hit (double damage); if hit points
reduced to 0, target is weakening (or destroyed if damage equals or exceeds threshold).
Escape
Control (Dex/Str) vs. Fortitude of grappling opponent; on hit, no longer grabbed or grappled and can step 1 square.
Feint
SKILL (Dex) vs. Reflex; on hit, target is disadvantaged to you until the end of your next turn.
Grapple
Unarmed (Str) vs. Reflex and Fortitude; on hit vs. Reflex, you and target are grabbed until the end of your next turn; on
hit vs. Reflex and Fortitude, target is also grappled until the end of your next turn.
Perform Stunt
Perform a stunt as a deliberate action.
Ready Action
Declare action and trigger that will activate it.
Recover
Recover up to 1/5 your maximum hit points from your reserves; 1/encounter.
Total Defense
Gain +2 bonus to all defenses until start of next turn.

Move Actions

Move, Limited*
Move, Simple*
Run*
Stand up*
Step
Wear/Remove Item*

Limited movement only; move a number of squares that falls within your declared speed category.
Simple movement only; move up to your speed.
Simple movement only; move up to twice your speed; disadvantaged until start of your next turn.
Stand up from a prone position.
Simple movement, character scale only; safely move 1 square without provoking an attack of opportunity.
Wear or remove a worn item from your person, such as a backpack, helmet, or belt.

Aim/Brace*

Fall Prone
Lean
Maintain Hold
Retrieve/Store Item
Shake Off
Target Lock*

Cannot move during same turn; with two-handed or emplaced ranged or area weapon, add style bonus to damage equal
to listed ability modifier (minimum 1): Strength (two-handed autofire or barrage), Intelligence (any ranged, blast,
splash, or spread attack; emplaced autofire or barrage).
When wielding two weapons and you hit with an attack with your primary weapon, use this action to make a melee or
ranged attack with your off-hand weapon: SKILL (Dex) vs. Primary; on hit, WEAPON + SKILL damage.
Drop to a prone position.
Reduce or improve existing cover by one step, such as by peeking around a corner.
Must be grabbing target; Unarmed (Str) vs. Reflex; on hit, you and target remain grabbed until the end of your next turn.
Item is retrieved from or stored in an accessible location such as a pocket, belt pouch, or holster.
Control (Dex/Str) vs. Fortitude of grabbing opponent; on hit, no longer grabbed.
Computers (Int) vs. Reflex; on hit, guided missile or torpedo will seek target independently when fired.

Maneuver
Regain Control
Release
Saving Throw
Speak

Control (varies) vs. maneuvers DC; on success, you perform maneuver; on failure by 10 or more, you lose control.
End of turn only; when uncontrolled, make DC 15 control (Dex) check; on success, you regain control.
You release a grab or grapple you initiated. If releasing a grapple, step 1 square into unoccupied space.
End of turn only; make a Fortitude, Reflex, or Will save to remove a condition currently affecting you.
Speak or shout a few words.

Attack of Opportunity

When a target you threaten performs a provoking action in your threatened area, you can make a simple melee attack or
simple ranged attack (handguns only) against that target.
You gain one benefit of using an Action Point (see page 35).

Swift Actions

Extra Attack

Free Actions

Interruptions

Use Action Point

Reactions

Perform Readied Action Perform action readied earlier in the round when triggering condition is met.

* Provokes attack of opportunity

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the targets Fortitude Defense; target takes WEAPON + Unarmed


(Str) damage, falls prone, and is no longer grappled.
Trip (grapple or any melee attack): Target within reach; SKILL (Dex)
vs. Reflex or Fortitude, whichever is greater. On hit, target falls
prone.

Dual Weapon
You wield one light or normal weapon in each of your hands. Once per
round when you hit with an attack using your primary weapon, you can
use make an extra attack (a swift action) with your off-hand weapon.
You take a 2 penalty to all attacks with light weapons and a 3 penalty
to all attacks with normal weapons.

Talent Stunts: A talent is always eligible to use any stunt that matches
its keywords or those of the weapon you wield. For example, Cleaving
Strike has the melee keyword, so you can use it to perform the Bull Rush
stunt.
In addition, you can use some talents to perform specific stunts in
addition to those allowed by its keywords. If a talent has stunts available
beyond those universal stunts you can use with a given weapon or talent
keyword, it will be noted in the Stunts line of the talents description. For
example, Draw Fire is not a ranged, autofire, or area attack, but you can
nevertheless use it to perform the Suppress stunt.
Finally, as a talent stunt, you can use a talent you know to perform
another talent of the same type (core or major) from the same talent
tree; you must meet the prerequisite (including minimum level) for the
talent performed. If you use a major talent to perform a talent stunt, you
expend that major talent for the duration of the encounter.

Emplaced Weapon
You are using two hands to operate an emplaced weapon of some sort,
such as a machine gun on a tripod, an autocannon on a fighter jet, or an
artillery emplacement.
The benefit of using this style depends on the specific type of weapon
you wield:
Melee Attack: You gain a style bonus to your damage with melee
weapons equal to your Charisma modifier (minimum +1). This
usually applies only when you make an attack using a mounts
natural weapons, such as a warhorses hooves.
Ranged or Area Attack: If you aim (a swift action) before making a
ranged or area attack, you gain a style bonus to your damage equal
to your Intelligence modifier (minimum +1).

Fighting Style

Fire Control: If your emplaced weapon (or the vehicle it is built into)
has an Intelligence score, it has a fire control system that helps you to
operate the weapon. When you make an attack with the emplaced
weapon, reduce the total of your range, speed, and concealment
penalties by an amount equal to the vehicles Intelligence modifier (if
positive).
Driver-Operated Weapons: If you are trained in your transports control
skill and you make an attack with a driver-operated weapon, you can
make a control (Dex) check instead of the appropriate weapon skill check
to make your attack roll.

The e20 System is designed to handle any style of combat, providing a


unique benefit for each option a character might choose to employ.
Unarmed Characters: If you are not wielding a weapon, you can use
the dual weapon, one-handed weapon, two-handed weapon, or weapon
and shield fighting styles. Unless you specify otherwise, you default to
one-handed weapon fighting style when unarmed.

Driving
When driving a transport (such as when riding a mount or piloting a
vehicle), add your Dexterity modifier (minimum 1) as a style bonus to
your transports Primary and Reflex Defenses. You must use two hands
(and often your feet as well) to control the transport in order to use this
fighting style.
While driving a transport, you must use a move action to drive your
transport on your turn and a free action at the end of your turn to
declare your transports speed for the following round. Failure to do
either of these actions results in your transport becoming uncontrolled
unless it is stationary.
Using a Different Fighting Style: Because you normally use both hands
to control a transport, you have some difficulty using a different fighting
style while driving. You take a penalty to all control checks if you dont
drive a transport with both hands: Using just one hand causes a 5
penalty (or a 10 penalty if driving a vehicle whose specialization has a
prerequisite, such as helicopters or heavy aircraft). At the Gamemasters
discretion, some transports might be so complex that they cant be
operated at all with less than two hands.
There are two ways to use a different fighting style while driving
without taking a penalty to your control checks. First, if your transport
has a driver-operated weapon, you can choose to use emplaced weapon
style instead of driving style. Because the weapon is specifically meant to
be used while driving, you dont take the penalties listed above to your
control checks.
Second, if riding a mount specifically trained for combat (such as a
warhorse) and you are trained in Nature, you can guide your mount using
your knees and free your hands for another use without taking the
penalties listed above to your control checks.

One-Handed Weapon
You wield a single light or normal weapon in one hand, and you have
nothing in your other hand. You gain a style bonus to your Primary and
Reflex Defenses equal to your Intelligence modifier (minimum +1).

Shield
You wield a light or normal weapon in your primary hand, and you carry
a shield in your off hand. You gain a style bonus to your Primary Defense
determined by the type of shield you use (ranging from +1 to +3). If you
are not proficient with shields, you gain only 1/2 the listed bonus for a
shield.

Two-Handed Weapon
You wield a light, normal, or heavy weapon in two hands. When using a
thrown weapon, you dont actually throw it with you hands, but you use
your off hand as a counterbalance to give your throw a little extra force.
The benefit of using this style depends on the specific type of weapon
you wield:
Melee Attack: You gain a style bonus to your damage with melee
weapons equal to your Constitution modifier (minimum +1).
Ranged or Area (Blast, Splash, or Spread) Attack: If you aim (a swift
action) before making a ranged or area (blast, splash, or spread)
attack, you gain a style bonus to your damage equal to your
Intelligence modifier (minimum +1).
Area (Autofire or Barrage) Attack: If you brace your weapon (a swift
action) before making an area (autofire or barrage) attack, you gain

66

a style bonus to your damage equal to your Strength modifier


(minimum +1).

Limited Movement
Characters with limited movement have some special rules for
movement. First, their facing matters because they cant change
direction very easily. Second, their ability to change speed from round to
round has some limitations, and their speed determines how quickly they
can turn. Third, they have to declare their speed at the end of their turn,
and they must move a distance on the following round that falls within
their declared speed category.
Unless otherwise specified, transports of all types (a creature you ride
as a mount or a vehicle you pilot) and flying creatures have limited
movement.

Movement
Your speed is determined by your race and your armor. Your speed while
unarmored is your base land speed. A character encumbered by carrying
a large amount of gear, treasure, or fallen comrades may move slower
than normal. Difficult terrain, obstacles, or poor visibility can hamper
movement.
During your turn, you can use actions to move across the combat grid.
The number of squares you can move depends on your base speed and
the specific action you take.
Moving 1 square in any direction (even diagonally) costs you 1 square
of movement. Each square of movement costs 2 normal if you are
crouched, and each square of movement costs 4 normal if you are
prone, crawling, climbing, swimming, or using some other alternative
mode of movement. (Such movement modes often require you to make
Athletics checks.) In addition, some environmental or terrain conditions
can change the cost of each square of movement. If more than one
multiplier applies to your movement cost, multiply them together to
determine the final cost of each square of movement.
Once you have used all the squares of movement your action allows,
your movement ends. You can always move less than the maximum
number of squares your action allows, if you wish.
Unless otherwise specified, moving out of a space provokes attacks of
opportunity from any character that threatens it.
Most creatures can maneuver freely, moving in any direction they
choose at will. Facing doesnt matter for these creatures because they
can easily turn toward or away from a threat. However, transports
(mounts and vehicles) and some types of creatures are not so agile, and
their facing matters during combat.
Simple Movement: Unless otherwise specified, all creatures that arent
flying have simple movement. They do not have facing, and they can
move in any direction. You can do any of the following types of
movement with a single move action if you have simple movement.

Facing

A character with limited movement has four faces: front, left, right, and
aft (rear). Its faces affect who it can attack and how it moves.
Firing Arcs: Each weapon attack that the character can make is limited
to one or more firing arcs. An attack with a turret firing arc can attack in
any direction. An attack with a partial turret can attack into three
adjacent firing arcs (such as front/left/right).
Direction of Movement: The character can move either forward (into a
space adjacent to its front) or in reverse (into a space adjacent to its aft),
but not left or right unless it has the hover trait (such as a helicopter).
Movement in reverse is limited to low speed unless otherwise specified.
(See Speed Categories, below.)

Speed Categories

A character with limited movement uses the following speed categories


to determine how far it can move, how quickly it can turn, and what
penalty it takes when making performing a maneuver (see Maneuvers,
page 68). The speed penalty (if any) that applies to your control checks at
each speed category is listed in parentheses.
Stationary (+0): The character is motionless. A vehicle with the pivot
or hover traits or a walking mount can turn in any direction while
stationary, but other characters cannot turn or move.
Low Speed (+0): The character moves up to its base speed. After
moving forward a distance equal to (1/2 space), it can turn up to
45 degrees.
Moderate Speed (1): The character moves up to 2 its base speed.
After moving forward a distance equal to (1/10 space base
speed), it can turn up to 45 degrees.
High Speed (2): The character moves up to 5 its base speed. After
moving forward a distance equal to (1/5 space base speed), it
can turn up to 45 degrees.
Very High Speed (5): The character moves up to its maximum speed
(see below). After moving forward a distance equal to (space base
speed), it can turn up to 45 degrees a maximum of once per round.

Simple move up to your base speed.


Run up to twice your base speed in a straight line; you become
disadvantaged until the start of your next turn.
Charge up to your base speed in a straight line (minimum 2 squares)
and make a melee attack at the end of your movement; your turn
ends after your attack, and you become disadvantaged until the start
of your next turn.
Step 1 square in any direction; unlike other movement, this doesnt
provoke an attack of opportunity.
If you have simple movement, you can trade your standard action for a
second move action if desired. Treat consecutive moves on the same turn
as a single continuous movement; for example, you can end your first
move action in an occupied square so long as you continue your
movement with a second move action (see Occupied Spaces, page 71).
Similarly, if you have a base speed of 5 and you are crouched (movement
cost 2 per square), you can move up to 5 squares if you use two
consecutive move actions (10 squares total movement cost).
Limited Movement: Flying creatures and transports (including
creatures ridden as mounts as well as piloted vehicles) have limited
movement, so that they cant change direction easily and thus their
facing is important. These characters have restrictions on how much they
can change their speed from turn to turn.
The following section outlines the specific rules for characters with
limited movement.

Turn Rate: The turn rate listed for each speed category represents the
default for a typical character relative to its speed and space. A
characters game statistics indicate if it has a longer or shorter turn rate.
Turning is a free action that you can take immediately after moving
forward a number of squares equal to a speed categorys listed turn rate.
Sideslip: A character might wish to move to the side without changing
its facing, for instance to change lanes, avoid obstacles, or weave in and
out of traffic. When performing a sideslip, the character moves one
square diagonally relative to its facing (that is, forward-left or forwardright) instead of moving one square forward.
The character must move forward at least one square before it can
sideslip one square. Once it has performed a sideslip, it cannot sideslip in
the opposite direction until it has moved forward a number of squares
equal to its turn rate.
Maximum Speed: Your maximum speed is the greatest distance that
you can travel in a single turn. By default, maximum speed is (base speed

67

Moving on your turn requires you to use a move action, and you can
do so a maximum of once on your turn each round. Unlike characters
with simple movement, you cannot have multiple moves in a single turn.
Unless you are stationary, you must perform a limited move (a move
action) each round or you become uncontrolled. (See Losing Control,
page 70.)
Squares of Movement: During your movement, you can move any
number of squares that falls within your declared speed category.
You might be able to turn (change direction by 45 degrees) one or
more times during your movement. Your current speed category, your
space, and your base speed determine your turn rate (the number of
squares you must move forward before being able to turn 45 degrees).

Simplified Limited Movement


The rules for limited movement are meant to provide a slight touch of
realism for campaigns that involve a fair amount of mounted or vehicle
combat. If these situations arise only rarely or if you prefer a more
streamlined approach, you can use the optional rules in this sidebar in
place of the normal rules for limited movement.

Move Actions

A character with limited movement can use one or both of its move
actions to move during its turn, just like any other character.
No Backtracking: When moving, a character with limited movement
cant move into a space that it just left. In practice, this means that most
characters with limited movement cant turn more than 90 degrees.
Hover or Pivot Traits: A character with the hover or pivot traits can
ignore this limitation when using a simple move action.
Run Action: When running, the character moves more than its base
speed and up to 2 its base speed in a straight line. It cant take the run
action unless it has moved at least its base speed since the start of its
last turn. Once it uses the run action, it must move at least its base
speed on its next turn or it becomes uncontrolled.
Running at Maximum Speed: If the character has performed no
movement other than the run action since the start of its last turn, it can
run a distance greater than 2 its base speed and up to 1/2 its listed
maximum speed. If the character runs at maximum speed, it must move
at least 2 its base speed on its next turn or it becomes uncontrolled.
Flying Characters: Flying characters without the hover trait must use
the run action to fly. A flying creature can take off with a simple move
so long as it immediately follows it with a run action on the same round.
However, a fixed-wing aircraft must reach a speed on the ground that
equals its base flying speed before it can take off with the run action.
Out of Control Vehicles: When a vehicle is uncontrolled, it repeats its
last move action (simple move, run, or run at maximum speed) once at
the beginning of its next turn, changing direction randomly at the start
of its turn and then moving in a straight line. Each round thereafter, it
reduces its move action by one step (to run, then to simple move, then to
stationary); for a flying character, it instead reduces its altitude by an
equivalent amount.
A failure by 10 or more when attempting to regain control causes
collision damage and brings the vehicle to a halt.

Aerial Movement
Some special rules apply to flying characters.
Minimum Speed: To remain in flight, the character must have a current
speed greater than its base speed unless it has the hover trait (such as a
helicopter). If its current speed drops below this amount for any reason,
it stalls, becoming uncontrolled and falling immediately. (See Losing
Control, page 70.)
Altitude: Flying characters move in three dimensions, gaining or losing
altitude by climbing or diving, respectively. Climbing costs 2 squares of
movement for every square you increase your altitude. Diving costs 1/2
square of movement for every square you decrease your altitude.
When declaring your speed at the end of your turn, determine your
current speed based on your actual distance moved rather than the
squares of movement you spent during your movement.
When calculating the range to a target, use either the horizontal
distance or the difference in altitude, whichever is more.
Falling: A falling character drops 100 squares (500 feet) at the end of
its first turn of falling and 200 squares (1,000 feet) at the end of each
additional turn of falling. When declaring your speed, determine your
current speed based on the distance fallen during your turn.
Taking Off and Landing: Flying creatures that have simple movement
on the ground and vehicles with the hover trait (such as a helicopters)
can take off at any time by declaring a flying speed. It can land safely
upon moving onto any unoccupied surface so long as the character is not
uncontrolled and it is able to end its movement upon touching down.
Otherwise, it crashes and suffers a collision. (See Collisions, page 72.)
Other flying vehicles (such as fixed-wing aircraft) have additional
requirements. To take off, the vehicle must have a current ground speed
greater than its stall speed (that is, its base flying speed); depending on
its base ground speed, this might take a few rounds to accomplish. To
land, the vehicle must fly in a direction parallel to the surface as it enters
an unoccupied space on ground; its current speed at landing cannot be
greater than its maximum ground speed when it touches down.
Otherwise, it crashes and suffers a collision. Once it touches down, it still
has to reduce its ground speed to stationary to complete the landing.

No Facing

Characters with limited movement do not have facing in this variant.


If the character has weapons with different firing arcs, it still can use
multiple weapons against a single target only if all of them are listed as
being able to attack into the same arc.
4) for a creature and (base speed 10) for a vehicle. However, the
actual maximum speed might be substantially faster or slower than this
amount, as listed in the characters game statistics. (Vehicles, in
particular, can vary widely in their maximum speeds.)
A characters maximum speed might make it unable to move at some
speed categories. For example, a character limited to four times its base
speed cant move at very high speed at all.

Maneuvers
When moving, you must make control checks to perform certain actions,
such as avoiding a hazard or intentionally ramming an opponent. Your
method of movement determines which skill you use to make control
checks:

Movement Sequence

Creature: A creature uses Athletics to perform maneuvers. If trained


in Acrobatics, you can substitute an Acrobatics check.
Mount: When riding a creature as a mount, a driver uses Nature to
perform maneuvers.
Vehicle: When piloting a vehicle, a driver uses Vehicles to perform
maneuvers.

Use the following steps each turn to handle your movement.


Declare Speed: Declare your speed category for next round at the end
of your turn. You can declare a speed category up to 1 step higher or
lower than your current speed on this last turn. You can declare a change
in your direction of movement (forward or reverse) only if you were
stationary this turn.

68

Unless otherwise specified, you add your Dexterity modifier to your


control check. In some situations, you might use a different skill or ability
modifier to make a control check. The maneuvers description notes if a
different skill applies.
Maneuver Modifiers: When making a maneuver, some modifiers might
apply to your control check.
Size Modifier: Subtract your size modifier from all control (Dex) checks
and add your size modifier to all control (Str) checks.
Speed Penalty: If you have limited movement, your current speed
category might cause a penalty to your control check. Stationary or low
speed, no penalty; moderate speed, 1 penalty; high speed, 2 penalty;
very high speed, 5 penalty.
Transports: If you are driving a transport (either riding a creature as a
mount or piloting a vehicle), you always make control checks using your
Dexterity modifier, regardless of what maneuver you perform. Add your
transports Dexterity modifier to control (Dex) checks and add your
transports Strength modifier to control (Str) checks.
Multiple Maneuvers: If you have limited movement, each additional
maneuver you perform in a single turn becomes increasingly difficult.
You take a cumulative 2 penalty to your control check for each previous
maneuver you have attempted since the start of your turn. (Characters
with simple movement do not take a penalty for multiple maneuvers.)

Altitude Categories
To help determine an appropriate altitude for a flying character, use the
following altitude categories as a guide.

As a free action, make a control check against its listed DC. On a success,
you perform the maneuver successfully. On a failure, you dont perform
the maneuver. On a failure by 10 or more points, you become
uncontrolled. (See Losing Control, page 70.)

Very Low: Up to 20 squares (100 feet) above the ground. Only flying
creatures and hovering vehicles tend to use this altitude category in
combat. Fixed-wing vehicles generally use this altitude only
immediately before landing or after takeoff.
Low: Up to 100 squares (500 feet) above the ground. Attack aircraft
often strafe ground targets at this altitude.
Moderate: Up to 500 squares (2,500 feet) above the ground. Aircraft
often use this altitude while in a landing pattern and awaiting
clearance for final approach. Most small arms arent a danger to
aircraft at this altitude.
High: Up to 2,000 squares (10,000 feet) above the ground. Most
helicopters cannot exceed this altitude. Creatures can breathe
indefinitely without special equipment at this altitude or below.
Surface-to-air missiles can strike a target at this altitude in a single
round.
Very High: Up to 10,000 squares (50,000 feet) above the ground. Most
fixed-wing aircraft cannot exceed this altitude. In fact, propeller- and
turboprop-driven airplanes typically dont exceed about half this
altitude.
Extreme: Up to 50,000 squares (250,000 feet) above the ground.
Almost leading up to the edge of space (about 60 miles), only rocket
vehicles normally travel in this altitude range.

Specific Maneuvers

Option: Declaring Altitude Categories

Attempting a Maneuver

Instead of calculating altitude in squares, you can use altitude categories


as an abstract representation of a flying characters distance from the
ground. At the end of a flying characters turn, it declares its altitude
category immediately after declaring its speed category.
When a flying character climbs or dives, its declared speed changes
because of the pull of gravity. For every step your altitude category
increases, your declared speed decreases by one category. For every step
your altitude category decreases, your declared speed increases by one
category (even when falling).

The following section describes each maneuver in detail. The ability


modifier you apply to your control check is listed in parentheses.
Some maneuvers require that the character have either simple or
limited movement, as noted in parentheses immediately after the ability
modifier that applies to the check.
Avoid Hazard (Dex): Combat rarely occurs on a perfectly flat,
featureless plain. When you try to move through an occupied square, you
must succeed on a control (Dex) check to avoid the hazard (collision or
otherwise) and continue moving.
You cannot avoid a hazard that fills the entire square (such as a large
structure). You cannot avoid a hazard if you cannot make a control check
(such as if you are disabled or uncontrolled) or if you are unaware of the
hazard. In these cases, the hazard automatically affects you.
The DC to avoid a hazard is 15 + hazards size modifier. On a success,
you avoid the hazard and can continue your movement. On a failure, the
hazards effect occurs normally.
Specific rules for some common types of hazards are outlined below.
Collision: If the hazard is another solid object, a collision occurs. (See
Collisions, page 72.)
Oil Slick: Determine an oil slicks size by the area it covers. If you dont
avoid the hazard, you must make an immediate control (Dex) check (DC
15). On a failure, you lose control.
Caltrops: Determine the caltrops size by the area they cover (rather
than using the size of an individual caltrop, usually Diminutive). Caltrops
attack any walking creature or wheeled vehicle with tires that enters
their space: Target moving character; Range 0 squares; Attack +0 vs.
Reflex and Fortitude; Hit vs. Reflex damage equal to moving characters
speed modifier; Hit vs. Reflex and Fortitude as above, and target is
slowed and takes 1 impairment penalty; Special slowed condition
remains until character reduces its impairment penalty by 1.
Other Hazard: For other types of hazards (pits, traps, and so forth), use
their listed game statistics to determine the effect of entering a space
they occupy.

Change Declared Speed (Dex, limited only): With this maneuver, a


character with limited movement can change its declared speed at a
time other than at the end of its turn, increasing or decreasing the total
distance it can move.
The DC for your control (Dex) check is determined by how much you
change your declared speed. A change of one category is a DC 15 check,
and a change of two categories is a DC 25 check. You can attempt to
change your declared speed only once per turn.
On a success, your declared speed changes by the amount you
specified. On a failed check, your declared speed does not change.
If your speed category changes, your turn rate and maneuver modifier
change to match the new speed category for the rest of your turn.
Exceed Maximum Speed (Dex): Every character has the potential to
move a bit farther than its normal limits. A character can attempt this
upon moving the maximum possible distance during a single action,
either a run action (simple movement) or its maximum speed (limited
movement).
Make a control (Dex) check vs. DC 25. On a success, you can move an
additional number of squares equal to 1/10 the maximum you can
normally move during your action. For every 10 points by which your
check result exceeds the DC, you can add an additional 1/10 to your total
movement allowed.

69

Sideswipe: If you and the struck target are both moving in the same
direction and the collision does not occur in either of your front or aft
faces, you can attempt a special type of ram called a sideswipe. A
sideswipe deals less damage to both targets during the collision, but it is
more likely to cause the struck target to lose control.
Make your control check as you would during a normal ram maneuver.
On a hit vs. Reflex and Fortitude, both targets take 1/5 normal damage
from the collision, and the struck target must make an immediate control
(Dex) check (DC 15) or it becomes uncontrolled. (Depending on the
collisions damage, the struck target might need to make another control
check to avoid losing control.)
On a miss vs. Fortitude, both targets take 1/2 normal damage from the
collision, and there is no additional effect.
Tumble (Dex, simple only): A creature trained in Acrobatics can
attempt to move through squares threatened or occupied by another
creature, avoiding attacks of opportunity and collisions while doing so.
Each square of tumbling costs twice as much as normal movement (2
points of movement per square on normal terrain). Make a single check
for all continuous squares of tumbling, up to a maximum of 4 squares.
Tumbling through a threatened square requires an Acrobatics (Dex)
check against DC 15. On a success, you do not provoke attacks of
opportunity during your tumbling movement. On a failure, you are
subject to attacks of opportunity normally.
Tumbling through a space occupied by another creature requires a
Acrobatics (Dex) check against DC 25. On a success, you can move
through the occupied space and you do not provoke attacks of
opportunity during your tumbling movement. On a failure, you cannot
move into or through the occupied space, and you are subject to attacks
of opportunity normally.
Use Skill (varies): Some skills are used as a part of movement. For
example, you can make a Stealth (Dex) check vs. a targets opposed sense
(Wis) check to avoid being noticed, and you can make an Athletics (Str)
check to climb a wall. Each skills description includes the specific check
you must make as well as the result of a successful or failed check.
As with any other maneuver, using a skill counts as an attempted
maneuver for purposes of determining your check penalty for multiple
maneuvers (if you have limited movement), and if you fail by 10 or more
you lose control.

Hard Turn (Dex, limited only): A hard turn allows a make a 45-degree
turn without first moving forward a number of squares equal to your
turn rate.
Make a control (Dex) check against DC 15. On a success, your facing
changes by 45 degrees in the direction you specify. On a failed check,
your facing does not change.
Bootleg Turn (wheeled vehicles only): By making a bootleg turn, a
vehicle can radically change direction without turning in a loop.
However, in so doing, the vehicle comes to a stop.
Before a transport can attempt a bootleg turn, it must move forward at
least a number of squares equal to its turn rate.
The DC for a bootleg turn is 5 per 45 degrees of facing change.
On a success, your facing changes by the specified amount and your
vehicles declared speed is reduced to stationary. On a failed check, your
vehicle turns only 45 degrees in the specified direction and its declared
speed does not change.
Jump (Str): If moving on the ground, you can attempt to jump over a
gap or obstacle in your path. Make a control (Str) check to attempt a
jump, and add 1/10 your current speed to your check result.
The DC of a long jump is equal to its distance in feet. (You clear a
vertical height equal to 1/4 the distance you jump.) The DC of a high
jump is equal to 5 its distance in feet. If you do not have a running
start (moving at least 2 squares in a straight line prior to the jump), the
DC is doubled.
Make a control (Str) check against the jumps DC. On a success, you
jump over the obstacle and can continue your movement. On a failure,
you do not clear the obstacle, and you either suffer a collision or fall
depending on the jump you attempted.
Simple Movement: If you have simple movement and you fail by 14
points, you clear the obstacle but you fall prone, ending your movement.
Wheeled and Tracked Vehicles: Wheeled and tracked vehicles cannot
physically jump upward, so they begin falling immediately upon starting
a jump. Double the DC for any jump made without a ramp. In addition, it
cannot even attempt a high jump (to clear a vertical obstacle) unless it
starts from a greater height or it uses a ramp (see below).
If the vehicles fall brings it into contact with an obstacle (such as the
far side of a ditch or ravine), a collision occurs. If the vehicle is not
resting on a stable surface after the collision, it falls.
If the vehicle uses a ramp, it gains some upward momentum that
makes the jump easier. With an adequate ramp, the vehicle can attempt
a long jump or high jump the same as any other character would. A long
jump requires a ramp between 30 and 45 degrees, and a high jump
requires a ramp between 45 and 60 degrees.
Overrun (Str, simple only): A creature with simple movement can
attempt to force its way through another creatures space.
Attempting to enter the targets space provokes an attack of
opportunity. If the target chooses to let you pass, you can move through
its space without further effect (no check necessary).
If the target resists your movement, make a control (Str) check against
the targets Fortitude Defense to attempt this maneuver. On a success,
you can move through the targets space. On a success by 5 or more, the
target is also knocked prone.
On a failure, you cannot enter the targets space and your movement
ends immediately.
Ram (Str): You can choose to collide intentionally with another target,
taking advantage of your momentum to try to strike in a way that
reduces the damage you take.
To ram a target, make a control (Str) check vs. Reflex and Fortitude. On
a hit vs. Reflex, a collision occurs regardless of the size of the two
characters. (A collision occurs automatically if either you or your target
have a space at least 1 square wide in the maps current scale, but this is
often not the case at local, tactical, or aerospace scale.)
On a hit vs. Reflex and Fortitude, you take half damage from the
collision.

Losing Control
When a character fails a control check, it might lose control of its
movement. The specific effect of losing control depends on whether the
character is a creature or a vehicle.

Creatures

When a creature becomes uncontrolled, it falls prone. A creature on a


solid surface suffers no lingering effect from losing control. (It must
spend a move action to stand up again, however.)
Mounted Creatures: If riding a mount when it falls prone, the creature
is thrown from the mount and falls 5 feet for every 1 square of the
mounts reach. For example, being thrown off the back of a warhorse
(Large, reach 1) would result in a fall of 5 feet.
Climbing Creatures: If climbing when it falls prone, the creature falls
100 squares on the first round and 200 squares on each subsequent
round. Unless the creature can fly, it remains uncontrolled until it hits
the ground. (See Falling, page 72.)
Swimming Creatures: If swimming when it falls prone, it sinks 1 square
per round until it regains control with a DC 15 control (Str) check at the
end of its turn. The creature automatically regains control if it settles
onto a solid surface underwater.
Flying Creatures: If flying when it falls prone, the creature falls 100
squares on the first round and 200 squares on each subsequent round
until it regains control with a DC 15 control (Dex) check at the end of its

70

No Resistance: Unless it is charging or running, a creature can move


through a space occupied by a creature that allows it to pass (most often
an ally, but sometimes an opponent will choose not to resist your
movement). The moving creature does not gain cover from the creature
that allows it to pass.
Overrun: While moving or charging, a creature can attempt to use the
overrun maneuver to move through another creatures space.
Bull Rush: The Bull Rush stunt allows a creature to move into (but not
through) another creatures space in an attempt to force it out.
Grappling: A creature can move into (but not through) another
creatures space if it is currently grappling.
Tumble: A creature trained in Acrobatics can attempt to tumble
through another creatures space.
Very Small Creatures: A Fine, Diminutive, or Tiny creature can move
into or through a space occupied by another creature. The creature
provokes attacks of opportunity when doing so.
Creatures Three Sizes Larger or Smaller: Any creature can move
through a space occupied by a creature at least three size categories
larger or smaller than it is.
Ending Your Movement: You cant end your movement in the same
space as another creature unless it is prone and disadvantaged.
Difficult Terrain: Difficult terrain hampers movement, costing as 2
squares of movement for every square of difficult terrain you move into.
You cant run or charge across difficult terrain. If you occupy squares
with different kinds of terrain, you can move only as fast as the most
difficult terrain you occupy will allow.
Obstacles: Like difficult terrain, obstacles (including vehicles) can
hamper movement. If an obstacle hampers movement but doesnt
completely block it, each obstructed square or obstacle between squares
counts as 2 squares of movement. You must pay this cost to cross the
barrier, in addition to the cost to move into the square on the other side.
If you dont have sufficient movement to cross the barrier and move into
the square on the other side, you cant cross the barrier. Some obstacles
may also require a skill check to cross.
Flying and incorporeal characters can avoid most obstacles.
Barriers: Some obstacles take up an entire square, blocking movement
entirely. A character cant move through a barrier, but it might be
possible to climb, jump, or fly over it.
Squeezing: In some cases, you might have to squeeze into or through
an area that isnt as wide as the space you take up. The specific effect of
squeezing depends on whether the character has simple or limited
movement.
Simple Movement: You can squeeze through or into a space that is at
1/2 as wide as your normal space (round down). Each move into or
through a narrow space counts as if it were 2 squares, and while
squeezed in a narrow space you are disadvantaged.
For example, when a Large creature (which normally takes up a space
two squares wide) squeezes into a space thats one square wide, the
creatures miniature figure occupies two squares, centered on the line
between the two squares. For a bigger creature, center the creature
likewise in the area it squeezes into.
A creature can squeeze past an opponent while moving but it cant end
its movement in an occupied square.
To squeeze through or into a space less than half your spaces width,
you must use the Acrobatics skill. You cant attack while using Acrobatics
to squeeze through or into a narrow space, and you are disadvantaged.
Limited Movement: A character with limited movement does have to
spend any additional movement when squeezing, and it occupies a space
half as wide as its normal space when doing so. It can end its movement
while squeezing.
A character with limited movement cannot turn to change its facing
while squeezing. For example, a Gargantuan bus (space 5 squares wide)
can squeeze into a 2-square wide lane on a typical road, driving forward
at no movement penalty and continuing to squeeze from round to round.

turn. The creature automatically regains control after it hits the ground.
(See Falling, page 72.)

Vehicles

When a becomes uncontrolled, the following effects occur.


First round: On the characters first turn that it becomes
uncontrolled, it continues its movement forward until it has moved
the minimum necessary for its declared speed. If its movement takes
it into an occupied square, a collision occurs.
Second and subsequent rounds: On the characters turn on each
following round that it remains uncontrolled, the character turns
randomly (d6: 12, 45 degrees left; 34, no turn; 56, 45 degrees
right) and reduces its declared speed by one category. (Exception: A
flying character instead decreases its altitude by a number of
squares equal to half the minimum for its declared speed.) As before,
it moves forward a number of squares equal to its declared speed,
and a collision occurs if its movement takes it into an occupied
square.
Once uncontrolled, the vehicle is subject to some special rules.
No Maneuvers: The vehicle cannot make any maneuvers while
uncontrolled. For example, the vehicles driver cannot attempt to avoid
hazards, so it has no way to prevent a collision if it moves into an
occupied square.
Regaining Control: At the end of each turn that it remains
uncontrolled, the vehicles driver can make a DC 15 control (Dex) check
to regain control of its movement.
On a success, the driver regains control.
On a failure by 19 points, the vehicle remains uncontrolled.
On a failure by 10 or more, the vehicle goes into a catastrophic spin
resulting in a flip (on the ground) or tumble (in the air). The vehicle
takes damage as if it had collided with a barrier. After the collision,
its declared speed is reduced to stationary, and its new facing is
determined randomly. If flying, the vehicle immediately begins
falling (100 squares on the first round, 200 squares on each
subsequent round).
If the driver cannot make a control check at the end of its turn, the
vehicle automatically flips or tumbles at the end of the second turn that
it remains uncontrolled.
If the vehicles declared speed is reduced to stationary and it is not
falling, the driver regains control automatically at the end of its turn.

Occupied Spaces
When another character or a barrier occupies a space, you have
limitations on the ways that you can move into or through that space.
The specific restrictions are determined by what occupies the space.
Creatures: Except as described below, you cant move into or through a
space occupied by another creature without causing a collision.
Prone and Disadvantaged: A creature can move into or through a
square occupied by a prone and disadvantaged creature without penalty.
(Some creatures, particularly very large ones, might count as difficult
terrain.)
If you end your movement in the creatures space, it remains
disadvantaged and prone until one of the following occurs:
You move out of its space. (It cannot make an attack of opportunity
against you for this movement.)
It crawls to an unoccupied space.
It successfully grapples you.
It successfully uses the Bull Rush stunt against you, forcing you out
of its space.

71

However, it needs its full space to turn a corner, so it must swing wide
(taking up more than one lane of traffic) to perform such a turn.

Collision

Big and Little Characters in Combat

Target: 1 moving character and 1 struck character or barrier*; Range: 0

[Hazard]

A collision occurs with a shuddering smash.

* Treat a barrier (such as the ground or a terrain feature) as a Colossal


object (+10 size modifier, 10 size multiplier).

Characters smaller than Small or larger than Medium have special rules
relating to position.
Little Characters: A little character is one whose space is no more than
1/2 square wide at the maps current scale. A little character can move
into or through the space of another little character without causing a
collision or having to use any special maneuver.
The size categories that take up such little space vary by the map scale
used: character scale, up to Tiny; local scale, up to Gargantuan; tactical
scale, up to 2X Colossal; aerospace scale, up to 5X Colossal.
Reach and Little Characters: Characters that take up less than 1 square
of space typically have a natural reach of 0 squares, meaning they cant
reach into adjacent squares. They must enter an opponents square to
attack in melee. This provokes an attack of opportunity from the
opponent if it has a reach of 1 or more squares. (You can attack a target
in your own space so long as you dont wield a reach weapon, so you can
usually attack such characters without difficulty.)
Since they have a natural reach of 0 squares, little characters do not
threaten the squares around them. You can move past them without
provoking attacks of opportunity, and they cannot flank an enemy.
Big Characters: A big character is one whose space is at least 2 squares
wide at the maps current scale.
The size categories that take up so much space vary by the map scale
used: character scale, Large or greater; local scale, 1X Colossal or greater;
tactical scale, 4X Colossal or greater; aerospace scale, 7X Colossal or
greater.
Reach and Big Characters: Characters that take up more than 1 square
typically have a natural reach of 2 squares or more, meaning that they
can reach targets in melee even if they arent in adjacent squares.
Unlike when someone uses a reach weapon, a character with greater
than normal natural reach (more than 1 square) still threatens squares
adjacent to it. A character with greater than normal natural reach
usually gets an attack of opportunity against you if you approach it,
because you must enter and move within its threatened area before you
can attack it in melee. (At character scale, you can step 1 square as a
move action without provoking an attack of opportunity.)
Big characters using reach weapons can strike up to double their
natural reach in melee but cant strike at their natural reach or less, just
as other characters can.

Attack: +(larger characters size modifier) vs. Reflex


Hit: (moving characters current speed/10) (other characters size
multiplier) bludgeoning damage.* Target must make immediate
control (Dex) check (DC = 10 + hit points lost) or lose control.

* If the struck character has limited movement, double damage if it


is moving toward the collision and halve it if it is moving away.

Moving Character: The character immediately spends a number of


squares of movement equal to the hit points lost in the collision.
Forced Movement: The smaller character (or the struck character, if
both targets have the same size) is forced 1 square away from the
collision and the other character.
Continued Movement: If the struck character is the same size or
larger and blocking the moving characters movement (either in its
front face or in the straight path of a running or charging
character), the moving character stops. If the moving character is
larger, it can continue its movement through the struck characters
space; the struck character is trampled, taking bludgeoning
damage equal to 2 the moving characters size modifier.
Miss: half damage, but all other effects apply normally.
Special: All characters carried on a transport take damage from a
collision equal to the damage that exceeded the transports massive
damage threshold. If a carried character is wearing safety restraints
(such as a seat belt) and the transport provides it with cover, divide the
damage dealt to that character by the transports size multiplier.

Falling

Falling is one of the most common types of collision that can occur
during an encounter. For ease of reference, the hazard statistics for a
falling creature are provided here:
Falling (hazard): Attack +10 vs. Reflex; Hit bludgeoning damage equal
to distance fallen in feet (min. 5, max. 200); Miss half damage; Effect
falling creature must make an Athletics (Dex) or Acrobatics (Dex) check
against a DC equal to 10 + the damage taken or fall prone.

Map Scale
Combat can occur at many different scales to account for the size of the
combatants and their movement. Vehicles, in particular, can move great
distances in a single round, so at a smaller scale they quickly run off the
edge of the battle grid.
For any given battle, choose an appropriate map scale depending on
the combatants involved. Each of the four scalescharacter, local,
tactical, and aerospaceis about 10 times larger than the next smallest
scale; however, aerospace scale is more open-ended, allowing it to
handle very different levels of technology.
Even though map scales list particular sizes for each square on the
battle grid, you should think of map scale as somewhat abstract;
depending on circumstances, the actual size of each square can vary a
bit from the numbers listed.

Collisions
A collision occurs when a character moves into an occupied space other
than as allowed under Occupied Spaces, above. If both characters occupy
a space no more than 1/2 square wide at the maps current scale, no
collision occurs unless the moving character successfully uses the Ram
stunt (page 70).
If a character collides with multiple characters simultaneously (for
example, a Large transport entering the spaces occupied by two adjacent
Medium-size characters), resolve the effect each collision individually.
A collision is a hazard that attacks all characters involved.

Character (5 feet/square)

The default battle grid is at character scale, where each square on the
battle grid represents approximately 5 feet of space. Most combat that
characters participate in will take place at this scale, and normal rules
for movement, attacks of opportunity, and range apply.

72

Local (50 feet/square)

What Fits on a Map?

Local scale is ideal for foot chases, platoon-level battles, and combat
involving most ground vehicles. An unencumbered human can move or
charge up to one square or run up to two squares in a single round.
At this scale, attacks of opportunity generally do not come into play
unless a character specifically moves into melee (usually with the charge
action); otherwise, even two characters sharing the same square might
be far apart.

With four different map scales, you might find it hard to estimate
exactly what fits on a single map so that you can choose the right scale
for the encounter. Use the following examples to help you visualize how
big a space fits on a typical tabletop map grid (roughly 3 ft. long and 2
ft. wide and using 1-inch squares).

Character (180 ft. 120 ft., 0.5 acre)

Tactical (500 feet/square)

Tiny ancient or medieval hamlet or thorp (up to 50 people)


Modern residence (residential street with four town homes, two small
houses with yards, or one large house with yard on each side; small
apartment complex; small mansion; Executive Residence at the White
House)
Mid-sized building or small complex (shopping center; warehouse;
small office building; small hangar; small fort or outpost)
Interior of an airliner or jumbo jet
Deck of a coast guard cutter or luxury yacht

Tactical scale works best for chases involving subsonic aircraft, aerial
dogfights, high-speed ground vehicle chases, and battles involving large
military units. At this scale, a car traveling at typical highway speeds
travels about 1 square per round, a light civilian airplane at takeoff or
landing travels about 2 squares per round, and modern jet fighters in a
dogfight travel about 6 to 10 squares per round.

Aerospace (1+ mile/square)

Aerospace scale is more abstract than the smaller scales, with a


minimum size of about 1 mile per square (appropriate for high-altitude
and long-range aerial battles with supersonic aircraft) but allowing for
much larger battles depending on the technology involved (such as a
space battle with gravity engines and warp drives).
As a comparison, a vehicle in low Earth orbit travels roughly 30 miles
per round, and anything over about 1 million miles per round represents
traveling over the speed of light. Nevertheless, the size of each individual
square in a space battle might be considerably smaller; vehicles could be
traveling at amazing absolute speeds while still maneuvering at much
lower speeds relative to one another. (In many science fiction and space
opera settings, such as Star Wars and Star Trek, even massive space
battles often take place when opponents are well within visual range.)

Local (1800 ft. 1200 ft., 50 acres)

Small ancient medieval city (up to 5,000 people)


Tiny modern town or several modern city blocks (about eight
Manhattan city blocks at 900 ft. 264 ft. each)
Large building or mid-sized complex (small farm; shopping mall;
factory; distribution center; office complex; small airport; large castle
or outpost; United States Capitol; the Pentagon; the Kremlin;
Westminster Palace)
Deck of an aircraft carrier or supertanker
Modern platoon-level firefight (100+ combatants)

Tactical (3.4 mi 2.3 mi., 7.82 sq. mi.)

Ancient or medieval metropolis (up to 500,000 people)


Small modern city or large section of a modern metropolis (Midtown
Manhattan; National Mall in Washington DC and across Potomac River
to the Pentagon and Arlington National Cemetery)
Large modern complex (large international airport; major seaport;
modern military base; JFK International Airport; Pearl Harbor; Naval
Base San Diego)
Modern battalion-level battle (1,000+ combatants; Omaha Beach
during invasion of Normandy)

Special Combat Rules


Different situations in combat can have a substantial effect on the
outcome of the battle. Most of these are similar to those seen in previous
d20-based games.

Area Attacks
Area attacks such as explosives, automatic weapons fire, and tear gas
affect all eligible characters in a given area. Normally, the attacks area is
a space of the specified length and width in squares; for example, area
3 means that the attack affects the area of a 33 group of squares.
If an attack affects a nonstandard area, its description details the
specifics of the areas shape (for example, a 41 line of squares).
Center of an Area: Determining the center of an area can be important
for some effects. When you make an area attack, identify the point that
is equally distant from all four corners of the area:

Aerospace (36 mi. 24 mi., 864 sq. mi.)

Modern metropolis and surrounding area (New York City; Tokyo;


London; Paris; Moscow; Hong Kong)
Massive modern complex (Edwards Air Force Base; Fort Hood; Kennedy
Space Center; Baikonur Cosmodrome)
Modern division-level battle (10,000+ combatants; all Operation
Overlord landings during invasion of Normandy)
For example, if you throw a grenade into a room through a window,
the window provides cover to the area youre trying to attack (that is,
your grenade might bounce off the wall on the way in). In addition, any
character inside might have cover (such as by hiding behind a desk) from
where the grenade actually detonates.
Common Effects: Unless otherwise specified, area attacks deal full
damage on a hit and half damage on a miss by 5 or less, and they cannot
score a critical hit.
Area attacks are less vulnerable to concealment because you dont
need to aim at individual targets; you take no penalty from concealment
unless it affects the line of sight between you and the center of the area.
Types of Area Attacks: Area attacks can be autofire, barrage, blast,
splash, or spread attacks. In the sections below, each types description
specifies its normal area, which of a targets defenses you use for your

If the point is inside a square, designate one corner of that square as


the center.
If the point is on the intersection between four squares, that
intersection is the center.
If the point is on the line between two squares, designate one corner
that touches that line as the center. (This occurs only when an area
has an uneven shape, such as a 41 line of squares.)
Indirect Range: Many area attacks have an indirect range, meaning
that you need a line of effect both from you to the center and from the
center to each target. In this case, each target gains the benefit of any
cover in both lines of effect. (This is the only case where cover bonuses
stack.)

73

attack, how it interacts with cover, and any other additional effect or
requirement associated with the attack.

Barrage

Either a short, controlled burst of automatic weapons fire or several


quick shots with a semiautomatic weapon, a barrage is similar to autofire
except that it is concentrated on a very small area.
A barrage requires the use of an automatic or semiautomatic weapon
and expends 5 shots. When using an automatic weapon, you might prefer
a barrage to autofire so you can better conserve ammunition, avoid
damaging other characters near your intended target, and have a
reduced chance of suffering a mishap.
When using a semiautomatic weapon, you cant use autofire at all, so
a barrage gives you an option that improves your chances of damaging a
hard-to-hit target. However, semiautomatic weapons are more likely to
jam when fired so rapidly in quick succession, so you have a greater
chance of suffering a mishap than with an ordinary attack (most likely
disabling your weapon).

Autofire

A sustained burst of automatic weapons fire spread over a small area,


autofire is very effective against both tightly packed groups of enemies
and Large or greater size enemies (which might be struck by multiple
shots that deal additional damage).
Autofire requires the use of an automatic weapon and expends 10
shots of ammunition. Because of the stress and heat generated by
sustained fire, you have a greater chance of suffering a mishap with
autofire than with most other attacks (most likely disabling your
weapon).
When wielding an automatic weapon with a high rate of fire (such as a
minigun or Gatling autocannon), you can instead expend 100 shots to
expand the attacks area or increase the chance of damaging your
targets, but using this option further increases your chances of suffering
a mishap.

Autofire

Barrage

[Simple Attack]

Requirement: You must use an automatic or semiautomatic weapon with


at least 5 shots remaining, which you expend when you make your
barrage attack.
Action: Standard; weapon, area (barrage)
Target: 5 largest characters in area 1
Range: direct, by weapon
Attack: SKILL (Str*) vs. Primary

[Simple Attack]

Requirement: You must use an automatic weapon with at least 10 shots


remaining, which you expend when you make your autofire attack.
Action: Standard; weapon, area (autofire)
Target: all characters in area 2
Range: direct, by weapon
Attack: SKILL (Str*) vs. Primary

* For emplaced weapon, add Intelligence modifier instead of Strength.


Hit: WEAPON + SKILL damage.

* For emplaced weapon, add Intelligence modifier instead of Strength.


Hit: WEAPON + SKILL damage.

Two-Handed or Emplaced: If you brace (a swift action) immediately


prior to your attack, add a style bonus to damage equal to your
Strength bonus (min. 1) with a two-handed weapon or your
Intelligence bonus (min. 1) with an emplaced weapon.
Miss by 5 or less: 1/2 damage
Mishap: If using a semiautomatic weapon, you suffer a mishap on a
natural 1 if trained or a natural 12 if untrained.
Automatic and Semiautomatic Area Weapons: Some weapons (such as
an automatic grenade launcher) produce area attacks in addition to
having automatic or semiautomatic fire capability, allowing you to
combine the effects of both types of area attacks. In this case, use the
weapons normal area attack with the following modifications.
Requirement: You expend 5 shots, as with any barrage attack.
Miss: Deal 1/2 damage on a miss by 5 additional points (for example,
1/2 damage on miss by 10 or less instead of miss by 5 or less).
Mishap: If using a semiautomatic weapon, you suffer a mishap on a
natural 1 if trained or a natural 12 if untrained, as with any barrage
attack.

Two-Handed or Emplaced: If you brace (a swift action) immediately


prior to your attack, add a style bonus to damage equal to your
Strength bonus (min. 1) with a two-handed weapon or your
Intelligence bonus (min. 1) with an emplaced weapon.
Target of Large or greater size: If the target occupies at least four
squares of the attacks area, you deal additional damage: 4
squares, +1 damage die; 9 squares, +2 damage dice; 16 squares,
+3 damage dice; 25 squares, +4 damage dice.
Miss by 5 or less: 1/2 damage
Mishap: You suffer a mishap on a natural 1 if trained or natural 12 if
untrained.
High Rare of Fire: If using an automatic weapon with a high rate of fire,
you can choose to expend 100 shots to gain one of the following two
benefits: (1) Target all characters in area 5; or (2) Deal 1/2 damage on
a miss by 10 or less. However, you suffer a mishap on a natural 12 if
trained or natural 15 if untrained.
Automatic Area Weapons: Some weapons (such as an autocannon with
high-explosive ammunition) produce area attacks in addition to having
automatic fire capability, allowing you to combine the effects of both
types of area attacks. In this case, use the weapons normal area attack
with the following modifications.
Requirement: You expend 10 shots, as with any autofire attack.
Area: Increase the attacks normal area by one step on the standard
progression (for example, from area 2 to area 5).
Miss: Deal 1/2 damage on a miss by 5 additional points (for example,
1/2 damage on miss by 10 or less instead of miss by 5 or less).
Mishap: You suffer a mishap on a natural 1 if trained or a natural 12
if untrained, as with any autofire attack.
High Rate of Fire: If using an automatic weapon with a high rate of
fire, you can choose to expend 100 shots to gain your choice of the
following two benefits: (1) Increase the attacks normal area by one
additional step; or (2) Deal 1/2 damage on a miss by 10 additional
points. However, you suffer a mishap on a natural 12 if trained or
natural 15 if untrained.

Blast

A blast attack is high-energy, concentrated burst such as that created by


most high explosives and fragmentary devices. A blast expands at a very
high velocity (sometimes enough to form a true shockwave), so it doesnt
move slowly enough to flow around walls or other barriers that provide
cover.

Blast

[Simple Attack]

Requirement: You must use a weapon or talent with the blast keyword.
Action: Standard; area (blast)
Target: all characters in area [by weapon or talent]
Range: indirect, by weapon or talent
Attack: SKILL (Int) vs. Reflex
Hit: WEAPON + SKILL damage
Miss by 5 or less: 1/2 damage

Splash

A splash attack focuses its energy on a single primary target and


damages other characters in its area as a secondary effect of its burst.

74

For example, an anti-armor rocket directs most of its damage to a single


target, but the force of its explosion can still damage other nearby
characters.
Like a blast, the secondary effect of a splash attacks burst expands at
too high a velocity to flow around walls or other barriers that provide
cover.

Splash

If all four lines cross a square that provides total concealment (such as
thick smoke), the target has total concealment and you have no line of
sight.
For an area attack, instead pick a corner of your space and draw a
single imaginary line to the areas center (see page 73). If this line
crosses a square that provides concealment, the area has concealment. If
this line crosses a square that provides total concealment, the area has
total concealment and you have no line of sight.
Close Targets: If your target has concealment from smoke, fog, or
precipitation, reduce its concealment by one step if you are adjacent to
it.
At the GMs discretion, particularly thin smoke or fog and light
precipitation might not provide concealment at all unless a target is
much farther away. For example, very light rain or mist might provide
concealment only at a distance of 100 squares or more.
Darkness: Dim light (concealment) and total darkness (total
concealment) are different from other types of concealment; determine
their effects based on the lighting conditions in the targets square rather
than the space between you. For example, a character holding a bright
lantern at the end of a long, dark hallway does not have concealment,
even if most of the space between you is dark.
Ignoring Concealment: Some abilities and effects might allow you to
ignore the effects of some or all concealment.
Blindsight: If you have blindsight, you ignore concealment and total
concealment from any source. However, some types of blindsight work
only within a limited range.
Darkvision: If you have darkvision, you ignore concealment and total
concealment from darkness only. As with blindsight, some types of
darkvision work only within a limited range.
Low-light Vision: If you have low-light vision, you ignore concealment
(but not total concealment) from darkness only.

[Simple Attack]

Requirement: You must use a weapon or talent with the splash keyword.
Action: Standard; weapon, area (splash)
Main Target: 1 character adjacent to center of secondary area
Secondary Targets: All other characters in area [by weapon or talent]
Range: direct (primary target) or indirect (secondary targets), by weapon
Attack: SKILL (Int) vs. Primary and Reflex
Main Target
Hit vs. Primary: WEAPON + SKILL (Int) damage
Critical: Can score a critical hit (unlike other area attacks)
Miss vs. Primary: Main target becomes a secondary target.
Secondary Targets
Hit vs. Reflex: 1/2 (WEAPON + SKILL) damage
Miss vs. Reflex by 5 or less: 1/5 (WEAPON + SKILL) damage

Spread

A spread attack (usually a gas or liquid such as tear gas or napalm)


expands to fill its entire area, bypassing cover and even flowing around
corners. Because it expands more slowly than a blast or splash attack, a
spread can damage characters that would have complete protection from
other area attacks. However, its lower kinetic energy usually means that
spread attacks deal somewhat less damage than that dealt by an
explosive weapon of comparable size.

Spread

[Simple Attack]

Requirement: You must use a weapon or talent with the spread keyword.
Action: Standard; area (spread)
Target: all characters in area [by weapon or talent]*

Cover
Any time an object or creature occupies a space directly between you
and an opponent, you might gain cover and become harder to hit
because your opponent doesnt have a clear shot. When you have cover
against an attack, you gain a +2 cover bonus to your Primary and Reflex
Defenses. If you have improved cover (such as from an arrow slit or
peeking around a corner), you instead gain a +5 cover bonus to your
Primary and Reflex Defenses.
You cannot make an attack of opportunity against a target that has
cover against you.
Determining Cover: When taking an action that requires line of effect
(such as any weapon attack), pick a corner of your space and draw an
imaginary line to all four corners of the opponents space. If one or two
lines cross a square that provides cover, the target has cover. If three
lines cross such a square, the target has improved cover. If all four lines
cross such as square, the target has total cover and there is no line of
effect for your attack.
Low Objects: Some low objects provide cover just as a wall or other
obstacle would. However, you ignore low objects that are within your
reach when making an attack because you are able to shoot or swing
above the low objects.
Normally, low objects do not provide more than normal cover if you
are standing or more than improved cover if you are prone.
Mobile Cover: Mobile cover is provided by other creatures, and it works
like ordinary cover except that it does not prevent attacks of opportunity.
A single creature normally grants no more than normal cover, but a
grappled or pinned creature (such as a hostage held as a human shield)
can provide improved cover. A creature two or more sizes smaller than
you grants no cover at all.
Multiple Sources of Cover: If multiple sources of cover are in the same
line of effect, do not add their cover bonuses together. Instead, the GM

* From center, area includes all contiguous squares not separated by


total cover.

Range: special*, by weapon or talent

* Only apply cover in line of effect from attacker to center of area.

Attack: SKILL (Int) vs. Reflex


Hit: WEAPON + SKILL damage
Miss by 5 or less: 1/2 damage

Concealment
Concealment represents any condition or effect that reduces your ability
to see clearly. If your view of a target is obscured significantly (such as in
dim light, smoke, fog, or heavy rain), that target has concealment. If you
make a skill check that requires line of sight or a direct line of effect
(such as a weapon attack) against a target that has concealment, you
take a 2 penalty to your skill check.
If your view is blocked completely (such as in total darkness, heavy
smoke or fog, or a blizzard), that target instead has total concealment.
You cannot use any action that requires line of sight against a target
with total concealment. If you use an action that requires a direct line of
effect, you must correctly guess the targets location (that is, you pick a
specific square to target) to have any effect; in addition, you take a 5
penalty to any skill check you make as a part of that action.
You cannot make an attack of opportunity against an opponent with
concealment.
Determining Concealment: To determine if a target has concealment,
pick a corner of your space and draw an imaginary line to all four corners
of the targets space. If at least one line crosses a square that provides
concealment, the target has concealment against your attack.

75

might upgrade the quality of your cover (from cover to improved cover,
for example) if it seems like two sources of cover would complement one
another by blocking the line of effect in different ways.
For example, standing behind another creature (mobile cover)
ordinarily wont provide more than normal cover (+2 cover bonus). If you
are standing on the other side of a whole crowd, however, there are
fewer and fewer gaps that an attacker might use to get a clear shot, so
you might instead gain improved cover (or even total cover, in the case
of a very large and tightly-packed crowd).
Indirect Range: The only exception is for attacks with an indirect
range, such as a blast area attack. Indirect range requires two separate
lines of effect (one from the attacker to the center of the area and
another from the center of the area to the target); because of this,
calculate the cover bonus for each line of effect separately and then add
both cover bonuses to the targets defenses.
This is the only case where cover bonuses stack.
Lean: As a swift action, you can lean into cover to increase it by one
step (for example, turning improved cover into total cover), and you can
reverse this with another swift action. This is possible only if there is a
space within your reach that would provide less cover if you were to
stand in it, such as when you peek around a corner.
Hitting Cover: If you miss with an attack against a target with cover
and the targets Primary Defense exceeds your attack roll by an amount
equal to or less than the targets cover bonus, the character providing
cover is subject to the attack instead of the original target. Compare the
attack roll to the new target to determine the effect of the attack.
Shooting Through Cover: Some objects are weak or thin enough that
particularly powerful attacks can penetrate them. If you hit this sort of
cover, your attack does not miss but the target gains Hardness (see page
77) against your attack.
Some common examples of cover and the Hardness they provide are
listed below. Decrease the listed Hardness by 1 step if the target is
adjacent to the cover; this is due to an effect called spalling, which
causes fragments and debris from the far side of the cover to be
propelled outward by the force of your attack.
Shooting Through Cover
Thick glass, thick padding (e.g. overturned mattress)
Thin wood or plastic (e.g. hollow-core door), typical interior
wall (e.g. plaster, sheet rock, dry wall)
Thick wood (e.g. solid oak door, small tree), thin light metal
(e.g. car door, empty barrel)
Typical exterior wall (thin brick or stone), bullet-resistant
glass, thin layer of steel, multiple interior walls
Thick or lightly armored wall, sandbags, thick tree trunk, thick
layer of steel
Heavily armored wall, very thick steel, bank vault

apply to specific types of damage. In these cases, the weapons damage


type matters.

Ballistic

Bullets of all types deal ballistic damage, traveling at very high velocity
to produce a great deal of kinetic energy despite their relatively low
mass. Ballistic damage has the trait penetrating 2 against archaic armor.
Ballistic weapons can use different types of bullets (such as armorpiercing or expanding ammunition) that produce a special effect.

Bludgeoning

Bludgeoning damage causes blunt-force trauma that smashes or crushes


the target.

Explosive

Explosive weapons default to using a basic high-explosive charge that


produces a blast area attack (see page 74).

Fire

Incendiary devices of all types deal fire damage by hitting their targets
with a burning flammable substance such as oil, gasoline, white
phosphorus, or napalm. On a hit vs. Reflex and Fortitude, the target
catches fire, taking ongoing fire damage (Reflex save ends).
If a spread area attack (page 75) deals fire damage, it creates a
persistent hazard that lasts until the start of the attackers next turn:
Target any character that enters or ends its turn in area; Attack +0 vs.
Reflex and Fortitude; Hit 1d4 fire damage, ongoing 1d4 fire damage
(Reflex save ends).
A character taking ongoing fire damage can gain an immediate saving
throw to end the effect if it smothers the flames with a standard action
while standing or a move action while prone (Stop, Drop, and Roll).
Alternatively, a character can automatically end ongoing fire damage by
submersing its entire body in water (or the equivalent).
Nonliving characters take 1/2 damage from fire damage.

Impact

10

Archaic black-powder cannons and similar weapons deal impact damage,


launching a cannonball or other projectile with sufficient force to cause
fragmentation that damages targets near the point of impact. Unlike
ballistic damage, impact damage has too low a velocity and too large a
striking area to have any additional penetration against archaic armor.
When employed, an impact weapon produces a splash attack (see page
74). Against secondary targets, damage dealt by an impact weapon has
the nonpenetrating trait.

20

Nonlethal Damage

Hardness
1
2
5

When a living target takes nonlethal damage that equals or exceeds its
massive damage threshold, it is always treated as if it has reserves
remaining but any fatigue penalty taken is doubled.
Nonlethal attacks deal 1/2 damage against nonliving targets.

50

Damage Reduction

Piercing

Damage Reduction (DR) represents a characters natural resilience to


damage. It might be the result of its composition (such as a gelatinous
target), its naturally redundant physiology or construction, or its sheer
size. Whenever the character takes damage, reduce the damage taken by
its DR, to a minimum of 0 damage.
Types of Damage Reduction: Some DR is bypassed by different sources
of damage. For example, DR 10/fire reduces damage by 10 points unless
the attack deals fire damage.
Multiple Sources of Damage Reduction: If a target has more than one
source of DR, only the best one applies.

Piercing damage concentrates its force in a very small striking surface for
better penetration. Most piercing weapons use a thrusting motion for
their attacks.

Poison

Poison damage uses a chemical or biological agent to harm or immobilize


a living target. Nonliving targets are immune to poison damage.
All poisons require a hit vs. Fortitude to affect a target. Depending on
the poisons relative strength and toxicity, a modifier might apply to the
targets Fortitude Defense. In addition, other requirements before the
poison takes effect depend on its delivery vector:

Damage Types

Contact: hit vs. Reflex (target immune if wearing sealed suit) or as


injected poison.

Some targets have resistance, vulnerability, or immunity to particular


types of damage, and some targets have Damage Reduction that doesnt

76

Inhaled: hit vs. Reflex (target immune if wearing gas mask, sealed
suit, or nonbreathing).
Injected: must use weapon attack to deliver poison; delivering attack
must hit vs. Primary and deal damage equal to or greater than the
targets massive damage threshold.
Ingested: target must consume poison in food or drink (usually not
possible in combat).

example, a flamethrower (4d4 fire damage) also deals 1d4 ongoing fire
damage.
At the end of the targets turn, it takes ongoing damage immediately
before it attempts its saving throw to end it; the attack specifies what
sort of saving throw the target must make.
Since the target has its normal actions during its turn before the
ongoing damage takes effect, it might have an opportunity to take a
specific action that either ends the ongoing damage outright or allows
an immediate extra saving throw to eliminate it before the end of the
targets turn. If so, the description of either the attack or the damage
type specifies what the target must do to gain this benefit.
For example, fire damage (page 76) specifies that the target can use a
standard action if standing or a move action if prone to smother the
flames and gain an immediate saving throw, and it can eliminate the
damage automatically by submersing itself in water.

Because the composition and function of poisons can vary widely, a


poisons description details all specifics such as damage and other effects
to the target.

Shock

Shock damage burns and immobilizes a target by sending a high-voltage


electrical current through its body. On a hit vs. Reflex, a shock weapon
deals its listed damage.
If a living or electronic target takes shock damage that equals or
exceeds its massive damage threshold, it is dazed (Fort save ends); on a
failed save, it becomes stunned (Fort save ends).
Nonliving, nonelectronic characters take 1/2 damage from shock
damage.

Penetrating

Penetrating damage is particularly good at piercing armor and striking


deep enough to hit the vital areas of even very large targets. If an attack
has a penetrating damage value (for example, penetrating 10), subtract
this value from the targets Hardness, Damage Reduction, and armor
bonus (in that order) before determining the effect of your damage.
Nonpenetrating: The inverse of the above, nonpenetrating damage is
particularly ineffective against large or armored targets. Before
determining the effect of your damage, double the Hardness, Damage
Reduction, and armor bonus of your target.

Slashing

Slashing damage uses a wide but very sharp cutting edge to slice
through a targets surface. Most slashing weapons use a swinging motion
for their attacks.

Disadvantaged Opponents

Hardness

A disadvantaged character grants opponents a +2 bonus to attacks


against it. In addition, some talents, feats, and other mechanics might
have a special effect when a target is disadvantaged.
Flanking: If two opponents are on opposite sides of your space and
both threaten you, you are disadvantaged to those opponents.
Flat-Footed: You are disadvantaged until the start of your first turn in
combat.
Uncanny Dodge: This feat prevents you from being disadvantaged due
to being flanked or flat-footed.

Hardness represents the toughness of a targets exterior, making it more


difficult to damage with weaker weapons. Whenever the target takes
damage, reduce the damage by the targets Hardness (to a minimum of 0
damage).
In addition, compare the weapon damage of an attack (not including
any modifiers such as your skill, ability modifiers, or extra damage dice);
if the weapons damage is not equal to or greater than the targets
Hardness, the attack deals no damage at all. For example, if attacking
with a club (1d6 + Strength modifier weapon damage), it is virtually
impossible to damage a bank vault (Hardness 20) regardless of your
training and experience.
Muscle-powered weapons (such as melee weapons) always include
your Strength modifier as a part of its base weapon damage, so be sure
to include this when determining if the weapon damage equals or
exceeds the targets Hardness.
Other Modifiers: Talents, feats, and other modifiers might change a
targets Hardness for purposes of your attack or alter the way your attack
interacts with Hardness. Such exceptions are described in the rules text.
Melee Attacks and Hardness: If making a melee attack and your
weapon damage is less than the targets Hardness, there is a possibility
that your weapon will be damaged by the attempt. If your weapon
damage equals or exceeds your weapons Hardness (or your armor bonus,
if you made an unarmed attack), deal that weapon damage to your
weapon (or you, if you made an unarmed attack).

Dynamic Damage
Unlike that caused by most attacks, dynamic damage interacts with a
targets Hardness, Damage Reduction, armor bonus, and massive damage
threshold in a way that can substantially change the outcome of an
attack. Dynamic damage can be devastating, ongoing, or penetrating, as
described below.

Devastating

Devastating damage is particularly likely to cause serious or lifethreatening injuries to a target. If an attack has a devastating damage
value (for example, devastating 5), subtract this value from the targets
massive damage threshold when determining the effect of your damage.
Nondevastating: The inverse of the above, nondevastating damage is
very unlikely to cause serious or life-threatening injuries to a target.
Before determining the effect of your damage, increase the targets
massive damage threshold by 5.

Range

Ongoing

Range is an abstract measurement of how a targets distance and speed


interfere with your ability to use an action against it. A targets range is
equal to the greatest of the following three values:

Ongoing damage represents the lingering effect of an earlier attack, and


it deals additional damage in later rounds. Ongoing damage occurs only
if the attack that produces it deals sufficient damage to overcome the
targets Hardness and Damage Reduction. Because of this, ongoing
damage ignores the targets Hardness and Damage Reduction; its already
inside the target once it takes effect.
Normally, ongoing damage is equal to 1 damage die of the same size
as the attack that produced it, and it has the same damage type. For

Horizontal Distance: The number of squares between you and the


target by most direct path, including the targets square but not your
own square.
Vertical Distance: The difference between your altitude (in squares)
and that of your target.

77

Target Speed: The targets current speed in squares (the distance it


has moved this turn, the minimum for its declared speed, or its
falling distance in feet [max. 200], whichever is more).

characters game statistics, this is abbreviated with [number]X


immediately before its size category. For example, a 2X Colossal
character is two size categories greater than Colossal, and a 1X Fine
character is one size category smaller than Fine.
Size Modifier: As a characters size increases, so does its size modifier.
Apply a characters size modifier to the following game statistics.
(Published stat blocks already include these adjustments.)
Subtract size modifier from a characters Primary Defense, Reflex
Defense, weapon attack rolls, and Dexterity-based skill checks other than
attacks.
Add size modifier to a characters Fortitude Defense, grappling attack
rolls, and Strength- or Constitution-based skill checks other than attacks.
Add 2 size modifier to a characters weapon damage. Weapon
damage always has a minimum value of 1 regardless of modifiers.
Size Multiplier: Just as with size modifier, as a characters size
increases, so does its size multiplier. Size multiplier applies in some
special situations where relative mass, volume, or surface area is
important. Multiply this value by a characters Strength when
determining carrying capacity and by its current speed when calculating
collision damage.
Damage Reduction: Because their sheer mass makes it difficult to deal
significant damage to them, characters of greater than Medium size have
Damage Reduction equal to their size modifier.
Height, Length, and Weight: Each size category has an average height
(for tall characters) or length (for long characters) associated with it.
When determining a characters size, choose the size category whose
average is closest to the characters actual height or length.
The size table also lists the average weight of a typical biological
creature of a given size. Because the creatures physical build and
dimensions can vary substantially within a single size category, its
weight might be as much as 10 times more or as little as 1/5 the average
weight.
Most biological creatures have a density a little lower than water, so
characters made of lighter or heavier substances and those with
substantial hollow interior space can weigh quite a bit more or less. Use
the following guidelines to determine a characters actual weight: solid
metal, 5 to 10 weight; solid stone, 2 to 5 weight; watercraft, 1/2
to 1/5 weight; aircraft, 1/5 to 1/10 weight.
Space: Space represents how wide a space (in squares) the character
takes up on the battle grid at character scale. For each step that the map
scale increases, a character takes up a space only 1/10 as wide, so only
the largest characters will occupy more than one square at greater
scales.
Reach: Reach represents how far from its space a character threatens
and can make melee attacks (page 79). With the exception of
anthropomorphic vehicles (such as mecha), vehicles generally do not
have a reach so they do not threaten an area around them.
Average Base Speed: These columns show the average base speed for a
creature of a given size and movement type (bipedal walking,
quadrupedal walking, flying, or swimming). The base speed for each
column advances according to the expanded progression (1, 1.5, 2, 3, 5,
7.5, 10, 15, and so forth). A particularly slow creature (such as a large
herd animal) might be one step slower, and a very fast creature (such as
a predator) might be one step higher; more extreme variations are
possible but uncommon for natural, biological creatures.
Vehicles do not use the average base speeds listed here. Instead,
determine their base speed using their means of locomotion: watercraft,
4 squares, walker or tracked, 10 squares; wheeled or rotary wing, 20
squares; fixed wing (propeller or turboprop), 100 squares; fixed wing
(turbojet or turbofan), 200 squares; rocket, 500 squares. A particularly
slow or fast vehicle might have a base speed 50% more or less than this
amount. Maximum speeds can vary widely, but they most often range
from 5 to 15 times the vehicles base speed.

Unless vehicles are involved, horizontal distance determines your range


in the vast majority of cases.

Range Penalty

Many actions list a range in their descriptions (for example, Range 10);
this represents the actions point blank range. Compare your targets
range to your actions range for your action to determine if you take a
range penalty:

Point Blank (up to listed range): no penalty


Short (up to 2 listed range): 2 penalty
Medium (up to 5 listed range): 5 penalty
Long (up to 10 listed range): 10 penalty
Extreme (up to 20 listed range): 20 penalty

You cannot affect a target beyond extreme range. In addition, some


actions might have a lower maximum range (for example, within 10).

Range and Map Scale

At different map scales, weapon and talent ranges require some


adjustments. Because each step up in map scale increases the size of a
square by a factor of 10, divide the range of a weapon or talent by 10 for
each step up in scale. Treat two characters in the same square as 1/2
square apart for purposes of calculating range penalties unless one
character specifically moves into melee combat (such as by using the
charge action).
Example: A typical pistol with range 5 in character scale has range 0.5
in local scale. You take no penalty against a target in the same square
(treated as 1/2 square away), a 2 range penalty against a target 1
square away, a 5 penalty against a target 2 squares away, a 10 penalty
against a target up to 5 squares away, and a 20 penalty against a target
up to 10 squares away.
Example: A typical rifle with range 20 in character scale has range 0.2
in tactical scale. Both point blank range and short range are less than 1/2
square (0.2 and 0.4, respectively), so you are at medium range (5
penalty) against a target up to 1 square away, long range (10 penalty)
against a target 2 squares away, and extreme range (20 penalty)
against a target 4 squares away.

Size
With targets larger or smaller than a typical adult human, some special
rules come into play. The bigger a target is, the easier it is to hit in
combat. The smaller it is, the harder it is to hit. Conversely, weapon
attacks of larger characters are less accurate because even a small
adjustment can shift its aim by a considerable amount; the opposite is
true of smaller characters. (Since this same modifier applies to weapon
attacks, a character doesnt have a hard time attacking another target of
the same size.) In addition, larger targets tend to be stronger and more
resilient in combat, and smaller targets tend to be lighter and weaker.
Table 103: Size summarizes the effect of size and provides
comparative sizes, weights, and examples to give you an idea of what
each size represents.
Size Category: A characters size category represents its height, length,
and weight relative to other characters. A typical adult human is a
Medium-size character.
Characters can be larger than Colossal and smaller than Fine, but
characters of such extreme size do not commonly interact directly in
character-scale combat. Each additional size category is given the
Extra descriptor, adding a multiple for each additional size (for
example, Extra-Colossal, Double Extra-Colossal, and so forth). In a

78

Table 103: Size


Size
Category
(3X) 2
(2X)
(1X)
Fine
Diminutive
Tiny
Small
Medium
Large
Huge
Gargantuan
Colossal
(1X)
(2X)
(3X) 2

Size
Mod.
25
20
15
10
5
2
1
+0
+1
+2
+5
+10
+15
+20
+25

Size
Mult.
0.01
0.02
0.05
0.1
0.2
0.5
0.75
1
1.5
2
5
10
20
50
100

DR

1
2
5
10
15
20
25

Height/
Length
0.2 in.
0.5 in.
1 in.
2 in.
5 in.
1 ft.
2 ft.
5 ft.
10 ft.
20 ft.
50 ft.
100 ft.
200 ft.
0.1 mi.
0.2 mi.

Weight
0.0002 oz.
0.002 oz.
0.02 oz.
0.2 oz.
2 oz.
1 lb.
10 lb.
100 lb.
1,000 lb
5 tons
50 tons
500 tons
5,000 tons
50,000 tons
500,000 tons

Space1
0.01 sq.
0.02 sq.
0.05 sq.
0.1 sq.
0.2 sq.
0.5 sq.
1 sq.
1 sq.
2 sq.
3 sq.
5 sq.
10 sq.
20 sq.
50 sq.
100 sq.

Reach1
(tall/long)
0 sq./0 sq.
0 sq./0 sq.
0 sq./0 sq.
0 sq./0 sq.
0 sq./0 sq.
0 sq./0 sq.
1 sq./0 sq.
1 sq./1 sq.
2 sq./1 sq.
3 sq./2 sq.
5 sq./3 sq.
10 sq./5 sq.
20 sq./10 sq.
50 sq./20 sq.
100 sq./50 sq.

Biped
1 sq.
1 sq.
2 sq.
2 sq.
3 sq.
3 sq.
5 sq.
5 sq.
5 sq.
7 sq.
7 sq.
10 sq.
10 sq.
15 sq.
15 sq.

Avg. Base Speed


Quad Fly
Swim
2 sq. 3 sq. 1 sq.
2 sq. 3 sq. 2 sq.
3 sq. 5 sq. 3 sq.
3 sq. 5 sq. 5 sq.
5 sq. 7 sq. 7 sq.
5 sq. 7 sq. 10 sq.
7 sq. 10 sq. 10 sq.
7 sq. 10 sq. 10 sq.
7 sq. 10 sq. 10 sq.
10 sq. 15 sq. 10 sq.
10 sq. 15 sq. 10 sq.
15 sq. 20 sq. 10 sq.
15 sq. 20 sq. 10 sq.
20 sq. 30 sq. 10 sq.
20 sq. 30 sq. 10 sq.

Example
Button on a cell phone
Tiny insects, key on a keyboard
Small insects, pistol bullet
Large insects, rifle bullet
Small rodents and birds, grenade
Birds of prey, large rodents
Human children, small dogs, cats
Human adults, small motorcycles
Horses, small cars
Elephants, large cars, trucks
Whales, tanks, small aircraft
Small airliner, rail cars, yachts
Jumbo jets, coast guard cutters
Frigates, destroyers, freighters
Cruisers, battleships, carriers

1 Space and reach at character scale. Specific objects and characters can vary from that listed. The first reach distance represents tall characters
(such as bipedal creatures) and the second reach distance represents long characters (such as quadrupedal or flying creatures).
2 For each additional category smaller than Fine (3X), subtract 5 from size modifier, reduce size multiplier and height/length by 1 step on the
standard progression, and divide weight by 10. For each additional category larger than Colossal (3X), add 5 to size modifier and DR, increase size
multiplier and height/length by 1 step on the standard progression, and multiply weight by 10. Average base speed does not change at sizes smaller
than Fine (3X) or larger than Colossal (3X).
Distractions: Some actions divert your attention from the battle, so
performing these within a threatened area provokes an attack of
opportunity. Table 101: Actions in Combat (page 65) identifies many of
the actions that provoke attacks of opportunity.
Making an Attack of Opportunity: Once per turn as an interruption, you
can make an attack of opportunity against an opponent who performs a
provoking action within your threatened area. However, you cannot make
an attack of opportunity if you are disadvantaged to your opponent, if
your opponent has cover (other than mobile cover from another
creature), or if your opponent has concealment.
An attack of opportunity is a simple melee attack if you wield a melee
weapon or a simple ranged attack if you wield a handgun. (You do not
have to make an attack of opportunity if you dont want to.)
Because it is an interruption, your attack of opportunity must be
resolved before your opponent can complete the provoking action.
Depending on the outcome, your opponent might be unable to complete
the provoking action at all.

Threatened Areas
If you wield a melee weapon or a handgun, you threaten an area that
includes all squares within your reach, even when it is not your action.
For most heroic characters, that means everything in all squares adjacent
to your space (including diagonally).
You can make melee attacks only against targets in your threatened
area. An enemy that takes certain actions while in a threatened square
provokes an attack of opportunity from you (see below).
Unarmed Combatants: When you dont wield a weapon, you dont
normally threaten an area. You can make unarmed or grappling attacks
into the area within your reach, but doing so provokes an attack of
opportunity from your opponent (unless he, too, is unarmed).
However, if you have a natural weapon (such as claws) or if you are
trained in the Unarmed skill, you are treated as if you are wielding a
melee weapon: You threaten the area within your reach, you can make
attacks of opportunity, and your unarmed attacks dont provoke attacks
of opportunity.
Reach Weapons: When wielding a reach weapon, you double your
reach but do not threaten the area within your natural reach. For
example, a Medium-size character (natural reach 1 square) wielding a
longspear threatens all spaces 2 squares away but does not threaten any
adjacent space (within 1 square).
Total Cover: You do not threaten any square that has total cover to you
(see Cover, page 75).

Transport Combat
Not every battle takes place on foot. Sometimes, you enter combat on
some type of transporta mount or a vehicle that carries youand some
special rules apply in this case. These rules cover every type of transport,
whether you are riding a creature, driving a ground vehicle, piloting a
water, air, or space vehicle, or riding as a crewmember or passenger on
any of the above.
For simply traveling from point to point, the transport you use is
largely a matter of personal style and finances; you need to make skill
checks only in particularly dangerous or challenging circumstances. In
those situations, a driver uses the control metaskill (page 23) to perform
maneuvers and maintain control of his or her transport.

Attacks of Opportunity

Sometimes a combatant in a fight lets down its guard. In this case,


combatants near her can take advantage of the lapse in defense to make
a free attack called an attack of opportunity.
Provoking an Attack of Opportunity: When you perform a provoking
action within an opponents threatened area, that opponent can make an
attack of opportunity as an interruption.
There are two types of provoking actions: movement and distractions.
Movement: Attempting to move out of a square in a threatened area
usually provokes an attack of opportunity. (However, at character scale,
you can step 1 square as a move action without provoking an attack of
opportunity.)

Characters on Transports
When onboard a transport, you fill one of several possible positions that
determine your role and what actions you can take. Each position can be
crewed by only one character at a time; you can change to a new

79

position, but only if no other character has crewed that position since
the end of your last turn.
Changing positions is normally a move action. At the Gamemasters
discretion, you might need to spend additional actions on a very large
transport if the new positions station is far away (such as when going
from the engine room to the bridge on a large vessel).
A single character can crew multiple positions simultaneously if all
those positions can be operated from the same location. (This is often the
case for mounts and smaller vehicles.)
Actions on Transports: Anyone aboard a transport can make an attack
with a personal weapon if they dont have total cover from the transport,
such as when standing on its top deck or shooting through an open
window or door. Drivers and gunners normally need to use both hands to
crew their positions, but they can use a personal weapon in one hand if
theyre willing to take a penalty. (For details, see the Driver and Gunner
sections, below.)
Any character attempting to move on board a transport might have
difficulty maintaining balance. If not in a seated position when the
transports driver attempts to perform a maneuver, the character must
make a DC 15 control (Dex) check as a reaction to avoid falling prone.
(For most characters, this is an Athletics check, or Acrobatics if trained in
that skill.)
Characters on board a transport can perform most other actions as
well (performing repairs, using skills or talents, and so forth). You must
be able to meet the actions range requirements (such as line of sight,
line of effect, communications, and so forth) for the action. The
Gamemaster adjudicates what actions can and cannot be performed
while on a transport.
Modifiers: If a transports current speed category is moderate or above,
a characters on board take a speed penalty to attack roll or sense check
against a target outside the transport, attempts to remain standing
during a maneuver, and any skill check that requires delicate or precise
movement (such as disabling an explosive device or picking a lock). The
speed penalty is determined by the transports current speed category:
moderate speed, 1; high speed, 2; very high speed, 5.
Apply the transports current fatigue and impairment penalties to all
checks made by the driver, copilot, commander, engineer, gunner, or
operator to perform any special action described in their individual
sections (for example, a driver making a control check, a gunner making
an attack with an emplaced weapon, and so forth).
Vehicles with an Intelligence modifier have advanced sensors and
electronic displays to aid their crews. When a vehicles driver, copilot,
commander, engineer, gunner, or operator makes a sense check, reduce
the total of the range, speed, and concealment penalties by the vehicles
Intelligence modifier (if positive).

control checks key ability. When making a control (Dex) check, add your
transports Dexterity modifier and subtract its size modifier. When
making a control (Str) check, add your transports Strength modifier and
add its size modifier.
If your transports current speed category is moderate or above, you
take a speed penalty to all control checks: moderate speed, 1; high
speed, 2; very high speed, 5.
If you dont use both hands to drive, you take a 5 penalty to your
control checks (or 10 if your transport requires a specialty that has a
prerequisite, such as helicopters or heavy aircraft). In addition, the
Gamemaster might rule that some transports are too complex to operate
with one hand at all.
You can use your hands for something else without penalty in two
cases:
You can drive and use a driver-operated weapon with both hands
simultaneously; you use the same controls to operate both.
If riding a mount specifically trained for combat (such as a warhorse)
and you are trained in Nature, you can guide your mount using your
knees and free your hands for another use.

Other Modifiers: When making a sense check, reduce the total of your
range, speed, and concealment penalties by your vehicles Intelligence
modifier (if positive) or your mounts Wisdom modifier (if positive).
Protect Transport: When your transport takes damage to its hit points,
as an interruption you can choose to apply some or all of this damage to
your hit points instead (up to your current hit points). Only one driver can
use this option in a single encounter, even if another character becomes
the driver.
Use Driver-Operated Weapon: If your transport has any driver-operated
weapons, you occupy their gunner position; you can choose to use
emplaced weapon style instead of driving style. (See Gunner, below.)
If you are trained in your transports control skill, you can substitute a
control (Dex) check for your weapons normal skill check when you make
an attack with a driver-operated weapon.
Charge: If your transport doesnt provide total cover and you have
melee reach equal to or greater than the transports space, you can
perform a charge attack. The transport must move in a straight line
during its movement, and you perform the charge attack as a standard
action at the end of its movement. (Unlike a character on foot, you and
your transport does not move any additional distance during the charge
action itself.)
When performing a charge attack, add a bonus equal to (2 the
transports size modifier) to your damage. Some weapons might deal
additional damage when used during a charge.
Total Defense: If you use total defense as a standard action, your
transport gains a +2 bonus to all defenses until the start of the your next
turn. However, gunners and all other characters making an attack from
on board your transport take a 5 penalty to attacks until the start of
your next turn.

Driver

The driver of the transport controls its movement. Most transports have
only one position from where the transport can be driven, so the person
seated there is the driver. A transport can have only one driver at a time.
Drivers can perform the following special actions.
Drive Transport: Driving a transport requires a move action to control
its movement during your turn and a free action to declare you speed at
the end of your turn. If you do not perform these actions on your turn,
your transport becomes uncontrolled at the end of the following turn
unless its declared speed is stationary. (This is usually enough time for
another character, such as the copilot or commander, to take over as
driver.)
If you use driving fighting style (page 66), add your Dexterity modifier
(minimum 1) as a style bonus to your transports Primary and Reflex
Defenses. You must drive with both hands to use this style.
Control Modifiers: Unlike other characters, you always make control
checks using your Dexterity modifier, but you apply additional modifiers
determined by your transports size and abilities depending on the

Copilot

The copilot must be seated in a location where he or she can see around
the vehicle and advise the pilot (in a car, this generally means the front
passenger seat). A transport can have only one copilot at a time.
A copilot can also take over driving the transport if the driver cannot
or chooses not to, provided there is a second set of controls at the
copilots seat (usually true in aircraft).
Copilots can perform the following special actions.
Copilot Transport: You can use a swift action on your turn to read
gauges, watch your surroundings, and advise the driver. If you do so, you
grant a style bonus equal to your Wisdom modifier (minimum 1) to either
the drivers control checks or the transports Reflex modifier until the
start of your next turn.

80

Aid Another: As a standard action, you can use the aid another action
to make a control (Dex) check that provides the driver a +2 bonus to a
single control check before the start of your next turn.

Aid Another: As a standard action, you can use the aid another action
to make a restoration (Int) check that provides the driver with a +2
bonus to a single control check made either to increase speed with the
Change Declared Speed maneuver or to use the Ram maneuver.

Commander

Gunner

A commander doesnt directly control a transport but can assist any


other crewmember on any skill check by using the aid another action.
Unless communications are somehow disrupted, the commander is
considered to be in communication with all crew and passengers.
A transport can have only one commander at a time. On smaller
transports, the driver or copilot usually doubles as the commander.
Commanders can perform the following special actions.
Command Transport: You can use a swift action on your turn to
evaluate the tactical situation and issue orders to other crewmembers. If
you do so, you grant a style bonus equal to the greater of your
Intelligence modifier or Charisma modifier (minimum 1) to either one of
the transports defenses or one crewmembers checks with a single skill
until the start of your next turn.
Aid Another: As a standard action, you can use the aid another action
to make a Tactics (Int) check that provides one crewmember with a +2
bonus to a single check or to use Tactics (Cha) to give any enemy in sight
or communication a 2 penalty to a single check before the start of your
next turn.

Many transports have emplaced weapons built into them. The driver
might operate some transport weapons, as specified in the transports
description; driver-operated weapons include everything from a jet
fighters autocannons to a warhorses hoof attacks. If a weapon is
controlled from a location other than the drivers position, another
character can crew that position and become a gunner. A transport can
have as many gunners as it has gunner positions.
Gunners can perform the following special actions.
Use Emplaced Weapon: You can make attacks with the transports
emplaced weapons. If you use emplaced weapon fighting style, you also
gain a benefit determined by the type of weapon:
Melee Attack: You gain a style bonus to your damage with melee
weapons equal to your Charisma modifier (minimum +1). This
usually applies only when you make an attack using a mounts
natural weapons, such as a warhorses hooves. (Melee attacks are
always driver-operated weapons.)
Ranged or Area Attack: If you aim (a swift action) before making a
ranged or area attack, you gain a style bonus to your damage equal
to your Intelligence modifier (minimum +1).

Engineer
Vehicles only

Larger vehicles often have a dedicated chief engineer who focuses on


keeping everything in working order. A vehicle can have only one
engineer at a time.
Engineers can perform the following special actions.
Engineering: You can use a swift action on your turn to monitor the
vehicles vital components, regulate power, and compensate for
overloaded systems. If you do so, you grant a style bonus equal to the
greater of your Intelligence modifier or Wisdom modifier (minimum 1) to
the vehicles Fortitude Defense.
Protect Vehicle: When your vehicle takes damage to its reserves (either
by using the recover action or because of an attack), as an interruption
you can choose to apply some or all of this damage to your hit points
instead (up to your current hit points). Only one engineer can use this
option in a single encounter, even if another character becomes the
engineer.
Jury-Rig: As a standard action, you can make a DC 15 restoration (Wis)
check to allow the vehicle to recover up to 1/5 its maximum hit points
from its reserves. (For almost all vehicles, you would use Mechanics to
make restoration checks.)
Modifiers: If you do not have at least a basic tool kit, you take a 5
penalty to your restoration check.
You take a penalty to your restoration check equal to the total of the
vehicles current fatigue and impairment penalties.
For every successful jury-rig attempt that your vehicle has received in
the same encounter (that is, without resting for one minute), you take a
cumulative 5 penalty to your restoration check.
Saving Throw: If your vehicle has at least 1/10 its listed crew, it gains
the self-repairing trait and can make saving throws to shake off the
effects of the disabled, fatigued, impaired, incapacitated, and weakening
conditions, just as a living creature can. (See Conditions, page 62.)
You roll the saving throw on the vehicles behalf, adding your
restoration training bonus (+2 if trained or +3 to +5 with Skill Focus)
instead of the vehicles defense bonus to the result.
If your vehicle has less than 1/2 its listed crew, it takes a penalty on its
saving throw or might be unable to make saving throws at all: less than
1/2, 2 penalty; less than 1/5, 5 penalty; less than 1/10, vehicle does
not gain self-repairing trait and no saving throw is possible.

If you are using a driver-operated weapon and trained in your transports


control skill, you can substitute a control (Dex) check for your weapons
normal skill check when you make an attack with a driver-operated
weapon.
Modifiers: If your transports current speed category is moderate or
above, you take a speed penalty to all attack rolls: moderate speed, 1;
high speed, 2; very high speed, 5.
If your transport is a vehicle with an Intelligence score, reduce your
attacks total range, speed, and concealment penalties by the vehicles
Intelligence modifier (if positive).
If you attempt to operate your emplaced weapon with one hand, you
take a 5 penalty to your attack roll and you cannot use emplaced
weapon fighting style. In addition, the Gamemaster might rule that some
transports are too complex to operate with one hand at all.
Aid Another: As a standard action, you can use the aid another action
to make a attack roll with your weapon that provides another gunner a
+2 bonus to a single attack or to give any enemy in line of effect a 2
penalty to a single check before the start of your next turn.

Operator
Vehicles only

Some larger vehicles have other systems with dedicated crew positions,
such as sensor operators, communications specialists, and the like. If a
system is controlled from a location other than the drivers position,
another character can crew that position and become an operator. A
transport can have as many operators as it has operator positions.
Operators can perform the following special actions:
Operate Sensors: You can use a swift action on your turn to monitor
sensor screens, convey critical information to other crewmembers, or
help gunners to acquire their targets. If you do so, you grant a style
bonus equal to your Intelligence modifier or Wisdom modifier (minimum
1) to either all crewmembers sense checks, the commanders Tactics
checks, or one gunners attack rolls until the start of your next turn.
You can also use a swift action to scan your surroundings with a
Computers (Int/Wis) check. Reduce your total penalty from range, speed,
and concealment by an amount equal to the vehicles Intelligence
modifier (if positive).

81

Operate Communications: You can use a swift action on your turn to


monitor communications traffic, eavesdrop on enemy radio chatter, and
convey critical orders and information to allies. If you do so, you grant a
style bonus equal to your Wisdom modifier or Charisma modifier
(minimum 1) to either the commanders Influence or Deception checks or
one gunners attack rolls until the start of your next turn.
As a standard action, you can attempt to decipher coded messages you
intercept with a Linguistics (Int) check.
Operate Computers: If your vehicle has an Intelligence modifier, it has
an on-board computer system that you can use for any number of tasks.
When you make a Computers check, add your vehicles Intelligence
modifier (positive or negative) to your check result, just as you would
with any other computer system.
Aid Another: As a standard action when operating a vehicles sensors,
you can use the aid another action to make a Computers (Int/Wis) check
that provides any crewmember with a +2 bonus to a single sense check,
to provide the commander with a +2 bonus to a single Tactics check, or
to give any enemy in sight a 2 penalty to a single check before the start
of your next turn.
As a standard action when operating a vehicles communications, you
can use the aid another action to make a Computers (Wis/Cha) check
that provides the commander with a +2 bonus to a single Deception,
Influence, or Tactics check or to give any enemy in sight or
communications a 2 penalty to a single check before the start of your
turn.

Damaging Transports

Unlike most creatures, transports have limited movement (page 67). A


transport acts on the drivers initiative count, and the driver controls all
its actions (declaring speed, making turns, performing maneuvers, and so
forth).

Transports have hit points and reserve points, just like other characters.
Unless otherwise specified, a transport has maximum reserve points
equal to 1/2 its maximum hit points. Deduct any damage taken from the
transports hit points until they are reduced to 0, and apply any
remaining damage to the transports reserves.
Damage Reduction and Hardness: Transports greater than Medium size
have Damage Reduction. In addition, vehicles (like most inanimate
objects) have Hardness. Deduct the transports Damage Reduction and
Hardness from any damage taken. If an attacks weapon damage does
not equal or exceed the transports Hardness, the attack doesnt deal any
damage at all.
Heavily Damaged Mounts: If a mount becomes disabled, incapacitated,
weakening, or destroyed, it immediately stops moving. All characters on
board must make a DC 15 control (Dex) check to avoid being thrown
from the mount, falling either 5 feet for every square of the mounts
reach or the mounts current altitude, whichever is more.
Heavily Damaged Vehicles: If a vehicle becomes disabled or
incapacitated, it continues moving but its driver has only partial control.
The driver cannot perform any maneuvers but can still turn normally.
A surface vehicles declared speed is automatically reduced by one
category at the end of the drivers turn each round. A flying vehicles
declared speed doesnt change, but its altitude is reduced by an amount
equal to the minimum movement for its declared speed.
Weakening and Destroyed Vehicles: A weakening vehicle is in the
process of breaking up or disintegrating. It continues moving as above,
but the driver has almost no control at all. Performing a 45-degree turn
requires a DC 25 control (Dex) check, and the driver can attempt to do so
only once per round.
A destroyed vehicle stops moving immediately and, if flying, its
wreckage falls from its current altitude (100 squares the first round, 200
squares each subsequent round).
If the vehicle has ejection seats, parachutes, lifeboats, or escape pods,
all crew and passengers will normally abandon ship as quickly as
possible. However, moving on board a vehicle as it is coming apart is very
difficult: Every creature must make a control (Dex) check (DC 15 for a
weakening vehicle or DC 20 for a destroyed vehicle) at the end of its turn
every round to avoid falling prone. Since the vehicle no longer has power,
those on board often have to contend with dim light (for a large vehicle
with emergency interior lighting), darkness (for other vehicles), and
smoke (for almost any powered vehicle).
In addition, the vehicle loses hull integrity, so a water vehicle begins
sinking and a high-altitude aerial vehicle or space vehicle depressurizes.
Depending on the size of the vehicle, it might take several rounds,
minutes, or even hours for the entire vehicle to flood or depressurize;
even then, a few isolated compartments might retain pressurization for
some time.
Exploding Vehicles: If a powered vehicle is destroyed by overwhelming
damagethat is, damage of 2 its massive damage threshold or moreit
explodes. (See Destroyed condition description, page 62.)

Starting a Transport

Attacking Occupants

Other Crew
Vehicles only

Larger vehicles often have additional crew beyond the specific positions
described above. These crewmembers might perform as gunners
assistants, deck hands, engineering technicians, or any number of other
jobs.
Other crewmembers can perform the following special action:
Crew Vehicle: You can use a swift action on your turn to perform your
assigned duties on board the vehicle, helping to keep everything in
working order. If you do so, you count toward fulfilling the vehicles crew
requirement to gain the self-repairing trait. (See Engineer, above.)

Passenger

All other characters aboard the transport are considered passengers.


Passengers have no specific role in the transports operation, but may be
able to fire weapons from the transport, make repairs to on-board
equipment, provide first aid to injured crewmembers, or take other
actions.

Transport Movement

You can choose to target specific transport occupants. The occupant


might gain a cover bonus from the transport; in addition, use the
transports current speed when determining your range penalty.
Even if an occupant has total cover from the transport, you might be
able to shoot through the cover and damage the occupant. This normally
isnt a viable option unless your target is protected by something
relatively weak (such as glass) or you use a very powerful weapon. (See
Cover, page 75.)

You can enter or mount most transports with a move action and start
them with a swift action. An exception is noted in a transports
description when it applies.

Attacking a Transport
An attack made against a transport uses the transports defense scores,
just as for any other character. Because many transports are capable of
very fast movement, your range penalty to attacks will often be
determined by the transports current speed instead of its actual distance
from you.

82

11: Gamemastering
The e20 System encourages combat encounters that are more fluid than
usual for earlier d20-based games; combatants rarely remain in fixed
positions for very long.
Drawing inspiration from Unearthed Arcana and DUNGEONS & DRAGONS
4th edition, threat levels are scaled such that a standard 1st-level
opponent is an appropriate challenge for a single 1st-level hero.
Encounters are thus very easy to scale for parties of different sizes; if you
have six 3rd-level heroes, pick out six 3rd-level standard opponents (or
any other combination that adds up to roughly the same amount of
experience). Opponent ranks include basic (simpler attack options and
lower hit points, somewhat like nonheroic characters in STAR WARS Saga
Edition or minions in DUNGEONS & DRAGONS 4th edition), standard, or elite
(higher hit points and defenses, more-or-less even match for a hero of
the same level). As a rough comparison, a 1st-level elite opponent is
roughly equivalent to a 3rd-level standard opponent or a 7th-level
ordinary opponent.

Table 111: Experience Awards by Level


Adj. Level
5
4
3
2
1
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25

Experience Awards
Experience points (XP) represent how much progress heroes make toward
advancing to their next level by overcoming opponents, hazards, and
challenges. As Game Master, you also use experience points to help you
to build encounters and estimate their difficulty for a given group of
heroes.
Every character has a character level and an adjusted level. Character
level represents a characters overall experience and capabilities, just as
it does for heroes. Adjusted level equals character level plus any
applicable level adjustment for size, template, special powers, and so
forth; most characters do not have a level adjustment, so their adjusted
level equals their character level.
Table 111: Experience Awards by Level provides the XP value for
basic, standard, and elite characters for adjusted levels from 5 to 25.
Higher and lower adjusted levels are possible; extend the table as needed
using the expanded progression.
Feel free to adjust XP awards to reflect unusual circumstances (such as
a substantial tactical advantage for one side), but such adjustments
should almost never change the XP award by more than 50%.

Basic
2
3
5
7
10
15
20
30
50
75
100
150
200
300
500
750
1,000
1,500
2,000
3,000
5,000
7,500
10,000
15,000
20,000
30,000
50,000
75,000
100,000
150000
200,000

Standard
10
15
20
30
50
75
100
150
200
300
500
750
1,000
1,500
2,000
3,000
5,000
7,500
10,000
15,000
20,000
30,000
50,000
75,000
100,000
150000
200,000
300,000
500,000
750,000
1,000,000

Elite
20
30
50
75
100
150
200
300
500
750
1,000
1,500
2,000
3,000
5,000
7,500
10,000
15,000
20,000
30,000
50,000
75,000
100,000
150000
200,000
300,000
500,000
750,000
1,000,000
1,500,000
2,000,000

Table 112: Encounter XP Targets


Level
1st
2nd
3rd
4th
5th
6th
7th
8th
9th
10th
11th
12th
13th
14th
15th
16th
17th
18th
19th
20th

Encounter XP Targets
An encounters XP target represents the total XP award that the heroes
earn for overcoming an encounter of average difficulty. This is
approximately equivalent to an encounter in which each hero faces a
single standard character of that heros level; after overcoming ten such
encounters, the hero should advance a level.
To calculate the XP target for any given group of heroes, add the listed
XP awards for one standard character of each heros level. For example, a
group including one 5th-level hero, two 4th-level heroes, and one 3rdlevel hero would have an XP target of 1,300 (500 XP for one 5th + 2
300 XP for two 4th + 200 XP for one 3rd). For your convenience, Table
112: Encounter XP Targets provides this value for groups of three to six
heroes of the same level.

Encounter Difficulty
You can estimate the difficulty of encounter by comparing its total XP
value to the XP target for your group of heroes, as shown below.

83

3 heroes
300
450
600
900
1,500
2,250
3,000
4,500
6,000
9,000
15,000
22,500
30,000
45,000
60,000
90,000
150,000
225,000
300,000
450,000

4 heroes
400
600
800
1,200
2,000
3,000
4,000
6,000
8,000
12,000
20,000
30,000
40,000
60,000
80,000
120,000
200,000
300,000
400,000
600,000

5 heroes
500
750
1,000
1,500
2,500
3,750
5,000
7,500
10,000
15,000
25,000
37,500
50,000
75,000
100,000
150,000
250,000
375,000
500,000
750,000

6 heroes
600
900
1,200
1,800
3,000
4,500
6,000
9,000
12,000
18,000
30,000
45,000
60,000
90,000
120,000
180,000
300,000
450,000
600,000
900,000

Trivial (less than 50% of target): The encounter is so easy that it


hardly presents a challenge at all, and the heroes can quite possibly
complete the encounter in one to two rounds.
Easy (50% to 75% of target): The encounter will most likely provide
a quick skirmish with little loss of resources.
Average (75% to 125% of XP target): The encounter provides a solid
challenge for the heroes, most likely consuming about 1/3 to 1/2 of
their reserves. Serious injury or death is very unlikely without
exceptionally bad luck.
Hard (125% to 175% of XP target): The encounter represents a
major challenge to the heroes, most likely consuming 2/3 or more of
their reserves. Serious injury or death are real possibilities, but they
are only likely if the heroes act recklessly.
Overwhelming (more than 175% of XP target): The encounter is
incredibly dangerous, and the capture or death of one or more
heroes is very likely. Because of this, the heroes immediate goal in
an overwhelming encounter should usually be evasion and escape
rather than trying to defeat their opponents.

a specific number and type of characters to appear (such as police or


military patrols, whose size, composition, and experience wont vary too
dramatically in a particular area). For example, if you decide that an
ordinary police patrol includes two 6th-level standard characters (1,400
XP), a group of five heroes would find this encounter overwhelming at
2nd level or below, hard at 3rd level, average at 4th level, easy at 5th
level, and trivial at 6th level and above.

Allies & Opponents


The cast of your campaign comprises countless Gamemaster characters
who assist, oppose, advise, or mislead the heroes. Many Gamemaster
characters participate in the game for no more than a single encounter,
but some important or powerful character fill a recurring role that might
last for several adventures, perhaps even the whole campaign.
As Gamemaster, you have your hands full with adjudicating the rules,
plotting adventures, managing the heroes, and organizing the game as a
whole. Because of this, the rules for Gamemaster characters reduce your
workload by providing a streamlined system for creating balanced and
level-appropriate characters with similar capabilities to what you might
create with a more detailed creation system (such as that for creating
heroic characters).
Since most characters come on stage for only a few rounds in a single
encounter, you wont need every detail that might go on a complete
character sheet; instead, you would get the most use out of something
more like a cheat sheet with the most important game statistics.
Therefore, the rules for creating Gamemaster characters provide an
abstract approximation of these critical details while providing enough
information for you to improvise in unexpected situations.
In other words, any given Gamemaster character might have as much
detail and nuance as any heroic characterits just that most of that

You can use encounter difficulty in two different ways. First, you can use
the desired difficulty to create a sort of budget that you spend on a
custom-built encounter. For example, if you have an XP target of 10,000
for a group of five 9th-level heroes and you want a hard encounter
(perhaps as the climactic confrontation with the main villain of the
adventure), you would want the encounters total XP award to be
anywhere from 12,500 to 17,500 XP. One possible configuration would
be one 10th-level elite character (the main villain), three 9th-level
standard characters (two of the villains senior lieutenants and his
security chief), and five 8th-level basic characters (the villains security
detail) for a total of 15,000 XP.
Second, you can use it to estimate the difficulty of a prepared
encounter. You might find this helpful when the story or setting calls for

Table 113: Gamemaster Characters


Base
Level
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20

Abilities1
13, 12, 11, 10, 9, 8
13, 12, 11, 10, 9, 8
13, 12, 11, 10, 9, 8
13, 12, 11, 10, 9, 8
14, 13, 11, 10, 9, 8
14, 13, 11, 10, 9, 8
14, 13, 11, 10, 9, 8
14, 13, 11, 10, 9, 8
15, 14, 12, 10, 9, 8
15, 14, 12, 10, 9, 8
15, 14, 12, 10, 9, 8
15, 14, 12, 10, 9, 8
16, 15, 13, 11, 9, 8
16, 15, 13, 11, 9, 8
16, 15, 13, 11, 9, 8
16, 15, 13, 11, 9, 8
17, 16, 14, 12, 10, 8
17, 16, 14, 12, 10, 8
17, 16, 14, 12, 10, 8
17, 16, 14, 12, 10, 8

Skill Modifer2
+3/+2/+0
+4/+3/+1
+5/+3/+1
+6/+4/+2
+6/+4/+2
+7/+5/+3
+8/+6/+3
+9/+7/+4
+10/+7/+4
+11/+8/+5
+12/+8/+5
+13/+9/+6
+13/+10/+6
+14/+11/+7
+15/+11/+7
+16/+12/+8
+17/+12/+8
+18/+13/+9
+19/+14/+9
+20/+15/+10

Feats
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
4
5
5
5
5

Defenses3
13/12/10
14/13/11
15/13/11
16/14/12
16/14/12
17/15/13
18/16/13
19/17/14
20/17/14
21/18/15
22/18/15
23/19/16
23/20/16
24/21/17
25/21/17
26/22/18
27/22/18
28/23/19
29/24/19
30/25/20

Basic
hp
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29

Basic
Talents
1 core4
1 core4
1 core4
1 core4
1 core4
1 core4
1 core4
2 core4
2 core4
2 core4
2 core4
2 core4
2 core4
2 core4
2 core4
3 core4
3 core4
3 core4
3 core4
3 core4

Std
hp
50
55
60
65
70
75
80
85
90
95
100
105
110
115
120
125
130
135
140
145

Standard
Talents
1 core, 1 major
1 core, 1 major
1 core, 1 major
1 core, 1 major
1 core, 1 major
1 core, 1 major
1 core, 1 major
2 core, 2 major
2 core, 2 major
2 core, 2 major
2 core, 2 major
2 core, 2 major
2 core, 2 major
2 core, 2 major
2 core, 2 major
3 core, 3 major
3 core, 3 major
3 core, 3 major
3 core, 3 major
3 core, 3 major

Elite
hp
100
110
120
130
140
150
160
170
180
190
200
210
220
230
240
250
260
270
280
290

Elite
Talents
1 core, 1 major
1 core, 1 major
1 core, 1 major
2 core, 2 major
2 core, 2 major
2 core, 2 major
2 core, 2 major
3 core, 3 major
3 core, 3 major
3 core, 3 major
3 core, 3 major
4 core, 4 major
4 core, 4 major
4 core, 4 major
4 core, 4 major
5 core, 5 major
5 core, 5 major
5 core, 5 major
5 core, 5 major
6 core, 6 major

1 Elite characters add +2 to all ability scores. The characters ability score modifiers from race and other templates also apply.
2 Use the highest modifier for any skill associated with a core talent, use the middle modifier for any other trained skill, and use the lowest modifier
for any untrained skill. The skill modifier includes Skill Focus (for the highest skill modifier) and enhancement bonuses (when applicable). Because
the key ability changes for different skill applications, it does not include an ability modifier.
3 Defenses do not include ability modifiers. Add the better of Strength or Constitution to Fortitude Defense, the better of Dexterity or Intelligence to
Primary and Reflex Defense, and the better of Wisdom or Charisma to Will Defense. (If the character wears armor, its armor limits the maximum
bonus from Dexterity or Intelligence.)
4 Basic characters can use a core talent only 1/encounter. They have at least one simple attack that is available each round.

84

Adjusted Level: If the character has any level modifiers (such as from
having a very large or very small size), add them to its character level to
determined the characters adjusted level. Use adjusted level when
calculating XP values and building encounters.
Abilities: Arrange ability scores as desired to match the characters role
and behavior during the encounter. The characters best ability score
should be the key ability for at least one core talent. If other talents have
a different key ability, assign the next highest ability score to that ability.
If the character has a template, it might specify that type of
characters most common order of ability scores from highest to lowest.
Unless otherwise specified, the templates order of ability scores is
optional.
The ability scores listed here show typical values assuming the
character uses the default ability score array and applies level-based
ability score increases to its highest ability scores first.
Templates: The characters templates can modify its ability scores. If
you dont use a race template at all, add +2 to two ability scores of your
choice (usually the highest two).
Nonabilities: Some characters do not have all ability scores (for
example, Int ). The character has a nonability if specified by its
template. In this case, discard the lowest listed ability score and assign
the rest to its remaining ability scores.
If template modifiers would reduce an ability score to 0 or less, that
character instead has a nonability for that score.
Point Buy: If you wish, you can use a point-buy method to determine a
characters ability scores. A basic or standard character has 15 points to
buy abilities, and an elite character has 30 points to buy abilities. If you
use this option, be sure to include adjustments for increasing ability
scores at higher levels (+1 to two abilities at 5th level, three abilities at
9th level, four abilities at 13th level, and five abilities at 17th level). Elite
characters do not gain the normal +2 to all ability scores if you use the
point buy method.
If the character has one or more nonabilities, its point allocation is
reduced. Basic and standard characters with nonabilities use the
following point buy allocations: one nonability, 15; two nonabilities, 14;
three nonabilities, 12; four nonabilities, 9; five nonabilities, 5.
Elite characters with nonabilities use the following point buy
allocations: one nonability, 28; two nonabilities, 25; three nonabilities,
21; four nonabilities, 16; five nonabilities, 9.
Skill Modifier: The listed skill modifier includes all applicable bonuses
from the characters level, training bonus, and enhancement bonuses.
Because the key ability varies for different skill applications, it does not
include any ability modifier.
Select six trained skills for the character. Any skill associated with a
core talent uses the highest skill modifier (which includes the Skill Focus
feat). Use any remaining skill training selections for skills associated with
major talents, simple attacks, or other skills appropriate for the
characters role; these other skills use the middle skill modifier. The
lowest skill modifier applies to any untrained skills.
Skill Training: The character can spend a feat to gain Skill Training,
adding one additional trained skill. This trained skill uses the middle skill
modifier.
Skill Focus: The character can gain Skill Focus either by spending a feat
selection or by reducing the number of trained skills (gaining one Skill
Focus selection for every trained skill sacrificed). Skill Focus improves a
trained skill from the middle to the highest skill modifier.
Feats: Select a number of feats equal to that listed for the characters
character level. Each feat can be a defensive feat, general feat, style feat,
or class feat, as appropriate for the characters role. The character must
meet all feat prerequisites, but unless the character has a class template,
treat class level prerequisites as character level prerequisites. (If it does
have a class template, its class level equals its character level.)
Defenses: Table 113: Gamemaster Characters lists three defense
numbers. The high score represents the character having both the first-

detail wont apply in a typical encounter, so you dont need to clutter up


their game statistics with unnecessary minutia. For particularly
important and recurring characters, however, you can use the rules for
creating heroic characters to produce more fleshed-out game statistics
appropriate for a wide range of different encounters.

Character Ranks
Character ranks represent how serious a threat a character represents to
a heroic character of the same level. The three character ranksbasic,
standard, and eliteare outlined below.
Basic: Basic characters make up the bulk of the population of the game
world. While they might have a respectable level of skill, they dont have
the durability to survive very long in heavy combat. When building
encounters, you can best use basic characters in groups that represent
thugs, conscripts, ordinary troops, and minions.
Encounter Building: Five basic characters are roughly equivalent to one
standard character, and therefore they will put up a good fight against a
single hero of the same level. When building an encounter, you might
pick some standard and elite opponents to make up the bulk of the
threat, and then add some basic characters to fill in any leftover XP value
that you want for the encounter.
Standard: Standard characters fill the role of reasonably well-trained
veterans, characters who have most likely seen some combat and
survived. They might serve as leaders for groups of basic characters, but
they most often appear as individuals.
Encounter Building: One standard character provides a decent fight for
one hero of the same level. Thus, the simplest way to build an encounter
is to pick a number of standard characters equal to the number of heroes
and of the same level. This method can make for a less dynamic
encounter, however, as it can easily break up into a bunch of
unconnected one-on-one fights. For this reason, you will usually want to
include at least some basic or elite characters in the encounter mix, and
dont be afraid to pick characters of higher or lower level.
Elite: Elite characters are the equivalent of a heroic character; in fact,
you could build a fully detailed heroic character and use it as an elite
character of the same level. In most cases, that degree of detail is
unnecessary because most opponents survive only a single fight.
However, for a recurring villain or important ally that you expect to
appear several times during the campaign, creating a complete heroic
write-up can provide for a more holistic set of options for use during
play.
The game statistics for elite characters provide the abstract equivalent
of a heroic character of a given level, with slightly fewer talents because
not every talent would apply in a single encounter. The elite characters
game statistics include the effect of enhancements, stunts, and most
feats because you usually will not need to determine that level of detail.
Encounter Building: One elite character is a good match for two heroic
characters of the same level. If you want a solo encounter with a single
powerful opponent, a single elite character 2 levels higher than the
heroes fills that role nicely. When creating a solo elite character, try to
give it at least one talent that allows the character to shake off the
effects of various conditions; with so many heroes ganging up on a single
target, the elite might find itself put out of action by multiple talents
that produce dazed or stunned effects. In addition, at least one talent
should be able to deal damage to multiple opponents with a single
action.

Game Statistics by Level


Use Table 113: Gamemaster Characters to determine the basic game
statistics for a character.
Character Level: Character level determines the characters ability
score increases, skill modifiers, feats, defenses, hit points, and talents.

85

and second-tier defensive feats for that defense; the middle score
represents having just the first-tier defensive feat for that defense; the
low score represents having no feats for that defense.
By default, a character has either (1) two high defenses, one middle
defense, and one low defense, or (2) one high defense and three middle
defenses. Assign these defenses as appropriate for the characters role;
however, its highest defenses should generally be associated with its best
ability scores.
If the character has a class template, its high defense must match its
class: Fortitude for Vanguard and Dreadnought; Reflex for Corsair and
Savant; Will for Sentinel and Envoy. If it has a second high defense, it
must be Primary Defense.
Determine the characters defense score by adding the base value
listed in the table to the best ability score associated with that defense:
Strength or Constitution for Fortitude; Dexterity or Intelligence for
Primary and Reflex; Wisdom or Charisma for Will.
Defensive Feats: You can use one or more of the characters feat
selections on defensive feats; if you do, increase that defenses score by
one step (from low to medium, or from medium to high). Characters with
class templates might be limited in what additional defensive feats they
can gain.
Armor: If the character has a high or medium Primary Defense, you can
choose to have it wear armor (representing the character taking Armor
Proficiency instead of Dodge). Choose a suit of armor from those
appropriate to the setting, selecting a light armor for a character with a
medium Primary Defense and a light or heavy armor for a character with
a high Primary Defense.
The characters Primary Defense does not change, but it gains the
listed armor bonus to its massive damage threshold, maximum ability
bonus to its Primary and Reflex Defenses, and check penalty to all
Strength-, Constitution-, and Dexterity-based skill checks. If the
character wears heavy armor, it has encumbrance equal to at least a
medium load (move only 1.5 base speed when running).
Massive Damage Threshold: Basic and standard characters have a
massive damage threshold equal to 5 + Fortitude Defense + armor bonus.
Elite characters, like heroic characters, are a bit tougher and they have
a massive damage threshold equal to 10 + Fortitude Defense + armor
bonus.
Saving Throws: Determine the characters saving throws from the
matching defense. For a high defense score, it has a +3 bonus to that
saving throw (+4 at 9th level, +5 at 17th level). For a middle defense
score, it has a +2 bonus to that saving throw. For a low defense score, it
has a +0 bonus to that saving throw.
Hit Points (hp): Hit points function just as they do for heroic
characters. Add the characters Constitution score its level to its total
hit points.
Reserves: Basic and standard characters have reserves equal to 1/2
their hit points. Elite characters have reserves equal to their hit points,
just as heroic characters do.
Talents: For each talent available, select a talent of that characters
level or less. You can choose any talent appropriate for the characters
role; however, most of the characters talents should use one of its two
best ability scores as its key ability. If the character has a class template,
pick only talents that are associated with that class.
In addition, you should feel free to create new talents for a character,
using existing talents as a guideline for gauging the relative value of a
talent.
Stunts: For some characters such as duelists or martial artists, stunts
might fit their role better than many talents. You can substitute up to
half the characters talents (core or major) for known stunts that it can
perform without penalty.

Other Game Statistics

Unlike those outlined above, some of the characters game statistics are
not directly related to its rank and level. The e20 System Core Rulebook
includes additional modifications you can make to a character, such as
adding additional modes of movement, natural weapons, the ability to
make extra attacks during a turn, and so forth.
Size: If you want the character to be a size other than Medium, you
need to apply the modifiers for its size category, as listed on Table 103:
Size (page 79). Published characters always include these adjustments in
their listed statistics.
Size Modifier: Apply a characters size modifier to the following:
Subtract size modifier from a characters Primary Defense, Reflex
Defense, weapon attack rolls, and Dexterity-based skill checks other
than attacks.
Add size modifier to a characters Fortitude Defense, grappling attack
rolls, and Strength- or Constitution-based skill checks other than
attacks.
Add 2 size modifier to a characters weapon damage. Weapon
damage always has a minimum value of 1 regardless of modifiers.
Add 1/2 size modifier to a characters character level when
determining its adjusted level.

Size Multiplier: Multiply a characters hit points by its size multiplier.


Space: Use the listed space to determine how many squares the

character occupies on the battle map.


Reach: Decide if the character is tall (such as a bipedal creature) or
long (such as a quadruped, flying creature, or swimming creature), and
then use that reach corresponding to the characters size.
Base Speed: Use the base speed corresponding to the characters type
of movement and size.
Action Point: Elite characters have 1 Action Point at the start of an
encounter.

Templates
You can use templates to add whole suites of thematically related
capabilities to a character. In many cases, a template will dictate (or at
least suggest) some of the characters ability score, defense, talent, and
feat selections; because of this, templates can greatly speed the creation
process.

Class Templates

Class templates are meant to represent characters whose focus, methods,


and roles are similar to those of the six heroic character classes. They are
particularly appropriate when you are designing a human (or humanoid)
character.

Vanguard

[Class Template]

Abilities: Str, Con, Int, Dex, Wis, Cha


Defenses: High Fortitude and Primary, medium Reflex, low Will
Hit Points: Make the following adjustments by rank.
Basic: Add 2 hit points.
Standard: Add 0.5 (level + 9) hit points.
Elite: Add 1 (level + 9) hit points.
Skills: Subtract 1 trained skill.

Dreadnought

[Class Template]

Abilities: Con, Str, Wis, Cha, Int, Dex


Defenses: High Fortitude and Primary, medium Will, low Reflex
Hit Points: Make the following adjustments by rank.
Basic: Add 4 hit points.
Standard: Add 1 (level + 9) hit points.
Elite: Add 2 (level + 9) hit points.
Skills: Subtract 2 trained skills.

86

Corsair

Standard: Subtract 1 (level + 9) hit points.


Elite: Subtract 2 (level + 9) hit points.

[Class Template]

Abilities: Dex, Int, Str, Con, Cha, Wis


Defenses: High Reflex and Primary, medium Fortitude, low Will
Hit Points: Make the following adjustments by rank.
Basic: Subtract 2 hit points.
Standard: Subtract 0.5 (level + 9) hit points.
Elite: Subtract 1 (level + 9) hit points.
Skills: Add 1 trained skill.

Savant

Skills: Add 2 trained skills.

Race Templates

If you want the character to be a member of an established race, you can


apply a race template. The e20 System Core Rulebook provides a wide
array of race templates for various genres and settings.

Human

[Class Template]

Abilities: Int, Dex, Cha, Wis, Con, Str


Defenses: High Reflex, medium Primary, Fortitude, and Will
Hit Points: Make the following adjustments by rank.
Basic: Subtract 6 hit points.
Standard: Subtract 1.5 (level + 9) hit points.
Elite: Subtract 3 (level + 9) hit points.
Skills: Add 3 trained skills.

Sentinel

[Class Template]

Vehicle Templates

Abilities: Wis, Cha, Con, Str, Dex, Int


Defenses: High Primary and Will, medium Fortitude, low Reflex
Hit Points: Make the following adjustments by rank.
Basic: No change.
Standard: No change.
Elite: No change.
Skills: No change.

Envoy

[Race Template]

Abilities: Add +2 to one ability score.


Size: Medium.
Base Speed: 5 squares.
Skills: Add one trained skill. (Use the middle value on Table 112:
Gamemaster Characters to determine its skill modifier.)
Feats: Add one feat for which the character meets the prerequisite.
Stunts: Add one known stunt, which can be either a universal stunt or a
talent stunt.
The e20 System Core Rulebook provides vehicle templates to help you
design new vehicles using many of the same methods you use for other
characters. This system allows you to replicate vehicles such as those
seen in Chapter 8 and gives players a chance to design and build their
own unique vehicles.

Other Templates

As with race templates, the e20 System Core Rulebook provides a wide
array of templates for various genres and settings. Many of these
templates are analogous to creature types, subtypes, and templates
found in DUNGEONS & DRAGONS v.3.5.

[Class Template]

Abilities: Cha, Wis, Dex, Int, Str, Con


Defenses: High Will, medium Primary, Fortitude, and Reflex
Hit Points: Make the following adjustments by character rank.
Basic: Subtract 4 hit points.

87

12: Genre & Setting


By default, the basic rules of the e20 System Core Rulebook emulate the
action and adventure genres in any historical or quasi-historical setting.
However, the system is designed to be universal in scope, capable of
handling virtually any genre, setting, or style of play you wish. To this
end, the e20 System Core Rulebook includes extensive rules for adding
genre- and setting-specific mechanics to your campaign, such as magic,
psionics, superpowers, and so forth.
In addition, the e20 System Core Rulebook includes some prepackaged
and ready-to-use campaign settings, each representing a different genre.
Ideally, the Gamemaster should be able to take a copy of the rulebook,
pick one of these settings, and start a campaign with only minimal effort.

Adventure: An adventure story often involves an epic scope, travel to


exotic locales, and a voyage of self-discovery. This is the classic heros
journey described in Joseph Campbells The Hero with a Thousand Faces
and typified by epics such as The Lord of the Rings or the Star Wars saga.
At its heart, adventure is about departing from the mundane and
crossing over into the extraordinary.
Action: An action story, in contrast, tends to focus less on the
transformation of the heroes (or the world around them) and more on
the action itself, such as physical challenges, extended battles, highspeed chases, and the like. Good examples include shoot-em-ups (Dirty
Harry), high-paced spy films (the James Bond series), martial arts films
(Enter the Dragon), and many westerns (A Fistful of Dollars).

Genre

Thriller & Suspense

The thriller and suspense genres include stories that focus on tension,
suspense, and the unknown rather than direct confrontation. The heroes
arent as resilient as in the action and adventure genres, so they must try
to outsmart and evade opponents, engaging in actual combat only when
absolutely necessary.
For most thriller and suspense stories, the e20 System requires only
minimal modification. To represent the increased danger the heroes face,
use either the heroic realism or gritty realism optional rules (see the
Excessive Damage sidebar, page 62). Because the heroes should also
know to avoid direct conflict whenever possible, most combat encounters
should be hard or even overwhelming in overall difficulty (see Encounter
Difficulty, page 83). For best results, use challenges (page 26) to set up
combat encounters, giving the heroes a chance either to avoid the fight
before it starts or to gain some tactical advantage that gives them a
decent chance in an otherwise overwhelming encounter.
Both thriller and suspense stories should make extensive use of
challenges for other purposes as well, such as investigating mysteries,
uncovering the plans of the opposition, and seeking aid or information
from other characters. Limited challenges, in particular, can serve as the
proverbial (or literal) ticking clock. Be flexible with allowing improvised
skills in challenges; its much better to let the player try something
interesting and fail than it is to just say no.
Thriller: A thriller story emphasizes excitement in the form of
overwhelming opposition, such as when the heroes become a target of a
vast conspiracy or when they find themselves in the path of an
approaching army. Often, youll want to give the heroes a glimpse of the
opposition in action so that they get a sense of just how powerful they
are (and how difficult it would be to attempt a direct confrontation).
Once they know what theyre up against, you can evoke a sense of
omnipresent danger by never letting the heroes know when the enemy
might be closing inor when they might be waiting for them. Nothing
puts the heroes on edge as much as when find that their homes were
sacked and searched in their absence or that the contact who had critical
information for them has turned up dead. In both of these cases, of
course, leave behind tantalizing clues that give the heroes a new lead;
that way, they can continue moving the story forward even as they
realize that the bad guys might be two steps ahead.
Dont overuse this technique, though; if the players come up with a
course of action that their opponents could not have realistically
anticipated, reward them for their creativity.
Suspense: A suspense story is a lot like a thriller, but it tends to focus
more on the unknown than on imminent danger. Mysteries are one of
the most common forms of suspense stories, and the heroes must spend
much of their time puzzling over clues and following the faintest of leads

Genre is a term thats hard to define in a way such that everyone


agrees; if you ask ten different professors of film and literature to explain
what genre means, youd likely get about a dozen different definitions.
For our purposes, a genre consists of stories that share a distinctive set
of narrative elements, such as similar moods or settings. Genres can be
mixed in countless ways, so feel free to experiment to find what works
for you; for example, high fantasy is essentially the combination of the
adventure and fantasy genres, and you could just as easily cross fantasy
with the thriller, suspense, or horror genres. Many campaigns will include
individual adventures from several different genres during their lifetime.
This section provides an overview of the way the e20 System Core
Rulebook approaches these elements to help you build your campaign.

Genre as Mood
For the purposes of a roleplaying game, mood refers to the way the game
feels from the point of view of the players. Many genres are defined
largely by the mood they evoke, and game mechanics can have a strong
effect on the emotional tone and atmosphere at the game table.

Action & Adventure

By far, action and adventure is the most common genre for roleplaying
games. The players take on the role of heroes capable of prevailing even
against overwhelming odds, often engaging in direct, physical
confrontation with their opponents.
The basic rules of the e20 System emulate both the adventure and
action genres without making any modifications, but these genres do
have considerable variation in precisely how capable and resilient the
heroes are in combat. To increase the lethality level for a slightly more
realistic feel, you might use the heroic realism optional rule (see the
Excessive Damage sidebar, page 62).
In combat, use a varied mix of opponents of different ranks (basic,
standard, and elite). Large numbers of basic opponents are good for
battles where you want the heroes to have a chance to shine against
seemingly overwhelming odds (such as the Battle of Helms Deep in The
Lord of the Rings), but always include some standard characters in the
mix to keep the fight from becoming one-dimensional. Elite opponents
can be used for climactic duels or when you need to present the heroes
with a major threat they should flee rather than fight (such as the
Ringwraiths in The Lord of the Rings).
Although they share many elements, the adventure and action genres
do have some distinctions between them.

88

to unravel the plots of their adversaries. Give them a seemingly


impossible puzzle to solve (such as the classic locked room, where there
is no apparent way for the villain to have entered or exited the scene of
the crime); theyll surprise you with their creativity and ingenuity.
The single biggest pitfall with a mystery scenario is that you might
invent an explanation or solution so convoluted that the players either
never find it or lose track of important clues over the course of a story
spread over several game sessions. To avoid this, try using these
techniques. First, recap critical information and clues at the beginning of
a new session; the players may have been gone for a week but the heroes
havent, so a brief reminder can help get the players back into the story.
Second, use your heroes skills to reveal critical information or to
remind them of an obscure detail that they might have missed. The e20
System has very flexible skills that can cover virtually any situation, so
make use of that as a means to drop important hints that help to get
them on the right track. In addition, skill checks give the player a chance
to shine and feel rewarded for how they built their characters. Make sure
you keep each heros current skills and other game statistics in your
notes so you can call for skill checks with a minimum of fuss.
Third, be flexible. If the players come up with a viable solution to the
mystery other than what you planned, dont automatically turn it into a
dead end; that just frustrates the players and makes them feel railroaded.
Instead, weave their solution into the original story, making it a partbut
not allof the truth. This creates the illusion of an even more convoluted
and intricate plot, and it makes the players feel that much more clever
for having solved it.
For example, if the players become convinced that the butler did it and
all the clues youve given so far could quite reasonably lead to that
conclusion, dont cut off that avenue too abruptly (such as by having the
butler turn up dead); instead, let their confrontation with the butler lead
to some critical new information. Perhaps he actually was present at the
time of the shooting, but its because hes actually an undercover cop
who was trying to find evidence before the victim was shot; now, he
becomes an ally who can share the information and clues that the
players missed the first time around.

as a vampire), but a more realistic monster (such as a serial killer) can


be just as terrifying, if not more.
Make use a small number of elite opponents of much higher level to
emphasize precisely how foolish it would be to engage in a direct
confrontation. This invites direct comparison between the heroes and the
nightmare that stalks them, making the threat feel more personal and
tangible. You can get a lot of use out of disposable characters that you
throw into the path of the oncoming slaughter, particularly if the
character is one that the heroes had thought of as relatively capable.
(Quints untimely demise in Jaws is a great example of this technique).
In addition, keep key details concealed as long as possible using the
rules for concealment and Stealth. Fighting an unstoppable monster is
bad enough, but not knowing what youre facing (or, worse, being unable
to see it when you do) helps to cross the line between thriller and horror.
Survival: For a survival scenario, the opposition is either abstract (a
natural disaster), enormously overwhelming (a gigantic radioactive
reptile rampaging through the city), or truly legion in number (see
Apocalypse, Zombie). Use high-level hazards and basic characters to
represent the threat most of the time; these can be amazingly dangerous,
but the heroes can usually avoid them by being smart (hazards, such as
being crushed under the giant reptile) or kill enough of them to open an
avenue of escape (basic characters, such as the never-ending hordes of
the walking dead).
Unlike in horror, you usually dont want to personalize the threat, at
least not at first; the impersonal nature of a faceless menace is part of
what makes the survival scenario work. However, shifting gears to a
more horror-oriented final confrontation can make for a great story. For
example, throughout most of Aliens, Ripley and the colonial marines are
in a straightforward survival scenario as they try to hold off countless
xenomorphs long enough to get a ride off the planet; at the movies
climax, however, the movie shifts to a direct confrontation between
Ripley and the Queen.

Genre as Setting
For our purposes, setting refers to the physical location or environment in
which the game is set as well as the distinctive elements that
characterize that environment and make it identifiable.

Horror & Survival

The horror and survival genres can be some of the most challenging to
try to emulate in a game. Even more than in a thriller, the players must
feel a true sense of dread and impending doom as they face a seemingly
unstoppable killing machine. However, you must balance that with just
the slimmest sliver of hope, just enough to make them feel like they have
a fighting chance. (If they truly are helpless, its not really a game
anymore; at that point, they might as well be sitting around a campfire
listening to the Gamemaster tell ghost stories.)
As with thrillers and suspense, the heroes need to feel highly
vulnerable: Use the gritty realism optional rules (see the Excessive
Damage sidebar, page 62) to make them feel like death can truly happen
at any time. Direct conflict must be avoided at all costs, so most (but not
all) combat encounters should be of overwhelming difficulty (see
Encounter Difficulty, page 83).
Given this, you must use challenges (page 26) to lead up to an
encounter (letting them prepare by fortifying or researching the
opponents weakness), to provide an avenue of escape, or preferably
both. The key is to give the heroes at least some chance of survival in
what would otherwise be a bloodbath. (Much of the challenge and plot
advice provided in Thrillers & Suspense, above, applies to horror and
survival stories as well.)
The e20 System Core Rulebook provides other options particularly
appropriate for the horror and survival genres, such as rules for sanity,
fear, terror, maiming, and so forth.
Horror: In a horror game, the antagonist is overwhelmingly powerful,
incredibly resilient, and possibly resistant or even immune to
conventional attacks. It is often a supernatural being of some sort (such

Historical

Historical settings generally provide a relatively realistic depiction of the


real world, either in modern day or in the past. You dont need to make
any special adjustments to the rules to use a historical setting; just pick
a year and pull the matching technology from Chapter 7, and youre
ready to go.
Alternative History: A particularly interesting way to use historical
settings is by changing some key event and speculating about how
history might unfold as a result. Mixing this premise with fantasy,
science fiction, or anachronistic elements allows you to create subgenres
such as steampunk.

Fantasy

More than anything else, fantasy settings are characterized by the


presence of magic and other supernatural elements. This genre should
always include at least some version of the rules for magic (page 39). If
present, particularly powerful beings such as demigods or other semidivine characters might also use of the rules for prodigies (page 40).
The various sub-genres of fantasy are far too numerous to discuss here,
but a couple of possibilities are outlined below.
High Fantasy: In its most popular forms, high fantasy is often set in a
quasi-medieval world filled with all manner of humanoids (such as elves,
dwarves, orcs, or goblins) and fantastic creatures (such as dragons,
giants, centaurs, or minotaurs); Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings is the
archetypical example of this subgenre.

89

Fantasy Elements in a Mundane Setting: One way to use fantasy is to


layer magic onto an otherwise normal, real-world setting. On the surface,
things might seem entirely mundane, but beyond that is another world
where the heroes find adventure. The mix might be relatively overt (as in
the Harry Potter series), but it can just as easily be a hidden truth that
only a few know (as in Vampire: The Masquerade).

sufficient space is available, each might also include a short introductory


adventure for starting 1st-level heroes.
The following are some of the setting concepts currently under
consideration, but the final selections, names, and other details are
ultimately up to the e20 System patrons.

Ruins of Empire

Science Fiction

High Fantasy

Science fiction is characterized by technological innovation of one form


or another, extrapolating what changes might happen when the change
is introduced to the world. Unlike fantasy, science fiction supposes that
the technology and science in its setting is bound by the ordinary laws of
nature, but its technology often depends on one or more elements that
modern science either doesnt know to exist or doesnt believe to be
realistically possible at all.
By definition, science fiction requires the introduction of at least one
element not found in the real world. Most often, the element is some
form of technological or scientific advancement, such as time travel,
faster-than-light travel, artificial intelligence, psionics, or highly
advanced forms of current medical technology such as cloning, genetic
engineering, or bionics. (These last few elements might give rise to
superhumans, represented using the rules for prodigies, page 40.)
However, the element could also be an event, such as contact with an
alien species or a global disaster such as nuclear war or major asteroid
impact. In either case, the interaction of society with the element (or its
aftermath) is what defines the setting. The e20 System Core Rulebook
includes an extensive collection futuristic technology and other sciencefiction elements so that you can choose which you want to use.
As with fantasy, the subgenres of science fiction are too numerous to
cover with any detail here, but two of them are outlined below.
Hard Science Fiction: Some science fiction restricts itself entirely to
technology that seems entirely plausible given our current understanding
of science (albeit not yet practical or feasible). Such stories would not
have faster-than-light travel or force fields, for example, but they might
have fusion power, artificial intelligence, and some energy-based
weapons. Except in the case of a sleeper or colony ship sent on a
decades- or centuries-long journey to another star system, the vast
majority of hard science fiction stories are set on Earth or in its
immediate neighborhood. Robert A. Heinleins The Moon is a Harsh
Mistress is a great example of this sub-genre, and it makes a good
template for a roleplaying game campaign.
Space Opera: At the opposite end of the spectrum from hard science
fiction is space opera, which might be described as the adventure genre
in a science-fiction setting. All the trappings of science fiction are
therespaceships, energy weapons, robots, aliensbut little or any
emphasis is placed on the underlying workings of the technology, let
alone staying within the boundaries of our current scientific knowledge.
The Star Wars saga is one of the best-known members of this sub-genre.
Because it plays more loosely with the laws of physics, space opera can
blur the lines between science fiction and fantasy, often introducing
elements that cross the line into magic.

Centuries have passed since the Empire fell to the Northern Hordes, but
pockets of civilization still cling to a tenuous existence in this savage
land.
With the Imperial legions long gone, no bulwark stands against the
encroaching evil; abandoned keeps that one stood guard over peaceful
settlements now serve as lairs for long-forgotten beasts. Roving bands of
brigands prey upon those brave or foolish enough to travel the broken
roads while warlords and self-declared nobles seek to expand their
would-be empires. In the midst of it all, those who seek the lost secrets
of the Imperial Magi sometimes open vaults best left sealed.
It is an age of darkness. It is a time for heroes.

The Hollow Sky


Space Opera

Humanitys reach finally extends to the stars as countless colonies have


been sown throughout the void, but the boundaries of civilization are not
firm; vast gulfs separate the isolated settlements. In the hollow sky of
known space, explorers seek to map new paths through hyperspace
(often with the aid of psychic navigators), and prospectors search for the
next big find.
Sometimes, though, the unknown finds them; now, humankind knows
it is not alone.
In this frontier of space, brave souls eke out a living transporting goods
between isolated colonies or working as guns-for-hire. Rumors spread
half-truths about their newfound neighbors, and there are whispers of
coming war. Xenophobia is rampant, and many lobby to get more
protection from the core.
But some folk on the fringe believe that when an invasion arrives, it
wont come from the outside. The conquerors will come from Earth.

Metahuman Zero
Superhuman Science Fiction

The leaked documents from the Centers for Disease Control confirmed
what some had long suspected: There are gods among us. The outcry, the
paranoia, the panic grew too much for him to bear, so he came forward
and announced that he was the one the media had dubbed Metahuman
Zero. He vowed never to use his powers in anger, never to turn his gifts
against his neighbors.
He was never heard from again.
In the days, weeks, and months following Zeros disappearance, more
came forward, showing there are more of them than anyone had
imagined. Despite their powers, many wear masks out of fear of their
neighbors and even their own families. Some grew to resent it, slowly
coming to identify more with the mask than with the humanity hidden
beneath it. Some became villains.
Remember Zero graffiti appears on more walls by the day, and many
fear that the metahumans will rise up in open conflict. Some have
started stockpiling food, making their homes far from civilization to
avoid whatever happens next. And in that remote wildernessfar from
the cities, far from the fearsome say they have found him.
They say that Metahuman Zero lives.

Campaign Settings
The e20 Core Rulebook includes a brief overview of some ready-to-use
campaign settings. The exact number will depend on how much space is
available, but current plans call for three compact campaign settings.
Each will include an overview of the settings history, environment,
inhabitants, current events, major factions, and influential personae;
settings on other worlds will also include regional maps with exotic
locations for the heroes to explore. Finally, each will provide a broad
range of adventure hooks to help the Gamemaster start the campaign. If

90

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owner of such Trademark or Registered Trademark. The use of any Product Identity in Open Game Content does not constitute a challenge to the ownership of
that Product Identity. The owner of any Product Identity used in Open Game Content shall retain all rights, title and interest in and to that Product Identity.
8. Identification: If you distribute Open Game Content You must clearly indicate which portions of the work that you are distributing are Open Game Content.
9. Updating the License: Wizards or its designated Agents may publish updated versions of this License. You may use any authorized version of this License to
copy, modify and distribute any Open Game Content originally distributed under any version of this License.
10. Copy of this License: You MUST include a copy of this License with every copy of the Open Game Content You Distribute.
11. Use of Contributor Credits: You may not market or advertise the Open Game Content using the name of any Contributor unless You have written permission
from the Contributor to do so.
12. Inability to Comply: If it is impossible for You to comply with any of the terms of this License with respect to some or all of the Open Game Content due to
statute, judicial order, or governmental regulation then You may not Use any Open Game Material so affected.
13 Termination: This License will terminate automatically if You fail to comply with all terms herein and fail to cure such breach within 30 days of becoming
aware of the breach. All sublicenses shall survive the termination of this License.
14 Reformation: If any provision of this License is held to be unenforceable, such provision shall be reformed only to the extent necessary to make it
enforceable.
15 COPYRIGHT NOTICE
Open Game License v 1.0 Copyright 2000, Wizards of the Coast, Inc.
System Reference Document, Copyright 2000, Wizards of the Coast, Inc., Authors Jonathan Tweet, Monte Cook, Skip Williams, based on original material by E.
Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson.
Modern System Reference Document Copyright 2002-2004, Wizards of the Coast, Inc.; Authors Bill Slavicsek, Jeff Grubb, Rich Redman, Charles Ryan, Eric Cagle,
David Noonan, Stan!, Christopher Perkins, Rodney Thompson, and JD Wiker, based on material by Jonathan Tweet, Monte Cook, Skip Williams, Richard Baker,
Peter Adkison, Bruce R. Cordell, John Tynes, Andy Collins, and JD Wiker.
Advanced Players Guide, Copyright 2004, White Wolf Publishing, Inc.
Blue Rose, Copyright 2005, Green Ronin Publishing; Authors Jeremy Crawford, Dawn Elliot, Steve Kenson, Alejandro Melchoir, and John Snead.
Monte Cook Presents: Iron Heroes, Copyright 2005, Monte J. Cook. All rights reserved.
Mutants & Masterminds, Copyright 2002, Green Ronin Publishing; Author Steve Kenson.
The Psychics Handbook, Copyright 2004, Green Ronin Publishing; Author Steve Kenson.
Unearthed Arcana, Copyright 2003, Wizards of the Coast, Inc.; Andy Collins, Jesse Decker, David Noonan, Rich Redman.
True20 Adventure Roleplaying, Copyright 2005, Green Ronin Publishing; Author Steve Kenson.
Caliphate Nights, Copyright 2006, Paradigm Concepts; Author Aaron Infante-Levy
Lux Aeternum, Copyright 2006, BlackWyrm Games; Author Ryan Wolfe, with Dave Mattingly, Aaron Sullivan, and Derrick Thomas.
Mecha vs. Kaiju, Copyright 2006, Big Finger Games; Author Johnathan Wright
Borrowed Time, Copyright 2006, Golden Elm Media; Authors Bruce Baugh and David Bolack

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